WorldWideScience

Sample records for scattering radiation

  1. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  2. Plasma scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sheffield, John

    1975-01-01

    Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation covers the theory and experimental application of plasma scattering. The book discusses the basic properties of a plasma and of the interaction of radiation with a plasma; the relationship between the scattered power spectrum and the fluctuations in plasma density; and the incoherent scattering of low-temperature plasma. The text also describes the constraints and problems that arise in the application of scattering as a diagnostic technique; the characteristic performance of various dispersion elements, image dissectors, and detectors; and the ge

  3. Light scattering reviews 8 radiative transfer and light scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    Light scattering review (vol 8) is aimed at the presentation of recent advances in radiative transfer and light scattering optics. The topics to be covered include: scattering of light by irregularly shaped particles suspended in atmosphere (dust, ice crystals), light scattering by particles much larger as compared the wavelength of incident radiation, atmospheric radiative forcing, astrophysical radiative transfer, radiative transfer and optical imaging in biological media, radiative transfer of polarized light, numerical aspects of radiative transfer.

  4. Light scattering reviews 9 light scattering and radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    This book details modern methods of the radiative transfer theory. It presents recent advances in light scattering (measurements and theory) and highlights the newest developments in remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties.

  5. Scattering of light and other electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kerker, Milton

    1969-01-01

    The Scattering of Light and Other Electromagnetic Radiation discusses the theory of electromagnetic scattering and describes some practical applications. The book reviews electromagnetic waves, optics, the interrelationships of main physical quantities and the physical concepts of optics, including Maxwell's equations, polarization, geometrical optics, interference, and diffraction. The text explains the Rayleigh2 theory of scattering by small dielectric spheres, the Bessel functions, and the Legendre functions. The author also explains how the scattering functions for a homogenous sphere chan

  6. Scattered Radiation Emission Imaging: Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging processes built on the Compton scattering effect have been under continuing investigation since it was first suggested in the 50s. However, despite many innovative contributions, there are still formidable theoretical and technical challenges to overcome. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art principles of the so-called scattered radiation emission imaging. Basically, it consists of using the cleverly collected scattered radiation from a radiating object to reconstruct its inner structure. Image formation is based on the mathematical concept of compounded conical projection. It entails a Radon transform defined on circular cone surfaces in order to express the scattered radiation flux density on a detecting pixel. We discuss in particular invertible cases of such conical Radon transforms which form a mathematical basis for image reconstruction methods. Numerical simulations performed in two and three space dimensions speak in favor of the viability of this imaging principle and its potential applications in various fields.

  7. Scattering by an electromagnetic radiation field

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Donato; Geralico, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Motion of test particles in the gravitational field associated with an electromagnetic plane wave is investigated. The interaction with the radiation field is modeled by a force term {\\it \\`a la} Poynting-Robertson entering the equations of motion given by the 4-momentum density of radiation observed in the particle's rest frame with a multiplicative constant factor expressing the strength of the interaction itself. Explicit analytical solutions are obtained. Scattering of fields by the elect...

  8. Radiative corrections to virtual Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, D.; Lhuillier, D.; Wanderhaeghen, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee; Van de Wiele, J. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1996-12-31

    Radiative corrections to virtual Compton scattering are calculated for the first time at the first order in {alpha}. We use the dimensional regularization scheme to treat both Ultra-Violet and Indra-Red divergences. After the compensation of divergences, the expression of the correction contains analytical terms and a numerical term which has to be computed. For a scattered photon of centre of mass energy q`= 45 MeV, a preliminary result of the comparison between theory and experimental data is presented taking into account only analytical terms. (authors). 10 refs.

  9. Radiative MRI Coil Design Using Parasitic Scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Avendal, Johan; Bibic, Adnan

    2018-01-01

    Conventionally, radiofrequency (RF) coils used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are electrically small and designed for nearfield operation. Therefore, existing antenna design techniques are mostly irrelevant for RF coils. However, the use of higher frequencies in ultrahigh field (UHF) MRI...... allows for antenna design techniques to be adapted to RF coil designs. This study proposes the use of parasitic scatterers to improve the performance of an existing 7T MRI coil called the single-sided adapted dipole (SSAD) antenna. The results reveal that scatterers arranged in a Yagi fashion can...... suitable for use in high density arrays. These findings show the potential of parasitic scatterers as an effective method to improve the performance of existing radiative MRI coils....

  10. Scattering by an electromagnetic radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, D.; Geralico, A.

    2012-02-01

    Motion of test particles in the gravitational field associated with an electromagnetic plane wave is investigated. The interaction with the radiation field is modeled by a force term à la Poynting-Robertson entering the equations of motion given by the 4-momentum density of radiation observed in the particle’s rest frame with a multiplicative constant factor expressing the strength of the interaction itself. Explicit analytical solutions are obtained. Scattering of fields by the electromagnetic wave, i.e., scalar (spin 0), massless spin (1)/(2) and electromagnetic (spin 1) fields, is studied too.

  11. Scattering of Non-Relativistic Charged Particles by Electromagnetic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, M.

    2017-11-01

    The cross-section is computed for non-relativistic charged particles (like electrons and ions) scattered by electromagnetic radiation confined to a finite region (like the focal region of optical laser beams). The cross-section exhibits maxima at scattering angles given by the energy and momentum conservation in multi-photon absorption or emission processes. For convenience, a potential scattering is included and a comparison is made with the well-known Kroll-Watson scattering formula. The scattering process addressed in this paper is distinct from the process dealt with in previous studies, where the scattering is immersed in the radiation field.

  12. An approach to calculate and visualize intraoperative scattered radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Markus; Duwenkamp, Christopher; Dresing, Klaus; Bott, Oliver J

    2009-01-01

    During the intraoperative radiograph generation process with mobile image intensifier systems (C-arm) most of the radiation exposure for patient, surgeon and operation room personal is caused by scattered radiation. The intensity and propagation of scattered radiation depend on different parameters, e.g. the intensity of the primary radiation, and the positioning of the mobile image intensifier. Exposure through scattered radiation can be minimized when all these parameters are adjusted correctly. Because radiation is potentially dangerous and could not be perceived by any human sense the current education on correct adjustment of a C-arm is designed very theoretical. This paper presents an approach of scattered radiation calculation and visualization embedded in a computer based training system for mobile image intensifier systems called virtX. With the help of this extension the virtX training system should enrich the current radiation protection training with visual and practical training aspects.

  13. Magnetic X-Ray Scattering with Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moncton, D. E.; Gibbs, D.; Bohr, Jakob

    1986-01-01

    With the availability of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation from multiple wigglers, magnetic X-ray scattering has become a powerful new probe of magnetic structure and phase transitions. Similar to the well-established magnetic neutron scattering technique, magnetic X-ray scattering methods have...

  14. Rayleigh scattering of Moessbauer radiation in hyaluronate oriented fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, G.; Cavatorta, F.; Deriu, A. [Parma Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Parma (Italy); Rupprecht, A. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dep. of Physical Chemistry

    1996-02-01

    The Rayleigh scattering of Moessbauer radiation has been measured on highly oriented fibres of Na-hyaluronate at different hydration levels. The elastic- and-inelastic-scattering intensities, measured as a function of the scattering vector Q, have provided information on the dynamic structuring of the water molecules to the polysaccharidic chains.

  15. Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and radiation dosimetery assessment. G M EL-ARAGI∗, M A AYAD, M A EL-KOLALY and .... 4000 system is in coaxial connection with a computer system which has a special software program for resolving TL-data and assorting the resolved data in classified files.

  16. Scatter correction for cone-beam CT in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Xie, Yaoqin; Wang, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2009-06-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is being increasingly used in modern radiation therapy for patient setup and adaptive replanning. However, due to the large volume of x-ray illumination, scatter becomes a rather serious problem and is considered as one of the fundamental limitations of CBCT image quality. Many scatter correction algorithms have been proposed in literature, while a standard practical solution still remains elusive. In radiation therapy, the same patient is scanned repetitively during a course of treatment, a natural question to ask is whether one can obtain the scatter distribution on the first day of treatment and then use the data for scatter correction in the subsequent scans on different days. To realize this scatter removal scheme, two technical pieces must be in place: (i) A strategy to obtain the scatter distribution in on-board CBCT imaging and (ii) a method to spatially match a prior scatter distribution with the on-treatment CBCT projection data for scatter subtraction. In this work, simple solutions to the two problems are provided. A partially blocked CBCT is used to extract the scatter distribution. The x-ray beam blocker has a strip pattern, such that partial volume can still be accurately reconstructed and the whole-field scatter distribution can be estimated from the detected signals in the shadow regions using interpolation/extrapolation. In the subsequent scans, the patient transformation is determined using a rigid registration of the conventional CBCT and the prior partial CBCT. From the derived patient transformation, the measured scatter is then modified to adapt the new on-treatment patient geometry for scatter correction. The proposed method is evaluated using physical experiments on a clinical CBCT system. On the Catphan 600 phantom, the errors in Hounsfield unit (HU) in the selected regions of interest are reduced from about 350 to below 50 HU; on an anthropomorphic phantom, the error is reduced from 15.7% to 5.4%. The proposed method

  17. Altitude Registration of Limb-Scattered Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Leslie; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen; Loughman, Robert; Kramarova, Natalya; Chen, Zhong; Taha, Ghassan; Chen, Grace; Xu, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest constraints to the retrieval of accurate ozone profiles from UV backscatter limb sounding sensors is altitude registration. Two methods, the Rayleigh scattering attitude sensing (RSAS) and absolute radiance residual method (ARRM), are able to determine altitude registration to the accuracy necessary for long-term ozone monitoring. The methods compare model calculations of radiances to measured radiances and are independent of onboard tracking devices. RSAS determines absolute altitude errors, but, because the method is susceptible to aerosol interference, it is limited to latitudes and time periods with minimal aerosol contamination. ARRM, a new technique introduced in this paper, can be applied across all seasons and altitudes. However, it is only appropriate for relative altitude error estimates. The application of RSAS to Limb Profiler (LP) measurements from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on board the Suomi NPP (SNPP) satellite indicates tangent height (TH) errors greater than 1 km with an absolute accuracy of +/-200 m. Results using ARRM indicate a approx. 300 to 400m intra-orbital TH change varying seasonally +/-100 m, likely due to either errors in the spacecraft pointing or in the geopotential height (GPH) data that we use in our analysis. ARRM shows a change of approx. 200m over 5 years with a relative accuracy (a long-term accuracy) of 100m outside the polar regions.

  18. Altitude registration of limb-scattered radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Leslie; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen; Loughman, Robert; Kramarova, Natalya; Chen, Zhong; Taha, Ghassan; Chen, Grace; Xu, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest constraints to the retrieval of accurate ozone profiles from UV backscatter limb sounding sensors is altitude registration. Two methods, the Rayleigh scattering attitude sensing (RSAS) and absolute radiance residual method (ARRM), are able to determine altitude registration to the accuracy necessary for long-term ozone monitoring. The methods compare model calculations of radiances to measured radiances and are independent of onboard tracking devices. RSAS determines absolute altitude errors, but, because the method is susceptible to aerosol interference, it is limited to latitudes and time periods with minimal aerosol contamination. ARRM, a new technique introduced in this paper, can be applied across all seasons and altitudes. However, it is only appropriate for relative altitude error estimates. The application of RSAS to Limb Profiler (LP) measurements from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on board the Suomi NPP (SNPP) satellite indicates tangent height (TH) errors greater than 1 km with an absolute accuracy of ±200 m. Results using ARRM indicate a ˜ 300 to 400 m intra-orbital TH change varying seasonally ±100 m, likely due to either errors in the spacecraft pointing or in the geopotential height (GPH) data that we use in our analysis. ARRM shows a change of ˜ 200 m over ˜ 5 years with a relative accuracy (a long-term accuracy) of ±100 m outside the polar regions.

  19. Measurements of Compton Scattered Transition Radiation at High Lorentz Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald; Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald

    2004-01-01

    X-ray transition radiation can be used to measure the Lorentz factor of relativistic particles. Standard transition radiation detectors (TRDs) typically incorporate thin plastic foil radiators and gas-filled x-ray detectors, and are sensitive up to \\gamma ~ 10^4. To reach higher Lorentz factors (up to \\gamma ~ 10^5), thicker, denser radiators can be used, which consequently produce x-rays of harder energies (>100 keV). At these energies, scintillator detectors are more efficient in detecting the hard x-rays, and Compton scattering of the x-rays out of the path of the particle becomes an important effect. The Compton scattering can be utilized to separate the transition radiation from the ionization background spatially. The use of conducting metal foils is predicted to yield enhanced signals compared to standard nonconducting plastic foils of the same dimensions. We have designed and built a Compton Scatter TRD optimized for high Lorentz factors and exposed it to high energy electrons at the CERN SPS. We pres...

  20. Polarized scattered light from self-luminous exoplanets : Three-dimensional scattering radiative transfer with ARTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, T.; Min, M.; Stam, D.M.; Mollière, P.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L. B.F.M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Direct imaging has paved the way for atmospheric characterization of young and self-luminous gas giants. Scattering in a horizontally-inhomogeneous atmosphere causes the disk-integrated polarization of the thermal radiation to be linearly polarized, possibly detectable with the newest

  1. Radiative entropy generation in a gray absorbing, emitting, and scattering planar medium at radiative equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Pegah; Safavinejad, Ali

    2017-11-01

    Radiative entropy generation through a gray absorbing, emitting, and scattering planar medium at radiative equilibrium with diffuse-gray walls is investigated. The radiative transfer equation and radiative entropy generation equations are solved using discrete ordinates method. Components of the radiative entropy generation are considered for two different boundary conditions: two walls are at a prescribed temperature and mixed boundary conditions, which one wall is at a prescribed temperature and the other is at a prescribed heat flux. The effect of wall emissivities, optical thickness, single scattering albedo, and anisotropic-scattering factor on the entropy generation is attentively investigated. The results reveal that entropy generation in the system mainly arises from irreversible radiative transfer at wall with lower temperature. Total entropy generation rate for the system with prescribed temperature at walls remarkably increases as wall emissivity increases; conversely, for system with mixed boundary conditions, total entropy generation rate slightly decreases. Furthermore, as the optical thickness increases, total entropy generation rate remarkably decreases for the system with prescribed temperature at walls; nevertheless, for the system with mixed boundary conditions, total entropy generation rate increases. The variation of single scattering albedo does not considerably affect total entropy generation rate. This parametric analysis demonstrates that the optical thickness and wall emissivities have a significant effect on the entropy generation in the system at radiative equilibrium. Considering the parameters affecting radiative entropy generation significantly, provides an opportunity to optimally design or increase overall performance and efficiency by applying entropy minimization techniques for the systems at radiative equilibrium.

  2. UV Irradiance Enhancements by Scattering of Solar Radiation from Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Feister

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Scattering of solar radiation by clouds can reduce or enhance solar global irradiance compared to cloudless-sky irradiance at the Earth’s surface. Cloud effects to global irradiance can be described by Cloud Modification Factors (CMF. Depending on strength and duration, irradiance enhancements affect the energy balance of the surface and gain of solar power for electric energy generation. In the ultraviolet region, they increase the risk for damage to living organisms. Wavelength-dependent CMFs have been shown to reach 1.5 even in the UV-B region at low altitudes. Ground-based solar radiation measurements in the high Andes region at altitudes up to 5917 m a.s.l showed cloud-induced irradiance enhancements. While UV-A enhancements were explained by cloud scattering, both radiation scattering from clouds and Negative Ozone Anomalies (NOA have been discussed to have caused short-time enhancement of UV-B irradiance. Based on scenarios using published CMF and additional spectroradiometric measurements at a low-altitude site, the contribution of cloud scattering to the UV-B irradiance enhancement in the Andes region has been estimated. The range of UV index estimates converted from measured UV-B and UV-A irradiance and modeled cloudless-sky ratios UV-B/erythemal UV is compatible with an earlier estimate of an extreme UV index value of 43 derived for the high Andes.

  3. Observation of redshifting and harmonic radiation in inverse Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Y.; Pogorelsky, I.; Williams, O.; O'Shea, F.; Barber, S.; Gadjev, I.; Duris, J.; Musumeci, P.; Fedurin, M.; Korostyshevsky, A.; Malone, B.; Swinson, C.; Stenby, G.; Kusche, K.; Babzien, M.; Montemagno, M.; Jacob, P.; Zhong, Z.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Rosenzweig, J.

    2015-06-01

    Inverse Compton scattering of laser photons by ultrarelativistic electron beam provides polarized x- to γ -ray pulses due to the Doppler blueshifting. Nonlinear electrodynamics in the relativistically intense linearly polarized laser field changes the radiation kinetics established during the Compton interaction. These are due to the induced figure-8 motion, which introduces an overall redshift in the radiation spectrum, with the concomitant emission of higher order harmonics. To experimentally analyze the strong field physics associated with the nonlinear electron-laser interaction, clear modifications to the angular and wavelength distributions of x rays are observed. The relativistic photon wave field is provided by the ps CO2 laser of peak normalized vector potential of 0.5 laser [M. Babzien et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 054802 (2006)]. The angular spectral characteristics are revealed using K -, L -edge, and high energy attenuation filters. The observation indicates existence of the electrons' longitudinal motion through frequency redshifting understood as the mass shift effect. Thus, the 3rd harmonic radiation has been observed containing on-axis x-ray component that is directly associated with the induced figure-8 motion. These are further supported by an initial evidence of off-axis 2nd harmonic radiation produced in a circularly polarized laser wave field. Total x-ray photon number per pulse, scattered by 65 MeV electron beam of 0.3 nC, at the interaction point is measured to be approximately 109 .

  4. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1990-10-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  5. Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as a facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  6. Polarized scattered light from self-luminous exoplanets. Three-dimensional scattering radiative transfer with ARTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolker, T.; Min, M.; Stam, D. M.; Mollière, P.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Direct imaging has paved the way for atmospheric characterization of young and self-luminous gas giants. Scattering in a horizontally-inhomogeneous atmosphere causes the disk-integrated polarization of the thermal radiation to be linearly polarized, possibly detectable with the newest generation of high-contrast imaging instruments. Aims: We aim to investigate the effect of latitudinal and longitudinal cloud variations, circumplanetary disks, atmospheric oblateness, and cloud particle properties on the integrated degree and direction of polarization in the near-infrared. We want to understand how 3D atmospheric asymmetries affect the polarization signal in order to assess the potential of infrared polarimetry for direct imaging observations of planetary-mass companions. Methods: We have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code (ARTES) for scattered light simulations in (exo)planetary atmospheres. The code is applicable to calculations of reflected light and thermal radiation in a spherical grid with a parameterized distribution of gas, clouds, hazes, and circumplanetary material. A gray atmosphere approximation is used for the thermal structure. Results: The disk-integrated degree of polarization of a horizontally-inhomogeneous atmosphere is maximal when the planet is flattened, the optical thickness of the equatorial clouds is large compared to the polar clouds, and the clouds are located at high altitude. For a flattened planet, the integrated polarization can both increase or decrease with respect to a spherical planet which depends on the horizontal distribution and optical thickness of the clouds. The direction of polarization can be either parallel or perpendicular to the projected direction of the rotation axis when clouds are zonally distributed. Rayleigh scattering by submicron-sized cloud particles will maximize the polarimetric signal whereas the integrated degree of polarization is significantly reduced with micron

  7. A study of scattered radiation effect on digital radiography imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Cheol Ha [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongseo University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Scattered radiation is inherent phenomenon of x-ray, which occurs to the subject (or patient). Therefore it cannot be avoidable but also interacts as serious noise factor because the only meaningful information on x-ray radiography is primary x-ray photons. The purpose of this study was to quantify scattered radiation for various shooting parameters and to verify the effect of anti-scatter grid. We employed beam stopper method to characterize scatter to primary ratio. To evaluate effect on the projection images calculated contrast to noise ratio of given shooting parameters. From the experiments, we identified the scattered radiation increases in thicker patient and smaller air gap. Moreover, scattered radiation degraded contrast to noise ratio of the projection images. We find out that the anti-scatter grid rejected scattered radiation effectively, however there were not fewer than 100% of scatter to primary ratio in some shooting parameters. The results demonstrate that the scattered radiation was serious problem of medical x-ray system, we confirmed that the scattered radiation was not considerable factor of digital radiography.

  8. The Ewald sphere construction for radiation, scattering, and diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Yen Lee

    2017-04-01

    In most electrodynamics textbooks, the directional gain of an antenna is calculated using analytical integration, and the resulting expression is plotted as an afterthought. From a student's perspective, the analysis may be difficult, mysterious, or unrevealing. In this paper, we show that the Ewald sphere construction, a powerful tool for predicting crystallographic diffraction patterns, can also be used to help students gain direct geometrical insight into antenna radiation patterns. The radiation pattern from a sinusoidally varying current distribution can be obtained intuitively by sketching the reciprocal-space current density and examining how it behaves on an "Ewald" sphere centered at the origin. Furthermore, the nodes of the radiation pattern can be determined quantitatively by locating the intersections of the Ewald sphere with the nodes of the reciprocal-space current density. We illustrate this procedure with several examples, in the context of quantum mechanics, acoustics (sound), and electrodynamics (light). We provide an alternative formulation using the reciprocal-space polarization and magnetization, which treats loop antennas and coil antennas as easily as linear antennas. We make the connection to the original Ewald construction for scattering. We also show how the Ewald construction applies to diffraction through a planar aperture, within the Kirchhoff approximation.

  9. Light scattering reviews 7 radiative transfer and optical properties of atmosphere and underlying surface

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    This book describes modern advances in radiative transfer and light scattering. Coverage includes fast radiative transfer techniques, use of polarization in remote sensing and recent developments in remote sensing of snow properties from space observations.

  10. Scattering of point particles by black holes: Gravitational radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Seth; Cardoso, Vitor

    2018-02-01

    Gravitational waves can teach us not only about sources and the environment where they were generated, but also about the gravitational interaction itself. Here we study the features of gravitational radiation produced during the scattering of a pointlike mass by a black hole. Our results are exact (to numerical error) at any order in a velocity expansion, and are compared against various approximations. At large impact parameter and relatively small velocities our results agree to within percent level with various post-Newtonian and weak-field results. Further, we find good agreement with scaling predictions in the weak-field/high-energy regime. Lastly, we achieve striking agreement with zero-frequency estimates.

  11. Acoustic and elastic multiple scattering and radiation from cylindrical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkulova, Feruza Abdukadirovna

    Multiple scattering (MS) and radiation of waves by a system of scatterers is of great theoretical and practical importance and is required in a wide variety of physical contexts such as the implementation of "invisibility" cloaks, the effective parameter characterization, and the fabrication of dynamically tunable structures, etc. The dissertation develops fast, rapidly convergent iterative techniques to expedite the solution of MS problems. The formulation of MS problems reduces to a system of linear algebraic equations using Graf's theorem and separation of variables. The iterative techniques are developed using Neumann expansion and Block Toeplitz structure of the linear system; they are very general, and suitable for parallel computations and a large number of MS problems, i.e. acoustic, elastic, electromagnetic, etc., and used for the first time to solve MS problems. The theory is implemented in Matlab and FORTRAN, and the theoretical predictions are compared to computations obtained by COMSOL. To formulate the MS problem, the transition matrix is obtained by analyzing an acoustic and an elastic single scattering of incident waves by elastic isotropic and anisotropic solids. The mathematical model of wave scattering from multilayered cylindrical and spherical structures is developed by means of an exact solution of dynamic 3D elasticity theory. The recursive impedance matrix algorithm is derived for radially heterogeneous anisotropic solids. An explicit method for finding the impedance in piecewise uniform, transverse-isotropic material is proposed; the solution is compared to elasticity theory solutions involving Buchwald potentials. Furthermore, active exterior cloaking devices are modeled for acoustic and elastic media using multipole sources. A cloaking device can render an object invisible to some incident waves as seen by some external observer. The active cloak is generated by a discrete set of multipole sources that destructively interfere with an

  12. Effect of scatter on image quality in synchrotron radiation mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeckli, Raphael; Verdun, Francis R.; Fiedler, Stefan; Pachoud, Marc; Schnyder, Pierre; Valley, Jean-Francois

    2001-06-01

    The display of low-contrast structures and fine microcalcifications is essential for the early diagnosis of breast cancer. In order to achieve a high image quality level with a minimum amount of radiation delivered to the patient, the use of different spectra (Mo or Rh anode and filters) was introduced. The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility is able to produce a monochromatic beam with a high photon flux. It is thus a powerful tool to study the effect of beam energy on image quality and dose in mammography. Our image quality assessment is based on the calculation of the size of the smallest microcalcification detectable on a radiograph, derived from the statistical decision theory. The mean glandular dose is simultaneously measured. Compared with conventional mammography units, the monochromaticity of synchrotron beams improves contrast and the use of a slit instead of an anti-scatter grid leads to a higher primary beam transmission. The relative contribution of these two effects on image quality and dose is discussed.

  13. Radiative properties of scattering and absorbing dense media: theory and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespel, Laurent; Mainguy, Stephane; Greffet, J.-J

    2003-03-01

    We investigate the validity of the radiative transfer equation to model transmission of light through an absorbing and scattering medium. Assuming that radiative transfer equation is valid, the inverse scattering problem for non-polarized radiative transfer in one-dimensional absorbing and scattering media is solved using a parameter identification method. We discuss how to identify the albedo, phase function and extinction coefficient of the medium. We present experimental data that confirm that this approach is robust and can be used to make reliable predictions of the behavior of scattering absorbing systems.

  14. Measuring main-ion temperatures in ASDEX upgrade using scattering of ECRH radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Stejner; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that collective Thomson scattering of millimeter wave electron cyclotron resonance heating radiation can be used for measurements of the main-ion temperature in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak.......We demonstrate that collective Thomson scattering of millimeter wave electron cyclotron resonance heating radiation can be used for measurements of the main-ion temperature in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak....

  15. Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation by Dimers of Two Finite Dielectric Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun-Kuzhel, V. A.; Ponyavina, A. N.

    2017-07-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of the scattering phase function for scattering of light by dimers of dielectric cylinders of finite length, using the volume integral equation formalism. We have studied the dependence of the scattering phase function on the optical and geometric parameters of the individual cylinders and their relative positions. We show that electrodynamic interaction between the cylinders leads to a substantial difference between the angular distribution of radiation scattered by this system and the angular distribution of radiation scattered by two cylinders with no electrodynamic coupling.

  16. (Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: quasielastic scattering studies on glycerol; gamma-ray scattering from alkali halides; lattice dynamics in metals; Moessbauer neutron scattering, x-ray diffraction, and macroscopic studies of high {Tc} superconductors containing tungsten; NiAl scattering studies; and atomic interference factors and nuclear Casimir effect.

  17. Timelike Virtual Compton Scattering from Electron-Positron Radiative Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasev, Andrei; /Hampton U. /Jefferson Lab; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Carlson, Carl E.; /William-Mary Coll.; Mukherjee, Asmita; /Indian Inst. Tech., Mumbai

    2009-03-31

    We propose measurements of the deeply virtual Compton amplitude (DVCS) {gamma}* {yields} H{bar H}{gamma} in the timelike t = (p{sub H} + p{sub {bar H}}){sup 2} > 0 kinematic domain which is accessible at electron-positron colliders via the radiative annihilation process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} H{bar H}{gamma}. These processes allow the measurement of timelike deeply virtual Compton scattering for a variety of H{bar H} hadron pairs such as {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, and D{bar D} as well as p{bar p}. As in the conventional spacelike DVCS, there are interfering coherent amplitudes contributing to the timelike processes involving C = - form factors. The interference between the amplitudes measures the phase of the C = + timelike DVCS amplitude relative to the phase of the timelike form factors and can be isolated by considering the forward-backward e{sup +} {leftrightarrow} e{sup -} asymmetry. The J = 0 fixed pole contribution which arises from the local coupling of the two photons to the quark current plays a special role. As an example we present a simple model.

  18. Timelike Virtual Compton Scattering from Electron-Positron Radiative Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanaciev,Andrei Afanasev, Stanley J. Brodsky, Carl E. Carlson, Asmita Mukherjee

    2010-02-01

    We propose measurements of the deeply virtual Compton amplitude (DVCS), gamma* to H H-bar gamma, in the timelike t = (p_{H} + p_{H-bar})^2 > 0 kinematic domain which is accessible at electron-positron colliders via the radiative annihilation process e+ e- to H H-bar gamma. These processes allow the measurement of timelike deeply virtual Compton scattering for a variety of H H-bar hadron pairs such as pi+ pi-, K+ K-, and D D-bar as well as p p-bar. As in the conventional spacelike DVCS, there are interfering coherent amplitudes contributing to the timelike processes involving C= - form factors. The interference between the amplitudes measures the phase of the C=+ timelike DVCS amplitude relative to the phase of the timelike form factors and can be isolated by considering the forward-backward e+ \\leftrightarrow e- asymmetry. The J=0 fixed pole contribution which arises from the local coupling of the two photons to the quark current plays a special role. As an example we present a simple model.

  19. 3D radiative transfer code for polarized scattered light with aligned grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkonen, V.-M.; Penttilä, A.; Juvela, M.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-09-01

    We are working on a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code which incorporates hierarchical grid structure (octree) and the full Stokes vector for both the incoming radiation and the radiation scattered by dust grains. The dust model can include different populations of dust, differing in composition, size distribution, shapes, and orientation. The non-spherical dust grains can be randomly aligned, or a fraction of them can be aligned with the magnetic fields (in particular, by the radiation field via radiative torques, RATs). The code will be a valuable tool in studying polarized scattered light from cometary comae in the solar system and from protoplanetary disks in the exoplanetary context.

  20. Change in the scattering spectrum of laser radiation in a plasma on transition from spontaneous to stimulated Mandelstam--Brillouin scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burunov, E.A.; Malyshev, G.M.; Razdobarin, G.T.; Semyonov, V.V.; Folomkin, I.P.

    1975-01-01

    The spectrum of radiation scattered by ion-sound plasma oscillations is obtained under conditions when the power density of the laser radiation is close to the threshold value for Mandelstam--Brillouin stimulated scattering. An additional maximum arises in the longwave range of the scattering spectrum when the laser power exceeds the threshold value. The width of the additional maximum indicates that damping of the stimulated oscillations is weak. When the threshold power is exceeded by several times, the intensity of the scattered radiation exceeds that of scattering by thermal oscillations by 15 to 20 percent.

  1. Calculation of the Scattered Radiation Profile in 64 Slice CT Scanners Using Experimental Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Akbarzadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important parameters in x-ray CT imaging is the noise induced by detected scattered radiation. The detected scattered radiation is completely dependent on the scanner geometry as well as size, shape and material of the scanned object. The magnitude and spatial distribution of the scattered radiation in x-ray CT should be quantified for development of robust scatter correction techniques. Empirical methods based on blocking the primary photons in a small region are not able to extract scatter in all elements of the detector array while the scatter profile is required for a scatter correction procedure. In this study, we measured scatter profiles in 64 slice CT scanners using a new experimental measurement. Material and Methods: To measure the scatter profile, a lead block array was inserted under the collimator and the phantom was exposed at the isocenter. The raw data file, which contained detector array readouts, was transferred to a PC and was read using a dedicated GUI running under MatLab 7.5. The scatter profile was extracted by interpolating the shadowed area. Results: The scatter and SPR profiles were measured. Increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kVp resulted in an 80% fall off in SPR for a water phantom (d=210 mm and 86% for a polypropylene phantom (d = 350 mm. Increasing the air gap to 20.9 cm caused a 30% decrease in SPR. Conclusion: In this study, we presented a novel approach for measurement of scattered radiation distribution and SPR in a CT scanner with 64-slice capability using a lead block array. The method can also be used on other multi-slice CT scanners. The proposed technique can accurately estimate scatter profiles. It is relatively straightforward, easy to use, and can be used for any related measurement.

  2. Scattered radiation in DBT geometries with flexible breast compression paddles: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Oliver; García, Eloy; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Joan; Martí, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Scattered radiation is an undesired signal largely present in most digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) projection images as no physically rejection methods, i.e. anti-scatter grids, are regularly employed, in contrast to full- field digital mammography. This scatter signal might reduce the visibility of small objects in the image, and potentially affect the detection of small breast lesions. Thus accurate scatter models are needed to minimise the scattered radiation signal via post-processing algorithms. All prior work on scattered radiation estimation has assumed a rigid breast compression paddle (RP) and reported large contribution of scatter signal from RP in the detector. However, in this work, flexible paddles (FPs) tilting from 0° to 10° will be studied using Monte Carlo simulations to analyse if the scatter distribution differs from RP geometries. After reproducing the Hologic Selenia Dimensions geometry (narrow angle) with two (homogeneous and heterogeneous) compressed breast phantoms, results illustrate that the scatter distribution recorded at the detector varies up to 22% between RP and FP geometries (depending on the location), mainly due to the decrease in thickness of the breast observed for FP. However, the relative contribution from the paddle itself (3-12% of the total scatter) remains approximately unchanged for both setups and their magnitude depends on the distance to the breast edge.

  3. Scattering of gravitational radiation - Second order moments of the wave amplitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macquart, JP

    Gravitational radiation that propagates through an inhomogeneous mass distribution is subject to random gravitational tensing, or scattering, causing variations in the wave amplitude and temporal smearing of the signal. A statistical theory is constructed to treat these effects. The statistical

  4. Remarks on the Radiative Transfer Approach to Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves in Layered Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RY-HS-TR-2010-0029 REMARKS ON THE RADIATIVE TRANSFER APPROACH TO SCATTERING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES IN LAYERED RANDOM MEDIA...TRANSFER APPROACH TO SCATTERING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES IN LAYERED RANDOM MEDIA 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Beckmann and A. Spizzichino. The Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves from Rough Surfaces. Artech House, Norwood, Massachusetts, 1987. [3] G. S. Brown. A

  5. Electromagnetic radiation from filamentary sources in the presence of axially magnetized cylindrical plasma scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es’kin, V. A.; Ivoninsky, A. V.; Kudrin, A. V., E-mail: kud@rf.unn.ru; Popova, L. L. [Lobachevsky University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Electromagnetic radiation from filamentary electric-dipole and magnetic-current sources of infinite length in the presence of gyrotropic cylindrical scatterers in the surrounding free space is studied. The scatterers are assumed to be infinitely long, axially magnetized circular plasma columns parallel to the axis of the filamentary source. The field and the radiation pattern of each source are calculated in the case where the source frequency is equal to one of the surface plasmon resonance frequencies of the cylindrical scatterers. It is shown that the presence of even a single resonant magnetized plasma scatterer of small electrical radius or a few such scatterers significantly affects the total fields of the filamentary sources, so that their radiation patterns become essentially different from those in the absence of scatterers or the presence of isotropic scatterers of the same shape and size. It is concluded that the radiation characteristics of the considered sources can efficiently be controlled using their resonance interaction with the neighboring gyrotropic scatterers.

  6. Scattering of terahertz radiation from oriented carbon nanotube films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichhorn, Finn; Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Schroeder, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Session title: IThC-THz Interactions with Condensed Matter. We report on the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to measure scattering from multi-walled carbon nanotubes aligned normal to the film plane. Measurements indicate scattering from the nanotubes is significantly stronger than...

  7. Explicit Form of the Radiative and Collisional Branching Ratios in Polarized Radiation Transport with Coherent Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, R.; del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.

    2017-10-01

    We consider the vector emissivity of the polarized radiation transfer in a Λ-type atomic transition, which we recently proposed to account for both complete frequency redistribution (CRD) and partial redistribution (PRD) contributions to the scattered radiation. This expression can concisely be written as ɛ = ( ɛ ( 1 ) - ɛ f . s . ( 2 ) ) + ɛ ( 2 ) , where {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(1) and {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(2) are the emissivity terms describing, respectively, one-photon and two-photon processes in a Λ-type atom, and where “f.s.” means that the corresponding term must be evaluated assuming an appropriate “flat spectrum” average of the incident radiation across the spectral line. In this follow-up study, we explicitly consider the expressions of these various terms for the case of a polarized multi-term atom to derive the algebraic forms of the branching ratios between the CRD and PRD contributions to the emissivity. In the limit of a two-term atom with non-coherent lower term, our results are shown to be in full agreement with those recently derived by Bommier.

  8. Characterizing the behavior of scattered radiation in multi-energy x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sossin, Artur, E-mail: artur.sossin@gmail.com [CEA-LETI MINATEC Grenoble, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Rebuffel, V.; Tabary, J. [CEA-LETI MINATEC Grenoble, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Létang, J.M.; Freud, N. [Univ Lyon, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, UJM-Saint Etienne, CNRS, Inserm, Centre Léon Bérard, CREATIS UMR 5220 U1206, F-69373 Lyon (France); Verger, L. [CEA-LETI MINATEC Grenoble, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2017-04-01

    Scattered radiation results in various undesirable effects in medical diagnostics, non-destructive testing (NDT) and security x-ray imaging. Despite numerous studies characterizing this phenomenon and its effects, the knowledge of its behavior in the energy domain remains limited. The present study aims at summarizing some key insights on scattered radiation originating from the inspected object. In addition, various simulations and experiments with limited collimation on both simplified and realistic phantoms were conducted in order to study scatter behavior in multi-energy x-ray imaging. Results showed that the spectrum shape of the scatter component can be considered preserved in the first approximation across the image plane for various acquisition geometries and phantoms. The variations exhibited by the scatter spectrum were below 10% for most examined cases. Furthermore, the corresponding spectrum shape proved to be also relatively invariant for different experimental angular projections of one of the examined phantoms. The observed property of scattered radiation can potentially lead to the decoupling of spatial and energy scatter components, which can in turn enable speed ups in scatter simulations and reduce the complexity of scatter correction.

  9. Plasma scattering of electromagnetic radiation theory and measurement techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Froula, Dustin H; Luhmann, Neville C Jr; Sheffield, John

    2011-01-01

    This work presents one of the most powerful methods of plasma diagnosis in exquisite detail to guide researchers in the theory and measurement techniques of light scattering in plasmas. Light scattering in plasmas is essential in the research and development of fusion energy, environmental solutions, and electronics.Referred to as the "Bible" by researchers the work encompasses fusion and industrial applications essential in plasma research. It is the only comprehensive resource specific to the plasma scattering technique. It provides a wide-range of experimental examples and discussion of the

  10. Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It was found that radiation levels would be minimum for different gases, when the gas pressure was between 0.5 and 0.8 Torr. Only helium deviated from this phenomenon as it gave maximum radiation level at 0.8 Torr pressure. It was also found that, for all the gases used, the radiation levels were maximum when the ...

  11. The impacts of light scattering by clouds on longwave radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C. P.; Yang, P.; Huang, X.; Feldman, D.; Flanner, M.

    2016-12-01

    In the longwave spectrum, clouds modulate energy budgets in the climate system through scattering, absorbing and emitting radiation. On the average, ice clouds tend to warm the climate, while liquid water clouds cool the climate, due to the distinct physical and optical properties of ice and liquid water clouds. General circulation models (GCMs) are the most popular tool to investigate the influences of clouds on climate. However, most GCMs, due to computational complexity, neglect multiple scattering effects in longwave radiative transfer calculations. To evaluate the potential impacts of neglecting longwave multiple scattering, we conduct sensitivity studies, utilizing the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) reanalysis atmospheric profiles, a modified RRTMG_LW (Longwave Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for GCM applications) and the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) collection 6 level 3 cloud retrieval products. The modified RRTMG_LW uses the 16-stream DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer Program for a Multi-Layered Plane-Parallel Medium) as a robust radiative solver to calculate longwave fluxes. In the study, the bias in longwave flux (simulated without, minus simulated with, light scattering by ice and liquid water clouds) represents the influence of neglecting light scattering. Biases of upward flux at the top of the atmosphere, downward flux at the surface, and net flux into the atmosphere are presented. The preliminary results show that the absence of longwave light scattering could lead to considerable biases in global and regional flux simulations.

  12. Two-dimensional modeling of multiply scattered laser radiation in optically dense aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zardecki, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Embury, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    The discrete ordinates finite element radiation transport code TWOTRAN is applied to describe the multiple scattering of a laser beam from a reflecting target. For a model scenario involving a 99% relative humidity rural aerosol, we compute the average intensity of the scattered radiation and correction factors to the Lambert-Beer law arising from multiple scattering. As our results indicate, two-dimensional x-y and r-z geometry modeling can reliably describe a realistic three-dimensional scenario. Specific results are presented for the two visual ranges of 1.52 and 0.76 km which show that for sufficiently high aerosol concentrations (e.g., equivalent to V = 0.76 km) the target signature in a distant detector becomes dominated by multiply scattered radiation from interactions of the laser light with the aerosol environment.

  13. Scattered-radiation field of a small betatron in nondestructive testing under nonstationary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bespalov, V.I.; Lunev, V.I.; Sedoi, A.G.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Shtein, M.M.

    1984-10-01

    The scattered-radiation fields of MIB-4 and TB-15 miniature betatrons have been determined experimentally and numerically, with a relative error in each measurement not exceeding 5 percent. An analysis of a three-dimensional topographic map of the scattered radiation field of TB-15 betatron shows that there exist regions near the betatron where the hazard to apparatus or man is a minimum for a given mode of operation. Such regions occur both in the forward (with respect to the direction of the beam) and rear hemispheres. Thus, the radiation dose to equipment and man can be substantially reduced by appropriately selecting a position near the betatron. 17 references.

  14. Radiative heat transfer in strongly forward scattering media of circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Cihan; Ozen, Guzide; Selçuk, Nevin; Kulah, Gorkem

    2016-10-01

    Investigation of the effect of particle scattering on radiative incident heat fluxes and source terms is carried out in the dilute zone of the lignite-fired 150 kWt Middle East Technical University Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (METU CFBC) test rig. The dilute zone is treated as an axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure containing grey/non-grey, absorbing, emitting gas with absorbing, emitting non/isotropically/anisotropically scattering particles surrounded by grey diffuse walls. A two-dimensional axisymmetric radiation model based on Method of Lines (MOL) solution of Discrete Ordinates Method (DOM) coupled with Grey Gas (GG)/Spectral Line-Based Weighted Sum of Grey Gases Model (SLW) and Mie theory/geometric optics approximation (GOA) is extended for incorporation of anisotropic scattering by using normalized Henyey-Greenstein (HG)/transport approximation for the phase function. Input data for the radiation model is obtained from predictions of a comprehensive model previously developed and benchmarked against measurements on the same CFBC burning low calorific value indigenous lignite with high volatile matter/fixed carbon (VM/FC) ratio in its own ash. Predictive accuracy and computational efficiency of nonscattering, isotropic scattering and forward scattering with transport approximation are tested by comparing their predictions with those of forward scattering with HG. GG and GOA based on reflectivity with angular dependency are found to be accurate and CPU efficient. Comparisons reveal that isotropic assumption leads to under-prediction of both incident heat fluxes and source terms for which discrepancy is much larger. On the other hand, predictions obtained by neglecting scattering were found to be in favorable agreement with those of forward scattering at significantly less CPU time. Transport approximation is as accurate and CPU efficient as HG. These findings indicate that negligence of scattering is a more practical choice in solution of the radiative

  15. Modeling of high‐frequency seismic‐wave scattering and propagation using radiative transfer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuehua

    2017-01-01

    This is a study of the nonisotropic scattering process based on radiative transfer theory and its application to the observation of the M 4.3 aftershock recording of the 2008 Wells earthquake sequence in Nevada. Given a wide range of recording distances from 29 to 320 km, the data provide a unique opportunity to discriminate scattering models based on their distance‐dependent behaviors. First, we develop a stable numerical procedure to simulate nonisotropic scattering waves based on the 3D nonisotropic scattering theory proposed by Sato (1995). By applying the simulation method to the inversion of M 4.3 Wells aftershock recordings, we find that a nonisotropic scattering model, dominated by forward scattering, provides the best fit to the observed high‐frequency direct S waves and S‐wave coda velocity envelopes. The scattering process is governed by a Gaussian autocorrelation function, suggesting a Gaussian random heterogeneous structure for the Nevada crust. The model successfully explains the common decay of seismic coda independent of source–station locations as a result of energy leaking from multiple strong forward scattering, instead of backscattering governed by the diffusion solution at large lapse times. The model also explains the pulse‐broadening effect in the high‐frequency direct and early arriving S waves, as other studies have found, and could be very important to applications of high‐frequency wave simulation in which scattering has a strong effect. We also find that regardless of its physical implications, the isotropic scattering model provides the same effective scattering coefficient and intrinsic attenuation estimates as the forward scattering model, suggesting that the isotropic scattering model is still a viable tool for the study of seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation coefficients in the Earth.

  16. Study of the Influence of Scattered Radiation at a Gamma Irradiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonso, Luciana C.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The Calibration Laboratory of IPEN offers calibration services for portable radiation monitors using a Buchler gamma irradiator with {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co radioactive sources. The beam dosimetry measurements are taken periodically between the source-instrument distances of 1 m and 4 m. The ISO 4037 standard (International Organization for Standardization) states that the air kerma rate due to scattered radiation shall not exceed 5% of that due to direct radiation. To verify if the facility was in accordance to the requirements, the evaluation of the scattered radiation was performed in this work. The air kerma rates were measured on the beam axis at various distances from the source up to 5.5 m, and the radiation attenuation curve was obtained. The air kerma rates were proportional within 5% of deviation to the inverse square law from the source centre to the detector centre, as required by the ISO 4037 standard. (authors)

  17. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braicovich, L., E-mail: lucio.braicovich@polimi.it; Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G. [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, Milano I-20133 (Italy); Le Tacon, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38043 (France); Supruangnet, R. [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand)

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  18. A new formulation of electromagnetic wave scattering using an on-surface radiation boundary condition approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegsmann, Gregory A.; Taflove, Allen; Umashankar, Koradar R.

    1987-01-01

    A new formulation of electromagnetic wave scattering by convex, two-dimensional conducting bodies is reported. This formulation, called the on-surface radiation condition (OSRC) approach, is based upon an expansion of the radiation condition applied directly on the surface of a scatterer. It is now shown that application of a suitable radiation condition directly on the surface of a convex conducting scatterer can lead to substantial simplification of the frequency-domain integral equation for the scattered field, which is reduced to just a line integral. For the transverse magnetic case, the integrand is known explicitly. For the transverse electric case, the integrand can be easily constructed by solving an ordinary differential equation around the scatterer surface contour. Examples are provided which show that OSRC yields computed near and far fields which approach the exact results for canonical shapes such as the circular cylinder, square cylinder, and strip. Electrical sizes for the examples are ka = 5 and ka = 10. The new OSRC formulation of scattering may present a useful alternative to present integral equation and uniform high-frequency approaches for convex cylinders larger than ka = 1. Structures with edges or corners can also be analyzed, although more work is needed to incorporate the physics of singular currents at these discontinuities. Convex dielectric structures can also be treated using OSRC.

  19. Simulation model to analyze the scatter radiation effects on breast cancer diagnosis by CAD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irita, Ricardo T.; Frere, Annie F.; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    One of factors that more affect the radiographic image quality is the scatter radiation produced by interaction between the x-ray and the radiographed object. Recently the Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) Systems are coming to aid the detection of breast small details. Nevertheless, we not sure how much the scatter radiation decrease the efficiency of this systems. This work presents a model in order to quantify the scatter radiation and find it relation between CAD's results used for the microcalcification detection. We simulated scatter photons that reaches the film and we added it to the mammography image. The new images were processed and the alterations of the CAD's results were analyzed. The information loss to breast composed by 80 percent adipose tissue was 0,0561 per each centimeter increased in the breast's thickness. We calculated these same data considering a proportion variation of adipose tissue and considering the breast composition of 90 percent and 70 percent the loss it would be of 0.0504 and 0.07559 per increased cm, respectively. We can increase the wanted scattered radiation to any image with its own characteristics and analyze the disturbances that it can bring to the visual inspection or the automatic detection (CAD system) efficiently.

  20. Efficient modeling of sun/shade canopy radiation dynamics explicitly accounting for scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bodin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The separation of global radiation (Rg into its direct (Rb and diffuse constituents (Rg is important when modeling plant photosynthesis because a high Rd:Rg ratio has been shown to enhance Gross Primary Production (GPP. To include this effect in vegetation models, the plant canopy must be separated into sunlit and shaded leaves. However, because such models are often too intractable and computationally expensive for theoretical or large scale studies, simpler sun-shade approaches are often preferred. A widely used and computationally efficient sun-shade model was developed by Goudriaan (1977 (GOU. However, compared to more complex models, this model's realism is limited by its lack of explicit treatment of radiation scattering.

    Here we present a new model based on the GOU model, but which in contrast explicitly simulates radiation scattering by sunlit leaves and the absorption of this radiation by the canopy layers above and below (2-stream approach. Compared to the GOU model our model predicts significantly different profiles of scattered radiation that are in better agreement with measured profiles of downwelling diffuse radiation. With respect to these data our model's performance is equal to a more complex and much slower iterative radiation model while maintaining the simplicity and computational efficiency of the GOU model.

  1. Multiple and dependent scattering by densely packed discrete spheres: Comparison of radiative transfer and Maxwell theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L. X.; Tan, J. Y.; Zhao, J. M.; Wang, F. Q.; Wang, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    The radiative transfer equation (RTE) has been widely used to deal with multiple scattering of light by sparsely and randomly distributed discrete particles. However, for densely packed particles, the RTE becomes questionable due to strong dependent scattering effects. This paper examines the accuracy of RTE by comparing with the exact electromagnetic theory. For an imaginary spherical volume filled with randomly distributed, densely packed spheres, the RTE is solved by the Monte Carlo method combined with the Percus-Yevick hard model to consider the dependent scattering effect, while the electromagnetic calculation is based on the multi-sphere superposition T-matrix method. The Mueller matrix elements of the system with different size parameters and volume fractions of spheres are obtained using both methods. The results verify that the RTE fails to deal with the systems with a high-volume fraction due to the dependent scattering effects. Apart from the effects of forward interference scattering and coherent backscattering, the Percus-Yevick hard sphere model shows good accuracy in accounting for the far-field interference effects for medium or smaller size parameters (up to 6.964 in this study). For densely packed discrete spheres with large size parameters (equals 13.928 in this study), the improvement of dependent scattering correction tends to deteriorate. The observations indicate that caution must be taken when using RTE in dealing with the radiative transfer in dense discrete random media even though the dependent scattering correction is applied.

  2. Do angles of obliquity apply to 30 degrees scattered radiation from megavoltage beams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Peter J; Styczynski, John R

    2008-10-01

    The angle of obliquity is used in radiation shielding calculations to account for the longer path length x rays will see when obliquely incident on the protective barrier. According to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), use of the angle of obliquity is explicitly assumed for primary radiation, so that an angle of obliquity for secondary radiation is never addressed. However, in the example section of the latest report, it specifically recommends against using an angle of obliquity for scattered radiation. To check this assumption, the existence or not of an angle of obliquity for scattered radiation has been investigated for bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV and for barriers consisting of concrete, lead, and steel using a Monte Carlo approach. The MCNP Monte Carlo code, v4.2C, has been used to generate scattered radiation at 30 degrees from a water phantom and incident on a secondary barrier at the same angle relative to the normal to the barrier. The barrier thickness was increased from zero to a thickness sufficient to reduce the fluence (f4 tally) to <10(-3). A transmission curve was created for each energy-barrier material combination by normalizing to zero thickness. The results for the first tenth-value layer (TVL) in concrete (5 energies) show an average angle of obliquity of 21.7 degrees +/- 5.6 degrees , and for the first two TVLs averaged 29.7 degrees +/- 3.9 degrees . The results for the first TVL in lead (3 energies) show an average angle of obliquity of 27.7 degrees +/- 4.0 degrees , and for the first two TVLs averaged 20.5 degrees +/- 5.8 degrees . There are no data in the NCRP reports for 30 degrees scattered radiation attenuated by steel with which to make a comparison.

  3. Intense Interactions of Molecules with a Short-Wavelength Electromagnetic Radiation Field: II. Resonance Scattering of Radiation and Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegarkov, A. I.

    2001-07-01

    Within the framework of the nonadiabatic approach developed in the preceding paper, the resonance scattering, resonance Raman scattering, and resonance fluorescence are studied in detail for diatomic and triatomic molecules, and polyatomic symmetric and antisymmetric top molecules, which interact with the field of short-wavelength radiation with a wavelength λ ≥ Å and an intensity up to 1014 W/cm2. The coherent excitations of high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states are taken into account. Analytical expressions for calculating the tensors and cross sections of the above processes are derived.

  4. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V., E-mail: niko200707@mail.ru; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A. [Department of Acoustics, Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kreider, Wayne [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St. Seattle WA 98105 (United States); Sapozhnikov, Oleg A. [Department of Acoustics, Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St. Seattle WA 98105 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  5. Medium-induced gluon radiation in hard forward parton scattering in the saturation formalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munier, Stéphane; Peigné, Stéphane; Petreska, Elena

    2017-01-01

    We derive the medium-induced, coherent gluon radiation spectrum associated with the hard forward scattering of an energetic parton off a nucleus, in the saturation formalism and within the Gaussian approximation for the relevant correlators of Wilson lines. The calculation reproduces the simple

  6. Determination of scattered gamma radiation in the calibration of environmental dose rate meters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1992-01-01

    Practical free-field and shadow-shield calibration techniques using a variety of environmental dose rate meters were studied, and experimental and theoretical determinations were made of the contribution of scattered photons to the air kerma rate from certificated Cs-137, Co-60 and Ra-226 gamma...... negligibly to the detector response relative to that from ground and air. Shadow-shield measurements were used to deduce the contribution to the response from the scattered radiation in free-field geometries and the experimentally obtained results were found to agree agree extremely well with those...... the detector responses. Insignificant differences of the order of 1 % between the results for the two geometries were found both experimentally and theoretically. It is thus concluded that the scattered radiation from surrounding buildings farther away than around 15 m from a calibration set-up contributes...

  7. INFLUENCE OF SCATTERED NEUTRON RADIATION ON METROLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF АТ140 NEUTRON CALIBRATION FACILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Komar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Today facilities with collimated radiation field are widely used as reference in metrological support of devices for neutron radiation measurement. Neutron fields formed by radionuclide neutron sources. The aim of this research was to study characteristics of experimentally realized neutron fields geometries on АТ140 Neutron Calibration Facility using Monte Carlo method.For calibration, we put a device into neutron field with known flux density or ambient equivalent dose rate. We can form neutron beam from radionuclide fast-neutron source in different geometries. In containercollimator of АТ140 Neutron Calibration Facility we can install special inserts to gather fast-neutron geometry or thermal-neutron geometry. We need to consider neutron scattering from air and room’s walls. We can conduct measurements of neutron field characteristics in several points and get the other using Monte Carlo method.Thermal neutron collimator forms a beam from radionuclide source with a significant amount of neutrons with thermal energies. From found relationship between full neutron flux and distance to neutron source we see that inverse square law is violated. Scattered radiation contribution into total flux increases when we are moving away from neutron source and significantly influences neutron fields characteristics. While source is exposed in shadow-cone geometry neutron specter has pronounced thermal component from wall scattering.In this work, we examined main geometry types used to acquire reference neutron radiation using radionuclide sources. We developed Monte Carlo model for 238Pu-Be neutron source and АТ140 Neutron Calibration Facility’s container-collimator. We have shown the most significant neutron energy distribution factor to be scattered radiation from room’s walls. It leads to significant changes of neutron radiation specter at a distance from the source. When planning location, and installing the facility we should consider

  8. Estimates of the Spectral Aerosol Single Sea Scattering Albedo and Aerosol Radiative Effects during SAFARI 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Pilewskie, Peter; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.

    2003-01-01

    Using measurements of the spectral solar radiative flux and optical depth for 2 days (24 August and 6 September 2000) during the SAFARI 2000 intensive field experiment and a detailed radiative transfer model, we estimate the spectral single scattering albedo of the aerosol layer. The single scattering albedo is similar on the 2 days even though the optical depth for the aerosol layer was quite different. The aerosol single scattering albedo was between 0.85 and 0.90 at 350 nm, decreasing to 0.6 in the near infrared. The magnitude and decrease with wavelength of the single scattering albedo are consistent with the absorption properties of small black carbon particles. We estimate the uncertainty in the single scattering albedo due to the uncertainty in the measured fractional absorption and optical depths. The uncertainty in the single scattering albedo is significantly less on the high-optical-depth day (6 September) than on the low-optical-depth day (24 August). On the high-optical-depth day, the uncertainty in the single scattering albedo is 0.02 in the midvisible whereas on the low-optical-depth day the uncertainty is 0.08 in the midvisible. On both days, the uncertainty becomes larger in the near infrared. We compute the radiative effect of the aerosol by comparing calculations with and without the aerosol. The effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is to cool the atmosphere by 13 W/sq m on 24 August and 17 W/sq m on 6 September. The effect on the downward flux at the surface is a reduction of 57 W/sq m on 24 August and 200 W/sq m on 6 September. The aerosol effect on the downward flux at the surface is in good agreement with the results reported from the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX).

  9. Measurement of scattered radiation in a volumetric 64-slice CT scanner using three experimental techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbarzadeh, A; Ay, M R; Sarkar, S [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghadiri, H [Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zaidi, H [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)], E-mail: mohammadreza_ay@tums.ac.ir

    2010-04-21

    Compton scatter poses a significant threat to volumetric x-ray computed tomography, bringing cupping and streak artefacts thus impacting qualitative and quantitative imaging procedures. To perform appropriate scatter compensation, it is necessary to estimate the magnitude and spatial distribution of x-ray scatter. The aim of this study is to compare three experimental methods for measurement of the scattered radiation profile in a 64-slice CT scanner. The explored techniques involve the use of collimator shadow, a single blocker (a lead bar that suppresses the primary radiation) and an array blocker. The latter was recently proposed and validated by our group. The collimator shadow technique was used as reference for comparison since it established itself as the most accurate experimental procedure available today. The mean relative error of measurements in all tube voltages was 3.9 {+-} 5.5% (with a maximum value of 20%) for the single blocker method whereas it was 1.4 {+-} 1.1% (with a maximum value of 5%) for the proposed blocker array method. The calculated scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) using the blocker array method for the tube voltages of 140 kVp and 80 kVp was 0.148 and 1.034, respectively. For a larger polypropylene phantom, the maximum SPR achieved was 0.803 and 6.458 at 140 kVp and 80 kVp, respectively. Although the three compared methods present a reasonable accuracy for calculation of the scattered profile in the region corresponding to the object, the collimator shadow method is by far the most accurate empirical technique. Nevertheless, the blocker array method is relatively straightforward for scatter estimation providing minor additional radiation exposure to the patient.

  10. Absorbing aerosol radiative effects in the limb-scatter viewing geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiacek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The limb-scatter satellite viewing geometry is well suited to detecting low-concentration aerosols in the upper troposphere due to its long observation path length (~200 km, high vertical resolution (~1–2 km and good geographic coverage. We use the fully three-dimensional radiative transfer code SASKTRAN to simulate the sensitivity of limb-scatter viewing Odin/OSIRIS satellite measurements to absorbing mineral dust and carbonaceous aerosols (smoke and pure soot, as well as to non-absorbing sulfate aerosols and ice in the upper troposphere. At long wavelengths (813 nm the addition of all aerosols (except soot to an air only atmosphere produced a radiance increase as compared to air only, on account of the low Rayleigh scattering in air only at 813 nm. The radiance reduction due to soot aerosol was negligible ( At short wavelengths (337, 377, 452 nm, we found that the addition of any aerosol species to an air only atmosphere caused a decrease in single-scattered radiation due to an extinction of Rayleigh scattering in the direction of OSIRIS. The reduction was clearly related to particle size first, with absorption responsible for second-order effects only. Multiple-scattered radiation could either increase or decrease in the presence of an aerosol species, depending both on particle size and absorption. Large scatterers (ice, mineral dust all increased multiple-scattered radiation within, below and above the aerosol layer. Small, highly absorbing pure soot particles produced a negligible multiple-scattering response ( At short wavelengths, the combined effect of single scattering decreases and multiple scattering increases led to complex total radiance signatures that generally could not unambiguously distinguish absorbing versus non-absorbing aerosols. Smoke aerosols led to a total radiance decrease (as compared to air only at all altitudes above the aerosol layer (15–100 km. This unique signature was a result of the aerosols' strong

  11. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardo, Angelo [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); Di Fabrizio, Enzo [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); BIONEM Lab at University Magna Graecia, Campus Salvatore Venuta, Viale Europa 88100, Germaneto-Catanzaro (Italy); Limongi, Tania [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Marinaro, Giovanni [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Riekel, Christian, E-mail: riekel@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-06-10

    A comprehensive review about the use of micro- and nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces as a tool for in situ X-ray scattering investigations of soft matter and biological materials. Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data.

  12. The Radiation Belt Electron Scattering by Magnetosonic Wave: Dependence on Key Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Mingda; Xie, Lun; Li, Jinxing; Pu, Zuyin; Fu, Suiyan; Ni, Binbin; Hua, Man; Chen, Lunjin; Li, Wen

    2017-12-01

    Magnetosonic (MS) waves have been found capable of creating radiation belt electron butterfly distributions in the inner magnetosphere. To investigate the physical nature of the interactions between radiation belt electrons and MS waves, and to explore a preferential condition for MS waves to scatter electrons efficiently, we performed a comprehensive parametric study of MS wave-electron interactions using test particle simulations. The diffusion coefficients simulated by varying the MS wave frequency show that the scattering effect of MS waves is frequency insensitive at low harmonics (f butterfly distributions in the inner part of the plasmasphere where the ratio of electron plasma-to-gyrofrequency (fpe/fce) is large, while they may essentially form a two-peak distribution outside the plasmapause and in the inner radiation belt where fpe/fce is small.

  13. Invited Review Terahertz Transmission, Scattering, Reflection, and Absorption—the Interaction of THz Radiation with Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R. A.

    2017-07-01

    Terahertz radiation has been proposed as a useful tool in the study of soils and related materials from such diverse perspectives as detection of non-metallic landmines to improving soil fertility by agricultural charcoals produced by pyrolysis of organic material. The main barrier to such applications is that soils are rather opaque at terahertz frequencies. In this article, the main findings to date on the interaction of terahertz radiation with soils are reviewed, organized around the four phenomena of terahertz: transmission, scattering, reflection, and absorption. Terahertz transmission through soils is generally low and decreases with frequency. Terahertz scattering is evident in many THz-soil interactions, as the wavelength of the radiation is of the order of the particle size. Terahertz reflection is important to communications as these develop from the GHz into the THz band. Terahertz absorption on diluted soil samples has been demonstrated to be effective in identifying soil constituents, such as aromatic compounds, and soil contaminants, such as pesticides.

  14. Scattering and Diffraction of Electromagnetic Radiation: An Effective Probe to Material Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Scattered electromagnetic waves from material bodies of different forms contain, in an intricate way, precise information on the intrinsic, geometrical and physical properties of the objects. Scattering theories, ever deepening, aim to provide dependable interpretation and prediction to the complicated interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. There are well-established multiple-scattering formulations based on classical electromagnetic theories. An example is the Generalized Multi-particle Mie-solution (GMM), which has recently been extended to a special version ? the GMM-PA approach, applicable to finite periodic arrays consisting of a huge number (e.g., >>106) of identical scattering centers [1]. The framework of the GMM-PA is nearly complete. When the size of the constituent unit scatterers becomes considerably small in comparison with incident wavelength, an appropriate array of such small element volumes may well be a satisfactory representation of a material entity having an arbitrary structure. X-ray diffraction is a powerful characterization tool used in a variety of scientific and technical fields, including material science. A diffraction pattern is nothing more than the spatial distribution of scattered intensity, determined by the distribution of scattering matter by way of its Fourier transform [1]. Since all linear dimensions entered into Maxwell's equations are normalized by wavelength, an analogy exists between optical and X-ray diffraction patterns. A large set of optical diffraction patterns experimentally obtained can be found in the literature [e.g., 2,3]. Theoretical results from the GMM-PA have been scrutinized using a large collection of publically accessible, experimentally obtained Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. As far as characteristic structures of the patterns are concerned, theoretical and experimental results are in uniform agreement; no exception has been found so far. Closely connected with the spatial distribution of

  15. Electromagnetic radiation and scattering from small canonical structures of double-negative metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel

    2007-01-01

    aspects associated with DNG materials, and was subsequently extended to investigations of the radiation and scattering from two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) MTM-based canonical problems in electromagnetic theory. As to the theoretical aspects of DNG materials, the sign, or more generally the branch......, of the free-space wavelength. The enhancement of e.g., the total radiated power, as compared to the power radiated by the respective sources alone in free space, is found to be of the order of 55 dB, for cylindrical, and 93 dB, for spherical structures. These resonant effects, not present in the corresponding...... investigated. It is demonstrated that the resonant effects of the electrically small MTM-based structures, and thus the resulting enhancements of e.g., the total radiated power, are diminished as the losses are included, while being confined, but still present, to very narrow bands of frequency upon inclusion...

  16. Modeling and design of radiative hydrodynamic experiments with X-ray Thomson Scattering measurements on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, K. H.; Lefevre, H. J.; Belancourt, P. X.; MacDonald, M. J.; Doeppner, T.; Keiter, P. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Johnsen, E.

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility studied the effect of radiation on shock-driven hydrodynamic instability growth. X-ray radiography images from these experiments indicate that perturbation growth is lower in highly radiative shocks compared to shocks with negligible radiation flux. The reduction in instability growth is attributed to ablation from higher temperatures in the foam for highly radiative shocks. The proposed design implements the X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) technique in the radiative shock tube platform to measure electron temperatures and densities in the shocked foam. We model these experiments with CRASH, an Eulerian radiation hydrodynamics code with block-adaptive mesh refinement, multi-group radiation transport and electron heat conduction. Simulations are presented with SiO2 and carbon foams for both the high temperature, radiative shock and the low-temperature, hydrodynamic shock cases. Calculations from CRASH give estimations for shock speed, electron temperature, effective ionization, and other quantities necessary for designing the XRTS diagnostic measurement. This work is funded by the LLNL under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Effect of substrate on the results of measuring coating thickness according to radiation scattered by substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedavnij, O.I.; Khripunov, L.Z. (Tomskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Ehlektronnoj Introskopii)

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a substrate on the results of measuring tantalum coating thickness in two-layer compositions according to gamma radiation scattered by the substrate is studied. It is shown that by means of an albedo-radiometer realizing the physical model absorber-scatterer one can determine the thickness (application uniformity) of tantalum coatings up to 150-300 ..mu..m depending on the substrate material (plexiglas, aluminium, iron, copper). In case of testing coatings on substrates of alloys and high-alloy steels in order to ensure high accuracy of measurement it is expedient with the above albedo-radiometer to determine the value of the backscattered radiation flux for the substrate before coating application.

  18. Modelling artificial night-sky brightness with a polarized multiple scattering radiative transfer computer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerola, Dana Xavier

    2006-02-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation of radiative effects produced by hazy atmospheres, computational procedures have been developed for use in determining the brightening of the night sky as a result of urban illumination. The downwardly and upwardly directed radiances of multiply scattered light from an offending metropolitan source are computed by a straightforward Gauss-Seidel (G-S) iterative technique applied directly to the integrated form of Chandrasekhar's vectorized radiative transfer equation. Initial benchmark night-sky brightness tests of the present G-S model using fully consistent optical emission and extinction input parameters yield very encouraging results when compared with the double scattering treatment of Garstang, the only full-fledged previously available model.

  19. Blackening of unprotected dental X-ray films due to scattered radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewerin, I.; Stoltze, K.

    1988-01-01

    Unexposed films awaiting exposure as well as exposed films awaiting processing are subjected to scattered radiation if kept unprotected in the dental X-ray clinic. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of various storing principles, film speed, and distance from X-ray source upon the degree of film blackening. Test films were subjected to scattered radiation from 150 exposures. Maximum additional blackening (0.27 D) was recorded for type E films not protected by lead foil at the shortest distance studied (55 cm). At a distance of 200 cm blackening was reduced to 0.02 D and could be further reduced by utilizing the inherent protective effect of the lead foil. It is concluded that if dental X-ray films not in use are kept a distance of 200 cm from the X-ray source and protected by lead foil additional blackening due to scattered radiation is negligible and further protective precautions are unnecessary.

  20. Influence of X-ray scatter radiation on image quality in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. J.; Di Maria, S.; Baptista, M.; Belchior, A.; Afonso, J.; Venâncio, J.; Vaz, P.

    2017-11-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a quasi-three-dimensional imaging technique that was developed to solve the principal limitation of mammography, namely the overlapping tissue effect. This issue in standard mammography (SM) leads to two main problems: low sensitivity (difficulty to detect lesions) and low specificity (non-negligible percentage of false positives). Although DBT is now being introduced in clinical practice the features of this technique have not yet been fully and accurately assessed. Consequently, optimization studies in terms of choosing the most suitable parameters which maximize image quality according to the known limits of breast dosimetry are currently performing. In DBT, scatter radiation can lead to a loss of contrast and to an increase of image noise by reducing the signal-to-difference-noise ratio (SDNR) of a lesion. Moreover the use of an anti-scatter grid is a concern due to the low exposure of the photon flux available per projection. For this reason the main aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the scatter radiation on image quality and the dose delivered to the breast. In particular a detailed analysis of the scatter radiation on the optimal energy that maximizes the SDNR was performed for different monochromatic energies and voltages. To reach this objective the PenEasy Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tool imbedded in the general-purpose main program PENELOPE, was used. After a successful validation of the MC model with measurements, 2D projection images of primary, coherent and incoherent photons were obtained. For that, a homogeneous breast phantom (2, 4, 6, 8 cm) with 25%, 50% and 75% glandular compositions was used, including a 5 mm thick tumor. The images were generated for each monochromatic X-ray energies in the range from 16 keV to 32 keV. For each angular projection considered (25 angular projections covering an arc of 50°) the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), the mean glandular dose (MGD) and the signal

  1. Non-Directional Radiation Spread Modeling and Non-Invasive Estimating the Radiation Scattering and Absorption Parameters in Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Makarov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article dwells on a development of new non-invasive measurement methods of optical parameters of biological tissues, which are responsible for the scattering and absorption of monochromatic radiation. It is known from the theory of radiation transfer [1] that for strongly scattering media, to which many biological tissues pertain, such parameters are parameters of diffusion approximation, as well as a scattering coefficient and an anisotropy parameter.Based on statistical modeling the paper examines a spread of non-directional radiation from a Lambert light beam with the natural polarization that illuminates a surface of the biological tissue. Statistical modeling is based on the Monte Carlo method [2]. Thus, to have the correct energy coefficient values of Fresnel reflection and transmission in simulation of such radiation by Monte Carlo method the author uses his finding that is a function of the statistical representation for the incidence of model photons [3]. The paper describes in detail a principle of fixing the power transmitted by the non-directional radiation into biological tissue [3], and the equations of a power balance in this case.Further, the paper describes the diffusion approximation of a radiation transfer theory, often used in simulation of radiation propagation in strongly scattering media and shows its application in case of fixing the power transmitted into the tissue. Thus, to represent an uneven power distribution is used an approximating expression in conditions of fixing a total input power. The paper reveals behavior peculiarities of solution on the surface of the biological tissue inside and outside of the incident beam. It is shown that the solution in the region outside of the incident beam (especially far away from it, essentially, depends neither on the particular power distribution across the surface, being a part of the tissue, nor on the refractive index of the biological tissue. It is determined only by

  2. The Influence of Radiation Damping on Through-Resonance Variation in the Scattering Cross-Section of Gas Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.; Leighton, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    When a gas bubble in water undergoes forced pulsations, sound is radiated at the forcing frequency, and the scattering cross-section exhibits a resonance peak when the forcing frequency passes through the bubble’s natural frequency. At resonance, the amplitude of the scattered spherical wave is

  3. Multiple scattering effects with cyclical terms in active remote sensing of vegetated surface using vector radiative transfer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy transport in a vegetated (corn) surface layer is examined by solving the vector radiative transfer equation using a numerical iterative approach. This approach allows a higher order that includes the multiple scattering effects. Multiple scattering effects are important when the optical t...

  4. Attosecond gamma-ray pulses via nonlinear Compton scattering in the radiation dominated regime

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Xing; Galow, Benjamin J; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counter-propagating tightly-focused laser beam is investigated for intensities when the dynamics is strongly affected by its own radiation. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma-radiation are evaluated employing a semiclassical description for the laser-driven electron dynamics and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emissions. We show for laser facilities under construction that gamma-ray bursts of few hundred attoseconds and dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies may be detected in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. Tight focussing of the laser beam and radiation reaction are demonstrated to be jointly responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts which are independent of both duration of electron bunch and laser pulse. Furthermore, the stochastic nature of the gamma-photon emission features signatures in the resulting gamma-ray comb in the case of the application of a multi-cycle laser pulse.

  5. Radiation Distribution Within a Canopy Profile Calculated by a Multiple-Layer Canopy Scattering Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, R. J.; Zhao, W.

    2004-05-01

    Remote sensing technology has tremendous potential for use in natural resource studies, agriculture, water and land use management because of the spatial information contained in remote sensing images and because of the ease and/or frequency of acquiring vast amounts of surface information. However, the quantitative application of remotely sensed data is restricted by several problems. One of them is that the entities a remote sensor views are not single targets. For example, measurement show that the skin temperature of many crops can exhibit more than a 10° C difference between the leaves at the bottom and those at the top of the canopy, in addition to the usually large difference between leaves and soil substrate. Directional radiometric surface temperatures measured from above a crop represent neither the skin temperature of the crop nor the surface temperature of the soil substrate but a complex aggregate of all elements viewed. When a remote sensing device views a vegetated surface from different view angles, different combinations of canopy and soil elements at different temperatures will be seen, producing different values of "remotely sensed surface temperature." As the first step in a series of models to be developed to simulate energy balance, sensible and latent heat fluxes, and temperature profiles within a vegetation canopy, a multiple-layer canopy scattering model to estimate short wave radiation distribution within a wheat canopy was developed. This model incorporates processes of radiation penetration through gaps between leaves, and radiation absorption, reflection and transmission in leaf layers. It is able to simulate the multiple scattering processes that occur among different canopy layers, and determine the vertical distributions of upwelling, downwelling, and reflected short wave radiation within the canopy, and at the soil surface. One of the primary advantages of this model, in contrast to other models, is that the multiple scattering

  6. Velocity-space tomography of fusion plasmas by collective Thomson scattering of gyrotron radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Jacobsen, A.S.; Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a diagnostic capable of measuring 2D fast-ion velocity distribution functions 푓2퐷푣 in the MeV-range in magnetized fusion plasmas. Today velocity-space tomography based on fast-ion D훼 spectroscopy is regularly used to measure 푓2퐷푣 for ion energies below 100 keV. Unfortunately, the signal......-tonoise ratio becomes fairly low for MeV-range ions. Ions at any energy can be detected well by collective Thomson scattering of mm-wave radiation from a high-power gyrotron. We demonstrate how collective Thomson scattering can be used to measure 푓2퐷푣 in the MeV-range in reactor relevant plasmas...

  7. High-Resolution X-Ray Scattering Topography Using Synchrotron Radiation Microbeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaura, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Kii, Hideki

    1994-02-01

    Although spatial resolution is the most essential factor determining the function of X-ray topography, it has not been improved in 30 years in spite of increasing requirements for highly-resolvable topography in materials science. X-ray scattering topography using a microbeam is a method capable of overcoming this resolution problem. Because the maximum resolution of an apparatus using a sealed-off tube is limited to 20 µ m, we designed and constructed scattering topography equipment using a synchrotron radiation microbeam. In the experiment, the slit system forms the microbeam 7 µ m in diameter. We observed a cellulose distribution in bamboo as a testing material. When the scanning step was 2 µ m, we attained spatial resolution less than 5 µ m.

  8. Revisiting Bragg's X-ray microscope: scatter based optical transient grating detection of pulsed ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Wilfred K; Paganin, David M; Hall, Chris J

    2011-06-01

    Transient optical gratings for detecting ultrafast signals are routine for temporally resolved photochemical investigations. Many processes can contribute to the formation of such gratings; we indicate use of optically scattering centres that can be formed with highly variable latencies in different materials and devices using ionising radiation. Coherent light scattered by these centres can form the short-wavelength-to-optical-wavelength, incoherent-to-coherent basis of a Bragg X-ray microscope, with inherent scope for optical phasing. Depending on the dynamics of the medium chosen, the way is open to both ultrafast pulsed and integrating measurements. For experiments employing brief pulses, we discuss high-dynamic-range short-wavelength diffraction measurements with real-time optical reconstructions. Applications to optical real-time X-ray phase-retrieval are considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation and scattering by thin-wire structures in the complex frequency domain. [electromagnetic theory for thin-wire antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Piecewise-sinusoidal expansion functions and Galerkin's method are employed to formulate a solution for an arbitrary thin-wire configuration in a homogeneous conducting medium. The analysis is performed in the real or complex frequency domain. In antenna problems, the solution determines the current distribution, impedance, radiation efficiency, gain and far-field patterns. In scattering problems, the solution determines the absorption cross section, scattering cross section and the polarization scattering matrix. The electromagnetic theory is presented for thin wires and the forward-scattering theorem is developed for an arbitrary target in a homogeneous conducting medium.

  10. The reciprocity relation for reflection and transmission of radiation by crops and other plane-parallel scattering media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical proof of the reciprocity relation for reflection and transmission of radiation by plane-parallel scattering media like crop canopies is presented. First, the proof is based on a radiation model for crop canopies, and then the proof is generalized. Matrix methods are used, leading to

  11. Solution of electromagnetic scattering and radiation problems using a spectral domain approach - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, R.; Ko, W. L.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of some recent developments on the use of the spectral-domain approach for deriving high-frequency solutions to electromagnetics scattering and radiation problems. The spectral approach is not only useful for interpreting the well-known Keller formulas based on the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD), it can also be employed for verifying the accuracy of GTD and other asymptotic solutions and systematically improving the results when such improvements are needed. The problem of plane wave diffraction by a finite screen or a strip is presented as an example of the application of the spectral-domain approach.

  12. Investigation of Doppler spectra of laser radiation scattered inside hand skin during occlusion test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, I. O.; Zherebtsov, E. A.; Zherebtsova, A. I.; Dremin, V. V.; Dunaev, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a method widely used in diagnosis of microcirculation diseases. It is well known that information about frequency distribution of Doppler spectrum of the laser radiation scattered by moving red blood cells (RBC) usually disappears after signal processing procedure. Photocurrent’s spectrum distribution contains valuable diagnostic information about velocity distribution of the RBC. In this research it is proposed to compute the indexes of microcirculation in the sub-ranges of the Doppler spectrum as well as investigate the frequency distribution of the computed indexes.

  13. MOL solution of DOM for transient radiative transfer in 3-D scattering media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayranci, Isil; Selcuk, Nevin E-mail: selcuk@metu.edu.tr

    2004-04-01

    A methodology based on the method of lines solution of discrete ordinates method for solution of the 3-D transient radiative transfer equation is introduced. The method is applied to the prediction of transient and steady state transmittances in a cubical enclosure containing purely scattering medium and validated against Monte Carlo solutions from the literature. The flexibility of the method for implementation of linear spatial differencing schemes, flux limiters and weighted essentially non-oscillatory methods is demonstrated. Van Leer flux limiter is found to provide stable, accurate and efficient solutions.

  14. Radiation scattering field of small-size betatrons in nondestructive testing under non-stationary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bespalov, V.I.; Lunev, V.I.; Sedoj, A.G.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Shtejn, M.M. (Tomskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Ehlektronnoj Introskopii)

    1984-01-01

    Data on absorbed dose spatial distribution in the air in the vicinity of MIB-4 and TB-15 small-size betatrons are presented. A technique of measuring with the help of photographic and thermoluminescent dosimetry are described. The measurement error did not exceed 5%. The scattered radiation field configuration around an accelerator is found to be determined mainly by its design features. The dose field has a complicated form. But if one knows a particular shape of the field, it is possible to choose regions close to the betatron that are most safe for the personnel and equipment under a given regime of accelerator operation.

  15. The scattering of a bremsstrahlung radiation of electrons with energy 13 and 22 MeV from plane targets

    CERN Document Server

    Asatov, U T

    2002-01-01

    In the present work the characteristics of backward (90 sup d egscattered gamma radiation originating at interaction of a beam of a bremsstrahlung radiation of electrons with energy 13 and 22 MeV with plane targets of different thickness from glass textolite, aluminium, iron, lead and their combination are investigated. The dependence of thickness of saturation of 'forward' scattered gamma radiation, a on angles of detection (theta sub s) and orientation (phi) of plane targets depending on a direction of probing beam was observed for the first time. For the first time, the numerical performances of beams of forward scattered gamma radiation from different targets were investigated and determined depending on their orientation and thickness. The new and corrected data on numerical performances of beams of the inverse scattered gamma radiation is obtained. The distinction in characteristics of beams of the scattered gamma radiation is s...

  16. Features of the scattering of focused terahertz radiation from the probe of a terahertz near-field microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trukhin, V. N.; Samoylov, L. L.; Khor'kov, D. P.

    2013-02-01

    The scattering of pulsed terahertz radiation from metallic probes in the form of thin cylinders and cones with a small opening angle, which are used in apertureless terahertz near-field microscopes, has been investigated. The extrema of the waveform of pulsed terahertz radiation scattered from a free probe are linearly shifted with a change in the vertical position of the probe, and the spectral distribution is characterized by an inversely proportional frequency dependence. In the presence of a reflecting surface under the probe, when new excitation and detection directions appear, the spectrum of scattered terahertz radiation does not differ from the spectrum of the incident radiation. The experimental data are in mutual agreement with the theoretical results obtained within the model of the generation of diffraction edge waves at the interface of inhomogeneous excitation between the excitation region and shadow region.

  17. Aerosol single scattering albedo and its contribution to radiative forcing dung EAST- AIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Li, Z.

    2007-12-01

    Quantification of aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) can improve determining aerosol radiative property. Combination technique using MODIS and ground-based Hazemeter measurement data by the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) over China is proposed to retrieve SSA. The accuracy of the retrieval of SSA increases with the aerosol loading and the uncertainties in the SSA retrieval are 0.02~0.03 (AOT=1.0) and up to 0.03~0.05 (AOT=0.5) at 0.47¥ìm, respectively. The comparison of one- year data of retrieved SSA values with those from AERONET inversion product are ~0.03 (RMSD) and ~0.02 (mean bias), respectively. Estimated SSA values were range from 0.89 to 0.93 over the study area. Since SSA is an important factor of aerosol radiative forcing, these will help to understood the study of aerosol climate effects.

  18. Time evolution of photon propagation in scattering and absorbing media: the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakopoulos, A; Georgiou, E

    2016-01-01

    A new dynamic system approach to the problem of radiative transfer inside scattering and absorbing media is presented, directly based on firsthand physical principles. This method, the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System (DRTS), calculates accurately the time evolution of photon propagation in media of complex structure and shape. DRTS employs a dynamical system formality using a global sparse matrix which characterizes the physical, optical and geometrical properties of the material volume of interest. The new system state vector is generated by the above time-independent matrix, using simple matrix vector multiplication addition for each subsequent time step. DRTS simulation results are presented for 3D light propagation in different optical media, demonstrating greatly reduced computational cost and resource requirements compared to other methods. Flexibility of the method allows the integration of time-dependent sources, boundary conditions, different media and several optical phenomena like reflection and ...

  19. Evaluation of the scattered radiation components produced in a gamma camera using Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo, Ivon Oramas, E-mail: ivonoramas67@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Technologies, Higher Institute of Applied Science and Technology (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: this paper presents a simulation for evaluation of the scattered radiation components produced in a gamma camera PARK using Monte Carlo code SIMIND. It simulates a whole body study with MDP (Methylene Diphosphonate) radiopharmaceutical based on Zubal anthropomorphic phantom, with some spinal lesions. Methods: the simulation was done by comparing 3 configurations for the detected photons. The corresponding energy spectra were obtained using Low Energy High Resolution collimator. The parameters related with the interactions and the fraction of events in the energy window, the simulated events of the spectrum and scatter events were calculated. Results: the simulation confirmed that the images without influence of scattering events have a higher number of valid recorded events and it improved the statistical quality of them. A comparison among different collimators was made. The parameters and detector energy spectrum were calculated for each simulation configuration with these collimators using {sup 99m}Tc. Conclusion: the simulation corroborated that LEHS collimator has higher sensitivity and HEHR collimator has lower sensitivity when they are used with low energy photons. (author)

  20. A MULTIPLE SCATTERING POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODEL: APPLICATION TO HD 189733b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopparla, Pushkar; Yung, Yuk L. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Natraj, Vijay; Swain, Mark R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA-JPL), Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhang, Xi [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Wiktorowicz, Sloane J., E-mail: pkk@gps.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We present a multiple scattering vector radiative transfer model that produces disk integrated, full phase polarized light curves for reflected light from an exoplanetary atmosphere. We validate our model against results from published analytical and computational models and discuss a small number of cases relevant to the existing and possible near-future observations of the exoplanet HD 189733b. HD 189733b is arguably the most well observed exoplanet to date and the only exoplanet to be observed in polarized light, yet it is debated if the planet’s atmosphere is cloudy or clear. We model reflected light from clear atmospheres with Rayleigh scattering, and cloudy or hazy atmospheres with Mie and fractal aggregate particles. We show that clear and cloudy atmospheres have large differences in polarized light as compared to simple flux measurements, though existing observations are insufficient to make this distinction. Futhermore, we show that atmospheres that are spatially inhomogeneous, such as being partially covered by clouds or hazes, exhibit larger contrasts in polarized light when compared to clear atmospheres. This effect can potentially be used to identify patchy clouds in exoplanets. Given a set of full phase polarimetric measurements, this model can constrain the geometric albedo, properties of scattering particles in the atmosphere, and the longitude of the ascending node of the orbit. The model is used to interpret new polarimetric observations of HD 189733b in a companion paper.

  1. Rayleigh scattering of Moessbauer radiation in oriented fibres of hydrated biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, G. [Parma Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Deriu, A. [Parma Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Cavatorta, F. [Parma Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Rupprecht, A. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry

    1995-03-01

    The Rayleigh scattering of Moessbauer radiation (RSMR) has been measured on films of highly oriented hydrated polynucleotides (A-NaDNA) and polysaccharides (Na-hyaluronate). Both DNA and hyaluronate (HA) have helical secondary structures with a similar pitch (28.2 A for A-DNA, and 32.8 A for Na-HA), but they differ in the basic elements which make up the helices and in the extent of water-biopolymer interactions. These differences are responsible for the diverse stiffness of the polymer backbone, and also affect the dynamics of the first hydration layers. For both samples the elastic scattering intensity shows a sharp peak at about 2 A{sup -1} only for samples oriented with Q parallel to the fibre direction. Its position is close to that of the first maximum in the structure factor of bulk water; it is, however, much narrower than in pure H{sub 2}O and it is similar to a crystalline Bragg peak. It can be attributed to an ordered structure of water along the double helices. From the temperature dependence of the elastic intensity under the peak maximum, the mean square displacement of water oxygens in the direction parallel to the helices has been deduced. The thermal diffuse scattering intensity is also peaked at the same Q values of the elastic intensity, indicating the presence of coherent vibrational excitations propagating along the ordered water filaments. (orig.)

  2. Radiation and scattering from cylindrically conformal printed antennas. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Microstrip patch antennas offer considerable advantages in terms of weight, aerodynamic drag, cost, flexibility, and observables over more conventional protruding antennas. These flat patch antennas were first proposed over thirty years ago by Deschamps in the United States and Gutton and Baisinot in France. Such antennas have been analyzed and developed for planar as well as curved platforms. However, the methods used in these designs employ gross approximations, suffer from extreme computational burden, or require expensive physical experiments. The goal of this thesis is to develop accurate and efficient numerical modeling techniques which represent actual antenna structures mounted on curved surfaces with a high degree of fidelity. In this thesis, the finite element method is extended to cavity-backed conformal antenna arrays embedded in a circular, metallic, infinite cylinder. Both the boundary integral and absorbing boundary mesh closure conditions will be used for terminating the mesh. These two approaches will be contrasted and used to study the scattering and radiation behavior of several useful antenna configurations. An important feature of this study will be to examine the effect of curvature and cavity size on the scattering and radiation properties of wraparound conformal antenna arrays.

  3. Resonant Scattering of Radiation Belt Electrons by Off-Equatorial Magnetosonic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Binbin; Zou, Zhengyang; Fu, Song; Cao, Xing; Gu, Xudong; Xiang, Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Fast magnetosonic (MS) waves are commonly regarded as electromagnetic waves that are characteristically confined within ±3° of the geomagnetic equator. We report two typical off-equatorial MS events observed by Van Allen Probes, that is, the 8 May 2014 event that occurred at the geomagnetic latitudes of 7.5°-9.2° both inside and outside the plasmasphere with the wave amplitude up to 590 pT and the 9 January 2014 event that occurred at the latitudes of—(15.7°-17.5°) outside the plasmasphere with a smaller amplitude about 81 pT. Detailed test particle simulations quantify the electron resonant scattering rates by the off-equatorial MS waves to find that they can cause the pitch angle scattering and momentum diffusion of radiation belt electrons with equatorial pitch angles belt electron butterfly distributions for a broad energy range from 100 keV to >1 MeV within an hour. Our study clearly demonstrates that the presence of off-equatorial MS waves, in addition to equatorial MS waves, can contribute importantly to the dynamical variations of radiation belt electron fluxes and their pitch angle distribution.

  4. Bounce Resonance Scattering of Radiation Belt Electrons by Low-Frequency Hiss: Comparison With Cyclotron and Landau Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Summers, Danny; Zou, Zhengyang; Fu, Song; Zhang, Wenxun

    2017-10-01

    Bounce resonant interactions with magnetospheric waves have been proposed as an important contributing mechanism for scattering near-equatorially mirroring electrons by violating the second adiabatic invariant associated with the electron bounce motion along a geomagnetic field line. This study demonstrates that low-frequency plasmaspheric hiss with significant wave power below 100 Hz can bounce resonate efficiently with radiation belt electrons. By performing quantitative calculations of pitch angle scattering rates, we show that low-frequency hiss-induced bounce resonant scattering of electrons has a strong dependence on equatorial pitch angle αeq. For electrons with αeq close to 90°, the timescale associated with bounce resonance scattering can be comparable to or even less than 1 h. Cyclotron and Landau resonant interactions between low-frequency hiss and electrons are also investigated for comparisons. It is found that while the bounce and Landau resonances are responsible for the diffusive transport of near-equatorially mirroring electrons to lower αeq, pitch angle scattering by cyclotron resonance could take over to further diffuse electrons into the atmosphere. Bounce resonance provides a more efficient pitch angle scattering mechanism of relativistic (≥1 MeV) electrons than Landau resonance due to the stronger scattering rates and broader resonance coverage of αeq, thereby demonstrating that bounce resonance scattering by low-frequency hiss can contribute importantly to the evolution of the electron pitch angle distribution and the loss of radiation belt electrons.

  5. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongoh [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungho [Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Weonkuu; Jahng, Geonho; Kim, Dongwook [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  6. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon; Shin, Dongoh; Park, Sungho; Chung, Weon Kuu; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  7. Neutron and photon scattering properties of high density concretes used in radiation therapy facilities: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbahi, Asghar; Khaldari, Rezvan

    2017-09-01

    In the current study the neutron and photon scattering properties of some newly developed high density concretes (HDCs) were calculated by using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Five high-density concretes including Steel-Magnetite, Barite, Datolite-Galena, Ilmenite-ilmenite, Magnetite-Lead with the densities ranging from 5.11 g/cm3 and ordinary concrete with density of 2.3 g/cm3 were studied in our simulations. The photon beam spectra of 4 and 18 MV from Varian linac and neutron spectra of clinical 18 MeV photon beam was used for calculations. The fluence of scattered photon and neutron from all studied concretes was calculated in different angles. Overall, the ordinary concrete showed higher scattered photons and Datolite-Galena concrete (4.42 g/cm3) had the lowest scattered photons among all studied concretes. For neutron scattering, fluence at the angle of 180 was higher relative to other angles while for photons scattering fluence was maximum at 90 degree. The scattering fluence for photons and neutrons was dependent on the angle and composition of concrete. The results showed that the fluence of scattered photons and neutrons changes with the composition of high density concrete. Also, for high density concretes, the variation of scattered fluence with angle was very pronounced for neutrons but it changed slightly for photons. The results can be used for design of radiation therapy bunkers.

  8. A Platform for X-Ray Thomson Scattering Measurements of Radiation Hydrodynamics Experiments on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Heath; Ma, Kevin; Belancourt, Patrick; MacDonald, Michael; Doeppner, Tilo; Keiter, Paul; Kuranz, Carolyn

    2017-10-01

    A recent experiment on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) radiographed the evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability under high and low drive cases. This experiment showed that under a high drive the growth rate of the RT instability is reduced relative to the low drive case. The high drive launches a radiative shock, increases the temperature of the post-shock region, and ablates the spikes, which reduces the RT growth rate. The plasma parameters must be measured to validate this claim. We present a target design for making X-Ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) measurements on radiation hydrodynamics experiments on NIF to measure the electron temperature of the shocked region in the above cases. Specifically, we show that a previously fielded NIF radiation hydrodynamics platform can be modified to allow sufficient signal and temperature resolution for XRTS measurements. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0002956 and the National Science Foundation through the Basic Plasma Science and Engineering program.

  9. Electromagnetic cloak to restore the antenna radiation patterns affected by nearby scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teperik, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatiana.teperik@u-psud.fr [Univ. Paris-Sud, Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, UMR 8622, Orsay F-91405 (France); Donostia International Physics Center, Aptdo. 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Lustrac, André de [Univ. Paris-Sud, Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, UMR 8622, Orsay F-91405 (France); Univ. Paris-Ouest, 92410 Ville d’Avray (France)

    2015-12-15

    We have theoretically verified the feasibility of the concept of mantle cloak for very high frequency (VHF) antenna communications. While the applicability of the concept has been demonstrated for an infinitely long cylindrical obstacle and infinitely long electric source [Y.R. Padooru, A.B. Yakovlev, and P.-Y. Chen and Andrea Alù, J. Appl. Phys., 112, 104902, (2012)], the use of this cloak in realistic conditions is not straightforward. In this paper as an electric source we consider a typical VHF monopole antenna mounted on ground plane together with a metallic cylindrical obstacle. The both ground plane and obstacle affect the antenna radiation scattering. Nevertheless, we could show that the mantle cloak can bee successfully applied to restore the radiation patterns of antenna even when the source, the cylindrical metallic obstacle, and the ground plane have finite length. We have studied the antenna adaptation in the presence of the cloaked obstacle and found that the complete radiation system is still functional in the bandwidth that is reduced only by 11%.

  10. Resonant absorption of electromagnetic radiation in a quantum channel due to the scattering of electrons by impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpunin, V. V.; Margulis, V. A.

    2017-06-01

    We have found an analytical expression for the absorption coefficient of electromagnetic radiation in a quantum channel with a parabolic confinement potential. The calculation has been performed using the second-order perturbation theory taking into account the scattering of a quasi-one-dimensional electron gas by ionized impurities. We have analyzed the dependences of the absorption coefficient on the frequency of the electromagnetic radiation and the magnetic field. The appearance of additional resonant peaks, which are caused by scattering by impurities, has been found.

  11. Small-angle Thomson scattering of ultrafast laser pulses for bright, sub-100-fs x-ray radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelin Li

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a scheme for bright sub-100-fs x-ray radiation generation using small-angle Thomson scattering. Coupling high-brightness electron bunches with high-power ultrafast laser pulses, radiation with photon energies between 8 and 40 keV can be generated with pulse duration comparable to that of the incoming laser pulse and with peak spectral brightness close to that of the third-generation synchrotron light sources of ∼10^{20} photons s^{-1} mm^{-2} mrad^{-2} per 10^{-3} bandwidth. A preliminary dynamic calculation is performed to understand the property of this novel scattering scheme with relativistic laser intensities.

  12. Experimental study of TJ-1 plasma using scattering and radiation emission techniques; Analisis experimental del plasma TJ-1 con tecnicas de scattering y emision de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, C.; Zurro, B.

    1987-07-01

    The Thomson scattering system of TJ-1 is described in detail. The radial profiles of Te and ne obtained in TJ-1 discharges are presented. This data make possible to deduce characteristic parameters of the plasma confinement in this machine, as energy confinement times, Zeff B. Using also radiation measurements (global and in the visible range) we obtained the particle confinement time and Zeff without non experimental assumptions. (Author) 52 refs.

  13. Combined Helmholtz Integral Equation - Fourier series formulation of acoustical radiation and scattering problems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fedotov, I

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available OF THE METHOD Helmholtz integral equation for the radiation-scattering steady-state acoustic field could be written as follows: ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ), , 4 in QA g P Q C P P Q g P Q V Q dA P n pi  ∂ ⋅Φ = ⋅Φ + ⋅ + ⋅ Ψ ∂  ∫ (1... and Q ; ( ), Q g P Q n ∂ ∂ - normal outer derivative of the Green function; ( )C P - coefficient, depending on location of point P , which is equal to 4pi , if P is in outer space of the surface; 0, if P is inside the surface. In general case...

  14. Efficient combination of acceleration techniques applied to high frequency methods for solving radiation and scattering problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Lorena; Algar, Ma Jesús; García, Eliseo; González, Iván; Cátedra, Felipe

    2017-12-01

    An improved ray-tracing method applied to high-frequency techniques such as the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD) is presented. The main goal is to increase the speed of the analysis of complex structures while considering a vast number of observation directions and taking into account multiple bounces. The method is based on a combination of the Angular Z-Buffer (AZB), the Space Volumetric Partitioning (SVP) algorithm and the A∗ heuristic search method to treat multiple bounces. In addition, a Master Point strategy was developed to analyze efficiently a large number of Near-Field points or Far-Field directions. This technique can be applied to electromagnetic radiation problems, scattering analysis, propagation at urban or indoor environments and to the mutual coupling between antennas. Due to its efficiency, its application is suitable to study large antennas radiation patterns and even its interactions with complex environments, including satellites, ships, aircrafts, cities or another complex electrically large bodies. The new technique appears to be extremely efficient at these applications even when considering multiple bounces.

  15. Scattering effect in radiative heat transfer during selective laser sintering of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Boutaous, M'hamed; Xin, Shihe

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an accurate model to simulate the selective laser sintering (SLS) process, in order to understand the multiple phenomena occurring in the material and to study the influence of each parameter on the quality of the sintered parts. A numerical model, coupling radiative and conductive heat transfers in a polymer powder bed providing a local temperature field, is proposed. To simulate the polymer sintering by laser heating as in additive manufacturing, a double-lines scanning of a laser beam over a thin layer of polymer powder is studied. An effective volumetric heat source, using a modified Monte Carlo method, is estimated from laser radiation scattering and absorption in a semi-transparent polymer powder bed. In order to quantify the laser-polymer interaction, the heating and cooling of the material is modeled and simulated with different types heat sources by both finite elements method (FEM) and discrete elements method (DEM). To highlight the importance of introducing a semi-transparent behavior of such materials and in order to validate our model, the results are compared with works taken from the literature.

  16. Automated Computer-Based Facility for Measurement of Near-Field Structure of Microwave Radiators and Scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Shantnu R.;; Pavlasek, Tomas J. F.;; Muresan, Letitia V.

    1980-01-01

    An automatic facility for measuring the three-dimensional structure of the near fields of microwave radiators and scatterers is described. The amplitude and phase for different polarization components can be recorded in analog and digital form using a microprocessor-based system. The stored data...

  17. Separation of radiated sound field components from waves scattered by a source under non-anechoic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    A method of estimating the sound field radiated by a source under non-anechoic conditions has been examined. The method uses near field acoustic holography based on a combination of pressure and particle velocity measurements in a plane near the source for separating outgoing and ingoing wave...... components. The outgoing part of the sound field is composed of both radiated and scattered waves. The method compensates for the scattered components of the outgoing field on the basis of the boundary condition of the problem, exploiting the fact that the sound field is reconstructed very close...... to the source. Thus the radiated free-field component is estimated simultaneously with solving the inverse problem of reconstructing the sound field near the source. The method is particularly suited to cases in which the overall contribution of reflected sound in the measurement plane is significant....

  18. Correlation between scatter radiation dose at the height of the operators eye and dose to patient for different angiographies projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyton, F.; Nogueira, M. S.; Da Silva, T. A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Post-graduation in Sciences and Technology of Radiations, Minerals and Materials, Pte. Antonio Carlos No. 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Gubolino, L.; Pivetta, M. R. [Hospital dos Fornecedores de Cana de Piracicaba, Av. Barao de Valenca 616, 13405-233 Piracicaba (Brazil); Ubeda, C., E-mail: leyton.fernando@gmail.com [Tarapaca University, Health Sciences Faculty, Radiological Sciences Center, Av. Gral. Velasquez 1775, 1000007 Arica, Arica and Parinacota (Chile)

    2015-10-15

    Cases of radiation induced cataract among cardiology professionals have been reported in studies. In view of evidence of radiation injuries, the ICRP recommends limiting the radiation dose to the lens to 20 mSv per year for occupational exposure. The aim of this works was to report scattered radiation doses at the height of the operators eye in an interventional cardiology facility from procedures performed without use of radiation protection devices, correlated with different angiographic projections and operational modes. Measurements were made in a cardiac laboratory with an angiography X-ray system GE equipped with flat-panel detector. PMMA plates of 30 x 30 x 5 cm were used to simulate a patient with a thickness of 20 cm. Two fluoroscopy modes (low and normal, 15 frame/s), cine mode 15 frame/s. Four angiographic projections anterior posterior (Ap), lateral (Lat), left anterior oblique caudal (spider) and left anterior oblique cranial (Lao-45/cra-30) and a cardiac protocol for patient between 70 to 90 kg was used. Measurements of phantom entrance doses rate and scatter doses rate were performed with two Unfors Xi plus. The detector measuring scatter radiation was positioned at the usual distance of the cardiologists eyes during working conditions (1 m from the isocenter and 1.7 m from the floor). There is a good linear correlation between the kerma-area product and scatter dose at the lens. An experimental correlation factor of 2.3; 12.0; 12.2 and 17.6 μSv/Gy cm{sup 2} were found for the Ap, Lao/cra, spider and Lat projections, respectively. The entrance dose of PMMA for fluoroscopy low, medium and cine was 13, 39 and 282 mGy/min, respectively to Ap. (Author)

  19. Polarized radiative transfer through terrestrial atmosphere accounting for rotational Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Luca; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper is devoted to the phenomenological derivation of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) accounting for first-order source terms of rotational Raman scattering (RRS), which is responsible for the in-filling of Fraunhofer and telluric lines by inelastic scattered photons. The implementation of the solution of the VRTE within the framework of the forward-adjoint method is given. For the Ca II and the oxygen A-band (O2 A) spectral windows, values of reflectance, degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and in-filling, in zenith and nadir geometry, are compared with results given in literature. Moreover, the dependence of these quantities on the columnar loading and vertical layering of non-spherical dust aerosols is investigated, together with their changes as function of two habits of ice crystals, modeled as regular icosahedra and severely rough aggregated columns. Bi-directional effects of an underlying polarizing surface are accounted for. The forward simulations are performed for one selected wavelength in the continuum and one in the strong absorption of the O2 A, as their combination can be exploited for the spaceborne retrieval of aerosol and cloud properties. For this reason, we also mimic seasonal maps of reflectance, DOLP and in-filling, that are prototypical measurements of the Ultraviolet-Visible-Near Infrared (UVN) sensor, at a nominal spectral resolution of 0.12 nm. UVN is the core payload of the upcoming European Sentinel-4 mission, that will observe Europe in geostationary orbit for air quality monitoring purposes. In general, in the core of O2 A, depending on the optical thickness and altitude of the scatterers, we find RRS-induced in-filling values ranging from 1.3% to 1.8%, while DOLP decreases by 1%. Conversely, while negligible differences of RRS in-filling are calculated with different ice crystal habits, the severely rough aggregated column model can reduce DOLP by a factor up to 10%. The UVN maps of in-filling show values varying

  20. [Experimental determination of radiation scattering and absorption coefficients in a homogeneous layer of highly-dispersive biological medium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, A A; Masloboev, Iu P; Selishchev, S V; Tereshchenko, S A

    2006-01-01

    A method for experimental determination of optical characteristics of a highly-dispersive medium (radiation scattering and absorption coefficients) is described. The method is based on two mathematical models of ultrashort laser pulse propagation through a highly-dispersive medium (HDM), an axial model and a diffusion model. Milk dissolved in water was used as HDM. Dependences of optical characteristics of HDM on the concentration of milk in water are obtained. The limits of applicability of the axial and diffusion models to media with different scattering and absorption characteristics are determined.

  1. Evidence that pitch angle scattering is an important loss mechanism for energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, W.; Mcilwain, C.; Mogro-Campero, A.; Steinberg, G.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of data from the Pioneer 10 flyby discloses that pitch angle scattering plays an important part in determining the distribution of energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. Angular distributions measured by a Cerenkov detector reveal that redistribution takes place in pitch angle. Additionally, the radial profile of phase space density along the equator demands simultaneous particle losses. The loss rates are too high to be accounted for by synchrotron radiation loss, but are reasonably attributed to pitch angle scattering into the planetary loss cone.

  2. Peculiarities of diffuse synchrotron radiation scattering in the SBN-60 single crystal at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey А. Bosak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of Sr0.6Ba0.4Nb2O6 (SBN-60 crystal structure at room temperature and at the zero applied electric field has been carried out by synchrotron radiation scattering. The wavelength of incident X-rays was λ = 0.7749 Å, the Δλ/λ value was ≈2 × 10−4. The two-dimensional distributions of diffuse and elastic intensities were obtained and analyzed in the several cross-sections: (H K 0, (H K 1/2, (H K 1, (H K 2, (H 0 L and (H H L. As a result, it was shown the coexistence of two different types of ordering with different correlation lengths and various correlation functions: the first type is described by squared Lorentzian and the second one – by Lorentzian. The first component is characterized by the correlation lengths ξ(1ab ≈ 10 nm and ξ(1c ≈ 15 nm, the second one is with ξ(2ab ≈ 3 nm and ξ(2c ≈ 25 nm.

  3. Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-03-03

    We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

  4. A Fast Hybrid (3-D/1-D) Model for Thermal Radiative Transfer in Cirrus via Successive Orders of Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Davis, Anthony B.; Cornet, Celine; Szczap, Frederic; Platnick, Steven; Dubuisson, Philippe; Thieuleux, Francois

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneity on the direct emission by cloud or surface and on the scattering by ice particles in the thermal infrared (TIR). Realistic 3-D cirri are modeled with the 3DCLOUD code, and top-of-atmosphere radiances are simulated by the 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) algorithm 3DMCPOL for two (8.65 micrometers and 12.05 micrometers) channels of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer on CALIPSO. At nadir, comparisons of 1-D and 3-D RT show that 3-D radiances are larger than their 1-D counterparts for direct emission but smaller for scattered radiation. For our cirrus cases, 99% of the 3-D total radiance is computed by the third scattering order, which corresponds to 90% of the total computational effort, but larger optical thicknesses need more scattering orders. To radically accelerate the 3-D RT computations (using only few percent of 3-D RT time with a Monte Carlo code), even in the presence of large optical depths, we develop a hybrid model based on exact 3-D direct emission, the first scattering order from 1-D in each homogenized column, and an empirical adjustment linearly dependent on the optical thickness to account for higher scattering orders. Good agreement is found between the hybrid model and the exact 3-D radiances for two very different cirrus models without changing the empirical parameters. We anticipate that a future deterministic implementation of the hybrid model will be fast enough to process multiangle thermal imagery in a practical tomographic reconstruction of 3-D cirrus fields.

  5. Confluent Heun functions and the physics of black holes: Resonant frequencies, Hawking radiation and scattering of scalar waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, H.S., E-mail: horacio.santana.vieira@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Centro de Ciências, Tecnologia e Saúde, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, CEP 58233-000, Araruna, PB (Brazil); Bezerra, V.B., E-mail: valdir@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    We apply the confluent Heun functions to study the resonant frequencies (quasispectrum), the Hawking radiation and the scattering process of scalar waves, in a class of spacetimes, namely, the ones generated by a Kerr–Newman–Kasuya spacetime (dyon black hole) and a Reissner–Nordström black hole surrounded by a magnetic field (Ernst spacetime). In both spacetimes, the solutions for the angular and radial parts of the corresponding Klein–Gordon equations are obtained exactly, for massive and massless fields, respectively. The special cases of Kerr and Schwarzschild black holes are analyzed and the solutions obtained, as well as in the case of a Schwarzschild black hole surrounded by a magnetic field. In all these special situations, the resonant frequencies, Hawking radiation and scattering are studied. - Highlights: • Charged massive scalar field in the dyon black hole and massless scalar field in the Ernst spacetime are analyzed. • The confluent Heun functions are applied to obtain the solution of the Klein–Gordon equation. • The resonant frequencies are obtained. • The Hawking radiation and the scattering process of scalar waves are examined.

  6. Scattering and emission from inhomogeneous vegetation canopy and alien target beneath by using three-dimensional vector radiative transfer (3D-VRT) equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Yaqiu [Center for Wave Scattering and Remote Sensing, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)]. E-mail: yqjin@fundan.ac.cn; Liang Zichang [Center for Wave Scattering and Remote Sensing, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2005-05-15

    To solve the 3D-VRT equation for the model of spatially inhomogeneous scatter media, the finite enclosure of the scatter media is geometrically divided, in both vertical z and transversal (x,y) directions, to form very thin multi-boxes. The zeroth order emission, first-order Mueller matrix of each thin box and an iterative approach of high-order radiative transfer are applied to derive high-order scattering and emission of whole inhomogeneous scatter media. Numerical results of polarized brightness temperature at microwave frequency and under different radiometer resolutions from inhomogeneous scatter model such as vegetation canopy and alien target beneath canopy are simulated and discussed.

  7. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Radiative Transfer Equation: Temperature and Gas Mixing Ratio Weighting Functions for Remote Sensing of Scattering Atmospheres in Thermal IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E.

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis based on using of the adjoint equation of radiative transfer is applied to the case of atmospheric remote sensing in the thermal spectral region with non-negligeable atmospheric scattering.

  8. Effect of Protective Lead Curtains on Scattered Radiation Exposure to the Operator During Ureteroscopy for Stone Disease: A Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takaaki; Komemushi, Atsushi; Murota, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Taguchi, Makoto; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate a reduction in the total radiation dose to the operator during ureteroscopy (URS) for stone disease by using protective lead curtains. Two studies were planned to compare scattered radiation doses without (nonprotective lead curtain [n-LC] group) and with protective lead curtains (lead curtain [LC] group). In study 1, we measured the spatial distribution of the scattered radiation dose using a human phantom simulating URS for stone management for both groups. In study 2, we prospectively randomized patients undergoing treatment for stone disease with URS into n-LC (n = 62) and LC (n = 61) groups. Scattered radiation doses to the operator during URS were recorded. The primary end point was a reduction in the effective dose to the operator. In study 1, there was an 80% reduction in dose at the operator area between the n-LC and the LC groups. In study 2, the mean effective doses to the operator in the n-LC and the LC groups were 0.33 ± 0.85 and 0.08 ± 0.08 µSv (P = .003). The mean doses measured at the neck and waist outside of the lead apron and at the chest inside the lead apron in the n-LC and the LC groups were 2.22 ± 4.56 vs 0.84 ± 0.7 µSv (P = .008), 5.48 ± 12.4 vs 0.76 ± 0.89 µSv (P = .001), and 0.10 ± 0.47 vs 0.00 ± 0.00 µSv (P = .001), respectively. These curtains are useful for protecting the operator from scattered radiation, resulting in a reduction of the total radiation exposure for surgeons performing URS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Combined small angle X-ray solution scattering with atomic force microscopy for characterizing radiation damage on biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luca; Andriatis, Alexander; Brennich, Martha; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Chen, Shu-Wen W; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Round, Adam

    2016-10-27

    Synchrotron radiation facilities are pillars of modern structural biology. Small-Angle X-ray scattering performed at synchrotron sources is often used to characterize the shape of biological macromolecules. A major challenge with high-energy X-ray beam on such macromolecules is the perturbation of sample due to radiation damage. By employing atomic force microscopy, another common technique to determine the shape of biological macromolecules when deposited on flat substrates, we present a protocol to evaluate and characterize consequences of radiation damage. It requires the acquisition of images of irradiated samples at the single molecule level in a timely manner while using minimal amounts of protein. The protocol has been tested on two different molecular systems: a large globular tetremeric enzyme (β-Amylase) and a rod-shape plant virus (tobacco mosaic virus). Radiation damage on the globular enzyme leads to an apparent increase in molecular sizes whereas the effect on the long virus is a breakage into smaller pieces resulting in a decrease of the average long-axis radius. These results show that radiation damage can appear in different forms and strongly support the need to check the effect of radiation damage at synchrotron sources using the presented protocol.

  10. A practical cone-beam CT scatter correction method with optimized Monte Carlo simulations for image-guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Bai, Ti; Yan, Hao; Ouyang, Luo; Pompos, Arnold; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-05-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) has become the standard image guidance tool for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy. However, due to its large illumination field, scattered photons severely degrade its image quality. While kernel-based scatter correction methods have been used routinely in the clinic, it is still desirable to develop Monte Carlo (MC) simulation-based methods due to their accuracy. However, the high computational burden of the MC method has prevented routine clinical application. This paper reports our recent development of a practical method of MC-based scatter estimation and removal for CBCT. In contrast with conventional MC approaches that estimate scatter signals using a scatter-contaminated CBCT image, our method used a planning CT image for MC simulation, which has the advantages of accurate image intensity and absence of image truncation. In our method, the planning CT was first rigidly registered with the CBCT. Scatter signals were then estimated via MC simulation. After scatter signals were removed from the raw CBCT projections, a corrected CBCT image was reconstructed. The entire workflow was implemented on a GPU platform for high computational efficiency. Strategies such as projection denoising, CT image downsampling, and interpolation along the angular direction were employed to further enhance the calculation speed. We studied the impact of key parameters in the workflow on the resulting accuracy and efficiency, based on which the optimal parameter values were determined. Our method was evaluated in numerical simulation, phantom, and real patient cases. In the simulation cases, our method reduced mean HU errors from 44 to 3 HU and from 78 to 9 HU in the full-fan and the half-fan cases, respectively. In both the phantom and the patient cases, image artifacts caused by scatter, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area, were reduced. With all the techniques employed, we achieved computation time of less than 30 s including the

  11. Study of electron densities of normal and neoplastic human breast tissues by Compton scattering using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C. [Departamento de Fisica-Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Fisica-Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Electron densities of 33 samples of normal (adipose and fibroglangular) and neoplastic (benign and malignant) human breast tissues were determined through Compton scattering data using a monochromatic synchrotron radiation source and an energy dispersive detector. The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of the samples. Adipose tissue exhibits the lowest values of electron density whereas malignant tissue the highest. The relationship with their histology was discussed. Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron density of normal and neoplastic breast tissues was measured using Compton scattering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used to obtain the Compton scattering data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose tissue shows the lowest electron density values whereas the malignant tissue the highest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%.

  12. COHERENCE PROPERTIES OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , COHERENT SCATTERING), (*COHERENT SCATTERING, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), LIGHT, INTERFERENCE, INTENSITY, STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS, QUANTUM THEORY, BOSONS, INTERFEROMETERS, CHINA

  13. Scatter radiation breast exposure during head CT: impact of scanning conditions and anthropometric parameters on shielded and unshielded breast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasic, B. [Hospital for pulmonary diseases, Zagreb (Croatia); Knezevic, Z.; Vekic, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Brnic, Z.; Novacic, K. [Merkur Univ. Hospital, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Constantly increasing clinical requests for CT scanning of the head on our facility continue to raise concern regarding radiation exposure of patients, especially radiosensitive tissues positioned close to the scanning plane. The aim of our prospective study was to estimate scatter radiation doses to the breast from routine head CT scans, both with and without use of lead shielding, and to establish influence of various technical and anthropometric factors on doses using statistical data analysis. In 85 patient referred to head CT for objective medical reasons, one breast was covered with lead apron during CT scanning. Radiation doses were measured at skin of both breasts and over the apron simultaneously, by the use of thermo luminescent dosimeters. The doses showed a mean reduction by 37% due to lead shielding. After we statistically analyzed our data, we observed significant correlation between under-the-shield dose and values of technical parameters. We used multiple linear regression model to describe the relationships of doses to unshielded and shielded breast respectively, with anthropometric and technical factors. Our study proved lead shielding of the breast to be effective, easy to use and leading to a significant reduction in scatter dose. (author)

  14. RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELING OF THE ENIGMATIC SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN THE SOLAR Na i D{sub 1} LINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belluzzi, Luca [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, CH-6605 Locarno Monti (Switzerland); Bueno, Javier Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Degl’Innocenti, Egidio Landi [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    The modeling of the peculiar scattering polarization signals observed in some diagnostically important solar resonance lines requires the consideration of the detailed spectral structure of the incident radiation field as well as the possibility of ground level polarization, along with the atom's hyperfine structure and quantum interference between hyperfine F-levels pertaining either to the same fine structure J-level, or to different J-levels of the same term. Here we present a theoretical and numerical approach suitable for solving this complex non-LTE radiative transfer problem. This approach is based on the density-matrix metalevel theory (where each level is viewed as a continuous distribution of sublevels) and on accurate formal solvers of the transfer equations and efficient iterative methods. We show an application to the D-lines of Na i, with emphasis on the enigmatic D{sub 1} line, pointing out the observable signatures of the various physical mechanisms considered. We demonstrate that the linear polarization observed in the core of the D{sub 1} line may be explained by the effect that one gets when the detailed spectral structure of the anisotropic radiation responsible for the optical pumping is taken into account. This physical ingredient is capable of introducing significant scattering polarization in the core of the Na i D{sub 1} line without the need for ground-level polarization.

  15. On the intensity and polarization of radiation emerging from a thick Rayleigh scattering atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Natraj

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We compute the intensity and polarization of reflected and transmitted light in optically thick Rayleigh scattering atmospheres. We obtain results accurate to seven decimal places. The results have been validated using a variety of methods.

  16. Switchable directional scattering of electromagnetic radiation with subwavelength asymmetric silicon dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albella, Pablo; Shibanuma, Toshihiko; Maier, Stefan A

    2015-12-10

    High refractive index dielectric nanoparticles show high promise as a complementary nanophotonics platform due to compared with plasmonic nanostructures low absorption losses and the co-existence of magnetic and electric resonances. Here we explore their use as resonantly enhanced directional scatterers. We theoretically demonstrate that an asymmetric dimer of silicon nanoparticles shows tuneable directional scattering depending on the frequency of excitation. This is due to the interference between electric and magnetic dipoles excited in each nanoparticle, enabling directional control of the scattered light. Interestingly, this control can be achieved regardless of the polarization direction with respect to the dimer axis; however, difference in the polarization can shift the wavelengths at which the directional scattering is achieved. We also explore the application of such an asymmetric nanoantenna as a tuneable routing element in a nanometer scale, suggesting applications in optical nanocircuitry.

  17. Thomson scattering laser-electron X-ray source for reduction of patient radiation dose in interventional coronary angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukov, I. A.; Dyachkov, N. V.; Feshchenko, R. M.; Polunina, A. V.; Popov, N. L.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    It was medical applications that stimulated F. Carrol in the early 1990s to start the research of on relativistic Thomson scattering X-ray sources, as a part of the infrastructure of the future society. The possibility to use such a source in interventional cardiology is discussed in this paper. The replacement of X-ray tube by relativistic Thomson scattering Xray source is predicted to lower the patient radiation dose by a factor of 3 while image quality remains the same. The required general characteristics of accelerator and laser units are found. They can be reached by existing technology. A semiempirical method for simulation of medical and technical parameters of interventional coronary angiography systems is suggested.

  18. TECHNIQUE OF ESTIMATE OF ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT LASER RADIATION IN BORON DOPED DIAMONDS BY INTENSITY OF RAMAN SCATTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Poklonskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of measurements of Raman scattering at the room temperature in air in boron doped synthetic diamonds (five with boron concentrations 2·1017; 6·1017; 2·1018; 1,7·1019; 1·1020 cm–3 and one intentionally undoped are presented. The laser with wavelength 532 nm was used for Raman scattering excitation. Dependences of integral intensity and halfwidth of diamond Raman line with respect to the doping level are presented. In the geometrical optics approximation an expression for doped to undoped integral intensity ratio is obtained. Qualitative estimates of conductivity of the studied samples are conducted. The obtained results can be applied for mapping of near-surface laser radiation absorption coefficient of synthetic single crystal diamonds and for their quality control.

  19. Three-dimensional simulation of the Ring effect in observations of scattered sun light using Monte Carlo radiative transfer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Deutschmann

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a new technique for the quantitative simulation of the "Ring effect" for scattered light observations from various platforms and under different atmospheric situations. The method is based on radiative transfer calculations at only one wavelength λ0 in the wavelength range under consideration, and is thus computationally fast. The strength of the Ring effect is calculated from statistical properties of the photon paths for a given situation, which makes Monte Carlo radiative transfer models in particular appropriate. We quantify the Ring effect by the so called rotational Raman scattering probability, the probability that an observed photon has undergone a rotational Raman scattering event. The Raman scattering probability is independent from the spectral resolution of the instrument and can easily be converted into various definitions used to characterise the strength of the Ring effect. We compare the results of our method to the results of previous studies and in general good quantitative agreement is found. In addition to the simulation of the Ring effect, we developed a detailed retrieval strategy for the analysis of the Ring effect based on DOAS retrievals, which allows the precise determination of the strength of the Ring effect for a specific wavelength while using the spectral information within a larger spectral interval around the selected wavelength. Using our technique, we simulated synthetic satellite observation of an atmospheric scenario with a finite cloud illuminated from different sun positions. The strength of the Ring effect depends systematically on the measurement geometry, and is strongest if the satellite points to the side of the cloud which lies in the shadow of the sun.

  20. Iterative solution of multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics using the BL-QMR algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Finite-element discretizations of time-harmonic acoustic wave problems in exterior domains result in large sparse systems of linear equations with complex symmetric coefficient matrices. In many situations, these matrix problems need to be solved repeatedly for different right-hand sides, but with the same coefficient matrix. For instance, multiple right-hand sides arise in radiation problems due to multiple load cases, and also in scattering problems when multiple angles of incidence of an incoming plane wave need to be considered. In this talk, we discuss the iterative solution of multiple linear systems arising in radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics by means of a complex symmetric variant of the BL-QMR method. First, we summarize the governing partial differential equations for time-harmonic structural acoustics, the finite-element discretization of these equations, and the resulting complex symmetric matrix problem. Next, we sketch the special version of BL-QMR method that exploits complex symmetry, and we describe the preconditioners we have used in conjunction with BL-QMR. Finally, we report some typical results of our extensive numerical tests to illustrate the typical convergence behavior of BL-QMR method for multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics, to identify appropriate preconditioners for these problems, and to demonstrate the importance of deflation in block Krylov-subspace methods. Our numerical results show that the multiple systems arising in structural acoustics can be solved very efficiently with the preconditioned BL-QMR method. In fact, for multiple systems with up to 40 and more different right-hand sides we get consistent and significant speed-ups over solving the systems individually.

  1. Evaluation of the scattered radiations of lead and lead-free aprons in diagnostic radiology by MCNPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebi, Mansour; Shooli, Fatemeh Shekoohi; Saeedi-Moghadam, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few years, because of high attenuation and lightweight, non-toxic, lead-free aprons (LFAs) have been replaced by lead aprons (LAs). Lots of studies declared that this fact was based on the interactions of diagnostic X-ray with material such as the photoelectric effect (PE) and Compton scattering. These studies have demonstrated that in these types of aprons, due to the presence of different K-edge absorption, PE has a wide absorption in various metals with divers K-edges. The measurement geometry in most of these studies was narrow beam geometry, i.e. a collimated source and a collimated detector with a large source-detector distance. The present study intended to evaluate the attenuation of radiology scattered radiations in LAs and LFAs in both narrow and broad beam geometries, which is a more realistic situation, in order to check whether or not the higher attenuation is valid. In this study, a lead apron contains (Pb + EPV) and two non-lead compounds of (W + Sn + EPVC) with different weight percent (Wt%) were evaluated in the energy range of diagnostic radiology (100 kVp). The MCNPX code was applied to simulate broad - and narrow-beam measurement geometries. The evaluations have been performed in three situations: 1st) the same density thickness of LA and LFAs 2nd) same line thickness of LA and LFAs 3rd) considering the thickness of LFAs which has the same attenuation with LAs i.e. lead equivalent thickness for LFAs in the narrow beam. Finally, the x-ray transmission ratio (I/I_0) of LAs and LFAs was compared in 100 kVp for three mentioned conditions. Our results indicated that LFAs had more radiation attenuation rather than LA in the 1st and 2nd conditions with both geometries. However, LFAs had lower attenuation in comparison to LAs in the 3rd condition with broad beam geometry. More importantly, the transmission ratio (I/I_0) of LFAs in the broad beam condition was more significant than LA. The scattered radiations produced by LFAs are more than

  2. Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation by Apertures: II. Oblique Incidence on the Slotted Plane for Parallel Polarization,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report is the second in a series of investigations into the diffraction of electromagnetic radiation by apertures in conducting screens. Herein...is presented a technique for obtaining the fields everywhere for plane electromagnetic radiation incident obliquely on a slotted conducting plane. The

  3. Limiting radiation damage for high-brilliance biological solution scattering: practical experience at the EMBL P12 beamline PETRAIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Cy M; Graewert, Melissa A; Svergun, Dmitri I; Blanchet, Clément E

    2015-03-01

    Radiation damage is the general curse of structural biologists who use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate biological macromolecules in solution. The EMBL-P12 biological SAXS beamline located at the PETRAIII storage ring (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) caters to an extensive user community who integrate SAXS into their diverse structural biology programs. The high brilliance of the beamline [5.1 × 10(12) photons s(-1), 10 keV, 500 (H) µm × 250 (V) µm beam size at the sample position], combined with automated sample handling and data acquisition protocols, enable the high-throughput structural characterization of macromolecules in solution. However, considering the often-significant resources users invest to prepare samples, it is crucial that simple and effective protocols are in place to limit the effects of radiation damage once it has been detected. Here various practical approaches are evaluated that users can implement to limit radiation damage at the P12 beamline to maximize the chances of collecting quality data from radiation sensitive samples.

  4. The differentiation between malignant and non-malignant breast tissues using elastic and inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Elaine A., E-mail: e.ryan@usyd.edu.a [Discipline of Medical Radiation Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Farquharson, Michael J. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-21

    The aim of this work was to investigate the differences in composition between malignant and non-malignant breast tissue. 38 invasive ductal carcinomas and 45 non-malignant breast tissues were measured, each being mounted in cylindrical sample holders of volume 25 mm{sup 2}. The experiments were performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) at Grenoble, France. A monochromatic beam of 10 keV was used, focussed to a 0.5 mmx0.5 mm rectangular area on the sample. Elastic and inelastic scattered photons were collected at an angle of 120{sup o}. A novel technique was used to find the mean atomic numbers of the tissues (Z-bar). A CT scanner that has been calibrated with an ED phantom was used to find the Z-bar of 10 gels. These were composed of a gelatine base, with low concentrations of copper added to increase the Z-bar values by an incremental amount. These were then used to calibrate the scattering measurement system. The area of the elastic and inelastic scatter peaks were found using peak fitting software and the ratio of these two areas was obtained. The data was shown to be non-parametric, and was therefore analysed using a Mann-Whitney test. Using this analysis the difference between non-malignant and malignant tissues was found to be extremely significant, with a 2-tailed p-value of <0.0001. The absolute Z-bar values were also analysed.

  5. The differentiation between malignant and non-malignant breast tissues using elastic and inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Elaine A.; Farquharson, Michael J.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the differences in composition between malignant and non-malignant breast tissue. 38 invasive ductal carcinomas and 45 non-malignant breast tissues were measured, each being mounted in cylindrical sample holders of volume 25 mm 2. The experiments were performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) at Grenoble, France. A monochromatic beam of 10 keV was used, focussed to a 0.5 mm×0.5 mm rectangular area on the sample. Elastic and inelastic scattered photons were collected at an angle of 120°. A novel technique was used to find the mean atomic numbers of the tissues ( Z¯). A CT scanner that has been calibrated with an ED phantom was used to find the Z¯ of 10 gels. These were composed of a gelatine base, with low concentrations of copper added to increase the Z¯ values by an incremental amount. These were then used to calibrate the scattering measurement system. The area of the elastic and inelastic scatter peaks were found using peak fitting software and the ratio of these two areas was obtained. The data was shown to be non-parametric, and was therefore analysed using a Mann-Whitney test. Using this analysis the difference between non-malignant and malignant tissues was found to be extremely significant, with a 2-tailed p-value of <0.0001. The absolute Z¯ values were also analysed.

  6. Applications of the conjugate gradient FFT method in scattering and radiation including simulations with impedance boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkeshli, Kasra; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical and computational aspects related to the application of the Conjugate Gradient FFT (CGFFT) method in computational electromagnetics are examined. The advantages of applying the CGFFT method to a class of large scale scattering and radiation problems are outlined. The main advantages of the method stem from its iterative nature which eliminates a need to form the system matrix (thus reducing the computer memory allocation requirements) and guarantees convergence to the true solution in a finite number of steps. Results are presented for various radiators and scatterers including thin cylindrical dipole antennas, thin conductive and resistive strips and plates, as well as dielectric cylinders. Solutions of integral equations derived on the basis of generalized impedance boundary conditions (GIBC) are also examined. The boundary conditions can be used to replace the profile of a material coating by an impedance sheet or insert, thus, eliminating the need to introduce unknown polarization currents within the volume of the layer. A general full wave analysis of 2-D and 3-D rectangular grooves and cavities is presented which will also serve as a reference for future work.

  7. Synchrotron radiation-based quasi-elastic scattering using time-domain interferometry with multi-line gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Makina; Masuda, Ryo; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Seto, Makoto

    2017-10-02

    We developed a multi-line time-domain interferometry (TDI) system using 14.4 keV Mössbauer gamma rays with natural energy widths of 4.66 neV from 57Fe nuclei excited using synchrotron radiation. Electron density fluctuations can be detected at unique lengths ranging from 0.1 nm to a few nm on time scales from several nanoseconds to the sub-microsecond order by quasi-elastic gamma-ray scattering (QGS) experiments using multi-line TDI. In this report, we generalize the established expression for a time spectrum measured using an identical single-line gamma-ray emitter pair to the case of a nonidentical pair of multi-line gamma-ray emitters by considering the finite energy width of the incident synchrotron radiation. The expression obtained illustrates the unique characteristics of multi-line TDI systems, where the finite incident energy width and use of a nonidentical emitter pair produces further information on faster sub-picosecond-scale dynamics in addition to the nanosecond dynamics; this was demonstrated experimentally. A normalized intermediate scattering function was extracted from the spectrum and its relaxation form was determined for a relaxation time of the order of 1 μs, even for relatively large momentum transfer of ~31 nm-1. The multi-line TDI method produces a microscopic relaxation picture more rapidly and accurately than conventional single-line TDI.

  8. Investigation of the influence of liner hard-splices on duct radiation/propagation and mode scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Wang, T. Q.

    2008-09-01

    In a turbofan engine, usually, the acoustically lined region consists of several liner segments separated by longitudinal hard-splices due to manufacturing. The non-uniform impedance in the circumferential direction will excite other circumferential modes besides the incident modes. Consequently, the acoustic propagation in and radiation from a turbofan is considerably different from that of an uniform impedance. To investigate the effect of liner hard-splices on acoustic radiation and propagation, a boundary integral equation method (BIEM) in two-dimensional (2D) is expanded into a three-dimensional form. In this model, an axially uniform inflow passes a cylindrical finite duct and the liner inside the duct may be circumferentially or axially non-uniform. The verifications are presented and the influence of hard-splices is investigated. Then an infinite duct model is developed to investigate the mechanism of mode scattering excited by a circumferentially non-uniform boundary. BIEM is combined with the mode-matching method. The model is validated by comparing with the analytical result in an infinite circular duct with a hard wall. Then a variety of liner configurations containing periodic/non-periodic hard-splices are studied and the mode scattering mechanism is discussed.

  9. Modelling canopy radiation budget through multiple scattering approximation: a case study of coniferous forest in Mexico City Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silván-Cárdenas, Jose L.; Corona-Romero, Nirani

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we describe some results from a study on hyperspectral analysis of coniferous canopy scattering for the purpose of estimating forest biophysical and structural parameters. Georeferenced airborne hyperspectral measurements were taken from a flying helicopter over a coniferous forest dominated by Pinus hartweguii and Abies religiosa within the Federal District Conservation Land in Mexico City. Hyperspectral data was recorded in the optical range from 350 to 2500 nm at 1nm spectral resolution using the FieldSpec 4 (ASD Inc.). Spectral measurements were also carried out in the ground for vegetation and understory components, including leaf, bark, soil and grass. Measurements were then analyzed through a previously developed multiple scattering approximation (MSA) model, which represents above-canopy spectral reflectance through a non-linear combination of pure spectral components (endmembers), as well as through a set of photon recollision probabilities and interceptance fractions. In this paper we provide an expression for the canopy absorptance as the basis for estimating the components of canopy radiation budget using the MSA model. Furthermore, since MSA does not prescribe a priori the endmembers to incorporate in the model, a multiple endmember selection method (MESMSA) was developed and tested. Photon recollision probabilities and interceptance fractions were estimated by fitting the model to airborne spectral reflectance and selected endmembers where then used to estimate the canopy radiation budget at each measured location.

  10. Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, R

    2009-09-04

    In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

  11. Polarization analysis of the scattered radiation by silicon nanoparticles in the infrared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Garcia-Camara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have studied the spectral dependence of the linear polarization degree at a right-angle scattering configuration (RASC for silicon nanoparticles (R ∼ 200nm in the IR (1 − 2μm. For isolated and isotropic particles smaller than the incident wavelength, this parameter is complementary to the conventional spectral analysis for showing deviations from the pure electric dipole-like response due to either magnetic dipole-like or higher-order contributions.

  12. Photon trajectory in strongly scattering media transilluminated by the sine-modulated laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimov, Vladimir V.; Kravtsenyuk, Olga V.; Skotnikov, V. A.; Volkonski, Vladimir B.

    1998-12-01

    Results of experimental study of the scattering object shape influence on the photon average trajectories (AT) are presented. The systematic experimental study of the AT inside the scattering bodies of different forms (semi- infinite medium, flat layer, rectangular sector, and cylinder) was carried out. The staking of the AT from a source to detect was carried out with the use of the standard inhomogeneity (SI): a point absolute absorber was embedded inside the object, and the point was searched where the maximal decrease of the detector signal was observed. Also this decreasing was explored as a function of the SI displacement from the AT. As it was predicted in our previous theoretical study, the simple approximation for the AT shape could be done as a three-segment polygonal line that is normal to the body surface at the initial and thermal trajectory points. The approximation error is much less then the width of the area where the presence of the SI is detectable. The obtained results comprise the base for further development of the fast computer algorithms for the real-time multi-aspect 3D optical imaging of strongly scattering objects.

  13. Relationship of scattering phase shifts to special radiation force conditions for spheres in axisymmetric wave-fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Philip L; Zhang, Likun

    2017-05-01

    When investigating the radiation forces on spheres in complicated wave-fields, the interpretation of analytical results can be simplified by retaining the s-function notation and associated phase shifts imported into acoustics from quantum scattering theory. For situations in which dissipation is negligible, as taken to be the case in the present investigation, there is an additional simplification in that partial-wave phase shifts become real numbers that vanish when the partial-wave index becomes large and when the wave-number-sphere-radius product vanishes. By restricting attention to monopole and dipole phase shifts, transitions in the axial radiation force for axisymmetric wave-fields are found to be related to wave-field parameters for traveling and standing Bessel wave-fields by considering the ratio of the phase shifts. For traveling waves, the special force conditions concern negative forces while for standing waves, the special force conditions concern vanishing radiation forces. An intermediate step involves considering the functional dependence on phase shifts. An appendix gives an approximation for zero-force plane standing wave conditions. Connections with early investigations of acoustic levitation are mentioned and some complications associated with viscosity are briefly noted.

  14. Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revskaya, Ekaterina; Chu, Peter; Howell, Robertha C; Schweitzer, Andrew D; Bryan, Ruth A; Harris, Matthew; Gerfen, Gary; Jiang, Zewei; Jandl, Thomas; Kim, Kami; Ting, Li-Min; Sellers, Rani S; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9 Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors.

  15. Evaluation of scattered radiation emitted from X-ray security scanners on occupational dose to airport personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalah, Entesar; Fakhry, Angham; Mukhtar, Asma; Al Salti, Farah; Bader, May; Khouri, Sara; Al-Zahmi, Reem

    2017-06-01

    Based on security issues and regulations airports are provided with luggage cargo scanners. These scanners utilize ionizing radiation that in principle present health risks toward humans. The study aims to investigate the amount of backscatter produced by passenger luggage and cargo toward airport personnel who are located at different distances from the scanners. To approach our investigation a Thermo Electron Radeye-G probe was used to quantify the backscattered radiation measured in terms of dose-rate emitted from airport scanners, Measurements were taken at the entrance and exit positions of the X-ray tunnel at three different distances (0, 50, and 100 cm) for two different scanners; both scanners include shielding curtains that reduce scattered radiation. Correlation was demonstrated using the Pearson coefficient test. Measurements confirmed an inverse relationship between dose rate and distance. An estimated occupational accumulative dose of 0.88 mSv/y, and 2.04 mSv/y were obtained for personnel working in inspection of carry-on, and cargo, respectively. Findings confirm that the projected dose of security and engineering staff are being well within dose limits.

  16. Reprint of 'Evaluation of Scattered Radiation Emitted From X-ray Security Scanners on Occupational Dose to Airport Personnel'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalah, Entesar; Fakhry, Angham; Mukhtar, Asma; Al Salti, Farah; Bader, May; Khouri, Sara; Al-Zahmi, Reem

    2017-11-01

    Based on security issues and regulations airports are provided with luggage cargo scanners. These scanners utilize ionizing radiation that in principle present health risks toward humans. The study aims to investigate the amount of backscatter produced by passenger luggage and cargo toward airport personnel who are located at different distances from the scanners. To approach our investigation a Thermo Electron Radeye-G probe was used to quantify the backscattered radiation measured in terms of dose-rate emitted from airport scanners, Measurements were taken at the entrance and exit positions of the X-ray tunnel at three different distances (0, 50, and 100 cm) for two different scanners; both scanners include shielding curtains that reduce scattered radiation. Correlation was demonstrated using the Pearson coefficient test. Measurements confirmed an inverse relationship between dose rate and distance. An estimated occupational accumulative dose of 0.88 mSv/y, and 2.04 mSv/y were obtained for personnel working in inspection of carry-on, and cargo, respectively. Findings confirm that the projected dose of security and engineering staff are being well within dose limits.

  17. A moment method for radiative transfer in an anisotropically-scattering slab medium with space-dependent albedo omega(x)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S. J.; Wan, F. S.

    1987-10-01

    A variation of the moment method of Wilson and Sen (1986) is used to solve the radiative transfer problem in an anisotropic scattering plane-parallel medium with an arbitrary space-dependent albedo, omega (x). Considering the case of both forward and backward scattering, the reflectance and transmission functions for linear and quadratic variation of omega(x) are given for isotropic incidence of unit intensity. The exit distribution of radiation for a linear variation of omega(x) is also given for both isotropic and normal incidence of intensity. Results from the present delta approximation method are in good agreement with those of Cengel and Ozisik (1985).

  18. Assessment of exposure to scattered radiation in interventional procedures using special protective bismuth; Evaluacion de la exposicion a radiacion dispersa en procedimientos intervencionistas usando protectores especiales de bismuto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto Bua, M.; Medina Jimenez, E.; Vazquez Vazquez, R.; Santamaria Vazquez, F.; Otero Martinez, C.; Lobato Busto, R.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Suero, J.; Sanchez Garcia, M.; Pombar Camean, M.

    2011-07-01

    There are currently marketed specific producta aimed at reducing personnel exposure to radiation scattered in cardiac catheterization procedures, interventional radiology or electrophysiology. Our service has been proposed to study the attenuation characteristics of the product Drape Armour manufactured by the company Microtek. Is a flexible devices constructed from an alloy of bismuth and sterility characteristics and infection control and fluid makes them particularly suitable for incorporating into the operative field of the patient. To study their behavior, there have been staff dose measurements representative of the moaL common situations of exposure to scattered radiation in a typical procedure of intervention.

  19. A comprehensive model for x-ray projection imaging system efficiency and image quality characterization in the presence of scattered radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnin, P.; Verdun, F. R.; Bosmans, H.; Rodríguez Pérez, S.; Marshall, N. W.

    2017-07-01

    This work proposes a method for assessing the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of radiographic imaging systems that include both the x-ray detector and the antiscatter device. Cascaded linear analysis of the antiscatter device efficiency (DQEASD) with the x-ray detector DQE is used to develop a metric of system efficiency (DQEsys); the new metric is then related to the existing system efficiency parameters of effective DQE (eDQE) and generalized DQE (gDQE). The effect of scatter on signal transfer was modelled through its point spread function (PSF), leading to an x-ray beam transfer function (BTF) that multiplies with the classical presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) to give the system MTF. Expressions are then derived for the influence of scattered radiation on signal-difference to noise ratio (SDNR) and contrast-detail (c-d) detectability. The DQEsys metric was tested using two digital mammography systems, for eight x-ray beams (four with and four without scatter), matched in terms of effective energy. The model was validated through measurements of contrast, SDNR and MTF for poly(methyl)methacrylate thicknesses covering the range of scatter fractions expected in mammography. The metric also successfully predicted changes in c-d detectability for different scatter conditions. Scatter fractions for the four beams with scatter were established with the beam stop method using an extrapolation function derived from the scatter PSF, and validated through Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Low-frequency drop of the MTF from scatter was compared to both theory and MC calculations. DQEsys successfully quantified the influence of the grid on SDNR and accurately gave the break-even object thickness at which system efficiency was improved by the grid. The DQEsys metric is proposed as an extension of current detector characterization methods to include a performance evaluation in the presence of scattered radiation, with an antiscatter device in place.

  20. A new radiative transfer scattering phase function discretisation approach with inherent energy conservation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roos, TH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the popular Discrete Ordinates Method (DOM) formulation of the Equation of Radiative Transfer (ERT), the 4 pi solid angle range of directions is divided into a finite number of discrete directions or ordinates. This requires that the continuous...

  1. Blood group typing based on recording the elastic scattering of laser radiation using the method of digital imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolmashkin, A A; Dubrovskii, V A; Zabenkov, I V [V.I.Razumovsky Saratov State Medical University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-31

    The possibility is demonstrated to determine the human blood group by recording the scattering of laser radiation with the help of the digital imaging method. It is experimentally shown that the action of a standing ultrasound wave leads to acceleration of the agglutination reaction of red blood cells, to formation of larger immune complexes of red blood cells, and, as a consequence, to acceleration of their sedimentation. In the absence of agglutination of red blood cells the ultrasound does not enhance the relevant processes. This difference in the results of ultrasound action on the mixture of blood and serum allows a method of blood typing to be offered. Theoretical modelling of the technique of the practical blood typing, carried out on the basis of the elastic light scattering theory, agrees well with the experimental results, which made it possible to plan further improvement of the proposed method. The studies of specific features of sedimentation of red blood cells and their immune complexes were aimed at the optimisation of the sample preparation, i.e., at the search for such experimental conditions that provide the maximal resolution of the method and the device for registering the reaction of red blood cells agglutination. The results of the study may be used in designing the instrumentation for blood group assessment in humans.

  2. Blood group typing based on recording the elastic scattering of laser radiation using the method of digital imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmashkin, A. A.; Dubrovskii, V. A.; Zabenkov, I. V.

    2012-05-01

    The possibility is demonstrated to determine the human blood group by recording the scattering of laser radiation with the help of the digital imaging method. It is experimentally shown that the action of a standing ultrasound wave leads to acceleration of the agglutination reaction of red blood cells, to formation of larger immune complexes of red blood cells, and, as a consequence, to acceleration of their sedimentation. In the absence of agglutination of red blood cells the ultrasound does not enhance the relevant processes. This difference in the results of ultrasound action on the mixture of blood and serum allows a method of blood typing to be offered. Theoretical modelling of the technique of the practical blood typing, carried out on the basis of the elastic light scattering theory, agrees well with the experimental results, which made it possible to plan further improvement of the proposed method. The studies of specific features of sedimentation of red blood cells and their immune complexes were aimed at the optimisation of the sample preparation, i.e., at the search for such experimental conditions that provide the maximal resolution of the method and the device for registering the reaction of red blood cells agglutination. The results of the study may be used in designing the instrumentation for blood group assessment in humans.

  3. Discovery of Scattering Polarization in the Hydrogen Ly α Line of the Solar Disk Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, R.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kubo, M.; Giono, G.; Hara, H.; Suematsu, Y. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Bueno, J. Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife, E-38205 (Spain); Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K. [Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Auchère, F. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, Université Paris Sud, Batiment 121, F-91405 Orsay (France); Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Tsuneta, S. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Ichimoto, K. [Hida Observatory, Kyoto University, Takayama, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Goto, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Belluzzi, L., E-mail: ryouhei.kano@nao.ac.jp [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, CH-6605 Locarno Monti (Switzerland); and others

    2017-04-10

    There is a thin transition region (TR) in the solar atmosphere where the temperature rises from 10,000 K in the chromosphere to millions of degrees in the corona. Little is known about the mechanisms that dominate this enigmatic region other than the magnetic field plays a key role. The magnetism of the TR can only be detected by polarimetric measurements of a few ultraviolet (UV) spectral lines, the Ly α line of neutral hydrogen at 121.6 nm (the strongest line of the solar UV spectrum) being of particular interest given its sensitivity to the Hanle effect (the magnetic-field-induced modification of the scattering line polarization). We report the discovery of linear polarization produced by scattering processes in the Ly α line, obtained with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) rocket experiment. The Stokes profiles observed by CLASP in quiet regions of the solar disk show that the Q / I and U / I linear polarization signals are of the order of 0.1% in the line core and up to a few percent in the nearby wings, and that both have conspicuous spatial variations with scales of ∼10 arcsec. These observations help constrain theoretical models of the chromosphere–corona TR and extrapolations of the magnetic field from photospheric magnetograms. In fact, the observed spatial variation from disk to limb of polarization at the line core and wings already challenge the predictions from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical models of the upper solar chromosphere.

  4. Evaluating the Efficiency of the Device in Shielding Scattered Radiation during Treatment of Carcinoma of the Penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gim, Yang Soo; Lee, Sun Young; Lim, Suk Gun; Gwak, Geun Tak; Park, Ju Gyeong; Lee, Seung Hoon; Hwang, Ho In; Cha, Sook Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Chonbuk National University Hoispital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    We evaluated the device that was created for maintaining the patient's setup and protecting the testicles from scattered radiation during treatment of carcinoma of the penis. The phantom testicles were made of vaseline cotton gauze and the device consisted of 5 mm of acryl box and 4 mm of lead shielding. 3 x 3 cm{sup 2}, 4 x 4 cm{sup 2}, 5 x 5 cm{sup 2}, 6 x 6 cm{sup 2}, 7 x 7 cm{sup 2} field sizes were used for this study and measurement was made at 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 cm from the lower edge of the field for 10 times with lead shielding and without the shielding respectively. 200 cGy was delivered using 6 MV photons. The scatted radiation without lead shielding at 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 cm from the lower edge of the field were 14.8-4.7 cGy with 3 x 3 cm{sup 2}, 15.7-5.2 cGy with 4 x 4 cm{sup 2}, 17.6-5.5 cGy with 5 x 5 cm{sup 2}, 19.9-6.6 cGy with 6 x 6 cm{sup 2}, 22.2-7.6 cGy with 7 x 7 cm{sup 2} and the measured dose without lead shielding were 7.1-2.6 cGy with 3 x 3 cm{sup 2}, 8.9-3.6 cGy with 4 x 4 cm{sup 2}, 12.3-4.8 cGy with 5 x 5 cm{sup 2}, 14.6-5.0 cGy with 6 x 6 cm{sup 2} and 21.1-6.4 cGy with 7 x 7 cm{sup 2}. As shown above, the scatted radiation decreased after using lead shielding. Depending of the range of field sizes, the resulting difference between without shielding values and with shielding values were: 7.8-1.1 cGy at 4 cm, 5.1-1.2 cGy at 5 cm, 3.8-1.1 cGy at 6 cm, 3.4-1.7 cGy at 7 cm, 2.8-1.7 cGy at 8 cm, 2.4-2.5 cGy at 9 cm and 2.1-1.8 cGy at 10 cm. In the situation as described above, the range in values depending on the distance was 7.8-1.1 cGy with 3 x 3 cm{sup 2}, 6.9-1.6 cGy with 4 x 4 cm{sup 2}, 5.3-0.8 cGy with 5 x 5 cm{sup 2}, 5.3-1.5 cGy with 6 x 6 cm{sup 2} and 1.1-1.8 cGy with 7 x 7 cm{sup 2}. Using the device we created to shield the testicles from scattered radiation during treatment of carcinoma of the penis, we have found that scattered radiation to the testicles is decreased by the phantom testicles, and by increasing the distance

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of scattered radiation fields in interventional radiology; Simulacion Monte Carlo de campos de radiacion dispersa en radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duch, M. A.; Zaragoza, F. J.; Sempau, J.; Ginjaume, M.; Vano, E.; Sanchez, R.; Fernandez, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The study shows that the MC simulation is a useful tool to facilitate the assessment of the spatial distribution of the dose due to the radiation scattered in interventional radiology procedures, as well as to determine the influence of various operational parameters in the same , avoiding experimental measures that require much time of use the Cath Labs. (Author)

  6. Nuclear and Non-Ionizing Energy-Loss for Coulomb Scattered Particles from Low Energy up to Relativistic Regime in Space Radiation Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Boschini, M.J.; Gervasi, M.; Giani, S.; Grandi, D.; Ivantchenko, V.; Pensotti, S.; Rancoita, P.G.; Tacconi, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the space environment, instruments onboard of spacecrafts can be affected by displacement damage due to radiation. The differential scattering cross section for screened nucleus--nucleus interactions - i.e., including the effects due to screened Coulomb nuclear fields -, nuclear stopping powers and non-ionization energy losses are treated from about 50\\,keV/nucleon up to relativistic energies.

  7. Three-dimensional Radiative Transfer Simulations of the Scattering Polarization of the Hydrogen Lyalpha Line in a Magnetohydrodynamic Model of the Chromosphere-Corona Transition Region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Jiří; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Leenaarts, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 803, č. 2 (2015), 65/1-65/15 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP209/12/P741 Grant - others:EU(XE) COST action MP1104 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : polarization * radiative transfer * scattering Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.909, year: 2015

  8. Fractional Boltzmann equation for multiple scattering of resonance radiation in low-temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchaikin, V V; Sibatov, R T, E-mail: vuchaikin@gmail.com, E-mail: ren_sib@bk.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, 432000, 42 Leo Tolstoy str., Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-08

    The fractional Boltzmann equation for resonance radiation transport in plasma is proposed. We start with the standard Boltzmann equation; averaging over photon frequencies leads to the appearance of a fractional derivative. This fact is in accordance with the conception of latent variables leading to hereditary and non-local dynamics (in particular, fractional dynamics). The presence of a fractional material derivative in the equation is concordant with heavy tailed distribution of photon path lengths and with spatiotemporal coupling peculiar to the process. We discuss some methods of solving the obtained equation and demonstrate numerical results in some simple cases.

  9. [Effects of high-strip density anti-scatter grid on image quality and radiation dose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamser, G; Maier, W; Aichinger, H; Bohndorf, K

    1997-06-01

    Using a new type of a stationary high strip density grid (13/75) for plain films of the abdomen, the effect was evaluated with regard to quality and patient dose in comparison with an established moving radiographic grid (12/40). The high strip density grid (13/75) was compared with a 12/40 grid using test objects and 100 patients per each grid type for plain films of the abdomen. The examinations were carried out via the screen-film system, speed class (SC) 400. Patients' weight, age and dose measurements were recorded. The image quality was evaluated via a multi-reader study using delineation of anatomical structures and a rating scale (score 1-5 or 1-3). Both measurements with test objects and patients abdominal plain films showed a decrease in radiation dose of 17% using the 13/75 grid, and 24%, respectively. The delineation of 4 out of 7 anatomical structures was slightly reduced with the new high strip density grid (maximum score reduction: 0.4), the image contrast, as well as the radiologists' subjective rating. Apart from an acceptable loss in image quality compared with the 12/40 grid, the new high strip density grid (13/ 75) enables a clear reduction in radiation dose.

  10. Polarization of x-gamma radiation produced by a Thomson and Compton inverse scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Petrillo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A systematic study of the polarization of x-gamma rays produced in Thomson and Compton scattering is presented, in both classical and quantum schemes. Numerical results and analytical considerations let us to establish the polarization level as a function of acceptance, bandwidth and energy. Few sources have been considered: the SPARC_LAB Thomson device, as an example of a x-ray Thomson source, ELI-NP, operating in the gamma range. Then, the typical parameters of a beam produced by a plasma accelerator has been analyzed. In the first case, with bandwidths up to 10%, a contained reduction (<10% in the average polarization occurs. In the last case, for the nominal ELI-NP relative bandwidth of 5×10^{-3}, the polarization is always close to 1. For applications requiring larger bandwidth, however, a degradation of the polarization up to 30% must be taken into account. In addition, an all optical gamma source based on a plasma accelerated electron beam cannot guarantee narrow bandwidth and high polarization operational conditions required in nuclear photonics experiments.

  11. The Inclusion of Raman Scattering Effects in the Combined Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model MOMO to Estimate the Influence of Raman Scattering in Case 1 Waters on Satellite Ocean Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bismarck, J.; Fischer, J.

    2011-12-01

    Raman scattering of the solar lightfield, due to energy absorption by vibrational modes of water molecules, may contribute significantly to the signals observed by remote sensing satellites over water. The inelastic fraction of the water-leaving radiance for clear water reaches values of 30% in the red part of the visible spectrum, and still reaches values of several percent in moderately turbid waters. Furthermore, inelastic scattering due to chlorophyll and yellow substance fluorescence adds to this fraction. For these reasons the inclusion of inelastic scattering sources into radiative-transfer models, used in ocean remote sensing applications or atmosphere remote sensing over the ocean, can be important. MOMO is a computer code based on the matrix-operator method designed to calculate the lightfield in the stratified atmosphere-ocean system. It has been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Freie Universität Berlin and provides the full polarization state (in the newest version) and an air-sea interface accounting for radiative effects of the wind roughened water surface. The inclusion of Raman scattering effects is done by a processing module, that starts a primary MOMO program run with a high spectral resolution, to calculate the radiative energy available for inelastic scattering at each model layer boundary. The processing module then calculates the first order Raman source-terms for every observation wavelength at every layer boundary, accounting for the non-isotropicity (including the azimuthal dependence) of the Raman phase-function, the spectral redistribution, and the spectral dependence of the Raman scattering coefficient. These elementary source-terms then serve as input for the second program run, which then calculates the source-terms of all model layers, using the doubling-adding method, and the resulting radiance field. Higher orders of the Raman contribution can be computed with additional program runs. Apart from the Raman

  12. Personnel Exposure to Scattered Radiation During Radiography of the Distal Interphalangeal Joint in the Horse Using a Portable X-Ray Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Šterc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiography of the distal interphalangeal joints of two limbs of a cadaver of a horse weighing 550 kg was conducted in the present study. The examination was performed on lateromedial, palmaroproximal-palmarodistal views and on dorsoproximal-palmarodistal, dorsolateral-palmaromedial, dorsomedial-palmarolateral views of a raised limb placed on a navicular block, and of weight-bearing limbs. During the examination, doses of scattered radiation were measured at the sites of radiographer, assistant holding a film cassette and assistant positioning the examined limb or the opposite one. The lowest radiation dose was received by the assistant holding the cassette behind the examined region; a total equivalent dose of 183.6 - 201.7 nSv was received by his hands and genitals, and 110.8 - 113.3 nSv by his eye lens and neck during the examination of the distal interphalangeal joint. The radiographer was exposed to higher radiation; an equivalent dose of 846.6 - 854.1 nSv was received by his hands and genitals, and 271.8 - 328.2 nSv by the eye lens and the neck. The highest scattered radiation dose was received by the assistant positioning the examined limbs; equivalent doses were 7751 - 9354 nSv (hands, 1117.3 - 1119.5 nSv (genitals, and 880.6 - 1096.2 nSv (eye lens and neck. The equivalent dose values measured, received by the radiographer and the assistants during the examination of the distal interphalangeal joint seem to be very low relative to radiation exposure limits. However, it must be taken into account that the personnel involved in radiography is also exposed to scattered radiation during other examinations where radiation doses are often much higher. These results indicate the necessity to use protective lead aprons, gloves and collars during radiography of the distal interphalangeal joint.

  13. Comparison of the light charged particles on scatter radiation dose in thyroid hadron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, M; Mowlavi, Aa

    2014-09-01

    Hadron therapy is a novel technique of cancer radiation therapy which employs charged particles beams, (1)H and light ions in particular. Due to their physical and radiobiological properties, they allow one to obtain a more conformal treatment, sparing better the healthy tissues located in proximity of the tumor and allowing a higher control of the disease. Objective : As it is well known, these light particles can interact with nuclei in the tissue, and produce the different secondary particles such as neutron and photon. These particles can damage specially the critical organs behind of thyroid gland. In this research, we simulated neck geometry by MCNPX code and calculated the light particles dose at distance of 2.14 cm in thyroid gland, for different particles beam: (1)H, (2)H, (3)He, and (4)He. Thyroid treatment is important because the spine and vertebrae is situated right behind to the thyroid gland on the posterior side. The results show that (2)H has the most total flux for photon and neutron, 1.944E-3 and 1.7666E-2, respectively. Whereas (1)H and (3)He have best conditions, 8.88609E-4 and 1.35431E-3 for photon, 4.90506E-4 and 4.34057E-3 for neutron, respectively. The same calculation has obtained for energy depositions for these particles. In this research, we investigated that which of these light particles can deliver the maximum dose to the normal tissues and the minimum dose to the tumor. By comparing these results for the mentioned light particles, we find out (1)H and (3)He is the best therapy choices for thyroid glands whereas (2)H is the worst.

  14. Radiances simulated in the presence of clouds by use of a fast radiative transfer model and a multiple-scattering scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorati, Roberta; Rizzi, Rolando

    2002-03-20

    A fast-forward radiative transfer (RTF) model is presented that includes cloud-radiation interaction for any number of cloud layers. Layer cloud fraction and transmittance are treated separately and combined with that of gaseous transmittances. RTF is tested against a reference procedure that uses line-by-line gaseous transmittances and solves the radiative transfer equation by use of the adding-doubling method to handle multiple-scattering conditions properly. The comparison is carried out for channels 8, 12, and 14 of the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS/2) and for the geostationary satellite METEOSAT thermal infrared and water vapor channels. Fairly large differences in simulated radiances by the two schemes are found in clear conditions for upper- and mid-tropospheric channels; the cause of the differences is discussed. For cloudy situations an improved layer source function is shown to be required when rapid changes in atmospheric transmission are experienced within the model layers. The roles of scattering processes are discussed; results with and without scattering, both obtained by use of a reference code, are compared. Overall, the presented results show that the fast model is capable of reproducing the cloudy results of the much more complex and time-consuming reference scheme.

  15. Dynamic mineral clouds on HD 189733b. II. Monte Carlo radiative transfer for 3D cloudy exoplanet atmospheres: combining scattering and emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G. K. H.; Wood, K.; Dobbs-Dixon, I.; Rice, A.; Helling, Ch.

    2017-05-01

    Context. As the 3D spatial properties of exoplanet atmospheres are being observed in increasing detail by current and new generations of telescopes, the modelling of the 3D scattering effects of cloud forming atmospheres with inhomogeneous opacity structures becomes increasingly important to interpret observational data. Aims: We model the scattering and emission properties of a simulated cloud forming, inhomogeneous opacity, hot Jupiter atmosphere of HD 189733b. We compare our results to available Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Spitzer data and quantify the effects of 3D multiple scattering on observable properties of the atmosphere. We discuss potential observational properties of HD 189733b for the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) and CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS) missions. Methods: We developed a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code and applied it to post-process output of our 3D radiative-hydrodynamic, cloud formation simulation of HD 189733b. We employed three variance reduction techniques, I.e. next event estimation, survival biasing, and composite emission biasing, to improve signal to noise of the output. For cloud particle scattering events, we constructed a log-normal area distribution from the 3D cloud formation radiative-hydrodynamic results, which is stochastically sampled in order to model the Rayleigh and Mie scattering behaviour of a mixture of grain sizes. Results: Stellar photon packets incident on the eastern dayside hemisphere show predominantly Rayleigh, single-scattering behaviour, while multiple scattering occurs on the western hemisphere. Combined scattered and thermal emitted light predictions are consistent with published HST and Spitzer secondary transit observations. Our model predictions are also consistent with geometric albedo constraints from optical wavelength ground-based polarimetry and HST B band measurements. We predict an apparent geometric albedo for HD 189733b of 0.205 and 0.229, in the

  16. Computing the far field scattered or radiated by objects inside layered fluid media using approximate Green's functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampolli, Mario; Tesei, Alessandra; Canepa, Gaetano; Godin, Oleg A

    2008-06-01

    A numerically efficient technique is presented for computing the field radiated or scattered from three-dimensional objects embedded within layered acoustic media. The distance between the receivers and the object of interest is supposed to be large compared to the acoustic wavelength. The method requires the pressure and normal particle displacement on the surface of the object or on an arbitrary circumscribing surface, as an input, together with a knowledge of the layered medium Green's functions. The numerical integration of the full wave number spectral representation of the Green's functions is avoided by employing approximate formulas which are available in terms of elementary functions. The pressure and normal particle displacement on the surface of the object of interest, on the other hand, may be known by analytical or numerical means or from experiments. No restrictions are placed on the location of the object, which may lie above, below, or across the interface between the fluid media. The proposed technique is verified through numerical examples, for which the near field pressure and the particle displacement are computed via a finite-element method. The results are compared to validated reference models, which are based on the full wave number spectral integral Green's function.

  17. About temporary autocorrelation function of fluctuations of the scattered radiation of the focused laser beam (0.63 mm) in the surface atmosphere in rain, drizzle and fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostretsov, N. A.; Zhukov, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    Measured temporal autocorrelation function the fluctuations of the scattered radiation of the focused laser beam (0.63 μm) in the surface atmosphere in rain, drizzle and fog on the highway with a length of 130 m. Found that the time correlation of the fluctuations of the scattered radiation of the focused laser beam in the rain and drizzle decreases with increasing perpendicular component to the path the wind speed is at close to atmospheric conditions (with close values of optical depth and particle size of atmospheric precipitation). The time correlation in the fog more, than the time correlation in the drizzle. It is an order of magnitude or more greater than in the rain.

  18. Comparative study of scattered radiation levels from 80-kVp and 240-kVp x rays in the surgical intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, M.W.; Patrick, J.; Tabrisky, J.

    1980-11-01

    The levels of scattered radiation from 80-kVp and 240-kVp mobile x-ray units were measured in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU). The intensity of scatter of the 240-kVp x rays does not decrease with distance as rapidly as with the 80-kVp beam. In an ICU with four beds, the weekly radiation exposure at the nurses's station approximated 0.05 mR (0.13 x 10/sup -7/ C/kg) for the 80-kVp beam and 0.2 mR (0.52 x 10/sup -7/ C/kg) for the 240-kVp beam. Thus, the annual exposure from either unit would be well below the Maximum Permissible Exposure for nonoccupational workers.

  19. Use of a solar panel as a directionally sensitive large-area radiation monitor for direct and scattered x-rays and gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Majid, S

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of a 25.4 X 91 cm solar cell panel used as an x-ray and gamma-ray radiation monitor are presented. Applications for monitoring the primary x-ray beam are described at different values of operating currents and voltages as well as for directional dependence of scattered radiation. Other applications in gamma-ray radiography are also given. The detector showed linear response to both x-ray and gamma-ray exposures. The equipment is rigid, easy to use, relatively inexpensive and requires no power supply or any complex electronic equipment.

  20. Whistlers Observed Outside the Plasmasphere: Correlation to Plasmaspheric/Plasmapause Features and Implications for the Scattering of Radiation-Belt Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Mark L.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetospherically reflected, lightning-generated whistler waves are an important potential contributor to pitch-angle scattering loss processes of the electron radiation belts. While lightning-generated whistlers are a common feature at, and just inside, the plasmapause, they are infrequently observed outside the plasmasphere. As such, their potential contribution to outer radiation belt loss processes is more tenuous. Recently, Platino et al. [2005] has reported on whistlers observed outside the plasmasphere by Cluster. Here, we present correlative global observations of the plasmasphere, for the reported periods of Cluster-observed whistlers outside the plasmasphere, using IMAGE-EUV data. The intent of this study is to seek the underlying mechanisms that result in whistlers outside the plasmasphere and consequently the anticipated morphology and significance these waves may have on radiation belt dynamics.

  1. Scatter radiation dose at height of the lens and image quality in interventional cardiology; Nivel de radiacao na altura do cristalino em cardiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguees, Fernando A. Leyton

    2016-07-01

    Cardiologist and other staff members receive high doses of scattered radiation. Cases of radiation-induced cataract among cardiology professionals have been reported in studies, estimates for the dose to eye lens ranged from 450 to 900 mSv per year (without ceiling suspended screen), over several years. Recent surveys regarding high prevalence of lens changes likely induced by radiation exposure suggest an urgent need for improved radiation safety and training, use of eye protection during catheterization procedures, and improved occupational dosimetry. In view of the evidence of radiation injuries, the ICRP recommends limiting the radiation dose to the lens to 20 mSv per year for occupational exposure. A system for optimizing the radiation exposure is the measurement of entrance surface air kerma (K{sub a,e}) and kerma-area product (P{sub KA}) for patient and scattered dose or dose rate at the position for the staff, under clinical working conditions using phantoms and defined technical factors. Correlating K{sub a,e} and P{sub KA} with the scatter dose, applying the attenuation factors protective devices can enable estimation of the lens doses for operators. The purpose of this work is: to study the possibility of establishing a procedure which is useful for scientific societies and the regulatory authority in the prevention and control of IOE dose and to control and improve the quality of procedures in interventional cardiology as an initiative to raise awareness and optimization of radiological protection. Measurements were taken in different cardiac laboratories. Clinical working conditions were reproduced during the experiments for the different hemodynamic angiographic projections and operating modes used in fluoroscopy and cine. A first K{sub a,e} rate reference proposal for the characterization of angiography for the different acquisition modes were 16; 35; 40 and 220 (mGy/min), respectively. Considering the typical PKA values to patient in interventional

  2. P1 approximation, MDA and IDA for the simulation of radiative transfer in a 3D geometry for an absorbing scattering medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, J.; Seiler, N.; Ruyer, P.; Trovalet, L.; Boulet, P.

    2012-01-01

    A numerical study has been conducted using the differential approximation and two modified versions of this method, known as MDA and IDA. The methods have been applied on a 3D geometry containing a participating, absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering medium. Comparisons have been carried out with some cases of the literature. It has been observed that the IDA can significantly improve the solution, where the classical P1 approximation is not able to reproduce accurately the actual flux or flux divergence in some of studied configurations. The MDA does not really improve the solution in the purely absorbing cases and when radiation is mainly coming from the medium. In other situations (scattering media, relevant influence of the boundaries), the MDA is more accurate than the P1 but the IDA still performs better, with uncertainties around a few percents for the literature cases studied in the present work.

  3. Dose reduction of scattered photons from concrete walls lined with lead: Implications for improvement in design of megavoltage radiation therapy facility mazes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Affan, I A M; Hugtenburg, R P; Bari, D S; Al-Saleh, W M; Piliero, M; Evans, S; Al-Hasan, M; Al-Zughul, B; Al-Kharouf, S; Ghaith, A

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the possibility of using lead to cover part of the radiation therapy facility maze walls in order to absorb low energy photons and reduce the total dose at the maze entrance of radiation therapy rooms. Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to establish the possibility of using high-Z materials to cover the concrete walls of the maze in order to reduce the dose of the scattered photons at the maze entrance. The dose of the backscattered photons from a concrete wall was measured for various scattering angles. The dose was also calculated by the FLUKA and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. The FLUKA code was also used to simulate an existing radiotherapy room to study the effect of multiple scattering when adding lead to cover the concrete walls of the maze. Monoenergetic photons were used to represent the main components of the x ray spectrum up to 10 MV. It was observed that when the concrete wall was covered with just 2 mm of lead, the measured dose rate at all backscattering angles was reduced by 20% for photons of energy comparable to Co-60 emissions and 70% for Cs-137 emissions. The simulations with FLUKA and EGS showed that the reduction in the dose was potentially even higher when lead was added. One explanation for the reduction is the increased absorption of backscattered photons due to the photoelectric interaction in lead. The results also showed that adding 2 mm lead to the concrete walls and floor of the maze reduced the dose at the maze entrance by up to 90%. This novel proposal of covering part or the entire maze walls with a few millimeters of lead would have a direct implication for the design of radiation therapy facilities and would assist in upgrading the design of some mazes, especially those in facilities with limited space where the maze length cannot be extended to sufficiently reduce the dose. © 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Dose reduction of scattered photons from concrete walls lined with lead: Implications for improvement in design of megavoltage radiation therapy facility mazes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Affan, I. A. M., E-mail: info@medphys-environment.co.uk; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Piliero, M. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Bari, D. S. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, United Kingdom and University of Zakho, Duhok (Iraq); Al-Saleh, W. M. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, United Kingdom and King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Science, Hofuf (Saudi Arabia); Evans, S. [Department of Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Singleton Hospital, Swansea SA2 8QA (United Kingdom); Al-Hasan, M.; Al-Zughul, B. [College of Sciences, Zarqa University, Zarqa (Jordan); Al-Kharouf, S. [The Royal Scientific Society, Amman (Jordan); Ghaith, A. [Association of Arab Universities, Amman (Jordan)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: This study explores the possibility of using lead to cover part of the radiation therapy facility maze walls in order to absorb low energy photons and reduce the total dose at the maze entrance of radiation therapy rooms. Methods: Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to establish the possibility of using high-Z materials to cover the concrete walls of the maze in order to reduce the dose of the scattered photons at the maze entrance. The dose of the backscattered photons from a concrete wall was measured for various scattering angles. The dose was also calculated by the FLUKA and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. The FLUKA code was also used to simulate an existing radiotherapy room to study the effect of multiple scattering when adding lead to cover the concrete walls of the maze. Monoenergetic photons were used to represent the main components of the x ray spectrum up to 10 MV. Results: It was observed that when the concrete wall was covered with just 2 mm of lead, the measured dose rate at all backscattering angles was reduced by 20% for photons of energy comparable to Co-60 emissions and 70% for Cs-137 emissions. The simulations with FLUKA and EGS showed that the reduction in the dose was potentially even higher when lead was added. One explanation for the reduction is the increased absorption of backscattered photons due to the photoelectric interaction in lead. The results also showed that adding 2 mm lead to the concrete walls and floor of the maze reduced the dose at the maze entrance by up to 90%. Conclusions: This novel proposal of covering part or the entire maze walls with a few millimeters of lead would have a direct implication for the design of radiation therapy facilities and would assist in upgrading the design of some mazes, especially those in facilities with limited space where the maze length cannot be extended to sufficiently reduce the dose.

  5. Computation of Green's Function of 3-D Radiative Transport Equations for Non-isotropic Scattering of P and Unpolarized S Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margerin, Ludovic

    2017-11-01

    In this work, I propose to model the propagation of high-frequency seismic waves in the heterogeneous Earth by means of a coupled system of radiative transfer equations for P and S waves. The model describes the propagation of both coherent and diffuse waves in a statistically isotropic heterogeneous medium and takes into account key phenomena such as scattering conversions between propagation modes, scattering anisotropy and absorption. The main limitation of the approach lies in the neglect of the shear wave polarization information. The canonical case of a medium with uniform scattering and absorption properties is studied in details. Using an adjoint formalism, Green's functions (isotropic point source solutions) of the transport equation are shown to obey a reciprocity relation relating the P energy density radiated by an S source to the S energy density radiated by a P source. A spectral method of calculation of the Green's function is presented. Application of Fourier, Hankel and Legendre transforms to time, space and angular variables, respectively, turns the equation of transport into a numerically tractable penta-diagonal linear system of equations. The implementation of the spectral method is discussed in details and validated through one-to-one comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations. Numerical experiments in different propagation regimes illustrate that the ratio between the correlation length of heterogeneities and the incident wavelength plays a key role in the rate of stabilization of the P-to- S energy ratio in the coda. The results suggest that the rapid stabilization of energy ratios observed in the seismic coda is a signature of the broadband nature of crustal heterogeneities. The impact of the texture of the medium on both pulse broadening and generation of converted S wave arrivals by explosion sources is illustrated. The numerical study indicates that smooth media enhance the visibility of ballistic-like S arrivals from P sources.

  6. Computation of Green's Function of 3-D Radiative Transport Equations for Non-isotropic Scattering of P and Unpolarized S Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margerin, Ludovic

    2017-07-01

    In this work, I propose to model the propagation of high-frequency seismic waves in the heterogeneous Earth by means of a coupled system of radiative transfer equations for P and S waves. The model describes the propagation of both coherent and diffuse waves in a statistically isotropic heterogeneous medium and takes into account key phenomena such as scattering conversions between propagation modes, scattering anisotropy and absorption. The main limitation of the approach lies in the neglect of the shear wave polarization information. The canonical case of a medium with uniform scattering and absorption properties is studied in details. Using an adjoint formalism, Green's functions (isotropic point source solutions) of the transport equation are shown to obey a reciprocity relation relating the P energy density radiated by an S source to the S energy density radiated by a P source. A spectral method of calculation of the Green's function is presented. Application of Fourier, Hankel and Legendre transforms to time, space and angular variables, respectively, turns the equation of transport into a numerically tractable penta-diagonal linear system of equations. The implementation of the spectral method is discussed in details and validated through one-to-one comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations. Numerical experiments in different propagation regimes illustrate that the ratio between the correlation length of heterogeneities and the incident wavelength plays a key role in the rate of stabilization of the P-to-S energy ratio in the coda. The results suggest that the rapid stabilization of energy ratios observed in the seismic coda is a signature of the broadband nature of crustal heterogeneities. The impact of the texture of the medium on both pulse broadening and generation of converted S wave arrivals by explosion sources is illustrated. The numerical study indicates that smooth media enhance the visibility of ballistic-like S arrivals from P sources.

  7. Impact of using scatter-mimicking beams instead of standard beams to measure penetration when assessing the protective value of radiation-protective garments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A Kyle; Pasciak, Alexander S; Wagner, Louis K

    2018-01-03

    Use standardized methods to determine how assessment of protective value of radiation-protective garments changes under conditions employing standard beam qualities, scatter-mimicking primary beams, and a modified H p (10) measurement. The shielding properties of radiation-protective garments depend on the spectrum of beam energies striking the garment and the attenuation properties of materials used to construct the garment, including x-ray fluorescence produced by these materials. In this study the primary beam spectra employed during clinical interventional radiology and cardiology procedures (clinical primary beams, CPB) were identified using radiation dose structured reports (RDSR) and fluoroscope log data. Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the scattered radiation spectra produced by these CPB during typical clinical application. For these scattered spectra, scatter-mimicking primary beams (SMPB) were determined using numerical optimization-based spectral reconstruction that adjusted kV and filtration to produce the SMPB that optimally matched the scattered spectrum for each CPB. The penetration of a subset of SMPB through four radiation-protective garments of varying compositions and nominal thicknesses was measured using a geometry specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The diagnostic radiological index of protection (DRIP), which increases with increasing penetration through a garment, was calculated using these measurements. Penetration through the same garments was measured for standard beams specified by the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM). Finally, 10 mm of PMMA was affixed to the inside of each garment and the DRIP remeasured in this configuration to simulate H p (10). The SMPB based on actual CPB were in general characterized by lower kV (range 60-76) and higher half-value layer (HVL, range 3.44-4.89 mm Al) than standard beam qualities specified by ASTM (kV range 70-85; HVL range 3.4-4.0 mm Al

  8. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  9. Using MERRA-2 analysis fields to simulate limb scattered radiance profiles for inhomogeneous atmospheric lines of sight: Preparation for data assimilation of OMPS LP radiances through 2D single-scattering GSLS radiative transfer model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughman, R. P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Moy, L.; Kramarova, N. A.; Wargan, K.

    2016-12-01

    Many remote sensing techniques used to monitor the Earth's upper atmosphere fall into the broad category of "limb viewing" (LV) measurements, which includes any method for which the line of sight (LOS) fails to intersect the surface. Occultation, limb emission and limb scattering (LS) measurements are all LV methods that offer strong sensitivity to changes in the atmosphere near the tangent point of the LOS, due to the enhanced geometric path through the tangent layer (where the concentration also typically peaks, for most atmospheric species). But many of the retrieval algorithms used to interpret LV measurements assume that the atmosphere consists of "spherical shells", in which the atmospheric properties vary only with altitude (creating a 1D atmosphere). This assumption simplifies the analysis, but at the possible price of misinterpreting measurements made in the real atmosphere. In this presentation, we focus on the problem of LOS inhomogeneity for LS measurements made by the OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) instrument during the 2015 ozone hole period. The GSLS radiative transfer model (RTM) used in the default OMPS LP algorithms assumes a spherical-shell atmosphere defined at levels spaced 1 km apart, with extinction coefficients assumed to vary linearly with height between levels. Several recent improvements enable an updated single-scattering version of the GSLS RTM to ingest 3D MERRA-2 analysis fields (including temperature, pressure, and ozone concentration) when creating the model atmosphere, by introducing flexible altitude grids, flexible atmospheric specification along the LOS, and improved treatment of the radiative transfer within each atmospheric layer. As a result, the effect of LOS inhomogeneity on the current (1D) OMPS LP retrieval algorithm can now be studied theoretically, using realistic 3D atmospheric profiles. This work also represents a step towards enabling OMPS LP data to be ingested as part of future data assimilation efforts.

  10. Scattering of Ultra-relativistic Electrons in the Van Allen Radiation Belts Accounting for Hot Plasma Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xing; Shprits, Yuri Y; Ni, Binbin; Zhelavskaya, Irina S

    2017-12-18

    Electron flux in the Earth's outer radiation belt is highly variable due to a delicate balance between competing acceleration and loss processes. It has been long recognized that Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves may play a crucial role in the loss of radiation belt electrons. Previous theoretical studies proposed that EMIC waves may account for the loss of the relativistic electron population. However, recent observations showed that while EMIC waves are responsible for the significant loss of ultra-relativistic electrons, the relativistic electron population is almost unaffected. In this study, we provide a theoretical explanation for this discrepancy between previous theoretical studies and recent observations. We demonstrate that EMIC waves mainly contribute to the loss of ultra-relativistic electrons. This study significantly improves the current understanding of the electron dynamics in the Earth's radiation belt and also can help us understand the radiation environments of the exoplanets and outer planets.

  11. Scattering of Ultra-relativistic Electrons in the Van Allen Radiation Belts Accounting for Hot Plasma Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Xing; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Ni, Binbin; Zhelavskaya, Irina S.

    2017-01-01

    Electron flux in the Earth’s outer radiation belt is highly variable due to a delicate balance between competing acceleration and loss processes. It has been long recognized that Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves may play a crucial role in the loss of radiation belt electrons. Previous theoretical studies proposed that EMIC waves may account for the loss of the relativistic electron population. However, recent observations showed that while EMIC waves are responsible for the signific...

  12. Effect of the Scattering Radiation in Air and Two Type of Slap Phantom between PMMA and the ISO Water Phantom for Personal Dosimeters Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamwang, N.; Rungseesumran, T.; Saengchantr, D.; Monthonwattana, S.; Pungkun, V.

    2017-06-01

    The calibration of personal dosimeter to determine the quantities of the personal dose equivalent, Hp(d), is required to be placed on a suitable phantom in order to provide a reasonable approximation to the radiation backscattering properties as equivalent as part of body. The dosimeter which is worn on the trunk usually calibrated with slap phantom which recommended in ICRU 47 with dimension of 30 cm (w) x 30 cm (h) x 15 cm (t) PMMA slab phantom to achieve uniformity in calibration procedures, on the other hand the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), ISO 4037-3, proposed the ISO water slap phantom, with PMMA walls, same dimension but different wall thickness (front wall 2.5 mm and other side wall 10 mm thick) and fill with water. However, some laboratories are still calibrating a personal dosimeter in air in term of ambient dose equivalent, H*(d). This research study the effect of the scattering radiation in two type of those slap phantoms and in air, to calibrate two type of OSL (XA and LA) and electronic personal dosimeters. The X-ray and Cs-137 radiation field with the energy range from 33 to 662 keV were used. The results of this study will be discussed.

  13. Evaluation of the space scattered dose according to the position of the radiation workers in mammography room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Yeon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Heaundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the dose of the space to the controller located within the mammography room conducted a research on ways to the reduction exposure to the radiation workers. Results, the dose of 6.18 mGy/year was measured when there is no difference in the hilar area of the controller position, the dose of 2.35E-11 mGy/year was measured when installing the Shielding door. In addition, when the direction of the X-ray tube anode be heading this direction controller, low average level measured was 0.30 mGy/year. Based on this study, the mammography should be considered when installing the anode and cathod directions. And, by installing the shielding door, it must be able to completely separate shooting space and control room. This is the best way radiation protection method in radiation workers.

  14. Lattice dynamics of Al-based quasicrystals studied by high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Burkel, E; Ponkratz, U; Sinn, H; Alatas, A; Alp, E E

    2003-01-01

    Quasicrystals are aperiodic long-range ordered solids expected to exhibit peculiar dynamical properties. For these new intermetallic phases, previous theoretical work predicted the existence of phason dynamics and a highly structured vibrational density of states. We used the high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering method to investigate the lattice dynamics of Al-Cu-Fe and Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals, near the (18,29) diffraction peak situated on the fivefold axis. Phonon dispersion relations were determined for both quasicrystals. In addition to propagating acoustic modes, dispersionless ('optic') low-energy modes were observed.

  15. Synchrotron radiation small- and wide- angle scattering study of dispergation of Equoral, a novel drug delivery system with cyclosporine A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhríková, D; Andrýsek, T; Funari, S S; Balgavý, P

    2004-08-01

    Equoral oral solution is a novel drug delivery system for cyclosporine consisting mainly of non-ionic surfactants, polyglycerol esters and polyoxyethylated fatty acids aggregates, and gives microdispersions in the aqueous enviroment. To simulate dispergation, Equoral was mixed with varying amounts of water. Changes in the structure of the prepared aggregates were studied using synchrotron x-ray small- and wide-angle scattering. A lamellar phase is the most probable structure, arising spontaneously after dispergation of Equoral in the region of 30-70 wt% H2O.

  16. Structural evolution of regenerated silk fibroin under shear: Combined wide- and small-angle x-ray scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossle, Manfred [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), France; Panine, Pierre [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Riekel, Christine [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF)

    2004-04-01

    The structural evolution of regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin during shearing with a Couette cell has been studied in situ by synchrotron radiation small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering techniques. An elongation of fibroin molecules was observed with increasing shear rate, followed by an aggregation phase. The aggregates were found to be amorphous with {beta}-conformation according to infrared spectroscopy. Scanning x-ray microdiffraction with a 5 {micro}m beam on aggregated material, which had solidified in air, showed silk II reflections and a material with equatorial reflections close to the silk I structure reflections, but with strong differences in reflection intensities. This silk I type material shows up to two low-angle peaks suggesting the presence of water molecules that might be intercalated between hydrogen-bonded sheets.

  17. A new observational approach to investigate the heliospheric interstellar wind interface - The study of extreme and far ultraviolet resonantly scattered solar radiation from neon, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Fahr, Hans J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the outstanding uncertainties in the understanding of the heliosphere concerns the character of the interaction between the outflowing solar wind and the interstellar medium. A new possibility for obtaining information on this topic is suggested. The cosmically abundant elements neon, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen will be affected differently at their interface passage depending upon the character of this region. Consequently, the distribution of these atoms and their ions will vary within the inner heliosphere. The study of resonantly scattered solar radiation from these species will then provide information on the nature of the interface. A preliminary evaluation of this approach has been carried out, and the results are encouraging. The relevant lines to be studied are in the extreme and far ulraviolet. The existing data in these bands are reviewed; unfortunately, past instrumentation has had insufficient resolution and sensitivity to provide useful information. The capabilities of future approved missions with capabilities in this area are evaluated.

  18. Study of the sensitivity of the radiation transport problem in a scattering medium; Estudo da sensibilidade do problema de transporte de radiacao em meio espalhador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Rogerio Chaffin

    2002-03-15

    In this work, the system of differential equations obtained by the angular approach of the two-dimensional transport equation by the discrete ordinates method is solved through the formulation of finite elements with the objective of investigating the sensitivity of the outgoing flux of radiation with the incoming flux and the properties of absorption and scattering of the medium. The variational formulation for the system of differential equations of second order with the generalized boundary conditions of Neumann (third type) allows an easy implementation of the method of the finite elements with triangular mesh and approximation space of first order. The geometry chosen for the simulations is a circle with a non homogeneous circular form in its interior. The mapping of Dirichlet-Neumann is studied through various simulations involving the incoming flux, the outgoing flux and the properties of the medium. (author)

  19. Continental pollution in the Western Mediterranean basin: large variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo and influence on the direct shortwave radiative effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Di Biagio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pollution aerosols strongly influence the composition of the Western Mediterranean basin, but at present little is known on their optical properties. We report in this study in situ observations of the single scattering albedo (ω of pollution aerosol plumes measured over the Western Mediterranean basin during the TRAQA (TRansport and Air QuAlity airborne campaign in summer 2012. Cases of pollution export from different source regions around the basin and at different altitudes between  ∼  160 and 3500 m above sea level were sampled during the flights. Data from this study show a large variability of ω, with values between 0.84–0.98 at 370 nm and 0.70–0.99 at 950 nm. The single scattering albedo generally decreases with the wavelength, with some exception associated to the mixing of pollution with sea spray or dust particles over the sea surface. The lowest values of ω (0.84–0.70 between 370 and 950 nm are measured in correspondence of a fresh plume possibly linked to ship emissions over the basin. The range of variability of ω observed in this study seems to be independent of the source region around the basin, as well as of the altitude and aging time of the plumes. The observed variability of ω reflects in a large variability for the complex refractive index of pollution aerosols, which is estimated to span in the large range 1.41–1.77 and 0.002–0.097 for the real and the imaginary parts, respectively, between 370 and 950 nm. Radiative calculations in clear-sky conditions were performed with the GAME radiative transfer model to test the sensitivity of the aerosol shortwave Direct Radiative Effect (DRE to the variability of ω as observed in this study. Results from the calculations suggest up to a 50 and 30 % change of the forcing efficiency (FE, i.e. the DRE per unit of optical depth, at the surface (−160/−235 W m−2 τ−1 at 60° solar zenith angle and at the Top-Of-Atmosphere (−137/−92

  20. Continental pollution in the Western Mediterranean basin: large variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo and influence on the direct shortwave radiative effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Biagio, Claudia; Formenti, Paola; Doppler, Lionel; Gaimoz, Cécile; Grand, Noel; Ancellet, Gerard; Attié, Jean-Luc; Bucci, Silvia; Dubuisson, Philippe; Fierli, Federico; Mallet, Marc; Ravetta, François

    2016-08-01

    Pollution aerosols strongly influence the composition of the Western Mediterranean basin, but at present little is known on their optical properties. We report in this study in situ observations of the single scattering albedo (ω) of pollution aerosol plumes measured over the Western Mediterranean basin during the TRAQA (TRansport and Air QuAlity) airborne campaign in summer 2012. Cases of pollution export from different source regions around the basin and at different altitudes between ˜ 160 and 3500 m above sea level were sampled during the flights. Data from this study show a large variability of ω, with values between 0.84-0.98 at 370 nm and 0.70-0.99 at 950 nm. The single scattering albedo generally decreases with the wavelength, with some exception associated to the mixing of pollution with sea spray or dust particles over the sea surface. The lowest values of ω (0.84-0.70 between 370 and 950 nm) are measured in correspondence of a fresh plume possibly linked to ship emissions over the basin. The range of variability of ω observed in this study seems to be independent of the source region around the basin, as well as of the altitude and aging time of the plumes. The observed variability of ω reflects in a large variability for the complex refractive index of pollution aerosols, which is estimated to span in the large range 1.41-1.77 and 0.002-0.097 for the real and the imaginary parts, respectively, between 370 and 950 nm. Radiative calculations in clear-sky conditions were performed with the GAME radiative transfer model to test the sensitivity of the aerosol shortwave Direct Radiative Effect (DRE) to the variability of ω as observed in this study. Results from the calculations suggest up to a 50 and 30 % change of the forcing efficiency (FE), i.e. the DRE per unit of optical depth, at the surface (-160/-235 W m-2 τ-1 at 60° solar zenith angle) and at the Top-Of-Atmosphere (-137/-92 W m-2 τ-1) for ω varying between its maximum and minimum value

  1. Evaluation of the OMI cloud pressures derived from rotational Raman scattering by comparisons with other satellite data and radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkov, Alexander; Joiner, Joanna; Spurr, Robert; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Levelt, Pieternel; Stephens, Graeme

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we examine differences between cloud pressures retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) using the ultraviolet rotational Raman scattering (RRS) algorithm and those from the thermal infrared (IR) Aqua/MODIS. Several cloud data sets are currently being used in OMI trace gas retrieval algorithms including climatologies based on IR measurements and simultaneous cloud parameters derived from OMI. From a validation perspective, it is important to understand the OMI retrieved cloud parameters and how they differ with those derived from the IR. To this end, we perform radiative transfer calculations to simulate the effects of different geophysical conditions on the OMI RRS cloud pressure retrievals. We also quantify errors related to the use of the Mixed Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) concept as currently implemented of the OMI algorithms. Using properties from the Cloudsat radar and MODIS, we show that radiative transfer calculations support the following: (1) The MLER model is adequate for single-layer optically thick, geometrically thin clouds, but can produce significant errors in estimated cloud pressure for optically thin clouds. (2) In a two-layer cloud, the RRS algorithm may retrieve a cloud pressure that is either between the two cloud decks or even beneath the top of the lower cloud deck because of scattering between the cloud layers; the retrieved pressure depends upon the viewing geometry and the optical depth of the upper cloud deck. (3) Absorbing aerosol in and above a cloud can produce significant errors in the retrieved cloud pressure. (4) The retrieved RRS effective pressure for a deep convective cloud will be significantly higher than the physical cloud top pressure derived with thermal IR.

  2. Evaluation of the OMI Cloud Pressures Derived from Rotational Raman Scattering by Comparisons with other Satellite Data and Radiative Transfer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkov, Alexander; Joiner, Joanna; Spurr, Robert; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Levelt, Pieternel; Stephens, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine differences between cloud pressures retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) using the ultraviolet rotational Raman scattering (RRS) algorithm and those from the thermal infrared (IR) Aqua/MODIS. Several cloud data sets are currently being used in OMI trace gas retrieval algorithms including climatologies based on IR measurements and simultaneous cloud parameters derived from OMI. From a validation perspective, it is important to understand the OMI retrieved cloud parameters and how they differ with those derived from the IR. To this end, we perform radiative transfer calculations to simulate the effects of different geophysical conditions on the OMI RRS cloud pressure retrievals. We also quantify errors related to the use of the Mixed Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) concept as currently implemented of the OMI algorithms. Using properties from the Cloudsat radar and MODIS, we show that radiative transfer calculations support the following: (1) The MLER model is adequate for single-layer optically thick, geometrically thin clouds, but can produce significant errors in estimated cloud pressure for optically thin clouds. (2) In a two-layer cloud, the RRS algorithm may retrieve a cloud pressure that is either between the two cloud decks or even beneath the top of the lower cloud deck because of scattering between the cloud layers; the retrieved pressure depends upon the viewing geometry and the optical depth of the upper cloud deck. (3) Absorbing aerosol in and above a cloud can produce significant errors in the retrieved cloud pressure. (4) The retrieved RRS effective pressure for a deep convective cloud will be significantly higher than the physical cloud top pressure derived with thermal IR.

  3. Determination of the scattered radiation at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory of IPEN using the shadow cone method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga, Tallyson S.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Freitas, Bruno M. [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Fonseca, Evaldo S.; Pereira, Walsan W., E-mail: talvarenga@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br, E-mail: bfreitas@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: walsan@ird.gov.br, E-mail: evaldo@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Because of the increase in the demand for the calibration of neutron detectors, there is a need for new calibration services. In this context, the Calibration Laboratory of Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN), São Paulo, which already offers calibration services of radiation detectors with standard X, gamma, beta and alpha beams, has recently projected a new test laboratory for neutron detectors. This work evaluated the contribution of dispersed neutron radiation in this laboratory, using the cone shadow method and a Bonner sphere spectrometer to take the measurements at a distance of 100 cm from the neutron source. The dosimetric quantities H⁎(10) and H⁎(10) were obtained at the laboratory, allowing the calibration of detectors. (author)

  4. Combining the absorptive and radiative loss in metasurfaces for multi-spectral shaping of the electromagnetic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenbo; Huang, Cheng; Pu, Mingbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Cui, Jianhua; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-02-01

    The absorptive and radiative losses are two fundamental aspects of the electromagnetic responses, which are widely occurring in many different systems such as waveguides, solar cells, and antennas. Here we proposed a metasurface to realize the control of the absorptive and radiative loss and to reduce the radar cross section (RCS) in multi-frequency bands. The anti-phase gradient and absorptive metasurfaces were designed that consists of metallic square patch and square loop structure inserted with resistors, acting as an phase gradient material in the X and Ku band, while behaving as an absorber in the S band. The simulation and experiment results verified the double-band, wideband and polarization-independent RCS reduction by the absorptive and anti-phase gradient metasurfaces.

  5. Effects of Compressibility on the Radiation and Viscous Damping Terms in the Scattering and Extinction Cross-Sections of a Single Spherical Bubble: A Puzzle Solved and a Puzzle Posed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.; Leighton, T.G.

    2011-01-01

    In [M. A. Ainslie & T. G. Leighton, Underwater Acoustic Measurements (Heraklion, Crete, 2007), pp 571-576], the authors described a discrepancy between the radiation damping coefficients in the models due to Weston and to Medwin describing the scattering cross-section of a single spherical bubble.

  6. Evaluation of a method for correction of scatter radiation in thorax cone beam CT; Evaluation d'une methode de correction du rayonnement diffuse en tomographie du thorax avec faisceau conique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinkel, J.; Dinten, J.M. [CEA Grenoble (DTBS/STD), Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique, LETI, 38 (France); Esteve, F. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution. X-ray scatter estimation is a big challenge for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax: scatter level is significantly higher on cone beam systems compared to collimated fan beam systems. The effects of this scattered radiation are cupping artefacts, streaks, and quantification inaccuracies. The beam stops conventional scatter estimation approach can be used for CBCT but leads to a significant increase in terms of dose and acquisition time. At CEA-LETI has been developed an original scatter management process without supplementary acquisition. Methods and Materials: This Analytical Plus Indexing-based method (API) of scatter correction in CBCT is based on scatter calibration through offline acquisitions with beam stops on lucite plates, combined to an analytical transformation issued from physical equations. This approach has been applied with success in bone densitometry and mammography. To evaluate this method in CBCT, acquisitions from a thorax phantom with and without beam stops have been performed. To compare different scatter correction approaches, Feldkamp algorithm has been applied on rough data corrected from scatter by API and by beam stops approaches. Results: The API method provides results in good agreement with the beam stops array approach, suppressing cupping artefact. Otherwise influence of the scatter correction method on the noise in the reconstructed images has been evaluated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the API method is effective for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax. Compared to a beam stops array method it needs a lower x-ray dose and shortens acquisition time. (authors)

  7. Combination of acoustic levitation with small angle scattering techniques and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism. Application to the study of protein solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiglio, Viviana; Grillo, Isabelle; Fomina, Margarita; Wien, Frank; Shalaev, Evgenyi; Novikov, Alexey; Brassamin, Séverine; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pérez, Javier; Hennet, Louis

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic levitation technique is a useful sample handling method for small solid and liquids samples, suspended in air by means of an ultrasonic field. This method was previously used at synchrotron sources for studying pharmaceutical liquids and protein solutions using x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). In this work we combined for the first time this containerless method with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) to study the structural behavior of proteins in solutions during the water evaporation. SANS results are also compared with SAXS experiments. The aggregation behavior of 45μl droplets of lysozyme protein diluted in water was followed during the continuous increase of the sample concentration by evaporating the solvent. The evaporation kinetics was followed at different drying stage by SANS and SAXS with a good data quality. In a prospective work using SRCD, we also studied the evolution of the secondary structure of the myoglobin protein in water solution in the same evaporation conditions. Acoustic levitation was applied for the first time with SANS and the high performances of the used neutron instruments made it possible to monitor fast container-less reactions in situ. A preliminary work using SRCD shows the potentiality of its combination with acoustic levitation for studying the evolution of the protein structure with time. This multi-techniques approach could give novel insights into crystallization and self-assembly phenomena of biological compound with promising potential applications in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics industry. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of time-of-flight near-infrared spectroscopy to fruits: analysis of absorption and scattering conditions of near-infrared radiation using cross-correlation of the time-resolved profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Yohei; Tsuchikawa, Satoru

    2009-03-01

    The absorption and scattering conditions of near-infrared radiation in a grapefruit, a popular thick-peeled fruit, were investigated by time-of-flight near-infrared spectroscopy (TOF-NIRS). The cross-correlation function was introduced to obtain fine spectroscopic information from the time-resolved profile. Variation of the optical parameters in both the time-resolved profile and the cross-correlation function showed that the NIR radiation was largely absorbed in the peel and considerably scattered in the flesh of the fruit. It also reflected the straightness of the input pulsed laser. The substantial optical path length of the grapefruit estimated from the cross-correlation function was approximately 4 to 5 times as long as the nominal optical path length (NOPL). The cross-correlation function was an effective tool to analyze the absorption/scattering conditions of NIR radiation in a sample where an unstable light source such as a Nd:YAG laser with high output energy was employed.

  9. Electromagnetic Scattering and Material Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Omar, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Based on the author's more-than 30 years of experience, this first-of-its-kind volume presents a comprehensive and systematic analysis of electromagnetic fields and their scattering by material objects. The book considers all three categories of scattering environments commonly used for material measurements – unbounded regions, waveguides, and cavity resonators. The book covers such essential topics as electromagnetic field propagation, radiation, and scattering, containing mathematically rigorous approaches for the computation of electromagnetic fields and the explanation of their behavior.

  10. Reprint of Testing scattering matrices: a compendium of recipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenier, J.W.; van der Mee, C.V.M.

    2010-01-01

    Scattering matrices describe the transformation of the Stokes parameters of a beam of radiation upon scattering of that beam. The problems of testing scattering matrices for scattering by one particle and for single scattering by an assembly of particles are addressed. The treatment concerns

  11. Incorporating quantitative single photon emission computed tomography into radiation therapy treatment planning for lung cancer: impact of attenuation and scatter correction on the single photon emission computed tomography-weighted mean dose and functional lung segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lingshu; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Celler, Anna; Thompson, Anna; Fua, Tsien-Fei; Liu, Mitchell; Duzenli, Cheryl; Gill, Brad; Sheehan, Finbar; Powe, John; Worsley, Daniel; Marks, Lawrence; Moiseenko, Vitali

    2010-10-01

    To assess the impact of attenuation and scatter corrections on the calculation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-weighted mean dose (SWMD) and functional volume segmentation as applied to radiation therapy treatment planning for lung cancer. Nine patients with lung cancer underwent a SPECT lung perfusion scan. For each scan, four image sets were reconstructed using the ordered subsets expectation maximization method with attenuation and scatter corrections ranging from none to a most comprehensive combination of attenuation corrections and direct scatter modeling. Functional volumes were segmented in each reconstructed image using 10%, 20%, …, 90% of maximum SPECT intensity as a threshold. Systematic effects of SPECT reconstruction methods on treatment planning using functional volume were studied by calculating size and spatial agreements of functional volumes, and V(20) for functional volume from actual treatment plans. The SWMD was calculated for radiation beams with a variety of possible gantry angles and field sizes. Functional volume segmentation is sensitive to the particular method of SPECT reconstruction used. Large variations in functional volumes, as high as >50%, were observed in SPECT images reconstructed with different attenuation/scatter corrections. However, SWMD was less sensitive to the type of scatter corrections. SWMD was consistent within 2% for all reconstructions as long as computed tomography-based attenuation correction was used. When using perfusion SPECT images during treatment planning optimization/evaluation, the SWMD may be the preferred figure of merit, as it is less affected by reconstruction technique, compared with threshold-based functional volume segmentation. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Angewandte Physik, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs.

  13. Generalized radiative transfer theory for scattering by particles in an absorbing gas: Addressing both spatial and spectral integration in multi-angle remote sensing of optically thin aerosol layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Xu, Feng; Diner, David J.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate the computational advantage gained by introducing non-exponential transmission laws into radiative transfer theory for two specific situations. One is the problem of spatial integration over a large domain where the scattering particles cluster randomly in a medium uniformly filled with an absorbing gas, and only a probabilistic description of the variability is available. The increasingly important application here is passive atmospheric profiling using oxygen absorption in the visible/near-IR spectrum. The other scenario is spectral integration over a region where the absorption cross-section of a spatially uniform gas varies rapidly and widely and, moreover, there are scattering particles embedded in the gas that are distributed uniformly, or not. This comes up in many applications, O2 A-band profiling being just one instance. We bring a common framework to solve these problems both efficiently and accurately that is grounded in the recently developed theory of Generalized Radiative Transfer (GRT). In GRT, the classic exponential law of transmission is replaced by one with a slower power-law decay that accounts for the unresolved spectral or spatial variability. Analytical results are derived in the single-scattering limit that applies to optically thin aerosol layers. In spectral integration, a modest gain in accuracy is obtained. As for spatial integration of near-monochromatic radiance, we find that, although both continuum and in-band radiances are affected by moderate levels of sub-pixel variability, only extreme variability will affect in-band/continuum ratios.

  14. Considerations on scattering and leak radiation for effective determination of secondary shielding in X-rays rooms of megavoltage; Consideracoes sobre radiacoes de espalhamento e vazamento para determinacao eficaz da barreira secundaria em salas de raios-x de megavoltagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Diogo da S.; Lava, Deise D.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F., E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: deise_dy@hotmail.com, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br, E-mail: tony@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This paper addresses the development of a algorithm capable of analyzing the thickness of the secondary shielding due to the production of secondary beams. The production of this beam requires consideration of scattering angle, as well as factors normally used for screening of medical facilities using radiographic techniques. Besides the beam emanated from scattering radiation, is is necessary to evaluate the contribution of leakage radiation, originating from equipment used for the production of the primary beam. A view of the mutual contribution of these radiation to the formation of the secondary beam has shown the need of using shieldings in adjacent walls of the room. The code was validated by comparison with an example case provided by NCRP-151 Report. In this report calculations for determining the secondary barrier for small angles are presented, that deserves greater attention for shielding and statements related to radiotherapy procedures of Modulated intensity. The results are consistent with those provided in the report, which makes the code can be used as a practical tool for the determination of effective shielding beams of megavoltage X-rays.

  15. Thomson Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Thomson scattering is a very powerful diagnostic which is applied at nearly every magnetic confinement device. Depending on the experimental conditions different plasma parameters can be diagnosed. When the wave vector is much larger than the plasma Debye length, the total scattered power is

  16. Measurement of e{sup +}p neutral current deep inelastic scattering with a longitudinally polarised positron beam and X-ray radiation damage for silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Januschek, Friederike

    2012-05-15

    The cross sections for Neutral Current e{sup +}p Deep Inelastic Scattering (NC DIS) with longitudinally polarised positron beams were measured at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=318 GeV using the ZEUS detector at HERA. Single-differential cross sections as a function of the virtuality of the exchanged boson, Q{sup 2}, of the inelasticity, y, and of the Bjorken scaling variable, x, and reduced cross sections (as a function of x and Q{sup 2}) were measured in the phase space region defined as Q{sup 2}>185 GeV{sup 2}, y<0.9 and y(1-x){sup 2}>0.004. The results, based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb{sup -1}, are given for zero polarisation for the whole sample, as well as for both positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beam. The measured cross sections are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. The proton structure function xF{sub 3} is measured and the interference term xF{sup {gamma}}{sup Z}{sub 3} is extracted as a function of x at Q{sup 2}=1500 GeV{sup 2} by extrapolating the measurements done at different Q{sup 2} values. The presented measurements of the polarised e{sup +}p NC DIS cross sections, the xF{sub 3} structure function and the xF{sup {gamma}}{sup Z}{sub 3} interference term exceed the precision of previous ZEUS measurements. The uncertainties of the Parton Density Functions (PDFs) for the gluon and the u-valence quark are expected to be reduced at high-x values when the presented results are included in the PDF fits of the proton. A study is presented to further reduce PDF uncertainties for the gluon at very high x (above 10{sup -1}) through the inclusion of DIS dijet cross sections in a ZEUS-JETS-like PDF fit. An irradiation facility to study the X-ray-induced radiation damage of silicon sensors for the European XFEL was set up at HASYLAB. Nine gate-controlled diodes were irradiated with doses from 1 kGy to 1 GGy in several irradiation steps and the surface current I

  17. Reducing the Spread in Modeled Aerosol Radiative Forcing with a Global, Scattering Line-by-Line Model as Part of RFMIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. L.; Paynter, D.; Freidenreich, S.; Feldman, D.; Ramaswamy, V.; Collins, W. D.

    2016-12-01

    The large range in aerosol radiative forcing across CMIP5 GCMs may come from either a true range in aerosol climatology or radiative parameterization errors. One of the goals of the Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project (RFMIP) is to quantify the contribution of radiative parameterization errors to the range in aerosol forcing on a global scale. This is achieved by running a benchmark-quality line-by-line code at the native resolution of each participating GCM using the atmospheric state from that GCM as input, including aerosol optical properties. Thus, the framework provides a benchmark estimate of flux for every model grid point. The resulting radiative fluxes can then be compared to those produced natively by the GCM radiative parameterization. In this way the radiative parameterization error is quantified globally and regionally while maintaining the variability in atmospheric state between models. This calculation is performed with and without aerosols to further provide an estimate of aerosol radiative forcing. This intercomparison is unique in that it performs calculations over the entire globe on each model's native grid and with each model's meteorological fields as input, thus elucidating the spatial distribution of errors and representing a wider range of atmospheric conditions in its characterizations. Previous radiative intercomparison efforts have relied on only a handful of atmospheric profiles, which are often idealized, to represent the variability of conditions in the atmosphere. For this study we present a proof of concept of the RFMIP protocol by intercomparing the results for two GCMs, GFDL's AM4 and NCAR's CESM. We demonstrate the contribution RFMIP has on reducing the range in modeled aerosol radiative forcing and the potential it can have with the participation of additional modeling centers.

  18. Evaluation of attenuating materials: model for the distribution of scattered radiation; Avaliacao de materiais atenuadores: modelo para a distribuicao da radiacao espalhada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo R. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Energia e Eletrotecnica; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model for the behaviour of the distribution of photon scattered by attenuating media is presented. Shielding barriers or attenuating materials used in tests of quality control in radiology are proposed. Comparative results for Lucite are reported 6 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Controlling Radiative Heat Transfer Across the Mold Flux Layer by the Scattering Effect of the Borosilicate Mold Flux System with Metallic Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dae-Woo; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2017-08-01

    The present study proposes a countermeasure for regulating total heat flux through the mold flux layer by designed mold flux with additive metallic iron particles. The heat flux through the B2O3-CaO-SiO2-Na2O-CaF2-Fe system was investigated using the infrared emitter technique to evaluate total flux density across the mold flux film. Both scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis were employed in order to identify the morphological and compositional changes of the crystalline phase, according to increasing iron contents in the mold flux. It was confirmed that the crystalline layer of studied mold fluxes does not have a meaningful effect on the total heat flux density due to the similar structure and fraction of the crystalline phase. The extinction coefficient was measured for glassy mold fluxes using an ultraviolet/visible and a Fourier transformation-infrared ray spectrometer in the range of 0.5 to 5 μm. For analyzing the scattering behavior of iron particles on the extinction coefficient, the number density and diameter of particles were observed by an automated SEM (auto-SEM). With these data, Mie scattering theory is adopted to define the scattering behavior of dispersed iron droplets in glassy matrix. It was found that the theoretical scattering coefficient demonstrated about 1623 to 3295 m-1, which is in accordance with the experimental results. In doing so, this study successfully achieves the strong scattering behavior that would contribute greatly to the optimization of overall heat flux through the mold flux film during the casting process.

  20. Critical scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ., Dep. of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Perry, S.C. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3} is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs.

  1. Physically based radiative transfer framework for hyperspectral modelling of light interaction with volumetrically inhomogeneous scattering tissue-like media (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Alexander; Bykov, Alexander; Rushmeier, Holly E.; Meglinski, Igor

    2017-02-01

    In the current report we present further developments of a unified Monte Carlo-based computational model and explore hyperspectral modelling of light interaction with volumetrically inhomogeneous scattering tissue-like media. The developed framework utilizes voxelized representation of the medium and considers spatial/volumetric variations in both structural e.g. surface roughness and wavelength-dependant optical properties. We present the detailed description of algorithms for modelling of light-medium interactions and schemes used for voxel-to-voxel photon packet transitions. The results of calculation of diffuse reflectance and Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF) are presented. The results of simulations are compared with exact analytical solutions, phantom studies and measurements obtained by a low-cost experimental system developed in house for acquiring shape and subsurface scattering properties of objects by means of projection of temporal sequences of binary patterns. The computational solution is accelerated by the graphics processing units (GPUs) and compatible with most standard graphics/ and computer tomography file formats.

  2. Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botto, D.J.; Pratt, R.H.

    1979-05-01

    The current status of Compton scattering, both experimental observations and the theoretical predictions, is examined. Classes of experiments are distinguished and the results obtained are summarized. The validity of the incoherent scattering function approximation and the impulse approximation is discussed. These simple theoretical approaches are compared with predictions of the nonrelativistic dipole formula of Gavrila and with the relativistic results of Whittingham. It is noted that the A/sup -2/ based approximations fail to predict resonances and an infrared divergence, both of which have been observed. It appears that at present the various available theoretical approaches differ significantly in their predictions and that further and more systematic work is required.

  3. Contactless diagnostics of biophysical parameters of skin and blood on the basis of approximating functions for radiation fluxes scattered by skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisenko, S A; Kugeiko, M M [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2014-03-28

    Approximating expressions are derived to calculate spectral and spatial characteristics of diffuse reflection of light from a two-layer medium mimicking human skin. The effectiveness of the use of these expressions in the optical diagnosis of skin biophysical parameters (tissue scattering parameters, concentration of melanin in the epidermis, concentration of total haemoglobin and bilirubin in the tissues of the dermis) and content of haemoglobin derivatives in blood (oxy-, deoxy-, met-, carboxy- and sulfhaemoglobin) is analysed numerically. The methods are proposed to determine in realtime these parameters without contact of the measuring instrument with the patient's body. (biophotonics)

  4. Time-resolved two-dimensional observation of the change in X-ray diffuse scattering from an alloy single crystal using an imaging plate on a synchrotron-radiation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, H. (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Photon Factory); Matsuo, Y. (Nara Women' s Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics); Ohshima, K. (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Applied Physics); Hashimoto, S. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research)

    1990-12-01

    Through the high sensitivity of an area-detector Imaging Plate and the high brilliance of synchrotron radiation, changes in two-dimensional intensity distribution of X-ray diffuse scattering from an AgZn single crystal having the B2-type structure were observed successively during the structural transition from the {beta}' phase to the {zeta} phase. It has been shown in a series of patterns taken at a time interval of 600 s that a diffuse intensity sheet extending parallel to the (111) relplane gradually loses its intensity without a precursive modulation while weak diffraction spots from the nuclei of the {zeta} phase appear superimposed on the sheet with a definite positional realtion to the diffraction spots from the {beta}' phase. Promising aspects as well as the limits of the method applied to time-resolved measurements of structural changes are discussed. (orig.).

  5. Beam-surface scattering studies of the individual and combined effects of VUV radiation and hyperthermal O, O2, or Ar on FEP Teflon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsvold, Amy L; Zhang, Jianming; Upadhyaya, Hari P; Minton, Timothy K

    2009-01-01

    Beam-surface scattering experiments were used to probe products that scattered from FEP Teflon surfaces during bombardment by various combinations of atomic and molecular oxygen, Ar atoms, and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light. A laser-breakdown source was used to create hyperthermal (translational energies in the range 4-13 eV) beams of argon and atomic/molecular oxygen. The average incidence energy of these beams was tunable and was controlled precisely with a synchronized chopper wheel. A filtered deuterium lamp provided a source of VUV light in a narrow-wavelength range centered at 161 nm. Volatile products that exited the surfaces were monitored with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Hyperthermal O atoms with average translational energies above approximately 4 eV may react directly with a pristine FEP Teflon surface, and the reactivity appears to increase with the translational energy of the incident O atoms. VUV light or highly energetic collisions of O2 or Ar may break chemical bonds and lead to the ejection of volatile products; the ejection of volatile products is enhanced when the surface is subjected to VUV light and energetic collisions simultaneously. Exposure to VUV light or to hyperthermal O2 or Ar may increase the reactivity of an FEP Teflon surface to O atoms.

  6. Light Scattering in Solid IX

    CERN Document Server

    Cardona, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    This is the ninth volume of a well-established series in which expert practitioners discuss topical aspects of light scattering in solids. It reviews recent developments concerning mainly semiconductor nanostructures and inelastic x-ray scattering, including both coherent time-domain and spontaneous scattering studies. In the past few years, light scattering has become one of the most important research and characterization methods for studying carbon nanotubes and semiconducting quantum dots, and a crucial tool for exploring the coupled exciton--photon system in semiconductor cavities. Among the novel techniques discussed in this volume are pump--probe ultrafast measurements and those which use synchrotron radiation as light source. The book addresses improvements in the intensity, beam quality and time synchronization of modern synchrotron sources, which made it possible to measure the phonon dispersion in very small samples and to determine electronic energy bands as well as enabling real-time observations...

  7. Simulation of image detectors in radiology for determination of scatter-to-primary ratios using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP/MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smans, Kristien; Zoetelief, Johannes; Verbrugge, Beatrijs; Haeck, Wim; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Bosmans, Hilde [SCKCEN, Mol 2400, Belgium and University Hospitals of Leuven, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Delft University of Technology, 2628 CN Delft (Netherlands); University Hospitals of Leuven, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); IRSN, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); SCKCEN, Mol 2400, Belgium, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); University Hospitals of Leuven, Leuven 3000 (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare and validate three methods to simulate radiographic image detectors with the Monte Carlo software MCNP/MCNPX in a time efficient way. Methods: The first detector model was the standard semideterministic radiography tally, which has been used in previous image simulation studies. Next to the radiography tally two alternative stochastic detector models were developed: A perfect energy integrating detector and a detector based on the energy absorbed in the detector material. Validation of three image detector models was performed by comparing calculated scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs) with the published and experimentally acquired SPR values. Results: For mammographic applications, SPRs computed with the radiography tally were up to 44% larger than the published results, while the SPRs computed with the perfect energy integrating detectors and the blur-free absorbed energy detector model were, on the average, 0.3% (ranging from -3% to 3%) and 0.4% (ranging from -5% to 5%) lower, respectively. For general radiography applications, the radiography tally overestimated the measured SPR by as much as 46%. The SPRs calculated with the perfect energy integrating detectors were, on the average, 4.7% (ranging from -5.3% to -4%) lower than the measured SPRs, whereas for the blur-free absorbed energy detector model, the calculated SPRs were, on the average, 1.3% (ranging from -0.1% to 2.4%) larger than the measured SPRs. Conclusions: For mammographic applications, both the perfect energy integrating detector model and the blur-free energy absorbing detector model can be used to simulate image detectors, whereas for conventional x-ray imaging using higher energies, the blur-free energy absorbing detector model is the most appropriate image detector model. The radiography tally overestimates the scattered part and should therefore not be used to simulate radiographic image detectors.

  8. Scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This corrected and updated second edition of "Scattering Theory" presents a concise and modern coverage of the subject. In the present treatment, special attention is given to the role played by the long-range behaviour of the projectile-target interaction, and a theory is developed, which is well suited to describe near-threshold bound and continuum states in realistic binary systems such as diatomic molecules or molecular ions. It is motivated by the fact that experimental advances have shifted and broadened the scope of applications where concepts from scattering theory are used, e.g. to the field of ultracold atoms and molecules, which has been experiencing enormous growth in recent years, largely triggered by the successful realization of Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute atomic gases in 1995. The book contains sections on special topics such as near-threshold quantization, quantum reflection, Feshbach resonances and the quantum description of scattering in two dimensions. The level of abstraction is k...

  9. Electromagnetic Scattering from Vegetation Canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabandi, Kamal

    Satellite-borne imaging radar has been proposed by the remote sensing community as a potential sensor for the acquisition of quantitative information about forested area on a global scale. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to develop retrieved algorithms that can provide reasonable estimate of vegetation biomass, leaf moisture content, and other physical parameters of tree canopies from multifrequency/multipolarization observations of their radar backscattering coefficients. Retrieval algorithms often are called "inverse problem" because their input/output parameters are the inverse of those associated with the direct problem, which in the present case refers to the development of a radar scattering model that relates the radar response to the canopy architecture and associated parameters. This thesis provides electromagnetic solutions to several problems associated with scattering from tree canopies. The forest canopy is modelled in the form of layers comprised of randomly distributed particles with known statistical properties. In Chapters 2-8 effective scattering models for different constituent particles of vegetation canopies are developed by employing appropriate asymptotic solutions and approximations. The effects of various physical features of the particles, such as curvature and variation in thickness for planar leaves and roughness for tree trunks, on their scattering behavior are examined. In Chapter 9 the scattering problem of inhomogeneous layered media is formulated via the vector radiative transfer equations and a first-order solution for the radar scattering coefficients is obtained. The radiative transfer solution is formulated in terms of two sets of input functions: the scattering matrices of the constituent particles, which are given in Chapters 2-8, and the size and orientation distribution functions of the particles. The radar scattering model and associated input functions can be used to conduct sensitivity analyses to determine the

  10. Spontaneous Brillouin scattering in a microdroplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, S. C.; Leung, P. T.; Young, K.

    1990-05-01

    Spontaneous Brillouin scattering in a micrometer-sized liquid droplet is analyzed from first principles, using the spherical-wave normal-mode basis. Instead of the conservation of linear momentum, this interaction is governed by a selection rule due to the conservation of angular momentum. The Brillouin spectrum is then calculated, both for observation at a given angle and for the sum over all angles, and compared with scattering in a bulk medium. Special attention is paid to the case where the incident and scattered radiation fall on an electromagnetic resonance of the droplet. The analysis lays the foundation for formulating stimulated Brillouin scattering in the same system.

  11. Dielectric effects on Thomson scattering in a relativistic magnetized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, H.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of the dielectric properties of a relativistic magnetized plasma on the scattering of electromagnetic radiation by fluctuations in electron density are investigated. The origin of the density fluctuations is not considered. Expressions for the scattering cross-section and the scattered...

  12. Diffusion and scattering in multifractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovejoy, S. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Schertzer, D. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Waston, B. [St. Lawrence Univ., Canton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes investigations of radiative properties of multifractal clouds using two different approaches. In the first, diffusion is considered by examining the scaling properties of one dimensional random walks on media with multifractal diffusivities. The second approach considers the scattering statistics associated with radiative transport.

  13. Soft X-ray synchrotron radiation investigations of actinidematerials systems utilizing X-ray emission spectroscopy and resonantinelastic X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuh, D.K.; Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.-H.; Nordgren, J.

    2004-01-03

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) methods have been utilized with increasing frequency over the past several years to study topics in actinide science, ranging from those of a fundamental nature to those that address a specifically-targeted technical need. In particular, the emergence of microspectroscopic and fluorescence-based techniques have permitted investigations of actinide materials at sources of soft x-ray SR. Spectroscopic techniques with fluorescence-based detection are useful for actinide investigations since they are sensitive to small amounts of material and the information sampling depth may be varied. These characteristics also serve to simplify both sample preparation and safety considerations. Examples of investigations using these fluorescence techniques will be described along with their results, as well as the prospects for future investigations utilizing these methodologies.

  14. Single and Multiple Scattering in UWB Bicone Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele D'Errico

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of interactions between radiators in a UWB biconical array, drawing attention to single and multiple scatterings, is carried out. The complementarity between electrical coupling and radiation scattering is argued. The point source approximation is discussed and shown to be insufficient. An approximation of radiation scattering based on angular averaging of the scattering coefficient is proposed. This approach yields a reduction of the problem complexity, which is especially interesting in UWB multiple antenna systems, because of the large bandwidth. Multiple scattering between radiators is shown to be a second-order effect. Finally, a time domain approach is used in order to investigate pulse distortion and quantify the exactness of the proposed scattering model.

  15. Reconstruction of surface morphology from coherent scattering of ''white'' synchrotron radiation in hard X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sant, Tushar

    2009-07-01

    Energy Dispersive Reflectometry (EDR) beamline at BESSY II provides ''white'' X-rays in the useful energy range of 5scattering material of Pt with high atom number, Z=78 and patterned semiconducting surface like a GaAs surface grating which provides a certain periodicity in the measured scattering intensity. Finally I measured the surface speckles from a spatially confined Si wafer under the constraint that the size of the sample is smaller than the footprint of the incoming beam at the sample position. To reconstruct surface morphology from coherent reflectivity data is a typical inverse problem. Conventional phase retrieval algorithms like Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm, error reduction (ER) algorithm, hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm are used in earlier work by other authors. I modified the conventional GS algorithm and ER algorithm which takes into account the additional Fresnel propagator term and also the illumination function at the sample position. I tested the modified algorithm successfully for a model surface in the form of a surface grating. I used the modified algorithm to reconstruct surface morphology from various static speckle measurements I performed at EDR beamline. The surface profiles reconstructed for different samples from the data at different energies (below the critical energy for the material at a particular incident angle) show almost the same roughness behavior for surface height with mean roughness of {proportional_to}1 nm. With the static speckle data I measured I could retrieve a one-dimensional picture of the sample surface with spatial

  16. Non-coherent continuum scattering as a line polarization mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J., E-mail: tanausu@iac.es, E-mail: rsainz@iac.es, E-mail: jtb@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-03-20

    Line scattering polarization can be strongly affected by Rayleigh scattering at neutral hydrogen and Thomson scattering at free electrons. Often a depolarization of the continuum results, but the Doppler redistribution produced by the continuum scatterers, which are light (hence, fast), induces more complex interactions between the polarization in spectral lines and in the continuum. Here we formulate and solve the radiative transfer problem of scattering line polarization with non-coherent continuum scattering consistently. The problem is formulated within the spherical tensor representation of atomic and light polarization. The numerical method of solution is a generalization of the Accelerated Lambda Iteration that is applied to both the atomic system and the radiation field. We show that the redistribution of the spectral line radiation due to the non-coherence of the continuum scattering may modify the shape of the emergent fractional linear polarization patterns significantly, even yielding polarization signals above the continuum level in intrinsically unpolarizable lines.

  17. Measurement of back-scattered radiation from micro multileaf collimator into the beam monitor chamber from a dual energy linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements designed to find the collimator backscatter into the beam monitor chamber from Micro Multileaf collimator of 6 MV photon beams of the Siemens Primus linear accelerator were made with the help of dose rate feedback control. The photons and electrons backscattered from the upper and lower secondary collimator jaws give rise to a significant increase in the ion charge measured by monitor chamber. This increase varies between the different accelerators. The output measurements were carried out in air at the isocenter. The effect of collimator backscatter was investigated by measuring the pulse width, number of beam pulses per monitor unit, monitor unit rate and dose for different mMLC openings. These measurements were made with and without dose rate feedback control, i.e., with constant electron beam current in the accelerator. Monitor unit rate (MU/min was almost constant for all field sizes. The maximum variation between the open and the closed feedback control circuits was 2.5%. There was no difference in pulse width and negligible difference in pulse frequency. Maximum value of backscattered radiation from the micro Multileaf collimator into the beam monitor chamber was found to be 0.5%.

  18. Thermal radiation heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, R.; Howell, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of heat transfer by thermal radiation is presented, including the radiative behavior of materials, radiation between surfaces, and gas radiation. Among the topics considered are property prediction by electromagnetic theory, the observed properties of solid materials, radiation in the presence of other modes of energy transfer, the equations of transfer for an absorbing-emitting gas, and radiative transfer in scattering and absorbing media. Also considered are radiation exchange between black isothermal surfaces, radiation exchange in enclosures composed of diffuse gray surfaces and in enclosures having some specularly reflecting surfaces, and radiation exchange between nondiffuse nongray surfaces. The use of the Monte Carlo technique in solving radiant-exchange problems and problems of radiative transfer through absorbing-emitting media is explained.

  19. On the scattering cross section of passive linear arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solymar, L.

    1973-01-01

    A general formula is derived for the scattering cross section of a passiven-element linear array consisting of isotropic radiators. When all the reactances are tuned out and scattering in the mirror direction is investigated, it is found thatA_{sr}, the relative scattering cross section is equal...... to the square of the maximum gain the array can produce. As a consequence, for forward scattering in the limiting case of zero spacing between the elements,A_{sr} = n^{4}....

  20. Electron Scattering From Atoms, Molecules, Nuclei, and Bulk Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, Colm T

    2005-01-01

    Topics that are covered include electron scattering in the scanning TEM; basic theory of inelastic electron imaging; study of confined atoms by electron excitation; helium bubbles created in extreme pressure with application to nuclear safety; lithium ion implantation; electron and positron scattering from clusters; electron scattering from physi- and chemi-absorbed molecules on surfaces; coincidence studies; electron scattering from biological molecules; electron spectroscopy as a tool for environmental science; electron scattering in the presence of intense fields; electron scattering from astrophysical molecules; electon interatctions an detection of x-ray radiation.

  1. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2015-11-10

    Nov 10, 2015 ... Module 3: Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter: Quantum theory of radiation, spontaneous, stimulated emission and absorption probabilities, electric dipole selection rules, Einstein A and B coefficients, Rabi coefficients, Thomson Scattering, Jaynes-Cummings Model. Module 4: Molecules ...

  2. On scattered subword complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Kása, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Special scattered subwords, in which the gaps are of length from a given set, are defined. The scattered subword complexity, which is the number of such scattered subwords, is computed for rainbow words.

  3. Bidirectional optical scattering facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Goniometric optical scatter instrument (GOSI)The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) quantifies the angular distribution of light scattered from a...

  4. Chapter 1: Direct Normal Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Daryl R.

    2016-04-15

    This chapter addresses the quantitative and qualitative aspects of the solar resource, the direct solar radiation. It discusses the total or integrated broadband direct beam extraterrestrial radiation (ETR). This total integrated irradiance is comprised of photons of electromagnetic radiation. The chapter also discusses the impact of the atmosphere and its effect upon the direct normal irradiance (DNI) beam radiation. The gases and particulates present in the atmosphere traversed by the direct beam reflect, absorb, and scatter differing spectral regions and proportions of the direct beam, and act as a variable filter. Knowledge of the available broadband DNI beam radiation resource data is essential in designing a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) system. Spectral variations in the DNI beam radiation affect the performance of a CPV system depending on the solar cell technology used. The chapter describes propagation and scattering processes of circumsolar radiation (CSR), which includes the Mie scattering from large particles.

  5. Light scattering by nonspherical particles theory, measurements, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Travis, Larry D

    1999-01-01

    There is hardly a field of science or engineering that does not have some interest in light scattering by small particles. For example, this subject is important to climatology because the energy budget for the Earth's atmosphere is strongly affected by scattering of solar radiation by cloud and aerosol particles, and the whole discipline of remote sensing relies largely on analyzing the parameters of radiation scattered by aerosols, clouds, and precipitation. The scattering of light by spherical particles can be easily computed using the conventional Mie theory. However, most small solid part

  6. Biological cell classification by multiangle light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, G.C.; Crowell, J.M.; Mullaney, P.F.

    1975-06-03

    The specification is directed to an apparatus and method for detecting light scattering from a biological cell. Light, preferably from a coherent source of radiation, intercepts an individual biological cell in a stream of cells passing through the beam. Light scattered from the cell is detected at a selected number of angles between 0 and 90/sup 0/ to the longitudinal axis of the beam with a circular array of light responsive elements which produce signals representative of the intensity of light incident thereon. Signals from the elements are processed to determine the light-scattering pattern of the cell and therefrom its identity.

  7. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  8. Radiation exposure during intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hak, David J

    2017-06-01

    Surgeons should aim to keep radiation exposure "As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA)" during intramedullary nailing and other minimally invasive surgical procedures. This requires understanding the principles of ionizing radiation and methods for minimizing exposure risk. The main source of radiation exposure to surgical personnel during fluoroscopy is from scattered radiation. Since radiation scatter is mainly directed towards the fluoroscopy source, the best configuration during surgery to reduce radiation dose to the surgeon is to position the fluoroscopic source below the operating room table and the image collector above the table. During cross table imaging, the surgeon should stand on the side with the image collector to minimize their exposure to radiation scatter. To reduce scattered radiation the patient must be placed as close to the image collector and as far away from the x-ray tube as possible. Standing farther away from the patient can exponentially reduce radiation exposure. The hands usually have the greatest dose exposure to radiation during surgical procedures, but they are far less radiosensitive than the eyes or thyroid. To minimize exposure to the hands, a surgeon should use the hands-off technique taking fluoroscopic images only when his or her hands are farthest from the radiographic field. Lead gowns, lead thyroid shields, and lead glasses, further reduces an individual's exposure to radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  10. Coupled effect of stimulated Raman scattering and random lasing of dyes in multiple scattering medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, Vasil P.

    2015-07-01

    Random lasing (RL) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of dye in multiple scattering media (MSM) appears simultaneously and each couple with other. This coupling has considerable influence on the SRS regularities of dye in MSM. The main feature of this impact is that RL radiation promotes the Raman lines revealing in the RL spectrum range as part of total radiation. SRS initiation occurs owing to the CARS-like mechanism provided by the two component pump: incident monochromatic radiation (laser pump) and RL radiation arising inside the MSM. It leads to important consequences: the RL spectrum must overlap with the spectral region of the possible Stokes lines of the dye; only those Stokes lines appear which are in a range of the RL spectrum; all conditions which promote RL assist SRS also. It is shown MSM promotes the best conditions for SRS and RL coupling due to optimal matching of RL localization regions and pump radiation.

  11. Intrabeam scattering in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mertens, Tom; Sousa Da Costa, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Intrabeam Scattering (IBS) is the process where particles within an accelerator beam elastically scatter off each other. The effect of IBS is not to be confused with the Coulomb repulsion due to the fields generated by the other particles in the beam. The Coulomb repulsion effects are referred to as space-charge effects in Accelerator Physics and become less important than IBS at high energies because of the 1/gamma^2 that occurs in the space-charge equations making IBS one of the most important causes of beam size growth. At high energies (for example at 7 TeV or the LHC nominal operation energy) IBS effects are counteracted by Radiation Damping effects, in some cases leading to decrease in beam sizes instead of beam growth. But at the time of writing the operation energies were still low enough to neglect Radiation Damping Effects in comparison with IBS effects (Radiation Lifetimes were a factor five to ten higher than the IBS Lifetimes in the cases presented at the end of this text). Because of its effect ...

  12. Lectures in scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sitenko, A G

    1971-01-01

    Lectures in Scattering Theory discusses problems in quantum mechanics and the principles of the non-relativistic theory of potential scattering. This book describes in detail the properties of the scattering matrix and its connection with physically observable quantities. This text presents a stationary formulation of the scattering problem and the wave functions of a particle found in an external field. This book also examines the analytic properties of the scattering matrix, dispersion relations, complex angular moments, as well as the separable representation of the scattering amplitude. Th

  13. Electron Dynamics by Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Schülke, Winfried

    2007-01-01

    The book offers the first comprehensive review of experimental methods, theory, and successful applications of synchrotron radiation based inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) spectroscopy, which enables the investigation of electron dynamics in condensed matter (correlated motion and excitation).

  14. A new SERS: scattering enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Joel N.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can be used to obtain detailed chemical information about a system without the need for chemical markers. It has been widely used for a variety of applications such as cancer diagnosis and material characterization. However, Raman scattering is a highly inefficient process, where only one in 1011 scattered photons carry the needed information. Several methods have been developed to enhance this inherently weak effect, including surface enhanced Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. These techniques suffer from drawbacks limiting their commercial use, such as the need for spatial localization of target molecules to a `hot spot', or the need for complex laser systems. Here, we present a simple instrument to enhance spontaneous Raman scattering using elastic light scattering. Elastic scattering is used to substantially increase the interaction volume. Provided that the scattering medium exhibits very low absorption in the spectral range of interest, a large enhancement factor can be attained in a simple and inexpensive setting. In our experiments, we demonstrate an enhancement of 107 in Raman signal intensity. The proposed novel device is equally applicable for analyzing solids, liquids, and gases.

  15. Thermal radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, John R; Mengüç, M Pinar

    2011-01-01

    Providing a comprehensive overview of the radiative behavior and properties of materials, the fifth edition of this classic textbook describes the physics of radiative heat transfer, development of relevant analysis methods, and associated mathematical and numerical techniques. Retaining the salient features and fundamental coverage that have made it popular, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, Fifth Edition has been carefully streamlined to omit superfluous material, yet enhanced to update information with extensive references. Includes four new chapters on Inverse Methods, Electromagnetic Theory, Scattering and Absorption by Particles, and Near-Field Radiative Transfer Keeping pace with significant developments, this book begins by addressing the radiative properties of blackbody and opaque materials, and how they are predicted using electromagnetic theory and obtained through measurements. It discusses radiative exchange in enclosures without any radiating medium between the surfaces-and where heat conduction...

  16. Robert R. Wilson Prize I: Intrabeam Scattering and Touschek Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwinski, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Intrabeam scattering and the Touschek effect are explained and compared. Especially intrabeam scattering plays an important role in colliders and synchrotron radiation sources where it limits the beam lifetime and the brightness,respectively. A short history of the consequences of both effects in different accelerators is given. An invariant due to intrabeam scattering is discussed which shows that only below transition energy a stable particle distribution is possible whereas above transition energy a stable distribution cannot exist.

  17. Multiple scattering polarization–Application of Chandrasekhar's ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandrasekhar's formalisms for the transfer of polarized radiation are used to explain the observed dust scattering polarization of brown dwarfs in the optical band. Model polarization profiles for hot and young directly imaged extrasolar planets are presented with specific prediction of the degree of polarization in the infrared ...

  18. K correlations and facet models in diffuse scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenders, B.J.; Jakeman, E.; Baltes, H.P.; Steinle, B.

    1979-01-01

    The angular intensity distribution of radiation scattered by a wide range of random media can be accounted for by assuming effective source amplitude correlations involving modified Bessel functions Kv. We investigate how such correlations can be derived from physical models of stochastic scattering

  19. Simulations, measurements, and optimization of OLEDs with scattering layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altazin, S.; Reynaud, C.; Mayer, U.M.; Lanz, T.; Lapagna, K.; Knaack, R.; Peninck, L.; Kirsch, C.; Pernstich, K.P.; Harkema, S.; Hermes, D.; Ruhstaller, B.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-scale optical model for organic light-emitting devices containing scattering layers is presented. This model describes the radiation of embedded oscillating dipoles and scattering from spherical particles. After successful model validation with experiments on a top-emitting white OLED, we

  20. Optical selection rules and scattering processes in rocksalt wide band gap ZnO

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kunert, HW

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available applications in ultraviolet optoelectronic devices. We have investigated radiative and non-radiative symmetry restricted selection rules, as well as inter- and intra-valley scattering processes....

  1. Light Scattering Tools for Cosmic Dust Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'in, V. B.; Voshchinnikov, N. V.; Farafonov, V. G.; Henning, Th.; Perelman, A. Ya.

    Because cosmic dust grains vary significantly in both morphology and chemical composition, it is necessary to develop different light scattering tools to analyze their scattering properties and to reconcile these properties with observations. We present a set of recently developed tools which includes a database of optical constants of materials of astronomical interest, exact and approximate methods and numerical codes using various models of a non-spherical inhomogeneous scatterer, a database of optical properties of non-spherical particles, a new approach to find a solution of ill-posed inverse problems in optics, and an original polarized radiation-transfer code applicable to 3D media populated by aligned non-spherical scatterers.

  2. Narrowband Compton Scattering Yield Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykovanov, Sergey; Seipt, Daniel; Kharin, Vasily

    2017-10-01

    Compton Scattering (CS) of laser light off high-energy electrons is a well-established source of X- and gamma-rays for applications in medicine, biology, nuclear and material sciences. Main advantage of CS photon sources is the possibility to generate narrow spectra as opposed to a broad continuum obtained when utilizing Bremsstrahlung. However, due to the low cross-section of the linear process, the total photon yield is quite low. The most straightforward way to increase the number of photon-electron beam scattering events is to increase the laser pulse intensity at the interaction point by harder focusing. This leads to an unfortunate consequence. Increase in the laser pulse normalized amplitude a0, leads to additional ponderomotive spectrum broadening of the scattered radiation. The ponderomotive broadening is caused by the v × B force, which slows the electron down near the peak of the laser pulse where the intensity is high, and can be neglected near the wings of the pulse, where the intensity is low. We show that laser pulse chirping, both nonlinear (laser pulse frequency ''following'' the envelope of the pulse) and linear, leads to compensation of the ponderomotive broadening and considerably enhances the yield of the nonlinear Compton sources. Work supported by the Helmholtz Association via Helmholtz Young Investigators Grant (VH-NG-1037).

  3. Radiation processes in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, Wallace H

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this book is twofold: to provide a brief, simple introduction to the theory of radiation and its application in astrophysics and to serve as a reference manual for researchers. The first part of the book consists of a discussion of the basic formulas and concepts that underlie the classical and quantum descriptions of radiation processes. The rest of the book is concerned with applications. The spirit of the discussion is to present simple derivations that will provide some insight into the basic physics involved and then to state the exact results in a form useful for applications. The reader is referred to the original literature and to reviews for rigorous derivations.The wide range of topics covered is illustrated by the following table of contents: Basic Formulas for Classical Radiation Processes; Basic Formulas for Quantum Radiation Processes; Cyclotron and Synchrotron Radiation; Electron Scattering; Bremsstrahlung and Collision Losses; Radiative Recombination; The Photoelectric Effect; a...

  4. Gold nanoparticles on polarizable surfaces as Raman scattering antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiuan-Yeh; Mock, Jack J; Hill, Ryan T; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Smith, David R; Lazarides, Anne A

    2010-11-23

    Surface plasmons supported by metal nanoparticles are perturbed by coupling to a surface that is polarizable. Coupling results in enhancement of near fields and may increase the scattering efficiency of radiative modes. In this study, we investigate the Rayleigh and Raman scattering properties of gold nanoparticles functionalized with cyanine deposited on silicon and quartz wafers and on gold thin films. Dark-field scattering images display red shifting of the gold nanoparticle plasmon resonance and doughnut-shaped scattering patterns when particles are deposited on silicon or on a gold film. The imaged radiation patterns and individual particle spectra reveal that the polarizable substrates control both the orientation and brightness of the radiative modes. Comparison with simulation indicates that, in a particle-surface system with a fixed junction width, plasmon band shifts are controlled quantitatively by the permittivity of the wafer or the film. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra and images are collected from cyanine on particles on gold films. SERRS images of the particles on gold films are doughnut-shaped as are their Rayleigh images, indicating that the SERRS is controlled by the polarization of plasmons in the antenna nanostructures. Near-field enhancement and radiative efficiency of the antenna are sufficient to enable Raman scattering cyanines to function as gap field probes. Through collective interpretation of individual particle Rayleigh spectra and spectral simulations, the geometric basis for small observed variations in the wavelength and intensity of plasmon resonant scattering from individual antenna on the three surfaces is explained.

  5. Ray effect and false scattering in the discrete ordinates method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, J.C.; Patankar, S.V. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Lee, H.S. [NASA, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

    1993-12-01

    A discussion on the ray effect and false scattering occurring in discrete ordinates solution of the radiative transfer equation is presented in this article. Ray effect arises from the approximation of a continuously varying angular nature of radiation by a specified set of discrete angular directions. It is independent of the spatial discretization practice. False scattering, on the other hand, is a consequence of the spatial discretization practice and is independent of the angular discretization practice. In multidimensional computations, when a beam is not aligned with the grid line, false scattering smears the radiative intensity field. It reduces the appearance of unwanted bumps, but does not eliminate ray effect. An inappropriate view of false scattering is also presented. Four sample problems are used to explain these two effects.

  6. High energy x-ray reflectivity and scattering study from spectrum-x-gamma flight mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Frederiksen, P. Kk

    1993-01-01

    Line radiation from Fe K-alpha(1), Cu K-alpha(1), and Ag K-alpha(1) is used to study the high energy X-ray reflectivity and scattering behavior of flight-quality X-ray mirrors having various Al substrates. When both the specular and the scattered radiation are integrated, near theoretical...

  7. Fast ion millimeter wave collective Thomson scattering diagnostics on TEXTOR and ASDEX upgrades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, S.; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Bindslev, H.

    2004-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic systems for measuring fast ions in TEXTOR and ASDEX Upgrade are described in this article. Both systems use millimeter waves generated by gyrotrons as probing radiation and the scattered radiation is detected with heterodyne receivers having 40...

  8. Polarimetric scattering and SAR information retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Ya-Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Taking an innovative look at Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), this practical reference fully covers new developments in SAR and its various methodologies and enables readers to interpret SAR imagery An essential reference on polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), this book uses scattering theory and radiative transfer theory as a basis for its treatment of topics. It is organized to include theoretical scattering models and SAR data analysis techniques, and presents cutting-edge research on theoretical modelling of terrain surface. The book includes quantitative app

  9. Scattering anomaly in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Silveirinha, Mario G

    2016-01-01

    In time-reversal invariant electronic systems the scattering matrix is anti-symmetric. This property enables an effect, designated here as "scattering anomaly", such that the electron transport does not suffer from back reflections, independent of the specific geometry of the propagation path or the presence of time-reversal invariant defects. In contrast, for a generic time-reversal invariant photonic system the scattering matrix is symmetric and there is no similar anomaly. Here, it is theoretically proven that despite these fundamental differences there is a wide class of photonic platforms - in some cases formed only by time-reversal invariant media - in which the scattering anomaly can occur. It is shown that an optical system invariant under the action of the composition of the time-reversal, parity and duality operators is characterized by an anti-symmetric scattering matrix. Specific examples of photonic platforms wherein the scattering anomaly occurs are given, and it is demonstrated with full wave n...

  10. Scattering of Skyrmions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Foster

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a detailed study of Skyrmion–Skyrmion scattering for two B=1 Skyrmions in the attractive channel where we observe two different scattering regimes. For large separation, the scattering can be approximated as interacting dipoles. We give a qualitative estimate when this approximation breaks down. For small separations we observe an additional short-range repulsion which is qualitatively similar to monopole scattering. We also observe the interesting effect of “rotation without rotating” whereby two Skyrmions, whose orientations remain constant while well-separated, change their orientation after scattering. We can explain this effect by following preimages through the scattering process, thereby measuring which part of an in-coming Skyrmion forms part of an out-going Skyrmion. This leads to a new way of visualising Skyrmions. Furthermore, we consider spinning Skyrmions and find interesting trajectories.

  11. Introduction to neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    We give here an introduction to the theoretical principles of neutron scattering. The relationship between scattering- and correlation-functions is particularly emphasized. Within the framework of linear response theory (justified by the weakness of the basic interaction) the relation between fluctuation and dissipation is discussed. This general framework explains the particular power of neutron scattering as an experimental method. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  12. LRAT: Lightning Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we extend to cloud physics the work done for single and multiple scattering of electromagnetic waves. We consider the scattering of light, visible or infrared, by a spherical cloud represented by a statistically homogeneous ensemble of configurations of N identical spherical water droplets whose centers are uniformly distributed in its volume V. The ensemble is specified by the average number rho of scatterers in unit volume and by rho f(R) with f(R) as the distribution function for separations R of pairs. The incident light, vector-phi(sub 0) a plane electromagnetic wave with harmonic time dependence, is from outside the cloud. The propagation parameter kappa(sub 0) and the index of refraction eta(sub 0) determine physically the medium outside the distribution of scatterers. We solve the interior problem separately to obtain the bulk parameters for the scatterer equivalent to the ensemble of spherical droplets. With the interior solution or the equivalent medium approach, the multiple scattering problem is reduced to that of an equivalent single scatterer excited from outside illumination. A dispersion relation which determines the bulk propagation parameter K and the bulk index of refraction eta of the cloud is given in terms of the vector equivalent scattering amplitude vector-G and the dyadic scattering amplitude tilde-g of the single object in isolation. Based on this transfer model we will have the ability to consider clouds composed of inhomogeneous distribution of water and/or ice particles and we will be able to take into account particle size distributions within the cloud. We will also be able to study the effects of cloud composition (i.e., particle shape, size, composition, orientation, location) on the polarization of the single or the multiple scattered waves. Finally, this study will provide a new starting point for studying the problem of lightning radiative transfer.

  13. Scattering of ultrarelativistic electrons in ultrathin crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shul' ga, N.F., E-mail: shulga@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology”, 1, Akademichna str., Kharkiv, 61108 (Ukraine); Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4, Svobody sq., Kharkiv, 61000 (Ukraine); Shulga, S.N. [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology”, 1, Akademichna str., Kharkiv, 61108 (Ukraine); Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4, Svobody sq., Kharkiv, 61000 (Ukraine)

    2017-06-10

    Quantum theory is proposed of high energy electrons scattering in ultrathin crystals. This theory is based upon a special representation of the scattering amplitude in the form of an integral over the surface surrounding the crystal, and on the spectral method of determination of the wave function. The comparison is performed of quantum and classical differential scattering cross-sections in the transitional range of crystal thicknesses, from those at which the channeling phenomenon is not developed up to those at which it is established. It is shown that in this thickness range the quantum scattering cross-section, unlike the classical one, contains sharp peaks corresponding to some specific scattering angles, that is connected with the diffraction of the incident plane wave onto the periodically distributed crystal atomic strings. It is shown that the value of the scattering cross-section in the peaks varies periodically with the change of the target thickness. We note that this must lead to a new interference effect in radiation that is connected with the rearrangement of incident wave packet in transitional area of crystal thicknesses.

  14. Scattering of ultrarelativistic electrons in ultrathin crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Shul'ga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantum theory is proposed of high energy electrons scattering in ultrathin crystals. This theory is based upon a special representation of the scattering amplitude in the form of an integral over the surface surrounding the crystal, and on the spectral method of determination of the wave function. The comparison is performed of quantum and classical differential scattering cross-sections in the transitional range of crystal thicknesses, from those at which the channeling phenomenon is not developed up to those at which it is established. It is shown that in this thickness range the quantum scattering cross-section, unlike the classical one, contains sharp peaks corresponding to some specific scattering angles, that is connected with the diffraction of the incident plane wave onto the periodically distributed crystal atomic strings. It is shown that the value of the scattering cross-section in the peaks varies periodically with the change of the target thickness. We note that this must lead to a new interference effect in radiation that is connected with the rearrangement of incident wave packet in transitional area of crystal thicknesses.

  15. Thomson scattering using an atomic notch filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, L. P.; Freriks, J. M.; de Hoog, F. J.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2000-05-01

    One of the biggest problems in performing Thomson scattering experiments in low-density plasmas is the very high stray light intensity in comparison with the Thomson scattering intensity. This problem is especially present in fluorescent lamps because of the proximity of the glass tube. We propose an atomic notch filter in combination with a dye laser and an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) filter as a way of reducing this stray light level. The dye laser produces 589 nm radiation which is guided through the ASE filter that increases the spectral purity. The beam is then guided in the fluorescent lamp, where the Thomson scattering process takes place. The scattered light is collected and guided through a sodium vapor absorption cell, where the stray light is absorbed because it is resonant to the D2 transition of sodium. The spectral width of the Thomson scattering light is large enough to be transmitted through the absorption cell. In this way we only measure the Thomson scattering light.

  16. Elastic scattering phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackintosh, R.S. [The Open University, School of Physical Sciences, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    We argue that, in many situations, fits to elastic scattering data that were historically, and frequently still are, considered ''good'', are not justifiably so describable. Information about the dynamics of nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering is lost when elastic scattering phenomenology is insufficiently ambitious. It is argued that in many situations, an alternative approach is appropriate for the phenomenology of nuclear elastic scattering of nucleons and other light nuclei. The approach affords an appropriate means of evaluating folding models, one that fully exploits available empirical data. It is particularly applicable for nucleons and other light ions. (orig.)

  17. Aerosol scattering of ultraviolet sunlight in the tropical maritime atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, A.; Krueger, A. J.; Fraser, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric aerosol scattering on the vertical profile of solar ultraviolet radiation are investigated. Measurements of diffuse and total ultraviolet radiation were made using a rocketborne optical sonde in the marine atmosphere of Antigua. During observations, the sun was at zenith. Vertical profiles of directly transmitted solar radiation were calculated by subtraction of the diffuse component from the total radiance. Using these values of direct downward solar UV-flux, the optical thickness of the atmosphere was derived as a function of altitude. Absorption by ozone was also considered. In the troposphere the values of observed optical thickness were in general equal to or lower than those expected theoretically from Rayleigh scattering alone. The measured radiation profiles were compared with those computed for a multiple scattering model atmosphere. Some computations regarding the interaction of UV-sunlight with maritime aerosols are presented.

  18. Realizing total reciprocity violation in the phase for photon scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deák, László; Bottyán, László; Fülöp, Tamás; Merkel, Dániel Géza; Nagy, Dénes Lajos; Sajti, Szilárd; Schulze, Kai Sven; Spiering, Hartmut; Uschmann, Ingo; Wille, Hans-Christian

    2017-02-22

    Reciprocity is when wave or quantum scattering satisfies a symmetry property, connecting a scattering process with the reversed one. While reciprocity involves the interchange of source and detector, it is fundamentally different from rotational invariance, and is a generalization of time reversal invariance, occurring in absorptive media as well. Due to its presence at diverse areas of physics, it admits a wide variety of applications. For polarization dependent scatterings, reciprocity is often violated, but violation in the phase of the scattering amplitude is much harder to experimentally observe than violation in magnitude. Enabled by the advantageous properties of nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation, we have measured maximal, i.e., 180-degree, reciprocity violation in the phase. For accessing phase information, we introduced a new version of stroboscopic detection. The scattering setting was devised based on a generalized reciprocity theorem that opens the way to construct new types of reciprocity related devices.

  19. Scattering Suppression and Absorption Enhancement in Contour Nanoantennas

    CERN Document Server

    Onal, E Doruk

    2015-01-01

    The expanding application spectrum of plasmonic nanoantennas demand versatile design approaches to tailor the antenna properties for specific requirements. The design efforts primarily concentrate on shifting the operation wavelength or enhancing the local fields by manipulating the size and shape of the nanoantenna. Here, we propose a design path to control the absorption and scattering characteristics of a dipole nanoantenna by introducing a hollow region inside the nanostructure. The resulting contour geometry can significantly suppress the scattering of the dipole nanoantenna and enhance its absorption simultaneously. Both the dipole and the contour dipole nanoantenna couple to equivalent amount of the incident radiation. The dipole nanoantenna scatters 84% of the coupled power (absorbs the remaining 16%) whereas the contour dipole structure scatters only 28% of the coupled power (absorbs the remaining 72%). This constitutes the transformation from scatter to absorber nanoantenna. The scattering of a cont...

  20. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in the field of a two-dimensionally localized pumping wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solikhov, D. K., E-mail: davlat56@mail.ru [Tajik National University, Faculty of Physics (Tajikistan); Dvinin, S. A., E-mail: dvinin@phys.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering of electromagnetic waves in the field of a two-dimensionally localized pump wave at arbitrary scattering angles in the regime of forward scattering is analyzed. Spatial variations in the amplitudes of interacting waves are studied for different values of the pump field and different dimensions of the pump wave localization region. The intensity of scattered radiation is determined as a function of the scattering angle and the dimensions of the pump wave localization region. It is shown that the intensity increases with increasing scattering angle.

  1. Neutron scattering from fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Jørgen; Freltoft, T.; Richter, D.

    1986-01-01

    -angle neutron scattering studies of the variation with aggregation rate are presented. These results allow a very detailed comparison to be made with the theoretical scattering curves. Preliminary incoherent inelastic data on the low-frequency dynamics of hydroxylated silica particle aggregates show a clear...

  2. Incoherent Thomson scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    1996-01-01

    Thomson scattering is a very powerful diagnostic which is applied at nearly every magnetic confinement device. Depending on the experimental conditions different plasma parameters can be diagnosed. When the wave vector is much larger than the plasma Debye length, the total scattered power is

  3. Effect of scattering on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; De Vito, Giuseppe; Piazza, Vincenzo; Potma, Eric O; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2017-04-17

    We develop a computational framework to examine the factors responsible for scattering-induced distortions of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in turbid samples. We apply the Huygens-Fresnel wave-based electric field superposition (HF-WEFS) method combined with the radiating dipole approximation to compute the effects of scattering-induced distortions of focal excitation fields on the far-field CARS signal. We analyze the effect of spherical scatterers, placed in the vicinity of the focal volume, on the CARS signal emitted by different objects (2μm diameter solid sphere, 2μm diameter myelin cylinder and 2μm diameter myelin tube). We find that distortions in the CARS signals arise not only from attenuation of the focal field but also from scattering-induced changes in the spatial phase that modifies the angular distribution of the CARS emission. Our simulations further show that CARS signal attenuation can be minimized by using a high numerical aperture condenser. Moreover, unlike the CARS intensity image, CARS images formed by taking the ratio of CARS signals obtained using x- and y-polarized input fields is relatively insensitive to the effects of spherical scatterers. Our computational framework provide a mechanistic approach to characterizing scattering-induced distortions in coherent imaging of turbid media and may inspire bottom-up approaches for adaptive optical methods for image correction.

  4. The use of gamma radiation in fluid flow measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Tjugum, S A; Holstad, M B

    2001-01-01

    Different measurement techniques involving the use of gamma radiation in flow measurement are discussed. In the Dual Modality Densitometry project at the University of Bergen, salinity-independent gas volume fraction measurements are obtained by combining scattered and transmitted radiation.

  5. Purely bianisotropic scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albooyeh, M.; Asadchy, V. S.; Alaee, R.; Hashemi, S. M.; Yazdi, M.; Mirmoosa, M. S.; Rockstuhl, C.; Simovski, C. R.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The polarization response of molecules or meta-atoms to external electric and magnetic fields, which defines the electromagnetic properties of materials, can either be direct (electric field induces electric moment and magnetic field induces magnetic moment) or indirect (magnetoelectric coupling in bianisotropic scatterers). Earlier studies suggest that there is a fundamental bound on the indirect response of all passive scatterers: It is believed to be always weaker than the direct one. In this paper, we prove that there exist scatterers which overcome this bound substantially. Moreover, we show that the amplitudes of electric and magnetic polarizabilities can be negligibly small as compared to the magnetoelectric coupling coefficients. However, we prove that if at least one of the direct-excitation coefficients vanishes, magnetoelectric coupling effects in passive scatterers cannot exist. Our findings open a way to a new class of electromagnetic scatterers and composite materials.

  6. Broken Cloud Field Longwave-Scattering Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, E. E.; Ellingson, R. G.

    2000-05-01

    Throughout most of the shortwave spectrum, atmospheric gases do not absorb the abundant amount of incoming solar radiation. The shortwave-scattering albedo of clouds is very large. The combination of large amounts of incoming solar radiation, low gaseous absorptivity, and large cloud-scattering albedo enables clouds at one level of the atmosphere to affect the shortwave radiative transfer at all other atmospheric levels. Absorption by atmospheric gases is much stronger in the longwave. This localizes the effects of clouds in the longwave. Since longwave absorption is weakest in the window region (8-12 m), cloud effects there will have the greatest chance of propagating to other levels of the atmosphere. In partially overcast conditions, individual cloud geometry and optical properties are important factors. Longwave calculations of most GCMs ignore individual cloud geometry. For liquid water clouds, the optical properties of clouds are also ignored.Previous work in the window region by Takara and Ellingson considered opaque clouds with no absorption or emission by atmospheric gases. Under those conditions, the effect of cloud scattering was comparable to cloud geometry. In this work, the comparison of longwave scattering and geometric effects in the window region is improved by including partially transparent clouds and adding absorption and emission by atmospheric gases. The results show that for optically thick water clouds, it is sufficient to model the geometry; scattering can be neglected. The window region errors are less than 5 W m2 for fluxes and 0.05 K day1 for heating rates. The flat-plate approximation worked for ice clouds; the window region flux errors are less than 3 W m2 with heating rate errors less than 0.05 K day1.

  7. Fundamentals of Atmospheric Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-02-01

    This textbook fills a gap in the literature for teaching material suitable for students of atmospheric science and courses on atmospheric radiation. It covers the fundamentals of emission, absorption, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation from ultraviolet to infrared and beyond. Much of the book applies to planetary atmosphere. The authors are physicists and teach at the largest meteorology department of the US at Penn State. Craig T. Bohren has taught the atmospheric radiation course there for the past 20 years with no book. Eugene Clothiaux has taken over and added to the course notes. Problems given in the text come from students, colleagues, and correspondents. The design of the figures especially for this book is meant to ease comprehension. Discussions have a graded approach with a thorough treatment of subjects, such as single scattering by particles, at different levels of complexity. The discussion of the multiple scattering theory begins with piles of plates. This simple theory introduces concepts in more advanced theories, i.e. optical thickness, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter. The more complicated theory, the two-stream theory, then takes the reader beyond the pile-of-plates theory. Ideal for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of atmospheric science.

  8. Radiation Protection for the Fluoroscopy Operator and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Quinn C; Stahl, Cosette M; Andre, Michael P; Kinney, Thomas B; Newton, Isabel G

    2016-10-01

    The purposes of this article are to review available data regarding the range of protection devices and garments with a focus on eye protection and to summarize techniques for reducing scatter radiation exposure. Fluoroscopy operators and staff can greatly reduce their radiation exposure by wearing properly fitted protective garments, positioning protective devices to block scatter radiation, and adhering to good radiation practices. By understanding the essentials of radiation physics, protective equipment, and the features of each imaging system, operators and staff can capitalize on opportunities for radiation protection while minimizing ergonomic strain. Practicing and promoting a culture of radiation safety can help fluoroscopy operators and staff enjoy long, productive careers helping patients.

  9. Study of the radiation scattered and produced by concrete shielding of radiotherapy rooms and its effects on equivalent doses in patients' organs; Estudo da radiacao espalhada e produzida pela blindagem de concreto de salas de radioterapia e seus efeitos sobre doses equivalentes nos orgaos dos pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, K.L.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Gavazza, S.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Gomes, R.G.; Silva, M.G., E-mail: kelmo.lins@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: sergiogavazza@yahoo.com, E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: raphaelmsm@gmail.com, E-mail: ggrprojetos@gmail.com, E-mail: maglosilva15@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Thalhofer, J.L.; Silva, A.X., E-mail: jardellt@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Energia Nuclear; Santos, R.F.G., E-mail: raphaelfgsantos@gmail.com [Centro Universitario Anhanguera, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia

    2015-07-01

    Within a radiotherapy room, in addition to the primary beam, there is also secondary radiation due to the leakage of the accelerator head and the radiation scattering from room objects, patient and even the room's shielding itself, which is projected to protect external individuals disregarding its effects on the patient. This work aims to study the effect of concrete shielding wall over the patient, taking into account its contribution on equivalent doses. The MCNPX code was used to model the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D operating at 18MeV, with MAX phantom representing the patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer following Brazilian Institute of Cancer four-fields radiation application protocol (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°). Firstly, the treatment was patterned within a standard radiotherapy room, calculating the equivalent doses on patient's organs individually. In a second step, this treatment was modeled withdrawing the walls, floor and ceiling from the radiotherapy room, and then the equivalent doses calculated again. Comparing these results, it was found that the concrete has an average shielding contribution of around 20% in the equivalent dose on the patient's organs. (author)

  10. Robust scatter correction method for cone-beam CT using an interlacing-slit plate

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kuidong; Zhang, Dinghua; Zhang, Hua; Shi, Wenlong

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in medical imaging and industrial nondestructive testing, but the presence of scattered radiation will cause significant reduction of image quality. In this article, a robust scatter correction method for CBCT using an interlacing-slit plate (ISP) is carried out for convenient practice. Firstly, a Gaussian filtering method is proposed to compensate the missing data of the inner scatter image, and simultaneously avoid too-large values of calculated inner scatter and smooth the inner scatter field. Secondly, an interlacing-slit scan without detector gain correction is carried out to enhance the practicality and convenience of the scatter correction method. Finally, a denoising step for scatter-corrected projection images is added in the process flow to control the noise amplification. The experimental results show that the improved method can not only make the scatter correction more robust and convenient, but also achieve a good quality of scatter-corre...

  11. Manipulating scattering features by metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review on manipulations of electromagnetic scattering features by using metamaterials or metasurfaces. Several approaches in controlling the scattered fields of objects are presented, including invisibility cloaks and radar illusions based on transformation optics, carpet cloak using gradient metamaterials, dc cloaks, mantle cloaks based on scattering cancellation, “skin” cloaks using phase compensation, scattering controls with coding/programmable metasurfaces, and scattering reductions by multilayered structures. Finally, the future development of metamaterials on scattering manipulation is predicted.

  12. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...... both physical and digital models at three distinct scales. The results suggest hyperboloid geometry, while difficult to fabricate, facilitates sound scattering.......The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...

  13. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...

  14. Scattering from randomly oriented scatterers with strong permittivity fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, S. H.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Strong permittivity fluctuation theory is used to solve the problem of scattering from a medium composed of completely randomly oriented scatterers under a low frequency limit. Gaussian statistics are not assumed for the renormalized scattering sources. Numerical results on effective permittivity are illustrated for oblate and prolate spheroidal scatterers and compared with the results for spherical scatterers. The results are consistent with discrete scatterer theory. The effective permittivity of a random medium embedded with nonspherical scatterers shows a higher imaginary part than the spherical scatterer case with equal correlation volume. Under the distorted Born approximation, the polarimetric covariance matrix for the backscattered electric field is calculated for half-space randomly oriented scatterers. The nonspherical geometry of the scatterers shows significant effects on the cross-polarized backscattering returns, and the correlation coefficient between HH and VV returns. The polarimetric backscattering coefficients can provide useful information in distinguishing the geometry of scatterers.

  15. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine

  16. Applied electromagnetic scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Osipov, Andrey A

    2017-01-01

    Besides classical applications (radar and stealth, antennas, microwave engineering), scattering and diffraction are enabling phenomena for some emerging research fields (artificial electromagnetic materials or metamaterials, terahertz technologies, electromagnetic aspects of nano-science). This book is a tutorial for advanced students who need to study diffraction theory. The textbook gives fundamental knowledge about scattering and diffraction of electromagnetic waves and provides some working examples of solutions for practical high-frequency scattering and diffraction problems. The book focuses on the most important diffraction effects and mechanisms influencing the scattering process and describes efficient and physically justified simulation methods - physical optics (PO) and the physical theory of diffraction (PTD) - applicable in typical remote sensing scenarios. The material is presented in a comprehensible and logical form, which relates the presented results to the basic principles of electromag...

  17. Gravitational Bhabha scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2017-10-01

    Gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM) as a theory for gravity has been developed similar to the electromagnetic field theory. A weak field approximation of Einstein theory of relativity is similar to GEM. This theory has been quantized. Traditional Bhabha scattering, electron-positron scattering, is based on quantized electrodynamics theory. Usually the amplitude is written in terms of one photon exchange process. With the development of quantized GEM theory, the scattering amplitude will have an additional component based on an exchange of one graviton at the lowest order of perturbation theory. An analysis will provide the relative importance of the two amplitudes for Bhabha scattering. This will allow an analysis of the relative importance of the two amplitudes as the energy of the exchanged particles increases.

  18. Investigation of ferrofluid nanostructure by laser light scattering: medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomnyashchaya, E. K.; Velichko, E. N.; Pleshakov, I. V.; Aksenov, E. T.; Savchenko, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    Investigation of ferrofluids nanostructure by the laser light scattering technique is presented. Experimental studies involved measurements of the intensity of the laser radiation scattered by ferrofluid particles in interaction with albumin and under the influence of magnetic field. The effects of the magnitude and duration of the applied magnetic field on the formation of aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles and also the influence of magnetic fluids of different concentrations on blood proteins are considered. The findings may be useful for medical applications.

  19. Evaluation of scatter effects on image quality for breast tomosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Boone, John M.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis uses a limited number (typically 10–20) of low-dose x-ray projections to produce a pseudo-three-dimensional volume tomographic reconstruction of the breast. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effect of scattered radiation on the image quality for breast tomosynthesis. In a simulation, scatter point spread functions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation method were convolved over the breast projection to estimate the distribution...

  20. Spectral bandwidth reduction of Thomson scattered light by pulse chirping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Ghebregziabher

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on single particle tracking in the framework of classical Thomson scattering with incoherent superposition, we developed a relativistic, three-dimensional numerical model that calculates and quantifies the characteristics of emitted radiation when a relativistic electron beam interacts with an intense laser pulse. This model has been benchmarked against analytical expressions, based on the plane wave approximation to the laser field, derived by Esarey et al. [Phys. Rev. E 48, 3003 (1993PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.48.3003]. For laser pulses of sufficient duration, we find that the scattered radiation spectrum is broadened due to interferences arising from the pulsed nature of the laser. We find that by appropriately chirping the scattering laser pulse, spectral broadening can be minimized, and the peak on-axis brightness of the emitted radiation is increased by a factor of approximately 5.

  1. HO-CHUNK: Radiation Transfer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Wood, Kenneth; Bjorkman, J. E.; Cohen, Martin; Wolff, Michael J.

    2017-11-01

    HO-CHUNK calculates radiative equilibrium temperature solution, thermal and PAH/vsg emission, scattering and polarization in protostellar geometries. It is useful for computing spectral energy distributions (SEDs), polarization spectra, and images.

  2. Neutron scattering in dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudel, H. U.; Furrer, A.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1986-01-01

    Insulating compounds containing dimers of transition metal and rare earth ions have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Energy splittings can be directly determined, and the corresponding parameters are easily extracted from the experimental data. The intensities of dimer excitati......Insulating compounds containing dimers of transition metal and rare earth ions have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Energy splittings can be directly determined, and the corresponding parameters are easily extracted from the experimental data. The intensities of dimer...

  3. Efficient Calculation of Born Scattering for Fixed-Offset Ground-Penetrating Radar Surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A formulation is presented for efficient calculation of linear electromagnetic scattering by buried penetrable objects, as involved in the analysis of fixed-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) systems. The actual radiation patterns of the GPR antennas are incorporated in the scattering calculat......A formulation is presented for efficient calculation of linear electromagnetic scattering by buried penetrable objects, as involved in the analysis of fixed-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) systems. The actual radiation patterns of the GPR antennas are incorporated in the scattering...

  4. High pressure and synchrotron radiation satellite workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, J.; Guignot, N.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, M.; Andrault, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Sturhahn, W.; Daniel, I.; Reynard, B.; Simionovici, A.; Sanchez Valle, C.; Martinez, I.; Kantor, I.; Dubrovinsky, I.; Mccammon, C.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Kurnosiv, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Goncharenko, I.; Loubeyre, P.; Desgreniers, S.; Weck, G.; Yoo, C.S.; Iota, V.; Park, J.; Cynn, H.; Gorelli, F.; Toulemonde, P.; Machon, D.; Merlen, A.; San Miguel, A.; Amboage, M.; Aquilanti, G.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.; Itie, J.P.; Mcmillan, P.F.; Trapananti, A.; Di Cicco, A.; Panfilis, S. de; Filipponi, A.; Kreisel, J.; Bouvier, P.; Dkhil, B.; Chaabane, B.; Rosner, H.; Koudela, D.; Schwarz, U.; Handestein, A.; Hanfland, M.; Opahle, I.; Koepernik, K.; Kuzmin, M.; Mueller, K.H.; Mydosh, J.; Richter, M.; Hejny, C.; Falconi, S.; Lundegaard, L.F.; Mcmahon, M.I; Loa, I.; Syassen, K.; Wang, X.; Roth, H.; Lorenz, T.; Farber Daniel, I.; Antonangeli Daniele, I.; Krisch, M.; Badro, J.; Fiquet, G.; Occelli, F.; Mao, W.L.; Mao, H.K.; Eng, P.; Kao, C.C.; Shu, J.F.; Hemley, R.J.; Tse, J.S.; Yao, Y.; Deen, P.P.; Paolasini, I.; Braithwaite, D.; Kernavanois, N.; Lapertot, G.; Rupprecht, K.; Leupold, O.; Ponkratz, U.; Wortmann, G.; Beraud, A.; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Aracne, C.; Zarestky, J.L.; Mcqueeney, R.; Mathon, O.; Baudelet, F.; Decremps, F.; Itie, J.P.; Nataf, I.; Pascarelli, S.; Polian, A

    2006-07-01

    The workshop is dedicated to recent advances on science at high pressure at third generation synchrotron sources. A variety of experiments using synchrotron radiation techniques including X-ray diffraction, EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), inelastic X-ray scattering, Compton scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy of crystalline, liquid or amorphous samples, are reported. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  5. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  6. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Be extra careful not to spend time with children or pregnant women. Internal Radiation Therapy Makes You Give Off Radiation With systemic radiation, your body fluids ( urine , sweat, and saliva ) will give off radiation for a while. With ...

  7. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  8. Hanle-Zeeman Scattering Matrix for Magnetic Dipole Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megha, A.; Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N.; Sankarasubramanian, K., E-mail: megha@iiap.res.in, E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in, E-mail: sankar@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034 (India)

    2017-06-01

    The polarization of the light that is scattered by the coronal ions is influenced by the anisotropic illumination from the photosphere and the magnetic field structuring in the solar corona. The properties of the coronal magnetic fields can be well studied by understanding the polarization properties of coronal forbidden emission lines that arise from magnetic dipole ( M 1) transitions in the highly ionized atoms that are present in the corona. We present the classical scattering theory of the forbidden lines for a more general case of arbitrary-strength magnetic fields. We derive the scattering matrix for M 1 transitions using the classical magnetic dipole model of Casini and Lin and applying the scattering matrix approach of Stenflo. We consider a two-level atom model and neglect collisional effects. The scattering matrix so derived is used to study the Stokes profiles formed in coronal conditions in those regions where the radiative excitations dominate collisional excitations. To this end, we take into account the integration over a cone of an unpolarized radiation from the solar disk incident on the scattering atoms. Furthermore, we also integrate along the line of sight to calculate the emerging polarized line profiles. We consider radial and dipole magnetic field configurations and spherically symmetric density distributions. For our studies we adopt the atomic parameters corresponding to the [Fe xiii] 10747 Å coronal forbidden line. We also discuss the nature of the scattering matrix for M 1 transitions and compare it with that for the electric dipole ( E 1) transitions.

  9. Electromagnetic sunscreen model: implementation and comparison between several methods: step-film model, differential method, Mie scattering, and scattering by a set of parallel cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécureux, Marie; Enoch, Stefan; Deumié, Carole; Tayeb, Gérard

    2014-10-01

    Sunscreens protect from UV radiation, a carcinogen also responsible for sunburns and age-associated dryness. In order to anticipate the transmission of light through UV protection containing scattering particles, we implement electromagnetic models, using numerical methods for solving Maxwell's equations. After having our models validated, we compare several calculation methods: differential method, scattering by a set of parallel cylinders, or Mie scattering. The field of application and benefits of each method are studied and examples using the appropriate method are described.

  10. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2017-01-01

    . In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus......We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  11. Electromagnetic scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, J. F.; Farrell, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering theory is discussed with emphasis on the general stochastic variational principle (SVP) and its applications. The stochastic version of the Schwinger-type variational principle is presented, and explicit expressions for its integrals are considered. Results are summarized for scalar wave scattering from a classic rough-surface model and for vector wave scattering from a random dielectric-body model. Also considered are the selection of trial functions and the variational improvement of the Kirchhoff short-wave approximation appropriate to large size-parameters. Other applications of vector field theory discussed include a general vision theory and the analysis of hydromagnetism induced by ocean motion across the geomagnetic field. Levitational force-torque in the magnetic suspension of the disturbance compensation system (DISCOS), now deployed in NOVA satellites, is also analyzed using the developed theory.

  12. Quantum Optical Multiple Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær

    . In the first part we use a scattering-matrix formalism combined with results from random-matrix theory to investigate the interference of quantum optical states on a multiple scattering medium. We investigate a single realization of a scattering medium thereby showing that it is possible to create entangled...... states by interference of squeezed beams. Mixing photon states on the single realization also shows that quantum interference naturally arises by interfering quantum states. We further investigate the ensemble averaged transmission properties of the quantized light and see that the induced quantum...... interference survives even after disorder averaging. The quantum interference manifests itself through increased photon correlations. Furthermore, the theoretical description of a measurement procedure is presented. In this work we relate the noise power spectrum of the total transmitted or reflected light...

  13. Λ scattering equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Humberto [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade de São Paulo,Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Santiago de Cali,Calle 5 62-00 Barrio Pampalinda, Cali, Valle (Colombia)

    2016-06-17

    The CHY representation of scattering amplitudes is based on integrals over the moduli space of a punctured sphere. We replace the punctured sphere by a double-cover version. The resulting scattering equations depend on a parameter Λ controlling the opening of a branch cut. The new representation of scattering amplitudes possesses an enhanced redundancy which can be used to fix, modulo branches, the location of four punctures while promoting Λ to a variable. Via residue theorems we show how CHY formulas break up into sums of products of smaller (off-shell) ones times a propagator. This leads to a powerful way of evaluating CHY integrals of generic rational functions, which we call the Λ algorithm.

  14. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  15. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  16. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, neutron polarization analysis with tht time-of-flight spectrometer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering with the KWS-1 and KWS-2 diffractometers, the very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractrometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  17. Algorithmic scatter correction in dual-energy digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Mou, Xuanqin [Institute of Image Processing and Pattern Recognition, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Nishikawa, Robert M.; Lau, Beverly A. [Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Chan, Suk-tak [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom (Hong Kong); Zhang, Lei [Department of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom (Hong Kong)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Small calcifications are often the earliest and the main indicator of breast cancer. Dual-energy digital mammography (DEDM) has been considered as a promising technique to improve the detectability of calcifications since it can be used to suppress the contrast between adipose and glandular tissues of the breast. X-ray scatter leads to erroneous calculations of the DEDM image. Although the pinhole-array interpolation method can estimate scattered radiations, it requires extra exposures to measure the scatter and apply the correction. The purpose of this work is to design an algorithmic method for scatter correction in DEDM without extra exposures.Methods: In this paper, a scatter correction method for DEDM was developed based on the knowledge that scattered radiation has small spatial variation and that the majority of pixels in a mammogram are noncalcification pixels. The scatter fraction was estimated in the DEDM calculation and the measured scatter fraction was used to remove scatter from the image. The scatter correction method was implemented on a commercial full-field digital mammography system with breast tissue equivalent phantom and calcification phantom. The authors also implemented the pinhole-array interpolation scatter correction method on the system. Phantom results for both methods are presented and discussed. The authors compared the background DE calcification signals and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of calcifications in the three DE calcification images: image without scatter correction, image with scatter correction using pinhole-array interpolation method, and image with scatter correction using the authors' algorithmic method.Results: The authors' results show that the resultant background DE calcification signal can be reduced. The root-mean-square of background DE calcification signal of 1962 μm with scatter-uncorrected data was reduced to 194 μm after scatter correction using the authors' algorithmic method

  18. Rayleigh scattering in an emitter-nanofiber-coupling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shui-Jing; Gao, Fei; Xu, Da; Li, Yan; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2017-04-01

    Scattering is a general process in both fundamental and applied physics. In this paper, we investigate Rayleigh scattering of a solid-state-emitter coupled to a nanofiber, by S -matrix-like theory in k -space description. Under this model, both Rayleigh scattering and dipole interaction are studied between a two-level artificial atom embedded in a nanocrystal and fiber modes (guided and radiation modes). It is found that Rayleigh scattering plays a critical role in the transport properties and quantum statistics of photons. On the one hand, Rayleigh scattering produces the transparency in the optical transmitted field of the nanofiber, accompanied by the change of atomic phase, population, and frequency shift. On the other hand, the interference between two kinds of scattering fields by Rayleigh scattering and dipole transition modifies the photon statistics (second-order autocorrelation function) of output fields, showing a strong wavelength dependence. This study provides guidance for the solid-state emitter acting as a single-photon source and can be extended to explore the scattering effect in many-body physics.

  19. Polarized multiple scattering effect in Qweak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Ciprian

    2017-09-01

    The Qweak experiment has measured the weak charge of the proton to unprecedented precision. In order to achieve this, all possible sources of systematic uncertainty had to be carefully controlled. This talk will present the work underpinning one of the leading systematic uncertainties in the measurement. Multiple scattering of transversely polarized electrons in the lead pre-radiator produced an additional asymmetry in the quartz integrating detectors. Analyzing powers inside the lead corresponding to Mott scattering and a two photon exchange model were implemented in a Geant4 simulation. A correction based on the physical differences between the left half and the right half of each Qweak detector was obtained. Potential implications to other parity violating experiments will be discussed.

  20. Wave scattering in spatially inhomogeneous currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churilov, Semyon; Ermakov, Andrei; Stepanyants, Yury

    2017-09-01

    We analytically study a scattering of long linear surface waves on stationary currents in a duct (canal) of constant depth and variable width. It is assumed that the background velocity linearly increases or decreases with the longitudinal coordinate due to the gradual variation of duct width. Such a model admits an analytical solution of the problem in hand, and we calculate the scattering coefficients as functions of incident wave frequency for all possible cases of sub-, super-, and transcritical currents. For completeness we study both cocurrent and countercurrent wave propagation in accelerating and decelerating currents. The results obtained are analyzed in application to recent analog gravity experiments and shed light on the problem of hydrodynamic modeling of Hawking radiation.

  1. Effect of Scatterering on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signals

    CERN Document Server

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Piazza, Vincenzo; Potma, Eric O; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2016-01-01

    We develop a computational framework to examine the factors responsible for scattering-induced distortions of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in turbid samples. We use the Huygens-Fresnel Wave-based Electric Field Superposition (HF-WEFS) method combined with the radiating dipole approximation to compute the effects of scattering-induced distortions of focal excitation fields on the far-field CARS signal. We analyze the effect of spherical scatterers, placed in the vicinity of the focal volume, on the CARS signal emitted by different objects (2{\\mu}m diameter solid sphere, 2{\\mu}m diameter myelin cylinder and 2{\\mu}m diameter myelin tube). We find that distortions in the CARS signals arise not only from attenuation of the focal field but also from scattering-induced changes in the spatial phase that modifies the angular distribution of the CARS emission. Our simulations further show that CARS signal attenuation can be minimized by using a high numerical aperture condenser. Moreover, unlike...

  2. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  3. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Volker S [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  4. Critical fluid light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to measure the decay rates of critical density fluctuations in a simple fluid (xenon) very near its liquid-vapor critical point using laser light scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy. Such experiments were severely limited on Earth by the presence of gravity which causes large density gradients in the sample when the compressibility diverges approaching the critical point. The goal is to measure fluctuation decay rates at least two decades closer to the critical point than is possible on earth, with a resolution of 3 microK. This will require loading the sample to 0.1 percent of the critical density and taking data as close as 100 microK to the critical temperature. The minimum mission time of 100 hours will allow a complete range of temperature points to be covered, limited by the thermal response of the sample. Other technical problems have to be addressed such as multiple scattering and the effect of wetting layers. The experiment entails measurement of the scattering intensity fluctuation decay rate at two angles for each temperature and simultaneously recording the scattering intensities and sample turbidity (from the transmission). The analyzed intensity and turbidity data gives the correlation length at each temperature and locates the critical temperature. The fluctuation decay rate data from these measurements will provide a severe test of the generalized hydrodynamic theories of transport coefficients in the critical regions. When compared to equivalent data from binary liquid critical mixtures they will test the universality of critical dynamics.

  5. Inelastic magnon scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert de Mello Koch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the worldsheet S-matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS5×S5. The D-brane is either a giant graviton or a dual giant graviton. In the gauge theory, the operators we consider belong to the su(2|3 sector of the theory. Magnon excitations of open strings can exhibit both elastic (when magnons in the bulk of the string scatter and inelastic (when magnons at the endpoint of an open string participate scattering. Both of these S-matrices are determined (up to an overall phase by the su(2|22 global symmetry of the theory. In this note we study the S-matrix for inelastic scattering. We show that it exhibits poles corresponding to boundstates of bulk and boundary magnons. A crossing equation is derived for the overall phase. It reproduces the crossing equation for maximal giant gravitons, in the appropriate limit. Finally, scattering in the su(2 sector is computed to two loops. This two loop result, which determines the overall phase to two loops, will be useful when a unique solution to the crossing equation is to be selected.

  6. Inelastic magnon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Koch, Robert; van Zyl, Hendrik J. R.

    2017-05-01

    We study the worldsheet S-matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS5 ×S5. The D-brane is either a giant graviton or a dual giant graviton. In the gauge theory, the operators we consider belong to the su (2 | 3) sector of the theory. Magnon excitations of open strings can exhibit both elastic (when magnons in the bulk of the string scatter) and inelastic (when magnons at the endpoint of an open string participate) scattering. Both of these S-matrices are determined (up to an overall phase) by the su(2 | 2) 2 global symmetry of the theory. In this note we study the S-matrix for inelastic scattering. We show that it exhibits poles corresponding to boundstates of bulk and boundary magnons. A crossing equation is derived for the overall phase. It reproduces the crossing equation for maximal giant gravitons, in the appropriate limit. Finally, scattering in the su (2) sector is computed to two loops. This two loop result, which determines the overall phase to two loops, will be useful when a unique solution to the crossing equation is to be selected.

  7. A scatter correction method for dual-energy digital mammography: Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Kai; Gao, Yanhua; Yu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    To develop a novel scatter correction method without additional patient dose for dual-energy digital mammography (DEDM) to reduce scatter's impacts and enhance microcalcification detectability in dual-energy X-ray subtraction image. Combining scatter radiation is lower spatial frequency component and calcifications are sparsely distributed in digital mammogram, we develop a new scatter correction strategy. First, an adaptive sampling scheme is presented to find possible noncalcification (zero calcification) pixels. Then the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm is applied to evaluate initial scatter surface. The accurate scatter radiation of sampling pixels is obtained by solving dual-energy computational formula with zero calcification constraint and scatter surface constraint. After scatter correction, the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) of wedge phantom is reduced from ~36.0% to ~3.1% for low-energy (LE) image and ~29.6% to ~0.6% for high-energy (HE) image. For step phantom, the SPR is reduced from ~42.1% and ~30.3% to ~3.9% and ~0.9% for LE and HE image, respectively. The calcification contrast-to-noise ratio is improved by two orders of magnitudes in calcification images. The proposed method shows an excellent performance on scatter reduction and calcification detection. Compared with hardware based scatter correction strategy, our method need no extra exposure and is easy to implementation.

  8. Radiation forces in the discrete dipole approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.G.; Frijlink, M.O.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The theory of the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) for light scattering is extended to allow for the calculation of radiation forces on each dipole in the DDA model. Starting with the theory of Draine and Weingartner [Astrophys. J. 470, 551 (1996)] we derive an expression for the radiation force

  9. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filhol, J.M.; Chavanne, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Weckert, E. [Hasylab at Desy, Hamburg (Germany)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  10. Small angle neutron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ∼ 1 nm up to ∼ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ∼ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area… through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer, form factor analysis (I(q→0, Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system, structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates, and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast. It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of

  11. Rayleigh's Scattering Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiets, Sergey; Gorelik, Andrey

    This report is devoted to a discussion of applicability limits of Rayleigh’s scattering model. Implicitly, Rayleigh’s ideas are being used in a wide range of remote sensing applications. To begin with it must be noted that most techniques which have been developed to date for measurements by means of active instruments for remote sensing in case of the target is a set of distributed moving scatters are only hopes, to say so, on measurements per se. The problem is that almost all of such techniques use a priori information about the microstructure of the object of interest during whole measurement session. As one can find in the literature, this approach may happily be applied to systems with identical particles. However, it is not the case with respect to scattering targets that consist of particles of different kind or having a particle size distribution. It must be especially noted that the microstructure of most of such targets changes significantly with time and/or space. Therefore, the true measurement techniques designed to be applicable in such conditions must be not only adaptable in order to take into account a variety of models of an echo interpretation, but also have a well-developed set of clear-cut criteria of applicability and exact means of accuracy estimation. So such techniques will require much more parameters to be measured. In spite of the fact that there is still room for some improvements within classical models and approaches, it is multiwavelength approach that may be seen as the most promising way of development towards obtaining an adequate set of the measured parameters required for true measurement techniques. At the same time, Rayleigh’s scattering is an invariant in regard to a change of the wavelength as it follows from the point of view dominating nowadays. In the light of such an idea, the synergy between multivawelength measurements may be achieved - to a certain extent - by means of the synchronous usage of Rayleigh’s and

  12. Soft-photon emission effects and radiative corrections for electromagnetic processes at very high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Higher-order electromagnetic processes involving particles at ultrahigh energies are discussed, with particular attention given to Compton scattering with the emission of an additional photon (double Compton scattering). Double Compton scattering may have significance in the interaction of a high-energy electron with the cosmic blackbody photon gas. At high energies the cross section for double Compton scattering is large, though this effect is largely canceled by the effects of radiative corrections to ordinary Compton scattering. A similar cancellation takes place for radiative pair production and the associated radiative corrections to the radiationless process. This cancellation is related to the well-known cancellation of the infrared divergence in electrodynamics.

  13. Multiple scattering of elliptically polarized light in two-dimensional medium with large inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorodnichev, E. E., E-mail: gorodn@theor.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    For elliptically polarized light incident on a two-dimensional medium with large inhomogeneities, the Stokes parameters of scattered waves are calculated. Multiple scattering is assumed to be sharply anisotropic. The degree of polarization of scattered radiation is shown to be a nonmonotonic function of depth when the incident wave is circularly polarized or its polarization vector is not parallel to the symmetry axis of the inhomogeneities.

  14. Optical properties of two-dimensional magnetoelectric point scattering lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Sersic, Ivana; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2013-01-01

    We explore the electrodynamic coupling between a plane wave and an infinite two-dimensional periodic lattice of magnetoelectric point scatterers, deriving a semianalytical theory with consistent treatment of radiation damping, retardation, and energy conservation. We apply the theory to arrays of...

  15. FDTD scattered field formulation for scatterers in stratified dispersive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkonen, Juuso

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a simple scattered field (SF) technique that enables finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of light scattering from dispersive objects residing in stratified dispersive media. The introduced SF technique is verified against the total field scattered field (TFSF) technique. As an application example, we study surface plasmon polariton enhanced light transmission through a 100 nm wide slit in a silver film.

  16. Line source excitation of multilayered metamaterial cylinders: source and scattering results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2006-01-01

    The problem of a line source radiating in the presence of a multilayered metamaterial cylinder is solved analytically and implemented numerically. Results for both the source and scattering problems demonstrate that electrically small cylindrical structures can be designed to be resonant leading...... to enhancements of the radiated and scattered powers. The effects of the dispersion present in the metamaterials are taken into account to study the bandwidth properties of the configurations at hand....

  17. Analysis of several ways to minimize the scatter contribution in radiographic digital images of offshore pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Edmilson M.; Silva, Ademir X.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: emonteiro@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: Ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Correa, Samanda C.A., E-mail: scorrea@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DIAPI/CGMI/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Instalacoes Medicas e Industriais. Div. de Aplicacoes Industriais

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate, through MCNPX simulations, several ways to minimize the scatter contribution in radiographic digital images of offshore pipelines. The influence of liquid inside the pipes and water surrounded the pipelines in the scatter contribution will be analyzed. The use of lead screen behind the detector to reduce the backscattered radiation and filter between the radiation source and the pipes will be discussed. (author)

  18. Fast-ion dynamics in the TEXTOR tokamak measured by collective Thomson scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, H.; Nielsen, S.K.; Porte, L.

    2006-01-01

    Here we present the first measurements by collective Thomson scattering of the evolution of fast-ion populations in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. 150 kW and 110 Ghz radiation from a gyrotron were scattered in the TEXTOR tokamak plasma with energetic ions generated by neutral beam injection...

  19. On the Scattering Properties of Urban and Maritime Aerosols and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The scattering properties of aerosols play a dominant role in radiative energy transfer and consequently influencing the visibility and turbidity in the atmosphere. In the present attempt, calculations for scattered intensity have been made in case of urban and maritime aerosols in the varying conditions of relative humidity.

  20. Numerical analysis of space-weathering effects on light scattering by asteroid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markkanen, J.; Martikainen, J.; Penttilä, A.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-09-01

    We have developed a novel radiative transfer (RT) / geometric optics (GO) numerical approach which allows us to model space-weathering effects on light scattering by planetary surfaces. Our analysis show that the space weathering has a major impact on light-scattering features of asteroids at the visible wavelengths.

  1. Material Assessment for ITER’s Collective Thomson Scattering first mirror

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, R.; Policarpo, H.; Gonçalves, B.

    2015-01-01

    ITER’s Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) system is a diagnostic instrument that will measure the plasma density and velocity through Thomson scattering of microwave radiation. Some of the key components of the CTS are quasioptical mirrors used to produce astigmatic beam patterns, which have...

  2. On velocity space interrogation regions of fast-ion collective Thomson scattering at ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    the collective scattering in well-defined regions in velocity space, here dubbed interrogation regions. Since the CTS instrument measures entire spectra of scattered radiation, many different interrogation regions are probed simultaneously. We here give analytic expressions for weight functions describing...

  3. Comparing natural and artificial carious lesions in human crowns by means of conventional hard x-ray micro-tomography and two-dimensional x-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Lea Maria; White, Shane N.; Deyhle, Hans; Dziadowiec, Iwona; Schulz, Georg; Thalmann, Peter; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Dental caries, one of the most prevalent infectious bacterial diseases in the world, is caused by specific types of acid-producing bacteria. Caries is a disease continuum resulting from the earliest loss of ions from apatite crystals through gross cavitation. Enamel dissolution starts when the pH-value drops below 5.5. Neutralizing the pH-value in the oral cavity opposes the process of demineralization, and so caries lesions occur in a dynamic cyclic de-mineralizing/remineralizing environment. Unfortunately, biomimetic regeneration of cavitated enamel is not yet possible, although remineralization of small carious lesions occurs under optimal conditions. Therefore, the development of methods that can regenerate carious lesions, and subsequently recover and retain teeth, is highly desirable. For the present proceedings we analyzed one naturally occurring sub-surface and one artificially produced lesion. For the characterization of artificial and natural lesions micro computed tomography is the method of choice when looking to determine three-dimensional mineral distribution and to quantify the degree of mineralization. In this pilot study we elucidate that the de-mineralized enamel in natural and artificially induced lesions shows comparable X-ray attenuation behavior, thereby implying that the study protocol employed herein seems to be appropriate. Once we know that the lesions are comparable, a series of well-reproducible in vitro experiments on enamel regeneration could be performed. In order to quantify further lesion morphology, the anisotropy of the enamel's nanostructure can be characterized by using spatially resolved, small-angle X-ray scattering. We wanted to demonstrate that the artificially induced defect fittingly resembles the natural carious lesion.

  4. Synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics

    CERN Document Server

    Pechkova, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the current state of research in both synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics from different laboratories worldwide. The book presents recent research results in the most advanced methods of synchrotron radiation analysis, protein micro- and nano crystallography, X-ray scattering and X-ray optics, coherent X-Ray diffraction, and laser cutting and contactless sample manipulation are described in details. The book focuses on biological applications and highlights important aspects such as radiation damage and molecular modeling.

  5. Radiative transfer on discrete spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Preisendorfer, Rudolph W; Stark, M; Ulam, S

    1965-01-01

    Pure and Applied Mathematics, Volume 74: Radiative Transfer on Discrete Spaces presents the geometrical structure of natural light fields. This book describes in detail with mathematical precision the radiometric interactions of light-scattering media in terms of a few well established principles.Organized into four parts encompassing 15 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the derivations of the practical formulas and the arrangement of formulas leading to numerical solution procedures of radiative transfer problems in plane-parallel media. This text then constructs radiative tran

  6. Electromagnetic scattering from random media

    CERN Document Server

    Field, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    - ;The book develops the dynamical theory of scattering from random media from first principles. Its key findings are to characterize the time evolution of the scattered field in terms of stochastic differential equations, and to illustrate this framework

  7. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  8. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  9. Nonreciprocal wave scattering on nonlinear string-coupled oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepri, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.lepri@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Pikovsky, Arkady [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str 24/25, Potsdam (Germany); Department of Control Theory, Nizhni Novgorod State University, Gagarin Av. 23, 606950, Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-01

    We study scattering of a periodic wave in a string on two lumped oscillators attached to it. The equations can be represented as a driven (by the incident wave) dissipative (due to radiation losses) system of delay differential equations of neutral type. Nonlinearity of oscillators makes the scattering non-reciprocal: The same wave is transmitted differently in two directions. Periodic regimes of scattering are analyzed approximately, using amplitude equation approach. We show that this setup can act as a nonreciprocal modulator via Hopf bifurcations of the steady solutions. Numerical simulations of the full system reveal nontrivial regimes of quasiperiodic and chaotic scattering. Moreover, a regime of a “chaotic diode,” where transmission is periodic in one direction and chaotic in the opposite one, is reported.

  10. Determination of diagnostic X ray spectra scattered by a phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehrenbacher, G.; Panzer, W.; Regulla, D. [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. of Radiation Protection; Tesfu, K. [Addis Ababa Univ. (Ethiopia)

    1997-12-01

    Photon spectra are reported that result from the scatter of diagnostic X rays at an appropriate water phantom that represents a patient. The tube voltages considered are between 52 kV and 110 kV, the scatter angles from 10{sup o} to 142{sup o} to the normal radiation incidence direction. All spectral measurements were performed with a high-purity germanium detector. Spectral photon fluences are computed from the measured pulse height distribution by using an unfolding procedure. The required response functions of the detection system were obtained by using Monte Carlo methods. Reference is made to a catalogue compiling 35 spectra of scattered X rays in diagnostics resulting from a human substitute, together with information on relevant primary field parameters as well as air kerma for the scattered X rays. (Author).

  11. Low dose out-of-field radiotherapy, part 2: Calculating the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum from scattered radiation using Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobala, A; Adamczyk, S; Kruszyna-Mochalska, M; Skórska, M; Konefał, A; Suchorska, W; Zaleska, K; Kowalik, A; Jackowiak, W; Malicki, J

    2017-08-01

    During radiotherapy, leakage from the machine head and collimator expose patients to out-of-field irradiation doses, which may cause secondary cancers. To quantify the risks of secondary cancers due to out-of-field doses, it is first necessary to measure these doses. Since most dosimeters are energy-dependent, it is essential to first determine the type of photon energy spectrum in the out-of-field area. The aim of this study was to determine the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum for a 6 MV photon beam using the GEANT 4-Monte Carlo method. A specially-designed large water phantom was simulated with a static field at gantry 0°. The source-to-surface distance was 92cm for an open field size of 10×10cm2. The photon energy spectra were calculated at five unique positions (at depths of 0.5, 1.6, 4, 6, 8, and 10cm) along the central beam axis and at six different off-axis distances. Monte Carlo simulations showed that mean radiation energy levels drop rapidly beyond the edge of the 6 MV photon beam field: at a distance of 10cm, the mean energy level is close to 0.3MeV versus 1.5MeV at the central beam axis. In some cases, the energy level actually increased even as the distance from the field edge increased: at a depth of 1.6cm and 15cm off-axis, the mean energy level was 0.205MeV versus 0.252MeV at 20cm off-axis. The out-of-field energy spectra and dose distribution data obtained in this study with Monte Carlo methods can be used to calibrate dosimeters to measure out-of-field radiation from 6MV photons. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Twisted Radiation by Electrons in Spiral Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Katoh, M; Mirian, N S; Konomi, T; Taira, Y; Kaneyasu, T; Hosaka, M; Yamamoto, N; Mochihashi, A; Takashima, Y; Kuroda, K; Miyamoto, A; Miyamoto, K; Sasaki, S

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically show that a single free electron in circular/spiral motion radiates an electromagnetic wave possessing helical phase structure and carrying orbital angular momentum. We experimentally demonstrate it by double-slit diffraction on radiation from relativistic electrons in spiral motion. We show that twisted photons should be created naturally by cyclotron/synchrotron radiations or Compton scatterings in various situations in astrophysics. We propose promising laboratory vortex photon sources in various wavelengths ranging from radio wave to gamma-rays.

  13. On stimulated resonance radiation by channeled particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabagov, S. B.; Kalashnikov, N. P.

    2017-07-01

    The channeled particles undergo quasiperiodic transverse bound motion along main crystallographic directions at either 1D planar or 2D axial channeling. This motion is accompanied by spontaneous radiation known as channeling radiation due to projectile's transmission between discrete quantum states. In this work we have presented preliminary evaluation of the processes of resonance scattering of external electromagnetic field when the external frequency becomes close to the channeled particle transition energies that might be of the source for induced radiation at channeling.

  14. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... A brand-new electron scattering facility, the SCRIT Electron Scattering Facility, will soon start its operation at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan. This is the world's first electron scattering facility dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. The goal of this facility is to determine the charge density ...

  15. Double parton scattering theory overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diehl, Markus; Gaunt, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of double hard scattering in proton-proton collisions is quite involved compared with the familiar case of single hard scattering. In this contribution, we review our theoretical understanding of double hard scattering and of its interplay with other reaction mechanisms.

  16. Seamount acoustic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehlert, George W.

    The cover of the March 1 issue of Eos showed a time series of acoustic scattering above Southeast Hancock Seamount (29°48‧N, 178°05‧E) on July 17-18, 1984. In a comment on that cover Martin Hovland (Eos, August 2, p. 760) argued that gas or “other far reaching causes” may be involved in the observed acoustic signals. He favors a hypothesis that acoustic scattering observed above a seeping pockmark in the North Sea is a combination of bubbles, stable microbubbles, and pelagic organisms and infers that this may be a more general phenomenon and indeed plays a role in the attraction of organisms to seamounts

  17. Scattering problems in elastodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Diatta, Andre; Wegener, Martin; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    In electromagnetism, acoustics, and quantum mechanics, scattering problems can routinely be solved numerically by virtue of perfectly matched layers (PMLs) at simulation domain boundaries. Unfortunately, the same has not been possible for general elastodynamic wave problems in continuum mechanics. In this paper, we introduce a corresponding scattered-field formulation for the Navier equation. We derive PMLs based on complex-valued coordinate transformations leading to Cosserat elasticity-tensor distributions not obeying the minor symmetries. These layers are shown to work in two dimensions, for all polarizations, and all directions. By adaptative choice of the decay length, the deep subwavelength PMLs can be used all the way to the quasi-static regime. As demanding examples, we study the effectiveness of cylindrical elastodynamic cloaks of the Cosserat type and approximations thereof.

  18. Molecular-beam scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  19. Means on scattered compacta

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Banakh, T.; Bonnet, R.; Kubiś, Wieslaw

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2014), s. 5-10 ISSN 2299-3231 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0290 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : scattered compact space * mean operation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/taa.2014.2.issue-1/taa-2014-0002/taa-2014-0002. xml

  20. K sup + - scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Farhan, A M

    2002-01-01

    A prescription is given to construct an effective interaction that may describe the scattering of K sup + by spin-zero nuclei in a more reliable way. This prescription is based on the Lorentz invariant representation of the meson-nucleon amplitude and the use of the Klein-Gordon equation of motion. Good results for K sup + - sup 1 sup 2 C as well as K sup + - D total cross sections at various energies have been obtained. (author)

  1. Neutron scattering in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains.

  2. A study of phonon anisotropic scattering effect on silicon thermal conductivity at nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong, Victor N-S; Wong, Basil T. [Swinburne Sarawak Research Centre for Sustainable Technologies, Faculty of Engineering, Computing & Science, Swinburne University of Technology Sarawak Campus, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2015-08-28

    Previous studies have shown that anisotropy in phonon transport exist because of the difference in phonon dispersion relation due to different lattice direction, as observed by a difference in in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivity. The directional preference (such as forward or backward scattering) in phonon propagation however, remains a relatively unexplored frontier. Our current work adopts a simple scattering probability in radiative transfer, which is called Henyey and Greenstein probability density function, and incorporates it into the phonon Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the effect of directional scattering in phonon transport. In this work, the effect of applying the anisotropy scattering is discussed, as well as its impact on the simulated thermal conductivity of silicon thin films. While the forward and backward scattering will increase and decrease thermal conductivity respectively, the extent of the effect is non-linear such that forward scattering has a more obvious effect than backward scattering.

  3. Energy dependence of scatter components in multispectral PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentourkia, M; Msaki, P; Cadorette, J; Lecomte, R

    1995-01-01

    High resolution images in PET based on small individual detectors are obtained at the cost of low sensitivity and increased detector scatter. These limitations can be partially overcome by enlarging discrimination windows to include more low-energy events and by developing more efficient energy-dependent methods to correct for scatter radiation from all sources. The feasibility of multispectral scatter correction was assessed by decomposing response functions acquired in multiple energy windows into four basic components: object, collimator and detector scatter, and trues. The shape and intensity of these components are different and energy-dependent. They are shown to contribute to image formation in three ways: useful (true), potentially useful (detector scatter), and undesirable (object and collimator scatter) information to the image over the entire energy range. With the Sherbrooke animal PET system, restoration of detector scatter in every energy window would allow nearly 90% of all detected events to participate in image formation. These observations suggest that multispectral acquisition is a promising solution for increasing sensitivity in high resolution PET. This can be achieved without loss of image quality if energy-dependent methods are made available to preserve useful events as potentially useful events are restored and undesirable events removed.

  4. Diffusive scattering of electrons by electron holes around injection fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2017-03-01

    Van Allen Probes have detected nonlinear electrostatic spikes around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. These spikes include electron holes (EH), double layers, and more complicated solitary waves. We show that EHs can efficiently scatter electrons due to their substantial transverse electric fields. Although the electron scattering driven by EHs is diffusive, it cannot be evaluated via the standard quasi-linear theory. We derive analytical formulas describing local electron scattering by a single EH and verify them via test particle simulations. We show that the most efficiently scattered are gyroresonant electrons (crossing EH on a time scale comparable to the local electron gyroperiod). We compute bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients and demonstrate their dependence on the EH spatial distribution (latitudinal extent and spatial filling factor) and individual EH parameters (amplitude of electrostatic potential, velocity, and spatial scales). We show that EHs can drive pitch angle scattering of ≲5 keV electrons at rates 10-2-10-4 s-1 and, hence, can contribute to electron losses and conjugated diffuse aurora brightenings. The momentum and pitch angle scattering rates can be comparable, so that EHs can also provide efficient electron heating. The scattering rates driven by EHs at L shells L ˜ 5-8 are comparable to those due to chorus waves and may exceed those due to electron cyclotron harmonics.

  5. Radiography by selective detection of scatter field velocity components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A reconfigurable collimated radiation detector, system and related method includes at least one collimated radiation detector. The detector has an adjustable collimator assembly including at least one feature, such as a fin, optically coupled thereto. Adjustments to the adjustable collimator selects particular directions of travel of scattered radiation emitted from an irradiated object which reach the detector. The collimated detector is preferably a collimated detector array, where the collimators are independently adjustable. The independent motion capability provides the capability to focus the image by selection of the desired scatter field components. When an array of reconfigurable collimated detectors is provided, separate image data can be obtained from each of the detectors and the respective images cross-correlated and combined to form an enhanced image.

  6. THE DISCOVERY OF RAMAN SCATTERING IN H II REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Nicholls, David C.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Groves, Brent A., E-mail: Michael.Dopita@anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2016-06-10

    We report here on the discovery of faint extended wings of H α observed out to an apparent velocity of ∼7600 km s{sup −1} in the Orion Nebula (M42) and in five H ii regions in the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds. We show that these wings are caused by Raman scattering of both the O i and Si ii resonance lines and stellar continuum UV photons with H i followed by radiative decay to the H i n = 2 level. The broad wings also seen in H β and in H γ result from Raman scattering of the UV continuum in the H i n = 4 and n = 5 levels, respectively. The Raman scattering fluorescence is correlated with the intensity of the narrow permitted lines of O i and Si ii. In the case of Si ii, this is explained by radiative pumping of the same 1023.7 Å resonance line involved in the Raman scattering by the Ly β radiation field. The subsequent radiative cascade produces enhanced Si ii λλ 5978.9, 6347.1, and 6371.4 Å permitted transitions. Finally, we show that in O i, radiative pumping of the 1025.76 Å resonance line by the Lyman series radiation field is also the cause of the enhancement in the permitted lines of this species lying near H α in wavelength, but here the process is a little more complex. We argue that all these processes are active in the zone of the H ii region near the ionization front.

  7. Hard scattering and QCD Fundamentals at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2008-01-01

    In 1998, at the 4th QCD workshop, Rolf Baier asked me whether jets could be measured in Au+Au collisions because he had a prediction of a QCD medium-effect (energy loss via soft gluon radiation induced by multiple scattering) on color-charged partons traversing a hot-dense-medium composed of screened color-charges. I reviewed the possibilities in a talk explaining that there was a general consensus that for Au+Au central collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV, leading particles are the only way to find jets because of the large particle density. The good news was that hard-scattering in p-p collisions was originally observed by the method of leading particles and that these techniques could be used to study hard-scattering and jets in Au+Au collisions. Notably, I described ``How everything you want to know about jets can be found using 2-particle correlations''. In fact, the predicted ``jet quenching'' and other new phenomena were discovered by this method. However, this past year, I had to soften the statemen...

  8. Modeling classical and quantum radiation from laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of models and the “Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation” (vdsr code that accurately describe the production of synchrotron radiation are described. These models and code are valid in the classical and linear (single-scattering quantum regimes and are capable of describing radiation produced from laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs through a variety of mechanisms including betatron radiation, undulator radiation, and Thomson/Compton scattering. Previous models of classical synchrotron radiation, such as those typically used for undulator radiation, are inadequate in describing the radiation spectra from electrons undergoing small numbers of oscillations. This is due to an improper treatment of a mathematical evaluation at the end points of an integration that leads to an unphysical plateau in the radiation spectrum at high frequencies, the magnitude of which increases as the number of oscillation periods decreases. This is important for betatron radiation from LPAs, in which the betatron strength parameter is large but the number of betatron periods is small. The code vdsr allows the radiation to be calculated in this regime by full integration over each electron trajectory, including end-point effects, and this code is used to calculate betatron radiation for cases of experimental interest. Radiation from Thomson scattering and Compton scattering is also studied with vdsr. For Thomson scattering, radiation reaction is included by using the Sokolov method for the calculation of the electron dynamics. For Compton scattering, quantum recoil effects are considered in vdsr by using Monte Carlo methods. The quantum calculation has been benchmarked with the classical calculation in a classical regime.

  9. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This program set out to explore a scattering-based approach to concentrate sunlight with the aim of improving collector field reliability and of eliminating wind loading and gross mechanical movement through the use of a stationary collection optic. The approach is based on scattering sunlight from the focal point of a fixed collection optic into the confined modes of a sliding planar waveguide, where it is transported to stationary tubular heat transfer elements located at the edges. Optical design for the first stage of solar concentration, which entails focusing sunlight within a plane over a wide range of incidence angles (>120 degree full field of view) at fixed tilt, led to the development of a new, folded-path collection optic that dramatically out-performs the current state-of-the-art in scattering concentration. Rigorous optical simulation and experimental testing of this collection optic have validated its performance. In the course of this work, we also identified an opportunity for concentrating photovoltaics involving the use of high efficiency microcells made in collaboration with partners at the University of Illinois. This opportunity exploited the same collection optic design as used for the scattering solar thermal concentrator and was therefore pursued in parallel. This system was experimentally demonstrated to achieve >200x optical concentration with >70% optical efficiency over a full day by tracking with <1 cm of lateral movement at fixed latitude tilt. The entire scattering concentrator waveguide optical system has been simulated, tested, and assembled at small scale to verify ray tracing models. These models were subsequently used to predict the full system optical performance at larger, deployment scale ranging up to >1 meter aperture width. Simulations at an aperture widths less than approximately 0.5 m with geometric gains ~100x predict an overall optical efficiency in the range 60-70% for angles up to 50 degrees from normal. However, the

  10. Barrier distributions and scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmers, H.; Leigh, J.R.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D.J.; Mein, J.C.; Morton, C.R.; Newton, J.O. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Austria); Rowley, N. [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, 23 Rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg CEDEX 2 (France); Stefanini, A.M.; Ackermann, D.; Corradi, L.; He, J.H. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F. [Universita di Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The extraction of representations of the fusion barrier distribution from backward-angle, quasi-elastic, elastic and transfer excitation functions is discussed. Such excitation functions have been measured for {sup 16}O, {sup 32}S and {sup 40}Ca projectiles incident on a variety of targets. The results are compared with representations obtained from fusion excitation functions. Varying in their sensitivity, all representations show evidence of the barrier structure. Differences between the scattering and the fusion representations can be related to the effects of coupling to residual, weak reaction channels. (author)

  11. Wave propagation scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Birman, M Sh

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this collection were written primarily by members of the St. Petersburg seminar in mathematical physics. The seminar, now run by O. A. Ladyzhenskaya, was initiated in 1947 by V. I. Smirnov, to whose memory this volume is dedicated. The papers in the collection are devoted mainly to wave propagation processes, scattering theory, integrability of nonlinear equations, and related problems of spectral theory of differential and integral operators. The book is of interest to mathematicians working in mathematical physics and differential equations, as well as to physicists studying va

  12. Raman scattering in crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D.F.

    1988-09-30

    A tutorial presentation is given of Raman scattering in crystals. The physical concepts are emphasized rather than the detailed mathematical formalism. Starting with an introduction to the concepts of phonons and conservation laws, the effects of photon-phonon interactions are presented. This interaction concept is shown for a simple cubic crystal and is extended to a uniaxial crystal. The correlation table method is used for determining the number and symmetry of the Raman active modes. Finally, examples are given to illustrate the relative ease of using this group theoretical method and the predictions are compared with measured Raman spectra. 37 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of scatter effects on image quality for breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Boone, John M.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2007-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis uses a limited number of low-dose x-ray projections to produce a three-dimensional (3D) tomographic reconstruction of the breast. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effect of scatter radiation on image quality for breast tomosynthesis. Generated by a Monte Carlo simulation method, scatter point spread functions (PSF) were convolved over the field of view (FOV) to estimate the distribution of scatter for each angle of tomosynthesis projection. The results demonstrated that in the absence of scatter reduction techniques, the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) levels for the average breast are quite high (~0.4 at the centre of mass), and increased with increased breast thickness and with larger FOV. Associated with such levels of x-ray scatter are cupping artifacts, as well as reduced accuracy in reconstruction values. The effect of x-ray scatter on the contrast, noise, and signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) in tomosynthesis reconstruction was measured as a function of tumour size. For example, the contrast in the reconstructed central slice of a tumour-like mass (14 mm in diameter) was degraded by 30% while the inaccuracy of the voxel value was 28%, and the reduction of SDNR was 60%. We have quantified the degree to which scatter degrades the image quality over a wide range of parameters, including x-ray beam energy, breast thickness, breast diameter, and breast composition. However, even without a scatter rejection device, the contrast and SDNR in the reconstructed tomosynthesis slice is higher than that of conventional mammographic projection images acquired with a grid at an equivalent total exposure.

  14. Evaluation of scatter effects on image quality for breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Boone, John M.; Yaffe, Martin J. [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, S-657, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, X-ray Imaging Laboratory, U. C. Davis Medical Center, 4701 X Street, Sacramento, California 95817 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, S-657, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis uses a limited number (typically 10-20) of low-dose x-ray projections to produce a pseudo-three-dimensional volume tomographic reconstruction of the breast. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effect of scattered radiation on the image quality for breast tomosynthesis. In a simulation, scatter point spread functions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation method were convolved over the breast projection to estimate the distribution of scatter for each angle of tomosynthesis projection. The results demonstrate that in the absence of scatter reduction techniques, images will be affected by cupping artifacts, and there will be reduced accuracy of attenuation values inferred from the reconstructed images. The effect of x-ray scatter on the contrast, noise, and lesion signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) in tomosynthesis reconstruction was measured as a function of the tumor size. When a with-scatter reconstruction was compared to one without scatter for a 5 cm compressed breast, the following results were observed. The contrast in the reconstructed central slice image of a tumorlike mass (14 mm in diameter) was reduced by 30%, the voxel value (inferred attenuation coefficient) was reduced by 28%, and the SDNR fell by 60%. The authors have quantified the degree to which scatter degrades the image quality over a wide range of parameters relevant to breast tomosynthesis, including x-ray beam energy, breast thickness, breast diameter, and breast composition. They also demonstrate, though, that even without a scatter rejection device, the contrast and SDNR in the reconstructed tomosynthesis slice are higher than those of conventional mammographic projection images acquired with a grid at an equivalent total exposure.

  15. Evaluation of scatter effects on image quality for breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Mainprize, James G; Boone, John M; Yaffe, Martin J

    2009-10-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis uses a limited number (typically 10-20) of low-dose x-ray projections to produce a pseudo-three-dimensional volume tomographic reconstruction of the breast. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effect of scattered radiation on the image quality for breast tomosynthesis. In a simulation, scatter point spread functions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation method were convolved over the breast projection to estimate the distribution of scatter for each angle of tomosynthesis projection. The results demonstrate that in the absence of scatter reduction techniques, images will be affected by cupping artifacts, and there will be reduced accuracy of attenuation values inferred from the reconstructed images. The effect of x-ray scatter on the contrast, noise, and lesion signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) in tomosynthesis reconstruction was measured as a function of the tumor size. When a with-scatter reconstruction was compared to one without scatter for a 5 cm compressed breast, the following results were observed. The contrast in the reconstructed central slice image of a tumorlike mass (14 mm in diameter) was reduced by 30%, the voxel value (inferred attenuation coefficient) was reduced by 28%, and the SDNR fell by 60%. The authors have quantified the degree to which scatter degrades the image quality over a wide range of parameters relevant to breast tomosynthesis, including x-ray beam energy, breast thickness, breast diameter, and breast composition. They also demonstrate, though, that even without a scatter rejection device, the contrast and SDNR in the reconstructed tomosynthesis slice are higher than those of conventional mammographic projection images acquired with a grid at an equivalent total exposure.

  16. Controlling the spectral shape of nonlinear Thomson scattering with proper laser chirping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Rykovanov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nonlinearity in Thomson scattering of a high intensity laser pulse from electrons are analyzed. Analytic expressions for laser pulse shaping in frequency (chirping are obtained which control spectrum broadening for high laser pulse intensities. These analytic solutions allow prediction of the spectral form and required laser parameters to avoid broadening. Results of analytical and numerical calculations agree well. The control over the scattered radiation bandwidth allows narrow bandwidth sources to be produced using high scattering intensities, which in turn greatly improves scattering yield for future x- and gamma-ray sources.

  17. Strong Scattering of High Power Millimeter Waves in Tokamak Plasmas with Tearing Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhof, E.; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Oosterbeek, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    In tokamak plasmas with a tearing mode, strong scattering of high power millimeter waves, as used for heating and noninductive current drive, is shown to occur. This new wave scattering phenomenon is shown to be related to the passage of the O point of a magnetic island through the high power...... heating beam. The density determines the detailed phasing of the scattered radiation relative to the O-point passage. The scattering power depends strongly nonlinearly on the heating beam power. ©2009 The American Physical Society...

  18. The leaf-shape effect on electromagnetic scattering from vegetated media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, M. A.; Fung, A. K.; Blanchard, A. J.; Shen, G. X.

    1988-01-01

    Using the generalized Rayleigh Gans approximation along with the radiative transfer method, a bistatic backscattering model for a layer of randomly oriented, elliptic-shaped leaves is formulated. Following a similar procedure the bistatic scattering model for a layer of needle-shaped leaves is also developed to simulate coniferous vegetation. The differences between the scattering characteristics of the deciduous and coniferous leaves are illustrated numerically for different orientation and incidence angles. It is found that both like and cross polarizations are needed to differentiate the difference in scattering due to the shapes of the scatterers. The calculated backscattering coefficients are compared with measured values from artificial canopies with circular-shaped leaves.

  19. A hybrid time-domain discontinuous galerkin-boundary integral method for electromagnetic scattering analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ping

    2014-05-01

    A scheme hybridizing discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) and time-domain boundary integral (TDBI) methods for accurately analyzing transient electromagnetic scattering is proposed. Radiation condition is enforced using the numerical flux on the truncation boundary. The fields required by the flux are computed using the TDBI from equivalent currents introduced on a Huygens\\' surface enclosing the scatterer. The hybrid DGTDBI ensures that the radiation condition is mathematically exact and the resulting computation domain is as small as possible since the truncation boundary conforms to scatterer\\'s shape and is located very close to its surface. Locally truncated domains can also be defined around each disconnected scatterer additionally reducing the size of the overall computation domain. Numerical examples demonstrating the accuracy and versatility of the proposed method are presented. © 2014 IEEE.

  20. On-road measurement of black carbon mass, absorption, and single-scattering albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absorption and scattering of solar radiation by aerosols emitted from combustion sources can affect the earth’s radiative balance and may potentially affect local and regional climate. Optical properties of aerosols emitted from mobile sources have not been thoroughly characteri...

  1. Stimulated Brillouin scatter and stimulated ion Bernstein scatter during electron gyroharmonic heating experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, H.; Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Samimi, A.; Mahmoudian, A.; Briczinski, S. J.; McCarrick, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Results of secondary radiation, Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE), produced during ionospheric modification experiments using ground-based high-power radio waves are reported. These results obtained at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility specifically considered the generation of Magnetized Stimulated Brillouin Scatter (MSBS) and Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter (SIBS) lines in the SEE spectrum when the transmitter frequency is near harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency. The heater antenna beam angle effect was investigated on MSBS in detail and shows a new spectral line postulated to be generated near the upper hybrid resonance region due to ion acoustic wave interaction. Frequency sweeping experiments near the electron gyroharmonics show for the first time the transition from MSBS to SIBS lines as the heater pump frequency approaches the gyroharmonic. Significantly far from the gyroharmonic, MSBS lines dominate, while close to the gyroharmonic, SIBS lines strengthen while MSBS lines weaken. New possibilities for diagnostic information are discussed in light of these new observations.

  2. On the coherent scattering length of natural gadolinium

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, A I; Kulin, G V; Kulina, O V

    2002-01-01

    Using the reflection of thermal neutrons from the surface of plane sample the coherent scattering length of natural gadolinium was measured. Due to the closeness of resonances in radiation capture cross section the imaginary part of coherent scattering length strongly depends on neutron wavelength. Its real part can be expressed as a sum of Re(b)=b sub 0 + b(lambda). For the constant component of the real part we experimentally obtained the value b sub 0 =(11.5+-0.7)Fm. This result should be considered as a preliminary.

  3. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by periodic particle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu-Lin

    2013-06-01

    The generalized multiparticle Mie-solution (GMM) is an extension of the well-known Mie-theory for single homogeneous spheres to the general case of an arbitrary ensemble of variously sized and shaped particles. The present work explores its specific application to periodic structures, starting from one- and two-dimensional regular arrays of identical particles. Emphasis is placed on particle arrays with a truncated periodic structure, i.e., periodic arrays (PAs) with finite overall dimensions. To predict radiative scattering characteristics of a PA with a large number of identical particles within the framework of the GMM, it is sufficient to solve interactive scattering for only one single component particle, unlike the general case where partial scattered fields must be solved for every individual constituent. The total scattering from an array as a whole is simply the convolution of the scattering from a single representative scattering center with the periodic spatial distribution of all replica constituent units, in the terminology of Fourier analysis. Implemented in practical calculations, both computing time and computer memory required by the special version of GMM formulation applicable to PAs are trivial for ordinary desktops and laptops. For illustration, the radiative scattering properties of several regular arrays of identical particles at a fixed spatial orientation are computed and analyzed. Numerical results obtained from the newly developed approach for PAs are compared with those calculated from the general GMM computer codes (that have been available online for about a decade). The two sets of numerical outputs show no significant relative deviations. However, the CPU time required by the specific approach for PAs could drop more than 10,000 times, in comparison with the general approach. In addition, an example PA is also presented, which consists of as large as 10(8) particles and the general solution process is unable to handle.

  4. Quantum effets in nonresonant X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowik, Jan Malte

    2015-11-15

    Due to their versatile properties, X rays are a unique tool to investigate the structure and dynamics of matter. X-ray scattering is the fundamental principle of many imaging techniques. Examples are X-ray crystallography, which recently celebrated one hundred years and is currently the leading method in structure determination of proteins, as well as X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI), which is an imaging technique with countless applications in biology, medicine, etc. The technological development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) has brought X-ray imaging at the edge of a new scientific revolution. XFELs offer ultrashort X-ray pulses with unprecedented high X-ray fluence and excellent spatial coherence properties. These properties make them an outstanding radiation source for X-ray scattering experiments, providing ultrafast temporal resolution as well as atomic spatial resolution. However, the radiation-matter interaction in XFEL experiments also advances into a novel regime. This demands a sound theoretical fundament to describe and explore the new experimental possibilities. This dissertation is dedicated to the theoretical study of nonresonant X-ray scattering. As the first topic, I consider the near-field imaging by propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI). I devise a novel theory of PCI, in which radiation and matter are quantized. Remarkably, the crucial interference term automatically excludes contributions from inelastic scattering. This explains the success of the classical description thus far. The second topic of the thesis is the X-ray imaging of coherent electronic motion, where quantum effects become particularly apparent. The electron density of coherent electronic wave packets - important in charge transfer and bond breaking - varies in time, typically on femto- or attosecond time scales. In the near future, XFELs are envisaged to provide attosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility for time-resolved ultrafast X-ray scattering

  5. Scattered vignettes from repeated radiant exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lawrence D.

    2012-10-01

    In this presentation selected applications from the fields of Radiometry and Scattering are mingled with personal experiences to provide illumination upon William Wolfe's teaching, mentorship, insights and wit. Professor Wolfe served as the presenter's dissertation advisor from 1979-1982, but occasional industry interactions before and after that 3-year period provided the author a unique before-during-after sampling of this industry leader, author and teacher of Radiometry and applications of infrared technology to optical systems. The collection of selected topics begins with a brief review of the contribution of Max Planck, specifically his discovery of the blackbody radiation law in 1900. The assumption in Planck's equation not only provided the foundation of Quantum Physics, but the venerable equation itself today still serves as convenient basis for self-radiative source characterization in radiation transfer modeling for infrared systems. Subsequent topics of a more personal experience nature will include a successful application example of an advisor's counsel; an insider's life at the early days of Optical Sciences Annex; how history turned on an unlikely OSA scatter paper presentation; social optical engineering observations; the BRDF and development of the first Arizona computer-automated scatterometer; and a Swiss Army knife gift and metaphor. Via this review process, the author will not only reinforce existing Wolfe paradigms, but perhaps add some unique colors to the Wolfe spectrum, illustrating through one person's perspective of how over the decades Professor Wolfe has positively influenced the optical community in general, and one former Ph.D. student's career in particular.

  6. Scattered UV irradiation during VISX excimer laser keratorefractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, R J; Weber, E D; Bower, K S; Pasternak, J P; Sliney, D H

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the potential occupational health hazards associated with scattered ultraviolet (UV) radiation during photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using the VISX Star S3 excimer laser. The Laser Vision Center, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Intraoperative radiometric measurements were made with the Ophir Power/Energy Meter (LaserStar Model PD-10 with silicon detector) during PRK treatments as well as during required calibration procedures at a distance of 20.3 cm from the left cornea. These measurements were evaluated using a worst-case scenario for exposure, and then compared with the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygeinists (ACGIH) Threshold Value Limits (TVL) to perform a risk/hazard analysis. During the PRK procedures, the highest measured value was 248.4 nJ/pulse. During the calibration procedures, the highest measured UV scattered radiation level was 149.6 nJ/pulse. The maximum treatment time was 52 seconds. Using a worst-case scenario in which all treatments used the maximum power and time, the total energy per eye treated was 0.132 mJ/cm2 and the total UV radiation at close range (80 cm from the treated eye) was 0.0085 mJ/cm2. With a workload of 20 patients, the total occupational exposure at 80 cm to actinic UV radiation in an 8-hour period would be 0.425 mJ/cm2. The scattered actinic UV laser radiation from the VISX Star S3 excimer laser did not exceed occupational exposure limits during a busy 8-hour workday, provided that operating room personnel were at least 80 cm from the treated eye. While the use of protective eyewear is always prudent, this study demonstrates that the trace amounts of scattered laser emissions produced by this laser do not pose a serious health risk even without the use of protective eyewear.

  7. Exploiting breakdown of the similarity relation for diffuse light transport: simultaneous retrieval of scattering anisotropy and diffusion constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, T.; Savo, R.; Alerstam, E.; Vynck, K.; Burresi, M.; Wiersma, D. S.

    2013-02-01

    As manifested in the similarity relation of diffuse light transport, it is difficult to assess single scattering characteristics from multiply scattered light. We take advantage of the limited validity of the diffusion approximation of light transport and demonstrate, experimentally and numerically, that even deep into the multiple scattering regime, time-resolved detection of transmitted light allows simultaneous assessment of both single scattering anisotropy and scattering mean free path, and therefore also macroscopic parameters like the diffusion constant and the transport mean free path. This is achieved via careful assessment of early light and matching against Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transfer.

  8. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Professions in Radiation Therapy Radiation Oncologist Therapeutic Medical Physicist Radiation Therapist Dosimetrist Radiation Oncology Nurse Social Worker Dietitian Radiation Oncologist Radiation oncologists are physicians who oversee the ...

  9. Nuclear scattering radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Garreta, D

    1980-01-01

    This method consists in producing three dimensional radiographs of samples that can be large by using medium energy proton beams (E/sub p / of the order of 1 GeV) and standard particle physics detection systems. For medical applications low radiation dose and fast data acquisition are required. A first step was taken at CERN where the solid angle of detection was increased so that a human head could be imaged with a radiation dose of 0.3 rad, and a faster acquisition rate but still leading to a prohibitive exposure time. Further improvement aims, by increasing the acquisition rate, to obtain such a radiograph in 20 minutes which would allow in vivo applications. (8 refs).

  10. Advances in total scattering analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proffen, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Hyunjeong [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the analysis of the total scattering pattern has become an invaluable tool to study disordered crystalline and nanocrystalline materials. Traditional crystallographic structure determination is based on Bragg intensities and yields the long range average atomic structure. By including diffuse scattering into the analysis, the local and medium range atomic structure can be unravelled. Here we give an overview of recent experimental advances, using X-rays as well as neutron scattering as well as current trends in modelling of total scattering data.

  11. Light scattering by small particles

    CERN Document Server

    Hulst, H C van de

    1981-01-01

    ""A must for researchers using the techniques of light scattering."" ? S. C. Snowdon, Journal of the Franklin InstituteThe measurement of light scattering of independent, homogeneous particles has many useful applications in physical chemistry, meteorology and astronomy. There is, however, a sizeable gap between the abstract formulae related to electromagnetic-wave-scattering phenomena, and the computation of reliable figures and curves. Dr. van de Hulst's book enables researchers to bridge that gap. The product of twelve years of work, it is an exhaustive study of light-scattering properties

  12. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  13. Radar detection of radiation-induced ionization in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Heifetz, Alexander; Chien, Hual-Te; Liao, Shaolin; Koehl, Eugene R.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2015-07-21

    A millimeter wave measurement system has been developed for remote detection of airborne nuclear radiation, based on electromagnetic scattering from radiation-induced ionization in air. Specifically, methods of monitoring radiation-induced ionization of air have been investigated, and the ionized air has been identified as a source of millimeter wave radar reflection, which can be utilized to determine the size and strength of a radiation source.

  14. Multiple scattering calculation of the middle ultraviolet reaching the ground. [SST effects on ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shettle, E. P.; Green, A. E. S.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding the increase in the UV radiation as a function of wavelength due to changes in the amounts of ozone and various other parameters affecting the radiation in the atmosphere. Attention is given to the methods that can be used to solve the problem of the transfer of radiation through an absorbing and scattering atmosphere which includes aerosols. The multiple channel solution reported by Mudgett and Richards' (1971) is extended to vertically inhomogeneous atmospheres.

  15. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  16. Elliptic scattering equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardona, Carlos [Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Tsing-Hua University,Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013 (China); Gomez, Humberto [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade de São Paulo,Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Santiago de Cali,Calle 5 62-00 Barrio Pampalinda, Cali, Valle (Colombia)

    2016-06-16

    Recently the CHY approach has been extended to one loop level using elliptic functions and modular forms over a Jacobian variety. Due to the difficulty in manipulating these kind of functions, we propose an alternative prescription that is totally algebraic. This new proposal is based on an elliptic algebraic curve embedded in a ℂP{sup 2} space. We show that for the simplest integrand, namely the n−gon, our proposal indeed reproduces the expected result. By using the recently formulated Λ−algorithm, we found a novel recurrence relation expansion in terms of tree level off-shell amplitudes. Our results connect nicely with recent results on the one-loop formulation of the scattering equations. In addition, this new proposal can be easily stretched out to hyperelliptic curves in order to compute higher genus.

  17. Plasma characterization using ultraviolet Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic and electron plasma waves (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, R. K., E-mail: rfollett@lle.rochester.edu; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Collective Thomson scattering is a technique for measuring the plasma conditions in laser-plasma experiments. Simultaneous measurements of ion-acoustic and electron plasma-wave spectra were obtained using a 263.25-nm Thomson-scattering probe beam. A fully reflective collection system was used to record light scattered from electron plasma waves at electron densities greater than 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3}, which produced scattering peaks near 200 nm. An accurate analysis of the experimental Thomson-scattering spectra required accounting for plasma gradients, instrument sensitivity, optical effects, and background radiation. Practical techniques for including these effects when fitting Thomson-scattering spectra are presented and applied to the measured spectra to show the improvements in plasma characterization.

  18. [Validation of a scatter correction method for IMRT verification using portal imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyas, Ina; Partridge, Mike; Hesse, Bernd-Michael; Oelfke, Uwe; Schlegel, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Complex dose-delivery techniques, as currently applied in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), require a highly efficient treatment-verification process. The present paper deals with the problem of the scatter correction for therapy verification by use of portal images obtained by an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based on amorphous silicon. It also presents an iterative method for the scatter correction of portal images based on Monte Carlo-generated scatter kernels. First applications of this iterative scatter-correction method for the verification of intensity-modulated treatments are discussed on the basis of MVCT- and dose reconstruction. Several experiments with homogeneous and anthropomorphic phantoms were performed in order to validate the scatter correction method and to investigate the precision and relevance in view of its clinical applicability. It is shown that the devised concept of scatter correction significantly improves the results of MVCT- and dose reconstruction models, which is in turn essential for an exact online IMRT verification.

  19. Polymer research at synchrotron radiation sources: symposium proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, T.P.; Goland, A.N. (eds.)

    1985-01-01

    The twenty-two papers are arranged into eleven sessions entitled: general overviews; time-resolved x-ray scattering; studies using fluorescence, ion-containing polymers; time-resolved x-ray scattering; novel applications of synchrotron radiation; phase transitions in polymers; x-ray diffraction on polymers; recent detector advances; complementary light, x-ray and neutron studies; and neutron scattering studies. Seven of the papers are processed separately; three of the remainder have been previously processed. (DLC)

  20. Radiation Physics for Medical Physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2010-01-01

    This well-received textbook and reference summarizes the basic knowledge of atomic, nuclear, and radiation physics that professionals working in medical physics and biomedical engineering need for efficient and safe use of ionizing radiation. Concentrating on the underlying principles of radiation physics, it covers the prerequisite knowledge for medical physics courses on the graduate and post-graduate levels in radiotherapy physics, radiation dosimetry, imaging physics, and health physics, thus providing the link between elementary physics on the one hand and the intricacies of the medical physics specialties on the other hand. This expanded and revised second edition offers reorganized and expanded coverage. Several of the original chapters have been split into two with new sections added for completeness and better flow. New chapters on Coulomb scattering; on energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions; and on waveguide theory have been added in recognition of their importance. Others tra...

  1. RADIATION ACOUSTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Lyamshev, L.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics. Its' fundamentals are lying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of a radiation with matter. The sound excitation in liquids and solids by modulated or pulsed particle beams (electron, proton, ion beams, γ-radiation and single high-energy elementary particles) and some practical applications are discussed.

  2. Numerical test of an inverse polarized radiative transfer algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Viik, T

    2003-01-01

    A procedure is tested with which to determine the single-scattering albedo from polarization measurements of the angle-dependent intensity at two locations within, or on the boundaries of, a homogeneous finite or infinite atmosphere that scatters radiation according to the Rayleigh law with true absorption.

  3. Characterization of scatter in digital mammography from physical measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Stephanie M., E-mail: Stephanie.Leon@uth.tmc.edu; Wagner, Louis K. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Brateman, Libby F. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: That scattered radiation negatively impacts the quality of medical radiographic imaging is well known. In mammography, even slight amounts of scatter reduce the high contrast required for subtle soft-tissue imaging. In current clinical mammography, image contrast is partially improved by use of an antiscatter grid. This form of scatter rejection comes with a sizeable dose penalty related to the concomitant elimination of valuable primary radiation. Digital mammography allows the use of image processing as a method of scatter correction that might avoid effects that negatively impact primary radiation, while potentially providing more contrast improvement than is currently possible with a grid. For this approach to be feasible, a detailed characterization of the scatter is needed. Previous research has modeled scatter as a constant background that serves as a DC bias across the imaging surface. The goal of this study was to provide a more substantive data set for characterizing the spatially-variant features of scatter radiation at the image detector of modern mammography units. Methods: This data set was acquired from a model of the radiation beam as a matrix of very narrow rays or pencil beams. As each pencil beam penetrates tissue, the pencil widens in a predictable manner due to the production of scatter. The resultant spreading of the pencil beam at the detector surface can be characterized by two parameters: mean radial extent (MRE) and scatter fraction (SF). The SF and MRE were calculated from measurements obtained using the beam stop method. Two digital mammography units were utilized, and the SF and MRE were found as functions of target, filter, tube potential, phantom thickness, and presence or absence of a grid. These values were then used to generate general equations allowing the SF and MRE to be calculated for any combination of the above parameters. Results: With a grid, the SF ranged from a minimum of about 0.05 to a maximum of about 0

  4. Dynamic measurement of forward scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Rusch, W.

    1975-01-01

    A dynamic method for the measurement of forward scattering in a radio anechoic chamber is described. The quantity determined is the induced-field-ratio (IFR) of conducting cylinders. The determination of the IFR is highly sensitive to 1) multiple scattering between the cylinder and the obpring...

  5. Quantum scattering at low energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derezinski, Jan; Skibsted, Erik

    2009-01-01

    For a class of negative slowly decaying potentials, including V(x):=−γ|x|−μ with 0quantum mechanical scattering theory in the low-energy regime. Using appropriate modifiers of the Isozaki–Kitada type we show that scattering theory is well behaved on the whole continuous spectrum...

  6. Quantum scattering at low energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derezinski, Jan; Skibsted, Erik

    For a class of negative slowly decaying potentials, including with , we study the quantum mechanical scattering theory in the low-energy regime. Using modifiers of the Isozaki--Kitada type we show that scattering theory is well behaved on the {\\it whole} continuous spectrum of the Hamiltonian...

  7. Light scattering in ophthalmic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchin, Valery V.

    1994-06-01

    In the overview optical models of cornea, sclera, and crystalline lens humor will be presented. On the basis of these models eye tissue transmittance spectra and scattering indicatrices for the main informative elements of the mueller matrix will be analyzed. This paper will discuss some problems of eye tissue optical characteristics control, and possibilities and perspectives of elastic scattering spectroscopy in cataract diagnostics.

  8. Quantum scattering in one dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlette, Vania E. [Centro Universitario Franciscano, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Leite, Marcelo M. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Adhikari, Sadhan K. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2000-09-01

    A self-contained discussion of non-relativistic quantum scattering is presented in the case of central potentials in one space dimension, which will facilitate the understanding of the more complex scattering theory in two and three dimensions. The present discussion illustrates in a simple way the concepts of partial-wave decomposition, phase shift, optical theorem and effective-range expansion. (author)

  9. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... determine the charge density distributions of short-lived exotic nuclei by elastic electron scattering. The first collision ... Electron scattering of highly unstable nuclei is not easy because it is difficult to produce ... both ends form a mirror potential to keep the ions longitudinally inside the SCRIT device, and the ...

  10. Light scattering by soap films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrij, A.

    A theory is constructed describing the scattering from a liquid film (e.g., a soap film) of a light beam polarized normal to the plane of incidence. This scattering is due to the small irregular corrugations caused by thermal motion. The interference of the reflected incident beam with its multiple

  11. Surface scattering from ceramic phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Peters, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Scattering from phosphor converters and epitaxial surfaces is critical for solid state lighting device performance. Volume and surface scattering in solid state lighting devices can play a critical role in efficiency/efficacy, color points, and color angular consistency. Surface scattering in particular has not been well characterized in solid state lighting devices and can be complex to model. Because large angle scattering is important in lighting applications, surface scattering models generally require vector electromagnetic theory to avoid ambiguities often associated with scalar theory at these angles. Furthermore, surface features are often on the order of a few wavelengths, bringing ray tracing approaches into question. In this work, experimental angular scattering measurements are made on ceramic phosphor components where surface scattering dominates. The surface ceramic grain structure is responsible for the scattering. The results are compared to approximate statistical vector theory predictions that use the height autocorrelation functions as input. The autocorrelation measurements were derived from atomic-force microscopy topography measurements. Resulting predictions are in fairly good agreement with measurements.

  12. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  13. High-energy anomalous scattering: Is it semiclassical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattis, M.P. (Theoretical Division T-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); McLerran, L. (Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MI (United States)); Yaffe, L.G. (Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-06-01

    We discuss the possibility of a semiclassical evaluation of baryon-number-nonconserving scattering amplitudes at nonperturbative'' energies of order {ital M}{sub {ital W}}/{alpha}{sub {ital W}}. Semiclassical expansions around standard instanton configurations are known {ital not} to be valid at these energies: multiloop radiative corrections are not suppressed relative to tree-graph contributions. Despite this pathology, we present a conjecture showing how anomalous scattering at such nonperturbative energies may nevertheless remain semiclassically calculable, and discuss partial results supporting this conjecture. To determine the correct weak-coupling behavior of high-energy anomalous scattering amplitudes, we argue that one must solve a modified set of classical field equations, or equivalently sum suitably modified tree graphs.

  14. Quantum scattering beyond the plane-wave approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlovets, Dmitry

    2017-12-01

    While a plane-wave approximation in high-energy physics works well in a majority of practical cases, it becomes inapplicable for scattering of the vortex particles carrying orbital angular momentum, of Airy beams, of the so-called Schrödinger cat states, and their generalizations. Such quantum states of photons, electrons and neutrons have been generated experimentally in recent years, opening up new perspectives in quantum optics, electron microscopy, particle physics, and so forth. Here we discuss the non-plane-wave effects in scattering brought about by the novel quantum numbers of these wave packets. For the well-focused electrons of intermediate energies, already available at electron microscopes, the corresponding contribution can surpass that of the radiative corrections. Moreover, collisions of the cat-like superpositions of such focused beams with atoms allow one to probe effects of the quantum interference, which have never played any role in particle scattering.

  15. Multiple light scattering in multilayered media: theory, experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A. da; Andraud, C.; Charron, E.; Stout, B.; Lafait, J

    2003-10-01

    The model presented here is based on the resolution of the radiative transfer equation, by the Discrete Ordinate Method, in the steady-state domain. A matricial formulation leads to the resolution of the problem of light scattering through multislabs, with index mismatch at each interface. In that way, the angular distribution of out-going fluxes is obtained. A complete dissociation between volume and interfaces behaviors allows the introduction of elaborated theories to describe them properly. An analytical scattering theory based on the T-matrix formalism is introduced to account for interactions between scatterers, when high volume fractions are considered. Theoretical calculations are compared with experiments obtained with a spectro-scatterometer.

  16. Tailorable Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Nanoscale Silicon Waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Heedeuk; Jarecki, Robert; Cox, Jonathan A; Olsson, Roy H; Starbuck, Andrew; Wang, Zheng; Rakich, Peter T

    2013-01-01

    While nanoscale modal confinement radically enhances a variety of nonlinear light-matter interactions within silicon waveguides, traveling-wave stimulated Brillouin scattering nonlinearities have never been observed in silicon nanophotonics. Through a new class of hybrid photonic-phononic waveguides, we demonstrate tailorable traveling-wave forward stimulated Brillouin scattering in nanophotonic silicon waveguides for the first time, yielding 3000 times stronger forward SBS responses than any previous waveguide system. Simulations reveal that a coherent combination of electrostrictive forces and radiation pressures are responsible for greatly enhanced photon-phonon coupling at nano-scales. Highly tailorable Brillouin nonlinearities are produced by engineering the structure of a membrane-suspended waveguide to yield Brillouin resonances from 1 to 18 GHz through high quality-factor (>1000) phonon modes. Such wideband and tailorable stimulated Brillouin scattering in silicon photonics could enable practical real...

  17. A Monte Carlo simulation of scattering reduction in spectral x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Matteo; Olsen, Ulrik L.; Knudsen, Erik B.; Frisvad, Jeppe R.; Kehres, Jan; Christensen, Erik D.; Khalil, Mohamad; Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2017-08-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT), scattered radiation plays an important role in the accurate reconstruction of the inspected object, leading to a loss of contrast between the different materials in the reconstruction volume and cupping artifacts in the images. We present a Monte Carlo simulation tool for spectral X-ray CT to predict the scattered radiation generated by complex samples. An experimental setup is presented to isolate the energy distribution of scattered radiation. Spectral CT is a novel technique implementing photon-counting detectors able to discriminate the energy of incoming photons, enabling spectral analysis of X-ray images. This technique is useful to extract efficiently more information on energy dependent quantities (e.g. mass attenuations coefficients) and study matter interactions (e.g. X-ray scattering, photoelectric absorption, etc...). Having a good knowledge of the spectral distribution of the scattered X-rays is fundamental to establish methods attempting to correct for it. The simulations are validated by real measurements using a CdTe spectral resolving detector (Multix ME-100). We observed the effect of the scattered radiation on the image reconstruction, becoming relevant in the energy range where the Compton events are dominant (i.e. above 50keV).

  18. Analysis of polarized pulse propagation through one-dimensional scattering medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Yao, Feng-Ju; Xie, Ming; Yi, Hong-Liang

    2017-08-01

    This paper analyzes the polarized light propagation in a one-dimensional scattering medium with the upper surface subjected to an oblique incident short-pulsed laser beam using the natural element method (NEM). The NEM discretization scheme for the transient vector radiative transfer equation (TVRTE) is presented in detail. The accuracy of the natural element method for transient vector radiative transfer in the scattering medium is assessed. Numerical results show that the NEM is accurate, and effective in solving transient polarized radiative problems. We examine a square short-pulsed laser transport firstly in the atmosphere with Mie scattering and then within aerosol scattering medium. We then investigate the transient polarized radiative transfer problem in the atmosphere-ocean system. The time-resolved signals and the polarization state of the Stokes vector are presented and analyzed. It is found that the scattering types of the medium make greatly influence on the transient transportation of the polarized light. Critically, the polarization states of the backward and forward scattered photons show significantly different time varying trends. For the two-layer system with dissimilar refractive index distributions, due to the total-reflection effect, the existence of a Fresnel interface significantly changes the polarization state of the light, and discontinuous distribution features are observed on the interface.

  19. SU-E-I-44: Some Preliminary Analysis of Angular Distribution of X-Ray Scattered On Soft Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganezer, K; Krmar, M; Cvejic, Z; Rakic, S; Pajic, B [University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad Serbia (Serbia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The angular distribution of x-radiation scattered at small angles (up to 16 degrees) from several different animal soft tissue (skin, fat, muscle, retina, etc) were measured using standard equipment devoted to study of crystal structure which provides excellent geometry conditions of measurements. showed measurable differences for different tissues. In the simplest possible case when measured samples do not differ in structure (different concentration solutions) it can be seen that intensity of scattered radiation is decreasing function of the concentration and the peak of the maximum of scattering distribution depends on the concentration as well. Methods: An x-ray scattering profile usually consists of sharp diffraction peak; however some properties of the spatial profiles of scattered radiation as intensity, the peak position, height, area, FWHM, the ratio of peak heights, etc. Results: The data contained measurable differences for different tissues. In the simplest possible case when measured samples do not differ in structure (different concentration solutions) it can be seen that intensity of scattered radiation is decreasing function of the concentration and the peak of the maximum of scattering distribution depends on the concentration as well. Measurements of different samples in the very preliminary phase showed that simple biological material used in study showed slightly different scattering pattern, especially at higher angles (around 10degrees). Intensity of radiation scattered from same tissue type is very dependent on water content and several more parameters. Conclusion: This preliminary study using animal soft tissues on the angular distributions of scattered x-rays suggests that angular distributions of X-rays scattered off of soft tissues might be useful in distinguishing healthy tissue from malignant soft tissue.

  20. Impact of polishing on the light scattering at aerogel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnyakov, A.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Barnyakov, M.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bobrovnikov, V.S.; Buzykaev, A.R. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Danilyuk, A.F. [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Katcin, A.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kononov, S.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kirilenko, P.S. [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kravchenko, E.A., E-mail: E.A.Kravchenko@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kuyanov, I.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Onuchin, A.P.; Ovtin, I.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Predein, A.Yu.; Protsenko, R.S. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-11

    Particle identification power of modern aerogel RICH detectors strongly depends on optical quality of radiators. It was shown that wavelength dependence of aerogel tile transparency after polishing cannot be described by the standard Hunt formula. The Hunt formula has been modified to describe scattering in a thin layer of silica dust on the surface of aerogel tile. Several procedures of polishing of aerogel tile have been tested. The best result has been achieved while using natural silk tissue. The resulting block has optical smooth surfaces. The measured decrease of aerogel transparency due to surface scattering is about few percent. This result could be used for production of radiators for the Focusing Aerogel RICH detectors.

  1. Warm dense matter and Thomson scattering at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faeustlin, Roland Rainer

    2010-05-15

    X-ray free electron lasers are powerful tools to investigate moderately to strongly correlated solid density low temperature plasmas, named warm dense matter. These plasmas are of most interest for astrophysics and laser plasma interaction, particularly inertial confinement fusion. This work utilizes the ultrashort soft x-ray pulse duration and high brilliance of the free electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH, to generate warm dense matter and to study its ultrafast processes. The techniques applied are absorption measurement, emission spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. Radiative hydrodynamics and Thomson scattering simulations are used to investigate the impact of temperature and density gradients in the sample and to fit the experimental data. The measurements result in a comprehensive picture of soft x-ray matter interaction related to warm dense matter and yield insight into ultrafast equilibration and relaxation mechanisms, in particular impact ionization and radiative recombination. (orig.)

  2. Effective Tree Scattering at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurum, Mehmet; ONeill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Cosh, Michael H.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    For routine microwave Soil Moisture (SM) retrieval through vegetation, the tau-omega [1] model [zero-order Radiative Transfer (RT) solution] is attractive due to its simplicity and eases of inversion and implementation. It is the model used in baseline retrieval algorithms for several planned microwave space missions, such as ESA's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission (launched November 2009) and NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission (to be launched 2014/2015) [2 and 3]. These approaches are adapted for vegetated landscapes with effective vegetation parameters tau and omega by fitting experimental data or simulation outputs of a multiple scattering model [4-7]. The model has been validated over grasslands, agricultural crops, and generally light to moderate vegetation. As the density of vegetation increases, sensitivity to the underlying SM begins to degrade significantly and errors in the retrieved SM increase accordingly. The zero-order model also loses its validity when dense vegetation (i.e. forest, mature corn, etc.) includes scatterers, such as branches and trunks (or stalks in the case of corn), which are large with respect to the wavelength. The tau-omega model (when applied over moderately to densely vegetated landscapes) will need modification (in terms of form or effective parameterization) to enable accurate characterization of vegetation parameters with respect to specific tree types, anisotropic canopy structure, presence of leaves and/or understory. More scattering terms (at least up to first-order at L-band) should be included in the RT solutions for forest canopies [8]. Although not really suitable to forests, a zero-order tau-omega model might be applied to such vegetation canopies with large scatterers, but that equivalent or effective parameters would have to be used [4]. This requires that the effective values (vegetation opacity and single scattering albedo) need to be evaluated (compared) with theoretical definitions of

  3. Radiation hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1982-12-31

    This course was intended to provide the participant with an introduction to the theory of radiative transfer, and an understanding of the coupling of radiative processes to the equations describing compressible flow. At moderate temperatures (thousands of degrees), the role of the radiation is primarily one of transporting energy by radiative processes. At higher temperatures (millions of degrees), the energy and momentum densities of the radiation field may become comparable to or even dominate the corresponding fluid quantities. In this case, the radiation field significantly affects the dynamics of the fluid, and it is the description of this regime which is generally the charter of radiation hydrodynamics. The course provided a discussion of the relevant physics and a derivation of the corresponding equations, as well as an examination of several simplified models. Practical applications include astrophysics and nuclear weapons effects phenomena.

  4. Interior tomographic imaging for x-ray coherent scattering (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Sean; Zhu, Zheyuan

    2017-05-01

    Conventional computed tomography reconstructs the attenuation only high-dimensional images. Coherent scatter computed tomography, which reconstructs the angular dependent scattering profiles of 3D objects, can provide molecular signatures that improves the accuracy of material identification and classification. Coherent scatter tomography are traditionally acquired by setups similar to x-ray powder diffraction machine; a collimated source in combination with 2D or 1D detector collimation in order to localize the scattering point. In addition, the coherent scatter cross-section is often 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of the absorption cross-section for the same material. Coded aperture and structured illumination approaches has been shown to greatly improve the collection efficiency. In many applications, especially in security imaging and medical diagnosis, fast and accurate identification of the material composition of a small volume within the whole object would lead to an accelerated imaging procedure and reduced radiation dose. Here, we report an imaging method to reconstruct the material coherent scatter profile within a small volume. The reconstruction along one radial direction can reconstruct a scalar coherent scattering tomographic image. Our methods takes advantage of the finite support of the scattering profile in small angle regime. Our system uses a pencil beam setup without using any detector side collimation. Coherent scatter profile of a 10 mm scattering sample embedded in a 30 mm diameter phantom was reconstructed. The setup has small form factor and is suitable for various portable non-destructive detection applications.

  5. Sensitivity kernels for coda-wave interferometry and scattering tomography: theory and numerical evaluation in two-dimensional anisotropically scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margerin, Ludovic; Planès, Thomas; Mayor, Jessie; Calvet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Coda-wave interferometry is a technique which exploits tiny waveform changes in the coda to detect temporal variations of seismic properties in evolving media. Observed waveform changes are of two kinds: traveltime perturbations and distortion of seismograms. In the last 10 yr, various theories have been published to relate either background velocity changes to traveltime perturbations, or changes in the scattering properties of the medium to waveform decorrelation. These theories have been limited by assumptions pertaining to the scattering process itself-in particular isotropic scattering, or to the propagation regime-single-scattering and/or diffusion. In this manuscript, we unify and extend previous results from the literature using a radiative transfer approach. This theory allows us to incorporate the effect of anisotropic scattering and to cover a broad range of propagation regimes, including the contribution of coherent, singly scattered and multiply scattered waves. Using basic physical reasoning, we show that two different sensitivity kernels are required to describe traveltime perturbations and waveform decorrelation, respectively, a distinction which has not been well appreciated so far. Previous results from the literature are recovered as limiting cases of our general approach. To evaluate numerically the sensitivity functions, we introduce an improved version of a spectral technique known as the method of `rotated coordinate frames', which allows global evaluation of the Green's function of the radiative transfer equation in a finite domain. The method is validated through direct pointwise comparison with Green's functions obtained by the Monte Carlo method. To illustrate the theory, we consider a series of scattering media displaying increasing levels of scattering anisotropy and discuss the impact on the traveltime and decorrelation kernels. We also consider the related problem of imaging variations of scattering properties based on intensity

  6. Neutralino Inelastic Scattering with Subsequent Detection of Nuclear Gamma Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, J; Vogel, P

    1999-01-01

    We consider the potential benefits of searching for supersymmetric dark-matter through its inelastic excitation, via the "scalar current", of low-lying collective nuclear states in a detector. If such states live long enough so that the gamma radiation from their decay can be separated from the signal due to nuclear recoil, then background can be dramatically reduced. We show how the kinematics of neutralino-nucleus scattering is modified when the nucleus is excited and derive expressions for...

  7. Large-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenakker, Wim; Passarino, Giampiero

    1998-04-01

    A critical assessment is given of the theoretical uncertainty in the predicted cross-sections for large-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP 1, with or without t-channel subtraction. To this end a detailed comparison is presented of the results obtained with the programs ALIBABA and TOPAZ0. Differences in the implementation of the radiative corrections and the effect of missing higher-order terms are critically discussed. © 1998

  8. Longwave scattering effects on fluxes in broken cloud fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, E.E.; Ellingson, R.G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The optical properties of clouds in the radiative energy balance are important. Most works on the effects of scattering have been in the shortwave; but longwave effects can be significant. In this work, the fluxes above and below a single cloud layer are presented, along with the errors in assuming flat black plate clouds or black clouds. The predicted fluxes are the averaged results of analysis of several fields with the same cloud amount.

  9. Two-dimensional analytic weighting functions for limb scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawada, D. J.; Bourassa, A. E.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2017-10-01

    Through the inversion of limb scatter measurements it is possible to obtain vertical profiles of trace species in the atmosphere. Many of these inversion methods require what is often referred to as weighting functions, or derivatives of the radiance with respect to concentrations of trace species in the atmosphere. Several radiative transfer models have implemented analytic methods to calculate weighting functions, alleviating the computational burden of traditional numerical perturbation methods. Here we describe the implementation of analytic two-dimensional weighting functions, where derivatives are calculated relative to atmospheric constituents in a two-dimensional grid of altitude and angle along the line of sight direction, in the SASKTRAN-HR radiative transfer model. Two-dimensional weighting functions are required for two-dimensional inversions of limb scatter measurements. Examples are presented where the analytic two-dimensional weighting functions are calculated with an underlying one-dimensional atmosphere. It is shown that the analytic weighting functions are more accurate than ones calculated with a single scatter approximation, and are orders of magnitude faster than a typical perturbation method. Evidence is presented that weighting functions for stratospheric aerosols calculated under a single scatter approximation may not be suitable for use in retrieval algorithms under solar backscatter conditions.

  10. An Exact Line Integral Representation of the Physical Optics Far Field from Plane PEC Scatterers Illuminnated by Hertzian Dipoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Meincke, Peter; Jørgensen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    We derive a line integral representation of the physical optics scattered far field that yields the exact same result as the conventional surface radiation integral. This representation applies to a perfectly electrically conducting plane scatterer illuminated by electric or magnetic Hertzian...

  11. Modeling Single Scattering and Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mishchenko, Michael I

    1998-01-01

    ... in the visible and infrared spectral regions. First, we have shown that using a matrix inversion scheme based on a special LU factorization rather than on the standard Gaussian elimination significantly improves the numerical stability...

  12. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo

    2014-06-10

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  13. The Scattering of Thermal Radiation into Open Underground Shelters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-10-30

    of the shelter and (2) direct measurements were made on an actual shelter to ensure the validity of the laboratory results. A Photronic cell and a...of the radiant energy incident upon a surface located within a shelter re- quires a knowledge of (1) the total radiant energy and its polar ...point. 4.2 PHOTOELECTRIC PHOTOMETER The primary receiving element was a Weston Photronic barrier-layer photocell, model 856 RR. This unit has a design

  14. Radiation and Scattering Compact Antenna Laboratory (RASCAL) Capabilities Brochure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-06

    Dist A. Approved for public release, 88ABW-2016-4712 RASCAL AT A GLANCE Chamber Dimensions: 35’ L x 18’ W x 14’ H Quiet Zone Dimensions...Measurement System The measurement system in RASCAL is built around a Keysight N5247A 67 GHz 4-port VNA. The system includes...processing. Processing Capabilities RASCAL has the capability to perform time-domain based post-processing on measured data as well as

  15. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  16. Chemical state speciation by resonant Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Karydas, A G; Zarkadas, C; Paradelis, T; Kallithrakas-Kontos, N

    2002-01-01

    In the resonant Raman scattering (RRS) process the emitted photon exhibits a continuous energy distribution with a high energy cutoff limit. This cutoff energy depends on the chemical state of the element under examination. In the present work, the possibility of identifying the chemical state of V atoms by employing RRS spectroscopy with a semiconductor Si(Li) detector is investigated. A proton induced Cr K alpha x-ray beam was used as the incident radiation, having a fixed energy lower than the V K-absorption edge. The net RRS distributions extracted from the energy dispersive spectra of metallic V and its compound targets were simulated by an appropriate theoretical model. The results showed the possibility of employing RRS spectroscopy with a semiconductor detector for chemical speciation studies.

  17. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  18. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, M A; Haque, S

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. sup 9 Be, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 2 sup 0 Ne and sup 3 sup 2 S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 2 sup 4 Mg and sup 4 sup 0 Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-paramet...

  19. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensson, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by Obstacles is to give a theoretical treatment of the scattering phenomena, and to illustrate numerical computations of some canonical scattering problems for different geometries and materials.

  20. Synthetic Fourier transform light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeoreh; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Youngchan; Hillman, Timothy R; Min, Bumki; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-09-23

    We present synthetic Fourier transform light scattering, a method for measuring extended angle-resolved light scattering (ARLS) from individual microscopic samples. By measuring the light fields scattered from the sample plane and numerically synthesizing them in Fourier space, the angle range of the ARLS patterns is extended up to twice the numerical aperture of the imaging system with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Extended ARLS patterns of individual microscopic polystyrene beads, healthy human red blood cells (RBCs), and Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized RBCs are presented.

  1. Vector boson scattering at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, Wolfgang; Fleper, Christian [Department Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Reuter, Juergen [DESY Theory Group, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Sekulla, Marco [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Linear colliders operating in a range of multiple TeV are able to investigate the details of vector boson scattering and electroweak symmetry breaking. We calculate cross sections with the Monte Carlo generator WHIZARD for vector boson scattering processes at the future linear e{sup +} e{sup -} collider CLIC. By finding suitable cuts, the vector boson scattering signal processes are isolated from the background. Finally, we are able to determine exclusion sensitivities on the non-Standard Model parameters of the relevant dimension eight operators.

  2. A Discrete Scatterer Technique for Evaluating Electromagnetic Scattering from Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    distribution is unlimited. 1 1. Introduction Developing sensing capabilities for the detection of ground targets concealed in a forest environment...scatterer simulation are 369 MB and 33 min/frequency, respectively, on a Dell Precision T7500 workstation with Intel Xeon CPU of 2.67 GHz, while those...2. Thirion L, Colin E, Dahon C. Capabilities of a forest coherent scattering model applied to radiometry, interferometry, and polarimetry at P

  3. Low angle X-ray scattering in biological tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos, Carla; Braz, Delson; Pinto, Nivia G.V.; Lima, Joao C.; Castro, Carlos R.F.; Filgueiras, R.A.; Mendonca, Leonardo; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.br; Barroso, Regina C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mail: cely@uerj.br

    2007-07-01

    Low-angle x-ray scatter (LAXS) for tissue characterization is based on the differences which result from the interference of photons coherently scattered from molecules of each sample. Biological samples (bone, blood and blood components) have been studied in recent years in our laboratory using powder diffractometer. The scattering information was obtained using a Shimadzu DRX 6000 diffractometer at the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Unpolarized monoenergetic K{alpha} radiation from Cu provided 8.04 keV photons. The measurements were made in reflection mode ({theta}-2{theta} geometry), with the sample stationary on a goniometer which rotates the sample and detector about an axis lying in the plane of the top of the sample holder. LAXS profiles from whole blood, plasma and formed elements were measured to investigate the nature of scattering from such lyophilized samples. The statistical analysis shows that the variation found for the characterization parameters is significant for whole blood considering the age. Gender was positively associated with the variation of the second peak position for the profiles obtained for formed elements. The correlation of the measured relative coherent intensity with the mineral content in the bone samples was investigated. These results suggest that the measurement of bone mineral content within trabecular bone can be performed by using quantitative coherent scattering information. (author)

  4. Refraction and scattering of sound by a shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    The angle and amplitude changes for acoustic waves refracted by a circular open jet shear layer were determined. The generalized refraction theory was assessed experimentally for on axis and off axis acoustic source locations as source frequency varied from 1 kHz to 10 kHz and free stream Mach number varied from 0.1 to 0.4. Angle and amplitude changes across the shear layer show good agreement with theory. Experiments confirm that the refraction theory is independent of shear layer thickness, acoustic source frequency, and source type. A generalized theory is, thus, available for correcting far field noise data acquired in open jet test facilities. The effect of discrete tone scattering by the open jet turbulent shear layer was also studied. Scattering effects were investigated over the same Mach number range as frequency varied from 5 kHz to 15 kHz. Attenuation of discrete tone amplitude and tone broadening were measured as a function of acoustic source position and radiation angle. Scattering was found to be stronger at angles close to the open jet axis than at 90 deg, and becomes stronger as the acoustic source position shifts downstream. A scattering analysis provided an estimate of the onset of discrete tone scattering.

  5. The Controlling Parameters for EMIC Wave Scattering of Relativistic Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bortnik, J.

    2016-12-01

    Although there is growing support for relativistic electron losses due to precipitation from electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave scattering, this mechanism is yet to be quantified. Such a quantification has been difficult in the past, because equatorial electron measurements simultaneous with EMIC waves have been limited, due to the highly localized presence of EMIC waves in the magnetosphere. In this study, we examine parameters controlling characteristics of EMIC wave induced relativistic (0.3-6 MeV) electron scattering, directly based on simultaneous wave and particle measurements from Van Allen Probes. We first present a case study when relativistic electrons respond differently during two intervals of intense ( 1 nT) EMIC wave observations: one with no scattering signature and one with efficient electron losses at >1.8 MeV. Based on the observed EMIC wave spectra and background plasma conditions, we calculate the wave diffusion rates and model the evolution of electron pitch angle distributions. By comparing the modeled results with local observations of pitch angle distributions, we demonstrate that fpe/fce is critical in controlling the effectiveness of EMIC waves in scattering multi-MeV electrons. We then expand our analysis to explore the conditions (such as fpe/fce, wave frequency spectra, and ring current ion temperature and anisotropy levels) favorable for EMIC wave scattering multi-MeV electrons through multi-event analyses. Our study is important for accurately modeling relativistic electron loss processes in radiation belt electron forecasts.

  6. Leaf-shape effects in electromagnetic wave scattering from vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Mostafa A.; Fung, Adrian K.

    1989-01-01

    A vegetation medium is modeled as a half-space of randomly distributed and oriented leaves of arbitrary shape. In accordance with the first-order radiative transfer theory, the backscattering coefficient for such a half-space is expressed in terms of the scattering amplitudes. For disc- or needle-shaped leaves, the generalized Rayleigh-Gans approximation is used to calculate the scattering amplitudes. This approach is valid for leaf dimensions up to the size of the incident wavelength. To examine the leaf-shape effect, elliptic discs are used to model deciduous leaves, and needles are used to model coniferous leaves. The differences between the scattering characteristics of leaves of different shapes are illustrated numerically for various orientations, frequencies, and incidence angles. It is found that the scattering characteristics of elliptic disc-shaped leaves are sensitive to the three angles of orientation and disc ellipticity. In general, both like and cross polarizations may be needed to differentiate the difference in scattering due to the shapes of the leaves.

  7. Radiation carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic tumors with radiation therapy is so outweighed by the benefit of cure that estimates of risk have not been considered necessary. However, with the introduction of chemotherapy, combined therapy, and particle radiation therapy, the comparative risks should be examined. In the case of radiation, total dose, fractionation, dose rate, dose distribution, and radiation quality should be considered in the estimation of risk. The biological factors that must be considered include incidence of tumors, latent period, degree of malignancy, and multiplicity of tumors. The risk of radiation induction of tumors is influenced by the genotype, sex, and age of the patient, the tissues that will be exposed, and previous therapy. With chemotherapy the number of cells at risk is usually markedly higher than with radiation therapy. Clearly the problem of the estimation of comparative risks is complex. This paper presents the current views on the comparative risks and the importance of the various factors that influence the estimation of risk.

  8. A scattering theory for the wave equation on Kerr black hole exteriors

    CERN Document Server

    Dafermos, Mihalis; Shlapentokh-Rothman, Yakov

    2014-01-01

    We develop a definitive physical-space scattering theory for the scalar wave equation on Kerr exterior backgrounds in the general subextremal case |a|scattering states" and "asymptotic completeness" and we show moreover that the resulting "scattering matrix" mapping radiation fields on the past horizon and past null infinity to radiation fields on the future horizon and future null infinity is a bounded operator. The latter allows us to give a time-domain theory of superradiant reflection. The boundedness of the scattering matrix shows in particular that the maximal amplification of solutions associated to ingoing finite-energy wave packets on past null infinity is bounded. On the frequency side, this corresponds to the novel statement that the suitably normalised reflection and transmission coefficients are uniformly bounded independently of the frequency parameters. We further complement this with a demonstration that super...

  9. A Monte Carlo simulation of scattering reduction in spectral x-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busi, Matteo; Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT), scattered radiation plays an important role in the accurate reconstruction of the inspected object, leading to a loss of contrast between the different materials in the reconstruction volume and cupping artifacts in the images. We present a Monte Carlo simulation...... photons, enabling spectral analysis of X-ray images. This technique is useful to extract efficiently more information on energy dependent quantities (e.g. mass attenuations coefficients) and study matter interactions (e.g. X-ray scattering, photoelectric absorption, etc...). Having a good knowledge...... of the spectral distribution of the scattered X-rays is fundamental to establish methods attempting to correct for it. The simulations are validated by real measurements using a CdTe spectral resolving detector (Multix ME-100). We observed the effect of the scattered radiation on the image reconstruction...

  10. Near-field distribution and propagation of scattering resonances in Vogel spiral arrays of dielectric nanopillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intonti, F.; Caselli, N.; Lawrence, N.; Trevino, J.; Wiersma, D. S.; Dal Negro, L.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we employ scanning near-field optical microscopy, full-vector finite difference time domain numerical simulations and fractional Fourier transformation to investigate the near-field and propagation behavior of the electromagnetic energy scattered at 1.56 μm by dielectric arrays of silicon nitride nanopillars with chiral α1-Vogel spiral geometry. In particular, we experimentally study the spatial evolution of scattered radiation and demonstrate near-field coupling between adjacent nanopillars along the parastichies arms. Moreover, by measuring the spatial distribution of the scattered radiation at different heights from the array plane, we demonstrate a characteristic rotation of the scattered field pattern consistent with net transfer of orbital angular momentum in the Fresnel zone, within a few micrometers from the plane of the array. Our experimental results agree with the simulations we performed and may be of interest to nanophotonics applications.

  11. Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  12. Laser light scattering basic principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Benjamin

    1994-01-01

    Geared toward upper-level undergraduate and graduate students, this text introduces the interdisciplinary area of laser light scattering, focusing chiefly on theoretical concepts of quasielastic laser scattering.

  13. Four-phonon scattering significantly reduces intrinsic thermal conductivity of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tianli; Lindsay, Lucas; Ruan, Xiulin

    2017-10-01

    For decades, the three-phonon scattering process has been considered to govern thermal transport in solids, while the role of higher-order four-phonon scattering has been persistently unclear and so ignored. However, recent quantitative calculations of three-phonon scattering have often shown a significant overestimation of thermal conductivity as compared to experimental values. In this Rapid Communication we show that four-phonon scattering is generally important in solids and can remedy such discrepancies. For silicon and diamond, the predicted thermal conductivity is reduced by 30% at 1000 K after including four-phonon scattering, bringing predictions in excellent agreement with measurements. For the projected ultrahigh-thermal conductivity material, zinc-blende BAs, a competitor of diamond as a heat sink material, four-phonon scattering is found to be strikingly strong as three-phonon processes have an extremely limited phase space for scattering. The four-phonon scattering reduces the predicted thermal conductivity from 2200 to 1400 W/m K at room temperature. The reduction at 1000 K is 60%. We also find that optical phonon scattering rates are largely affected, being important in applications such as phonon bottlenecks in equilibrating electronic excitations. Recognizing that four-phonon scattering is expensive to calculate, in the end we provide some guidelines on how to quickly assess the significance of four-phonon scattering, based on energy surface anharmonicity and the scattering phase space. Our work clears the decades-long fundamental question of the significance of higher-order scattering, and points out ways to improve thermoelectrics, thermal barrier coatings, nuclear materials, and radiative heat transfer.

  14. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin SALTIK

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available According to classical electromagnetic theory, an accelerated charge or system of charges radiates electromagnetic waves. In a radio transmitter antenna charges are accelerated along the antenna and release electromagnetic waves, which is radiated at the velocity of light in the surrounding medium. All of the radio transmitters work on this principle today. In this study an analogy is established between the principles by which accelerated charge systems markes radiation and the accelerated mass system, and the systems cousing gravitational radiation are investigated.

  15. MO-AB-BRA-02: A Novel Scatter Imaging Modality for Real-Time Image Guidance During Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redler, G; Bernard, D; Templeton, A; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Nair, C Kumaran [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Turian, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Rush Radiosurgery LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel scatter imaging modality is developed and its feasibility for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer patients is assessed using analytic and Monte Carlo models as well as experimental testing. Methods: During treatment, incident radiation interacts and scatters from within the patient. The presented methodology forms an image of patient anatomy from the scattered radiation for real-time localization of the treatment target. A radiographic flat panel-based pinhole camera provides spatial information regarding the origin of detected scattered radiation. An analytical model is developed, which provides a mathematical formalism for describing the scatter imaging system. Experimental scatter images are acquired by irradiating an object using a Varian TrueBeam accelerator. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging simple objects of known compositions (water, lung, and cortical bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is fabricated and imaged to investigate image quality for various quantities of delivered radiation. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code is used for validation and testing by simulating scatter image formation using the experimental pinhole camera setup. Results: Analytical calculations, MCNP simulations, and experimental results when imaging the water, lung, and cortical bone equivalent objects show close agreement, thus validating the proposed models and demonstrating that scatter imaging differentiates these materials well. Lung tumor phantom images have sufficient contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) to clearly distinguish tumor from surrounding lung tissue. CNR=4.1 and CNR=29.1 for 10MU and 5000MU images (equivalent to 0.5 and 250 second images), respectively. Conclusion: Lung SBRT provides favorable treatment outcomes, but depends on accurate target localization. A comprehensive

  16. Scatter reduction for grid-less mammography using the convolution-based image post-processing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimón, Elena; Nait-Charif, Hammadi; Khan, Asmar; Marsden, Philip A.; Diaz, Oliver

    2017-03-01

    X-ray Mammography examinations are highly affected by scattered radiation, as it degrades the quality of the image and complicates the diagnosis process. Anti-scatter grids are currently used in planar mammography examinations as the standard physical scattering reduction technique. This method has been found to be inefficient, as it increases the dose delivered to the patient, does not remove all the scattered radiation and increases the price of the equipment. Alternative scattering reduction methods, based on post-processing algorithms, are being investigated to substitute anti-scatter grids. Methods such as the convolution-based scatter estimation have lately become attractive as they are quicker and more flexible than pure Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. In this study we make use of this specific method, which is based on the premise that the scatter in the system is spatially diffuse, thus it can be approximated by a two-dimensional low-pass convolution filter of the primary image. This algorithm uses the narrow pencil beam method to obtain the scatter kernel used to convolve an image, acquired without anti-scatter grid. The results obtained show an image quality comparable, in the worst case, to the grid image, in terms of uniformity and contrast to noise ratio. Further improvement is expected when using clinically-representative phantoms.

  17. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Dawson, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is developed for the generation of electromagnetic radiation in an electron beam-plasma interaction. The plasma is treated as a two-dimensional finite system, and effects of a continuous nonrelativistic beam input are accounted for. Three momentum and three field components are included in the simulation, and an external magnetic field is excluded. EM radiation generation is possible through interaction among Langmuir oscillations, ion-acoustic waves, and the electromagnetic wave, producing radiation perpendicular to the beam. The radiation is located near the plasma frequency, and polarized with the E component parallel to the beam. The scattering of Langmuir waves caused by ion-acoustic fluctuations generates the radiation. Comparison with laboratory data for the three-wave interactions shows good agreement in terms of the radiation levels produced, which are small relative to the plasma thermal energy.

  18. Scattering of light by crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, William

    2012-01-01

    This authoritative graduate-level text describes inelastic light scattering by crystals and its use in the investigation of solid-state excitation, with experimental techniques common to all types of excitation. 1978 edition.

  19. Integration rules for scattering equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baadsgaard, Christian; Bjerrum-Bohr, N.E.J.; Bourjaily, Jacob L.; Damgaard, Poul H. [Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center,Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2015-09-21

    As described by Cachazo, He and Yuan, scattering amplitudes in many quantum field theories can be represented as integrals that are fully localized on solutions to the so-called scattering equations. Because the number of solutions to the scattering equations grows quite rapidly, the contour of integration involves contributions from many isolated components. In this paper, we provide a simple, combinatorial rule that immediately provides the result of integration against the scattering equation constraints for any Möbius-invariant integrand involving only simple poles. These rules have a simple diagrammatic interpretation that makes the evaluation of any such integrand immediate. Finally, we explain how these rules are related to the computation of amplitudes in the field theory limit of string theory.

  20. Compton scattering at high intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzl, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.heinzl@plymouth.ac.u [University of Plymouth, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-01

    High-intensity Compton scattering takes place when an electron beam is brought into collision with a high power laser. We briefly review the main intensity signatures using the formalism of strong-field quantum electrodynamics.

  1. Neutron scattering and models: Titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.

    1997-07-01

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental titanium were measured from 4.5 {r_arrow} 10.0 MeV in incident energy increments of {approx} 0.5 MeV. At each energy the measurements were made at forty or more scattering angles distributed between {approx} 17 and 160{degree}. Concurrently, differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured for observed excitations of 0.975 {+-} 0.034, 1.497 {+-} 0.033, 2.322 {+-} 0.058, 3.252 {+-} 0.043, 3.700 {+-} 0.093, 4.317 {+-} 0.075 and 4.795 {+-} 0.100 MeV. All of the observed inelastically-scattered neutron groups were composites of contributions from several isotopes and/or levels. The experimental results were used to develop energy-average optical, statistical and coupled-channels models.

  2. Modeling fluctuations in scattered waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jakeman, E

    2006-01-01

    Fluctuations in scattered waves limit the performance of imaging and remote sensing systems that operate on all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. To better understand these fluctuations, Modeling Fluctuations in Scattered Waves provides a practical guide to the phenomenology, mathematics, and simulation of non-Gaussian noise models and discusses how they can be used to characterize the statistics of scattered waves.Through their discussion of mathematical models, the authors demonstrate the development of new sensing techniques as well as offer intelligent choices that can be made for system analysis. Using experimental results and numerical simulation, the book illustrates the properties and applications of these models. The first two chapters introduce statistical tools and the properties of Gaussian noise, including results on phase statistics. The following chapters describe Gaussian processes and the random walk model, address multiple scattering effects and propagation through an extended med...

  3. Theory and approach of information retrievals from electromagnetic scattering and remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Ya-Qiu

    2006-01-01

    Covers several hot topics in current research of electromagnetic scattering, and radiative transfer in complex and random media, polarimetric scattering and SAR imagery technology, data validation and information retrieval from space-borne remote sensing, computational electromagnetics, etc.Including both forward modelling and inverse problems, analytic theory and numerical approachesAn overall summary of the author's works during most recent yearsAlso presents some insight for future research topics.

  4. A Glimpse of Gluons through Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the Proton

    OpenAIRE

    Defurne, M.; Jiménez-Argüello, A. Martì; Ahmed, Z.; H. Albataineh; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Bellini, V.; Benali, M; Boeglin, W.; Bertin, P.; M. Brossard; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Chandavar, S.; Chen, C.

    2017-01-01

    The proton is composed of quarks and gluons, bound by the most elusive mechanism of strong interaction called confinement. In this work, the dynamics of quarks and gluons are investigated using deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS): produced by a multi-GeV electron, a highly virtual photon scatters off the proton which subsequently radiates a high energy photon. Similarly to holography, measuring not only the magnitude but also the phase of the DVCS amplitude allows to perform 3D images of...

  5. Radiation Effects in a Semitransparent Gray Coating Heated by Convection and Cooled by Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2002-01-01

    A parametric study using a one dimensional model of a semitransparent gray thermal barrier coating was performed to gain an understanding of the role thermal radiation can play in the heat transferred. Some ceramic materials are semitransparent in the wavelength ranges were thermal radiation is important. Therefore, absorption, emission, and scattering of thermal radiation can affect the he at transfer through the coating. In this paper, a one dimensional layer was used to model the heat transfer process occurring, in a burner test rig. The semitransparent layer is heated by a hot gas flowing over its surface. The layer and substrate at a cooled by radiation to the surroundings. The back side of the substrate is insulated. The coating is assumed to be gray (absorption and scattering coefficients are not function of wavelength). An absorption coefficient of 0.3/cm and scatter a rig coefficients of 0 (no scattering) and 100/cm (isotropic scattering) were used. The thickness and thermal conductivity of the layer are varied. The results show that the temperatures are affected by the properties of the semitransparent .ever and the emissivity of the substrate. The substrate and surface temperatures are presented. The apparent temperature an optical pyrometer would read for the emitted energy is also given. An apparent thermal conductivity was calculated for the layer.

  6. Radar interferometry persistent scatterer technique

    CERN Document Server

    Kampes, Bert M

    2014-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the Persistent Scatterer Technique, the latest development in radar interferometric data processing. It is the only book on Permanent Scatterer (PS) technique of radar interferometry, and it details a newly developed stochastic model and estimator algorithm to cope with possible problems for the application of the PS technique. The STUN (spatio-temporal unwrapping network) algorithm, developed to cope with these issues in a robust way, is presented and applied to two test sites.

  7. Isogeometric analysis of acoustic scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Venås, Jon Vegard

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic scattering has been thoroughly analyzed with the use of finite element analysis (FEA). The problem at hand is a coupled fluid-structure interaction problem on an unbounded domain, where an object of elastic material is surrounded by fluid. Using physical assumptions, the fluid is described by the wave equation which is transformed to the Helmholtz equation. That is, the frequency domain is considered instead of the time domain. In particular one is interested in the scattered pressur...

  8. Double parton scattering in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Sunar Cerci, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    Recent results on the double parton scattering measurements performed using the proton-proton collision data collected with the CMS detector are presented. The observables, which are sensitive to double parton scattering, are investigated after being corrected for detector effects and selection efficiencies. Multivariate analysis techniques are used for increasing the sensitivity. The effective cross section, $\\sigma_{eff}$ is also extracted using different processes at various center-of-mass energies.

  9. Scattered light characterization of FORTIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandliss, Stephan R.; Carter, Anna; Redwine, Keith; Teste, Stephane; Pelton, Russell; Hagopian, John; Kutyrev, Alexander; Li, Mary J.; Moseley, S. Harvey

    2017-08-01

    We describe our efforts to build a Wide-Field Lyman alpha Geocoronal simulator (WFLaGs) for characterizing the end-to-end sensitivity of FORTIS (Far-UV Off Rowland-circle Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy) to scattered Lyman α emission from outside of the nominal (1/2 degree)2 field-of-view. WFLaGs is a 50 mm diameter F/1 aluminum parabolic collimator fed by a hollow cathode discharge lamp with a 80 mm clear MgF2 window housed in a vacuum skin. It creates emission over a 10 degree FOV. WFLaGS will allow us to validate and refine a recently developed scattered light model and verify our scatter light mitigation strategies, which will incorporate low scatter baffle materials, and possibly 3-d printed light traps, covering exposed scatter centers. We present measurements of scattering intensity of Lyman alpha as a function of angle with respect to the specular reflectance direction for several candidate baffle materials. Initial testing of WFLaGs will be described.

  10. Radiative Neutron Capture on Lithium-7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rupak, Gautam; Renato, Higa

    2011-01-01

    The radiative neutron capture on lithium-7 is calculated model independently using a low energy halo effective field theory. The cross section is expressed in terms of scattering parameters directly related to the S-matrix element. The cross section depends on the poorly known p-wave effective range

  11. Light Scattering By Nonspherical Particles: Current Status and Challenging Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative analyses of remote sensing measurements of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and particulate surfaces as well as computations of the Earth's radiation balance require detailed understanding of the interaction of small particles with light and other electromagnetic radiation. The convenient availability of the Lorenz-Mie theory has led to a widespread practice of treating all particles as if they were spheres. However, many natural and anthropogenic particles have nonspherical shapes, and the accumulated knowledge suggests that their scattering and radiative properties can be dramatically different from those of equivalent spheres. This presentation will summarize the recent significant progress achieved in the area of electromagnetic scattering by nonspherical particles and outline major problems that still await solution. The talk will cover the following specific topics: (1) comparison of most widely used exact and approximate theoretical techniques; (2) outline of laboratory and field measurement techniques; (3) compare theory and experiment; (4) need for a statistical approach in dealing with natural particles; (5) remote sensing and radiative transfer applications; and (6) major unsolved problems.

  12. A hybrid approach to simulate multiple photon scattering in X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, N. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: nicolas.freud@insa-lyon.fr; Letang, J.-M. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Babot, D. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid simulation approach is proposed to compute the contribution of scattered radiation in X- or {gamma}-ray imaging. This approach takes advantage of the complementarity between the deterministic and probabilistic simulation methods. The proposed hybrid method consists of two stages. Firstly, a set of scattering events occurring in the inspected object is determined by means of classical Monte Carlo simulation. Secondly, this set of scattering events is used as a starting point to compute the energy imparted to the detector, with a deterministic algorithm based on a 'forced detection' scheme. For each scattering event, the probability for the scattered photon to reach each pixel of the detector is calculated using well-known physical models (form factor and incoherent scattering function approximations, in the case of Rayleigh and Compton scattering respectively). The results of the proposed hybrid approach are compared to those obtained with the Monte Carlo method alone (Geant4 code) and found to be in excellent agreement. The convergence of the results when the number of scattering events increases is studied. The proposed hybrid approach makes it possible to simulate the contribution of each type (Compton or Rayleigh) and order of scattering, separately or together, with a single PC, within reasonable computation times (from minutes to hours, depending on the number of pixels of the detector). This constitutes a substantial benefit, compared to classical simulation methods (Monte Carlo or deterministic approaches), which usually requires a parallel computing architecture to obtain comparable results.

  13. Measurement of the primary and scatter dose in high energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Linden, P.M. [Catharina Ziekenhuis, Eindhoven (Netherlands). Radiotherapy Dept.; Tiourina, T.B.; Dries, W.

    1995-12-01

    A method is presented to measure the primary and scatter components separately in a water tank using a small cylindrical absorber. Results from this experiment are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. The measurement setup consists of a small cylindrical absorber placed on a central axis of the beam a few centimetres above the radiation detector. Both absorber and detector move along the central axis while absorbed dose is registered. As the primary radiation is fully blocked, only scatter component is measured when a cylindrical absorber is used. Measurements in open fields result in the total absorbed dose being the sum of primary and scatter components. The primary dose component can be derived by substraction. Absorbers with different diameters are used. With decreasing dimensions the relative contribution of the dose due to scatter radiation increases. A steep increase is observed when the range of laterally scattered electrons becomes comparable with the radius of the absorber. Two different Monte Carlo simulations have been performed: with and without secondary electron transport. The data obtained for the former case perfectly agrees with the experiment. The situation where the secondary electron is assumed zero (i.e. local energy deposition) simulates the Cunningham model. Our results show that the Cunningham model predicts lower scatter component under the block edge which can be important for these applications.

  14. Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M

    2002-04-01

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2001 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department are enviromnental remediation, emergency planning, radiation protection research, low-level radioactvity measurements, safeguards and physics measurements, decision strategy research and policy support and social sciences in nuclear research. Main achievements for 2001 in these areas are reported.

  15. PSR B2111+46: a test of the inverse Compton scattering model of radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Qiao, G. J.; Han, J. L.; Lee, K. J.; Wang, H. G.

    2007-04-01

    The region in which pulsars radiate is very important to constrain pulsar emission mechanisms. A three-dimensional (3D) method to calculate emission heights is developed in this paper. As an example, radiation regions for different components at different frequencies have been calculated for PSR B2111+46. Emission components at seven frequencies are fitted with Gaussian components, then the radiation heights for emission components are calculated. We found that different emission components, even if at the same radio frequency, are radiated from different heights. This is probably a common phenomena and challenges any emission mechanisms. The inverse Compton scattering emission model for pulsar radio emission can explain these results well.

  16. Radiative properties of ice clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.L.; Koracin, D.; Carter, E. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A new treatment of cirrus cloud radiative properties has been developed, based on anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), which does not parameterize size distributions in terms of an effective radius. Rather, is uses the size distribution parameters directly, and explicitly considers the ice particle shapes. There are three fundamental features which characterize this treatment: (1) the ice path radiation experiences as it travels through an ice crystal is parameterized, (2) only determines the amount of radiation scattered and absorbed, and (3) as in other treatments, the projected area of the size distribution is conserved. The first two features are unique to this treatment, since it does not convert the ice particles into equivalent volume or area spheres in order to apply Mie theory.

  17. SU-F-J-144: Scatter and Leakage Survey of An Integrated MR-Linac System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Bosco, G; Darenbourg, B; Ibbott, G [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the scatter and leakage radiation of an integrated 1.5T MRI-Linac system. Methods: A 150cc chamber (model 96020C, Inovision) was used in all the scatter and leakage measurements, after being recalibrated for MV energy by the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory at MD Anderson. The scatter radiation was measured by placing a 25 cm stack of solid-water materials at iso-center on the patient couch to simulate patient scatter. Gantry angles were positioned at 0 degree (beam pointing downward) and 270 (beam pointing laterally). Scatter radiation was measured at selective locations inside the RF room. Beam stopper leakage was measured at the exterior panel of the gantry. The head leakage was measured at 1 meter away from the Linac head in the direction which was determined to be the area of maximum leakage by wrapped films test. All measurements were repeated with the 1.5T magnetic field turned off to study the effect of magnetic field. Results: When the magnet was on (B=1.5T), the maximum head leakage at 1 meter was 191.6mR/1000MU. The scatter radiation at 1 meter from the iso-center was 1.091R/1000MU when the radiation beam was pointing downward, 1.296R/1000MU when the beam pointed laterally. The beam stopper leakage was measured as 299.4 mR/1000MU at the exterior panel of the gantry. When magnet was off (B=0), the head leakage was measured as 198.6mR/1000MU. The scatter radiation at 1 meter was 1.153R/1000MU when beam pointed downward, 1.287R/1000MU when beam pointed laterally. The beam stopper leakage was measured as 309.4 mR/1000MU at the exterior panel of the gantry. Conclusion: The measurements indicate that the scatter and leakage radiation from the integrated MR-Linac system are in-line with the expected values. The beam stopper leakage is approximately 300 mR/1000MU. The leakage and scatter difference with the magnetic field ON and OFF was within 5%. The authors received a corporate sponsored grant from Elekta which is the vendor of

  18. Reflectance of Biological Turbid Tissues under Wide Area Illumination: Single Backward Scattering Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guennadi Saiko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various scenarios of light propagation paths in turbid media (single backward scattering, multiple backward scattering, banana shape are discussed and their contributions to reflectance spectra are estimated. It has been found that a single backward or multiple forward scattering quasi-1D paths can be the major contributors to reflected spectra in wide area illumination scenario. Such a single backward scattering (SBS approximation allows developing of an analytical approach which can take into account refractive index mismatched boundary conditions and multilayer geometry and can be used for real-time spectral processing. The SBS approach can be potentially applied for the distances between the transport and reduced scattering domains. Its validation versus the Kubelka-Munk model, path integrals, and diffusion approximation of the radiation transport theory is discussed.

  19. SIMULATION OF THE Ku-BAND RADAR ALTIMETER SEA ICE EFFECTIVE SCATTERING SURFACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonboe, Rasmus; Andersen, Søren; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2006-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to simulate the sea ice radar altimeter effective scattering surface variability as a function of snow depth and density. Under dry snow conditions without layering these are the primary snow parameters affecting the scattering surface variability. The model...... is initialised with in situ data collected during the May 2004 GreenIce ice camp in the Lincoln Sea (73ºW; 85ºN). Our results show that the snow cover is important for the effective scattering surface depth in sea ice and thus for the range measurement, ice freeboard and ice thickness estimation....

  20. A polarimetric scattering database for non-spherical ice particles at microwave wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yinghui; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Aydin, Kultegin; Verlinde, Johannes; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Botta, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    The atmospheric science community has entered a period in which electromagnetic scattering properties at microwave frequencies of realistically constructed ice particles are necessary for making progress on a number of fronts. One front includes retrieval of ice-particle properties and signatures from ground-based, airborne, and satellite-based radar and radiometer observations. Another front is evaluation of model microphysics by application of forward operators to their outputs and comparison to observations during case study periods. Yet a third front is data assimilation, where again forward operators are applied to databases of ice-particle scattering properties and the results compared to observations, with their differences leading to corrections of the model state. Over the past decade investigators have developed databases of ice-particle scattering properties at microwave frequencies and made them openly available. Motivated by and complementing these earlier efforts, a database containing polarimetric single-scattering properties of various types of ice particles at millimeter to centimeter wavelengths is presented. While the database presented here contains only single-scattering properties of ice particles in a fixed orientation, ice-particle scattering properties are computed for many different directions of the radiation incident on them. These results are useful for understanding the dependence of ice-particle scattering properties on ice-particle orientation with respect to the incident radiation. For ice particles that are small compared to the wavelength, the number of incident directions of the radiation is sufficient to compute reasonable estimates of their (randomly) orientation-averaged scattering properties. This database is complementary to earlier ones in that it contains complete (polarimetric) scattering property information for each ice particle - 44 plates, 30 columns, 405 branched planar crystals, 660 aggregates, and 640 conical

  1. Radiation damping of a polarizable particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Lukas

    2017-09-01

    A polarizable body moving in an external electromagnetic field will slow down. This effect is referred to as radiation damping and is analogous to Doppler cooling in atomic physics. Using the principles of special relativity we derive an expression for the radiation damping force and find that it solely depends on the scattered power. The cooling of the particle's center-of-mass motion is balanced by heating due to radiation pressure shot noise, giving rise to an equilibrium that depends on the ratio of the field's frequency and the particle's mass. While damping is of relativistic nature, heating has its roots in quantum mechanics.

  2. Fundamentals of neutron scattering by condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherm, R. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this introductory lecture is to give the basic facts about the scattering of neutrons by condensed matter. This lecture is restricted to nuclear scattering, whereas magnetic scattering will be dealt with in an other course. Most of the formalism, however, can also be easily extended to magnetic scattering. (author) 17 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  3. Physics Model Based Scatter Correction in Multi-source Interior Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hao; Li, Bin; Jia, Xun; Gao, Guohua

    2017-08-17

    Multi-source interior computed tomography (CT) has a great potential to provide ultra-fast and organ-oriented imaging at low radiation dose. However, X-ray cross scattering from multiple simultaneously activated X-ray imaging chains compromises imaging quality. Previously, we published two hardware based scatter correction methods for multi-source interior CT. Here, we propose a software based scatter correction method, with the benefit of no need for hardware modifications. The new method is based on a physics model and an iterative framework. The physics model was derived analytically, and was used to calculate X-ray scattering signals in both forward direction and cross directions in multi-source interior CT. The physics model was integrated to an iterative scatter correction framework to reduce scatter artifacts. The method was applied to phantom data from both Monte Carlo simulations and physical experimentation that were designed to emulate the image acquisition in a multi-source interior CT architecture recently proposed by our team. The proposed scatter correction method reduced scatter artifacts significantly, even with only one iteration. Within a few iterations, the reconstructed images fast converged toward the "scatter-free" reference images. After applying the scatter correction method, the maximum CT number error at the region-of-interests (ROIs) was reduced to 46 HU in numerical phantom dataset and 48 HU in physical phantom dataset respectively, and the contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) at those ROIs increased by up to 44.3% and up to 19.7% respectively. The proposed physics model based iterative scatter correction method could be useful for scatter correction in dual-source or multi-source CT.

  4. High frequency and pulse scattering physical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Pierce, Allan D

    1992-01-01

    High Frequency and Pulse Scattering investigates high frequency and pulse scattering, with emphasis on the phenomenon of echoes from objects. Geometrical and catastrophe optics methods in scattering are discussed, along with the scattering of sound pulses and the ringing of target resonances. Caustics and associated diffraction catastrophes are also examined.Comprised of two chapters, this volume begins with a detailed account of geometrically based approximation methods in scattering theory, focusing on waves transmitted through fluid and elastic scatterers and glory scattering; surface ray r

  5. Radiation shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Tadahiro [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Omori, Tetsu; Mizuochi, Akira

    1997-11-18

    A radiation shield is constituted by using a flexible bag made of a synthetic resin, a rubber plate or a composite member of them. Water is charged therein as a shielding liquid. Water injection ports are formed at the lower surface, and gas exhaustion ports are formed on the upper surface of the radiation shield. A plurality of vertical ribs made of the same material as the bag of the radiation shield are formed, integral with the bag, each at a space on the outer surface of the radiation shield. A reinforcing tube are inserted to the vertical ribs integral with the bag. The reinforcing tube may be made of an metal or non-metal material, but material having a bending strength greater than that of the bag is used. When wide surfaces are constituted in the horizontal direction as radiation shielding surfaces, a plurality of the radiation shields are used being in adjacent in the horizontal direction. The reinforcing tubes in adjacent with each other among the adjacent radiation shields are connected by connectors. (I.N.)

  6. Thermal neutron scattering evaluation framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Chris; Leal, Luiz; Rahnema, Farzad; Danon, Yaron; Arbanas, Goran

    2017-09-01

    A neutron scattering kernel data evaluation framework for computation of model-dependent predictions and their uncertainties is outlined. In this framework, model parameters are fitted to double-differential cross section measurements and their uncertainties. For convenience, the initial implementation of this framework uses the molecular dynamics model implemented in the GROMACS code. It is applied to light water using the TIP4P/2005f interaction model. These trajectories computed by GROMACS are then processed using nMOLDYN to compute the density of states, which is then used to calculate the scattering kernel using the Gaussian approximation. Double differential cross sections computed from the scattering kernel are then fitted to double-differential scattering data measured at the Spallation Neutron Source detector at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The fitting procedure is designed to yield optimized model-parameters and their uncertainties in the form of a covariance matrix, from which new evaluations of thermal neutron scattering kernel will be generated. The Unified Monte Carlo method will be used to fit the simulation data to the experimental data.

  7. Simultaneous reconstruction of temperature field and radiative properties by inverse radiation analysis using stochastic particle swarm optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous reconstruction of temperature field and radiative properties including scattering albedo and extinction coefficient is presented in a two-dimensional (2-D rectangular, absorbing, emitting and isotropically scattering gray medium from the knowledge of the exit radiative intensities received by charge-coupled device (CCD cameras at boundary surfaces. The inverse problem is formulated as a non-linear optimization problem and solved by stochastic particle swarm optimization. The effects of particle swarm size, generation number, measurement errors, and optical thickness on the accuracy of the estimation, and computing time were investigated and the results show that the temperature field and radiative properties can be reconstructed well for the exact and noisy data, but radiative properties are harder to obtain than temperature field. Moreover, the extinction coefficient is more difficult to reconstruct than scattering albedo.

  8. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is

  9. Low-angle X-ray scattering from spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desouky, O.S. E-mail: omardesouky@yahoo.com; Ashour, Ahmed H.; Abdullah, Mohamed I.; Elshemey, Wael M

    2002-07-01

    Low-angle scattering of X-rays is characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are due to the interference of photons coherently scattered from the molecules of the medium. Thus these patterns are closely linked to the molecular structure of the investigated medium. In this work, low-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) profiles of five spices; pimpinella anisum (anise), coriandrum sativum (coriander), cuminum cyminum (cumin), foenculum vulgare (fennel) and nigella sativa (nigella or black cumin) are presented after extensive measurements. It is found that all spices exhibit one characteristic peak at a scattering angle around 10 deg. This is equivalent to a value x=0.0565 A{sup -1}, where x=sin({theta}/2)/{lambda}. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak is found to be characteristic for each type of the investigated spices. The possibility to detect the irradiation of these spices from their LAXS profiles is also examined after 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy doses of gamma radiation. Except for anise, coriander and cumin at 40 kGy, there are no detectable deviations from the control samples in the scattering profiles of irradiated samples. These results comply with the recommendations of the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) which defines 30 kGy as the maximum dose for irradiation of spices. The present technique could be used to detect over-irradiation, which causes damage to the molecular structure of some spices.

  10. Low-angle X-ray scattering from spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.; Abdullah, Mohamed I.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2002-07-01

    Low-angle scattering of X-rays is characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are due to the interference of photons coherently scattered from the molecules of the medium. Thus these patterns are closely linked to the molecular structure of the investigated medium. In this work, low-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) profiles of five spices; pimpinella anisum (anise), coriandrum sativum (coriander), cuminum cyminum (cumin), foenculum vulgare (fennel) and nigella sativa (nigella or black cumin) are presented after extensive measurements. It is found that all spices exhibit one characteristic peak at a scattering angle around 10°. This is equivalent to a value x=0.0565 Å -1, where x=sin( θ⧸2)⧸ λ. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak is found to be characteristic for each type of the investigated spices. The possibility to detect the irradiation of these spices from their LAXS profiles is also examined after 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy doses of gamma radiation. Except for anise, coriander and cumin at 40 kGy, there are no detectable deviations from the control samples in the scattering profiles of irradiated samples. These results comply with the recommendations of the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) which defines 30 kGy as the maximum dose for irradiation of spices. The present technique could be used to detect over-irradiation, which causes damage to the molecular structure of some spices.

  11. A Prototype Large Area Detector Module for Muon Scattering Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, C.A.; Boakes, J.; Burns, J.; Snow, S.; Stapleton, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Quillin, S. [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Abstract-Shielded special nuclear materials (SNM) are of concern as some fissile isotopes have low gamma and neutron emission rates. These materials are also easily shielded to the point where their passive emissions are comparable to background. Consequently, shielded SNM is very challenging for passive radiation detection portals which scan cargo containers. One potential solution for this is to utilise the natural cosmic ray muon background and examine how these muons scatter from materials inside the container volume, terms; the muon scattering tomography (MST) technique measures the three-dimensional localised scattering at all points within a cargo container, providing a degree of material discrimination. There is the additional benefit that the MST signal increases with the presence of more high density shielding materials, in contrast to passive radiation detection. Simulations and calculations suggest that the effectiveness of the technique is sensitive to the tracking accuracy amongst other parameters, motivating the need to develop practical detector systems that are capable of tracking cosmic ray muons. To this end, we have constructed and tested a 2 m by 2 m demonstration module based on gaseous drift chambers and triggered by a large area scintillator-based detector, which is readout by wavelength shifting fibres. We discuss its design, construction, characterisation and operational challenges. (authors)

  12. Luminosity calibration from elastic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Stenzel, H

    2006-01-01

    The absolute luminosity of the LHC at the ATLAS interaction point will be calibrated by the measurement of the t-distribution of elastic pp-scattering in the Coulomb-Nuclear interference region. The ALFA detector housed in Roman Pots located 240m away from IP1 is designed to approach the beam at mm distance and to measure elastic pp-scattering at micro-radian scattering angles. This measurement will be performed with dedicated runs using a special beam optics with high beta* and parallel-to-point focusing in order to access the Coulomb regime. In this note the expected performance of this method, evaluated with a simulation of the experimental set-up, is presented.

  13. Quantifying entanglement with scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, O.; Epping, M.; Kampermann, H.; Bruß, D.; Plenio, M. B.; Cramer, M.

    2014-03-01

    We show how the entanglement contained in states of spins arranged on a lattice may be lower bounded with observables arising in scattering experiments. We focus on the partial differential cross section obtained in neutron scattering from magnetic materials but our results are sufficiently general such that they may also be applied to, e.g., optical Bragg scattering from ultracold atoms in optical lattices or from ion chains. We discuss resonating valence bond states and ground and thermal states of experimentally relevant models—such as the Heisenberg, Majumdar-Ghosh, and XY models—in different geometries and with different spin numbers. As a by-product, we find that for the one-dimensional XY model in a transverse field such measurements reveal factorization and the quantum phase transition at zero temperature.

  14. Helium atom scattering from surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    High resolution helium atom scattering can be applied to study a number of interesting properties of solid surfaces with great sensitivity and accuracy. This book treats in detail experimental and theoretical aspects ofthis method as well as all current applications in surface science. The individual chapters - all written by experts in the field - are devoted to the investigation of surface structure, defect shapes and concentrations, the interaction potential, collective and localized surface vibrations at low energies, phase transitions and surface diffusion. Over the past decade helium atom scattering has gained widespread recognitionwithin the surface science community. Points in its favour are comprehensiveunderstanding of the scattering theory and the availability of well-tested approximation to the rigorous theory. This book will be invaluable to surface scientists wishing to make an informed judgement on the actual and potential capabilities of this technique and its results.

  15. SCATTERING FROM RAMIFIED POLYMERIC SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Benhamou

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, of great interest to us is a quantitative study of the scattering properties from ramified polymeric systems of arbitrary topology. We consider three types of systems, namely ramified polymers in solution, ramified polymer blends, or ternary mixtures made of two ramified polymers of different chemical nature immersed in a good solvent. To achieve the goal of the study, use is made of the Random Phase Approximation. First we determine the exact expression of the form factor of an ideal ramified polymer of any topology, from which we extract the exact expression of its gyration radius. Using the classical Zimm's formulae and the exact form factor, we determine all scattering properties of these three types of ramified polymeric systems. The main conclusion is that ramification of the chains induces drastic changes of the scattering properties.

  16. Scattering functions of Platonic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Shew, Chwen-Yang [City University of New York (CUNY); He, Lilin [ORNL; Meilleur, Flora [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Liu, Emily [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Smith, Greg [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Pynn, Roger [ORNL; Chen, Wei-Ren [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The single-particle small-angle scattering properties of five Platonic solids, including the tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron, are systematically investigated. For each given geometry, the Debye spatial autocorrelation function, pair distance distribution function and intraparticle structure factor (form factor) are calculated and compared with the corresponding scattering function of a spherical reference system. From the theoretical models, the empirical relationship between the dodecahedral and icosahedral structural characteristics and those of the equivalent spheres is found. Moreover, the single-particle scattering properties of icosahedral and spherical shells with identical volume are investigated, and the prospect of using different data analysis approaches to explore their structural differences is presented and discussed.

  17. Scattering functions of Platonic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Ren [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Li, Xin [ORNL; Liu, Emily [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); Pynn, Roger [ORNL; Shew, Chwen-Yang [City University of New York (CUNY); Smith, Gregory Scott [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Meilleur, Flora [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In this report the single-particle scattering properties of five Platonic solids, including tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron, are investigated in a systematic manner. For each given geometry, the Debye spatial autocorrelation function (r), pair distance distribution function (PDDF) p (r) and intraparticle structure factor (form factor) P (Q) are respectively calculated and compared to the corresponding scattering function of the spherical referential system. Based on our theoretical models, the empirical relationship between the dodecahedral and icosahedral structural characteristics and those of the equivalent spheres is found. Moreover, the single-particle scattering properties of the icosahedral and the spherical shells with the same volume are further investigated and the prospect of using different data analysis approaches to explore their structural difference is also presented and discussed.

  18. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  19. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  20. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.