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Sample records for scattering cars detection

  1. Detection of chemical interfaces in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy: Dk-CARS. I. Axial interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, David; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-12-01

    We develop a full vectorial theoretical investigation of the chemical interface detection in conventional coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. In Part I, we focus on the detection of axial interfaces (i.e., parallel to the optical axis) following a recent experimental demonstration of the concept [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 213905 (2010)]. By revisiting the Young's double slit experiment, we show that background-free microscopy and spectroscopy is achievable through the angular analysis of the CARS far-field radiation pattern. This differential CARS in k space (Dk-CARS) technique is interesting for fast detection of interfaces between molecularly different media. It may be adapted to other coherent and resonant scattering processes.

  2. Accurate car plate detection via car face landmark localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailiang; Chiu, Man-Yau; Wu, Kangheng; Lei, Zhibin; Lam, Kin-Man

    2017-07-01

    For intelligent vehicle surveillance systems, it is a big challenge to detect small, blurred car plates of vehicles driving on a highway. In this paper, we present a novel, two-stage detection scheme for small, blurred car-plate detection in large surveillance images. Our proposed scheme firstly detects vehicles, and then locates the car plates in specific regions of detected vehicles based on our proposed car-face landmark localization algorithm. Our scheme can also solve the high false-alarming rate problem with small, blurred car-plate detection. Experimental results show that our proposed method is accurate, and able to reduce the false-alarming rate, without any compromise in speed.

  3. Effect of scattering on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; De Vito, Giuseppe; Piazza, Vincenzo; Potma, Eric O; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2017-04-17

    We develop a computational framework to examine the factors responsible for scattering-induced distortions of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in turbid samples. We apply the Huygens-Fresnel wave-based electric field superposition (HF-WEFS) method combined with the radiating dipole approximation to compute the effects of scattering-induced distortions of focal excitation fields on the far-field CARS signal. We analyze the effect of spherical scatterers, placed in the vicinity of the focal volume, on the CARS signal emitted by different objects (2μm diameter solid sphere, 2μm diameter myelin cylinder and 2μm diameter myelin tube). We find that distortions in the CARS signals arise not only from attenuation of the focal field but also from scattering-induced changes in the spatial phase that modifies the angular distribution of the CARS emission. Our simulations further show that CARS signal attenuation can be minimized by using a high numerical aperture condenser. Moreover, unlike the CARS intensity image, CARS images formed by taking the ratio of CARS signals obtained using x- and y-polarized input fields is relatively insensitive to the effects of spherical scatterers. Our computational framework provide a mechanistic approach to characterizing scattering-induced distortions in coherent imaging of turbid media and may inspire bottom-up approaches for adaptive optical methods for image correction.

  4. Visualizing Resonances in the Complex Plane with Vibrational Phase Contrast Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.; Garbacik, E.T.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Otto, Cornelis; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2010-01-01

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the emitted signal carries both amplitude and phase information of the molecules in the focal volume. Most CARS experiments ignore the phase component, but its detection allows for two advantages over intensity-only CARS. First, the pure resonant

  5. Effect of Scatterering on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signals

    CERN Document Server

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Piazza, Vincenzo; Potma, Eric O; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2016-01-01

    We develop a computational framework to examine the factors responsible for scattering-induced distortions of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in turbid samples. We use the Huygens-Fresnel Wave-based Electric Field Superposition (HF-WEFS) method combined with the radiating dipole approximation to compute the effects of scattering-induced distortions of focal excitation fields on the far-field CARS signal. We analyze the effect of spherical scatterers, placed in the vicinity of the focal volume, on the CARS signal emitted by different objects (2{\\mu}m diameter solid sphere, 2{\\mu}m diameter myelin cylinder and 2{\\mu}m diameter myelin tube). We find that distortions in the CARS signals arise not only from attenuation of the focal field but also from scattering-induced changes in the spatial phase that modifies the angular distribution of the CARS emission. Our simulations further show that CARS signal attenuation can be minimized by using a high numerical aperture condenser. Moreover, unlike...

  6. O2 (1Δg) detection using broadband CARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinbo; Guo, Jingwei; Cai, Xianglong; Gai, Baodong; Meng, Qingkun; Jin, Yuqi

    2015-02-01

    1 Δg oxygen was the active medium of chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL), the concentration and distribution of 1 Δg oxygen was important for the output power and beam quality. However, the current test technique, such as fluorescence detection method, absorption spectrum method could not get accurate 1 Δg oxygen information, due to the interference from the iodine fluorescence or the rigorous request of the laser source and optics and detection elements. The anti-stokes Raman spectrum of 1 Δg oxygen was regarded as a potential technique to obtain desirable signal, and the coherent anti-stokes Raman scatter (CARS) was the most feasible technique to get better signal to noise ratio (SNR). In this paper, we reported a broadband nanosecond coherent anti-stokes Raman scatter (CARS) detecting system built up for the detection of the concentration and distribution of O2( 1 Δg) in COIL:The second harmonic of a Nd: YAG pulse laser was separated into two parts, one part was used to pump a broadband nanosecond dye laser to generate light of 578-580 nm, which covered both stokes lines of O2 ( 1 Δg)and O2 (3 ∑) The other part was combined with dye laser output by a dichroic mirror, and then introduced into the detection region of COIL through a focus lens. CARS signals for O2(1 Δg)and O2 (3 ∑)have different wavelengths, and their intensity was proportional to the square of the concentration of O2(1 Δg) and O2( 3 ∑). By changing the focus spot of pump and stokes laser, the concentration distribution of O2(1 Δg) and O2(3 ∑)at different position could be obtained.

  7. Design of wideband MIMO car-to-car channel models based on the geometrical street scattering model

    OpenAIRE

    Avazov, Nurilla; Pätzold, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Published version of an article in the journal: Modelling and Simulation in Engineering. Also available from the publisher at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/264213 Open access We propose a wideband multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) car-to-car (C2C) channel model based on the geometrical street scattering model. Starting from the geometrical model, a MIMO reference channel model is derived under the assumption of single-bounce scattering in line-of-sight (LOS) and non-LOS (NLOS) propag...

  8. Epi-detection of vibrational phase contrast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbacik, E.T.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a system for the phase-resolved epi-detection of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in highly scattering and/or thick samples. With this setup, we measure the complex vibrational responses of multiple components in a thick, highly-scattering pharmaceutical tablet in

  9. Design of Wideband MIMO Car-to-Car Channel Models Based on the Geometrical Street Scattering Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurilla Avazov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a wideband multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO car-to-car (C2C channel model based on the geometrical street scattering model. Starting from the geometrical model, a MIMO reference channel model is derived under the assumption of single-bounce scattering in line-of-sight (LOS and non-LOS (NLOS propagation environments. The proposed channel model assumes an infinite number of scatterers, which are uniformly distributed in two rectangular areas located on both sides of the street. Analytical solutions are presented for the space-time-frequency cross-correlation function (STF-CCF, the two-dimensional (2D space CCF, the time-frequency CCF (TF-CCF, the temporal autocorrelation function (ACF, and the frequency correlation function (FCF. An efficient sum-of-cisoids (SOCs channel simulator is derived from the reference model. It is shown that the temporal ACF and the FCF of the SOC channel simulator fit very well to the corresponding correlation functions of the reference model. To validate the proposed channel model, the mean Doppler shift and the Doppler spread of the reference model have been matched to real-world measurement data. The comparison results demonstrate an excellent agreement between theory and measurements, which confirms the validity of the derived reference model. The proposed geometry-based channel simulator allows us to study the effect of nearby street scatterers on the performance of C2C communication systems.

  10. Standoff ultraviolet raman scattering detection of trace levels of explosives.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2011-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) Raman scattering with a 244-nm laser is evaluated for standoff detection of explosive compounds. The measured Raman scattering albedo is incorporated into a performance model that focused on standoff detection of trace levels of explosives. This model shows that detection at {approx}100 m would likely require tens of seconds, discouraging application at such ranges, and prohibiting search-mode detection, while leaving open the possibility of short-range point-and-stare detection. UV Raman spectra are also acquired for a number of anticipated background surfaces: tile, concrete, aluminum, cloth, and two different car paints (black and silver). While these spectra contained features in the same spectral range as those for TNT, we do not observe any spectra similar to that of TNT.

  11. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy driving the future of loaded mesoporous silica imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, A.L.; Mah, Pei Ting; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Niemi, Sanna-Mari; Salonen, Jarno; Santos, Helder A.; Strachan, Clare

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the use of variants of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel method for improved physicochemical characterization of drug-loaded silica particles. Ordered mesoporous silica is a biomaterial that can be loaded to carry a number of biochemicals,

  12. Imaging the intact mouse cornea using coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, David A; Lei, Tim C; Kahook, Malik Y; Masihzadeh, Omid

    2013-08-05

    The aim of this study was to image the cellular and noncellular structures of the cornea and limbus in an intact mouse eye using the vibrational oscillation of the carbon-hydrogen bond in lipid membranes and autofluorescence as label-free contrast agents. Freshly enucleated mouse eyes were imaged using two nonlinear optical techniques: coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon autofluorescence (TPAF). Sequential images were collected through the full thickness of the cornea and limbal regions. Line scans along the transverse/sagittal axes were also performed. Analysis of multiple CARS/TPAF images revealed that corneal epithelial and endothelial cells could be identified by the lipid-rich plasma membrane CARS signal. The fluorescent signal from the collagen fibers of the corneal stroma was evident in the TPAF channel. The transition from the cornea to sclera at the limbus was marked by a change in collagen pattern (TPAF channel) and thickness of surface cells (CARS channel). Regions within the corneal stroma that lack collagen autofluorescence coincided with CARS signal, indicating the presence of stromal fibroblasts or nerve fibers. The CARS technique was successful in imaging cells in the intact mouse eye, both at the surface and within corneal tissue. Multiphoton images were comparable to histologic sections. The methods described here represent a new avenue for molecular specific imaging of the mouse eye. The lack of need for tissue fixation is unique compared with traditional histology imaging techniques.

  13. Bistatic Forward Scattering Radar Detection and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Forward Scattering Radar (FSR is a special type of bistatic radar that can implement image detection, imaging, and identification using the forward scattering signals provided by the moving targets that cross the baseline between the transmitter and receiver. Because the forward scattering effect has a vital significance in increasing the targets’ Radar Cross Section (RCS, FSR is quite advantageous for use in counter stealth detection. This paper first introduces the front line technology used in forward scattering RCS, FSR detection, and Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR imaging and key problems such as the statistical characteristics of forward scattering clutter, accurate parameter estimation, and multitarget discrimination are then analyzed. Subsequently, the current research progress in FSR detection and SISAR imaging are described in detail, including the theories and experiments. In addition, with reference to the BeiDou navigation satellite, the results of forward scattering experiments in civil aircraft detection are shown. Finally, this paper considers future developments in FSR target detection and imaging and presents a new, promising technique for stealth target detection.

  14. Rapid-scan Fourier-transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy with heterodyne detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kotaro; Luo, Yizhi; Ideguchi, Takuro; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-11-01

    High-speed Raman spectroscopy has become increasingly important for analyzing chemical dynamics in real time. To address the need, rapid-scan Fourier-transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (FT-CARS) spectroscopy has been developed to realize broadband CARS measurements at a scan rate of more than 20,000 scans/s. However, the detection sensitivity of FT-CARS spectroscopy is inherently low due to the limited number of photons detected during each scan. In this Letter, we show our experimental demonstration of enhanced sensitivity in rapid-scan FT-CARS spectroscopy by heterodyne detection. Specifically, we implemented heterodyne detection by superposing the CARS electric field with an external local oscillator (LO) for their interference. The CARS signal was amplified by simply increasing the power of the LO without the need for increasing the incident power onto the sample. Consequently, we achieved enhancement in signal intensity and the signal-to-noise ratio by factors of 39 and 5, respectively, compared to FT-CARS spectroscopy with homodyne detection. The sensitivity-improved rapid-scan FT-CARS spectroscopy is expected to enable the sensitive real-time observation of chemical dynamics in a broad range of settings, such as combustion engines and live biological cells.

  15. EVALUATION OF SELECTED FEATURES FOR CAR DETECTION IN AERIAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tuermer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of vehicles from aerial images provides a wide area traffic situation within a short time. Applications for the gathered data are various and reach from smart routing in the case of congestions to usability validation of roads in the case of disasters. The challenge of the vehicle detection task is finding adequate features which are capable to separate cars from other objects; especially those that look similar. We present an experiment where selected features show their ability of car detection. Precisely, Haar-like and HoG features are utilized and passed to the AdaBoost algorithm for calculating the final detector. Afterwards the classifying power of the features is accurately analyzed and evaluated. The tests a carried out on aerial data from the inner city of Munich, Germany and include small inner city roads with rooftops close by which raise the complexity factor.

  16. Evaluation of Selected Features for CAR Detection in Aerial Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuermer, S.; Leitloff, J.; Reinartz, P.; Stilla, U.

    2011-09-01

    The extraction of vehicles from aerial images provides a wide area traffic situation within a short time. Applications for the gathered data are various and reach from smart routing in the case of congestions to usability validation of roads in the case of disasters. The challenge of the vehicle detection task is finding adequate features which are capable to separate cars from other objects; especially those that look similar. We present an experiment where selected features show their ability of car detection. Precisely, Haar-like and HoG features are utilized and passed to the AdaBoost algorithm for calculating the final detector. Afterwards the classifying power of the features is accurately analyzed and evaluated. The tests a carried out on aerial data from the inner city of Munich, Germany and include small inner city roads with rooftops close by which raise the complexity factor.

  17. Deep Learning Approach for Car Detection in UAV Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassim Ammour

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an automatic solution to the problem of detecting and counting cars in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV images. This is a challenging task given the very high spatial resolution of UAV images (on the order of a few centimetres and the extremely high level of detail, which require suitable automatic analysis methods. Our proposed method begins by segmenting the input image into small homogeneous regions, which can be used as candidate locations for car detection. Next, a window is extracted around each region, and deep learning is used to mine highly descriptive features from these windows. We use a deep convolutional neural network (CNN system that is already pre-trained on huge auxiliary data as a feature extraction tool, combined with a linear support vector machine (SVM classifier to classify regions into “car” and “no-car” classes. The final step is devoted to a fine-tuning procedure which performs morphological dilation to smooth the detected regions and fill any holes. In addition, small isolated regions are analysed further using a few sliding rectangular windows to locate cars more accurately and remove false positives. To evaluate our method, experiments were conducted on a challenging set of real UAV images acquired over an urban area. The experimental results have proven that the proposed method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods, both in terms of accuracy and computational time.

  18. Hyperspectral imaging and characterization of live cells by broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy with singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Jasensky, Joshua; Price, Erika; Zhang, Chi; Boughton, Andrew; Han, Xiaofeng; Seeley, Emily; Liu, Xinran; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Chen, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy can be used as a powerful imaging technique to identify chemical compositions of complex samples in biology, biophysics, medicine, and materials science. In this work we developed a CARS microscopic system capable of hyperspectral imaging. By employing an ultrafast laser source, a photonic crystal fiber, and a scanning laser microscope together with spectral detection by a highly sensitive back-illuminated cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, we were able to rapidly acquire and process hyperspectral images of live cells with chemical selectivity. We discuss various aspects of hyperspectral CARS image analysis and demonstrate the use of singular value decomposition methods to characterize the cellular lipid content.

  19. Light Scattering based detection of food pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current methods for detecting foodborne pathogens are mostly destructive (i.e., samples need to be pretreated), and require time, personnel, and laboratories for analyses. Optical methods including light scattering based techniques have gained a lot of attention recently due to its their rapid a...

  20. Fiber-based optical parametric oscillator for high resolution coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschall, Thomas; Meyer, Tobias; Baumgartl, Martin; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-09-08

    Imaging based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) relies on the interaction of high peak-power, synchronized picosecond pulses with narrow bandwidths and a well-defined frequency difference. Recently a new type of fiber-based CARS laser source based on four-wave-mixing (FWM) has been developed. In order to enhance its spectral resolution and efficiency, a FWM based fiber optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) is proposed in this work. The source delivers 180 mW with 5.6 kW peak power for the CARS pump and 130 mW with 2.9 kW peak power for the Stokes signal. CARS resonances around 2850 and 2930 cm(-1) can be resolved with a resolution of 1 cm(-1) enabling high-contrast, spectrally resolved CARS imaging of biological tissue.

  1. Insights into Caco-2 cell culture structure using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Jukka; Sözeri, Erkan; Fraser-Miller, Sara J; Peltonen, Leena; Santos, Hélder A; Isomäki, Antti; Strachan, Clare J

    2017-05-15

    We have used coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel and rapid, label-free and non-destructive imaging method to gain structural insights into live intestinal epithelial cell cultures used for drug permeability testing. Specifically we have imaged live Caco-2 cells in (bio)pharmaceutically relevant conditions grown on membrane inserts. Imaging conditions were optimized, including evaluation of suitable membrane materials and media solutions, as well as tolerable laser powers for non-destructive imaging of the live cells. Lipid structures, in particular lipid droplets, were imaged within the cells on the insert membranes. The size of the individual lipid droplets increased substantially over the 21-day culturing period up to approximately 10% of the volume of the cross section of individual cells. Variation in lipid content has important implications for intestinal drug permeation testing during drug development but has received limited attention to date due to a lack of suitable analytical techniques. CARS microscopy was shown to be well suited for such analysis with the potential for in situ imaging of the same individual cell-cultures that are used for permeation studies. Overall, the method may be used to provide important information about cell monolayer structure to better understand drug permeation results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Femtosecond, fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) for simultaneous single-shot thermometry and detection of minor combustion species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Hans U.; Schmidt, Jacob B.; Richardson, Daniel R.; Roy, Sukesh; Wrzesinski, Paul J.; Gord, James R.

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved, fully resonant electronically enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (FREECARS) spectroscopy, incorporating a two-color ultraviolet excitation scheme, is used to demonstrate chemically selective and sensitive detection of gas-phase species, including nitric oxide (NO) and the hydroxyl (OH) radical. The observed time-dependent, spectrally resolved CARS signal contains rich structure that depends both on the rovibronic states accessed within the bandwidth of the initial (pump) excitation pulse and the Raman-active rovibrational levels within the vibrationally excited ground electronic state that are accessed following interaction with the second (Stokes) excitation pulse. By comparing experimental spectra to computational simulations, therefore, this approach also allows simultaneous determination of local temperature associated with the thermal distribution of initial states under singlelaser- shot conditions. For OH radical detected in a reacting flow, spectral resolution of the emitted FREE-CARS signal allows simultaneous single-shot detection of relative OH mole fraction and temperature in a laminar ethylene-air flame at 1-kHz repetition rates. By comparison to previously reported OH concentration and temperature measurements, we demonstrate excellent single-shot temperature accuracies ( 2% deviation from adiabatic flame temperature) and precisions ( 2% standard deviation), with simultaneous relative OH concentration measurements that demonstrate high detection sensitivity (100-300 ppm).

  3. Infrared-based facial points tracking and action units detection in context of car driving simulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zadeh Varcheie, Parisa Darvish; Chapdelaine, Claude; Gagnon, Langis

    2012-01-01

    .... Precise facial point tracking is crucial since it is a necessary step for AU detection. Here, we present our progress in FE analysis based on AU detection on face infrared videos in the context of a car driving simulator...

  4. Acoustic Inverse Scattering for Breast Cancer Microcalcification Detection. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    07-1-0640 TITLE: Acoustic Inverse Scattering for Breast Cancer Microcalcification Detection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matthew A. Lewis...Acoustic Inverse Scattering for Breast Cancer Microcalcification Detection 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d... Microcalcification detection is the hallmark of mammography as a breast cancer screening modality. For technical reasons, ultrasonic detection of all

  5. Temperature Measurements in Reacting Flows Using Time-Resolved Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (fs-CARS) Spectroscopy (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, Sukesh; Kinnius, Paul J; Lucht, Robert P; Gord, James R

    2007-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectroscopy of the nitrogen molecule is used for the measurement of temperature in atmospheric-pressure, near-adiabatic, hydrogen-air diffusion flames...

  6. A design of toxic gas detecting security robot car based on wireless path-patrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Ho-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because a toxic gas detecting/monitoring system in a chemical plant is not movable, a gas detecting/monitoring system will be passive and the detecting range will also be constrained. This invention is an active multi-functional wireless patrol car that can substitute for humans that inspect a plant's security. In addition, to widen the monitoring vision within the environment, two motors used to rotate a wireless IPCAM with two axes are presented. Also, to control the robot car's movement, two axis motors used to drive the wheel of the robot car are also installed. Additionally, a toxic gas detector is linked to the microcontroller of the patrol car. The detected concentration of the gas will be fed back to the server pc. To enhance the robot car's patrolling duration, a movable electrical power unit in conjunction with a wireless module is also used. Consequently, this paper introduces a wireless path-patrol and toxic gas detecting security robot car that can assure a plant's security and protect workers when toxic gases are emitted.

  7. Intelligent Smartphone based system for detecting speed bumps and reducing car speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daraghmi Yousef-Awwad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although speed bumps are used to force drivers reduce car speed for avoiding accidents, these bumps may cause car crash or accident when drivers do not notice them. Studies have proposed different methods to detect bumps and alert drivers. However, these methods have limitations and require modifications to enable accurate detection. Also these methods did not propose speed reduction approaches. Therefore, in this research, we propose a method that utilizes smartphone microelectronic mechanical technology for speed bump detection. The system uses the gravity sensor to detect the vertical vibration of cars passes over bumps and the GPS to determine the position of the bump. To give accurate detection results, data are collected from crowd, stored and processed on the cloud. The system also contains a speed reduction unit which is attached to the brake pedal and reduces the speed if a bump is detected. A small scale experiment showed that the system detected the position and the height of bumps with a very small error. The system also reduced the speed of cars at the moment they hit the bumps to a point that does not cause any harm to cars or passengers.

  8. Acoustic Inverse Scattering for Breast Cancer Microcalcification Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Acoustic Inverse Scattering for Breast Cancer Microcalcification Detection 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0640 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S... Microcalcification detection is the hallmark of mammography as a breast cancer screening modality. For technical reasons, ultrasonic detection of all... Cancer Microcalcification Detection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matthew A. Lewis, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Texas

  9. Car Detection from Low-Altitude UAV Imagery with the Faster R-CNN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzheng Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available UAV based traffic monitoring holds distinct advantages over traditional traffic sensors, such as loop detectors, as UAVs have higher mobility, wider field of view, and less impact on the observed traffic. For traffic monitoring from UAV images, the essential but challenging task is vehicle detection. This paper extends the framework of Faster R-CNN for car detection from low-altitude UAV imagery captured over signalized intersections. Experimental results show that Faster R-CNN can achieve promising car detection results compared with other methods. Our tests further demonstrate that Faster R-CNN is robust to illumination changes and cars’ in-plane rotation. Besides, the detection speed of Faster R-CNN is insensitive to the detection load, that is, the number of detected cars in a frame; therefore, the detection speed is almost constant for each frame. In addition, our tests show that Faster R-CNN holds great potential for parking lot car detection. This paper tries to guide the readers to choose the best vehicle detection framework according to their applications. Future research will be focusing on expanding the current framework to detect other transportation modes such as buses, trucks, motorcycles, and bicycles.

  10. Vehicle Plate Detection in Car Black Box Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongjin Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet services that share vehicle black box videos need a way to obfuscate license plates in uploaded videos because of privacy issues. Thus, plate detection is one of the critical functions that such services rely on. Even though various types of detection methods are available, they are not suitable for black box videos because no assumption about size, number of plates, and lighting conditions can be made. We propose a method to detect Korean vehicle plates from black box videos. It works in two stages: the first stage aims to locate a set of candidate plate regions and the second stage identifies only actual plates from candidates by using a support vector machine classifier. The first stage consists of five sequential substeps. At first, it produces candidate regions by combining single character areas and then eliminates candidate regions that fail to meet plate conditions through the remaining substeps. For the second stage, we propose a feature vector that captures the characteristics of plates in texture and color. For performance evaluation, we compiled our dataset which contains 2,627 positive and negative images. The evaluation results show that the proposed method improves accuracy and sensitivity by at least 5% and is 30 times faster compared with an existing method.

  11. Early detection of precancer using Polarized Light Scattering Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Rajan; Backman, Vadim; Itzkan, Irving; Dasari, Ramachandra; Perelman, Lev; Feld, Michael; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a light scattering technique to detect early pre-cancerous changes in the tissues which, line the epithelial surfaces of the body. The majority of cancers are epithelial in nature. We use light reflection spectroscopy to observe the earliest sign, the enlargement of the index of the cells which, line this layer. Our method is based on the feature that single scattering in the backward direction retains the polarization of the light incident on nucleus in the epithelial layer whereas multiple scattering destroys the polarization. Collecting the backscattering spectral intensities of both polarizations, and taking their difference, we extract the single scattering component. The signals are analyzed to extract the nuclear density, size and the relative refractive index. The experimental results will be presented to illustrate the physical basis of the technique, and its biological application.

  12. Nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates for explosives detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbaek; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a method for trace detection of explosives in the gas phase using novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy substrates. Novel substrates that produce an exceptionally large enhancement of the Raman effect were used to amplify the Raman signal of explosives molecu...

  13. Line grouping using perceptual saliency and structure prediction for car detection in traffic scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denasi, Sandra; Quaglia, Giorgio

    1993-08-01

    Autonomous and guide assisted vehicles make a heavy use of computer vision techniques to perceive the environment where they move. In this context, the European PROMETHEUS program is carrying on activities in order to develop autonomous vehicle monitoring that assists people to achieve safer driving. Car detection is one of the topics that are faced by the program. Our contribution proposes the development of this task in two stages: the localization of areas of interest and the formulation of object hypotheses. In particular, the present paper proposes a new approach that builds structural descriptions of objects from edge segmentations by using geometrical organization. This approach has been applied to the detection of cars in traffic scenes. We have analyzed images taken from a moving vehicle in order to formulate obstacle hypotheses: preliminary results confirm the efficiency of the method.

  14. Detection of partial polarization in Compton scattered photons

    CERN Document Server

    Curioni, A

    2003-01-01

    It has been recently proposed (Boggs, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 503 (2003) 562), to use polarization of Compton scattered gamma-rays to improve the imaging performance of Compton telescopes. Building upon that work, we detected the aforementioned polarization in a sample of 1.836 MeV gamma-rays from the LXeGRIT Compton telescope. Here we present the measurement, together with detector oriented considerations on the application of the principle to a realistic Compton telescope.

  15. Investigation of Optical Fibers for Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Spectroscopy in Reacting Flows (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed...CARS or a BOXCARS configuration (Eckbreth 1996; Roy et al. 2010). To achieve an accurate point measurement of temperature in a reacting flow, a high...CARS system using collinear geometry will be signifi- cantly lower than the BOXCARS geometry, and the tem- perature accuracy of the collinear CARS will

  16. Microscopie "CARS" (Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering). Génération du signal au voisinage d'interfaces et à l'intérieur d'une cavité Fabry-Perot.

    OpenAIRE

    Gachet, D

    2007-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (``CARS'') is a spectroscopic technique that gives access to intra-molecular vibrational information. It was first proposed as a contrast mechanism in microscopy in 1982, and was implemented under a convenient colinear configuration in 1999. Since then, the signal generation in CARS microscopy has been studied in the litterature on some simple configurations. In this PhD dissertation, we extend the CARS signal generation study in isotropic media using a f...

  17. Influence of low concentrations of scatterers and signal detection time on the results of their measurements using dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkin, N. F.; Shkirin, A. V.; Suyazov, N. V.; Chaikov, L. L.; Chirikov, S. N.; Kirichenko, M. N.; Nikiforov, S. D.; Tymper, S. I.

    2017-11-01

    The influence of limited detection time on the form of the autocorrelation function (ACF) has been analysed for measurements in low-concentration suspensions by dynamic light scattering with allowance for the spatial distribution of the laser beam intensity. The general view of the ACF of the scattered light intensity is obtained for a Gaussian beam and a finite measurement time. The results of the theoretical analysis are compared with the experimental data and the results obtained by computer simulation of the scattering from an ensemble of particles involved in Brownian motion in a Gaussian beam. It is shown that, in the case of low suspension concentrations, the ACF distortions related to finite detection time lead to underestimation of the particle sizes and occurrence of an artefact peak in the distribution of the scattered light intensity over scatterer sizes. An empirical dependence of the measured size of particles on their number in the scattering volume is found.

  18. Detection of microsleep events in a car driving simulation study using electrocardiographic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenis Gustavo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microsleep events (MSE are short intrusions of sleep under the demand of sustained attention. They can impose a major threat to safety while driving a car and are considered one of the most significant causes of traffic accidents. Driver’s fatigue and MSE account for up to 20% of all car crashes in Europe and at least 100,000 accidents in the US every year. Unfortunately, there is not a standardized test developed to quantify the degree of vigilance of a driver. To account for this problem, different approaches based on biosignal analysis have been studied in the past. In this paper, we investigate an electrocardiographic-based detection of MSE using morphological and rhythmical features. 14 records from a car driving simulation study with a high incidence of MSE were analyzed and the behavior of the ECG features before and after an MSE in relation to reference baseline values (without drowsiness were investigated. The results show that MSE cannot be detected (or predicted using only the ECG. However, in the presence of MSE, the rhythmical and morphological features were observed to be significantly different than the ones calculated for the reference signal without sleepiness. In particular, when MSE were present, the heart rate diminished while the heart rate variability increased. Time distances between P wave and R peak, and R peak and T wave and their dispersion increased also. This demonstrates a noticeable change of the autonomous regulation of the heart. In future, the ECG parameter could be used as a surrogate measure of fatigue.

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  20. A Method for Detecting Damage of Traffic Marks by Half Celestial Camera Attached to Cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takafumi Kawasaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Roads are becoming deterioration in everywhere. In some places, traffic marks painted on roads are damaged thus needed to be updated. Municipalities must manage road condition and traffic marks (road painting. It is the municipalities task to manage those roads using, for example, special inspection cars and human eyes. However, the management cost is high if a city contains many roads. This paper proposes a mechanism that automates this management. Our idea is to leverage cameras attached to garbage trucks, which run through the entire city almost everyday. The mechanism collects road images and detects damaged traffic marks using an image recognition algorithm. This paper shows the algorithm and reports the benchmark results. The benchmark showed that the mechanism can detect the damaged traffic marks with 76.6% precision.

  1. Implementation of a Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) System on a Ti:Sapphire and OPO Laser Based Standard Laser Scanning Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytskaniuk, Vasyl; Bardin, Fabrice; Boukhaddaoui, Hassan; Rigneault, Herve; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-07-17

    Laser scanning microscopes combining a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to duplicate the laser line have become available for biologists. These systems are primarily designed for multi-channel two-photon fluorescence microscopy. However, without any modification, complementary non-linear optical microscopy such as second-harmonic generation (SHG) or third harmonic generation (THG) can also be performed with this set-up, allowing label-free imaging of structured molecules or aqueous medium-lipid interfaces. These techniques are well suited for in-vivo observation, but are limited in chemical specificity. Chemically selective imaging can be obtained from inherent vibration signals based on Raman scattering. Confocal Raman microscopy provides 3D spatial resolution, but it requires high average power and long acquisition time. To overcome these difficulties, recent advances in laser technology have permitted the development of nonlinear optical vibrational microscopy, in particular coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). CARS microscopy has therefore emerged as a powerful tool for biological and live cell imaging, by chemically mapping lipids (via C-H stretch vibration), water (via O-H stretch vibrations), proteins or DNA. In this work, we describe the implementation of the CARS technique on a standard OPO-coupled multiphoton laser scanning microscope. It is based on the in-time synchronization of the two laser lines by adjusting the length of one of the laser beam path. We present a step-by-step implementation of this technique on an existing multiphoton system. A basic background in experimental optics is helpful and the presented system does not require expensive supplementary equipment. We also illustrate CARS imaging obtained on myelin sheaths of sciatic nerve of rodent, and we show that this imaging can be performed simultaneously with other nonlinear optical imaging, such as standard two-photon fluorescence technique

  2. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  3. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  4. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  5. Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

    2012-03-22

    The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

  6. Coherent and Incoherent Neutral Current Scattering for Supernova Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Divari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The total cross sections as well as the neutrino event rates are calculated in the neutral current neutrino scattering off 40Ar and 132Xe isotopes at neutrino energies (Ev<100 MeV. The individual contribution coming from coherent and incoherent channels is taking into account. An enhancement of the neutral current component is achieved via the coherent (0gs+→0gs+ channel which is dominant with respect to incoherent (0gs+→Jf one. The response of the above isotopes as a supernova neutrino detection has been considered, assuming a two parameter Fermi-Dirac distribution for the supernova neutrino energy spectra. The calculated total cross sections are tested on a gaseous spherical TPC detector dedicated for supernova neutrino detection.

  7. Fly Eye radar: detection through high scattered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanov, Pavlo; Gorwara, Ashok

    2017-05-01

    Longer radio frequency waves better penetrating through high scattered media than millimeter waves, but imaging resolution limited by diffraction at longer wavelength. Same time frequency and amplitudes of diffracted waves (frequency domain measurement) provides information of object. Phase shift of diffracted waves (phase front in time domain) consists information about shape of object and can be applied for reconstruction of object shape or even image by recording of multi-frequency digital hologram. Spectrum signature or refracted waves allows identify the object content. Application of monopulse method with overlap closely spaced antenna patterns provides high accuracy measurement of amplitude, phase, and direction to signal source. Digitizing of received signals separately in each antenna relative to processor time provides phase/frequency independence. Fly eye non-scanning multi-frequency radar system provides simultaneous continuous observation of multiple targets and wide possibilities for stepped frequency, simultaneous frequency, chaotic frequency sweeping waveform (CFS), polarization modulation for reliable object detection. Proposed c-band fly eye radar demonstrated human detection through 40 cm concrete brick wall with human and wall material spectrum signatures and can be applied for through wall human detection, landmines, improvised explosive devices detection, underground or camouflaged object imaging.

  8. In-line balanced detection stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Crisafi, Francesco

    2017-08-31

    We introduce a novel configuration for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, called In-line Balanced Detection (IBD), which employs a birefringent plate to generate a time-delayed polarization-multiplexed collinear replica of the probe, acting as a reference. Probe and reference cross the sample at the same position, thus maintaining their balance during image acquisition. IBD can be implemented in any conventional SRS setup, by adding a few simple elements, bringing its sensitivity close to the shot-noise limit even with a noisy laser. We tested IBD with a fiber-format laser system and observed signal-to-noise ratio improvement by up to 30 dB.

  9. An angle-sensitive detection system for scattered heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Ganz, R E; Bär, R; Bethge, Klaus; Bokemeyer, H; Folger, H; Samek, M; Salabura, P; Schwalm, D; Stiebing, K E

    1999-01-01

    A compact detection system for heavy ions scattered in collisions at the Coulomb barrier is presented. This system, consisting of four identical, low-pressure Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) modules with two sensitive layers each, was built to operate in an ultra-high-vacuum environment inside the EPoS II solenoid spectrometer at GSI Darmstadt. The detector covers polar angles between 20 deg. and 70 deg. with respect to the beam axis, and about 80% of 2 pi in azimuthal angle. Segmented cathodes and a delay-line read-out allow for a determination of both angles with a precision of delta THETA approx 0.7 deg. in polar and delta PHI approx 1.5 deg. in azimuthal angle, respectively. The system has been proven to be capable of handling instantaneous rates of up to 5x10 sup 5 detected ions per second per module. It neither exhibits the degradation of detection efficiency nor loss in resolution over a 500 h period of a 6 MeV/u sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U+ sup 1 sup 8 sup 1 Ta measurement at average luminosities of 8...

  10. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) as a Probe for Supersonic Hydrogen-Fuel/Air Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, P. M.; O'Byrne, S.; Cutler, A. D.; Rodriguez, C. G.

    2003-01-01

    The dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method was used to measure temperature and the absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in a supersonic non-reacting fuel-air mixing experiment. Experiments were conducted in NASA Langley Research Center s Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility. Under normal operation of this facility, hydrogen and air burn to increase the enthalpy of the test gas and O2 is added to simulate air. This gas is expanded through a Mach 2 nozzle and into a combustor model where fuel is then injected, mixes and burns. In the present experiment the O2 of the test gas is replaced by N2. The lack of oxidizer inhibited combustion of the injected H2 fuel jet allowing the fuel/air mixing process to be studied. CARS measurements were performed 427 mm downstream of the nozzle exit and 260 mm downstream of the fuel injector. Maps were obtained of the mean temperature, as well as the N2, O2 and H2 mean mole fraction fields. A map of mean H2O vapor mole fraction was also inferred from these measurements. Correlations between different measured parameters and their fluctuations are presented. The CARS measurements are compared with a preliminary computational prediction of the flow.

  11. High Sensitivity Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection of Tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandakkathara, Archana

    Raman spectroscopy has the capability of providing detailed information about molecular structure, but the extremely small cross section of Raman scattering prevents this technique from applications requiring high sensitivity. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on the other hand provides strongly increased Raman signal from molecules attached to metallic nanostructures. SERS is thus a promising technique for high sensitivity analytical applications. One particular area of interest is the application of such techniques for the analysis of the composition of biological cells. However, there are issues which have to be addressed in order to make SERS a reliable technique such as the optimization of conditions for any given analyte, understanding the kinetic processes of binding of the target molecules to the nanostructures and understanding the evolution and coagulation of the nanostructures, in the case of colloidal solutions. The latter processes introduce a delay time for the observation of maximum enhancement factors which must be taken into account for any given implementation of SERS. In the present thesis the goal was to develop very sensitive SERS techniques for the measurement of biomolecules of interest for analysis of the contents of cells. The techniques explored could be eventually be applicable to microfluidic systems with the ultimate goal of analyzing the molecular constituents of single cells. SERS study of different amino acids and organic dyes were performed during the course of this thesis. A high sensitivity detection system based on SERS has been developed and spectrum from tryptophan (Trp) amino acid at very low concentration (10-8 M) has been detected. The concentration at which good quality SERS spectra could be detected from Trp is 4 orders of magnitude smaller than that previously reported in literature. It has shown that at such low concentrations the SERS spectra of Trp are qualitatively distinct from the spectra commonly reported in

  12. Automated detection of satellite contamination in incoherent scatter radar spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porteous

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous ion line spectra have been identified in many experiments. Such spectra are defined as deviations from the standard symmetric "double-humped" spectra derived from incoherent scatter radar echoes from the upper atmosphere. Some anomalous spectra – where there are sharp enhancements of power over restricted height ranges – have been attributed to satellite contamination in the beam path. Here we outline a method for detecting such contamination, and review in detail a few cases where the method enables the identification of anomalous spectra as satellite echoes, subsequently ascribed to specific orbital objects. The methods used here to identify such satellites provide a useful way of distinguishing anomalous spectra due to satellites from those of geophysical origin. Analysis of EISCAT Svalbard Radar data reveals that an average of 8 satellites per hour are found to cross the beam. Based on a relatively small sample of the data set, it appears that at least half of the occurrences of anomalous spectra are caused by satellite contamination rather than being of geophysical origin.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere, instruments and techniques – Radio Science (signal processing

  13. Condensation nucleation light scattering detection for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostek, B; Koropchak, J A

    1996-09-01

    We describe two means for interfacing condensation nucleation light scattering detection to capillary electrophoresis (CE). With the first method, a fused-silica capillary was used for the separation and the CE was grounded through a Nafion membrane that also connected the system to a microconcentric pneumatic nebulizer. Limits of detection (LODs) for underivatized amino acids were at the low microgram per milliliter level, and separation efficiencies were ∼9 times lower than the optimum predicted for these species based on the injection plug width and axial dispersion by diffusion. LODs were limited by background nonvolatiles resulting from dissolution of fused silica at the high pHs used for the separations. An alternate system employed PEEK capillaries which acted as the separation capillary and also as the inner nebulizer capillary. In this case, the exit end of the capillary was coated with conductive paint which extended to the tip of the nebulizer, was in contact with the CE buffer, and was grounded to complete the CE circuit. Response was nonlinear and the separation efficiency of this system was somewhat lower than that for the Nafion membrane system. Response as peak heights for all of the amino acids and peptides studied was nearly identical on a mass basis. With this system, much lower background signals were obtained, and as a result, LODs for underivatized amino acids and peptides were below the 1 μg/mL level, corresponding to less than 10 pg or less than 100 fmol injected. Both systems were fairly simple, effective means to generate aerosols with the low flows of CE and should be applicable to interfacing of other aerosol-based detectors with CE.

  14. Evans blue dye-enhanced imaging of the brain microvessels using spectral focusing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Ram Lee

    Full Text Available We performed dye-enhanced imaging of mouse brain microvessels using spectral focusing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SF-CARS microscopy. The resonant signals from C-H stretching in forward CARS usually show high background intensity in tissues, which makes CARS imaging of microvessels difficult. In this study, epi-detection of back-scattered SF-CARS signals showed a negligible background, but the overall intensity of resonant CARS signals was too low to observe the network of brain microvessels. Therefore, Evans blue (EB dye was used as contrasting agent to enhance the back-scattered SF-CARS signals. Breakdown of brain microvessels by inducing hemorrhage in a mouse was clearly visualized using backward SF-CARS signals, following intravenous injection of EB. The improved visualization of brain microvessels with EB enhanced the sensitivity of SF-CARS, detecting not only the blood vessels themselves but their integrity as well in the brain vasculature.

  15. Vital Sign Monitoring and Mobile Phone Usage Detection Using IR-UWB Radar for Intended Use in Car Crash Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Seong Kyu; Khan, Faheem; Cho, Sung Ho

    2017-05-30

    In order to avoid car crashes, active safety systems are becoming more and more important. Many crashes are caused due to driver drowsiness or mobile phone usage. Detecting the drowsiness of the driver is very important for the safety of a car. Monitoring of vital signs such as respiration rate and heart rate is important to determine the occurrence of driver drowsiness. In this paper, robust vital signs monitoring through impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar is discussed. We propose a new algorithm that can estimate the vital signs even if there is motion caused by the driving activities. We analyzed the whole fast time vital detection region and found the signals at those fast time locations that have useful information related to the vital signals. We segmented those signals into sub-signals and then constructed the desired vital signal using the correlation method. In this way, the vital signs of the driver can be monitored noninvasively, which can be used by researchers to detect the drowsiness of the driver which is related to the vital signs i.e., respiration and heart rate. In addition, texting on a mobile phone during driving may cause visual, manual or cognitive distraction of the driver. In order to reduce accidents caused by a distracted driver, we proposed an algorithm that can detect perfectly a driver's mobile phone usage even if there are various motions of the driver in the car or changes in background objects. These novel techniques, which monitor vital signs associated with drowsiness and detect phone usage before a driver makes a mistake, may be very helpful in developing techniques for preventing a car crash.

  16. Vital Sign Monitoring and Mobile Phone Usage Detection Using IR-UWB Radar for Intended Use in Car Crash Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Kyu Leem

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to avoid car crashes, active safety systems are becoming more and more important. Many crashes are caused due to driver drowsiness or mobile phone usage. Detecting the drowsiness of the driver is very important for the safety of a car. Monitoring of vital signs such as respiration rate and heart rate is important to determine the occurrence of driver drowsiness. In this paper, robust vital signs monitoring through impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB radar is discussed. We propose a new algorithm that can estimate the vital signs even if there is motion caused by the driving activities. We analyzed the whole fast time vital detection region and found the signals at those fast time locations that have useful information related to the vital signals. We segmented those signals into sub-signals and then constructed the desired vital signal using the correlation method. In this way, the vital signs of the driver can be monitored noninvasively, which can be used by researchers to detect the drowsiness of the driver which is related to the vital signs i.e., respiration and heart rate. In addition, texting on a mobile phone during driving may cause visual, manual or cognitive distraction of the driver. In order to reduce accidents caused by a distracted driver, we proposed an algorithm that can detect perfectly a driver's mobile phone usage even if there are various motions of the driver in the car or changes in background objects. These novel techniques, which monitor vital signs associated with drowsiness and detect phone usage before a driver makes a mistake, may be very helpful in developing techniques for preventing a car crash.

  17. Single Molecule Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Wang, Yang; Kneipp, Harald; Perelman, Lev T.; Itzkan, Irving; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    1997-03-01

    By exploiting the extremely large effective cross sections ( 10-17-10-16 cm2/molecule) available from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), we achieved the first observation of single molecule Raman scattering. Measured spectra of a single crystal violet molecule in aqueous colloidal silver solution using one second collection time and about 2×105 W/cm2 nonresonant near-infrared excitation show a clear ``fingerprint'' of its Raman features between 700 and 1700 cm-1. Spectra observed in a time sequence for an average of 0.6 dye molecule in the probed volume exhibited the expected Poisson distribution for actually measuring 0, 1, 2, or 3 molecules.

  18. Coherent detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering for distributed temperature sensing using a Brillouin laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoeuche, V.; Webb, David J.; Pannell, Christopher N.; Jackson, David A.

    1998-08-01

    Distributed temperature sensors based on Brillouin scattering are attractive because they offer very large sensing length. The intensity of spontaneous Brillouin scattering is directly proportional to the temperature of the fiber, and permits a measurement independent of the strain applied to it. We report on a novel system to detect this signal, incorporating a mode-locked Brillouin fiber ring laser.

  19. Detection of microsleep events in a car driving simulation study using electrocardiographic features

    OpenAIRE

    Lenis Gustavo; Reichensperger Patrick; Sommer David; Heinze Christian; Golz Martin; Dössel Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Microsleep events (MSE) are short intrusions of sleep under the demand of sustained attention. They can impose a major threat to safety while driving a car and are considered one of the most significant causes of traffic accidents. Driver’s fatigue and MSE account for up to 20% of all car crashes in Europe and at least 100,000 accidents in the US every year. Unfortunately, there is not a standardized test developed to quantify the degree of vigilance of a driver. To account for this problem, ...

  20. Sector-Based Detection for Hands-Free Speech Enhancement in Cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourgeois Julien

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation control of beamforming interference cancellation techniques is investigated for in-car speech acquisition. Two efficient adaptation control methods are proposed that avoid target cancellation. The "implicit" method varies the step-size continuously, based on the filtered output signal. The "explicit" method decides in a binary manner whether to adapt or not, based on a novel estimate of target and interference energies. It estimates the average delay-sum power within a volume of space, for the same cost as the classical delay-sum. Experiments on real in-car data validate both methods, including a case with km/h background road noise.

  1. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy in Caenorhabditis elegans and Globodera pallida: evidence for an ivermectin-activated decrease in lipid stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smus, Justyna P; Ludlow, Elizabeth; Dallière, Nicolas; Luedtke, Sarah; Monfort, Tual; Lilley, Catherine; Urwin, Peter; Walker, Robert J; O'Connor, Vincent; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2017-12-01

    Macrocyclic lactones are arguably the most successful chemical class with efficacy against parasitic nematodes. Here we investigated the effect of the macrocyclic lactone ivermectin on lipid homeostasis in the plant parasitic nematode Globodera pallida and provide new insight into its mode of action. A non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free and chemically selective technique called Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy was used to study lipid stores in G. pallida. We optimised the protocol using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and then used CARS to quantify lipid stores in the pre-parasitic, non-feeding J2 stage of G. pallida. This revealed a concentration of lipid stores in the posterior region of J2 s within 24 h of hatching which decreased to undetectable levels over the course of 28 days. We tested the effect of ivermectin on J2 viability and lipid stores. Within 24 h, ivermectin paralysed J2 s. Counterintuitively, over the same time-course ivermectin increased the rate of depletion of J2 lipid, suggesting that in ivermectin-treated J2 s there is a disconnection between the energy requirements for motility and metabolic rate. This decrease in lipid stores would be predicted to negatively impact on J2 infective potential. These data suggest that the benefit of macrocyclic lactones as seed treatments may be underpinned by a multilevel effect involving both neuromuscular inhibition and acceleration of lipid metabolism. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Enzyme catalytic resonance scattering spectral detection of trace ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogen peroxide oxidized guaiacol to form tetramer particles that exhibited a strong resonance scattering (RS) peak at 530 nm in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in citric acid-Na2HPO4 buffer solution of pH 4.4. The RS peak increased when the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased. The increased ...

  3. Foreign body detection in food materials using compton scattered x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Nigel James Bruce

    This thesis investigated the application of X-ray Compton scattering to the problem of foreign body detection in food. The methods used were analytical modelling, simulation and experiment. A criterion was defined for detectability, and a model was developed for predicting the minimum time required for detection. The model was used to predict the smallest detectable cubes of air, glass, plastic and steel. Simulations and experiments were performed on voids and glass in polystyrene phantoms, water, coffee and muesli. Backscatter was used to detect bones in chicken meat. The effects of geometry and multiple scatter on contrast, signal-to-noise, and detection time were simulated. Compton scatter was compared with transmission, and the effect of inhomogeneity was modelled. Spectral shape was investigated as a means of foreign body detection. A signal-to-noise ratio of 7.4 was required for foreign body detection in food. A 0.46 cm cube of glass or a 1.19 cm cube of polystyrene were detectable in a 10 cm cube of water in one second. The minimum time to scan a whole sample varied as the 7th power of the foreign body size, and the 5th power of the sample size. Compton scatter inspection produced higher contrasts than transmission, but required longer measurement times because of the low number of photon counts. Compton scatter inspection of whole samples was very slow compared to production line speeds in the food industry. There was potential for Compton scatter in applications which did not require whole-sample scanning, such as surface inspection. There was also potential in the inspection of inhomogeneous samples. The multiple scatter fraction varied from 25% to 55% for 2 to 10 cm cubes of water, but did not have a large effect on the detection time. The spectral shape gave good contrasts and signal-to-noise ratios in the detection of chicken bones.

  4. Single Molecule Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneipp, K.; Wang, Y.; Kneipp, H.; Perelman, L.T.; Itzkan, I.; Dasari, R.R.; Feld, M.S. [George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Technical University of Berlin, D 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    By exploiting the extremely large effective cross sections (10{sup -17}{endash}10{sup -16}cm{sup 2}/molecule) available from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), we achieved the first observation of single molecule Raman scattering. Measured spectra of a single crystal violet molecule in aqueous colloidal silver solution using one second collection time and about 2{times}10{sup 5}W/cm{sup 2} nonresonant near-infrared excitation show a clear {open_quotes}fingerprint{close_quotes} of its Raman features between 700 and 1700cm{sup -1}. Spectra observed in a time sequence for an average of 0.6 dye molecule in the probed volume exhibited the expected Poisson distribution for actually measuring 0, 1, 2, or 3 molecules. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Radiography by selective detection of scatter field velocity components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A reconfigurable collimated radiation detector, system and related method includes at least one collimated radiation detector. The detector has an adjustable collimator assembly including at least one feature, such as a fin, optically coupled thereto. Adjustments to the adjustable collimator selects particular directions of travel of scattered radiation emitted from an irradiated object which reach the detector. The collimated detector is preferably a collimated detector array, where the collimators are independently adjustable. The independent motion capability provides the capability to focus the image by selection of the desired scatter field components. When an array of reconfigurable collimated detectors is provided, separate image data can be obtained from each of the detectors and the respective images cross-correlated and combined to form an enhanced image.

  6. Neutralino Inelastic Scattering with Subsequent Detection of Nuclear Gamma Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, J; Vogel, P

    1999-01-01

    We consider the potential benefits of searching for supersymmetric dark-matter through its inelastic excitation, via the "scalar current", of low-lying collective nuclear states in a detector. If such states live long enough so that the gamma radiation from their decay can be separated from the signal due to nuclear recoil, then background can be dramatically reduced. We show how the kinematics of neutralino-nucleus scattering is modified when the nucleus is excited and derive expressions for...

  7. Detection of inverse Compton scattering in plasma wakefield experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlen, Simon

    2016-12-15

    Inverse Compton scattering (ICS) is the process of scattering of photons and electrons, where the photons gain a part of the electrons energy. In combination with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWA), ICS offers a compact MeV γ-ray source. A numerical study of ICS radiation produced in PWA experiments at FLASHForward was performed, using an ICS simulation code and the results from particle-in-cell modelling. The possibility of determining electron beam properties from measurements of the γ-ray source was explored for a wide range of experimental conditions. It was found that information about the electron divergence, the electron spectrum and longitudinal information can be obtained from measurements of the ICS beams for some cases. For the measurement of the ICS profile at FLASHForward, a CsI(Tl) scintillator array was chosen, similar to scintillators used in other ICS experiments. To find a suitable detector for spectrum measurements, an experimental test of a Compton spectrometer at the RAL was conducted. This test showed that a similar spectrometer could also be used at FLASHForward. However, changes to the spectrometer could be needed in order to use the pair production effect. In addition, further studies using Geant4 could lead to a better reconstruction of the obtained data. The studies presented here show that ICS is a promising method to analyse electron parameters from PWA experiments in further detail.

  8. Pedestrian and car detection and classification for unmanned ground vehicle using 3D lidar and monocular camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kuk; Baeg, Seung-Ho; Lee, Kimin; Lee, Hae Seok; Park, SangDeok

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes an object detection and classification method for an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) using a range sensor and an image sensor. The range sensor and the image sensor are a 3D Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) sensor and a monocular camera, respectively. For safe driving of the UGV, pedestrians and cars should be detected on their moving routes of the vehicle. An object detection and classification techniques based on only a camera has an inherent problem. On the view point of detection with a camera, a certain algorithm should extract features and compare them with full input image data. The input image has a lot of information as object and environment. It is hard to make a decision of the classification. The image should have only one reliable object information to solve the problem. In this paper, we introduce a developed 3D LIDAR sensor and apply a fusion method both 3D LIDAR data and camera data. We describe a 3D LIDAR sensor which is developed by LG Innotek Consortium in Korea, named KIDAR-B25. The 3D LIDAR sensor detects objects, determines the object's Region of Interest (ROI) based on 3D information and sends it into a camera region for classification. In the 3D LIDAR domain, we recognize breakpoints using Kalman filter and then make a cluster using a line segment method to determine an object's ROI. In the image domain, we extract the object's feature data from the ROI region using a Haar-like feature method. Finally it is classified as a pedestrian or car using a trained database with an Adaboost algorithm. To verify our system, we make an experiment on the performance of our system which is mounted on a ground vehicle, through field tests in an urban area.

  9. New developments in clinical CARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; Darvin, Maxim; Lademann, Juergen; König, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    We combined two-photon fluorescence and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging in a clinical hybrid multiphoton tomograph for in vivo imaging of human skin. The clinically approved TPEF/CARS system provides simultaneous imaging of endogenous fluorophores and non-fluorescent lipids. The Stokes laser for the two-beam configuration of CARS is based on spectral broadening of femtosecond laser pulses in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We report on the highly flexible medical TPEF/CARS tomograph MPTflex®-CARS with an articulated arm and first in vivo measurements on human skin.

  10. Optimized signal-to-noise ratio with shot noise limited detection in Stimulated Raman Scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moester, M.J.B.; Ariese, F.; de Boer, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe our set-up for Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy with shot noise limited detection for a broad window of biologically relevant laser powers. This set-up is used to demonstrate that the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SRS with shot noise limited detection is achieved

  11. Two-channel microfluidic CARS: experimental quantification of pure vibrational contrast in CARS images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, G.; Henkel, T.; Akimov, D.; Dietzek, B.; Schlücker, S.; Bartelt, H.; Popp, J.

    2011-07-01

    The combination of linear and nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy has been established to be a powerful tool for biomedical diagnostics. In this contribution we discuss our recent approaches towards CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering) based quantification of analytes, which is generally complicated by the CARS-signal strength dependence on the square of the molecular concentration and on the interplay between a molecular-specific vibrational signal and a nonresonant contribution in the signal generation. Due to these complications the quantification of analytes presents a major challenge in CARS microscopy. Here we discuss two recently developed approaches, i.e. on the one hand a simplified setup for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, which allows for recording CARS images with 30 cm-1 excitation bandwidth for probing Raman bands between 500 and 900 cm-1 with minimal requirements for alignment. This experimental arrangement is based on electronic switching between CARS images recorded at different Raman resonances by combining a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as broad-band light source and an acoustooptical programmable dispersive filter (AOPDF) as tunable wavelength filter. On the other hand, we discuss how the introduction of carbon-deuterium (C-D) bonds into drug compounds constitutes a non-invasive labeling approach that allows for higher intrinsic CARS contrast to be obtained. The quantitative detection of C-deuterated drugs by Raman microspectroscopy and CARS microscopy is examined. Concentration-dependent studies on drugs with aliphatic and aromatic C-D moieties were performed in a two-channel microfluidic chip, using the corresponding non-deuterated (C-H) isotopomers as an internal reference.

  12. Detection of early cancer and precancer with scattered light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, Lev T.; Backman, Vadim

    2001-05-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Over 85% of all cancers, such as colorectal, esophageal, bladder, cervical, and oral cancers, originate in the epithelial linings of the body and are readily curable if diagnosed at an early stage. However, many forms of precancerous epithelial lesions are difficult to detect and diagnose using current methods.

  13. Forward scatter radar for detection of moving people inside buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, J.J.M. de; Rossum, W.L. van

    2017-01-01

    Through-wall radar offers capabilities that allow an important contribution to inside-building awareness, such as target detection and tracking. However, reliable radar tracking of people inside a building is not a trivial task. In monostatic operation, radar measures the backscatter from people

  14. Distributed fiber temperature and strain sensor using coherent radio-frequency detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jihong; Staines, Sean; Blake, Mike; Jiang, Shibin

    2007-08-01

    A novel technique that enables coherent detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering in the radio-frequency (<500 MHz) region with excellent long-term stability has been demonstrated for distributed measurements of temperature and strain in long fiber. An actively stabilized single-frequency Brillouin fiber laser with extremely low phase noise and intensity noise is used as a well-defined, frequency-shifted local oscillator for the heterodyne detection, yielding measurements of spontaneous Brillouin scattering with high frequency stability. Based on this approach, a highly stable real-time fiber sensor for distributed measurements of both temperature and strain over long fiber has been developed utilizing advanced digital signal processing techniques.

  15. Light-scattering detection of phospholipids resolved by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descalzo, A M; Insani, E M; Pensel, N A

    2003-09-01

    An improved method for the analysis of phospholipids by normal-phase HPLC is described. Addition of methanol and acetonitrile to a gradient based on 2-propanol/hexane/water promoted a rapid separation of major classes of bovine surfactant phospholipids (PL) by using a conventional silica column. The use of an ELSD permitted an accurate analysis of a mixture of PL. Calibration curves were linear within the range of 5-40 microg with detection limits below 1 microg for PE and PC, and CV ranged from 0.6 to 9.6%. PL present in surfactant homogenates were separated by a solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure before HPLC analysis. This methodology gave a recovery of 95% and combined SPE-HPLC and quantification of biological PL within a 30-min run. The use of ELSD detection of the eluted compounds was precise, linear, and sensitive.

  16. Vibrational phase contrast CARS microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a new technique that improves specificity, selectivity and sensitivity in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. CARS microscopy is a nonlinear optical technique that utilizes specific bonds of molecules, sometimes referred to as the `fingerprint' of a

  17. Design of an intelligent car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yongyi

    2017-03-01

    The design of simple intelligent car, using AT89S52 single chip microcomputer as the car detection and control core; The metal sensor TL - Q5MC induction to iron, to detect the way to send feedback to the signal of single chip microcomputer, make SCM according to the scheduled work mode to control the car in the area according to the predetermined speed, and the operation mode of the microcontroller choose different also can control the car driving along s-shaped iron; Use A44E hall element to detect the car speeds; Adopts 1602 LCD display time of car driving, driving the car to stop, take turns to show the car driving time, distance, average speed and the speed of time. This design has simple structure and is easy to implement, but are highly intelligent, humane, to a certain extent reflects the intelligence.

  18. A Survey of the Scattering Characteristics and Detection of Aircraft Wake Vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianbing

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft wake vortex is a pair of strong counter-rotating vortices and has attracted considerable attention in various fields including aviation safety and atmospheric physics. The characteristics and detection of wake vortex act as the basis for both behavior prediction as well as hazard assessment. This paper provides a short survey of the characteristics and detection researches. Initially, the wake vortex is classified as clear-air wake vortex (i.e., wake turbulence and contrail and precipitation wake vortex (i.e., under rainy, foggy or snowy condition. Subsequently, the dynamics and scattering are introduced, and the main verdicts are: the radar (radio detection and ranging scattering of wake vortex is relatively weak under clear air conditions, but the Lidar (Light detection and ranging scattering is appreciable owing to the presence of particles such as aerosols. Wake vortices under precipitation conditions and contrails possess relatively good radar reflectivity owing the strong scattering characteristics of precipitation droplets and ice crystals. Furthermore, we have introduced a joint detection scheme of Lidar and radar for wake vortex along with parameter-retrieval algorithms. Finally, we have presented our conclusions and intended future research.

  19. Signatures of Earth-scattering in the direct detection of Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavanagh, Bradley J.; Catena, Riccardo; Kouvaris, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Direct detection experiments search for the interactions of Dark Matter (DM) particles with nuclei in terrestrial detectors. But if these interactions are sufficiently strong, DM particles may scatter in the Earth, affecting their distribution in the lab. We present a new analytic calculation...

  20. Evaluation of back scatter interferometry, a method for detecting protein binding in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, S. T.; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Zong, Weiyong

    2015-01-01

    Back Scatter Interferometry (BSI) has been proposed to be a highly sensitive and versatile refractive index sensor usable for analytical detection of biomarker and protein interactions in solution. However the existing literature on BSI lacks a physical explanation of why protein interactions...

  1. A random matrix approach to detect defects in a strongly scattering polycrystal: How the memory effect can help overcome multiple scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahan, S.; Aubry, A.; Rupin, F.; Chassignole, B.; Derode, A.

    2014-06-01

    We report on ultrasonic imaging in a random heterogeneous medium. The goal is to detect flaws embedded deeply into a polycrystalline material. A 64-element array of piezoelectric transmitters/receivers at a central frequency of 5 MHz is used to capture the Green's matrix in a backscattering configuration. Because of multiple scattering, conventional imaging completely fails to detect the deepest flaws. We utilize a random matrix approach, taking advantage of the deterministic coherence of the backscattered wave-field which is characteristic of single scattering and related to the memory effect. This allows us to separate single and multiple scattering contributions. As a consequence, we show that flaws are detected beyond the conventional limit, as if multiple scattering had been overcome.

  2. Dual wavelength multiple-angle light scattering system for cryptosporidium detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaprathoom, S.; Pedley, S.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2012-06-01

    A simple, dual wavelength, multiple-angle, light scattering system has been developed for detecting cryptosporidium suspended in water. Cryptosporidium is a coccidial protozoan parasite causing cryptosporidiosis; a diarrheal disease of varying severity. The parasite is transmitted by ingestion of contaminated water, particularly drinking-water, but also accidental ingestion of bathing-water, including swimming pools. It is therefore important to be able to detect these parasites quickly, so that remedial action can be taken to reduce the risk of infection. The proposed system combines multiple-angle scattering detection of a single and two wavelengths, to collect relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering phase functions from tested suspension, and multivariate data analysis techniques to obtain characterizing information of samples under investigation. The system was designed to be simple, portable and inexpensive. It employs two diode lasers (violet InGaN-based and red AlGaInP-based) as light sources and silicon photodiodes as detectors and optical components, all of which are readily available. The measured scattering patterns using the dual wavelength system showed that the relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering pattern of cryptosporidium oocysts was significantly different from other particles (e.g. polystyrene latex sphere, E.coli). The single wavelength set up was applied for cryptosporidium oocysts'size and relative refractive index measurement and differential measurement of the concentration of cryptosporidium oocysts suspended in water and mixed polystyrene latex sphere suspension. The measurement results showed good agreement with the control reference values. These results indicate that the proposed method could potentially be applied to online detection in a water quality control system.

  3. Analysis on Target Detection and Classification in LTE Based Passive Forward Scattering Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Abdullah, Raja Syamsul Azmir; Abdul Aziz, Noor Hafizah; Abdul Rashid, Nur Emileen; Ahmad Salah, Asem; Hashim, Fazirulhisyam

    2016-09-29

    The passive bistatic radar (PBR) system can utilize the illuminator of opportunity to enhance radar capability. By utilizing the forward scattering technique and procedure into the specific mode of PBR can provide an improvement in target detection and classification. The system is known as passive Forward Scattering Radar (FSR). The passive FSR system can exploit the peculiar advantage of the enhancement in forward scatter radar cross section (FSRCS) for target detection. Thus, the aim of this paper is to show the feasibility of passive FSR for moving target detection and classification by experimental analysis and results. The signal source is coming from the latest technology of 4G Long-Term Evolution (LTE) base station. A detailed explanation on the passive FSR receiver circuit, the detection scheme and the classification algorithm are given. In addition, the proposed passive FSR circuit employs the self-mixing technique at the receiver; hence the synchronization signal from the transmitter is not required. The experimental results confirm the passive FSR system's capability for ground target detection and classification. Furthermore, this paper illustrates the first classification result in the passive FSR system. The great potential in the passive FSR system provides a new research area in passive radar that can be used for diverse remote monitoring applications.

  4. Analysis on Target Detection and Classification in LTE Based Passive Forward Scattering Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Syamsul Azmir Raja Abdullah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The passive bistatic radar (PBR system can utilize the illuminator of opportunity to enhance radar capability. By utilizing the forward scattering technique and procedure into the specific mode of PBR can provide an improvement in target detection and classification. The system is known as passive Forward Scattering Radar (FSR. The passive FSR system can exploit the peculiar advantage of the enhancement in forward scatter radar cross section (FSRCS for target detection. Thus, the aim of this paper is to show the feasibility of passive FSR for moving target detection and classification by experimental analysis and results. The signal source is coming from the latest technology of 4G Long-Term Evolution (LTE base station. A detailed explanation on the passive FSR receiver circuit, the detection scheme and the classification algorithm are given. In addition, the proposed passive FSR circuit employs the self-mixing technique at the receiver; hence the synchronization signal from the transmitter is not required. The experimental results confirm the passive FSR system’s capability for ground target detection and classification. Furthermore, this paper illustrates the first classification result in the passive FSR system. The great potential in the passive FSR system provides a new research area in passive radar that can be used for diverse remote monitoring applications.

  5. Differing self-similarity in light scattering spectra: A potential tool for pre-cancer detection

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Sayantan; Purwar, Harsh; Jagtap, Jaidip; Pradhan, Asima; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Panigrahi, Prasanta K

    2011-01-01

    The fluctuations in the elastic light scattering spectra of normal and dysplastic human cervical tissues analyzed through wavelet transform based techniques reveal clear signatures of self-similar behavior in the spectral fluctuations. Significant differences in the power law behavior ascertained through the scaling exponent was observed in these tissues. The strong dependence of the elastic light scattering on the size distribution of the scatterers manifests in the angular variation of the scaling exponent. Interestingly, the spectral fluctuations in both these tissues showed multi-fractality (non-stationarity in fluctuations), the degree of multi-fractality being marginally higher in the case of dysplastic tissues. These findings using the multi-resolution analysis capability of the discrete wavelet transform can contribute to the recent surge in the exploration for non-invasive optical tools for pre-cancer detection.

  6. Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-08-05

    We show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps are to isolate the back-scattered surface waves, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. A deconvolution filter derived from the data can be used to collapse a dispersive arrival into a non-dispersive event. Results with synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. Applying this method to USArray data or passively recorded exploration data might open new opportunities in mapping tectonic features over the extent of the array.

  7. Detection of internal structure by scattered light intensity: Application to kidney cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby, C. L.; Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered light measurements in flow cytometry were sucessfully used to distinguish cells on the basis of differing morphology and internal structure. Differences in scattered light patterns due to changes in internal structure would be expected to occur at large scattering angles. Practically, the results of these calculations suggest that in experimental situations an array of detectors would be useful. Although in general the detection of the scattered light intensity at several intervals within the 10 to 60 region would be sufficient, there are many examples where increased sensitivity could be acheived at other angles. The ability to measure at many different angular intervals would allow the experimenter to empirically select the optimum intervals for the varying conditions of cell size, N/C ratio, granule size and internal structure from sample to sample. The feasibility of making scattered light measurements at many different intervals in flow cytometry was demonstrated. The implementation of simplified versions of these techniques in conjunction with independant measurements of cell size could potentially improve the usefulness of flow cytometry in the study of the internal structure of cells.

  8. Model-Based Detection of Radioactive Contraband for Harbor Defense Incorporating Compton Scattering Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Breitfeller, E F; Guidry, B L; Verbeke, J M; Axelrod, M A; Sale, K E; Meyer, A M

    2010-03-02

    The detection of radioactive contraband is a critical problem is maintaining national security for any country. Photon emissions from threat materials challenge both detection and measurement technologies especially when concealed by various types of shielding complicating the transport physics significantly. This problem becomes especially important when ships are intercepted by U.S. Coast Guard harbor patrols searching for contraband. The development of a sequential model-based processor that captures both the underlying transport physics of gamma-ray emissions including Compton scattering and the measurement of photon energies offers a physics-based approach to attack this challenging problem. The inclusion of a basic radionuclide representation of absorbed/scattered photons at a given energy along with interarrival times is used to extract the physics information available from the noisy measurements portable radiation detection systems used to interdict contraband. It is shown that this physics representation can incorporated scattering physics leading to an 'extended' model-based structure that can be used to develop an effective sequential detection technique. The resulting model-based processor is shown to perform quite well based on data obtained from a controlled experiment.

  9. Intercomparison of gamma scattering, gammatography, and radiography techniques for mild steel nonuniform corrosion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyada, P.; Margret, M.; Ramar, R.; Shivaramu, Menaka, M.; Thilagam, L.; Venkataraman, B.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-03-01

    This paper focuses on the mild steel (MS) corrosion detection and intercomparison of results obtained by gamma scattering, gammatography, and radiography techniques. The gamma scattering non-destructive evaluation (NDE) method utilizes scattered gamma radiation for the detection of corrosion, and the scattering experimental setup is an indigenously designed automated personal computer (PC) controlled scanning system consisting of computerized numerical control (CNC) controlled six-axis source detector system and four-axis job positioning system. The system has been successfully used to quantify the magnitude of corrosion and the thickness profile of a MS plate with nonuniform corrosion, and the results are correlated with those obtained from the conventional gammatography and radiography imaging measurements. A simple and straightforward reconstruction algorithm to reconstruct the densities of the objects under investigation and an unambiguous interpretation of the signal as a function of material density at any point of the thick object being inspected is described. In this simple and straightforward method the density of the target need not be known and only the knowledge of the target material's mass attenuation coefficients (composition) for the incident and scattered energies is enough to reconstruct the density of the each voxel of the specimen being studied. The Monte Carlo (MC) numerical simulation of the phenomena is done using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) and the quantitative estimates of the values of signal-to-noise ratio for different percentages of MS corrosion derived from these simulations are presented and the spectra are compared with the experimental data. The gammatography experiments are carried out using the same PC controlled scanning system in a narrow beam, good geometry setup, and the thickness loss is estimated from the measured transmitted intensity. Radiography of the MS plates is carried out using 160 kV x

  10. Nanoparticle-Functionalized Porous Polymer Monolith Detection Elements for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jikun; White, Ian; DeVoe, Don L.

    2011-01-01

    The use of porous polymer monoliths functionalized with silver nanoparticles is introduced in this work for high-sensitivity surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection. Preparation of the SERS detection elements is a simple process comprising the synthesis of a discrete polymer monolith section within a silica capillary, followed by physically trapping silver nanoparticle aggregates within the monolith matrix. A SERS detection limit of 220 fmol for Rhodamine 6G (R6G) is demonstrated, with excellent signal stability over a 24 h period. The capability of the SERS-active monolith for label-free detection of biomolecules was demonstrated by measurements of bradykinin and cyctochrome c. The SERS-active monoliths can be readily integrated into miniaturized micro-total-analysis systems for on-line and label-free detection for a variety of biosensing, bioanalytical, and biomedical applications. PMID:21322579

  11. Charge coupled devices for detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Moroni, Guillermo; Estrada, Juan; Paolini, Eduardo E.; Cancelo, Gustavo; Tiffenberg, Javier; Molina, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    In this article the feasibility of using charge coupled devices (CCD) to detect low-energy neutrinos through their coherent scattering with nuclei is analyzed. The detection of neutrinos through this standard model process has been elusive because of the small energy deposited in such interaction. Typical particle detectors have thresholds of a few keV, and most of the energy deposition expected from coherent scattering is well below this level. The CCD detectors discussed in this paper can operate at a threshold of approximately 30 eV, making them ideal for observing this signal. On a CCD array of 500 g located next to a power nuclear reactor the number of coherent scattering events expected is about 3000 events/year. Our results shows that a detection with a confidence level of 99% can be reached within 16 days of continuous operation; with the current 52 g detector prototype this time lapse extends to five months.

  12. Feasibility Study of an Optical Caustic Plasmonic Light Scattering Sensor for Human Serum Anti-Dengue Protein E Antibody Detection

    OpenAIRE

    García, Antonio A.; Franco, Lina S.; Pirez-Gomez, Miguel A.; Pech-Pacheco, José L.; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F.; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Espinosa-Carrillo, José H.; Duarte-Villaseñor, Miriam M.; Be-Ortiz, Christian; Espinosa-de los Monteros, Luz E.; Castillo-Pacheco, Ariel; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.

    2017-01-01

    Antibody detection and accurate diagnosis of tropical diseases is essential to help prevent the spread of disease. However, most detection methods lack cost-effectiveness and field portability, which are essential features for achieving diagnosis in a timely manner. To address this, 3D-printed oblate spheroid sample chambers were fabricated to measure green light scattering of gold nanoparticles using an optical caustic focus to detect antibodies. Scattering signals of 20–200 nm gold nanopart...

  13. Method and apparatus for detecting and/or imaging clusters of small scattering centers in the body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Sommer, F.G.

    1982-07-13

    An ultrasonic method and apparatus are provided for detecting and imaging clusters of small scattering centers in the breast wherein periodic pulses are applied to an ultrasound emitting transducer and projected into the body, thereafter being received by at least one receiving transducer positioned to receive scattering from the scattering center clusters. The signals are processed to provide an image showing cluster extent and location. 6 figs.

  14. Surface enhanced Raman scattering technique for simultaneous detection of four trace polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FU Shuyue

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytic acid modified Au (IP6@Au nanoparticles with high surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS activity as well as hydrophobicity were synthesized.Based on IP6@Au and the molecular fingerprint information,we developed a SERS-based method for simultaneous detection of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon species in river water by using a portable Raman system.The limit of detection for anthracene,fluoranthene,pyrene and benzopyrene were 100,100,10 and 1 μg/L,respectively.

  15. Time and direction of arrival detection and filtering for imaging in strongly scattering random media

    CERN Document Server

    Borcea, Liliana; Tsogka, Chrysoula

    2016-01-01

    We study detection and imaging of small reflectors in heavy clutter, using an array of transducers that emits and receives sound waves. Heavy clutter means that multiple scattering of the waves in the heterogeneous host medium is strong and overwhelms the arrivals from the small reflectors. Building on the adaptive time-frequency filter of [1], we propose a robust method for detecting the direction of arrival of the direct echoes from the small reflectors, and suppressing the unwanted clutter backscatter. This improves the resolution of imaging. We illustrate the performance of the method with realistic numerical simulations in a non-destructive testing setup.

  16. Range verification of passively scattered proton beams using prompt gamma-ray detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, Joost M; Testa, Mauro; Seco, Joao

    2015-02-07

    We performed an experimental study to verify the range of passively scattered proton beams by detecting prompt gamma-rays emitted from proton-nuclear interactions. A method is proposed using a single scintillation detector positioned near the distal end of the irradiated target. Lead shielding was used to attenuate gamma-rays emitted along most of the entrance path of the beam. By synchronizing the prompt gamma-ray detector to the rotation of the range modulation wheel, the relation between the gamma emission from the distal part of the target and the range of the incident proton beam was determined. In experiments with a water phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom, this relation was found to be sensitive to range shifts that were introduced. The wide opening angle of the detector enabled a sufficient signal-to-background ratio to be achieved in the presence of neutron-induced background from the scattering and collimating devices. Uniform range shifts were detected with a standard deviation of 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm at a dose level of 30 cGy to 50 cGy (RBE). The detectable magnitude of a range shift limited to a part of the treatment field area was approximately proportional to the ratio between the field area and the area affected by the range shift. We conclude that it is feasible to detect changes in the range of passively scattered proton beams using a relatively simple prompt gamma-ray detection system. The method can be employed for in vivo verification of the consistency of the delivered range in fractionated treatments.

  17. CHANGE DETECTION BASED ON PERSISTENT SCATTERER INTERFEROMETRY – CASE STUDY OF MONITORING AN URBAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Yang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI is a technique to extract subtle surface deformation from sets of scatterers identified in time-series of SAR images which feature temporally stable and strong radar signal (i.e., Persistent Scatterers, PS. Because of the preferred rectangular and regular structure of man-made objects, PSI works particularly well for monitoring of settlements. Usually, in PSI it is assumed that except for surface motion the scene is steady. In case this is not given, corresponding PS candidates are discarded during PSI processing. On the other hand, pixel-based change detection relying on local comparison of multi-temporal images typically highlights scene modifications of larger size rather than detail level. In this paper, we propose a method to combine these two types of change detection approaches. First, we introduce a local change-index based on PSI, which basically looks for PS candidates that remain stable over a certain period of time, but then break down suddenly. In addition, for the remaining PS candidates we apply common PSI processing which yields attributes like velocity in line-of-sight. In order to consider context, we apply now spatial filtering according to the derived attributes and morphology to exclude outliers and extract connect components of similar regions at the same time. We demonstrate our approach for test site Berlin, Germany, where, firstly, deformation-velocities on man-made structures are estimated and, secondly, some construction-sites are correctly recognized.

  18. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jena, Bipulendu; Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    .... Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63...

  19. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering-Based Immunoassay Technologies for Detection of Disease Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Smolsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of biomarkers is of vital importance in disease detection, management, and monitoring of therapeutic efficacy. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the development of novel diagnostic methods that detect and quantify biomarkers with higher sensitivity and reliability, contributing to better disease diagnosis and prognosis. When it comes to such devastating diseases as cancer, these novel powerful methods allow for disease staging as well as detection of cancer at very early stages. Over the past decade, there have been some advances in the development of platforms for biomarker detection of diseases. The main focus has recently shifted to the development of simple and reliable diagnostic tests that are inexpensive, accurate, and can follow a patient’s disease progression and therapy response. The individualized approach in biomarker detection has been also emphasized with detection of multiple biomarkers in body fluids such as blood and urine. This review article covers the developments in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS and related technologies with the primary focus on immunoassays. Limitations and advantages of the SERS-based immunoassay platform are discussed. The article thoroughly describes all components of the SERS immunoassay and highlights the superior capabilities of SERS readout strategy such as high sensitivity and simultaneous detection of a multitude of biomarkers. Finally, it introduces recently developed strategies for in vivo biomarker detection using SERS.

  20. Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) imaging: From cancer detection to sub-cellular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Le

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), an optical technique that relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles to their size, refractive index and shape, has been recently successfully employed for sensing morphological and biochemical properties of epithelial tissues and cells in vivo. LSS does not require exogenous markers, is non-invasive, and, due to its multispectral nature, can sense biological structures well beyond the diffraction limit. All that makes LSS be a very good candidate to be used both in clinical medicine for in vivo detection of disease and in cell biology to monitor cell function on the organelle scale. Recently we developed two LSS-based imaging modalities: clinical Polarized LSS (PLSS) Endoscopic Technique for locating early pre-cancerous changes in GI tract and Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) Microscopy for studying cells in vivo without exogenous markers. One important application of the clinical PLSS endoscopic instrument, a noncontact scanning imaging device compatible with the standard clinical endoscopes and capable of detecting dysplastic changes, is to serve as a guide for biopsy in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The instrument detects parallel and perpendicular components of the polarized light, backscattered from epithelial tissues, and determines characteristics of epithelial nuclei from the residual spectra. It also can find tissue oxygenation, hemoglobin content and other properties from the diffuse light component. By rapidly scanning esophagus the PLSS endoscopic instrument makes sure the entire BE portion is scanned and examined for the presence of dysplasia. CLASS microscopy, on the other hand, combines principles of light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal microscopy. Its main purpose is to image cells on organelle scale in vivo without the use of exogenous labels which may affect the cell function. The confocal geometry selects specific region and

  1. DaMaSCUS: the impact of underground scatterings on direct detection of light dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emken, Timon; Kouvaris, Chris

    2017-10-01

    Conventional dark matter direct detection experiments set stringent constraints on dark matter by looking for elastic scattering events between dark matter particles and nuclei in underground detectors. However these constraints weaken significantly in the sub-GeV mass region, simply because light dark matter does not have enough energy to trigger detectors regardless of the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross section. Even if future experiments lower their energy thresholds, they will still be blind to parameter space where dark matter particles interact with nuclei strongly enough that they lose enough energy and become unable to cause a signal above the experimental threshold by the time they reach the underground detector. Therefore in case dark matter is in the sub-GeV region and strongly interacting, possible underground scatterings of dark matter with terrestrial nuclei must be taken into account because they affect significantly the recoil spectra and event rates, regardless of whether the experiment probes DM via DM-nucleus or DM-electron interaction. To quantify this effect we present the publicly available Dark Matter Simulation Code for Underground Scatterings (DaMaSCUS), a Monte Carlo simulator of DM trajectories through the Earth taking underground scatterings into account. Our simulation allows the precise calculation of the density and velocity distribution of dark matter at any detector of given depth and location on Earth. The simulation can also provide the accurate recoil spectrum in underground detectors as well as the phase and amplitude of the diurnal modulation caused by this shadowing effect of the Earth, ultimately relating the modulations expected in different detectors, which is important to decisively conclude if a diurnal modulation is due to dark matter or an irrelevant background.

  2. Revisiting Bragg's X-ray microscope: scatter based optical transient grating detection of pulsed ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Wilfred K; Paganin, David M; Hall, Chris J

    2011-06-01

    Transient optical gratings for detecting ultrafast signals are routine for temporally resolved photochemical investigations. Many processes can contribute to the formation of such gratings; we indicate use of optically scattering centres that can be formed with highly variable latencies in different materials and devices using ionising radiation. Coherent light scattered by these centres can form the short-wavelength-to-optical-wavelength, incoherent-to-coherent basis of a Bragg X-ray microscope, with inherent scope for optical phasing. Depending on the dynamics of the medium chosen, the way is open to both ultrafast pulsed and integrating measurements. For experiments employing brief pulses, we discuss high-dynamic-range short-wavelength diffraction measurements with real-time optical reconstructions. Applications to optical real-time X-ray phase-retrieval are considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A portable optical waveguide resonance light-scattering scanner for microarray detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xuefeng; Liu, Wanyao; Li, Tao; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Wu, Dongyang; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-01-07

    In the present work, a portable and low-cost planar waveguide based resonance light scattering (RLS) scanner (termed as: PW-RLS scanner) has been developed for microarray detection. The PW-RLS scanner employs a 2 × 4 white light emitting diode array (WLEDA) as the excitation light source, a folded optical path with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) as the signal/image acquisition device and stepper motors with gear drives as the mechanical drive system. The biological binding/recognizing events on the microarray can be detected with an evanescent waveguide-directed illumination and light-scattering label (e.g., nanoparticles) while the microarray slide acts as an evanescent waveguide substrate. The performance of the as-developed PW-RLS scanner has been evaluated by analyzing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk genes. Highly selective and sensitive (less than 1% allele frequency at the attomole-level) T2DM risk gene detection is achieved using single-stranded DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (ssDNA-GNPs) as detection probes. Additionally, the successful simultaneous analysis of 15 T2DM patient genotypes suggests that the device has great potential for the realization of a personalized diagnostic test for a given disease or patient follow-up.

  4. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of bacterial microcolonies for rapid detection using light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Nan

    A label-free and nondestructive optical elastic forward light scattering method has been extended for the analysis of microcolonies for food-borne bacteria detection and identification. To understand the forward light scattering phenomenon, a model based on the scalar diffraction theory has been employed: a bacterial colony is considered as a biological spatial light modulator with amplitude and phase modulation to the incoming light, which continues to propagate to the far-field to form a distinct scattering 'fingerprint'. Numerical implementation via angular spectrum method (ASM) and Fresnel approximation have been carried out through Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to simulate this optical model. Sampling criteria to achieve unbiased and un-aliased simulation results have been derived and the effects of violating these conditions have been studied. Diffraction patterns predicted by these two methods (ASM and Fresnel) have been compared to show their applicability to different simulation settings. Through the simulation work, the correlation between the colony morphology and its forward scattering pattern has been established to link the number of diffraction rings and the half cone angle with the diameter and the central height of the Gaussian-shaped colonies. In order to experimentally prove the correlation, a colony morphology analyzer has been built and used to characterize the morphology of different bacteria genera and investigate their growth dynamics. The experimental measurements have demonstrated the possibility of differentiating bacteria Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia in their early growth stage (100˜500 µm) based on their phenotypic characteristics. This conclusion has important implications in microcolony detection, as most bacteria of our interest need much less incubation time (8˜12 hours) to grow into this size range. The original forward light scatterometer has been updated to capture scattering patterns from microcolonies. Experiments have

  5. Feasibility Study of an Optical Caustic Plasmonic Light Scattering Sensor for Human Serum Anti-Dengue Protein E Antibody Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonio A; Franco, Lina S; Pirez-Gomez, Miguel A; Pech-Pacheco, José L; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Espinosa-Carrillo, José H; Duarte-Villaseñor, Miriam M; Be-Ortiz, Christian; Espinosa-de Los Monteros, Luz E; Castillo-Pacheco, Ariel; Garcina-Rejon, Julian E

    2017-08-17

    Antibody detection and accurate diagnosis of tropical diseases is essential to help prevent the spread of disease. However, most detection methods lack cost-effectiveness and field portability, which are essential features for achieving diagnosis in a timely manner. To address this, 3D-printed oblate spheroid sample chambers were fabricated to measure green light scattering of gold nanoparticles using an optical caustic focus to detect antibodies. Scattering signals of 20-200 nm gold nanoparticles using a green laser were compared to green light emitting diode (LED) light source signals and to Mie theory. The change in signal from 60 to 120 nm decreased in the order of Mie Theory > optical caustic scattering > 90° scattering. These results suggested that conjugating 60 nm gold nanoparticles and using an optical caustic system to detect plasmonic light scattering, would result in a sensitive test for detecting human antibodies in serum. Therefore, we studied the light scattering response of conjugated gold nanoparticles exposed to different concentrations of anti-protein E antibody, and a feasibility study of 10 human serum samples using dot blot and a handheld optical caustic-based sensor device. The overall agreement between detection methods suggests that the new sensor concept shows promise to detect gold nanoparticle aggregation in a homogeneous assay. Further testing and protocol optimization is needed to draw conclusions on the positive and negative predictive values for this new testing system.

  6. Feasibility Study of an Optical Caustic Plasmonic Light Scattering Sensor for Human Serum Anti-Dengue Protein E Antibody Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonio A.; Pirez-Gomez, Miguel A.; Pech-Pacheco, José L.; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F.; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Espinosa-Carrillo, José H.; Duarte-Villaseñor, Miriam M.; Be-Ortiz, Christian; Espinosa-de los Monteros, Luz E.; Castillo-Pacheco, Ariel; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.

    2017-01-01

    Antibody detection and accurate diagnosis of tropical diseases is essential to help prevent the spread of disease. However, most detection methods lack cost-effectiveness and field portability, which are essential features for achieving diagnosis in a timely manner. To address this, 3D-printed oblate spheroid sample chambers were fabricated to measure green light scattering of gold nanoparticles using an optical caustic focus to detect antibodies. Scattering signals of 20–200 nm gold nanoparticles using a green laser were compared to green light emitting diode (LED) light source signals and to Mie theory. The change in signal from 60 to 120 nm decreased in the order of Mie Theory > optical caustic scattering > 90° scattering. These results suggested that conjugating 60 nm gold nanoparticles and using an optical caustic system to detect plasmonic light scattering, would result in a sensitive test for detecting human antibodies in serum. Therefore, we studied the light scattering response of conjugated gold nanoparticles exposed to different concentrations of anti-protein E antibody, and a feasibility study of 10 human serum samples using dot blot and a handheld optical caustic-based sensor device. The overall agreement between detection methods suggests that the new sensor concept shows promise to detect gold nanoparticle aggregation in a homogeneous assay. Further testing and protocol optimization is needed to draw conclusions on the positive and negative predictive values for this new testing system. PMID:28817080

  7. Fiber optic quench detection via optimized Rayleigh Scattering in high-field YBCO accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) coated conductors are known for their ability to operate in the superconducting state at relatively high temperatures, even above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K). When these same conductors are operated at lower temperatures, they are able to operate in much higher magnetic fields than traditional superconductors like NiTi or Nb3Sn. Thus, YBCO superconducting magnets are one of the primary options for generating the high magnetic fields needed for future high energy physics devices. Due to slow quench propagation, quench detection remains one of the primary limitations to YBCO magnets. Fiber optic sensing, based upon Rayleigh scattering, has the potential for spatial resolution approaching the wavelength of light, or very fast temporal resolution at low spatial resolution, and a continuum of combinations in between. This project has studied, theoretically and experimentally, YBCO magnets and Rayleigh scattering quench detection systems to demonstrate feasibility of the systems for YBCO quench protection systems. Under this grant an experimentally validated 3D quench propagation model was used to accurately define the acceptable range of spatial and temporal resolutions for effective quench detection in YBCO magnets and to evaluate present-day and potentially improved YBCO conductors. The data volume and speed requirements for quench detection via Rayleigh scattering required the development of a high performance fiber optic based quench detection/data acquisition system and its integration with an existing voltage tap/thermo-couple based system. In this project, optical fibers are tightly co-wound into YBCO magnet coils, with the fiber on top of the conductor as turn-to-turn insulation. Local changes in the temperature or strain of the conductor are sensed by the optical fiber, which is in close thermal and mechanical contact with the conductor. Intrinsic imperfections in the fiber reflect Rayleigh

  8. Detection of radioactive isotopes by using laser Compton scattered γ-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajima, R.; Kikuzawa, N.; Nishimori, N.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kando, M.; Minehara, E.; Toyokawa, H.; Ohgaki, H.

    2009-09-01

    Non-destructive detection and assay of nuclear materials is one of the most critical issues for both the management of nuclear waste and the non-proliferation of nuclear materials. We use laser Compton scattered (LCS) γ-ray beams and the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) for the non-destructive detection of radioactive materials. Quasi-monochromatic and energy-tunable LCS γ-ray beams help improve the signal-to-noise ratio during NRF measurements. We developed the conceptual design of a high-flux γ-ray source with an energy-recovery linac, which produces a γ-ray beam at the flux of 1013 photons/s. In this paper, we discuss the execution of simulation studies using a Monte Carlo code, results of a proof-of-principle experiment for isotope detection, and the status of the development of LCS X-ray and γ-ray facilities.

  9. Detection and mapping of polar stratospheric clouds using limb scattering observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. von Savigny

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-based measurements of Visible/NIR limb-scattered solar radiation are well suited for the detection and mapping of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs. This publication describes a method to detect PCSs from limb scattering observations with the Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY on the European Space Agency's Envisat spacecraft. The method is based on a color-index approach and requires a priori knowledge of the stratospheric background aerosol loading in order to avoid false PSC identifications by stratospheric background aerosol. The method is applied to a sample data set including the 2003 PSC season in the Southern Hemisphere. The PSCs are correlated with coincident UKMO model temperature data, and with very few exceptions, the detected PSCs occur at temperatures below 195–198 K. Monthly averaged PSC descent rates are about 1.5 km/month for the −50° S to −75° S latitude range and assume a maximum between August and September with a value of about 2.5 km/month. The main cause of the PSC descent is the slow descent of the lower stratospheric temperature minimum.

  10. Nd:YAG Laser-Based Dual-Line Detection Rayleigh Scattering and Current Efforts on UV, Filtered Rayleigh Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otugen, M. Volkan; Popovic, Svetozar

    1996-01-01

    Ongoing research in Rayleigh scattering diagnostics for variable density low speed flow applications and for supersonic flow measurements are described. During the past several years, the focus has been on the development and use of a Nd:YAG-based Rayleigh scattering system with improved signal-to-noise characteristics and with applicability to complex, confined flows. This activity serves other research projects in the Aerodynamics Laboratory which require the non-contact, accurate, time-frozen measurement of gas density, pressure, and temperature (each separately), in a fairly wide dynamic range of each parameter. Recently, with the acquisition of a new seed-injected Nd:YAG laser, effort also has been directed to the development of a high-speed velocity probe based on a spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering technique.

  11. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-21

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into "coffee" rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.

  12. Early recovery of circulating immature B cells in B-lymphoblastic leukemia patients after CD19 targeted CAR T cell therapy: A pitfall for minimal residual disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenbin; Salem, Dalia; McCoy, Catharine S; Lee, Daniel; Shah, Nirali N; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Yuan, Constance M

    2017-09-09

    CD19-targeted chimeric-antigen receptor-modified T-cells (CAR-T) are promising in the treatment of refractory B-lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Minimal residual disease (MRD) detection by multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) is critical to distinguish B-ALL MRD from regenerating, non-neoplastic B-cell populations. FCM was performed on samples from 9 patients with B-ALL treated with CAR-T. All 9 patients showed response to CAR-T. Additionally, FCM revealed circulating CD10 + B cells, potentially mimicking MRD. Circulating CD10+ B-cells were detected in blood from 3 days to 3 months after CAR-T, comprising 73% (median) of B-cells (52-83%, 95%CI). They expressed CD19, CD10, CD20, bright CD9, CD22, CD24, moderate CD38 and dim CD58, but were CD34 (-), with bright CD45 and polyclonal surface light chain immunoglobulin (sIg) expression. A similar CD10 + B-cell subpopulation was detected by marrow FCM, amidst abundant B-cell precursors. These circulating CD10 + B-cells are compatible with immature B-cells, and are a reflection of B-cell recovery within the marrow. They are immunophenotypically distinguishable from residual B-ALL. Expression of light chain sIg and key surface antigens characterizing regenerating B-cell precursors can distinguish immature B-cells from B-ALL MRD and prevent misdiagnosis. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  13. CHANGE DETECTION BASED ON PERSISTENT SCATTERER INTERFEROMETRY – A NEW METHOD OF MONITORING BUILDING CHANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI is a technique to detect a network of extracted persistent scatterer (PS points which feature temporal phase stability and strong radar signal throughout time-series of SAR images. The small surface deformations on such PS points are estimated. PSI particularly works well in monitoring human settlements because regular substructures of man-made objects give rise to large number of PS points. If such structures and/or substructures substantially alter or even vanish due to big change like construction, their PS points are discarded without additional explorations during standard PSI procedure. Such rejected points are called big change (BC points. On the other hand, incoherent change detection (ICD relies on local comparison of multi-temporal images (e.g. image difference, image ratio to highlight scene modifications of larger size rather than detail level. However, image noise inevitably degrades ICD accuracy. We propose a change detection approach based on PSI to synergize benefits of PSI and ICD. PS points are extracted by PSI procedure. A local change index is introduced to quantify probability of a big change for each point. We propose an automatic thresholding method adopting change index to extract BC points along with a clue of the period they emerge. In the end, PS ad BC points are integrated into a change detection image. Our method is tested at a site located around north of Berlin main station where steady, demolished, and erected building substructures are successfully detected. The results are consistent with ground truth derived from time-series of aerial images provided by Google Earth. In addition, we apply our technique for traffic infrastructure, business district, and sports playground monitoring.

  14. Change Detection Based on Persistent Scatterer Interferometry - a New Method of Monitoring Building Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. H.; Kenduiywo, B. K.; Soergel, U.

    2016-06-01

    Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) is a technique to detect a network of extracted persistent scatterer (PS) points which feature temporal phase stability and strong radar signal throughout time-series of SAR images. The small surface deformations on such PS points are estimated. PSI particularly works well in monitoring human settlements because regular substructures of man-made objects give rise to large number of PS points. If such structures and/or substructures substantially alter or even vanish due to big change like construction, their PS points are discarded without additional explorations during standard PSI procedure. Such rejected points are called big change (BC) points. On the other hand, incoherent change detection (ICD) relies on local comparison of multi-temporal images (e.g. image difference, image ratio) to highlight scene modifications of larger size rather than detail level. However, image noise inevitably degrades ICD accuracy. We propose a change detection approach based on PSI to synergize benefits of PSI and ICD. PS points are extracted by PSI procedure. A local change index is introduced to quantify probability of a big change for each point. We propose an automatic thresholding method adopting change index to extract BC points along with a clue of the period they emerge. In the end, PS ad BC points are integrated into a change detection image. Our method is tested at a site located around north of Berlin main station where steady, demolished, and erected building substructures are successfully detected. The results are consistent with ground truth derived from time-series of aerial images provided by Google Earth. In addition, we apply our technique for traffic infrastructure, business district, and sports playground monitoring.

  15. Fast quantitative detection of thiram using surface-enhanced Raman scattering and support vector machine regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shizhuang; Yuan, Baohong; Zhu, Zede; Huang, Linsheng; Zhang, Dongyan; Zheng, Ling

    2016-03-01

    As a novel and ultrasensitive detection technology that had advantages of fingerprint effect, high speed and low cost, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used to develop the regression models for the fast quantitative detection of thiram by support vector machine regression (SVR) in the paper. Meanwhile, three parameter optimization methods, which were grid search (GS), genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO), were employed to optimize the internal parameters of SVR. Furthermore, the influence of the spectral number, spectral wavenumber range and principal component analysis (PCA) on the quantitative detection was also discussed. Firstly, the experiments demonstrate the proposed method can realize the fast and quantitative detection of thiram, and the best result is obtained by GS-SVR with the spectra of the range of characteristic peak which are processed by PCA. And the effect of GS, GA, PSO on the parameter optimization is similar, but the analysis time has a great difference in which GS is the fastest. Considering the analysis accuracy and time simultaneously, the spectral number of samples over each concentration should be set to 50. Then, developing the quantitative model with the spectra of range of characteristic peak can reduce analysis time on the promise of ensuring the detection accuracy. Additionally, PCA can further reduce the detection error through reserving the main information of the spectra data and eliminating the noise.

  16. A novel cyanide ion sensing approach based on Raman scattering for the detection of environmental cyanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Gopal Reddy, C V; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a direct optical approach based on Raman scattering for selective and sensitive detection of cyanide ions in aqueous environment without requiring time-consuming sample pretreatment and the formation of hydrogen cyanide. Due to the strong affinity between copper (I) and cyanide ion, evaporated copper (I) iodide (CuI) thin films are shown to be excellent substrates for selective recognition of free cyanide ions in aqueous matrices. The amount of cyanide ion retained by the copper (I) in the CuI thin films reflects its actual concentration in tested samples, and the subsequent Raman measurements of the substrate are shown to be capable of detecting toxic cyanide content at levels under international drinking water standard and environmental regulatory concentrations. Measurements obtained from the same batch of evaporated CuI thin films (approximately 100-nm thickness) show excellent linearity over a variety of cyanide concentrations ranging from 1.5 microM to 0.15 mM. This detection method offers the advantage of selectively detecting cyanides causing a health hazard while avoiding detection of other common interfering anions such as Cl-, Br-, PO4(3-), SO4(2-), NO2-, S2- and SCN-. Coupled with portable Raman systems that are commercially available, our detection approach will provide on-site monitoring capability with little sample preparation or instrument supervision, which will greatly expedite the assessment of potential environmental cyanide risks. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of Changes on and below the Surface in Epithelium Mucosal Tissue Structure using Scattered Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslidere, Ezgi

    The aim of this work is to answer the question of whether it is possible to detect changes on and below the surface in epithelium tissue structure using light reflected from the tissue over an area (2-D scan) illuminated by an optical sensor (fiber) emitting light at either one wavelength or with white light. Towards that end we model the 2-D reflected scans using a Stochastic Decomposition Method (SDM). The emphasis in this work is on the novelty of the proposed model and its theoretical pinning and foundation. The model is biologically motivated by the stochastic textural nature of the tissue. We model the textural content (which relates to tissue morphology) that manifests itself in the 2-D scans. Unlike previous works that analyze the scattered signal at one spot at various wavelengths, our method statistically analyzes 2-D scans of light scattering data over an area, and extracts from the data features (SDM parameters) that change with changes in the tissue morphology. The examination of an area rather than a spot not only leads to a more reliable calculation of the extracted parameters using single techniques (e.g. nuclear size distribution), but it also leads to the computation of additional information embedded in the spatial texture that our decomposition technique arrives at by modeling the hidden correlations that are obtained only by interrogating a wide sample area. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt at modeling the scattered light over an area using a stochastic decomposition model that allows for the assessment of correlation and textural characteristics that otherwise could not be revealed when the analysis of the scattering signal is a function of wavelength or angle. We also come up with a segmentation technique to raise a flag on the fly when a transition occurs between different mucosal architectures on the surface. The segmentation is based on a novel difference metric for detecting an abrupt change in the parameters

  18. Scanning elastic scattering spectroscopy detects metastatic breast cancer in sentinel lymph nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austwick, Martin R.; Clark, Benjamin; Mosse, Charles A.; Johnson, Kristie; Chicken, D. Wayne; Somasundaram, Santosh K.; Calabro, Katherine W.; Zhu, Ying; Falzon, Mary; Kocjan, Gabrijela; Fearn, Tom; Bown, Stephen G.; Bigio, Irving J.; Keshtgar, Mohammed R. S.

    2010-07-01

    A novel method for rapidly detecting metastatic breast cancer within excised sentinel lymph node(s) of the axilla is presented. Elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) is a point-contact technique that collects broadband optical spectra sensitive to absorption and scattering within the tissue. A statistical discrimination algorithm was generated from a training set of nearly 3000 clinical spectra and used to test clinical spectra collected from an independent set of nodes. Freshly excised nodes were bivalved and mounted under a fiber-optic plate. Stepper motors raster-scanned a fiber-optic probe over the plate to interrogate the node's cut surface, creating a 20×20 grid of spectra. These spectra were analyzed to create a map of cancer risk across the node surface. Rules were developed to convert these maps to a prediction for the presence of cancer in the node. Using these analyses, a leave-one-out cross-validation to optimize discrimination parameters on 128 scanned nodes gave a sensitivity of 69% for detection of clinically relevant metastases (71% for macrometastases) and a specificity of 96%, comparable to literature results for touch imprint cytology, a standard technique for intraoperative diagnosis. ESS has the advantage of not requiring a pathologist to review the tissue sample.

  19. Detection of early carious lesions using contrast enhancement with coherent light scattering (speckle imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deana, A. M.; Jesus, S. H. C.; Koshoji, N. H.; Bussadori, S. K.; Oliveira, M. T.

    2013-07-01

    Currently, dental caries still represent one of the chronic diseases with the highest prevalence and present in most countries. The interaction between light and teeth (absorption, scattering and fluorescence) is intrinsically connected to the constitution of the dental tissue. Decay induced mineral loss introduces a shift in the optical properties of the affected tissue; therefore, study of these properties may produce novel techniques aimed at the early diagnosis of carious lesions. Based on the optical properties of the enamel, we demonstrate the application of first-order spatial statistics in laser speckle imaging, allowing the detection of carious lesions in their early stages. A highlight of this noninvasive, non-destructive, real time and cost effective approach is that it allows a dentist to detect a lesion even in the absence of biofilm or moisture.

  20. Detecting the shape of anisotropic gold nanoparticles in dispersion with single particle extinction and scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, M A C; Krpetić, Ž; Sanvito, T; Cai, Q; Monopoli, M; de Araújo, J M; Cella, C; Boselli, L; Castagnola, V; Milani, P; Dawson, K A

    2017-02-23

    The shape and size of nanoparticles are important parameters affecting their biodistribution, bioactivity, and toxicity. The high-throughput characterisation of the nanoparticle shape in dispersion is a fundamental prerequisite for realistic in vitro and in vivo evaluation, however, with routinely available bench-top optical characterisation techniques, it remains a challenging task. Herein, we demonstrate the efficacy of a single particle extinction and scattering (SPES) technique for the in situ detection of the shape of nanoparticles in dispersion, applied to a small library of anisotropic gold particles, with a potential development for in-line detection. The use of SPES paves the way to the routine quantitative analysis of nanoparticles dispersed in biologically relevant fluids, which is of importance for the nanosafety assessment and any in vitro and in vivo administration of nanomaterials.

  1. Indoor detection of passive targets recast as an inverse scattering problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardi, G.; Moriyama, T.

    2017-10-01

    The wireless local area networks represent an alternative to custom sensors and dedicated surveillance systems for target indoor detection. The availability of the channel state information has opened the exploitation of the spatial and frequency diversity given by the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing. Such a fine-grained information can be used to solve the detection problem as an inverse scattering problem. The goal of the detection is to reconstruct the properties of the investigation domain, namely to estimate if the domain is empty or occupied by targets, starting from the measurement of the electromagnetic perturbation of the wireless channel. An innovative inversion strategy exploiting both the frequency and the spatial diversity of the channel state information is proposed. The target-dependent features are identified combining the Kruskal-Wallis test and the principal component analysis. The experimental validation points out the detection performance of the proposed method when applied to an existing wireless link of a WiFi architecture deployed in a real indoor scenario. False detection rates lower than 2 [%] have been obtained.

  2. Amplification of resonant Rayleigh light scattering response using immunogold colloids for detection of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Phuoc Long; Choi, Seung Phill; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-10-25

    A strategy for attomolar-level detection of small molecule-size proteins is reported based on Rayleigh light scattering spectroscopy of individual nanoplasmonic aptasensors by exploiting the outstanding characteristics of gold colloids to amplify the nontransparent resonant signal at ultralow analyte concentrations. The fabrication method utilizes thiol-mediated adsorption of a DNA aptamer on the immobilized Au nanoparticle surface, the interfacial binding characteristics of the aptamer with its target molecules, and the antibody-antigen interaction through plasmonic resonance coupling of the Au nanoparticles. Using lysozyme as a model analyte for disease detection, the detection limit of the aptasensor is ∼7 × 10(3) aM, corresponding to the LSPR λmax shift of ∼2.25 nm. Up to a 380% increase in the localized resonant λmax shift is demonstrated upon antibody binding to the analyte compared to the primary response during signal amplification using immunogold colloids. This enhancement leads to a limit of detection of ∼7 aM, which is an improvement of three orders of magnitude. The results demonstrate substantial promise for developing coupled plasmonic nanostructures for ultrasensitive detection of various biological and chemical analytes. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Separation and detection of plasmalogen in marine invertebrates by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shinji; Abe, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kinoshita, Mikio; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a new method for determining ethanolamine plasmalogen contents in marine invertebrates. This quantification method involves derivatization of ethanolamine glycerophospholipid (EtnGpl) subclasses, alkenylacyl (plasmalogen), diacyl, and alkylacyl subclasses, by enzyme treatment and acetylation, followed by separation and detection by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD). This method enabled complete separation of the subclasses, and the limit of detection for plasmalogen was 200 ng (260 pmol). The peak area of plasmalogen by ELSD was unaffected by the degree of unsaturated fatty acids in EtnGpl, in contrast to ultraviolet (UV) detection. Thus, this method enables accurate determination of plasmalogen contents in various species containing marine products possessing abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The method developed here was applied to marine invertebrates available in Japan. The examined marine invertebrates showed a wide range of plasmalogen contents ranging from 19 to 504 μmol/100 g wet wt. The plasmalogen levels in samples except those of class Cephalopoda and Crustacea were more than 60 mol% of EtnGpl.

  4. Dual-tip-enhanced ultrafast CARS nanoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Charles W. Ballmann; Cao, Bin; Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Alexei V. Sokolov; Voronine, Dmitri V.

    2013-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and, in particular, femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques (FAST CARS) have been successfully used for molecular spectroscopy and microscopic imaging. Recent progress in ultrafast nanooptics provides flexibility in generation and control of optical near fields, and holds promise to extend CARS techniques to the nanoscale. In this theoretical study, we demonstrate ultrafast subwavelentgh control of coherent Raman spectra of molecules in the v...

  5. Coherent self-heterodyne detection of spontaneously Brillouin-scattered light waves in a single-mode fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kaoru; Horiguchi, Tsuneo; Koyamada, Yahei; Kurashima, Toshio

    1993-02-01

    Time-domain reflectometry of spontaneous Brillouin scattering in a single-mode optical fiber is performed with a coherent self-heterodyne detection system containing a recently proposed external frequency translator and a single light-wave source. The light wave is divided into probe and reference light waves. The frequency of the probe light wave is upconverted by the translator by an amount approximately equal to the Brillouin frequency shift. The frequency-converted probe is launched into the fiber and spontaneously Brillouin scattered. As the frequency of the scattered probe is downconverted to near that of the reference light wave, coherent self-heterodyne detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering becomes possible without having to use a fast-speed detector.

  6. Multiple and double scattering contributions to depth resolution and low energy background in hydrogen elastic recoil detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1996-12-31

    The sensitivity of hydrogen elastic recoil detection ( ERD ) is usually limited by the low energy background in the ERD spectrum. A number of 4.5 MeV He{sup ++} hydrogen ERD spectra from different hydrogen implanted samples are compared. The samples are chosen with different atomic numbers from low Z (carbon) to high Z (tungsten carbide) to observe the effects of multiple scattering and double scattering within the sample material. The experimental depth resolution and levels of the low energy background in ERD spectra are compared with theoretical predictions from multiple and double scattering. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  7. A simple approach for ultrasensitive detection of bisphenols by multiplexed surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bleye, C., E-mail: cdebleye@ulg.ac.be; Dumont, E.; Hubert, C.; Sacré, P.-Y.; Netchacovitch, L.; Chavez, P.-F.; Hubert, Ph.; Ziemons, E.

    2015-08-12

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is well known for its use in plastic manufacture and thermal paper production despite its risk of health toxicity as an endocrine disruptor in humans. Since the publication of new legislation regarding the use of BPA, manufacturers have begun to replace BPA with other phenolic molecules such as bisphenol F (BPF) and bisphenol B (BPB), but there are no guarantees regarding the health safety of these compounds at this time. In this context, a very simple, cheap and fast surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method was developed for the sensitive detection of these molecules in spiked tap water solutions. Silver nanoparticles were used as SERS substrates. An original strategy was employed to circumvent the issue of the affinity of bisphenols for metallic surfaces and the silver nanoparticles surface was functionalized using pyridine in order to improve again the sensitivity of the detection. Semi-quantitative detections were performed in tap water solutions at a concentrations range from 0.25 to 20 μg L{sup −1} for BPA and BPB and from 5 to 100 μg L{sup −1} for BPF. Moreover, a feasibility study for performing a multiplex-SERS detection of these molecules was also performed before successfully implementing the developed SERS method on real samples. - Highlights: • Development of a simple, fast and ultrasensitive SERS method to detect bisphenols. • Multiplexed-SERS detection of bisphenol A, bisphenol B and bisphenol F. • Implementation of the SERS developed method on real samples to detect bisphenols.

  8. Nanotextured thin films for detection of chemicals by surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korivi, Naga; Jiang, Li; Ahmed, Syed; Nujhat, Nabila; Idrees, Mohanad; Rangari, Vijaya

    2017-11-01

    We report on the development of large area, nanostructured films that function as substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of chemicals. The films are made of polyethylene terephthalate layers partially embedded with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and coated with a thin layer of gold. The films are fabricated by a facile method involving spin-coating, acid dip, and magnetron sputtering. The films perform effectively as SERS substrates when used in the detection of dye pollutants such as Congo red dye, with an enhancement factor of 1.1  ×  106 and a detection limit of 10‑7 M which is the lowest reported for CR detection by freestanding SERS film substrates. The films have a long shelf life, and cost US0.20 per cm2 of active area, far less than commercially available SERS substrates. This is the first such work on the use of a polymer layer modified with carbon nanotubes to create a nano-scale texture and arbitrary ‘hot-spots’, contributing to the SERS effect.

  9. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  10. Design and measurement technique of surface-enhanced Raman scattering for detection of bisphenol A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Norhayati; Mat Salleh, Muhamad; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Shapter, Joseph George

    2017-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive measurement technique that provides Raman peaks at different Raman shift for different molecule structures. The SERS sensor is potentially used to detect food contamination and monitor environmental pollutants. A self-developed SERS system for specific analysis with low development cost is a challenging issue. This study attempts to develop a simple SERS sensor system for detection of bisphenol A (BPA) molecule using SERS substrate of silver nanoplate film. A SERS sensor system was developed, consisting of a light source to excite analyte molecules, Inphotonic Raman probe, sensor chamber and spectrophotometer as an analyser system. A duplex fibre optic is used to transmit light from the source to the probe and from the probe to the spectrophotometer. For SERS measurement, BPA detection was done by comparing the Raman signal spectra of the BPA on the quartz substrate and BPA on the silver nanoplate film. This SERS sensor successfully sensed BPA with SERS enhancement factor (EF) 5.55  ×  103 and a detection limit of BPA concentration at 1 mM.

  11. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C; Heth, Jason A; Maher, Cormac O; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D; Freudiger, Christian W; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A

    2015-10-14

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a nondestructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. We show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ = 0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Explosive and chemical threat detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakonen, Aron; Andersson, Per Ola; Stenbæk Schmidt, Michael; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Käll, Mikael

    2015-09-17

    Acts of terror and warfare threats are challenging tasks for defense agencies around the world and of growing importance to security conscious policy makers and the general public. Explosives and chemical warfare agents are two of the major concerns in this context, as illustrated by the recent Boston Marathon bombing and nerve gas attacks on civilians in the Middle East. To prevent such tragic disasters, security personnel must be able to find, identify and deactivate the threats at multiple locations and levels. This involves major technical and practical challenges, such as detection of ultra-low quantities of hazardous compounds at remote locations for anti-terror purposes and monitoring of environmental sanitation of dumped or left behind toxic substances and explosives. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is one of todays most interesting and rapidly developing methods for label-free ultrasensitive vibrational "fingerprinting" of a variety of molecular compounds. Performance highlights include attomolar detection of TNT and DNT explosives, a sensitivity that few, if any, other technique can compete with. Moreover, instrumentation needed for SERS analysis are becoming progressively better, smaller and cheaper, and can today be acquired for a retail price close to 10,000 US$. This contribution aims to give a comprehensive overview of SERS as a technique for detection of explosives and chemical threats. We discuss the prospects of SERS becoming a major tool for convenient in-situ threat identification and we summarize existing SERS detection methods and substrates with particular focus on ultra-sensitive real-time detection. General concepts, detection capabilities and perspectives are discussed in order to guide potential users of the technique for homeland security and anti-warfare purposes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection and Implications of Laser-Induced Raman Scattering at Astronomical Observatories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric P. A. Vogt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser guide stars employed at astronomical observatories provide artificial wavefront reference sources to help correct (in part the impact of atmospheric turbulence on astrophysical observations. Following the recent commissioning of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF on Unit Telescope 4 (UT4 of the Very Large Telescope (VLT, we characterize the spectral signature of the uplink beams from the 22-W lasers to assess the impact of laser scattering from the 4LGSF on science observations. We use the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE optical integral field spectrograph mounted on the Nasmyth B focus of UT4 to acquire spectra at a resolution of R≅3000 of the uplink laser beams over the wavelength range of 4750 Å–9350 Å. We report the first detection of laser-induced Raman scattering by N_{2}, O_{2}, CO_{2}, H_{2}O, and (tentatively CH_{4} molecules in the atmosphere above the astronomical observatory of Cerro Paranal. In particular, our observations reveal the characteristic spectral signature of laser photons—but 480 Å to 2210 Å redder than the original laser wavelength of 5889.959 Å—landing on the 8.2-m primary mirror of UT4 after being Raman-scattered on their way up to the sodium layer. Laser-induced Raman scattering, a phenomenon not usually discussed in the astronomical context, is not unique to the observatory of Cerro Paranal, but it is common to any astronomical telescope employing a laser guide star (LGS system. It is thus essential for any optical spectrograph coupled to a LGS system to thoroughly handle the possibility of a Raman spectral contamination via a proper baffling of the instrument and suitable calibrations procedures. These considerations are particularly applicable for the HARMONI optical spectrograph on the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT. At sites hosting multiple telescopes, laser-collision-prediction tools should also account for the presence of Raman emission from the uplink laser beam

  14. Detection and Implications of Laser-Induced Raman Scattering at Astronomical Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Opitom, Cyrielle; Comin, Mauro; Schmidtobreik, Linda; Smoker, Jonathan; Blanchard, Israel; Espinoza Contreras, Marcela; Aranda, Ivan; Milli, Julien; Jaffe, Yara L.; Selman, Fernando; Kolb, Johann; Hibon, Pascale; Kuntschner, Harald; Madec, Pierre-Yves

    2017-04-01

    Laser guide stars employed at astronomical observatories provide artificial wavefront reference sources to help correct (in part) the impact of atmospheric turbulence on astrophysical observations. Following the recent commissioning of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) on Unit Telescope 4 (UT4) of the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we characterize the spectral signature of the uplink beams from the 22-W lasers to assess the impact of laser scattering from the 4LGSF on science observations. We use the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) optical integral field spectrograph mounted on the Nasmyth B focus of UT4 to acquire spectra at a resolution of R ≅3000 of the uplink laser beams over the wavelength range of 4750 Å-9350 Å. We report the first detection of laser-induced Raman scattering by N2 , O2 , CO2 , H2O , and (tentatively) CH4 molecules in the atmosphere above the astronomical observatory of Cerro Paranal. In particular, our observations reveal the characteristic spectral signature of laser photons—but 480 Å to 2210 Å redder than the original laser wavelength of 5889.959 Å—landing on the 8.2-m primary mirror of UT4 after being Raman-scattered on their way up to the sodium layer. Laser-induced Raman scattering, a phenomenon not usually discussed in the astronomical context, is not unique to the observatory of Cerro Paranal, but it is common to any astronomical telescope employing a laser guide star (LGS) system. It is thus essential for any optical spectrograph coupled to a LGS system to thoroughly handle the possibility of a Raman spectral contamination via a proper baffling of the instrument and suitable calibrations procedures. These considerations are particularly applicable for the HARMONI optical spectrograph on the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). At sites hosting multiple telescopes, laser-collision-prediction tools should also account for the presence of Raman emission from the uplink laser beam(s) to avoid the unintentional

  15. Car sick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, M G

    1988-01-01

    The automobile is currently seen as the most desirable mode of transportation. However, this view needs to be changed since the proliferation of the automobile worldwide is leading to the poisoning of the environment and people. In the US the number of passenger cars grew 51% between 1971-86 and in the noncommunist industrialized community that figure is 71%. The gasoline and diesel fuel used to power the overwhelming majority of cars creates a variety of problems. The pollution is estimated to have a hidden cost of US $.80/gallon. Others estimate that the pollution causes 30,000 premature deaths annually just in the US. 75% of the carbon monoxide (CO), 48% of nitrogen oxides (NO2), 13% of particulates (P), and 3% of sulfur (S) emissions come from cars in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), which includes the US, Canada, Western Europe, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand. 17% of all worldwide carbon dioxide (CO2) emission comes from the production and use of fossil fuels for cars. The single biggest problem associated with cars is the photochemical smog they create in urban areas. In 1986 75 million Americans lived in areas that failed to meet national air quality standards for CO, P, and ozone (03). The only area of major improvement has been the removal of lead from gasoline. It was known to cause problems from the beginning of its use in the 1920s, but remained for 50 years because of auto and oil company pressure. Ground 03 is estimated by the US government to cost US $4 billion in annual losses, just for corn, wheat, soybeans, and peanuts. Acid rain is the other major problem associated with cars, and its damage is estimated at US $5 billion annually. Both these problems are shortterm, their effects occur immediately; the longterm disadvantage is the build up of CO2 and its contribution to the greenhouse effect. While the US is at the forefront of regulation and many other countries are modeling their emission

  16. Fabrication and Robotization of Ultrasensitive Plasmonic Nanosensors for Molecule Detection with Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Xu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce the history and mechanisms of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS, discuss various techniques for fabrication of state-of-the-art SERS substrates, and review recent work on robotizing plasmonic nanoparticles, especially, the efforts we made on fabrication, characterization, and robotization of Raman nanosensors by design. Our nanosensors, consisting of tri-layer nanocapsule structures, are ultrasensitive, well reproducible, and can be robotized by either electric or magnetic tweezers. Three applications using such SERS nanosensors were demonstrated, including location predictable detection, single-cell bioanalysis, and tunable molecule release and monitoring. The integration of SERS and nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS devices is innovative in both device concept and fabrication, and could potentially inspire a new device scheme for various bio-relevant applications.

  17. In vivo light scattering for the detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourant, Judith R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    A noninvasive optical diagnostic system for detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the cervix was evaluated in vivo. The optical system included a fiber-optic probe designed to measure polarized and unpolarized light transport properties of a small volume of tissue. An algorithm for diagnosing tissue based on the optical measurements was developed that used four optical properties, three of which were related to light scattering properties and the fourth of which was related to hemoglobin concentration. A sensitivity of {approx}77% and specificities in the mid 60% range were obtained for separating high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cancer from other pathologies and normal tissue. The use of different cross-validation methods in algorithm development is analyzed, and the relative difficulties of diagnosing certain pathologies are assessed. Furthermore, the robustness of the optical system for use by different doctors and to changes in fiber-optic probe are also assessed, and potential improvements in the optical system are discussed.

  18. Fabrication and robotization of ultrasensitive plasmonic nanosensors for molecule detection with Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Kim, Kwanoh; Liu, Chao; Fan, Donglei

    2015-05-04

    In this work, we introduce the history and mechanisms of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), discuss various techniques for fabrication of state-of-the-art SERS substrates, and review recent work on robotizing plasmonic nanoparticles, especially, the efforts we made on fabrication, characterization, and robotization of Raman nanosensors by design. Our nanosensors, consisting of tri-layer nanocapsule structures, are ultrasensitive, well reproducible, and can be robotized by either electric or magnetic tweezers. Three applications using such SERS nanosensors were demonstrated, including location predictable detection, single-cell bioanalysis, and tunable molecule release and monitoring. The integration of SERS and nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) devices is innovative in both device concept and fabrication, and could potentially inspire a new device scheme for various bio-relevant applications.

  19. Levels of detail analysis of microwave scattering from human head models for brain stroke detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awais Munawar Qureshi

    2017-11-01

    solvers so as to find out the solution of subject microwave scattering problem in a minimum computational time along with memory resources requirement. It is seen from this study that the microwave imaging may effectively be utilized for the detection, localization and differentiation of different types of brain stroke. The simulation results verified that the microwave imaging can be efficiently exploited to study the significant contrast between electric field values of the normal and abnormal brain tissues for the investigation of brain anomalies. In the end, a specific absorption rate analysis was carried out to compare the ionizing effects of microwave signals to different types of head model using a factor of safety for brain tissues. It is also suggested after careful study of various inversion methods in practice for microwave head imaging, that the contrast source inversion method may be more suitable and computationally efficient for such problems.

  20. Novel Observational Technique of Gravitational Wave (GW) Events: Detecting and Locating Electromagnetic Counterparts to GW Sources using Dust Scattering Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederlander, Richard; Paerels, Frits

    2018-01-01

    We discuss a novel observational technique for detecting and locating the electromagnetic counterpart to its GW source, providing astronomers with a several-hour reprieve after a GW event’s occurrence. The technique relies on identifying a dust scattering halo caused by GW-produced X-rays scattering off Galactic dust clouds. The travel time delay of these scattered photons makes them detectable for up to several hours after the prompt event, and the location of the gravitational wave source will be at the geometric center of the halo. The center can be determined with precision sufficient enough to allow the host galaxy to be discerned. This novel technique will be especially relevant for binary black-hole mergers because their counterparts have, as of now, been difficult to detect.

  1. Capillary-driven surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based microfluidic chip for abrin detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Deng, Min; Ga, Shan; Chen, Shouhui; Kang, Lin; Wang, Junhong; Xin, Wenwen; Zhang, Tao; You, Zherong; An, Yuan; Wang, Jinglin; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-03-01

    Herein, we firstly demonstrate the design and the proof-of-concept use of a capillary-driven surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based microfluidic chip for abrin detection. The micropillar array substrate was etched and coated with a gold film by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) process to integrate into a lateral flow test strip. The detection of abrin solutions of various concentrations was performed by the as-prepared microfluidic chip. It was shown that the correlation between the abrin concentration and SERS signal was found to be linear within the range of 0.1 ng/mL to 1 μg/mL with a limit of detection of 0.1 ng/mL. Our microfluidic chip design enhanced the operability of SERS-based immunodiagnostic techniques, significantly reducing the complication and cost of preparation as compared to previous SERS-based works. Meanwhile, this design proved the superiority to conventional lateral flow test strips in respect of both sensitivity and quantitation and showed great potential in the diagnosis and treatment for abrin poisoning as well as on-site screening of abrin-spiked materials.

  2. A Nanosensor for TNT Detection Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Hankus, Mikella E.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a new sensor strategy that integrates molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The sensor was developed to detect the explosive, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Micron thick films of sol gel-derived xerogels were deposited on a SERS-active surface as the sensing layer. Xerogels were molecularly imprinted for TNT using non-covalent interactions with the polymer matrix. Binding of the TNT within the polymer matrix results in unique SERS bands, which allow for detection and identification of the molecule in the MIP. This MIP-SERS sensor exhibits an apparent dissociation constant of (2.3 ± 0.3) × 10−5 M for TNT and a 3 μM detection limit. The response to TNT is reversible and the sensor is stable for at least 6 months. Key challenges, including developing a MIP formulation that is stable and integrated with the SERS substrate, and ensuring the MIP does not mask the spectral features of the target analyte through SERS polymer background, were successfully met. The results also suggest the MIP-SERS protocol can be extended to other target analytes of interest. PMID:22163761

  3. A Nanosensor for TNT Detection Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikella E. Hankus

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on a new sensor strategy that integrates molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS. The sensor was developed to detect the explosive, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT. Micron thick films of sol gel-derived xerogels were deposited on a SERS-active surface as the sensing layer. Xerogels were molecularly imprinted for TNT using non-covalent interactions with the polymer matrix. Binding of the TNT within the polymer matrix results in unique SERS bands, which allow for detection and identification of the molecule in the MIP. This MIP-SERS sensor exhibits an apparent dissociation constant of (2.3 ± 0.3 × 10−5 M for TNT and a 3 µM detection limit. The response to TNT is reversible and the sensor is stable for at least 6 months. Key challenges, including developing a MIP formulation that is stable and integrated with the SERS substrate, and ensuring the MIP does not mask the spectral features of the target analyte through SERS polymer background, were successfully met. The results also suggest the MIP-SERS protocol can be extended to other target analytes of interest.

  4. Clean cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piffaretti, M.

    2008-07-01

    This well-illustrated presentation made at the Swiss 2008 research conference on traffic by the Protoscar company takes a look at research, design, engineering and communication topics in the area of 'clean cars'. The present situation with electrically driven and hybrid-drive cars is reviewed and the chances and problems of the present-day vehicles are examined. New developments and a number of vehicles that should be on the market in the period from 2012 to 2015 are presented. Also, 'clean' specialist vehicles such as trucks and buses are reviewed. Battery systems and associated problems and new developments are looked at. The promotion scheme in Mendrisio, Switzerland is reviewed. Bottom-up and top-down approaches are discussed and future market developments are looked at, as are promotional activities in various countries.

  5. Hybrid graphene-copper UWB array sensor for brain tumor detection via scattering parameters in microwave detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamlos, Mohd Aminudin; Ismail, Abdul Hafiizh; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Narbudowicz, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid graphene-copper ultra-wideband array sensor applied to microwave imaging technique is successfully used in detecting and visualizing tumor inside human brain. The sensor made of graphene coated film for the patch while copper for both the transmission line and parasitic element. The hybrid sensor performance is better than fully copper sensor. Hybrid sensor recorded wider bandwidth of 2.0-10.1 GHz compared with fully copper sensor operated from 2.5 to 10.1 GHz. Higher gain of 3.8-8.5 dB is presented by hybrid sensor, while fully copper sensor stated lower gain ranging from 2.6 to 6.7 dB. Both sensors recorded excellent total efficiency averaged at 97 and 94%, respectively. The sensor used for both transmits equivalent signal and receives backscattering signal from stratified human head model in detecting tumor. Difference in the data of the scattering parameters recorded from the head model with presence and absence of tumor is used as the main data to be further processed in confocal microwave imaging algorithm in generating image. MATLAB software is utilized to analyze S-parameter signals obtained from measurement. Tumor presence is indicated by lower S-parameter values compared to higher values recorded by tumor absence.

  6. Mathematical modeling and optimization of traffic control through the use of sensors detect the passing cars and information devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Skrypnikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers that the most effective measure to reduce the number of road accidents when overtaking in areas with limited visibility is timely information about drivers driving conditions and the lack of an oncoming car within the danger zone. More reliable results give light boards included automatically when the car passes the corresponding sensor. In this light boards issued information must be obtained by the driver at such a distance from the places of concentration of traffic accidents in which the driver received it, would be able to freely make a particular maneuver. To determine this distance, we used the method of calculating the path of overtaking. Analysis of the various options the traffic situation, taking place on the road with an unsecured appearance, shows that the most disadvantaged will be the following: one of the first bands moving slow-moving car, followed by a time interval of 3 - speedboat driver who wishes to overtake; in the opposite lane at the expiration of 3 from the moment of the passage of low-speed vehicle-speed sensor moves. A scheme for the organization and regulation of traffic on road sections with unsecured visibility with in the power of information devices. Information that warn drivers about traffic conditions on the road with limited visibility, set on the way to a dangerous site from both directions at a distance of visibility is not less than 400 m, and traffic does not exceed 400 authors / h per lane. The economic effect of the introduction of information devices is achieved by reducing the number of traffic accidents on the road with limited visibility in plan and profile, as well as by increasing the Flow rate of road traffic.

  7. Optimized Signal-To Ratio with Shot Noise Limited Detection in Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moester, M. J. B.; Ariese, F.; de Boer, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    We describe our set-up for Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy with shot noise limited detection for a broad window of biologically relevant laser powers. This set-up is used to demonstrate that the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SRS with shot noise limited detection is achieved with a time-averaged laser power ratio of 1:2 of the unmodulated and modulated beam. In SRS, two different coloured laser beams are incident on a sample. If the energy difference between them matches a molecular vibration of a molecule, energy can be transferred from one beam to the other. By applying amplitude modulation to one of the beams, the modulation transfer to the other beam can be measured. The efficiency of this process is a direct measure for the number of molecules of interest in the focal volume. Combined with laser scanning microscopy, this technique allows for fast and sensitive imaging with sub-micrometre resolution. Recent technological advances have resulted in an improvement of the sensitivity of SRS applications, but few show shot noise limited detection. The dominant noise source in this SRS microscope is the shot noise of the unmodulated, detected beam. Under the assumption that photodamage is linear with the total laser power, the optimal SNR shifts away from equal beam powers, where the most signal is generated, to a 1:2 power ratio. Under these conditions the SNR is maximized and the total laser power that could induce photodamage is minimized. Compared to using a 1:1 laser power ratio, we show improved image quality and a signal-to-noise ratio improvement of 8 % in polystyrene beads and C. Elegans worms. Including a non-linear damage mechanism in the analysis, we find that the optimal power ratio converges to a 1:1 ratio with increasing order of the non-linear damage mechanism.

  8. Hybrid fs/ps CARS for Sooting and Particle-laden Flames [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Kathryn N. Gabet; Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Kearney, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the application of ultrafast rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for temperature and relative oxygen concentration measurements in the plume emanating from a burning aluminized ammonium perchlorate propellant strand. Combustion of these metal-based propellants is a particularly hostile environment for laserbased diagnostics, with intense background luminosity, scattering and beam obstruction from hot metal particles that can be as large as several hundred microns in diameter. CARS spectra that were previously obtained using nanosecond pulsed lasers in an aluminumparticle- seeded flame are examined and are determined to be severely impacted by nonresonant background, presumably as a result of the plasma formed by particulateenhanced laser-induced breakdown. Introduction of fs/ps laser pulses enables CARS detection at reduced pulse energies, decreasing the likelihood of breakdown, while simultaneously providing time-gated elimination of any nonresonant background interference. Temperature probability densities and temperature/oxygen correlations were constructed from ensembles of several thousand single-laser-shot measurements from the fs/ps rotational CARS measurement volume positioned within 3 mm or less of the burning propellant surface. Preliminary results in canonical flames are presented using a hybrid fs/ps vibrational CARS system to demonstrate our progress towards acquiring vibrational CARS measurements for more accurate temperatures in the very high temperature propellant burns.

  9. Hybrid fs/ps CARS for Sooting and Particle-laden Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Kathryn N. Gabet; Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Kearney, Sean P.

    2015-12-01

    We report the application of ultrafast rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for temperature and relative oxygen concentration measurements in the plume emanating from a burning aluminized ammonium perchlorate propellant strand. Combustion of these metal-based propellants is a particularly hostile environment for laserbased diagnostics, with intense background luminosity, scattering and beam obstruction from hot metal particles that can be as large as several hundred microns in diameter. CARS spectra that were previously obtained using nanosecond pulsed lasers in an aluminumparticle- seeded flame are examined and are determined to be severely impacted by nonresonant background, presumably as a result of the plasma formed by particulateenhanced laser-induced breakdown. Introduction of fs/ps laser pulses enables CARS detection at reduced pulse energies, decreasing the likelihood of breakdown, while simultaneously providing time-gated elimination of any nonresonant background interference. Temperature probability densities and temperature/oxygen correlations were constructed from ensembles of several thousand single-laser-shot measurements from the fs/ps rotational CARS measurement volume positioned within 3 mm or less of the burning propellant surface. Preliminary results in canonical flames are presented using a hybrid fs/ps vibrational CARS system to demonstrate our progress towards acquiring vibrational CARS measurements for more accurate temperatures in the very high temperature propellant burns.

  10. Ultrasonic guided wave detection of scatterers on large clad steel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peng; Harley, Joel B.; Berges, Mario; Junker, Warren R.; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2016-04-01

    "Clad steel" refers to a thick carbon steel structural plate bonded to a corrosion resistant alloy (CRA) plate, such as stainless steel or titanium, and is widely used in industry to construct pressure vessels. The CRA resists the chemically aggressive environment on the interior, but cannot prevent the development of corrosion losses and cracks that limit the continued safe operation of such vessels. At present there are no practical methods to detect such defects from the exposed outer surface of the thick carbon steel plate, often necessitating removing such vessels from service and inspecting them visually from the interior. In previous research, sponsored by industry to detect and localize damage in pressurized piping systems under operational and environmental changes, we investigated a number of data-driven signal processing methods to extract damage information from ultrasonic guided wave pitch-catch records. We now apply those methods to relatively large clad steel plate specimens. We study a sparse array of wafer-type ultrasonic transducers adhered to the carbon steel surface, attempting to localize mass scatterers grease-coupled to the stainless steel surface. We discuss conditions under which localization is achieved by relatively simple first-arrival methods, and other conditions for which data-driven methods are needed; we also discuss observations of plate-like mode properties implied by these results.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering for quantitative detection of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Danting; Zhou, Haibo; Ying, Yibin; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph

    2013-11-01

    Ethyl carbamate, a by-product of fermentation and storage with widespread occurrence in fermented food and alcoholic beverages, is a compound potentially toxic to humans. In this work, a new approach for quantitative detection of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages, based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), is reported. Individual silver-coated gold nanoparticle colloids are used as SERS amplifiers, yielding high Raman enhancement of ethyl carbamate in three kinds of alcoholic beverages (vodka, Obstler, and white rum). The characteristic band at 1,003 cm(-1), which is the strongest and best reproducible peak in the SERS spectra, was used for quantitative evaluation of ethyl carbamate. The limit of detection, which corresponds to a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, was 9.0 × 10(-9) M (0.8 μg · L(-1)), 1.3 × 10(-7) M (11.6 μg · L(-1)), and 7.8 × 10(-8) M (6.9 μg · L(-1)), respectively. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy offers great practical potential for the in situ assessment and identification of ethyl carbamate in the alcoholic beverage industry.

  12. A simple and rapid resonance Rayleigh scattering method for detection of indigo carmine in soft drink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Yang, Jidong; Tan, Xuanping; Zhang, Zhan; Hu, Xiaomei; Yang, Menghuan

    2016-08-01

    A novel method that uses acridine orange (AO) to detect indigo carmine (IC) in soft drinks was developed. The method is highly sensitive and is based on a resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) technique. In Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, pH 4.3, the weak RRS intensity of AO was greatly enhanced by the addition of IC, with the maximum peak located at 332 nm. Under optimum conditions, it was found that the enhanced RRS intensity was proportional to the concentration of IC over a range of 2-32 × 10(-6)  mol/L. A low detection limit of 2.4 × 10(-8)  mol/L was achieved. The sensitivity and selectivity of the method are high enough to permit the determination of trace amounts of IC without any significant interference from high levels of other components such as common anions and other amino acids. Finally, the concentration of IC in three different soft drinks was determined with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Indirect glyphosate detection based on ninhydrin reaction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng-Lei; Gao, Yu; Li, Yali; Li, Xueliang; Zhang, Huanjie; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhao, Bing; Su, Liang

    2018-01-05

    Glyphosate is one of the most commonly-used and non-selective herbicides in agriculture, which may directly pollute the environment and threaten human health. A simple and effective approach to assessment of its damage to the natural environment is thus quite necessary. However, traditional chromatography-based detection methods usually suffer from complex pretreatment procedures. Herein, we propose a simple and sensitive method for the determination of glyphosate by combining ninhydrin reaction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The product (purple color dye, PD) of the ninhydrin reaction is found to SERS-active and directly correlate with the glyphosate concentration. The limit of detection of the proposed method for glyphosate is as low as 1.43×10 -8 mol·L -1 with a relatively wider linear concentration range (1.0×10 -7 -1.0×10 -4 mol·L -1 ), which demonstrates its great potential in rapid, highly sensitive concentration determination of glyphosate in practical applications for safety assessment of food and environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of neurotransmitters by a light scattering technique based on seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang Li; Dong Shaojun [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)], E-mail: dongsj@ciac.jl.cn

    2008-03-05

    A simple light scattering detection method for neurotransmitters has been developed, based on the growth of gold nanoparticles. Neurotransmitters (dopamine, L-dopa, noradrenaline and adrenaline) can effectively function as active reducing agents for generating gold nanoparticles, which result in enhanced light scattering signals. The strong light scattering of gold nanoparticles then allows the quantitative detection of the neurotransmitters simply by using a common spectrofluorometer. In particular, Au-nanoparticle seeds were added to facilitate the growth of nanoparticles, which was found to enhance the sensing performance greatly. Using this light scattering technique based on the seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles, detection limits of 4.4 x 10{sup -7} M, 3.5 x 10{sup -7} M, 4.1 x 10{sup -7} M, and 7.7 x 10{sup -7} M were achieved for dopamine, L-dopa, noradrenaline and adrenaline, respectively. The present strategy can be extended to detect other biologically important molecules in a very fast, simple and sensitive way, and may have potential applications in a wide range of fields.

  15. Rapid Analysis of Apolar Low Molecular Weight Constituents in Wood Using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography with Evaporative Light Scattering Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, F.W.; Haar, van de C.; Beek, van T.A.; Dorado, J.; Martinez-Inigo, M.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.

    2000-01-01

    A new high pressure liquid chromatographic method with evaporative light scattering detection was developed for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of apolar, low molecular weight constituents in wood. The wood extractives were obtained by means of a 6 h Soxhlet extraction with acetone. The

  16. Sensitive absorption detection for micro-column liquid chromatography by ultraviolet forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, T.; Beso, P.; Velthorst, N.H.; Brinkman, U.A.T.; Gooijer, C.; Hoornweg, G.Ph.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing (F-D4WM) in the mid-ultraviolet (UV) region (351nm) as a detection technique for micro-column liquid chromatography (μLC) is studied, using nitro-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NO

  17. Detection of Silver Nanoparticles in Cells by Flow Cytometry Using Light Scattering and Far-red Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cellular uptake of different sized silver nanoparticles (l0 nm, 50 nm, and 75nm) coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or citrate in ARPE-19 cells following 24 hour incubation was detected by side scatter through the use of a flow cytometer. A large far red fluorescence sign...

  18. Rapid detection of polychlorinated biphenyls at trace levels in real environmental samples by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Xian; Huang, Yu; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2011-01-01

    Detection of trace levels of persistent pollutants in the environment is difficult but significant. Organic pollutant homologues, due to their similar physical and chemical properties, are even more difficult to distinguish, especially in trace amounts. We report here a simple method to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil and distilled spirit samples by the surface-enhanced Raman scattering technique using Ag nanorod arrays as substrates. By this method, polychlorinated biphenyls can be detected to a concentration of 5 μg/g in dry soil samples within 1 minute. Furthermore, based on simulation and understanding of the Raman characteristics of PCBs, we recognized homologues of tetrachlorobiphenyl by using the surface-enhance Raman scattering method even in trace amounts in acetone solutions, and their characteristic Raman peaks still can be distinguished at a concentration of 10(-6) mol/L. This study provides a fast, simple and sensitive method for the detection and recognition of organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls.

  19. Rapid detection of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by using Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Peng, Yankun; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Dhakal, Sagar; Xu, Tianfeng

    2015-05-01

    Benzoyl peroxide is a common flour additive that improves the whiteness of flour and the storage properties of flour products. However, benzoyl peroxide adversely affects the nutritional content of flour, and excess consumption causes nausea, dizziness, other poisoning, and serious liver damage. This study was focus on detection of the benzoyl peroxide added in wheat flour. A Raman scattering spectroscopy system was used to acquire spectral signal from sample data and identify benzoyl peroxide based on Raman spectral peak position. The optical devices consisted of Raman spectrometer and CCD camera, 785 nm laser module, optical fiber, prober, and a translation stage to develop a real-time, nondestructive detection system. Pure flour, pure benzoyl peroxide and different concentrations of benzoyl peroxide mixed with flour were prepared as three sets samples to measure the Raman spectrum. These samples were placed in the same type of petri dish to maintain a fixed distance between the Raman CCD and petri dish during spectral collection. The mixed samples were worked by pretreatment of homogenization and collected multiple sets of data of each mixture. The exposure time of this experiment was set at 0.5s. The Savitzky Golay (S-G) algorithm and polynomial curve-fitting method was applied to remove the fluorescence background from the Raman spectrum. The Raman spectral peaks at 619 cm-1, 848 cm-1, 890 cm-1, 1001 cm-1, 1234 cm-1, 1603cm-1, 1777cm-1 were identified as the Raman fingerprint of benzoyl peroxide. Based on the relationship between the Raman intensity of the most prominent peak at around 1001 cm-1 and log values of benzoyl peroxide concentrations, the chemical concentration prediction model was developed. This research demonstrated that Raman detection system could effectively and rapidly identify benzoyl peroxide adulteration in wheat flour. The experimental result is promising and the system with further modification can be applicable for more products in near

  20. Rapid Detection of Pediatric Bacteriuria Using Narrow Angle Forward Laser Scattering Technology (NAFLST) with Bacterioscan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Adriana; Jhaveri, Ravi; Levinson, Kara; Miller, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Pediatric urinary tract infections (UTI) are common, but culture-based diagnosis can take up to 48 hours. This time delay means patients are exposed to potentially unnecessary antibiotics. The sensitivity of screening urinalysis can vary, so rapid detection of UTI by another means would be beneficial. Narrow Angle Forward Laser Scattering Technology (NAFLST) with Bacterioscan can rapidly detect bacteriuria by shining a laser continuously through a liquid sample containing replicating bacteria, and graphing the degree of light refraction over time. Higher degrees of light refraction represent higher initial bacterial load and continued bacterial growth. After 3 hours, the optical scatter classifies a sample as either Likely Positive or Likely Negative. We compared Bacterioscan results to culture data in pediatric patients to assess the ability to diagnose UTI and avoid unnecessary urine culture. Methods This protocol was approved by the UNC Biomedical Institutional Review Board. Over one month, 169 pediatric (<18 yo) urine cultures were collected as part of routine patient care. An individual urine sample and 2.5mL of Sterile Tryptic Soy Broth were pipetted into a Bacterioscan micro-curette. Bacterioscan labeled the specimen as Likely Positive or Likely Negative after a 3 hour period. Results were then compared with urine culture results obtained by routine microbiologic methods. Results Of the 169 urine cultures, 96 were positive, but only 27 were positive for uropathogens. Bacterioscan was 100% sensitive and 58.4% specific in predicting clinically relevant/pathogenic bacterial growth in culture (PPV 31.3%, NPV 100%), and 70.8% sensitive and 75.3% specific in predicting any bacterial growth (PPV 79.0%, NPV 66.2%). If a “Likely Positive” Bacterioscan result had been used in our study population to screen urine samples for culture, then 58% (83/142) of negative urine cultures would have been eliminated with no UTIs missed. Conclusion By

  1. Background free CARS imaging by phase sensitive heterodyne CARS

    OpenAIRE

    Jurna, M.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we show that heterodyne CARS, based on a controlled and stable phase-preserving chain, can be used to measure amplitude and phase information of molecular vibration modes. The technique is validated by a comparison of the imaginary part of the heterodyne CARS spectrum to the spontaneous Raman spectrum of polyethylene. The detection of the phase allows for rejection of the non-resonant background from the data. The resulting improvement of the signal to noise ratio is shown by ...

  2. The use of magnetic small angle neutron scattering for the detection of flow profiles in magnetic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odenbach, S.; Gilly, H. [Center of Applied Spacetechnology and Microgravity (ZARM), University of Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Lindner, P. [Institute Laue Langevin, Avenue des Martyrs, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    1999-07-01

    We have investigated the possibility of using magnetic small angle neutron scattering (MSANS) to detect the flow pattern of flow in concentrated magnetic fluids. It has been shown that the anisotropy of the scattering pattern can be determined with appropriate accuracy allowing to identify changes of the anisotropy induced by different flow states. These changes can be used as a measure for flow characteristics in the fluids. In this paper we present the general idea and an experimental demonstration of the concept using a simple convective flow pattern. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Phase imaging and detection in pseudo-heterodyne scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Camilo; Alda, Javier; Kinzel, Edward; Boreman, Glenn

    2017-02-01

    When considering the pseudo-heterodyne mode for detection of the modulus and phase of the near field from scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) measurements, processing only the modulus of the signal may produce an undesired constraint in the accessible values of the phase of the near field. A two-dimensional analysis of the signal provided by the data acquisition system makes it possible to obtain phase maps over the whole [0, 2π) range. This requires post-processing of the data to select the best coordinate system in which to represent the data along the direction of maximum variance. The analysis also provides a quantitative parameter describing how much of the total variance is included within the component selected for calculation of the modulus and phase of the near field. The dependence of the pseudo-heterodyne phase on the mean position of the reference mirror is analyzed, and the evolution of the global phase is extracted from the s-SNOM data. The results obtained from this technique compared well with the expected maps of the near-field phase obtained from simulations.

  4. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biomarkers in biological fluids using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yiping; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2014-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes major infection not only in Cystic Fibrosis patients but also in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in critically ill patients in intensive care units. Successful antibiotic treatment of the infection relies on accurate and rapid identification of the infectious agents. Conventional microbiological detection methods usually take more than 3 days to obtain accurate results. We have developed a rapid diagnostic technique based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering to directly identify PA from biological fluids. P. aeruginosa strains, PAO1 and PA14, are cultured in lysogeny broth, and the SERS spectra of the broth show the signature Raman peaks from pyocyanin and pyoverdine, two major biomarkers that P. aeruginosa secretes during its growth, as well as lipopolysaccharides. This provides the evidence that the presence of these biomarkers can be used to indicate P. aeruginosa infection. A total of 22 clinical exhaled breath condensates (EBC) samples were obtained from subjects with CF disease and from non-CF healthy donors. SERS spectra of these EBC samples were obtained and further analyzed by both principle component analysis and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). PLS-DA can discriminate the samples with P. aeruginosa infection and the ones without P. aeruginosa infection at 99.3% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity. In addition, this technique can also discriminate samples from subject with CF disease and healthy donor with 97.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These results demonstrate the potential of using SERS of EBC samples as a rapid diagnostic tool to detect PA infection.

  6. Evaporative light scattering detection in quantitative HPLC of PAC mixtures and coal-tar pitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebolla, V.L.; Membrado, L.; Vela, J. [Instituto de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The term Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PACs) include a wide variety of classes of compounds. In turn, the number of possible PACs for each class is of astronomical proportion. Environmental and fossil-fuel samples are composed of very complex mixtures of unknown PACs. The strategy for their analysis depends, among others, on the nature of matrix and PAC concentration, and involves cleanup/prefractionation steps and HPLC analysis. Therefore, HPLC detectors must be calibrated with pure reference standards for every substance to be quantified. However, only a relatively small fraction of PACs can unambiguously be identified and are commercially available. An ideal detector for chromatography of complex mixtures should provide uniform response factors for each separated compound or class of compounds. None of the conventional HPLC detectors (UV, Refractive Index, fluorescence) meet this requirement, neither for mixtures of unknown but well-separated pure peaks nor for compound-class fractionation of fossil fuels (where other additional problems can occur, such as presence of very heavy and polar PACs, quenching problems using fluorescence detection, need of tedious absolute calibrations, etc.) It has been reported that the Evaporative Light Scattering Detector (ELSD) enables all types of non-volatile solutes to be detected, although it has recently been reported that solutes having a lower volatility than the mobile phase can be analyzed working at mild temperatures. Detector response has been reported to be quite independent of the chemical composition of the solute. However, very different response factors were reported in the past in the case of semi-volatile PACs. This work intends: (i) to evaluate the possibility of the application of ELSD in order to quantify PACs in complex mixtures, (ii) to theoretically justify the responses of the studied PACs, and (iii) to lay the groundwork for application to fossil-fuel characterization.

  7. CAR STICKERS

    CERN Multimedia

    Access and Control Service

    2004-01-01

    Following to the operational circular No2 title III. Conditions of access, paragraph 21 . Except in the case of exemptions authorized by the Director-General, all drivers must facilitate the identification of their vehicle. For CERN car stickers to be valid in 2004, they must have the numbers 04 printed on them. As of Monday, March 15th, the security agents on duty at the various access points will have no alternative but to refuse entry to vehicles which do not have a valid sticker. Anyone in this situation is requested to follow the regularization procedure either by logging on to the web site, or by going in person to the registration service in bldg. 55, first floor, between 07h30 et 16h30, Monday through Friday. Access and Control Service - FM Group, TS Department

  8. Automatic scatter detection in fluorescence landscapes by means of spherical principal component analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotwa, Ewelina Katarzyna; Jørgensen, Bo Munk; Brockhoff, Per B.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new method, based on spherical principal component analysis (S‐PCA), for the identification of Rayleigh and Raman scatters in fluorescence excitation–emission data. These scatters should be found and eliminated as a prestep before fitting parallel factor analysis...

  9. Directional Stand-off Detection of Fast Neutrons and Gammas Using Angular Scattering Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanier P. e.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.; Forman, L.

    2009-10-25

    We have investigated the response of a DoubleScatter Neutron Spectrometer (DSNS) for sources at long distances (gr than 200 meters). We find that an alternative method for analyzing double scatter data avoids some uncertainties introduced by amplitude measurements in plastic scintillators.Time of flight is used to discriminate between gamma and neutron events, and the kinematic distributions of scattering angles are assumed to apply. Non-relativistic neutrons are most likely to scatter at 45°, while gammas with energies greater than 2 MeV are most likely to be forward scattered. The distribution of scattering angles of fission neutrons arriving from a distant point source generates a 45° cone, which can be back-projected to give the source direction. At the same time, the distribution of Compton-scattered gammas has a maximum in the forward direction, and can be made narrower by selecting events that deposit minimal energy in the first scattering event. We have further determined that the shape of spontaneous fission neutron spectra at ranges gr than 110 m is still significantly different from thecosmic ray background.

  10. Debris Disks in Aggregate: Using Hubble Space Telescope Coronagraphic Imagery to Understand the Scattered-Light Disk Detection Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of coronagraphic imaging of debris disk candidate stars, only 16 have been imaged in scattered light. Since imaged disks provide our best insight into processes which sculpt disks, and can provide signposts of the presence of giant planets at distances which would elude radial velocity and transit surveys, we need to understand under what conditions we detect the disks in scattered light, how these disks differ from the majority of debris disks, and how to increase the yield of disks which are imaged with 0.1" angular resolution. In this talk, I will review what we have learned from a shallow HSTINICMOS NIR survey of debris disks, and present first results from our on-going HST /STIS optical imaging of bright scattered-light disks.

  11. Label-free detection and identification of waterborne parasites using a microfluidic multi-angle laser scattering system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Limei; Lei, Lei; Li, Feng

    2017-10-01

    A microfluidic-based multi-angle laser scattering (MALS) system capable of acquiring scattering patterns of a single particle is designed and demonstrated. The system includes a sheathless nozzle microfluidic glass chip, and an on-chip MALS unit being in alignment with the nozzle exit in the chip. The size and relative refractive indices (RI) of polystyrene (PS) microspheres were deduced with accuracies of 60 nm and 0.002 by comparing the experimental scattering patterns with theoretical ones. We measured scattering patterns of waterborne parasites i.e., Cryptosporidium parvum (C.parvum) and Giardia lamblia (G. lamblia), and some other representative species suspended in deionized water at a maximum flow rate of 12 μL/min, and a maximum of 3000 waterborne parasites can be identified within one minute with a mean accuracy higher than 96% by classification of distinctive scattering patterns using a support-vector-machine (SVM) algorithm. The system provides a promising tool for label-free detection of waterborne parasites and other biological contaminants.

  12. Detection of gastrointestinal cancer by elastic scattering and absorption spectroscopies with the Los Alamos Optical Biopsy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourant, J.R.; Boyer, J.; Johnson, T.M.; Lacey, J.; Bigio, I.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bohorfoush, A. [Wisconsin Medical School, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Gastroenterology; Mellow, M. [Univ. of Oklahoma Medical School, Oklahoma City, OK (United States). Dept. of Gastroenterology

    1995-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has continued the development of the Optical Biopsy System (OBS) for noninvasive, real-time in situ diagnosis of tissue pathologies. In proceedings of earlier SPIE conferences we reported on clinical measurements in the bladder, and we report here on recent results of clinical tests in the gastrointestinal tract. With the OBS, tissue pathologies are detected/diagnosed using spectral measurements of the elastic optical transport properties (scattering and absorption) of the tissue over a wide range of wavelengths. The use of elastic scattering as the key to optical tissue diagnostics in the OBS is based on the fact that many tissue pathologies, including a majority of cancer forms, exhibit significant architectural changes at the cellular and sub-cellular level. Since the cellular components that cause elastic scattering have dimensions typically on the order of visible to near-IR wavelengths, the elastic (Mie) scattering properties will be wavelength dependent. Thus, morphology and size changes can be expected to cause significant changes m an optical signature that is derived from the wavelength-dependence of elastic scattering. Additionally, the optical geometry of the OBS beneficially enhances its sensitivity for measuring absorption bands. The OBS employs a small fiber-optic probe that is amenable to use with any endoscope or catheter, or to direct surface examination, as well as interstitial needle insertion. Data acquistion/display time is <1 second.

  13. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2016-04-26

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green\\'s function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  14. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for Detection in Immunoassays. Applications, fundamentals, and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driskell, Jeremy Daniel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    Immunoassays have been utilized for the detection of biological analytes for several decades. Many formats and detection strategies have been explored, each having unique advantages and disadvantages. More recently, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been introduced as a readout method for immunoassays, and has shown great potential to meet many key analytical figures of merit. This technology is in its infancy and this dissertation explores the diversity of this method as well as the mechanism responsible for surface enhancement. Approaches to reduce assay times are also investigated. Implementing the knowledge gained from these studies will lead to a more sensitive immunoassay requiring less time than its predecessors. This dissertation is organized into six sections. The first section includes a literature review of the previous work that led to this dissertation. A general overview of the different approaches to immunoassays is given, outlining the strengths and weaknesses of each. Included is a detailed review of binding kinetics, which is central for decreasing assay times. Next, the theoretical underpinnings of SERS is reviewed at its current level of understanding. Past work has argued that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the enhancing substrate influences the SERS signal; therefore, the SPR of the extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) utilized in our SERS-based immunoassay is discussed. Four original research chapters follow the Introduction, each presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 2 modifies a SERS-based immunoassay previously developed in our group, extending it to the low-level detection of viral pathogens and demonstrating its versatility in terms of analyte type, Chapter 3 investigates the influence of ERL size, material composition, and separation distance between the ERLs and capture substrate on the SERS signal. This chapter links SPR with SERS enhancement factors and is consistent with many of the results from theoretical treatments

  15. Ultrasensitive detection of target analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles using laser-induced nanoparticle Rayleigh scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Detection of salt- and analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mostly relies on costly and bulky analytical instruments. To response this drawback, a portable, miniaturized, sensitive, and cost-effective detection technique is urgently required for rapid field detection and monitoring of target analyte via the use of AuNP-based sensor. This study combined a miniaturized spectrometer with a 532-nm laser to develop a laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique, allowing the sensitive and selective detection of Rayleigh scattering from the aggregated AuNPs. Three AuNP-based sensing systems, including salt-, thiol- and metal ion-induced aggregation of the AuNPs, were performed to examine the sensitivity of laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique. Salt-, thiol-, and metal ion-promoted NP aggregation were exemplified by the use of aptamer-adsorbed, fluorosurfactant-stabilized, and gallic acid-capped AuNPs for probing K(+), S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase-induced hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine, and Pb(2+), in sequence. Compared to the reported methods for monitoring the aggregated AuNPs, the proposed system provided distinct advantages of sensitivity. Laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique was improved to be convenient, cheap, and portable by replacing a diode laser and a miniaturized spectrometer with a laser pointer and a smart-phone. Using this smart-phone-based detection platform, we can determine whether or not the Pb(2+) concentration exceed the maximum allowable level of Pb(2+) in drinking water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Connected Car: Quantified Self becomes Quantified Car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Swan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The automotive industry could be facing a situation of profound change and opportunity in the coming decades. There are a number of influencing factors such as increasing urban and aging populations, self-driving cars, 3D parts printing, energy innovation, and new models of transportation service delivery (Zipcar, Uber. The connected car means that vehicles are now part of the connected world, continuously Internet-connected, generating and transmitting data, which on the one hand can be helpfully integrated into applications, like real-time traffic alerts broadcast to smartwatches, but also raises security and privacy concerns. This paper explores the automotive connected world, and describes five killer QS (Quantified Self-auto sensor applications that link quantified-self sensors (sensors that measure the personal biometrics of individuals like heart rate and automotive sensors (sensors that measure driver and passenger biometrics or quantitative automotive performance metrics like speed and braking activity. The applications are fatigue detection, real-time assistance for parking and accidents, anger management and stress reduction, keyless authentication and digital identity verification, and DIY diagnostics. These kinds of applications help to demonstrate the benefit of connected world data streams in the automotive industry and beyond where, more fundamentally for human progress, the automation of both physical and now cognitive tasks is underway.

  17. Car Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Automobile Club

    2012-01-01

    The Car Club wishes all its members Good road and Happy New Year 2012. It is time to think about renewing your subscription for this year, at a cost of 50 CHF, unchanged since several years. For those of you who are regular users of our equipment and who know all the advantages that the club is in a position to offer, it seems pointless to going to more details, as we are sure that many of you have made use of them and are satisfied. Therefore don’t forget to fill in the payment slip to continue to be a part of our large family. We remind you that everyone who works on the CERN site can be members of our club, this includes industrial support personnel and the personnel of companies which have a contract with CERN. If you are not yet a member, come and visit us! We will be happy to welcome you and show you the installations, alternatively you can visit our web site: http://club-acc.web.cern.ch/club-acc/ The use of the club’s installations is strictly reserved for members. Pour t...

  18. Chemical imaging and microspectroscopy with spectral focusing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bi-Chang; Sung, Jiha; Wu, Xiaoxi; Lim, Sang-Hyun

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate two different coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and microspectroscopy methods based on the spectral focusing mechanism. The first method uses strongly chirped broadband pulses from a single Ti:sapphire laser and generates CARS signals at the fingerprint region. Fast modulation of the time delay between the pump and Stokes laser pulses coupled with lock-in signal detection significantly reduces the nonresonant background and produces Raman-like CARS signals with a spectral resolution of 20 cm-1. The second method generates CARS signals in the CH (carbon-hydrogen) stretching region with IR supercontinuum pulses from a photonic crystal fiber. The spectral resolution of 30 cm-1 is achieved. Maximum entropy method is used to retrieve a Raman-equivalent CARS spectrum from lipid membranes. Chemical imaging and microspectroscopy are demonstrated with various samples.

  19. Dual-tip-enhanced ultrafast CARS nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmann, Charles W.; Cao, Bin; Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Voronine, Dmitri V.

    2014-08-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and, in particular, femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques (FAST CARS) have been successfully used for molecular spectroscopy and microscopic imaging. Recent progress in ultrafast nano-optics provides flexibility in generation and control of optical near fields, and holds promise to extend CARS techniques to the nanoscale. In this theoretical study, we demonstrate ultrafast subwavelentgh control of coherent Raman spectra of molecules in the vicinity of a plasmonic nanostructure excited by ultrashort laser pulses. The simulated nanostructure design provides localized excitation sources for CARS by focusing incident laser pulses into subwavelength hot spots via two self-similar nanolens antennas connected by a waveguide. Hot-spot-selective dual-tip-enhanced CARS (2TECARS) nanospectra of DNA nucleobases are obtained by simulating optimized pump, Stokes and probe near fields using tips, laser polarization- and pulse-shaping. This technique may be used to explore ultrafast energy and electron transfer dynamics in real space with nanometre resolution.

  20. Dual-tip-enhanced ultrafast CARS nanoscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ballmann, Charles W; Sinyukov, Alexander M; Sokolov, Alexei V; Voronine, Dmitri V

    2013-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and, in particular, femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques (FAST CARS) have been successfully used for molecular spectroscopy and microscopic imaging. Recent progress in ultrafast nanooptics provides flexibility in generation and control of optical near fields, and holds promise to extend CARS techniques to the nanoscale. In this theoretical study, we demonstrate ultrafast subwavelentgh control of coherent Raman spectra of molecules in the vicinity of a plasmonic nanostructure excited by ultrashort laser pulses. The simulated nanostructure design provides localized excitation sources for CARS by focusing incident laser pulses into subwavelength hot spots via two self-similar nanolens antennas connected by a waveguide. Hot-spot-selective dual-tip-enhanced CARS (2TECARS) nanospectra of DNA nucleobases are obtained by simulating optimized pump, Stokes and probe near fields using tips, laser polarization- and pulse-shaping. This technique may be used to explore ...

  1. Multimodal CARS microscopy of structured carbohydrate biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Moffatt, Douglas J.; Stolow, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for the study of structured condensed carbohydrate systems. Simultaneous second-harmonic generation (SHG) and spectrally-scanned CARS microscopy was used to elucidate structure, alignment, and density in cellulose cotton fibers and in starch grains undergoing rapid heat-moisture swelling. Our results suggest that CARS response of the O-H stretch region (3000 cm−1–3400 cm−1), together with the commonly-measured C-H stretch (2750 cm−1–2970 cm−1) and SHG provide potentially important structural information and contrast in these materials. PMID:21258555

  2. Saharan dust events at the Jungfraujoch: detection by wavelength dependence of the single scattering albedo and first climatology analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Collaud Coen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Scattering and absorption coefficients have been measured continuously at several wavelengths since March 2001 at the high altitude site Jungfraujoch (3580ma.s.l.. From these data, the wavelength dependences of the Ångström exponent and particularly of the single scattering albedo are determined. While the exponent of the single scattering albedo usually increases with wavelength, it decreases with wavelength during Saharan dust events (SDE due to the greater size of the mineral aerosol particles and their different chemical composition. This change in the sign of the single scattering exponent turns out to be a sensitive means for detecting Saharan dust events. The occurrence of SDE detected by this new method was confirmed by visual inspection of filter colors and by studying long-range back-trajectories. An examination of SDE over a 22-month period shows that SDE are more frequent during the March-June period as well as during October and November. The trajectory analysis indicated a mean traveling time of 96.5h, with the most important source countries situated in the northern and north-western part of the Saharan desert. Most of the SDE do not lead to a detectable increase of the 48-h total suspended particulate matter (TSP concentration at the Jungfraujoch. During Saharan dust events, the average contribution of this dust to hourly TSP at the Jungfraujoch is 16µg/m3, which corresponds to an annual mean of 0.8µg/m3 or 24% of TSP.

  3. First Order Statistics of Speckle around a Scatterer Volume Density Edge and Edge Detection in Ultrasound Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic imaging plays an important role in medical imaging. But the images exhibit a granular structure, commonly known as speckle. The speckle tends to mask the presence of low-contrast lesions and reduces the ability of a human observer to resolve fine details. Our interest in this research is to examine the problem of edge detection and come up with methods for improving the visualization of organ boundaries and tissue inhomogeneity edges. An edge in an image can be formed either by acoustic impedance change or by scatterer volume density change (or both). The echo produced from these two kinds of edges has different properties. In this work, it has been proved that the echo from a scatterer volume density edge is the Hilbert transform of the echo from a rough impedance boundary (except for a constant) under certain conditions. This result can be used for choosing the correct signal to transmit to optimize the performance of edge detectors and characterizing an edge. The signal to noise ratio of the echo produced by a scatterer volume density edge is also obtained. It is found that: (1) By transmitting a signal with high bandwidth ratio and low center frequency, one can obtain a higher signal to noise ratio. (2) For large area edges, the farther the transducer is from the edge, the larger is the signal to noise ratio. But for small area edges, the nearer the transducer is to the edge, the larger is the signal to noise ratio. These results enable us to maximize the signal to noise ratio by adjusting these parameters. (3) The signal to noise ratio is not only related to the ratio of scatterer volume densities at the edge, but also related to the absolute value of scatterer volume densities. Some of these results have been proved through simulation and experiment. Different edge detection methods have been used to detect simulated scatterer volume density edges to compare their performance. A so-called interlaced array method has been developed for speckle

  4. Bistatic electromagnetic scattering and detection of pollutant on a sea surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanmi, Helmi; Khenchaf, Ali; Comblet, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    We present the study and analysis of the variations of the bistatic electromagnetic (EM) signature of the sea surface contaminated by pollutants. Therefore, we start with the numerical analyses of the pollutant effect on the geometrical and physical characteristics of sea surface. Then, we evaluate the EM scattering coefficients of the clean and polluted sea surfaces observed in bistatic configuration by using the numerical forward-backward method. The obtained numerical results of the EM scattering coefficients are studied and given as a function of various parameters: sea state, wind velocity, type of pollutant (sea surface polluted by oil emulsion and sea surface covered by oil layer), incidence and scattering angles, frequencies bands (C, X, and Ku), and radar polarization.

  5. Resonance Rayleigh Scattering and SERS Spectral Detection of Trace Hg(II) Based on the Gold Nanocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Huixiang; Li, Chongning; Liu, Qingye; Wen, Guiqing; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2017-05-17

    Mercury (Hg) is a heavy metal pollutant, there is an urgent need to develop simple and sensitive methods for Hg(II) in water. In this article, a simple and sensitive resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) method was developed for determination of 0.008-1.33 µmol/L Hg, with a detection limit of 0.003 μmol/L, based on the Hg(II) regulation of gold nanoenzyme catalysis on the HAuCl₄-H₂O₂ to form gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with an RRS peak at 370 nm. Upon addition of molecular probes of Victoria blue B (VBB), the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) peak linearly decreased at 1612 cm-1 with the Hg(II) concentration increasing in the range of 0.013-0.5 μmol/L. With its good selectivity and good accuracy, the RRS method is expected to be a promising candidate for determining mercury ions in water samples.

  6. Rapid Detection of Polychlorinated Biphenyls at Trace Levels in Real Environmental Samples by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjun Zhang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of trace levels of persistent pollutants in the environment is difficult but significant. Organic pollutant homologues, due to their similar physical and chemical properties, are even more difficult to distinguish, especially in trace amounts. We report here a simple method to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs in soil and distilled spirit samples by the surface-enhanced Raman scattering technique using Ag nanorod arrays as substrates. By this method, polychlorinated biphenyls can be detected to a concentration of 5 μg/g in dry soil samples within 1 minute. Furthermore, based on simulation and understanding of the Raman characteristics of PCBs, we recognized homologues of tetrachlorobiphenyl by using the surface-enhance Raman scattering method even in trace amounts in acetone solutions, and their characteristic Raman peaks still can be distinguished at a concentration of 10-6 mol/L. This study provides a fast, simple and sensitive method for the detection and recognition of organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls.

  7. The use of surface-enhanced Raman scattering for detecting molecular evidence of life in rocks, sediments, and sedimentary deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Stephen A; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M; Parnell, John

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a versatile analytical technique capable of characterizing the composition of both inorganic and organic materials. Consequently, it is frequently suggested as a payload on many planetary landers. Only approximately 1 in every 10(6) photons are Raman scattered; therefore, the detection of trace quantities of an analyte dispersed in a sample matrix can be much harder to achieve. To overcome this, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) both provide greatly enhanced signals (enhancements between 10(5) and 10(9)) through the analyte's interaction with the locally generated surface plasmons, which occur at a "roughened" or nanostructured metallic surface (e.g., Cu, Au, and Ag). Both SERS and SERRS may therefore provide a viable technique for trace analysis of samples. In this paper, we describe the development of SERS assays for analyzing trace amounts of compounds present in the solvent extracts of sedimentary deposits. These assays were used to detect biological pigments present in an Arctic microoasis (a small locale of elevated biological productivity) and its detrital regolith, characterize the pigmentation of microbial mats around hydrothermal springs, and detect fossil organic matter in hydrothermal deposits. These field study examples demonstrate that SERS technology is sufficiently mature to be applied to many astrobiological analog studies on Earth. Many current and proposed imaging systems intended for remote deployment already posses the instrumental components needed for SERS. The addition of wet chemistry sample processing facilities to these instruments could yield field-deployable analytical instruments with a broadened analytical window for detecting organic compounds with a biological or geological origin.

  8. Small Angle Neutron Scattering for the Detection of Branching in Worm-Like Micellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtt, Karsten; Rai, Durgesh; Beaucage, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Micellar solutions can exhibit a broad variety of phase structure as a function of counter ion content, surfactant concentration, and the presence of ternary components. Under some conditions extended cylindrical structures that display persistence and other chain features of polymers are produced. These worm-like micelles (WLMs) can form branched structures that dynamically change under shear and even in quiescent conditions. The rheology of these branched WLMs is strongly dependent on migration of the branch points, and the dynamics of branch formation and removal. We have recently developed a scattering model for branched polyolefins and other topologically complex materials that can quantify the branching density, branch length, branch functionality and the hyperbranch (branch-on-branch) content of polymers. Using small angle neutron scattering these parameters are determined for model emulsions with varying surfactant and salt concentrations.

  9. A novel method for resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering via photoelectron spectroscopy detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakovski, Georgi L; Lin, Ming Fu; Damiani, Daniel S; Schlotter, William F; Turner, Joshua J; Nordlund, Dennis; Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2017-11-01

    A method for measuring resonant inelastic X-ray scattering based on the conversion of X-ray photons into photoelectrons is presented. The setup is compact, relies on commercially available detectors, and offers significant flexibility. This method is demonstrated at the Linac Coherent Light Source with ∼0.5 eV resolution at the cobalt L3-edge, with signal rates comparable with traditional grating spectrometers.

  10. Silver nanoparticle enhanced Raman scattering-based lateral flow immunoassays for ultra-sensitive detection of the heavy metal chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiajie; Liu, Hongwu; Lan, Caifeng; Fu, Qiangqiang; Huang, Caihong; Luo, Zhi; Jiang, Tianjiu; Tang, Yong

    2014-12-01

    We report a simple and ultra-sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) strip sensor based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs). LFIAs are inexpensive, simple, portable and robust, thus making them commonplace in medicine, agriculture and food safety. However, their applications are limited due to the low signal intensity of the color-formation reaction based on the label accumulation. SERS is a powerful molecular spectroscopy technique for ultra-detection, which is based on the enhancement of the inelastic scattering from molecules located near nanostructured metallic surfaces when the molecules are illuminated and the surface plasmons are excited. Because of the rapidity and robustness of LFIAs and the high sensitivity of SERS, we introduce SERS into LFIAs (SERS-LFIA). Our SERS-LFIA demonstrates fast, excellent performance and is suitable for the semiquantitative examination of ultratrace analytes (Cr3+), with the limit of the detection (LOD) as low as 10-5 ng mL-1, which is 105-fold more highly sensitive than those previously used to detect Cr3+ within 15 min.

  11. Simultaneous Determination of Four Active Ingredients in Sargentodoxa cuneata by HPLC Coupled with Evaporative Light Scattering Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di-Hua Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A HPLC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection method had been developed for the simultaneous determination of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethyl alcohol glycoside, salidroside, chlorogenic acid, and liriodendrin in the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata. With a C18 column, the analysis was performed using acetonitrile and 0.2% formic acid aqueous solution as mobile phase in gradient program at a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min. The optimum drift tube temperature of evaporative light scattering detection was at 105°C with the air flow rate of 2.5 L/min. The calibration curves showed good linearity during the test ranges. This method was validated for limits of detection and quantification, precision, and reproducibility. The recoveries were within the range of 96.39%–104.64%. The relative standard deviations of intraday and interday precision were less than 2.90% and 3.30%, respectively. The developed method can be successfully used to quantify the four analytes in the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata from various regions in China.

  12. Novel system for pulse radiolysis with multi-angle light scattering detection (PR-MALLS) - concept, construction and first tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlubowski, S.; Sawicki, P.; Sowinski, S.; Rokita, B.; Bures, K. D.; Rosiak, J. M.; Ulanski, P.

    2018-01-01

    Time-resolved pulse radiolysis, utilizing short pulses of high-energy electrons from accelerators, is an effective method for rapidly generating free radicals and other transient species in solution. Combined with fast time-resolved spectroscopic detection (typically in the ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared), it is invaluable for monitoring the reactivity of species subjected to radiolysis on timescales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. When used for polymer solutions, pulse radiolysis can be coupled with light-scattering detection, creating a powerful tool for kinetic and mechanistic analysis of processes like degradation or cross-linking of macromolecules. Changes in the light scattering intensity (LSI) of polymer solutions are indicative of alterations in the molecular weight and/or in the radius of gyration, i.e., the dimensions and shape of the macromolecules. In addition to other detection methods, LSI technique provides a convenient tool to study radiation-induced alterations in macromolecules as a function of time after the pulse. Pulse radiolysis systems employing this detection mode have been so far constructed to follow light scattered at a single angle (typically the right angle) to the incident light beam. Here we present an advanced pulse radiolysis & multi-angle light-scattering-intensity system (PR-MALLS) that has been built at IARC and is currently in the phase of optimization and testing. Idea of its design and operation is described and preliminary results for radiation-induced degradation of pullulan as well as polymerization and crosslinking of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate are presented. Implementation of the proposed system provides a novel research tool, which is expected to contribute to the expansion of knowledge on free-radical reactions in monomer- and polymer solutions, by delivering precise kinetic data on changes in molecular weight and size, and thus allowing to formulate or verify reaction mechanisms. The proposed method is

  13. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) detected in abnormally high concentrations in postmortem blood and urine from two persons found dead inside a car containing a gasoline spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karinen, Ritva; Vindenes, Vigdis; Morild, Inge; Johnsen, Lene; Le Nygaard, Ilah; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2013-09-01

    Two deep frozen persons, a female and a male, were found dead in a car. There had been an explosive fire inside the car which had extinguished itself. On the floor inside the car were large pools of liquid which smelled of gasoline. The autopsy findings and routine toxicological analyses could not explain the cause of death. Carboxyhemoglobin levels in the blood samples were gasoline as a fuel oxygenate. Gasoline poisoning is likely to be the cause of the death in these two cases, and MTBE can be a suitable marker of gasoline exposure, when other volatile components have vaporized. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Colleges Drive Research on Electric Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basken, Paul

    2009-01-01

    As the General Motors Corporation shuts assembly plants and veers toward bankruptcy, the lonely remnants of one of its top technological achievements--the first modern mass-produced electric car--lie scattered across a few dozen American college campuses. GM produced and leased to customers more than 1,000 "EV1" automobiles beginning in 1996. In…

  15. Detecting scattered light from low-mass molecular cores at 3.6 μm. Impact of global effects on the observation of coreshine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacker, J.; Andersen, M.; Thi, W.-F.; Bacmann, A.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Recently discovered scattered light at 3-5 μm from low-mass cores (so-called "coreshine") reveals the presence of grains around 1 μm, which is larger than the grains found in the low-density interstellar medium. But only about half of the 100+ cores investigated so far show the effect. This prompts further studies on the origin of this detection rate. Aims: We aim to supply criteria for detecting scattered light at 3.6 μm from molecular cloud cores. Methods: From the 3D continuum radiative transfer equation, we derive the expected scattered light intensity from a core placed in an arbitrary direction seen from Earth. We use the approximation of single scattering, consider extinction up to 2nd-order Taylor approximation, and neglect spatial gradients in the dust size distribution. We analyze how scattered light can outshine the absorbing effect of extinction in front of background radiation by the core for given grain properties, anisotropic interstellar radiation field and background field. The impact of the directional characteristics of the scattering on the detection of scattered light from cores is calculated for a given grain size distribution, and local effects like additional radiation field components are discussed. The surface brightness profiles of a core with a 1D density profile are calculated for various Galactic locations, and the results are compared to the approximate detection limits. Results: We find that for optically thin radiation and a constant size distribution, a simple limit for detecting scattered light from a low-mass core can be derived that holds for grains with sizes smaller than 0.5 μm. The extinction by the core prohibits detection in bright parts of the Galactic plane, especially near the Galactic center. For scattered light received from low-mass cores with grain sizes beyond 0.5 μm, the directional characteristics of the scattering favors the detection of scattered light above and below the Galactic center, and to

  16. A novel array processing method for precise depth detection of ultrasound point scatter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    A signal based algorithm resulting in increased depth resolution is presented for medical ultrasound. It relies on multiple foci beamforming that is enabled by current ultrasound imaging systems. The concept stems from optical microscopy and is translated here into ultrasound using the Field II...... scatter. A 37.8 μm uncertainty in depth estimation is achieved, which attains an almost 3-fold improvement compared to conventional ultrasound imaging axial resolution. Future work on the development of this algorithm requires experimental validation in tissue-like materials that provide strong...

  17. Ultrasonic scattering and transmission properties of mammalian white matter in the detection of brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Joel; Mathur, Anu N.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2001-06-01

    In this work, we examine the orientation-dependent scattering and attenuation properties of white mater from mammalian brain tissue. We find that both the backscatter and attenuation of ultrasound in these tissues exhibit anisotropy. Furthermore, when extrapolated down to 1 MHz, it appears that the attenuation differences will be small but the backscatter differences are potentially resolvable. From a tissue characterization context, this means that the impact of changes due to the rotation of overlying tissues will be small compared to the changes in the strength of the backscatter signals from the regions of interest.

  18. The Socialist Car

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars K.

    2013-01-01

    Review of L.H. Siegelbaum (ed.) The Socialist Car. Automobility in the Eastern Block. Cornell University Press, 2011.......Review of L.H. Siegelbaum (ed.) The Socialist Car. Automobility in the Eastern Block. Cornell University Press, 2011....

  19. [Determination of amygdalin content in Semen Armeniacae Amarum by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao-hui; You, Wen-wei; He, Feng

    2005-12-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD) was employed for determination of amygdalin content in Semen Armeniacae Amarum. The detection was performed with the column of Hypersil-ODS (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 microm) and column temperature of 25 degrees C. The mobile phase was methanol-water (70:30) with flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. Evaporative light-scattering detector was used and the drift tube temperature was set at 98 degrees Celsius with the gas flow rate of 3.2 L/min. A standard curve was generated, which was linear in the range of 1.0-15.1 microg for amygdalin content (r=0.999 9). The average recovery of amygdalin was 99.0% with RSD of 2.9% (n=5). Besides simplicity and rapidness, the method yields accurate and reproducible results and can therefore be used in the quality control of Semen Armeniacae Amarum.

  20. Flexible and Adhesive Surface Enhance Raman Scattering Active Tape for Rapid Detection of Pesticide Residues in Fruits and Vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiaming; Huang, Youju; Kannan, Palanisamy; Zhang, Lei; Lin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Jiawei; Chen, Tao; Guo, Longhua

    2016-02-16

    The efficient extraction of targets from complex surfaces is vital for technological applications ranging from environmental pollutant monitoring to analysis of explosive traces and pesticide residues. In our present study, we proposed a proof-of-concept surface enhance Raman scattering (SERS) active substrate serving directly to the rapid extraction and detection of target molecules. The novel substrate was constructed by decorating the commercial tape with colloidal gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), which simultaneously provides SERS activity and "sticky" of adhesive. The utility of SERS tape was demonstrated by directly extracting pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables via a simple and viable "paste and peel off" approach. The obtained strong and easily distinguishable SERS signals allow us to detect various pesticide residues such as parathion-methyl, thiram, and chlorpyrifos in the real samples with complex surfaces including green vegetable, cucumber, orange, and apple.

  1. Monomeric Amyloid Beta Peptide in Hexafluoroisopropanol Detected by Small Angle Neutron Scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang-Haagen

    Full Text Available Small proteins like amyloid beta (Aβ monomers are related to neurodegenerative disorders by aggregation to insoluble fibrils. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS is a nondestructive method to observe the aggregation process in solution. We show that SANS is able to resolve monomers of small molecular weight like Aβ for aggregation studies. We examine Aβ monomers after prolonged storing in d-hexafluoroisopropanol (dHFIP by using SANS and dynamic light scattering (DLS. We determined the radius of gyration from SANS as 1.0±0.1 nm for Aβ1-40 and 1.6±0.1 nm for Aβ1-42 in agreement with 3D NMR structures in similar solvents suggesting a solvent surface layer with 5% increased density. After initial dissolution in dHFIP Aβ aggregates sediment with a major component of pure monomers showing a hydrodynamic radius of 1.8±0.3 nm for Aβ1-40 and 3.2±0.4 nm for Aβ1-42 including a surface layer of dHFIP solvent molecules.

  2. A Semi-Automated Object-Based Approach for Landslide Detection Validated by Persistent Scatterer Interferometry Measures and Landslide Inventories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Lang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Geoinformation derived from Earth observation (EO plays a key role for detecting, analyzing and monitoring landslides to assist hazard and risk analysis. Within the framework of the EC-GMES-FP7 project SAFER (Services and Applications For Emergency Response a semi-automated object-based approach for landslide detection and classification has been developed. The method was applied to a case study in North-Western Italy using SPOT-5 imagery and a digital elevation model (DEM, including its derivatives slope, aspect, curvature and plan curvature. For the classification in the object-based environment spectral, spatial and morphological properties as well as context information were used. In a first step, landslides were classified on a coarse segmentation level to separate them from other features with similar spectral characteristics. Thereafter, the classification was refined on a finer segmentation level, where two categories of mass movements were differentiated: flow-like landslides and other landslide types. In total, an area of 3.77 km² was detected as landslide-affected area, 1.68 km² were classified as flow-like landslides and 2.09 km² as other landslide types. The outcomes were compared to and validated by pre-existing landslide inventory data (IFFI and PAI and an interpretation of PSI (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry measures derived from ERS1/2, ENVISAT ASAR and RADARSAT-1 data. The spatial overlap of the detected landslides and existing landslide inventories revealed 44.8% (IFFI and 50.4% (PAI, respectively. About 32% of the polygons identified through OBIA are covered by persistent scatterers data.

  3. Label and label-free based surface-enhanced Raman scattering for pathogen bacteria detection: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhou, Haibo; Hu, Ziwei; Yu, Guangxia; Yang, Danting; Zhao, Jinshun

    2017-08-15

    Rapid, accurate detection of pathogen bacteria is a highly topical research area for the sake of food safety and public health. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is being considered as a powerful and attractive technique for pathogen bacteria detection, due to its sensitivity, high speed, comparatively low cost, multiplexing ability and portability. This contribution aims to give a comprehensive overview of SERS as a technique for rapid detection of pathogen bacteria based on label and label-free strategies. A brief tutorial on SERS is given first of all. Then we summarize the recent trends and developments of label and label-free based SERS applied to detection of pathogen bacteria, including the relatively complete interpretation of SERS spectra. In addition, multifunctional SERS platforms for pathogen bacteria in matrix are discussed as well. Furthermore, an outlook of the work done and a perspective on the future directions of SERS as a reliable tool for real-time pathogen bacteria detection are given. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic immunoassay for cancer biomarker detection based on surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from coupled plasmonic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zhen; Wang, Chongwen; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Donggen; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2016-10-15

    A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor was developed for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Capture antibody-coated silver shell magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag MNPs) were utilized as the CEA enrichment platform and the SERRS signal amplification substrate. Gold nanorods (AuNRs) were coated with a thin silver shell to be in resonance with the resonant Raman dye diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTC) and the excitation wavelength at 785nm. The silver-coated AuNRs (Au@Ag NRs) were then modified with detection antibody as the SERRS tags. Sandwich immune complexes formed in the presence of the target biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and this formation induced the plasmonic coupling between the Au@Ag NRs and Fe3O4@Ag MNPs. The SERRS signal of DTTC molecules located in the coupled plasmonic nanostructures was significantly enhanced. As a result, the proposed SERRS sensor was able to detect CEA with a low limit of detection of 4.75fg/mL and a wide dynamic linear range from 10fg/mL to 100ng/mL. The sensor provides a novel SERRS strategy for trace analyte detection and has a potential for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cross Sections of Charged Current Neutrino Scattering off 132Xe for the Supernova Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Divari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The total cross sections as well as the neutrino event rates are calculated in the charged current neutrino and antineutrino scattering off 132Xe isotope at neutrino energies Ev<100 MeV. Transitions to excited nuclear states are calculated in the framework of quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The contributions from different multipoles are shown for various neutrino energies. Flux-averaged cross sections are obtained by convolving the cross sections with a two-parameter Fermi-Dirac distribution. The flux-averaged cross sections are also calculated using terrestrial neutrino sources based on conventional sources (muon decay at rest or on low-energy beta-beams.

  6. Intelligent Car System

    OpenAIRE

    Siddique, Qasim

    2012-01-01

    In modern life the road safety has becomes the core issue. One single move of a driver can cause horrifying accident. The main goal of intelligent car system is to make communication with other cars on the road. The system is able to control to speed, direction and the distance between the cars the intelligent car system is able to recognize traffic light and is able to take decision according to it. This paper presents a framework of the intelligent car system. I validate several aspect of o...

  7. Intelligent Car System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qasim Siddique

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern life the road safety has becomes the core issue. One single move of a driver can cause horrifying accident. The main goal of intelligent car system is to make communication with other cars on the road. The system is able to control to speed, direction and the distance between the cars the intelligent car system is able to recognize traffic light and is able to take decision according to it. This paper presents a framework of the intelligent car system. I validate several aspect of our system using simulation.

  8. Simultaneous determination of nucleosides, myriocin, and carbohydrates in Cordyceps by HPLC coupled with diode array detection and evaporative light scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Yang, Feng-Qing; Feng, Kun; Li, De-Qiang; Zhao, Jing; Li, Shao-Ping

    2009-12-01

    A HPLC coupled with diode array detection (DAD) and evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) method for qualitative and quantitative analysis of eight nucleosides and nucleobases, three carbohydrates and myriocin in Cordyceps was developed. A Prevail Carbohydrate ES column was employed for the separation within 50 min. Nucleosides and their bases were tested at UV 254 nm. ELSD was connected with DAD to determine myriocin and carbohydrates. The optimum drift tube temperature of ELSD was at 94 degrees C with the nitrogen flow rate of 2.0 L/min. All calibration curves showed good linearity (R(2)>0.9933) during the test ranges. The precision, repeatability, accuracy, LOD and LOQ were also fully investigated. This developed method was successfully applied to quantify 12 components, eight nucleosides and nucleobases, three carbohydrates and myriocin, in natural and cultured Cordyceps, which provides another view for quality control of Cordyceps sinensis.

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of DNA derived from the West Nile virus genome using magnetic capture of Raman-active gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model paramagnetic nanoparticle (MNP) assay is demonstrated for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of DNA oligonucleotides derived from the West Nile virus (WNV) genome. Detection is based on the capture of WNV target sequences by hybridization with complementary oligonucleotide pr...

  10. Non-labeling multiplex surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2014-01-01

    -pillars. In this experiment, detections of acetone and ethanol vapor at different concentrations were demonstrated. The detection limits were found to be 0.0017 ng and 0.0037 ng for ethanol and acetone vapor molecules respectively. Our approach is a non-labeling method such that it does not require the incorporation of any...... of acetone and ethanol vapor was also successfully demonstrated. The vibrational fingerprints of molecular structures provide specific Raman peaks for different VOCs contents. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multiplex VOCs detection using SERS. We believe that this work may lead to a portable...

  11. Explosive and chemical threat detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakonen, Aron; Andersson, Per Ola; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2015-01-01

    Acts of terror and warfare threats are challenging tasks for defense agencies around the world and of growing importance to security conscious policy makers and the general public. Explosives and chemical warfare agents are two of the major concerns in this context, as illustrated by the recent...... Boston Marathon bombing and nerve gas attacks on civilians in the Middle East. To prevent such tragic disasters, security personnel must be able to find, identify and deactivate the threats at multiple locations and levels. This involves major technical and practical challenges, such as detection......-situ threat identification and we summarize existing SERS detection methods and substrates with particular focus on ultra-sensitive real-time detection. General concepts, detection capabilities and perspectives are discussed in order to guide potential users of the technique for homeland security and anti...

  12. Stepped Frequency GPR for Utility Line Detection using Polarization Dependent Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Kiel; Gregersen, Ole

    2000-01-01

    A GPR for detection of buried cables and pipes is developed by Ekko Dome Production in cooperation with Aalborg University. The appearance is a "lawn mower" model including antennas, electronics and on-line data processing. A successful result is obtained by combining dedicated hardware and signa...... conditions, including sand, wet clay, pavements and grass covered soil. The results show reliable detection even when the conditions are difficult....

  13. Connected Car: Quantified Self becomes Quantified Car

    OpenAIRE

    Melanie Swan

    2015-01-01

    The automotive industry could be facing a situation of profound change and opportunity in the coming decades. There are a number of influencing factors such as increasing urban and aging populations, self-driving cars, 3D parts printing, energy innovation, and new models of transportation service delivery (Zipcar, Uber). The connected car means that vehicles are now part of the connected world, continuously Internet-connected, generating and transmitting data, which on the one hand can be hel...

  14. Ultra-sensitive molecular detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering on periodic metal-dielectric nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nien, Chun; Li, Yi-Hsuan; Su, Vin-Cent; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2017-02-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique for trace chemical analysis and single molecule detection in the application of biochemical monitoring and food safety due to its ability to enhance the Raman scattering of molecules near the metallic surface or nanostructures. Here, we present a comprehensive study of the SERS enhancement by the periodically nanostructured surface, where the thin film of silver is deposited onto the surface, except the sidewall of posts, of 1-D lamellar gratings with varying pitch to forming metal-dielectric composite nanostructures. By enhancing the localized and surface-propagating mode in the vicinity of the concaves, the SERS signal can be improved by amplifying the intensity of electric field and increasing the optical path length of the incident light. Experimental investigations show that the enhancement factor can be manipulated by varying the polarization of incident light and the pitch size of gratings. To demonstrate the SERS effects of the proposed structures, thin layers of benzoic acid, which is commonly used as a food preservative, are deposited on the SERS substrates by spin-coating a solution of benzoic acid and dried at room temperature. A Confocal Raman microscope with a 532 nm laser source is used to illuminate light and measure the Raman spectrum of benzoic acid. We demonstrate the Raman signal of benzoic acid can be enhanced on the order of 102 on the SERS substrates.

  15. Detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in artificial sea-water using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péron, Olivier; Rinnert, Emmanuel; Lehaitre, Michel; Crassous, Philippe; Compère, Chantal

    2009-07-15

    This paper reports an accurate synthesis of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrates, based on gold colloidal monolayer, suitable for in situ environmental analysis. Quartz substrates were functionalized by silanization with (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPMS) or (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS) and they subsequently reacted with colloidal suspension of gold metal nanoparticles: respectively, the functional groups SH and NH(2) bound gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles were prepared by the chemical reduction of HAuCl(4) using sodium tricitrate and immobilized onto silanized quartz substrates. Active substrate surface morphology was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements and gold nanoparticles presented a diameter in the range 40-100 nm. Colloidal hydrophobic films, allowing nonpolar molecule pre-concentration, were obtained. The surfaces exhibit strong enhancement of Raman scattering from molecules adsorbed on the films. Spectra were recorded for two PAHs, naphthalene and pyrene, in artificial sea-water (ASW) with limits of detection (LODs) of 10 ppb for both on MPMS silanized substrates.

  16. Using small-angle neutron scattering to detect nanoscopic lipid domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Heberle, Frederick A; Petruzielo, Robin S; Katsaras, John

    2013-01-01

    The cell plasma membrane is a complex system, which is thought to be capable of exhibiting non-random lateral organization. Studies of live cells and model membranes have yielded mechanisms responsible for the formation, growth, and maintenance of nanoscopic heterogeneities, although the existence and mechanisms that give rise to these heterogeneities remain controversial. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a tool ideally suited to interrogate lateral heterogeneity in model membranes, primarily due to its unique spatial resolution (i.e., ~5-100nm) and its ability to resolve structure with minimal perturbation to the membrane. In this review we examine several methods used to analyze the SANS signal arising from freely suspended unilamellar vesicles containing lateral heterogeneity. Specifically, we discuss an analytical model for a single, round domain on a spherical vesicle. We then discuss a numerical method that uses Monte Carlo simulation to describe systems with multiple domains and/or more complicated morphologies. Also discussed are several model-independent approaches that are sensitive to membrane heterogeneity. The review concludes with several recent applications of SANS to the study of membrane raft mixtures. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering to Detect Nanoscopic Lipid Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Petruzielo, Robin S [Cornell University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The cell plasma membrane is a complex system, which is thought to be capable of exhibiting non-random lateral organization. Studies of live cells and model membranes have yielded mechanisms responsible for the formation, growth, and maintenance of nanoscopic heterogeneities, although the existence and mechanisms that give rise to these heterogeneities remain controversial. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a tool ideally suited to interrogate lateral heterogeneity in model membranes, primarily due to its unique spatial resolution (i.e., "5 100 nm) and its ability to resolve structure with minimal perturbation to the membrane. In this review we examine several methods used to analyze the SANS signal arising from freely suspended unilamellar vesicles containing lateral heterogeneity. Specifically, we discuss an analytical model for a single, round domain on a spherical vesicle. We then discuss a numerical method that uses Monte Carlo simulation to describe systems with multiple domains and/or more complicated morphologies. Also discussed are several model-independent approaches that are sensitive to membrane heterogeneity. The review concludes with several recent applications of SANS to the study of membrane raft mixtures.

  18. Detection of nerve gases using surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates with high droplet adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakonen, Aron; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    Threats from chemical warfare agents, commonly known as nerve gases, constitute a serious security issue of increasing global concern because of surging terrorist activity worldwide. However, nerve gases are difficult to detect using current analytical tools and outside dedicated laboratories. Here...... adhesion and nanopillar clustering due to elasto-capillary forces, resulting in enrichment of target molecules in plasmonic hot-spots with high Raman enhancement. The results may pave the way for strategic life-saving SERS detection of chemical warfare agents in the field....

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of silver nanoparticles in environmental and biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Huiyuan [Stockbridge School of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Xing, Baoshan, E-mail: bx@umass.edu [Stockbridge School of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Hamlet, Leigh C.; Chica, Andrea [Stockbridge School of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); He, Lili, E-mail: lilihe@foodsci.umass.edu [Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Growing concerns over the potential release and threat of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to environmental and biological systems urge researchers to investigate their fate and behavior. However, current analytical techniques cannot meet the requirements for rapidly, sensitively and reliably probing AgNPs in complex matrices. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has shown great capability for rapid detection of AgNPs based on an indicator molecule that can bind on the AgNP surface. The objective of this study was to exploit SERS to detect AgNPs in environmental and biological samples through optimizing the Raman indicator for SERS. Seven indicator molecules were selected and determined to obtain their SERS signals at optimal concentrations. Among them, 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene (BPE), crystal violet and ferric dimethyl-dithiocarbamate (ferbam) produced the highest SERS intensities. Further experiments on binding competition between each two of the three candidates showed that ferbam had the highest AgNPs-binding ability. The underlying mechanism lies in the strong binding affinity of ferbam with AgNPs via multiple sulfur atoms. We further validated ferbam to be an effective indicator for SERS detection of as low as 0.1 mg/L AgNPs in genuine surface water and 0.57 mg/L in spinach juice. Moreover, limited interference on SERS detection of AgNPs was found from environmentally relevant inorganic ions, organic matter, inorganic particles, as well as biologically relevant components, demonstrating the ferbam-assisted SERS is an effective and sensitive method to detect AgNPs in complex environmental and biological samples. - Graphical abstract: SERS signal intensity of ferbam indicates the concentration of AgNPs. - Highlights: • Ferbam was found to be the best indicator for SERS detection of AgNPs. • SERS was able to detect AgNPs in both environmental and biological samples. • Major components in the two matrices had limited effect on AgNP detection.

  20. Aptamer based surface enhanced Raman scattering detection of vasopressin using multilayer nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yun Suk; Erickson, David

    2010-01-15

    Here we present an optofluidic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) device for on-chip detection of vasopressin using an aptamer based binding assay. To create the SERS-active substrate, densely packed, 200 nm diameter, metal nanotube arrays were fabricated using an anodized alumina nanoporous membrane as a template for shadow evaporation. We explore the use of both single layer Au structures and multilayer Au/Ag/Au structures and also demonstrate a facile technique for integrating the membranes with all polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. Using the integrated device, we demonstrate a linear response in the main detection peak intensity to solution phase concentration and a limit of detection on the order of 5.2 microU/mL. This low limit of detection is obtained with device containing the multilayer SERS substrate which we show exhibits a stronger Raman enhancement while maintaining biocompatibility and ease or surface reactivity with the capture probe. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High sensitive detection of penicillin G residues in milk by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongliang; Li, Xiuling; Yang, Ming; Yang, Libin; Han, Xiaoxia; Jiang, Xin; Zhao, Bing

    2017-05-15

    The antibiotic residue in animal source foods (milk, meat, etc.) is threatening people's health due to its abusing in livestock breeding more and more seriously. In this study, a simple and sensitive SERS method coupled with a two-step pretreatment process of sample was proposed for the residue detection of penicillin G (PENG) in real milk sample. It can be found that the two-step pretreatment process of sample is an essential procedure for the successful detection of PENG residue in milk, which can effectively avoid interference from other components in the sample and achieve the trace-level detection of PENG residue by SERS. Under the optimal test conditions, the limit of detection of PENG residue is 2.54×10(-9)mol/L (equal to 0.85μg/kg), which is lower than the standard of the European Union (4μg/kg). And, there is a good linear relationship (R(2)=0.9902) in the concentration range of 1.0×10(-8)~1.0×10(-3)mol/L. By this method, the recovery of PENG residue ranges from 76% to 97% with relative standard deviation between 4.8% and 2.1%. The proposed SERS method can be effectively applied for determination of PENG residue in milk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Residual pesticide detection on food with particle-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Huang, LiChuan; Masui, Kyoko; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2014-08-01

    Modern farming relies highly on pesticides to protect agricultural food items from insects for high yield and better quality. Increasing use of pesticide has raised concern about its harmful effects on human health and hence it has become very important to detect even small amount of pesticide residues. Raman spectroscopy is a suitable nondestructive method for pesticide detection, however, it is not very effective for low concentration of pesticide molecules. Here, we report an approach based on plasmonic enhancement, namely, particle enhanced Raman spectroscopy (PERS), which is rapid, nondestructive and sensitive. In this technique, Raman signals are enhanced via the resonance excitation of localized plasmons in metallic nanoparticles. Gold nanostructures are promising materials that have ability to tune surface plasmon resonance frequency in visible to near-IR, which depends on shape and size of nanostructures. We synthesized gold nanorods (GNRs) with desired shape and size by seed mediated growth method, and successfully detected very tiny amount of pesticide present on food items. We also conformed that the detection of pesticide was not possible by usual Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Porous Silicon Covered with Silver Nanoparticles as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Substrate for Ultra-Low Concentration Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosović, Marin; Balarin, Maja; Ivanda, Mile; Đerek, Vedran; Marciuš, Marijan; Ristić, Mira; Gamulin, Ozren

    2015-12-01

    Microporous and macro-mesoporous silicon templates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates were produced by anodization of low doped p-type silicon wafers. By immersion plating in AgNO3, the templates were covered with silver metallic film consisting of different silver nanostructures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs of these SERS substrates showed diverse morphology with significant difference in an average size and size distribution of silver nanoparticles. Ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) reflection spectroscopy showed plasmonic absorption at 398 and 469 nm, which is in accordance with the SEM findings. The activity of the SERS substrates was tested using rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules and 514.5 nm laser excitation. Contrary to the microporous silicon template, the SERS substrate prepared from macro-mesoporous silicon template showed significantly broader size distribution of irregular silver nanoparticles as well as localized surface plasmon resonance closer to excitation laser wavelength. Such silver morphology has high SERS sensitivity that enables ultralow concentration detection of R6G dye molecules up to 10(-15) M. To our knowledge, this is the lowest concentration detected of R6G dye molecules on porous silicon-based SERS substrates, which might even indicate possible single molecule detection.

  4. Detection of mercury ions using silver telluride nanoparticles as a substrate and recognition element through surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei eWang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we unveil a new sensing strategy for sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS using Ag2Te nanoparticles (NPs as a substrate and recognition element and rhodamine 6G (R6G as a reporter. Ag2Te NPs prepared from tellurium dioxide and silver nitrate and hydrazine in aqueous solution containing sodium dodecyl sulfate at 90ºC with an average size of 26.8 ± 4.1 nm (100 counts have strong SERS activity. The Ag2Te substrate provides strong SERS signals of R6G with an enhancement factor of 3.6 × 105 at 1360 cm-1, which is comparable to Ag NPs. After interaction of Ag2Te NPs with Hg2+, some HgTe NPs are formed, leading to decreases in the SERS signal of R6G, mainly because HgTe NPs relative to Ag2Te NPs have weaker SERS activity. Under optimum conditions, this SERS approach using Ag2Te as substrates is selective for the detection of Hg2+, with a limit of detection of 3 nM and linearity over 10-150 nM. The practicality of this approach has been validated for the determination of the concentrations of spiked Hg2+ in a pond water sample.

  5. Scattered light modulation cancellation method for sub-ppb-level NO2 detection in a LD-excited QEPAS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huadan; Dong, Lei; Ma, Ying; Wu, Hongpeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Yin, Xukun; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Weiguang; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-05-16

    A sub-ppb-level nitrogen dioxide (NO2) QEPAS sensor is developed by use of a cost-effective wide stripe laser diode (LD) emitting at 450 nm and a novel background noise suppression method called scattered light modulation cancellation method (SL-MOCAM). The SL-MOCAM is a variant of modulation spectroscopy using two light sources: excitation and balance light sources. The background noise caused by the stray light of the excitation light sources can be eliminated by exposing the QEPAS spectrophone to the modulated balance light. The noise in the LD-excited QEPAS system is investigated in detail and the results shows that > ~90% background noise can be effectively eliminated by the SL-MOCAM. For NO2 detection, a 1σ detection limit of ~60 ppb is achieved for 1 s integration time and the detection limit can be improved to 0.6 ppb with an integration time of 360 s. Moreover, the SLMOCAM shows a remote working ability in the preliminary investigation.

  6. Breaking car use habits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Møller, Berit Thorup

    2008-01-01

    and consider using-or at least trying-public transport instead. About 1,000 car drivers participated in the experiment either as experimental subjects, receiving a free one-month travelcard, or as control subjects. As predicted, the intervention had a significant impact on drivers' use of public transport...... and it also neutralized the impact of car driving habits on mode choice. However, in the longer run (i.e., four months after the experiment) experimental subjects did not use public transport more than control subjects. Hence, it seems that although many car drivers choose travel mode habitually, their final......Based on calls for innovative ways of reducing car traffic and research indicating that car driving is often the result of habitual decision-making and choice processes, this paper reports on a field experiment designed to test a tool aimed to entice drivers to skip the habitual choice of the car...

  7. Engineering an Affordable Self-Driving Car

    KAUST Repository

    Budisteanu, Alexandru Ionut

    2018-01-17

    "More than a million people die in car accidents each year, and most of those accidents are the result of human errorヤ Alexandru Budisteanu is 23 years old and owns a group of startups including Autonomix, an Artificial Intelligence software for affordable self-driving cars and he designed a low-cost self-driving car. The car\\'s roof has cameras and low-resolution 3D LiDAR equipment to detect traffic lanes, other cars, curbs and obstacles, such as people crossing by. To process this dizzying amount of data, Alexandru employed Artificial Intelligence algorithms to extract information from the visual data and plot a safe route for the car. Then, he built a manufacturing facility in his garage from Romania to assembly affordable VisionBot Pick and Place robots that are used to produce electronics. During this lecture, Alexandru will talk about this autonomous self-driving car prototype, for which he received the grand prize of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, and was nominated by TIME magazine as one of the worldメs most influential teens of 2013.

  8. Detection of Surface-Linked Polychlorinated Biphenyls using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindzevicius, Tomas; Barten, Jan; Vorobiev, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    formation of microsized nanopillar clusters, and consequently, so-called “hot spots” can be formed. In order to improve PCB detection limit, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB77) compounds were chemically modified with a – SCH3 (PCB77-SCH3) group. Experimental and numerical analysis of vibrational modes...... showed only minor differences between standard PCB77 and PCB77-SCH3. Consequently, we observe significantly increased SERS signals for –SCH3 modified PCB77 while retaining most vibrational modes that characterize standard PCB77. Results point towards more efficient path for detecting different PCB...... congeners from real-life samples. We interpret the result as PCB77-SCH3 link to gold surface via sulfur atoms that facilitates accumulation of the modified PCB molecules on the metal surface. For similar SERS experimental conditions most spectral characteristics of PCB77 are identifiable down...

  9. Label-free evaluation of hepatic microvesicular steatosis with multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuc T Le

    Full Text Available Hepatic microvesicular steatosis is a hallmark of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and early-stage fatty liver disease. Current histopathology techniques are inadequate for the clinical evaluation of hepatic microvesicular steatosis. In this paper, we explore the use of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy for the detection and characterization of hepatic microvesicular steatosis. We show that CARS microscopy is more sensitive than Oil Red O histology for the detection of microvesicular steatosis. Computer-assisted analysis of liver lipid level based on CARS signal intensity is consistent with triglyceride measurement using a standard biochemical assay. Most importantly, in a single measurement procedure on unprocessed and unstained liver tissues, multimodal CARS imaging provides a wealth of critical information including the detection of microvesicular steatosis and quantitation of liver lipid content, number and size of lipid droplets, and lipid unsaturation and packing order of lipid droplets. Such information can only be assessed by multiple different methods on processed and stained liver tissues or tissue extracts using current standard analytical techniques. Multimodal CARS microscopy also permits label-free identification of lipid-rich non-parenchymal cells. In addition, label-free and non-perturbative CARS imaging allow rapid screening of mitochondrial toxins-induced microvesicular steatosis in primary hepatocyte cultures. With its sensitivity and versatility, multimodal CARS microscopy should be a powerful tool for the clinical evaluation of hepatic microvesicular steatosis.

  10. Hyperspectral and differential CARS microscopy for quantitative chemical imaging in human adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Di Napoli, Claudia; Pope, Iestyn; Masia, Francesco; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy for quantitative chemical imaging of saturated and unsaturated lipids in human stem-cell derived adipocytes. We compare dual-frequency/differential CARS (D-CARS), which enables rapid imaging and simple data analysis, with broadband hyperspectral CARS microscopy analyzed using an unsupervised phase-retrieval and factorization method recently developed by us for quantitative chemica...

  11. Car stickers for 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    The 2012 car stickers are now available. Holders of blue car stickers will receive by internal mail their 2012 car stickers as of 5 December. Holders of red car stickers are kindly requested to come to the Registration Service (Building 55,1st floor) to renew their 2011 stickers. This service is open from Monday to Friday from 7.30 am to 5.30 pm non-stop. Documents related to the vehicles concerned are mandatory. Reception and Access Control Service – GS/IS/SIS General Infrastructure Services Department

  12. Car stickers for 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    The 2011 car stickers are now available. Holders of blue car stickers will receive their 2011 car stickers by internal mail as of 15 December.   Holders of red car stickers are kindly requested to come to the Registration Service (Building 55,1st floor) to renew their 2011 stickers. This service is open from Monday to Friday from 7.30 am to 5.30 pm non-stop. Documents for the vehicles concerned must be presented. Reception and Access Control Service – GS/ISG/SIS General Infrastructure Services Department

  13. Ultrasensitive Detection of Angiogenin Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Immunoassay Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chon, Hyangah; Lim, Dong Woo; Choo, Jaebum [Hanyang Univ., Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Sooik [Chungbuk National Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Our proposed SERS-based immunoassay technique, using HGNs and magnetic beads, shows a strong potential for the early diagnosis of angiogenic disease because the ultrasensitive detection to attomolar concentration level is possible. Angiogenesis, the process of new blood-vessel growth, plays an important role in normal physiological process. To date, angiogenin (ANG) is known to be a key factor in induction of angiogenesis by activation of endothelial and smooth muscle cells as well as by triggering a number of biological processes. It is also well known that the expression of ANG is up-regulated in various types of human cancers.

  14. Detection of the tuberculosis antigenic marker mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan in pretreated serum by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Alexis C; Laurentius, Lars B; Mulvihill, Timothy S; Granger, Jennifer H; Spencer, John S; Chatterjee, Delphi; Hanson, Kimberly E; Porter, Marc D

    2016-12-19

    The ability to detect tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a global health care priority. This paper describes the development and preliminary assessment of the clinical accuracy of a heterogeneous immunoassay that integrates a serum pretreatment process with readout by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the low-level detection of mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM). ManLAM is a major virulence factor in the infectious pathology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that has been found in the serum and other body fluids of infected patients. The effectiveness of ManLAM as a TB diagnostic marker, however, remains unproven for reasons not yet well understood. As reported herein, we have found that (1) ManLAM complexes with proteins and possibly other components in serum; (2) these complexes have a strongly detrimental impact on the ability to detect ManLAM using an immunoassay; (3) a simple pretreatment step can disrupt this complexation; and (4) disruption by pretreatment improves detection by 250×. We also describe the results from a preliminary assessment on the utility of serum pretreatment by running immunoassays on archived specimens from 24 TB-positive patients and 10 healthy controls. ManLAM was measurable in 21 of the 24 TB-positive specimens, but not in any of the 10 control specimens. These findings, albeit for a very small specimen set, translate to a clinical sensitivity of 87.5% and a clinical specificity of 100%. Together, these results both provide much needed evidence for the clinical utility of ManLAM as a TB marker, and demonstrate the potential utility of our overall approach to serve as a new strategy for the development of diagnostic tests for this disease.

  15. Simultaneous separation of nine surfactants of various types by HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong Soon; Ryu, Ho Ryul; Rhee, Choong Kyun

    2006-10-15

    A simultaneous separation of cationic, amphoteric and nonioinc nine surfactants (DMDS, DMDP, DMDM, DMDL, BZC, CDE, A/O, SUNC, IMD) has been performed by a reverse phase-HPLC method utilizing a single J'sphere ODS (250mmx4.6mm, 4mum) column and a methanol-water containing 0.2% TFA eluent system within 60min. The observed precision in determination of concentration was less than 5% R.S.D., which revealed that ELSD was an effective tool to detect the various studied surfactants of low volatility without chromophore. In addition, the detection limits were in the concentration range of 3.5-10mug/mL, and the calibration curves, i.e. the log-log plots, were linear in the working range of 5-4600mug/mL with the slopes of 1.321-1.668. The application of the analytical procedure to three household products without pretreatment supported that the presented chromatographic method was simple to be practical for a routine analysis of commercial products.

  16. Ultrafast surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering detection in droplet-based microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Michael P; Hong, Jongin; Lim, Chaesung; Choo, Jaebum; Albrecht, Tim; Demello, Andrew J; Edel, Joshua B

    2011-04-15

    The development of ultrafast Raman-based detection is one of the most interesting challenges underpinning the application of droplet-based microfluidics. Herein, we describe the use of surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) with submillisecond time resolution as a powerful detection tool in microdroplet reactors. Individual droplets containing silver nanoparticle aggregates functionalized with Raman reporters are interrogated and characterized by full spectra acquisitions with high spatial resolution in real time. Whereas previous works coupling SERRS with droplet-based microfluidics acquire a single spectrum over single or multiple droplets, we build upon these results by increasing our temporal resolution by 2 orders of magnitude. This allows us to interrogate multiple points within one individual droplet. The SERRS signals emitted from the aggregates are utilized to access the influence of flow rate on droplet size and throughput. Accordingly, our approach allows for high-throughput analysis that facilitates the study of other biological assays or molecular interactions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Flow injection analysis-Rayleigh light scattering detection for online determination of protein in human serum sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Dong, Lijun; Wang, Weiping; Hu, Zhide; Chen, Xingguo

    2006-07-01

    A flow injection analysis (FIA) system combined with Rayleigh light scattering (RLS) detection is developed for the sensitive and rapid determination of protein concentration in human serum sample. This method is based on the weak intensity of RLS of Eriochrome Black T (EBT, 2-hydroxy-1-(1-hydroxy-2-naphthylazo)-6-nitronaphthalene-4-sulfonic acid sodium salt), which can be enhanced by the addition of protein in weakly acidic solution. The effects of pH and interfering species on the determination of protein were examined. Calibrations for protein, based on RLS intensity, were linear in the concentration ranges of 7-36 microg/ml for human serum album (HSA) and 8-44 microg/ml for bovine serum album (BSA). The detection limits of the method were found to be 0.882 and 2.507 microg/ml for HSA and BSA, respectively. A relative standard deviation of 0.76% (n=5) was obtained with 20 microg/ml HSA standard solution. The FIA-RLS method was more stable than the general RLS method, and the average RSD value of FIA-RLS was less than that of the general RLS. The sample rate was determined to be 90 samples per hour.

  18. Highly sensitive immunoassay of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide marker using surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, H.; Lee, S.; Wang, R.; Bang, S.-Y.; Lee, H.-S.; Bae, S.-C.; Hong, S. H.; Yoon, Y. H.; Lim, D.; Choo, J.

    2015-07-01

    We report a highly sensitive anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) detection method for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based immunoassay. Herein, cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP)-conjugated magnetic beads and anti-human IgG-conjugated hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) were used as substrates and SERS nano-tags, respectively. First, its detection sensitivity was evaluated using anti-CCP standard solutions. Then quantitative anti-CCP levels, determined by the SERS-based assay, were compared with those obtained from three commercially available anti-CCP assay kits (Immunoscan CCPlus, ImmunnLisa™ CCP and BioPlex™ 2200) to assess its potential utility as a clinical tool. Finally, clinical samples from 20 RA patients were investigated using them. In the SERS-based assay, the anti-CCP level in human serum was successfully determined by monitoring the characteristic Raman peak intensity of SERS nano-tags. The diagnostic performance of our SERS-based immunoassay for clinical samples shows a good agreement with those measured by three commercial anti-CCP kits. In addition, our SERS-based assay results are more consistent in the low concentration range (0-25 U/mL) than those achieved by the commercial kits. Accordingly, it is estimated that the SERS-based assay is a potentially useful diagnostic tool for early diagnosis of RA.

  19. Label-free aptamer-based sensor for specific detection of malathion residues by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yonghui; Teng, Yuanjie; Li, Pan; Liu, Wenhan; Shi, Qianwei; Zhang, Yuchao

    2018-02-01

    A novel label-free aptamer surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensor for trace malathion residue detection was proposed. In this process, the binding of malathion molecule with aptamer is identified directly. The silver nanoparticles modified with positively charged spermine served as enhancing and capture reagents for the negatively charged aptamer. Then, the silver nanoparticles modified by aptamer were used to specifically capture the malathion. The SERS background spectra of spermine, aptamer, and malathion were recorded and distinguished with the spectrum of malathion-aptamer. To enhance the characteristic peak signal of malathion captured by the aptamer, the aggregate reagents (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2) were compared and selected. The selectivity of this method was verified in the mixed-pesticide standard solution, which included malathion, phosmet, chlorpyrifos-methyl, and fethion. Results show that malathion can be specifically identified when the mixed-pesticide interferences existed. The standard curve was established, presenting a good linear range of 5 × 10- 7 to 1 × 10- 5 mol·L- 1. The spiked experiments for tap water show good recoveries from 87.4% to 110.5% with a relative standard deviation of less than 4.22%. Therefore, the proposed label-free aptamer SERS sensor is convenient, specifically detects trace malathion residues, and can be applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of other pesticides.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Based on Controllable-Layer Graphene Shells Directly Synthesized on Cu Nanoparticles for Molecular Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hengwei; Huo, Yanyan; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Peixi; Jiang, Shouzhen; Xu, Shicai; Ma, Yong; Wang, Shuyun; Li, Hongsheng

    2015-10-05

    Graphene shells with a controllable number of layers were directly synthesized on Cu nanoparticles (CuNPs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to fabricate a graphene-encapsulated CuNPs (G/CuNPs) hybrid system for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The enhanced Raman spectra of adenosine and rhodamine 6G (R6G) showed that the G/CuNPs hybrid system can strongly suppress background fluorescence and increase signal-to-noise ratio. In four different types of SERS systems, the G/CuNPs hybrid system exhibits more efficient SERS than a transferred graphene/CuNPs hybrid system and pure CuNPs and graphene substrates. The minimum detectable concentrations of adenosine and R6G by the G/CuNPs hybrid system can be as low as 10(-8) and 10(-10)  M, respectively. The excellent linear relationship between Raman intensity and analyte concentration can be used for molecular detection. The graphene shell can also effectively prevent surface oxidation of Cu nanoparticles after exposure to ambient air and thus endow the hybrid system with a long lifetime. This work provides a basis for the fabrication of novel SERS substrates. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Detection of explosives by surface enhanced Raman scattering using substrate with a monolayer of ordered Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T. F.; Lu, S. H.; Wang, A. J.; Zheng, D.; Wu, Z. L.; Wang, Y. S.

    2014-10-01

    Monolayers with different structures arranged by 5 nm Au nanoparticles were grown using a self-assembly method on Si substrates. Raman spectra of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) explosives adsorbed on bare and Au nanoparticle covered Si substrates were measured. Effects of Au monolayers and their structures on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of NH4NO3 and RDX were investigated. The monolayer arranged by Au nanoparticles into linear arrays is more sensitive to the explosives than that arranged into hexagonal close-packed structure. The detection limit using the substrate covered by a monolayer of Au nanoparticle linear arrays is about 7.7 ppm for NH4NO3 and 0.19 ppm for RDX. The integrated intensity of the vibration peak increases linearly with an increase in explosive concentration in log-log scales for both NH4NO3 and RDX. The enhancement factor is 7.0 × 104 for RDX. Monolayers of Au nanoparticles arranged into linear arrays have potential applications in detecting or identifying explosives at very low levels of concentration.

  2. Graphene Dendrimer-stabilized silver nanoparticles for detection of methimazole using Surface-enhanced Raman scattering with computational assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Tawfik A.; Al-Shalalfeh, Mutasem M.; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2016-08-01

    Graphene functionalized with polyamidoamine dendrimer, decorated with silver nanoparticles (G-D-Ag), was synthesized and evaluated as a substrate with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for methimazole (MTZ) detection. Sodium borohydride was used as a reducing agent to cultivate silver nanoparticles on the dendrimer. The obtained G-D-Ag was characterized by using UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM image indicated the successful formation of the G-D-Ag. The behavior of MTZ on the G-D-Ag as a reliable and robust substrate was investigated by SERS, which indicated mostly a chemical interaction between G-D-Ag and MTZ. The bands of the MTZ normal spectra at 1538, 1463, 1342, 1278, 1156, 1092, 1016, 600, 525 and 410 cm-1 were enhanced due to the SERS effect. Correlations between the logarithmical scale of MTZ concentrations and SERS signal intensities were established, and a low detection limit of 1.43 × 10-12 M was successfully obtained. The density functional theory (DFT) approach was utilized to provide reliable assignment of the key Raman bands.

  3. Gain-assisted U-shaped Au nanostructure for ultrahigh sensitivity single molecule detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Jun; Jiang, Tao

    2015-12-01

    We report an efficient gain-assisted U-shaped Au nanostructure for ultrahigh sensitivity single-molecule detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) amplification property and SERS characteristics of the proposed nanosystem are numerically analyzed by the finite-element method (FEM). The calculations show that the LSPR strength and the local electric field intensity of the active nanosystem can be greatly amplified when the nanosystem reaches its spaser threshold (k thre). Furthermore, the maximum SERS enhancement factor of the nanosystem is as high as 4.7 × 1017 on the Au surface areas and 5.8 × 1018 in volume, respectively. Moreover, there is a high SERS enhancement factor of 1014-1017 on the entire surface of the active nanosystem, which is sufficient for single-molecule detection. Finally, the plasmon hybridization theory and effective LC circuit are used to qualitatively illustrate the red-shift of the resonance wavelength by increasing the geometric parameter W 2.

  4. Simultaneous determination of sucralose and related compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenwu; Wang, Nani; Zhang, Peimin; Zhang, Jiajie; Wu, Shuchao; Zhu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Sucralose is widely used in food and beverages as sweetener. Current synthesis approaches typically provide sucralose products with varying levels of related chlorinated carbohydrates which can affect the taste and flavor-modifying properties of sucralose. Quantification of related compounds in sucralose is often hampered by the lack of commercially available standards. In this work, nine related compounds were purified (purity>97%) and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), then a rapid and simple HPLC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of sucralose and related compounds. Under optimized conditions, the method showed good linearity in the range of 2-600μgmL(-1) with determination coefficients R(2)⩾0.9990. Moreover, low limits of detection in the range of 0.5-2.0μgmL(-1) and good repeatability (RSDsucralose quality control and purification process monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Highly selective and sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering nanosensors for detection of hydrogen peroxide in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lu-Lu; Liu, Ying-Ya; He, Sai-Huan; Chen, Jia-Qing; Liang, Yuan; Li, Hai-Tao

    2016-03-15

    Determination of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with high sensitivity and selectivity in living cells is a challenge for evaluating the diverse roles of H2O2 in the physiological and pathological processes. In this work, we present novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanosensors, 4-carboxyphenylboronic acid (4-CA) modified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs/4-CA), for sensing H2O2 in living cells. The nanosensors are based on that the H2O2-triggered oxidation reaction with the arylboronate on Au NPs would liberate the phenol, thus causing changes of the SERS spectra of the nanosensors. The results show the nanosensors feature higher selectivity for H2O2 over other reactive oxygen species, abundant competing cellular thiols and biologically relevant species, as well as excellent sensitivity with a low detection limit of 80 nM, which fulfills the requirements for detection of H2O2 in a biological system. In addition, the SERS nanosensors exhibit long term stability against time and pH, and high biocompatibility. More importantly, the presented nanosensors can be successfully used for monitoring changes of H2O2 levels within living biological samples upon oxidative stress, which opens up new opportunities to study its cellular biochemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Watching dance of the molecules - CARS microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczyński, Jaroslaw; Kubiak, Katarzyna; Węgłowska, Edyta

    2017-01-01

    CARS (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering) microscopy is an imaging method for living cells visualization as well as for food or cosmetics material analysis without the need for staining. The near infrared laser source generates the CARS signal - the characteristic intrinsic vibrational contrast of the molecules in a sample which is no longer caused by staining, but by the molecules themselves. It provides the benefit of a non-toxic, non-destructive and almost noninvasive method for sample imaging. CARS can easily be combined with fluorescence confocal microscopy so it is an excellent complementary imaging method. In this article we showed some of the applications for this technology: imaging of lipid droplets inside human HaCaT cells and analysis of the composition of cosmetic products. Moreover we believe, that soon new fields of application become accessible for this rapidly developing branch of microscopy.

  7. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with biopolymer encapsulated silver nanosubstrates for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Jaya; Park, Bosoon; Kwon, Yongkuk; Lawrence, Kurt C

    2013-10-01

    A biopolymer encapsulated with silver nanoparticles was prepared using silver nitrate, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution, and trisodium citrate. It was deposited on a mica sheet to use as SERS substrate. Fresh cultures of Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria innocua were washed from chicken rinse and suspended in 10 ml of sterile deionized water. Approximately 5 μl of the bacterial suspensions was placed on the substrate individually and exposed to 785 nm HeNe laser excitation. SERS spectral data were recorded over the Raman shift between 400 and 1800 cm(-1) from 15 different spots on the substrate for each sample; and three replicates were done on each bacteria type. Principal component analysis (PCA) model was developed to classify foodborne bacteria types. PC1 identified 96% of the variation among the given bacteria specimen, and PC2 identified 3%, resulted in a total of 99% classification accuracy. Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogies (SIMCA) of validation set gave an overall correct classification of 97%. Comparison of the SERS spectra of different types of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria indicated that all of them have similar cell walls and cell membrane structures. Conversely, major differences were noted around the nucleic acid and amino acid structure information between 1200 cm(-1) and 1700 cm(-1) and at the finger print region between 400 cm(-1) and 700 cm(-1). Silver biopolymer nanoparticle substrate could be a promising SERS tool for pathogen detection. Also this study indicates that SERS technology could be used for reliable and rapid detection and classification of food borne pathogens. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for pharmaceutics: a shift in the right direction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation demonstrates coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a tool in pharmaceutical solid state development. CARS microscopy is a nonlinear optical imaging technique that uses inelastic scattering of light to provide chemically specific imaging. CARS microscopy is

  9. The Electric Cars Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Over 100 years ago, the great inventor Thomas Edison warned that gasoline cars would pollute the environment and lead to gasoline shortages. He preferred the use of clean electric vehicles. He also put his money where his mouth was and developed an entirely new alkaline storage battery system for his beloved cars, the nickel-iron storage battery.…

  10. Femtosecond-Laser-Pulse Characterization and Optimization for CARS Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Piazza

    Full Text Available We present a simple method and its experimental implementation to determine the pulse durations and linear chirps of the pump-and-probe pulse and the Stokes pulse in a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope at sample level without additional autocorrelators. Our approach exploits the delay line, ubiquitous in such microscopes, to perform a convolution of the pump-and-probe and Stokes pulses as a function of their relative delay and it is based on the detection of the photons emitted from an appropriate non-linear sample. The analysis of the non-resonant four-wave-mixing and sum-frequency-generation signals allows for the direct retrieval of the pulse duration on the sample and the linear chirp of each pulse. This knowledge is crucial in maximizing the spectral-resolution and contrast in CARS imaging.

  11. Comparison of multialkali and GaAs photocathode detectors for Joint European Torus edge light detection and ranging Thomson scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempenaars, M.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Gowers, C.; Beurskens, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak has two light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering systems, one for the core and one dedicated to the edge T-e and n(e) profiles. The LIDAR scheme is unique to JET and is envisaged for use on ITER. The system's spatial resolution is defined by

  12. City Car = The City Car / Andres Sevtshuk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sevtshuk, Andres, 1981-

    2008-01-01

    Massachusettsi Tehnoloogiainstituudi (MIT) meedialaboratooriumi juures tegutseva Targa Linna Grupi (Smart City Group) ja General Motorsi koostööna sündinud kaheistmelisest linnasõbralikust elektriautost City Car. Nimetatud töögrupi liikmed (juht William J. Mitchell, töögruppi kuulus A. Sevtshuk Eestist)

  13. First Demonstration of a Scintillating Xenon Bubble Chamber for Detecting Dark Matter and Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, D; Chen, C J; Crisler, M; Cwiok, T; Dahl, C E; Grimsted, A; Gupta, J; Jin, M; Puig, R; Temples, D; Zhang, J

    2017-06-09

    A 30-g xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in a superheated liquid. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind photomultiplier tube to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time of nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. We report on data from this chamber for thermodynamic "Seitz" thresholds from 4.2 to 15.0 keV. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a ^{252}Cf neutron source indicate that, for an 8.3-keV thermodynamic threshold, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is 19±6  keV (1σ uncertainty). This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at any of the thresholds studied, setting a 90% C.L. upper limit of 6.3×10^{-7} bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF_{3}I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils, while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for the detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter and coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  14. First Demonstration of a Scintillating Xenon Bubble Chamber for Detecting Dark Matter and Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, D.; Chen, C. J.; Crisler, M.; Cwiok, T.; Dahl, C. E.; Grimsted, A.; Gupta, J.; Jin, M.; Puig, R.; Temples, D.; Zhang, J.

    2017-06-01

    A 30-g xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in a superheated liquid. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind photomultiplier tube to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time of nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. We report on data from this chamber for thermodynamic "Seitz" thresholds from 4.2 to 15.0 keV. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a Cf 252 neutron source indicate that, for an 8.3-keV thermodynamic threshold, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is 19 ±6 keV (1 σ uncertainty). This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at any of the thresholds studied, setting a 90% C.L. upper limit of 6.3 ×10-7 bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF3 I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils, while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for the detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter and coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  15. New mononuclear leukocyte-like populations within the granulocyte scatter gate detected by flow cytometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Susanne; Löffler, Markus; Kautzner, Marlene; Tárnok, Attila

    2017-02-01

    Granulocytes are the major players in innate immunity and are prognostic markers in diseases. An in-depth phenotypic characterization of granulocyte subtypes and correlation with biometry or lifestyle is so far lacking. The reason is, that either preparation of mononuclear cells was analyzed or that cells in the neutrophil window were neglected in the analysis. Here we show for the first time lymphocyte- (LL) and monocyte-like (ML) cells within the granulocyte scatter gate as new, previously unknown cell subpopulation. Immunophenotyping of 905 healthy German adults from the LIFE study [1] was performed by 10-color flow cytometry [2]. Age of men (n=420): 56.5±14.0 years, women (n=485): 56.7±13.6 y (range of 18-81 y). Data analyzed by FlowJo v10.0.6. Values compared by Mann-Whitney-U test: men vs women, young (18-49 y) vs. elderly (50-81 y.) men, and young (19-49 y.) vs. elderly (50-81 y.) women; significance: pgranulocyte gate four phenotypically distinct cell types were detected (all CD45+, SSCmid-high): LL1 CD3+,CD4+,CD8++,CD16/56+,CD38+,HLA-DR+ LL2 CD3+,CD4low,CD8+,CD38low LL3 CD3+,CD4+,CD8- ML1 CD3-,CD4low,CD14+,CD38+ LL2 counts were increased in men (p=0.042), as well as ML1 counts (p <0.001). Most of the cell counts were not dependent on age, except LL2 in women. In conclusion, new lymphocyte like cell types with the neutrophil scatter characteristics are reported. Counts correlate with age and gender. We plan to sort these new subtypes for further functional characterization and aim to establish them as cellular biomarkers for the early detection of various diseases. [1] BMC Public Health. 2015;15:691; [2] Cytometry A. 2014;85(9):781

  16. Completely background free broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xing; Niu, Hanben; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    For the first time it was proposed a numerical approach to obtain non-NRB time-frequency coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectrograms. In order to evaluate the validity of the CARS spectrogram for background free broadband CARS spectroscopy, the authors numerically constructed a CARS...

  17. The set-up for forward scattered particle detection at the external microbeam facility of the INFN-LABEC laboratory in Florence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuntini, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Massi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Calusi, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Gelli, N.; Castelli, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Carraresi, L.; Czelusniak, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Fedi, M.E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Gueli, A.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); INFN Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Liccioli, L.; Mandò, P.A.; Mazzinghi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Palla, L. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa and Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); and others

    2015-04-01

    In the last few years some new implementations and upgrades have been made to the external scanning microbeam of INFN-LABEC laboratory in Florence, enriching the existing PIXE, PIGE, BS, IBIL set-up with complementary techniques, when possible allowing for simultaneous multi-technique analyses. We developed a system, compatible with the existing set-up, for the out-of-vacuum detection of the forward scattered particles. This system makes feasible the external-STIM (Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) and external-FS (Forward Scattering), now both available at our beamline. Test measurements are shortly presented.

  18. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering detection for the analysis of structured nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattoni, Andrea; Rambaldi, Diana Cristina; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Melucci, Manuela; Krol, Silke; Garcia, Ana Maria Coto; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Roessner, Dierk; Johann, Christoph

    2009-12-25

    Synthesis and applications of new functional nanoparticles are topics of increasing interest in many fields of nanotechnology. Chemical modifications of inorganic nanoparticles are often necessary to improve their features as spectroscopic tracers or chemical sensors, and to increase water solubility and biocompatibility for applications in nano-biotechnology. Analysis and characterization of structured nanoparticles are then key steps for their synthesis optimization and final quality control. Many properties of structured nanoparticles are size-dependent. Particle size distribution analysis then provides fundamental analytical information. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with multi-angle light scattering (MALS) detection is able to size-separate and to characterize nanosized analytes in dispersion. In this work we focus on the central role of AF4-MALS to analyze and characterize different types of structured nanoparticles that are finding increasing applications in nano-biotechnology and nanomedicine: polymer-coated gold nanoparticles, fluorescent silica nanoparticles, and quantum dots. AF4 not only size-fractionated these nanoparticles and measured their hydrodynamic radius (r(h)) distribution but it also separated them from the unbound, relatively low-M(r) components of the nanoparticle structures which were still present in the sample solution. On-line MALS detection on real-time gave the gyration radius (r(g)) distribution of the fractionated nanoparticles. Additional information on nanoparticle morphology was then obtained from the r(h)/r(g) index. Stability of the nanoparticle dispersions was finally investigated. Aggregation of the fluorescent silica nanoparticles was found to depend on the concentration at which they were dispersed. Partial release of the polymeric coating from water-soluble QDs was found when shear stress was induced by increasing flowrates during fractionation.

  19. Possible Detection of an Emission Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature from the Accretion-Powered Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, W. B.; Terada, Y.; Tashiro, M. S.; Mihara, T.; Angelini, L.; Yamada, S.; Enoto, T.; Makishima, K.; Nakajima, M.; Yoshida, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present analysis of 4U 1626-67, a 7.7 s pulsar in a low-mass X-ray binary system, observed with the hard X-ray detector of the Japanese X-ray satellite Suzaku in 2006 March for a net exposure of 88 ks. The source was detected at an average 10-60 keY flux of approx 4 x 10-10 erg / sq cm/ s. The phase-averaged spectrum is reproduced well by combining a negative and positive power-law times exponential cutoff (NPEX) model modified at approx 37 keY by a cyclotron resonance scattering feature (CRSF). The phase-resolved analysis shows that the spectra at the bright phases are well fit by the NPEX with CRSF model. On the other hand. the spectrum in the dim phase lacks the NPEX high-energy cutoff component, and the CRSF can be reproduced by either an emission or an absorption profile. When fitting the dim phase spectrum with the NPEX plus Gaussian model. we find that the feature is better described in terms of an emission rather than an absorption profile. The statistical significance of this result, evaluated by means of an F test, is between 2.91 x 10(exp -3) and 1.53 x 10(exp -5), taking into account the systematic errors in the background evaluation of HXD-PIN. We find that the emission profile is more feasible than the absorption one for comparing the physical parameters in other phases. Therefore, we have possibly detected an emission line at the cyclotron resonance energy in the dim phase.

  20. Microfluidic chip based micro RNA detection through the combination of fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhile; Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Wu, Lei; Chen, Peng; Yun, Binfeng; Cui, Yiping

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel microfluidic chip based method for the detection of micro RNA (miRNA) via the combination of fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopies. First, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are immobilized onto a glass slide, forming a SERS enhancing substrate. Then a specificially designed molecular beacon (MB) is attached to the SERS substrate. The 3‧ end of the MB is decorated with a thiol group to facilitate the attachment of the MB, while the 5‧ end of the MB is labeled with an organic dye 6-FAM, which is used both as the fluorophore and SERS reporter. In the absence of target miRNA, the MB will form a hairpin structure, making 6-FAM close to the Ag NPs. Hence, the fluorescence of 6-FAM will be quenched and the Raman signal of 6-FAM will be enhanced. On the contrary, with target miRNA present, hybridization between the miRNA and MB will unfold the MB and increase the distance between 6-FAM and the Ag NPs. Thus the fluorescence of 6-FAM will recover and the SERS signal of 6-FAM will decrease. So the target miRNA will simultaneously introduce opposite changing trends in the intensities of the fluorescence and SERS signals. By combining the opposite changes in the two optical spectra, an improved sensitivity and linearity toward the target miRNA is achieved as compared with using solely fluorescence or SERS. Moreover, introducing the microfluidic chip can reduce the reaction time, reagent dosage and complexity of detection. With the improved sensitivity and simplicity, we anticipate that the presented method can have great potential in the investigation of miRNA related diseases.

  1. Au Nanoparticles Immobilized on Honeycomb-Like Polymeric Films for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yen Chiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully developed novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS substrates with three-dimensional (3D porous structures for effectively improving the sensitivity and reproducibility of SERS, which can rapidly detect small molecules (rhodamine 6G as an example. Periodical arrays of the honeycomb-like substrates were fabricated by self-assembling polyurethane-co-azetidine-2,4-dione (PU-PAZ polymers. PU-PAZ comprising amphiphilic dendrons could stabilize the phase separation between the water droplets and polymer solution, and then organize into regular porous structures during the breath figure method. Subsequently, SERS substrates were fabricated by immobilizing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs onto the honeycomb-like films with various 3D porous structures, controlled by the different PU-PAZ concentrations and relative humidities. Results show that surface enhancement factors of honeycomb-like substrates were 20 times higher than that of flat-film substrates (control group due to enormous hot-spots resonance effects by the 3D porous structure, verified through Raman mapping at various positions of the z-axis. Furthermore, the particle size effects were evaluated by immobilized 12 and 67 nm of AuNPs on the honeycomb-like substrates, indicating larger AuNPs could induce more pronounced hot-spots effects. The generation of hot-spots resonance to enhance Raman intensity is strongly dependent on the diameter of AuNPs and the pore size of the honeycomb-like and 3D porous substrates for label-free and rapid SERS detection.

  2. Sensitive Detection of Rhodamine B in Condiments Using Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) Silver Nanowires as Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixia; Li, Peng; Luo, Lan; Bu, Xiangfeng; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Bing; Tian, Yuan

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a facile large-scale preparation of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) substrates for the determination of Rhodamine B (RhB) based on silver nanowires (Ag NWs) has been developed. The morphology, structure, and properties of as-prepared Ag NWs are characterized using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Ag NWs were assembled onto glass slides through a self-assembly method. Moreover, in our experiment, as-prepared Ag NWs@glass were used as a SERRS substrate to detect RhB at the excitation wavelength of 532 nm. Experimental conditions such as pH value and soaking time on SERRS performance were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the SERRS intensity at 1648 cm(-1) exhibited a linear relationship with the concentration of RhB in the range of 1.0 × 10(-9)-1.0 × 10(-5 )mol L(-1) and detection limit (signal-to-noise ratio [S/N] = 3) is as low as 0.3 nmol L(-1). The corresponding correlation coefficient of the linear equation was 0.996. This method based on Ag NWs@glass for the detection of RhB in three kinds of condiment was investigated. The limits of detection (LODs) for RhB were 0.35 µg/g in chili powder, 0.14 µg/g in chili sauce, and 0.02 µg/g in Chinese prickly ash. The relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 2.18% and 4.56% (n = 3) and recoveries at three levels were in the range of 80.0-98.7% for different spiked food products. Moreover, the results showed that the proposed method was sensitive, convenient, and feasible for the determination of RhB in condiments.

  3. Detecting 3-D rotational motion and extracting target information from the principal component analysis of scatterer range histories

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nel, W

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available to estimate the 3-D position of scatterers as a by-product of the analysis. The technique is based on principal component analysis of accurate scatterer range histories and is shown only in simulation. Future research should focus on practical application....

  4. A gold nanohole array based surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensor for detection of silver(i) and mercury(ii) in human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Li, Ming; Jurevic, Richard; Cushing, Scott K.; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-06-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) biosensor has been developed by incorporating a gold nanohole array with a SERS probe (a gold nanostar@Raman-reporter@silica sandwich structure) into a single detection platform via DNA hybridization, which circumvents the nanoparticle aggregation and the inefficient Raman scattering issues. Strong plasmonic coupling between the Au nanostar and the Au nanohole array results in a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field, leading to amplification of the SERS signal. The SERS sensor has been used to detect Ag(i) and Hg(ii) ions in human saliva because both the metal ions could be released from dental amalgam fillings. The developed SERS sensor can be adapted as a general detection platform for non-invasive measurements of a wide range of analytes such as metal ions, small molecules, DNA and proteins in body fluids.A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) biosensor has been developed by incorporating a gold nanohole array with a SERS probe (a gold nanostar@Raman-reporter@silica sandwich structure) into a single detection platform via DNA hybridization, which circumvents the nanoparticle aggregation and the inefficient Raman scattering issues. Strong plasmonic coupling between the Au nanostar and the Au nanohole array results in a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field, leading to amplification of the SERS signal. The SERS sensor has been used to detect Ag(i) and Hg(ii) ions in human saliva because both the metal ions could be released from dental amalgam fillings. The developed SERS sensor can be adapted as a general detection platform for non-invasive measurements of a wide range of analytes such as metal ions, small molecules, DNA and proteins in body fluids. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02142a

  5. The Electric Car Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Brian E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Electric Car Challenge during which students applied methods of construction to build lightweight, strong vehicles that were powered by electricity. The activity required problem solving, sheet metal work, electricity, design, and construction skills. (JOW)

  6. Car-use habits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Berit Thorup; Thøgersen, John

    2008-01-01

    consequences. Since the decision is made quite automatically and only one choice alternative is considered (the habitually chosen one), behaviour guided by habit is difficult to change. The implications of car use habits for converting drivers to commuters using public transportation is analysed based......It is often claimed that many drivers use their private car rather habitually. The claim gains credibility from the fact that travelling to many everyday destinations fulfils all the prerequisites for habit formation: it is recurring, performed under stable circumstances and produces rewarding...... to do so, car use habit, and the interaction between the two, confirms the theory-derived hypothesis that car use habits act as an obstacle to the transformation of intentions to commute by public transportation into action....

  7. Distortionary company car taxation: deadweight losses through increased car ownership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ommeren, J.N.; Gutierrez Puigarnau, E.

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the effects of distortionary company car taxation through increased household car consumption for the Netherlands. We use several identification strategies and demonstrate that for about 20 % of households company car possession increases car ownership. The annual welfare loss of

  8. Usefulness of gold nanoparticles as labels for the determination of gliadins by immunoaffinity chromatography with light scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Delgado, M A; Aguilar-Caballos, M P; Gómez-Hens, A

    2011-10-15

    A simple and fast immunoaffinity method is proposed for the determination of gliadins for the first time using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as labels. The tracer used consists in a gliadin-AuNP conjugate prepared by the adsorption of gliadins onto the nanoparticle surface. Two AuNP sizes with diameters of 10nm and 20 nm were assayed to compare the behaviour of the corresponding tracer in the assay. The method relies on the injection in a commercial Protein G column of a preincubated mixture containing gliadins, polyclonal anti-gliadin antibodies, and the gliadin-AuNP tracer. This approach allows the separation of free and bound tracer fractions without any additional elution step, and the direct measurement of the resonance light scattering intensity of the free tracer through the peak height of the immunochromatogram, which is proportional to the analyte concentration. The immunocolumn can be used up to 25 times without eluting and it can be regenerated for at least 20 times. The dynamic ranges of the calibration graphs and the detection limits are 0.5-15.0 and 1.5-15.0 μg mL(-1) gliadins, and 0.2 μg mL(-1) and 0.8 μg mL(-1) gliadins, using 20-nm and 10-nm Au-NPs as labels, respectively. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, ranges between 2.7% and 2.9% using 20-nm AuNPs and 4% and 6.1% for 10-nm AuNPs. The method has been applied to the determination of the prolamin fraction in beer samples, obtaining recovery values in the range 71.2% and 101.7%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comprehensive model for studying noise induced by self-homodyne detection of backward Rayleigh scattering in optical fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fleyer, Michael; Cahill, James P; Horowitz, Moshe; Menyuk, Curtis R; Okusaga, Olukayode

    2015-01-01

    Backward Rayleigh scattering in optical fibers due to the fluctuations that are "frozen-in" to the fiber during the manufacturing process may limit the performance of optical sensors and bidirectional...

  10. An engineered CARS substrate with giant field enhancement in crisscross dimer nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Chen, Shu; Wang, Junqiao; Mu, Kaijun; Fan, Chunzhen; Liang, Erjun; Ding, Pei

    2018-01-15

    We theoretically investigate the optical properties of a nanostructure consisting of the two identical and symmetrically arranged crisscrosses. A plasmonic Fano resonance is induced by a strong interplay between bright mode and dark modes, where the bright mode is due to electric dipole resonance while dark modes originate from the magnetic dipole induced by LC resonances. In this article, we find that the electric field "hotspots" corresponding to three different wavelengths can be positioned at the same spatial position, and its spectral tunability is achieved by changing geometric parameters. The crisscrosses system can be designed as a plasmonic substrate for enhancing Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signal. This discovery provides a new method to achieve single molecule detection. At the same time, it also has many important applications for multi-photon imaging and other nonlinear optical processes, such as four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman scattering.

  11. Leica solution: CARS microscopy at video rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurquin, V.

    2008-02-01

    Confocal and multiphoton microscopy are powerful techniques to study morphology and dynamics in cells and tissue, if fluorescent labeling is possible or autofluorescence is strong. For non-fluorescent molecules, Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy provides chemical contrast based on intrinsic and highly specific vibrational properties of molecules eliminating the need for labeling. Just as other multiphoton techniques, CARS microscopy possesses three-dimensional sectioning capabilities. Leica Microsystems has combined the CARS imaging technology with its TCS SP5 confocal microscope to provide several advantages for CARS imaging. For CARS microscopy, two picosecond near-infrared lasers are overlapped spatially and temporally and sent into the scanhead of the confocal system. The software allows programmed, automatic switching between these light sources for multi-modal imaging. Furthermore the Leica TCS SP5 can be equipped with a non-descanned detector which will significantly enhance the signal. The Leica TCS SP5 scanhead combines two technologies in one system: a conventional scanner for maximum resolution and a resonant scanner for high time resolution. The fast scanner allows imaging speeds as high as 25 images/per second at a resolution of 512×512 pixel. This corresponds to true video-rate allowing to follow processes at these time-scales as well as the acquisition of three-dimensional stacks in a few seconds. This time resolution is critical to study live animals or human patients for which heart beat and muscle movements lead to a blurring of the image if the acquisition time is high. Furthermore with the resonant scanhead the sectioning is truly confocal and does not suffer from spatial leakage. In summary, CARS microscopy combined with the tandem scanner makes the Leica TCS SP5 a powerful tool for three-dimensional, label-free imaging of chemical and biological samples in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Color resolution improvement of the dark-field microscopy imaging of single light scattering plasmonic nanoprobes for microRNA visual detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Gao, Peng Fei; Zhang, Hong Zhi; Lei, Gang; Zheng, Lin Ling; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2017-03-30

    Imaging of light scattering plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs) with the aid of the dark-field microscopy imaging (iDFM) technique has attracted wide attention owing to its high signal-to-noise ratio, but to improve the color resolution and contrast of dark-field microscopy (DFM) images of single light scattering PNPs in a small spectral variation environment is still a challenge. In this study, a new color analytical method for resolving the resolution and contrast in DFM images has been developed and further applied for colorimetric analysis using the digital image processing technique. The color of single light scattering PNP images is automatically coded at first with the hue values of the HSI color model, and then amplified using the MATLAB program even for marginal spectral changes, leading to significant improvement of the color resolution of DFM images and easy detection with the naked eye. As a proof of concept, this method is then applied to distinguish single PNPs with various sizes and to visually detect hepatocellular carcinoma-associated microRNA. As it greatly improved the color resolution of iDFM and its detection sensitivity, this method shows promise to serve as a better alternative for sensitive visual analysis and spectrometer-based spectral analysis.

  13. Car stickers for 2009

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    All members of the personnel holding a valid contract (except owners of cars with green or CD plates) can come to the Registration Service (Building 55, 1st floor) to obtain their 2009 car sticker, Mondays to Fridays from 7.30 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. non-stop. Please ensure you bring with you the documents relating to the vehicles(s) concerned. If you only wish to register one vehicle, you can obtain the 2009 sticker using the request form on the Web (via internet Explorer only). NB: This notice only applies to members of the personnel who obtained one or several blue car stickers for 2008. Reception and Access Control Service – TS/FM

  14. A CdZnTe array for the detection of explosives in baggage by energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction signatures at multiple scatter angles

    CERN Document Server

    Malden, C H

    2000-01-01

    CdZnTe detectors were used to collect energy-dispersive diffraction spectra at a range of scatter angles, from sheets of explosives hidden in baggage. It is shown that the combined information from these 'signatures' can be used to determine whether an explosive sample is present or not. The geometrical configuration of the collimation and the position of the baggage within the scanner must be taken into careful consideration when optimising the capabilities of such a system. The CdZnTe array lends itself well to the detection of explosives in baggage since multiple signals may be collected simultaneously providing more rapid detection than achieved using a single detector.

  15. Car use within the household

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Borger, Bruno; Mulalic, Ismir; Rouwendal, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the demand for car kilometres in two-car households, focusing on the substitution between cars in response to fuel price changes. We use a large sample of detailed Danish data on two-car households to estimate—for each car owned by the household—own and cross-price effects...... of increases in fuel costs per kilometre. The empirical results show that failure to capture substitution between cars within the household can result in substantial misspecification biases. Ignoring substitution, we estimate fuel price elasticities of –0.81 and -0.65 for the primary and secondary cars...... efficient car, finding partial support for the underlying hypothesis. More importantly, the results of this extended model emphasize the importance of behavioural differences related to the position of the most fuel efficient car in the household, suggesting that households’ fuel efficiency choices...

  16. Quantitative detection of codeine in human plasma using surface-enhanced Raman scattering via adaptation of the isotopic labelling principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subaihi, Abdu; Muhamadali, Howbeer; Mutter, Shaun T; Blanch, Ewan; Ellis, David I; Goodacre, Royston

    2017-03-27

    In this study surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) combined with the isotopic labelling (IL) principle has been used for the quantification of codeine spiked into both water and human plasma. Multivariate statistical approaches were employed for the analysis of these SERS spectral data, particularly partial least squares regression (PLSR) which was used to generate models using the full SERS spectral data for quantification of codeine with, and without, an internal isotopic labelled standard. The PLSR models provided accurate codeine quantification in water and human plasma with high prediction accuracy (Q(2)). In addition, the employment of codeine-d6 as the internal standard further improved the accuracy of the model, by increasing the Q(2) from 0.89 to 0.94 and decreasing the low root-mean-square error of predictions (RMSEP) from 11.36 to 8.44. Using the peak area at 1281 cm(-1) assigned to C-N stretching, C-H wagging and ring breathing, the limit of detection was calculated in both water and human plasma to be 0.7 μM (209.55 ng mL(-1)) and 1.39 μM (416.12 ng mL(-1)), respectively. Due to a lack of definitive codeine vibrational assignments, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have also been used to assign the spectral bands with their corresponding vibrational modes, which were in excellent agreement with our experimental Raman and SERS findings. Thus, we have successfully demonstrated the application of SERS with isotope labelling for the absolute quantification of codeine in human plasma for the first time with a high degree of accuracy and reproducibility. The use of the IL principle which employs an isotopolog (that is to say, a molecule which is only different by the substitution of atoms by isotopes) improves quantification and reproducibility because the competition of the codeine and codeine-d6 for the metal surface used for SERS is equal and this will offset any difference in the number of particles under analysis or any fluctuations in

  17. High-resolution narrowband CARS spectroscopy in the spectral fingerprint region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chimento, P.F.; Jurna, M.; Bouwmans, H.S.P.; Garbacik, E.T.; Garbacik, E.T.; Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is an important technique for spectroscopy and chemically selective microscopy, but wider implementation requires dedicated versatile tunable sources. We describe an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on a magnesium oxide-doped

  18. Floating car data for traffic monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp, Kristian; Lahrmann, Harry Spaabæk

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a complete prototype system that uses Floating Car Data (FCD) for both automatic and manual detection of queues in traffic. The system is developed under EU’s Tempo program. The systems consists of small hardware units placed in mobile traffic report units (we use taxis...

  19. Looking at life through molecular vibrations: biomedical applications of CARS spectro-microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rago, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we present a series of studies employing non-linear vibrational microscopy, in the form of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) spectro-microscopy. The underlying motivation of this thesis is to explore the limits and demonstrate the technical feasibility of CARS imaging in a

  20. Gas Tank for Cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Lorenz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the development of a highly efficient pressure vessel for liquid petroleum gas (LPG in integral design is described. The pressure vessel can be customized in an optimal available installation space and thus means that the suitable for everyday use of existing modified cars or trucks can be increased.

  1. Cars submerged in water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Crashes in which cars are submerged in deep water or in a ditch are often complicated and serious. Considering their severity and the fact that approximately half the fatalities in this crash type are not due to drowning but to injury, preventive measures are to be preferred above measures that have

  2. Detection of short range order in SiO{sub 2} thin-films by grazing-incidence wide and small-angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Kohki, E-mail: nagata.koki@iri-tokyo.jp [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ogura, Atsushi [School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Hirosawa, Ichiro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Suwa, Tomoyuki; Teramoto, Akinobu; Ohmi, Tadahiro [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aramakiazaaoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-04-21

    The effects of the fabrication process conditions on the microstructure of silicon dioxide thin films of <10 nm thickness are presented. The microstructure was investigated using grazing-incidence wide and small-angle X-ray scattering methods with synchrotron radiation. The combination of a high brilliance light source and grazing incident configuration enabled the observation of very weak diffuse X-ray scattering from SiO{sub 2} thin films. The results revealed different microstructures, which were dependent on oxidizing species or temperature. The micro-level properties differed from bulk properties reported in the previous literature. It was indicated that these differences originate from inner stress. The detailed structure in an amorphous thin film was not revealed owing to detection difficulties.

  3. CARS measurements in an internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhouse, I A; Williams, D R; Cole, J B; Swords, M D

    1979-11-15

    The first reported coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) experiments within the cylinder of a firing internal combustion engine are described. The feasibility of making noninvasive temperature and species measurements, with good spatial and temporal resolution, both before and after ignition has been demonstrated. Temperatures have been derived from the shape of the Q-branch vibrational spectrum of nitrogen since it is present as a major species and does not take part in combustion. Methods of overcoming such problems as were encountered are discussed.

  4. Our Car as Power Plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, A.J.M.; Verhoef, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cell cars can provide more efficient and cleaner transportation. However, we use our cars for transportation only 5% of the time. When parked, the fuel cell in the car can produce electricity from hydrogen, which is cleaner and more efficient than the current electricity system, generating

  5. DOES ELECTRIC CAR PRODUCE EMISSIONS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír RIEVAJ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the comparison of the amount of emissions produced by vehicles with a combustion engine and electric cars. The comparison, which is based on the LCA factor results, indicates that an electric car produces more emissions than a vehicle with combustion engine. The implementation of electric cars will lead to an increase in the production of greenhouse gases.

  6. Car boots : Layers and drawers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veefkind, M.; Soetens, B.; Van Kasteren, J.

    2003-01-01

    The car boot of practically any car appears to be pretty low on the list of items the manufacturer considers important.The world of glossy, state of the art and high-tech design seems to come to a halt behind the rear seat. Designers at Audi, the German car manufacturers, were well aware that this

  7. Design optimization for car compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nastic, T.; Schoofs, A.J.G.; Mooi, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays traffic safety and occupant protection get a lot of attention due to the large number of fatalities and injuries in car accidents. The occupant protection in two-vehicle crashes can be improved by car-to-car compatibility, which means well balanced crashworthiness characteristics of both

  8. Scattering phase function spectrum makes reflectance spectrum measured from Intralipid phantoms and tissue sensitive to the device detection geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanick, S. C.; Krishnaswamy, V.; Gamm, U. A.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; Robinson, D. J.; Amelink, A.; Pogue, B. W.

    2012-01-01

    Reflectance spectra measured in Intralipid (IL) close to the source are sensitive to wavelength-dependent changes in reduced scattering coefficient (μ′s) and scattering phase function (PF). Experiments and simulations were performed using device designs with either single or separate optical fibers for delivery and collection of light in varying concentrations of IL. Spectral reflectance is not consistently linear with varying IL concentration, with PF-dependent effects observed for single fiber devices with diameters smaller than ten transport lengths and for separate source-detector devices that collected light at less than half of a transport length from the source. Similar effects are thought to be seen in tissue, limiting the ability to quantitatively compare spectra from different devices without compensation. PMID:22567598

  9. A large Raman scattering cross-section molecular embedded SERS aptasensor for ultrasensitive Aflatoxin B1 detection using CS-Fe3O4 for signal enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quansheng; Yang, Mingxiu; Yang, Xiaojing; Li, Huanhuan; Guo, Zhiming; Rahma, M. H.

    2018-01-01

    With growing concern on oil safety problems, developing a simple and sensitive method to detect Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a common mycotoxin in peanut oil, is very necessary. In this study, Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) aptasensor was developed for ultrasensitive AFB1 detection using the amino-terminal AFB1 aptamer (NH2-DNA1); and thiol-terminal AFB1 complementary aptamer (SH-DNA2) conjugated magnetic-beads (CS-Fe3O4) as enrichment nanoprobe and AuNR@DNTB@Ag nanorods (ADANRs) as reporter nanoprobe respectively. 5,5‧-Dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoicacid) (DNTB) with large Raman scattering cross-section and no fluorescence interference was embedded in Au and Ag core/shell nanorods as Raman reporter molecules. CS-Fe3O4 possessed excellent biocompatibility and superparamagnetism for rapid signal enrichment. Therefore, NH2-DNA1-CS-Fe3O4 and SH-DNA2-ADANRs were fabricated via the hybrid reaction between aptamers and complementary aptamers. When there is AFB1, AFB1 would competitively combine with the NH2-DNA1-CS-Fe3O4 inducing the dissociation of SH-DNA2-ADANRs from CS-Fe3O4 and further decreasing the SERS signal. Based on this developed SERS aptasensor, a low limit of 0.0036 ng/mL and an effective linear detection range from 0.01 to 100 ng/mL with the correlation coefficient up to 0.986 for AFB1 detection were obtained. Moreover, the specificity of this SERS aptasensor was demonstrated by detecting other two mycotoxins and its accuracy for AFB1 detection in real peanut oil was further confirmed by standard addition recovery test.

  10. French Professional Car Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veslav Kuranovič

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this scientific article is presented french professional car language, also it is analysed a problem of teaching professional language at the technical university. It is presented lot of methods which help student to acquire language skills and also it is presented importance of dialog between student and teacher. Psychology and pedagogy are 2 sciences strong related in teacher’s work.

  11. CAR ACCESS USING MULTIMODAL BIOMETRICS

    OpenAIRE

    Lupu, Catalin

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the use of multimodal biometrics in order to identify or to verify a person that wants to start the engine of a car. First of all, a fingerprint sensor is posted on the car’s door, one on the steering wheel, a camera for iris recognition on the car's main mirror, and finally a microphone for voice recognition. There are two possibilities: if the person is identified as the car owner or a known user, then he/she can take control over the car; if it’s an intruder, the car ca...

  12. CuseCar--community car-sharing program : car sharing lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    CuseCar of Syracuse launched services in December 2008 with 3 Toyota Prius Hybrids. CuseCar initially, due to : concerns about availability, limited membership to Origination Sponsor Locations, which in turn developed few : members. In 2009 CuseCar o...

  13. Disperse magnetic solid phase microextraction and surface enhanced Raman scattering (Dis-MSPME-SERS) for the rapid detection of trace illegally chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shihua; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Weixian; Jin, Li; Xu, Weiqing; Wu, Yuqing

    2018-02-01

    The technique of solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) is an important method for sample pretreatment in analytical chemistry, especially for the analysis in micro-systems. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an ultra-sensitive and fast detection technique. Both are particularly important in qualitative analysis of trace amount of substance. In this study, combining the magnetic nanoparticles with magnetic SPME device, we develop a high efficient new pretreatment method named as disperse magnetic solid phase micro-extraction (Dis-MSPME). In comparison to the traditional SPME, the proposed Dis-MSPME realizes solid phase micro-extraction from dispersive system, which improved the extraction efficiency largely. Conjunction the advantages both of Dis-MSPME and SERS is proposed as Dis-MSPME-SERS as a new detection method, which realize enrichment, magnetic separation and detection all-in-one. Making it a simpler, more efficient and sensitive approach in identifying the illegal additives. Sildenafil citrate (SC) in 500μL health wine as an example of illegal additive was successfully detected in a LOD of 1.0 × 10-8M. Moreover, comparative study on the extract efficient of Dis-MSPME-SERS with SPME-SERS shows it takes only 10min to detect sildenafil citrate in the health wine, from enrichment to detection by Dis-MSPME-SERS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Angewandte Physik, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs.

  15. The ν-cleus experiment: a gram-scale fiducial-volume cryogenic detector for the first detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, R.; Rothe, J.; Angloher, G.; Hauff, D.; Mancuso, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Bento, A. [Universidade de Coimbra, CIUC, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Guetlein, A.; Kluck, H.; Schieck, J. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Vienna (Austria); Oberauer, L.; Schoenert, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    We discuss a small-scale experiment, called ν-cleus, for the first detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering by probing nuclear-recoil energies down to the 10 eV regime. The detector consists of low-threshold CaWO{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} calorimeter arrays with a total mass of about 10 g and several cryogenic veto detectors operated at millikelvin temperatures. Realizing a fiducial volume and a multi-element target, the detector enables active discrimination of γ, neutron and surface backgrounds. A first prototype Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} device, operated above ground in a setup without shielding, has achieved an energy threshold of ∝20 eV and further improvements are in reach. A sensitivity study for the detection of coherent neutrino scattering at nuclear power plants shows a unique discovery potential (5 σ) within a measuring time of

  16. The ν -cleus experiment: a gram-scale fiducial-volume cryogenic detector for the first detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, R.; Rothe, J.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Gütlein, A.; Hauff, D.; Kluck, H.; Mancuso, M.; Oberauer, L.; Petricca, F.; Pröbst, F.; Schieck, J.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.

    2017-08-01

    We discuss a small-scale experiment, called ν -cleus, for the first detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering by probing nuclear-recoil energies down to the 10 eV regime. The detector consists of low-threshold CaWO_4 and Al_2O_3 calorimeter arrays with a total mass of about 10 g and several cryogenic veto detectors operated at millikelvin temperatures. Realizing a fiducial volume and a multi-element target, the detector enables active discrimination of γ , neutron and surface backgrounds. A first prototype Al_2O_3 device, operated above ground in a setup without shielding, has achieved an energy threshold of {˜ }20 eV and further improvements are in reach. A sensitivity study for the detection of coherent neutrino scattering at nuclear power plants shows a unique discovery potential (5σ ) within a measuring time of {≲ }2 weeks. Furthermore, a site at a thermal research reactor and the use of a radioactive neutrino source are investigated. With this technology, real-time monitoring of nuclear power plants is feasible.

  17. Combining asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with light-scattering and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection for characterization of nanoclay used in biopolymer nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Petersen, Jens Højslev; Koch, C. Bender

    2009-01-01

    It is expected that biopolymers obtained from renewable resources will in due course become fully competitive with fossil fuel-derived plastics as food-packaging materials. In this context, biopolymer nanocomposites are a field of emerging interest since such materials can exhibit improved...... mechanical and barrier properties and be more suitable for a wider range of food-packaging applications. Natural or synthetic clay nanofillers are being investigated for this purpose in a project called NanoPack funded by the Danish Strategic Research Council. In order to detect and characterize the size...... of clay nanoparticulates, an analytical system combining asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with multi-angle light-scattering detection (MALS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented. In a migration study, we tested a biopolymer nanocomposite consisting...

  18. A competitive immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of Hg{sup 2+} in water, human serum and urine samples using immunochromatographic test based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, Pei; Chu, Yanxin [The Key Lab of Health Chemistry & Molecular Diagnosis of Suzhou, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, Soochow University, Renai Road 199, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Chunwei; Guo, Xun [OptoTrace (Suzhou) Technologies, Inc., STE 316, Building 4, No. 218, Xinghu Street, bioBAY, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhao, Kang [The Key Lab of Health Chemistry & Molecular Diagnosis of Suzhou, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, Soochow University, Renai Road 199, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Jianguo, E-mail: lijgsd@suda.edu.cn [The Key Lab of Health Chemistry & Molecular Diagnosis of Suzhou, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, Soochow University, Renai Road 199, Suzhou 215123 (China); Du, Haijing; Zhang, Xiang [The Key Lab of Health Chemistry & Molecular Diagnosis of Suzhou, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, Soochow University, Renai Road 199, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Hong [OptoTrace (Suzhou) Technologies, Inc., STE 316, Building 4, No. 218, Xinghu Street, bioBAY, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou 215123 (China); Deng, Anping, E-mail: denganping@suda.edu.cn [The Key Lab of Health Chemistry & Molecular Diagnosis of Suzhou, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, Soochow University, Renai Road 199, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-02-04

    An immunochromatographic test (ICT) strip was developed for ultrasensitive competitive immunoassay of Hg{sup 2+}. This strategy was achieved by combining the easy-operation and rapidity of ICT with the high sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Monoclonal antibody (mAb) against Hg{sup 2+} and Raman active substance 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) dual labelled gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were prepared as an immunoprobe. The Raman scattering intensity of MBA on the test line of the ICT strip was measured for quantitative determination of Hg{sup 2+}. The ICT was able to directly detect Hg{sup 2+} without complexing due to the specific recognition of the mAb with Hg{sup 2+}. The IC{sub 50} and limit of detection (LOD) of the assay for Hg{sup 2+} detection were 0.12 ng mL{sup −1} and 0.45 pg mL{sup −1}, respectively. There was no cross-reactivity (CR) of the assay with other nineteen ions and the ICT strips could be kept for 5 weeks without loss of activity. The recoveries of the assay for water, human serum and urine samples spiked with Hg{sup 2+} were in range of 88.3–107.3% with the relative standard deviations (RSD) of 1.5–9.5% (n = 3). The proposed ICT was used for the detection of Hg{sup 2+} in urine samples collected from Occupational Disease Hospital and the results were confirmed by cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CV-AFS). The assay exhibited high sensitivity, selectivity, stability, precision and accuracy, demonstrating a promising method for the detection of trace amount of Hg{sup 2+} in environmental water samples and biological serum and urine samples. - Highlights: • The proposed ICT was able to directly detect Hg{sup 2+} without formation of Hg{sup 2+}-ligand complex. • The proposed ICT exhibited high sensitivity, specificity, stability, precision and accuracy for Hg{sup 2+} detection. • The proposed ICT was applicable for the detection of trace amount of Hg{sup 2+} in water, human serum and urine samples.

  19. Car stickers for 2010

    CERN Document Server

    GS Department

    The 2010 car stickers are now available. Holders of blue stickers will receive their 2010 stickers through the internal mail from 1st December onwards. Holders of red stickers are required to go to the Registration Service (Building 55, first floor), which is open non-stop from 7.30 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. Mondays to Fridays, in order to obtain their new stickers. They will be asked to present documents relating to the vehicles concerned. Owners of vehicles registered on green and CD plates should disregard this message. Reception and Access Control Service – GS/SEM/LS

  20. Car monitoring information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alica KALAŠOVÁ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this contribution is to characterize alternatives of information systems used for managing, processing and evaluation of information related to company vehicles. Especially we focus on logging, transferring and processing of on-road vehicle movement information in inland and international transportation. This segment of company information system has to monitor the car movement – actively or passively – according to demand of the company and after the processing it has to evaluate and give the complex monitoring of a situation of all the company vehicles to the controller.

  1. Electric Cars and Oil Prices

    OpenAIRE

    Azar, Jose

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the joint dynamics of oil prices and interest in electric cars, measured as the volume of Google searches for related phrases. Not surprisingly, I find that oil price shocks predict increases in Google searches for electric cars. Much more surprisingly, I also find that an increase in Google searches predicts declines in oil prices. The high level of public interest in electric cars between April and August of 2008 can explain approximately half of the decline in oil prices...

  2. Proton - Malaysia's national car project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleming, Daniel; Søborg, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    The rise and development of the Malaysian national car project. How this project has become an esential part of the industrial development in Malaysia and how it has underpinned a growing middle class consumption culture with house and car as it pivotal goods.......The rise and development of the Malaysian national car project. How this project has become an esential part of the industrial development in Malaysia and how it has underpinned a growing middle class consumption culture with house and car as it pivotal goods....

  3. Solar car (2); Soraka (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujinaka, Masaharu [Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-01-31

    (87) The running performance of solar car for the game. The second report:' The running performance in 98 WSR in Akita. (88) Output characteristics of solar cell mounted small motor car. (89) The development research of electric automobile for second car. (Part 1: The development objective and basic consideration.) (90) Trial manufacture of nickel, hydrogen battery and application to the solar automobile. (91) Solar wheelchair (2). Electric automobile (EV) is noticed from the environmental problem. EV which required the energy source for a solar cell output is a solar car. 2 and 3 miniature EV application were announced for the optimum lace for the solar car development in this session. The estimated result of solar car which won championship by the high improvement result at '98 WSR in AKITA be shown by the for lace. And, the solar car of latest nickel, hydrogen battery installation produced experimentally in the university laboratory was also announced, and trial manufacture and characteristics of the battery were shown. It was supposed at the content the description which the enjoyment of solar car race matched the engineering education in working. The application to the small automobile was the report of the high contribution effect by the solar cell panel installation in trial manufacture of second car EV and roof of wheelchair EV. In 2015 years in our country, 1 person was a lecture as miniature EV became 4 persons for old people society of over of 65-year-old with the need. (translated by NEDO)

  4. Manipulation of silver nanoparticles in a droplet for label-free detection of biological molecules using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çulha, Mustafa; Altunbek, Mine; Keskin, Sercan; Saatçi, Deniz

    2011-03-01

    Detection and identification of biomacromolecules is of critical importance in many fields ranging from biotechnology to medicine. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an emerging technique for the label-free detection and identification of biological molecules and structures with its fingerprinting properties and high sensitivity. However, there are a number of obstacles for its applications for biological macromolecules due to their complexity. In this report, manipulation of microscopic processes in play during the drying of a sessile droplet as a tool to influence the nanoparticle-macromolecule packing, which has dramatic effect on SERS performance, before the SERS acquisition is demonstrated. A process known as the coffee ring phenomenon jams all particles and molecular species to the edges of the droplet during drying. This uncontrolled process has dramatic effects on a SERS experiment, using colloidal metal nanoparticles as substrates, by sweeping everything to the edges and influencing the packing of nanoparticles in the droplet area. A plastic tip was dipped into a drying sample droplet to influence the uncontrolled piling up. A negatively-charged protein, BSA, a positively-charged protein, cytochrom c, and a 20-base long oligonucleotide, were used as model biomacromolecules in this study. While a minimum of one order of magnitude lower concentration improvement in detection limit was observed with negatively-charged biomacromolecules, no significant improvement was observed with positively-charged ones compared to a sample droplet left on the surface without any interference. With the demonstrated approach, picomolar-level biomolecular detection using SERS is possible.

  5. Arrays of ZnO nanorods decorated with Au nanoparticles as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for rapid detection of trace melamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Zao [College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Yi, Yong [Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Luo, Jiangshan; Li, Xibo [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900 (China); Xu, Xibin [College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Jiang, Xiaodong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900 (China); Yi, Yougen, E-mail: yougenyi@mail.csu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Tang, Yongjian [Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900 (China)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, as a new, highly sensitive and uniform hybrid surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, arrays of ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) decorated with Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) have been prepared. This hybrid substrate manifests high SERS sensitivity to melamine and a detection limit as low as 1.0×10{sup −10} M (1.26 µg L{sup −1}). A maximum enhancement factor of 1.0×10{sup 9} can be obtained with the ZnO NF–Au (sample 2) film. Au-NPs gaps in the array can create lots of SERS “hot spots” that mainly contribute to the high SERS sensitivity. Moreover, the supporting chemical enhancement effect of ZnO-NRs and the better enrichment effect ascribed to the large surface area of the substrate also help to achieve a lower detection limit. The promising advantages of easy sample pretreatment, short detection time and low cost makes the arrays of ZnO-NRs decorated with Au-NPs substrate a potential detection tool in the field of food safety.

  6. A novel method for detection of phosphorylation in single cells by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS using composite organic-inorganic nanoparticles (COINs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Shachaf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Detection of single cell epitopes has been a mainstay of immunophenotyping for over three decades, primarily using fluorescence techniques for quantitation. Fluorescence has broad overlapping spectra, limiting multiplexing abilities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To expand upon current detection systems, we developed a novel method for multi-color immuno-detection in single cells using "Composite Organic-Inorganic Nanoparticles" (COINs Raman nanoparticles. COINs are Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS nanoparticles, with unique Raman spectra. To measure Raman spectra in single cells, we constructed an automated, compact, low noise and sensitive Raman microscopy device (Integrated Raman BioAnalyzer. Using this technology, we detected proteins expressed on the surface in single cells that distinguish T-cells among human blood cells. Finally, we measured intracellular phosphorylation of Stat1 (Y701 and Stat6 (Y641, with results comparable to flow cytometry. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, we have demonstrated the practicality of applying COIN nanoparticles for measuring intracellular phosphorylation, offering new possibilities to expand on the current fluorescent technology used for immunoassays in single cells.

  7. Pharmacokinetic detection of penicillin excreted in urine using a totally internally reflected resonance light scattering technique with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng Zhi; Feng, Ping; Li, Yuan Fang; Tan, Ke Jun

    2005-05-01

    A quantitative analysis method for penicillins including ampicillin (AmP), benzyl penicillin (BP), oxacillin (OA) and amoxycillin (AmO) is proposed that makes use of the totally internally reflected resonance light scattering (TIR-RLS) signal from the penicillin at the H2O/CCl4 interface in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), and enables the pharmacokinetics of penicillin taken orally and excreted through urine to be monitored. Penicillin is coadsorbed with CTMAB at the H2O/CCl4 interface in neutral solution, resulting in the formation of ion associates that display greatly enhanced TIR-RLS signals (maximum at 368-372 nm). This enhanced TIR-RLS intensity was found to be proportional to the penicillin concentration over the range 0.2 x 10(-6) to 2.2 x 10(-6) mol L(-1), with limits of determination (3sigma) of 5.0 x 10(-8) to 7.0 x 10(-8) mol L(-1). Pharmacokinetics studies performed using the present method show that the excretion of orally-taken ampicillin through urine has a half-time of 1.05 h and an excremental quantum over 8 h of 49.3%, respectively.

  8. Detecting non-bridging oxygens: non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering in crystalline lithium borates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelong, Gérald; Radtke, Guillaume; Cormier, Laurent; Bricha, Hanane; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Ablett, James M; Cabaret, Delphine; Gélébart, Frédéric; Shukla, Abhay

    2014-10-20

    Probing the local environment of low-Z elements, such as oxygen, is of great interest for understanding the atomic-scale behavior in materials, but it requires experimental techniques allowing it to work with versatile sample environments. In this paper, the local environment of lithium borate crystals is investigated using non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) at energy losses corresponding to the oxygen K-edge. Large variations of the spectral features are observed close to the edge onset in the 535-540 eV energy range when varying the Li2O content. Calculations allow identification of contributions associated with bridging oxygen (BO) and non-bridging oxygen (NBO) atoms. The main result resides in the observed core-level shift of about 1.7 eV in the spectral signatures of the BO and NBO. The clear signature at 535 eV in the O K-edge NRXIS spectrum is thus an original way to probe the presence of NBOs in borates, with the great advantage of making possible the use of complex environments such as a high-pressure cell or high-temperature device for in situ measurements.

  9. A method for achieving super-resolved widefield CARS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Kim M; Littleton, Brad; Turk, Douglas; McIntyre, Timothy J; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2010-08-30

    We propose a scheme for achieving widefield coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy images with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. This approach adds structured illumination to the widefield CARS configuration [Applied Physics Letters 84, 816 (2004)]. By capturing a number of images at different phases of the standing wave pattern, an image with up to three times the resolution of the original can be constructed. We develop a theoretical treatment of this system and perform numerical simulations for a typical CARS system, which indicate that resolutions around 120 nm are obtainable with the present scheme. As an imaging system, this method combines the advantages of sub-diffraction-limited resolution, endogenous contrast generation, and a wide field of view.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based volatile organic compounds (VOCs) detection using plasmonic bimetallic nanogap substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Buddharaju, Kavitha Devi

    2014-01-01

    circular patterns is 30 +/- 5 nm. Silver (30 nm) and gold (15 nm) plasmonic active layers are deposited on the nanostructures subsequently. SERS measurements on different concentrations of acetone vapor ranged from 0.7, 1.5, 3.5, 10.3, 24.5 % and control have been performed with the substrate....... The measurement results are found reproducible, and the detection limit is found to be 9.5 pg (acetone molecule). The detection sensitivity is 28.7 % higher than that of the recent reported leaning silicon nanopillar substrate. With further system miniaturization, the sensing technique can work as a portable SERS...

  11. Visual and light scattering spectrometric method for the detection of melamine using uracil 5‧-triphosphate sodium modified gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lijiao; Zhen, Shujun; Huang, Chengzhi

    2017-02-01

    A highly selective method was presented for colorimetric determination of melamine using uracil 5‧-triphosphate sodium modified gold nanoparticles (UTP-Au NPs) in this paper. Specific hydrogen-bonding interaction between uracil base (U) and melamine resulted in the aggregation of AuNPs, displaying variations of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features such as color change from red to blue and enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance light scattering (LSPR-LS) signals. Accordingly, the concentration of melamine could be quantified based on naked eye or a spectrometric method. This method was simple, inexpensive, environmental friendly and highly selective, which has been successfully used for the detection of melamine in pretreated liquid milk products with high recoveries.

  12. Upgrade of the automatic analysis system in the TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic: New image recognition classifier and fault condition detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makili, L. [Dpto. Informatica y Automatica - UNED, Madrid (Spain); Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Dormido-Canto, S., E-mail: sebas@dia.uned.e [Dpto. Informatica y Automatica - UNED, Madrid (Spain); Pastor, I.; Pereira, A. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Farias, G. [Dpto. Informatica y Automatica - UNED, Madrid (Spain); Portas, A.; Perez-Risco, D.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, M.C. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Busch, P. [FOM Institut voor PlasmaFysica Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2010-07-15

    An automatic image classification system based on support vector machines (SVM) has been in operation for years in the TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic. It recognizes five different types of images: CCD camera background, measurement of stray light without plasma or in a collapsed discharge, image during ECH phase, image during NBI phase and image after reaching the cut off density during ECH heating. Each kind of image implies the execution of different application software. Due to the fact that the recognition system is based on a learning system and major modifications have been carried out in both the diagnostic (optics) and TJ-II plasmas (injected power), the classifier model is no longer valid. A new SVM model has been developed with the current conditions. Also, specific error conditions in the data acquisition process can automatically be detected and managed now. The recovering process has been automated, thereby avoiding the loss of data in ensuing discharges.

  13. Local detection efficiency of a NbN superconducting single photon detector explored by a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Renema, Jelmer J; Engel, Andreas; van Exter, Martin P; de Dood, Michiel J A

    2015-09-21

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the local response of a superconducting single photon detector using a sharp metal tip in a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope. The optical absorption is obtained by simulating the tip-detector system, where the tip-detector is illuminated from the side, with the tip functioning as an optical antenna. The local detection efficiency is calculated by considering the recently introduced position-dependent threshold current in the detector. The calculated response for a 150 nm wide detector shows a peak close to the edge that can be spatially resolved with an estimated resolution of ∼ 20 nm, using a tip with parameters that are experimentally accessible.

  14. Substitution between cars within the household

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Borger, B.; Mulalic, I.; Rouwendal, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the demand for car kilometres in two-car households, focusing on the substitution between cars of different fuel efficiency in response to fuel price changes. We use a large sample of detailed Danish data on two-car households to estimate - for each car owned by the household

  15. Thomson Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Thomson scattering is a very powerful diagnostic which is applied at nearly every magnetic confinement device. Depending on the experimental conditions different plasma parameters can be diagnosed. When the wave vector is much larger than the plasma Debye length, the total scattered power is

  16. Energy Use of Passenger Cars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of the Danish sale and stock of passenger cars, focusing particularly on aspects influencing energy use. The project has tracked the development of vehicle weight, power and fuel economy for both the sale of new cars (from 1980 to 1997)and the stock. In addition, the energy use...

  17. Shopping for a safer car

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This brochure provides some helpful tips on what to look for when shopping for a safer car. Automakers are increasingly advertising the safety features of their cars. The problem is sorting out their claims and zeroing in on the safety features that ...

  18. The attractiveness of car use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, A.N.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind car use is necessary for the development of effective transport policies. The high door-to-door speed of the car in comparison with other travel modes forms its main attractiveness. And speed is the main engine for mobility growth, which is not easy to curb.

  19. Noise mapping inside a car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, V. A.; Shaimuhametov, R. R.

    2017-09-01

    We present new wireless sensor telemetry system designed to be mounted on different nodes of the car and record acoustic noises. The proposed system is mapping noise inside a car. The noise field is recorded at the ten control regions simultaneously.

  20. Threat detection of liquid explosives and precursors from their x-ray scattering pattern using energy dispersive detector technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehres, Jan; Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Lyksborg, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) can be applied for identification of liquid threats in luggage scanning in security applications. To define the instrumental design, the framework for data reduction and analysis and test the performance of the threat detection in various scenarios...

  1. Detection of Silver and TiO2 Nanoparticles using Light Scatter by Flow Cytometry and Darkfield Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanium Dioxide (Ti02) and Silver (Ag) nanoparticles are used in many domestic applications, including sunscreens and paints. Evaluation of the potential hazard of manmade nanomaterials has been hampered by a limited ability to detect and measure nanoparticles in cells. In the p...

  2. Epi-detecting label-free multimodal imaging platform using a compact diode-pumped femtosecond solid-state laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreana, Marco; Le, Tuan; Hansen, Anders Kragh

    2017-01-01

    We have developed an epi-detected multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy platform based on a compact and cost-effective laser source featuring simultaneous acquisition of signals arising from hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon fluorescence, and second harmonic...... for these three modalities, achieving sufficient spectral resolution for CARS in the lipid region. The experimental results on a biological tissue reveal that the combination of the epi-detection scheme and the use of a compact diode-pumped femtosecond solid-state laser in the nonlinear optical microscope...

  3. Gold nanoparticle-based simple colorimetric and ultrasensitive dynamic light scattering assay for the selective detection of Pb(II) from paints, plastics, and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beqa, Lule; Singh, Anant Kumar; Khan, Sadia Afrin; Senapati, Dulal; Arumugam, Sri Ranjini; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2011-03-01

    Pb (II) is a common water pollutant with high toxicity. According to the CDC, about 310,000 U.S. children of ages 1-5 have high levels of lead in their blood that it is due to the exposure to lead from plastic toys and other products. As a result, the development of ultrasensitive assays for the real-time detection of Pb(II) from plastic toys and paints is very important for water controlling, clinical toxicology and industrial processes. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of Pb(II) from water samples, we report a label-free, highly selective and ultra sensitive glutathione modified gold nanoparticle based dynamic light scattering (DLS) probe for Pb(II) recognition in 100 ppt level from aqueous solution with excellent discrimination against other heavy metals. The sensitivity of our assay to detect Pb(II) level in water is almost 2 orders of magnitude higher than the EPA standard limit. We have also demonstrated that our DLS assay is capable of measuring the amount of Pb(II) in paint, plastic toys, and water from MS river. A possible mechanism and operating principles of our DLS assay have been discussed. Ultimately, this nanotechnology driven assay could have enormous potential applications in rapid, on-site monitoring of Pb(II) from day-to-day sample.

  4. Simultaneous determination of sugars and picrosides in Picrorhiza species using ultrasonic extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pamita; Kumar, Neeraj; Singh, Bikram; Kaul, Vijay K

    2008-06-20

    Sugars play a critical role in regulating overall cellular metabolism in high altitude growing plants. These plants are shown to have high levels of sugars to enhance their tolerance to abiotic stresses such as drought and freezing temperature. In the present study, a simple, sensitive, selective and reliable HPLC method based on ultrasonic extraction and evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of important sugars (xylose, xylitol, mannitol, glucose and sucrose) and picrosides (picroside-I and picroside-II) in two species Picrorhiza kurroa and P. scrophulariiflora. The analysis was carried out on a Zorbax amino column (250 mm x 4.6 mm i.d., 5 microm) with isocratic elution of acetonitrile:water (78:22, v/v). The method was validated for accuracy, precision, limit of detection and quantification according to International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines. The drift tube temperature of the ELSD system was set to 81 degrees C and nitrogen flow rate was 2.0 standard liter per minute (SLM). The regression equation revealed a good linear relationship (r(2)=0.9997+/-0.0012) within test ranges. The limit of detection and quantification for seven analytes in ELSD were less than 0.98 and 2.95 microg, respectively. The method showed good reproducibility for the quantification of seven analytes in Picrorhiza species with intra- and inter-day variation of less than 2.0%.

  5. Rapid Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Detection of Sibutramine Hydrochloride in Pharmaceutical Capsules with a β-Cyclodextrin- Ag/Polyvivnyl Alcohol Hydrogel Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Lei; Jiang, Zuyan; Wang, Nan; Zhu, Lihua; Tang, Heqing

    2017-01-01

    Sibutramine hydrochloride (SH) is a banned weight-loss drug, but its illegal addition to health products is still rampant. This suggests a very urgent need for a fast and precise detection method for SH. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) is a promising candidate for this purpose, but the weak affinity between SH and bare metal limits its direct SERS detection. In the present work, β-cyclodextrin was capped in situ onto the surface of Ag nanoparticles to function as a scaffold to capture SH. The obtained Ag nanoparticles were encapsulated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to fabricate a SERS active hydrogel with excellent reproducibility. A facile SERS strategy based on such substrate was proposed for trace SH quantification with a linear range of 7.0–150.0 µg·mL–1, and a detection limit low to 3.0 µg·mL−1. It was applied to analyze seven types of commercial slimming capsules with satisfactory results, showing good prospect for real applications. PMID:28698502

  6. A high speed detection platform based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering for monitoring antibiotic-induced chemical changes in bacteria cell wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Liu

    Full Text Available Rapid and accurate diagnosis for pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility is critical for controlling bacterial infections. Conventional methods for determining bacterium's sensitivity to antibiotic depend mostly on measuring the change of microbial proliferation in response to the drug. Such "biological assay" inevitably takes time, ranging from days for fast-growing bacteria to weeks for slow-growers. Here, a novel tool has been developed to detect the "chemical features" of bacterial cell wall that enables rapid identification of drug resistant bacteria within hours. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS technique based on our newly developed SERS-active substrate was applied to assess the fine structures of the bacterial cell wall. The SERS profiles recorded by such a platform are sensitive and stable, that could readily reflect different bacterial cell walls found in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, or mycobacteria groups. Moreover, characteristic changes in SERS profile were noticed in the drug-sensitive bacteria at the early period (i.e., approximately 1 hr of antibiotic exposure, which could be used to differentiate them from the drug-resistant ones. The SERS-based diagnosis could be applied to a single bacterium. The high-speed SERS detection represents a novel approach for microbial diagnostics. The single-bacterium detection capability of SERS makes possible analyses directly on clinical specimen instead of pure cultured bacteria.

  7. Rapid Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS Detection of Sibutramine Hydrochloride in Pharmaceutical Capsules with a β-Cyclodextrin- Ag/Polyvivnyl Alcohol Hydrogel Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ouyang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sibutramine hydrochloride (SH is a banned weight-loss drug, but its illegal addition to health products is still rampant. This suggests a very urgent need for a fast and precise detection method for SH. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS is a promising candidate for this purpose, but the weak affinity between SH and bare metal limits its direct SERS detection. In the present work, β-cyclodextrin was capped in situ onto the surface of Ag nanoparticles to function as a scaffold to capture SH. The obtained Ag nanoparticles were encapsulated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA to fabricate a SERS active hydrogel with excellent reproducibility. A facile SERS strategy based on such substrate was proposed for trace SH quantification with a linear range of 7.0–150.0 µg·mL–1, and a detection limit low to 3.0 µg·mL−1. It was applied to analyze seven types of commercial slimming capsules with satisfactory results, showing good prospect for real applications.

  8. Contrast in coherent raman scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbacik, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is becoming a widely used technique for sub-micron, chemically-selective imaging at high rates of speed In this thesis I discuss three methods for increasing the specificity and selectivity of coherent Raman experiments. The first method is the

  9. Fabrication of chitosan-gold nanoshells for γ-aminobutyric acid detection as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ik Joong; Lim, Jae Wook [Dept. of Chemical and BioEngineering, Gachon University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) principle-based brain-probing optical fiber was produced to analyze changes in the concentration of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The procedure was carried out within the GABA administration concentration range of 5–30 mM for the patients who should take cranial medicines for GABA components of less than a normal range. The optical fiber, of which the surface had been reformed, was prepared by treatment with chitosan-gold nanoshell particles, which were synthesized by using an ionic interaction. The treated fiber was subsequently combined with GABA, for the purpose of analyzing its GABA concentration. The calibration curve of the SERS sensitivity (counts) as determined by the concentration levels of GABA adsorbed onto the chitosan-gold nanoshell without attachment to the optical fiber was as follows: y = 0.2x{sup 2} − 0.6743x + 419.8 ( R{sup 2}  = 0.9874), while the corresponding calibration curve of the SERS sensitivity (counts) with attachment to optical fiber was as follows: y = 7.4057x{sup 2} + 93.68x + 1851.4 ( R{sup 2}  = 0.9472). Based on the aforementioned two sets of data, it was confirmed that the analysis of GABA using optical fiber had a higher level of sensitivity compared to its analysis in the absence of optical fiber.

  10. Car insurance and the risk of car crash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blows, Stephanie; Ivers, Rebecca Q; Connor, Jennie; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Norton, Robyn

    2003-11-01

    Despite speculation about the role of vehicle insurance in road traffic accidents, there is little research estimating the direction or extent of the risk relationship. Data from the Auckland Car Crash Injury Study (1998-1999) were used to examine the association between driving an uninsured motor vehicle and car crash injury. Cases were all cars involved in crashes in which at least one occupant was hospitalized or killed anywhere in the Auckland region. Controls were 588 drivers of randomly selected cars on Auckland roads. Participants completed a structured interview. Uninsured drivers had significantly greater odds of car crash injury compared to insured drivers after adjustment for age, sex, level of education, and driving exposure (odds ratio 4.77, 95% confidence interval 2.94-7.75). The causal mechanism for insurance and car crash injury is not easily determined. Although we examined the effects of multiple potential confounders in our analysis including socioeconomic status and risk-taking behaviours, both of which have been previously observed to be associated with both insurance status and car crash injury, residual confounding may partly explain this association. The estimated proportion of drivers who are uninsured is between 5 and 15% in developed countries, representing a significant public health problem worthy of further investigation.

  11. Lipid droplet pattern and nondroplet-like structure in two fat mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Liu, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Ta-Chau; Lo, Szecheng J.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid is an important energy source and essential component for plasma and organelle membranes in all kinds of cells. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is a label-free and nonlinear optical technique that can be used to monitor the lipid distribution in live organisms. Here, we utilize CARS microscopy to investigate the pattern of lipid droplets in two live Caenorhabditis elegans mutants (fat-2 and fat-3). The CARS images showed a striking decrease in the size, number, and content of lipid droplets in the fat-2 mutant but a slight difference in the fat-3 mutant as compared with the wild-type worm. Moreover, a nondroplet-like structure with enhanced CARS signal was detected for the first time in the uterus of fat-2 and fat-3 mutants. In addition, transgenic fat-2 mutant expressing a GFP fusion protein of vitellogenin-2 (a yolk lipoprotein) revealed that the enhanced CARS signal colocalized with the GFP signal, which suggests that the nondroplet-like structure is primarily due to the accumulation of yolk lipoproteins. Together, this study implies that CARS microscopy is a potential tool to study the distribution of yolk lipoproteins, in addition to lipid droplets, in live animals.

  12. Deep-learning versus OBIA for scattered shrub detection with Google Earth imagery: Ziziphus lotus as case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Guirado

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing demand for accurate high-resolution land cover maps in many fields, e.g., in land-use planning and biodiversity conservation. Developing such maps has been traditionally performed using Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA methods, which usually reach good accuracies, but require a high human supervision and the best configuration for one image often cannot be extrapolated to a different image. Recently, deep learning Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs have shown outstanding results in object recognition in computer vision and are offering promising results in land cover mapping. This paper analyzes the potential of CNN-based methods for detection of plant species of conservation concern using free high-resolution Google Earth TM images and provides an objective comparison with the state-of-the-art OBIA-methods. We consider as case study the detection of Ziziphus lotus shrubs, which are protected as a priority habitat under the European Union Habitats Directive. Compared to the best performing OBIA-method, the best CNN-detector achieved up to 12% better precision, up to 30% better recall and up to 20% better balance between precision and recall. Besides, the knowledge that CNNs acquired in the first image can be re-utilized in other regions, which makes the detection process very fast. A natural conclusion of this work is that including CNN-models as classifiers, e.g., ResNet-classifier, could further improve OBIA methods. The provided methodology can be systematically reproduced for other species detection using our codes available through (https://github.com/EGuirado/CNN-remotesensing.

  13. Monitoring Car Drivers' Condition Using Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kazumasa; Yamamto, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Osami; Nakano, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Shin

    We have developed a car driver monitoring system for measuring drivers' consciousness, with which we aim to reduce car accidents caused by drowsiness of drivers. The system consists of the following three subsystems: an image capturing system with a pulsed infrared CCD camera, a system for detecting blinking waveform by the images using a neural network with which we can extract images of face and eye areas, and a system for measuring drivers' consciousness analyzing the waveform with a fuzzy inference technique and others. The third subsystem extracts three factors from the waveform first, and analyzed them with a statistical method, while our previous system used only one factor. Our experiments showed that the three-factor method we used this time was more effective to measure drivers' consciousness than the one-factor method we described in the previous paper. Moreover, the method is more suitable for fitting parameters of the system to each individual driver.

  14. In situ dissolution analysis using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and hyperspectral CARS microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, A.L.; Garbacik, E.T.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Kleinebudde, Peter; Strachan, Clare

    2013-01-01

    The solid-state form of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in an oral dosage form plays an important role in determining the dissolution rate of the API. As the solid-state form can change during dissolution, there is a need to monitor the oral dosage form during dissolution testing. Coherent

  15. Detecting 1/10th scaled structures in dielectric media using monostatic X-band radar scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekis, John D.; Testorf, Markus E.; Fiddy, Michael A.; Giles, Robert H.

    2000-11-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Army's National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC), researchers at U. Mass. Lowell's Submillimeter-Wave Technology Laboratory (STL) and Center for Electromagnetic Materials and Optical Systems (CEMOS) investigated the feasibility of detecting non-metallic structures embedded in various types of soil using a 1-GHz ground penetrating radar by establishing a 1/10th-scale laboratory environment with two spot-focusing X-band (10- GHz) lens antennae and an HP8510B Network Analyzer. Achieving similitude with the full-scale environment required fabricating replicas that were dimensional and dielectric scale-models of the non-metallic structures of interest (i.e. anti-personnel mines), as well as rocks, and soil with various levels of moisture content. The 1/10th- scale replicas were constructed form models at 10.0-GHz. The monostatic X-band measurements were acquired in an anechoic environment, and digital images of the backscattered radar data from the 1/10th-scale composite scenes were processed using inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) signal processing routines, and also PDFT superresolution imaging techniques. Based on the 1/10th-scale signature measurements performed, the feasibility of detecting a VS-50 anti-personnel mine buried in dry loam at a depth of 11.2mm was established. The full-scale radar cross-section of a VS=50 mine in this configuration was estimated to be -25 dBsm. Radar cross section values were not established for the structures embedded in the wet loam due to a change in the intensity scale (an inherent property of the superresolution algorithm), which changed for each image. However, the embedded objects were detected by the PDFT algorithm, showing promise for the future of this research.

  16. Nanobody Based Dual Specific CARs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn De Munter

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent clinical trials have shown that adoptive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy is a very potent and possibly curative option in the treatment of B cell leukemias and lymphomas. However, targeting a single antigen may not be sufficient, and relapse due to the emergence of antigen negative leukemic cells may occur. A potential strategy to counter the outgrowth of antigen escape variants is to broaden the specificity of the CAR by incorporation of multiple antigen recognition domains in tandem. As a proof of concept, we here describe a bispecific CAR in which the single chain variable fragment (scFv is replaced by a tandem of two single-antibody domains or nanobodies (nanoCAR. High membrane nanoCAR expression levels are observed in retrovirally transduced T cells. NanoCARs specific for CD20 and HER2 induce T cell activation, cytokine production and tumor lysis upon incubation with transgenic Jurkat cells expressing either antigen or both antigens simultaneously. The use of nanobody technology allows for the production of compact CARs with dual specificity and predefined affinity.

  17. Pervasive Adaptation in Car Crowds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferscha, Alois; Riener, Andreas

    Advances in the miniaturization and embedding of electronics for microcomputing, communication and sensor/actuator systems, have fertilized the pervasion of technology into literally everything. Pervasive computing technology is particularly flourishing in the automotive domain, exceling the “smart car”, embodying intelligent control mechanics, intelligent driver assistance, safety and comfort systems, navigation, tolling, fleet management and car-to-car interaction systems, as one of the outstanding success stories of pervasive computing. This paper raises the issue of the socio-technical phenomena emerging from the reciprocal interrelationship between drivers and smart cars, particularly in car crowds. A driver-vehicle co-model (DVC-model) is proposed, expressing the complex interactions between the human driver and the in-car and on-car technologies. Both explicit (steering, shifting, overtaking), as well as implicit (body posture, respiration) interactions are considered, and related to the drivers vital state (attentive, fatigue, distracted, aggressive). DVC-models are considered as building blocks in large scale simulation experiments, aiming to analyze and understand adaptation phenomena rooted in the feed-back loops among individual driver behavior and car crowds.

  18. CERN CAR STICKERS

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Accueil et Controle d'Accès; ST Division

    1999-01-01

    In accordance with Operational Circular n¡ 2, paragraph 21, CERN car stickers are to be renewed. The new stickers are now available and will be valid for a year.Youare therefore requested:either to obtain them from the distribution points for new stickers (see below); or to send us the application form below, duly completed, via the internal mail; or to complete the application form directly via the Web at the address: http://cern.ch/registration-stickers. Each vehicle has to carry a sticker and needs a separate application form.Vehicles bearing CERN diplomatic plates (CD07, 431K and CD series) do not need a sticker for access to the CERN areas.Thank you.List of distribution points:Registration Service (bldg 55 1st floor), open from 07h30 to 16h30. Building 33 (entrance hall), open from 08h00 to 18h00. Building 120 (ground floor), outside working hours.Name Surname CERN identification number Vehicle registration plates Country issuing the plates Vehicle ma...

  19. CERN CAR CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    Automobile club

    2009-01-01

    You are cordially invited to the next General Assembly of the CERN Car Club Tuesday 12 January 2010 at 5:45pm Bldg. 593 / room 11 As the end of 2009 is approaching, it is time to think about renewing your subscription. Therefore next time you are on the CERN-Meyrin site or at the Post Office counter don’t forget to fill in the payment slip to continue to be a part of our large family. The fee remains unchanged: 50 CHF. For those of you who are regular users of our equipment and who know of all the advantages that the club is in a position to offer, it seems pointless to give details, we are sure that many of you have made use of them and are satisfied. We remind you everyone working on CERN site is entitled to become a member of our club, this includes industrial support personnel and staff of companies which have a contract with CERN. If you are not yet a member, come and visit us! We will be happy to welcome you and show you the facilities, or you can visit our web site. The use of the club&...

  20. Rapid Detection and Identification of Overdose Drugs in Saliva by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Using Fused Gold Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Inscore

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The number of drug-related emergency room visits in the United States doubled from 2004 to 2009 to 4.6 million. Consequently there is a critical need to rapidly identify the offending drug(s, so that the appropriate medical care can be administered. In an effort to meet this need we have been investigating the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS to detect and identify numerous drugs in saliva at ng/mL concentrations within 10 minutes. Identification is provided by matching measured spectra to a SERS library comprised of over 150 different drugs, each of which possess a unique spectrum. Trace detection is provided by fused gold colloids trapped within a porous glass matrix that generate SERS. Speed is provided by a syringe-driven sample system that uses a solid-phase extraction capillary combined with a SERS-active capillary in series. Spectral collection is provided by a portable Raman analyzer. Here we describe successful measurement of representative illicit, prescribed, and over-the-counter drugs by SERS, and 50 ng/mL cocaine in saliva as part of a focused study.

  1. A virus resonance light scattering sensor based on mussel-inspired molecularly imprinted polymers for high sensitive and high selective detection of Hepatitis A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Gong, Hang; Chen, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoming; Cai, Changqun

    2017-01-15

    We described a novel resonance light scattering (RLS) sensor for the specific recognition of trace quantities of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV); the sensor was based on a mussel-inspired hepatitis molecularly imprinted polymer. As a recognition element, polydopamine (PDA)-coated totivirus-imprinted polymer was introduced on the surface of SiO2 nanoparticles (virus-imprinted SiO2@PDA NPs) using an efficient one-step synthesis method. The target virus was selectively captured by the imprinted polymer films, thereby increasing the RLS intensity. A simple fluorescence spectrophotometer was employed to measure the changes in the intensity. The enhanced RLS intensity (∆IRLS) was proportional to the concentration of HAV in the range of 0.04-6.0nmol∙L-1, with a low limit of detection of 8.6pmol∙L-1. The selectivity study confirmed that the resultant HAV-imprinted SiO2@PDA NPs possessed high selectivity for HAV. The sensor was successfully applied for the direct detection of additional HAV from a 20,000-fold dilution of human serum. The proposed strategy is simple, eco-friendly, highly selective, and sensitive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Basic study of charring detection at the laser catheter-tip using back scattering light measurement during therapeutic laser irradiation in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mei; Ito, Arisa; Kajihara, Takuro; Matsuo, Hiroki; Arai, Tsunenori

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate transient process of the charring at the laser catheter-tip in blood during therapeutic laser irradiation by the back scattering light measurement to detect precursor state of the charring. We took account of using photodynamic therapy for arrhythmia in blood through the laser catheter. We observed the influence of the red laser irradiation (λ=663 nm) upon the shape of red blood cells (RBCs). The RBCs aggregation, round formation, and hemolysis were took place sequentially before charring. With a model blood sandwiched between glass plates simulated as a catheter-tip boundary, we measured diffuse-reflected-light power and transmitted-light power simultaneously and continuously by a microscopic optics during the laser irradiation. We found that measured light power changes were originated with RBCs shape change induced by temperature rise due to the laser irradiation. A gentle peak following a slow descending was observed in the diffuse-reflected-light power history. This history might indicate the precursor state of the charring, in which the hemolysis might be considered to advance rapidly. We think that the measurement of diffuse-reflected-light power history might be able to detect precursor state of charring at the catheter-tip in blood.

  3. Simultaneous determination of sodium saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame-K and sucralose in food consumed in Korea using high-performance liquid chromatography and evaporative light-scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngsun; Do, Byungkyung; Lee, Gunyoung; Lim, Ho Soo; Yun, Sang Soon; Kwon, Hoonjeong

    2017-05-01

    Four artificial sweeteners, i.e., sodium saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame-K and sucralose, are permitted for use in Korea, and recent regulatory changes have expanded the number of food categories in which they may be used. Four artificial sweeteners were determined simultaneously in more than 900 food items from 30 food categories that are commercially available in Korean markets, including both domestic and imported products, using high-performance liquid chromatography and evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD). A new procedure using 75% acetone to remove fat was applied for sample preparation. The levels detected in all samples were below the maximum permitted use levels established in Korea. Despite the increased number of categories, the only one in which sodium saccharin was newly found was takju, an alcoholic beverage. Sodium saccharin was not found in other beverages in the food analysis or in the food label survey, even though its use was reported in a previous study, suggesting that consumer preference outweighs regulatory decisions. When the analytical results were combined with food-consumption data obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-14, the estimated daily intakes of all the sweeteners were considered safe.

  4. Critical scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ., Dep. of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Perry, S.C. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3} is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs.

  5. Hyperspectral and differential CARS microscopy for quantitative chemical imaging in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Claudia; Pope, Iestyn; Masia, Francesco; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy for quantitative chemical imaging of saturated and unsaturated lipids in human stem-cell derived adipocytes. We compare dual-frequency/differential CARS (D-CARS), which enables rapid imaging and simple data analysis, with broadband hyperspectral CARS microscopy analyzed using an unsupervised phase-retrieval and factorization method recently developed by us for quantitative chemical image analysis. Measurements were taken in the vibrational fingerprint region (1200-2000/cm) and in the CH stretch region (2600-3300/cm) using a home-built CARS set-up which enables hyperspectral imaging with 10/cm resolution via spectral focussing from a single broadband 5 fs Ti:Sa laser source. Through a ratiometric analysis, both D-CARS and phase-retrieved hyperspectral CARS determine the concentration of unsaturated lipids with comparable accuracy in the fingerprint region, while in the CH stretch region D-CARS provides only a qualitative contrast owing to its non-linear behavior. When analyzing hyperspectral CARS images using the blind factorization into susceptibilities and concentrations of chemical components recently demonstrated by us, we are able to determine vol:vol concentrations of different lipid components and spatially resolve inhomogeneities in lipid composition with superior accuracy compared to state-of-the art ratiometric methods.

  6. Dwelling on Everyday Car Journeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølbøll, Lene; Jensen, Hanne Louise

    different traffic conditions as well as the emotional states related to the drivers’ thoughts about work and family issues, the materiality of the car and the recreational activities inside the car. Analyses are based on a web-based questionnaire, sent to 373 participating drivers in the Big Data research...... project Intelligent Transportation System Platform North Denmark (Lahrmann 2012). In that project data on e.g. position and speed was collected via an On Board Unit from more than 400 cars in 2012-2014 (Tøfting et. al. 2014). The full dataset includes a driven distance of approximately 14 million km...... experiences related to commuting. The findings will be discussed using theoretical inspiration from Sheller (2004), Bull (2003) and Thrift (2004) and we will suggest that the various emotional experiences of the commuters are of great importance for their ability to use of the car as a dwelling place....

  7. Simultaneous quantification of differently glycosylated, acetylated and 2,3-dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4h-pyran-4-one-conjugated soyasaponins using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeCroos, K.; Vincken, J.P.; Heng, L.; Bakker, R.; Gruppen, H.; Verstraete, W.

    2005-01-01

    A novel method utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was developed for the analysis of soyasaponins, a divers group of triterpenic compounds with one or two sugar side chains,

  8. A reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with resonance Rayleigh scattering detection for the determination of four tetracycline antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lifeng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Peng Jingdong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)], E-mail: hxpengjd@swu.edu.cn; Liu Limin [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2008-12-07

    A new reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography with resonance Rayleigh scattering detection (HPLC-RRS) was developed for simultaneous separation and determination of four tetracycline antibiotics (TCs). A good chromatographic separation among the compounds was achieved using a Synergi Fusion-RP column (150 mm x 4.6 mm; 4 {mu}m) and a mobile phase consisting of methanol-acetonitrile-oxalic acid (5 mM) at the flow rate of 0.8 mL min{sup -1}. Column temperature was 30 deg. C. The RRS signal was detected at {lambda}{sub ex} = {lambda}{sub em} = 370 nm. The recoveries of sample added standard ranged from 95.3% to 103.5%, and the relative standard deviation was below 2.79%. A detection limit of 2.12-5.12 {mu}g mL{sup -1} was reached and a linear range was found between peak height and concentration in the range of 10.36-518.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for oxytetracycline (OTC), 12.11-605.5 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for tetracycline (TC), 11.79-589.5 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for chlortetracycline (CTC) and 10.32-516.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for doxycycline (DC). The linear regression coefficients were all above 0.999. The method has been applied successfully to the determination of OTC, TC, CTC, DC in pharmaceutical formulations and in honey. The method was simple, rapid and showed a better linear relation and high repeatability.

  9. Unveiling NIR Aza-Boron-Dipyrromethene (BODIPY) Dyes as Raman Probes: Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)-Guided Selective Detection and Imaging of Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adarsh, Nagappanpillai; Ramya, Adukkadan N; Maiti, Kaustabh Kumar; Ramaiah, Danaboyina

    2017-10-12

    The development of new Raman reporters has attracted immense attention in diagnostic research based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) techniques, which is a well established method for ultrasensitive detection through molecular fingerprinting and imaging. Herein, for the first time, we report the unique and efficient Raman active features of the selected aza-BODIPY dyes 1-6. These distinctive attributes could be extended at the molecular level to allow detection through SERS upon adsorption onto nano-roughened gold surface. Among the newly revealed Raman reporters, the amino substituted derivative 4 showed high signal intensity at very low concentrations (ca. 0.4 μm for 4-Au). Interestingly, an efficient nanoprobe has been constructed by using gold nanoparticles as SERS substrate, and 4 as the Raman reporter (4-Au@PEG), which unexpectedly showed efficient recognition of three human cancer cells (lung: A549, cervical: HeLa, Fibrosarcoma: HT-1080) without any specific surface marker. We observed well reflected and resolved Raman mapping and characteristic signature peaks whereas, such recognition was not observed in normal fibroblast (3T3L1) cells. To confirm these findings, a SERS nanoprobe was conjugated with a specific tumour targeting marker, EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor), a well known targeted agent for Human Fibrosarcoma (HT1080). This nanoprobe efficiently targeted the surface marker of HT1080 cells, threreby demonstrating its use as an ultrasensitive Raman probe for detection and targeted imaging, leaving normal cells unaffected. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Higher moments of scattered light fields by heterodyne analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M.; Paerson, G. N.; Hill, C. A.; Vaughan, J. M.

    1994-10-01

    A simple scattering experiment employing heterodyne detection and operating in Gaussian scattering regime (with large number of illuminated independent scatterers) is shown to yield experimental values of higher-order moments of scattered light intensity distribution in agreement with theoretical predictions. This permits assessment of Gaussian behavior. Laser light scattering from a rotating glass screen is used in the study.

  11. The solar car in suburbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storey, J.W.V. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia). School of Physics

    1995-12-31

    The problems associated with the popularity of the car, such as potential oil shortages and pollution and alternative fuel options for vehicles are discussed in this paper. The renewable fuels most appropriate to transport are ethanol, hydrogen and electricity. While the electric car appears to be the best solution, it has some of the same problems of road congestion, parking and public safety as conventional cars. The `electric vehicle` is suggested as something that takes full advantage of the unique features of electric drive and does not cripple itself with unrealistic (and ultimately undesirable) ambition of mimicking its fossil-fueled predecessor. Some solutions are proposed to the problems, including examples of the use of electric vehicles. It is concluded that it makes no difference whether the cars that use the roads are fossil-fueled or electric. Efforts to develop an electric car which simply replaces a conventional car are misguided. A well-planned city with good public transport, cycle-ways and a thriving local community is the only way to provide residents with a reasonable quality of life. 12 refs.

  12. Art Cars: Transformations of the Mundane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienecker, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    The automobile itself is often understood as an extension of oneself, where individuals may manipulate the interior and exterior of cars and trucks, decorating them through detailing, stickers, custom colors, and so on. Others go further and change their cars into unique works of art called art cars. Such cars break away from the banality of mass…

  13. Welfare Effects of Distortionary Company Car Taxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau, Eva; Ommeren, van Jos

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, company cars are offered by employers as fringe benefits to their employees at a lower price than employees pay in the car market, mainly due to favourable taxation of company cars. We analyse the welfare effects of favourable taxation of company cars for the Netherlands. The estimated

  14. Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botto, D.J.; Pratt, R.H.

    1979-05-01

    The current status of Compton scattering, both experimental observations and the theoretical predictions, is examined. Classes of experiments are distinguished and the results obtained are summarized. The validity of the incoherent scattering function approximation and the impulse approximation is discussed. These simple theoretical approaches are compared with predictions of the nonrelativistic dipole formula of Gavrila and with the relativistic results of Whittingham. It is noted that the A/sup -2/ based approximations fail to predict resonances and an infrared divergence, both of which have been observed. It appears that at present the various available theoretical approaches differ significantly in their predictions and that further and more systematic work is required.

  15. Epigenetic Methylation of Parathyroid CaR and VDR Promoters in Experimental Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Gravesen, Eva; Olgaard, Klaus; Lewin, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (s-HPT) in uremia is characterized by decreased expression in the parathyroids of calcium sensing (CaR) and vitamin D receptors (VDR). Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is normalized despite low levels of CaR and VDR after experimental reversal of uremia. The expression of CaR in parathyroid cultures decreases rapidly. Methylation of promoter regions is often detected during epigenetic downregulation of gene expression. Therefore, using an experimental rat model, we exam...

  16. Methodological modifications on quantification of phosphatidylethanol in blood from humans abusing alcohol, using high-performance liquid chromatography and evaporative light scattering detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aradottir Steina

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidylethanol (PEth is an abnormal phospholipid formed slowly in cell membranes by a transphosphatidylation reaction from phosphatidylcholine in the presence of ethanol and catalyzed by the enzyme phospholipase D. PEth in blood is a promising new marker of ethanol abuse depending on the high specificity and sensitivity of this marker. None of the biological markers used in clinical routine at the present time are sensitive and specific enough for the diagnosis of alcohol abuse. The method for PEth analysis includes lipid extraction of whole blood, a one-hour HPLC separation of lipids and ELSD (evaporative light scattering detection of PEth. Results Methodological improvements are presented which comprise a simpler extraction procedure, the use of phosphatidylbutanol as internal standard and a new algorithm for evaluation of unknown samples. It is further demonstrated that equal test results are obtained with blood collected in standard test tubes with EDTA as with the previously used heparinized test tubes. The PEth content in blood samples is stable for three weeks in the refrigerator. Conclusion Methodological changes make the method more suitable for routine laboratory use, lower the limit of quantification (LOQ and improve precision.

  17. Long-range distributed temperature and strain optical fibre sensor based on the coherent detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering with in-line Raman amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahbabi, Mohamed N.; Tat Cho, Yuh; Newson, Trevor P.

    2006-05-01

    We report an extended range distributed temperature and strain optical fibre sensor based on the coherent detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering combined with Raman amplification. The Raman amplification was achieved within the sensing fibre using either co- or counter-propagating Raman pump configuration with respect to the probe pulse and experiments were conducted to investigate the optimum pump and probe power combination. Using Brillouin frequency shift measurements with co-propagating Raman pump configuration, a temperature resolution of 1.7 °C with a 20 m spatial resolution at 100 km was achieved. With the counter-propagating pump configuration, a temperature resolution of 5 °C with a 50 m spatial resolution at 150 km was achieved. Measuring both the power and frequency of the Brillouin signal, a simultaneous temperature and strain measurement was performed over 50 km using co-propagating Raman pump. Temperature and strain resolutions of 3.5 °C and 85 μɛ with 5 m spatial resolution were achieved.

  18. A resonance light scattering sensor based on methylene blue-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate for ultrasensitive detection of guanine base associated mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanguang; Qian, Sihua; Chen, Junhui; Chen, Xi; Zheng, Liwen; Liu, Jinbin

    2012-10-01

    A resonance light scattering (RLS) sensor for guanine base associated mutations has been developed on the basis of the high selectivity of methylene blue (MB) for guanine bases in the presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS). MB, when bound to SDBS, underwent a dramatic enhancement of its RLS intensity. However, the addition of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) caused the strong RLS intensity of MB-SDBS to decrease, and the RLS intensity of MB-SDBS-ssDNA was much lower than that of MB-SDBS-dsDNA. Consequently, it can be concluded that the binding abilities of MB-SDBS with ssDNA and dsDNA were different. Besides, the experimental results showed that MB-SDBS could bind specifically to oligonucleotides rich in guanine bases. Short DNA targets with sequences related to β-thalassaemia, thrombophilia and psoriasis, all of which are guanine base relevant mutations, were synthesized. It was found that MB-SDBS could recognize the single-base mismatches in the mutational DNA, followed by different RLS signal changes between MB-SDBS-normal DNA systems and MB-SDBS-mutational DNA systems. The ultrasensitive sensor allows simple, rapid, sensitive and selective detection of guanine base associated mutations, indicating its potential application in the medical field.

  19. Headspace thin-film microextraction coupled with surface-enhanced Raman scattering as a facile method for reproducible and specific detection of sulfur dioxide in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhuo; Chen, Xuexu; Wang, Yiru; Fang, Enhua; Zhang, Zhigang; Chen, Xi

    2015-01-06

    By coupling thin-film microextraction (TFME) with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), a facile method was developed for the determination of sulfur dioxide (SO2), the most effective food additive in winemaking technology. The TFME substrate was made by free settling of sea urchin-like ZnO nanomaterials on a glass sheet. The headspace sampling (HS) procedure for SO2 was performed in a simple homemade device, and then the SO2 was determined using SERS after uniformly dropping or spraying a SERS-active substrate (gold nanoparticles, AuNPs) onto the surface of the TFME substrate. A reproducible and strong SERS response of the SO2 absorbed onto the ZnO substrate was obtained. After condition optimization, the SERS signal intensity at a shift of 600 cm(-1) and the SO2 concentration showed a good linearity in the range of 1-200 μg/mL, and the linear correlation coefficient was 0.992. The detection limit for SO2 was found to be 0.1 μg/mL. The HS-TFME-SERS method was applied for the determination of SO2 in wine, and the results obtained agreed very well with those obtained using the traditional distillation and titration method. Analysis of variance and Student t test show that there is no significant difference between the two methods, indicating that the newly developed method is fast, convenient, sensitive and has selective characteristics in the determination of SO2 in wine.

  20. Multiplex Immunochips for High-Accuracy Detection of AFP-L3% Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Implications for Early Liver Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hao; Sun, Xiaoying; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Weina; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhao, Bing; He, Chengyan

    2017-09-05

    α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is an important tumor biomarker. In particular, the overexpression of AFP-L3 is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Accordingly, several hospitals have begun to employ the ratio of AFP-L3 to the total AFP level (AFP-L3%) as new diagnostic evidence for HCC owing to its high diagnostic accuracy. However, current methods of detection for AFP and AFP-L3 are time-consuming, require multiple samples, and lack in sensitivity and specificity. Herein, we present a novel concept for the early diagnosis of HCC based on the combination of Raman frequency shift and intensity change, and developed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based immunochips via AFP-L3%. In the first step of the study, the frequency shift of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) was applied for the quantitative determination of total AFP based on the AFP and anti-AFP interaction on MBA-modified silver chips. 5,5-Dithiobis(succinimidyl-2-nitrobenzoate) (DSNB)-modified immunogold was then incorporated with AFP-L3 antibodies for sandwich immunoreaction on the chips. As a result, we found that a typical Raman band intensity of DSNB presented an exponential linear relationship with the concentration of AFP-L3. Thus, the AFP-L3% can be calculated according to the concentrations of AFP-L3 and total AFP. The most important advantage of the proposed method is the combination of AFP-L3% and frequency shifts of SERS, which exhibits excellent reproducibility and high accuracy, and significantly simplifies the conventional detection procedure of AFP-L3%. Application of the proposed method with the serum of patients with HCC demonstrated its great potential in early liver cancer diagnosis.

  1. Design review of gondola car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To ensure the constantly growing volume of freight transportations it is necessary to introduce the innovation rolling stock. It should have the best technical and economic parameters in comparison with the existing fleet. Gondola car is the most popular type of railway freight car. Designs of the modern gondolas are based on many years of operating experience and numerous tests carried out by design and research organizations in the field of car building. To improve the body structure of gondolas it is necessary to perform a review of the existing structures and to identify the trends in their improvement. Methodology. The works on improvement the designs of produced gondolas are held by many engineering organizations in almost all industrialized countries. Analysis of the existing body designs of gondola cars is possible by analyzing the research in the field of transport engineering, namely patents, scientific articles, producers catalogues and so on. Findings. When analyzing it was determined that there are gondolas of different designs, but the most common are the gondolas with a solid floor and unloading hatches, the covers of which form the floor of gondola design. An effective method for reducing the gondola empty weight and increasing the body volume is also the use of aluminum alloy instead of steel. Results of the improvement analysis of the gondola bodies` designs showed that the creation of the modern gondola car requires from designers and scientists the implementation of scientific and technical solutions providing the increase of carrying capacity and the body volume, reduction of the gondolas empty weight, increase in repair intervals while improving the strength and dynamic qualities at the same time. Originality. For the first time the gondolas designs were analyzed, their advantages and disadvantages were considered and the trends in improvement of the given structures of gondola cars were determined. Practical value

  2. Seatbelts in CAR therapy: How Safe Are CARS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Minagawa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available T-cells genetically redirected with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR to recognize tumor antigens and kill tumor cells have been infused in several phase 1 clinical trials with success. Due to safety concerns related to on-target/off-tumor effects or cytokine release syndrome, however, strategies to prevent or abate serious adverse events are required. Pharmacologic therapies; suicide genes; or novel strategies to limit the cytotoxic effect only to malignant cells are under active investigations. In this review, we summarize results and toxicities of investigations employing CAR redirected T-cells, with a focus on published strategies to grant safety of this promising cellular application.

  3. Car sharing à la carte

    CERN Document Server

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Do you want to make your commute to CERN easier, while saving money at the same time? Would you prefer not to spend a quarter of an hour crawling round the CERN car parks looking for a space? If so, read on: this article might well be of great interest to you.   We would like to draw your attention to a well established, albeit sadly under-used, method of transport: car sharing. To promote car-sharing, the GS Department has stepped in to call on the services of the Swiss firm Green Monkeys which specialises in this user-friendly and intelligent transport scheme. The company’s slogan is:  “Car-sharing as you want, when you want and as much as you want”. The principle is very straightforward. To use this car-sharing facility, you simply complete your free online registration with Green Monkeys, providing the following details: your journey, departure time, arrival time and days of the week, and indicating whether you are a passenger or driver or both. &a...

  4. Microsaccades generated during car driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Shuntaro; Hirata, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Microsaccades together with drift and tremor are fixational eye movements that are generated when we try to fixate our gaze on a visual target. Besides their function in vision to prevent neural adaptation to unchanging retinal image, microsaccades have been studied in neuroscience as an indicator of attentional states for the last decade. Most of microsaccade researches have been conducted in unnatural laboratory environments, using controlled artificial visual stimuli. Thus, little is known about the characteristics of microsaccades in natural viewing conditions. Here we attempted to evaluate microsaccades during car driving condition in the aim of estimating driver's spatial attention. We demonstrate that microsaccades are generated during car driving, and the rate of microsaccade generation is modulated by road conditions such as appearance of pedestrians or/and other cars.

  5. Advanced Infant Car Seat Would Increase Highway Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Richard; Elrod, Susan

    2004-01-01

    An advanced infant car seat has been proposed to increase highway safety by reducing the incidence of crying, fussy behavior, and other child-related distractions that divert an adult driver s attention from driving. In addition to a conventional infant car seat with safety restraints, the proposed advanced infant car seat would include a number of components and subsystems that would function together as a comprehensive infant-care system that would keep its occupant safe, comfortable, and entertained, and would enable the driver to monitor the baby without having to either stop the car or turn around to face the infant during driving. The system would include a vibrator with bulb switch to operate; the switch would double as a squeeze toy that would make its own specific sound. A music subsystem would include loudspeakers built into the seat plus digital and analog circuitry that would utilize plug-in memory modules to synthesize music or a variety of other sounds. The music subsystem would include a built-in sound generator that could synthesize white noise or a human heartbeat to calm the baby to sleep. A second bulb switch could be used to control the music subsystem and would double as a squeeze toy that would make a distinct sound. An anti-noise sound-suppression system would isolate the baby from potentially disturbing ambient external noises. This subsystem would include small microphones, placed near the baby s ears, to detect ambient noise. The outputs of the microphone would be amplified and fed to the loudspeakers at appropriate amplitude and in a phase opposite that of the detected ambient noise, such that the net ambient sound arriving at the baby s ears would be almost completely cancelled. A video-camera subsystem would enable the driver to monitor the baby visually while continuing to face forward. One or more portable miniature video cameras could be embedded in the side of the infant car seat (see figure) or in a flip-down handle. The outputs of

  6. Who Will Buy Electric Cars?

    OpenAIRE

    Turrentine, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    1998 will be a big year for both automakers and clean-air advocates. In less than three years, the seven largest car sellers in California must sell zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) - 2 percent of their sales of vehicles under 3750 lbs loaded weight. Given the size of the current market, that's about 20,000 vehicles and they most likely will be electric cars. By 2003, 10 percent must be zero-emitters.  The crux is that the government requires the auto industry to put ZEVs on the market ...

  7. One smart card, one less car

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenton, B.

    2003-06-30

    A system of car-sharing in Bremen, Germany, a membership-based structure of car-sharing that gives members access to a network of cars stationed throughout the city on a pay-per-trip basis, and without the hassles of car ownership, is discussed. The car-sharing scheme is combined with the city's transit system by means of a smart card that serves both as a pass for the city's transit system and as an electronic key to the cars in the car-sharing system. Future plans include to use the card also as a method of payment for taxis, and organizers are also working with the municipal government to get support for having car-sharing included in the city's official plan. At present, car-sharing stations are simply reserved parking spots for one or more cars, however, future stations are envisaged to include parking for up to five cars, a computer to book cars, direct access to keys using the smart card, parking for bicycles, and information about car-sharing stations, bus, trams, as well as bike and walking routes. Similar, if somewhat more modest, car-sharing schemes are also available in several cities in Canada, including Halifax, Quebec City, Montreal, Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver.

  8. Positive and negative spillover effects from electric car purchase to car use

    OpenAIRE

    Kløckner, Christian; Nayum, Alim; Mehmetoglu, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the results of two online surveys conducted on buyers of conventional combustion engine cars compared to those of electric vehicles in Norway. The results show that electric cars are generally purchased as additional cars, do not contribute to a decrease in annual mileage if the old car is not substituted, and that electric car buyers use the car more often for their everyday mobility. Psychological determinants derived from the theory of planned behavior and the norm-activ...

  9. Vibrational phase contrast CARS microscopy for quantitative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.; Garbacik, E.T.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Periasamy, Ammasi; So, Peter T.C.; Konig, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    In biological samples the resonant CARS signal of less abundant constituents can be overwhelmed by the nonresonant background, preventing detection of those molecules. We demonstrate a method to obtain the phase of the oscillators in the focal volume that allows discrimination of those hidden

  10. Scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This corrected and updated second edition of "Scattering Theory" presents a concise and modern coverage of the subject. In the present treatment, special attention is given to the role played by the long-range behaviour of the projectile-target interaction, and a theory is developed, which is well suited to describe near-threshold bound and continuum states in realistic binary systems such as diatomic molecules or molecular ions. It is motivated by the fact that experimental advances have shifted and broadened the scope of applications where concepts from scattering theory are used, e.g. to the field of ultracold atoms and molecules, which has been experiencing enormous growth in recent years, largely triggered by the successful realization of Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute atomic gases in 1995. The book contains sections on special topics such as near-threshold quantization, quantum reflection, Feshbach resonances and the quantum description of scattering in two dimensions. The level of abstraction is k...

  11. Detection and characterization of nanoparticles in suspension at low concentrations using the X-ray total scattering pair distribution function technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terban, Maxwell W. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics; Columbia University; New York, USA; Johnson, Matthew [GlaxoSmithKline Medicines Research Centre; Hertfordshire, UK; Di Michiel, Marco [ESRF – The European Synchrotron; 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9, France; Billinge, Simon J. L. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics; Columbia University; New York, USA; Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department; Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2015-01-01

    Total scattering experiments are used with pair distribution function analysis to study nanoscale structure and morphology in highly disordered samples. We investigate sensitivity for the case of organic nanoparticles in dilute solution.

  12. Sea-urchin-like Au nanocluster with surface-enhanced raman scattering in detecting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status of malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Guo, Ting; Lu, Qiang; Yan, Xiaolong; Zhong, Daixing; Zhang, Zhipei; Ni, Yunfeng; Han, Yong; Cui, Daxiang; Li, Xiaofei; Huang, Lijun

    2015-01-14

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are common in patients with lung adenocarcinomas and are associated with sensitivity to the small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). For 10%-50% of the patients who experienced malignant pleural effusion (MPE), pathological diagnosis might rely exclusively on finding lung cancer cells in the MPE. Current methods based on polymerase chain reaction were utilized to test EGFR mutation status of MPE samples, but the accuracy of the test data was very low, resulting in many patients losing the chance of TKIs treatment. Herein, we synthesized the sea-urchin-like Au nanocluster (AuNC) with an average diameter of 92.4 nm, composed of 15-nm nanopricks. By introducing abundant sharp nanopricks, the enhancement factor of AuNC reached at 1.97 × 10(7). After capped with crystal violet (CV), polyethylene glycol, and EGFR mutation specific antibody, the AuNC-EGFR had excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity and EGFR mutation targeted recognition capability in lung cancer cells. Characteristic SERS signal at 1617 cm(-1) of CV was linear correlation with the number of H1650 cells, demonstrating the minimum detection limit as 25 cells in a 1-mL suspension. The gold mass in single H1650 cells exposed to AuNC-E746_750 for 2 h ranged from 208.6 pg to 231.4 pg, which approximately corresponded to 56-62 AuNCs per cell. Furthermore, SERS was preclinically utilized to test EGFR mutation status in MPE samples from 35 patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Principal component analysis (PCA) and the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm were constructed for EGFR mutation diagnostic analysis, yielding an overall accuracy of 90.7%. SERS measurement based on sea-urchin-like AuNC was an efficient method for EGFR mutation detection in MPE, and it might show great potential in applications such as predicting gene typing of clinical lung cancer in the near future.

  13. Physics Fun with Toy Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herald, Christine

    2010-01-01

    According to the National Science Education Standards, students should be able to describe an object by its position, direction of motion, and speed (NRC 1996). During a unit on motion, the author decided to use Hot Wheels cars as the object students would describe. The first two activities are used to introduce students to the equipment and the…

  14. Restoring a Classic Electric Car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    One hundred years ago, automobiles were powered by steam, electricity, or internal combustion. Female drivers favored electric cars because, unlike early internal-combustion vehicles, they did not require a crank for starting. Nonetheless, internal-combustion vehicles came to dominate the industry and it's only in recent years that the electrics…

  15. Automated Car Park Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabros, J. P.; Tabañag, D.; Espra, A.; Gerasta, O. J.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to develop a prototype for an Automated Car Park Management System that will increase the quality of service of parking lots through the integration of a smart system that assists motorist in finding vacant parking lot. The research was based on implementing an operating system and a monitoring system for parking system without the use of manpower. This will include Parking Guidance and Information System concept which will efficiently assist motorists and ensures the safety of the vehicles and the valuables inside the vehicle. For monitoring, Optical Character Recognition was employed to monitor and put into list all the cars entering the parking area. All parking events in this system are visible via MATLAB GUI which contain time-in, time-out, time consumed information and also the lot number where the car parks. To put into reality, this system has a payment method, and it comes via a coin slot operation to control the exit gate. The Automated Car Park Management System was successfully built by utilizing microcontrollers specifically one PIC18f4550 and two PIC16F84s and one PIC16F628A.

  16. Integrated CARS source based on seeded four-wave mixing in silicon nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epping, J.P.; Kues, M.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Lee, Christopher James; Fallnich, C.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of an integrated nonlinear light source for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) based on silicon nitride waveguides. Wavelength tunable and temporally synchronized signal and idler pulses are obtained by using seeded four-wave mixing. We find that the

  17. Chemically-specific dual/differential CARS micro-spectroscopy of saturated and unsaturated lipid droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Napoli, C.; Masia, F; Pope, I.; Otto, Cornelis; Langbein, W.; Borri, P.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the ability of dual-frequency Coherent Antistokes Raman Scattering (D-CARS) micro-spectroscopy, based on femtosecond pulses (100 fs or 5 fs) spectrally focussed by glass dispersion, to distinguish the chemical composition of micron-sized lipid droplets consisting of different

  18. A theoretical investigation of super-resolution CARS imaging via coherent and incoherent saturation of transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeker, W.P.; Beeker, Willem; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.; Gross, Petra; Gross, P.; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2011-01-01

    We review two approaches to achieving sub-diffraction-limited resolution coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy (Beeker et al., Opt. Express, 2009, 17, 22632 and Beeker et al., J. Herek, Phys. Rev. A, 2010, 81, 012507). We performed a numerical investigation, based on the density

  19. A Discrete Scatterer Technique for Evaluating Electromagnetic Scattering from Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    distribution is unlimited. 1 1. Introduction Developing sensing capabilities for the detection of ground targets concealed in a forest environment...scatterer simulation are 369 MB and 33 min/frequency, respectively, on a Dell Precision T7500 workstation with Intel Xeon CPU of 2.67 GHz, while those...2. Thirion L, Colin E, Dahon C. Capabilities of a forest coherent scattering model applied to radiometry, interferometry, and polarimetry at P

  20. A Demonstration of Car Braking Instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Jack; Swinson, Derek

    1990-01-01

    Detailed are the construction of a demonstration car, apparatus and procedures used in the demonstration, and the analysis of the effects of car braking. The cases of rear-wheel and front-wheel braking are considered. (CW)

  1. AAP Updates Recommendations on Car Seats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trip in every type of transportation, on the road or in the air,” Dr. Durbin said. Click here for a list of approved car safety seats. Healthy Children Radio: Car Seat Safety Dennis Durbin, MD, FAAP, ...

  2. [Unusual findings in a death caused by a car fire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Michael; Schmidt, Ulrike; Werp, Jürgen; Simon, Karl-Heinz

    2007-01-01

    Witnesses detected a burning car in the parking lot next to a discotheque in the early morning hours. After the fire had been extinguished, the charred body of the 23-year-old car owner was found in the driver's seat. The young man had been a guest of the discotheque the previous night and consumed plenty of alcoholic drinks. The traces left by the fire on the car suggested that the fire had started in the passenger compartment. At autopsy, greyish-brown discoloration and induration of the mucosa of the respiratory tract were found in addition to massive aspiration of soot and signs of soot swallowing. The macroscopic and histological findings pointed to a chemical burn of the airways probably caused by chlorine gases developing when the covering of the passenger compartment was burning. Chemical burns due to inhalation, aspiration and swallowing of soot are all signs of vitality, so that a smoldering fire must have gone on for a while inside the car with the windows closed. The most probable cause of the fire is that clothing or textile material in the car was set on fire by a burning cigarette.

  3. Entwurfskonzept einer Car2Car-Multiband-Dachantenne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Reit, M.; Mathis, W.

    2012-09-01

    Due to the vastly increasing use of wireless services in the car, such as WiFi, Car2Car and LTE, the requirements on bandwidth and radiation pattern of the roof antenna systems become more challenging. In this work, a design concept for multi-band roof antenna systems is presented. We aim to get a higher bandwidth and an almost circular radiation pattern on the horizontal plane. Moreover, the antenna length is considered in order to fulfill the requirements set by construction ECE-regulations (ECE, 2010). The applicability of the design concept is not limited to multi-band roof antennas, it can also be used for a general wideband antenna design. For illustration of this concept, a multi-band roof antenna with a bandwidth of 780 MHz to 5.9 GHz and a near circular radiation pattern with an average gain of G = 3 dBi (at 5.9 GHz) on the horizontal plane is designed. The simulation and measurement results are presented.

  4. Trial products of solar cars; Solar car no shisaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, A.; Hatakeyama, S.; Sugiura, S.; Shinoda, S.; Daigo, Y.; Fujihara, Y.; Yano, K.; Kasuga, M. [Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-11-25

    A solar car was trially manufactured installing solar panels on a motor-wheelchair for the old (senior car). It is a car for one person with maximum speed of 6km/h, motor of 360w, two of storage battery of 12Vtimes29AH, and two of solar cell of 20Vtimes3A. The output of solar cell is about 100W, which may not be enough to drive a 360W motor. However, if action time per day is about 2 hours, the required power 700WH, and the sunshine duration 7 hours per day, solar cells of 100W can generate 700WH. This is stored in battery, and when it is short, it is supplemented by nighttime power. Product prices are 200,000-250,000 yen. A solar go-cart was trially manufactured remodeling the gasoline-run go-cart. It is a solar go-cart for one person with maximum speed of 30km/h, a motor of 600W, four of storage battery of 12Vtimes29AH, and four of solar cell of 20Vtimes3A. The output of solar battery at 200W is a third of the motor power, with battery charged three times the travel time. More than 1000 persons trially rode the go-cart. 2 figs.

  5. FTIR, Raman, and CARS microscopic imaging for histopathologic assessment of brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Christoph; Bergner, Norbert; Matthäus, Christian; Romeike, Bernd; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Dietzek, B.,; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    The contribution demonstrates how the molecular contrast of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopic imaging can be applied for the histopathological assessment of brain tumors. Human brain tissue specimens were obtained from patients undergoing neurosurgery. Thin sections of control brain tissue from an epilepsy patient and tumor tissue from a meningioma patient were prepared on calciumfluoride slides which were appropriate substrates for data acquisition in transmission and reflection mode. All CARS images correlate well with the FTIR and Raman images. Whereas CARS images were collected within seconds, exposure times were minutes for FTIR imaging and hours for Raman imaging. CARS images in the interval 2750-3000 cm-1 mainly probed spectral contributions of lipids which are important diagnostic markers of brain tumors. It was demonstrated that the CARS profile in the interval 2750-3000 cm-1 differed between the control sample and meningioma. Full spectral information could be extracted from Raman and FTIR images that enabled to distinguish different tissue types in brain tumors. Based on the current results we suggest a complementary application of FTIR, Raman and CARS imaging. FTIR and Raman imaging defines spectral regions and spectral markers that are essential for tissue classification. CARS images at different Stokes shifts or in the multiplex mode probe these spectral descriptors at video-time frame rates.

  6. Active deceleration support in car following

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.; Pauwelussen, J.J.A.; Paassen, M.M. van; Mulder, M.; Abbink, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    A haptic gas pedal feedback system is developed that provides car-following information via haptic cues from the gas pedal. During normal car-following situations, the haptic feedback (HF) cues were sufficient to reduce control activity and improve car-following performance. However, in more

  7. Car Ownership and Welfare-to-Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Paul M.

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the role of car ownership in facilitating employment among recipients under the current welfare-to-work law. Because of a potential problem with simultaneity, the analysis uses predicted car ownership constructed from two instrumental variables, insurance premiums and population density for car ownership. The data come from a…

  8. Detection of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor receptor (c-Met in axillary clearance after mastectomy for breast cancer using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Refaey H.K.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diverse biological effects of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF are mediated by c-Met which is preferentially expressed on epithelial cells. Met signaling has a role in normal cellular activities, and may be associated with development and progression of malignant processes. In this study presence of Met in the axillary drainage from patients who underwent conservative operations for breast cancer, and its prognostic significance was examined. Sixty-two consecutive patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast which were suitable for breast-conserving treatment participated in the study. The output of the drain that had been placed in the axilla during the operation was collected, and the presence of Met and β-actin were assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assays. The data were compared with the pathological features of the tumor and the axillary lymph nodes, and with the estrogen and progesterone receptors status.RT-PCR of the axillary lymphatic drainage was positive for Met in 46 (74.2% of the patients and positive assays were correlated with increase in tumor size and grade of capillary and lymphatic invasion, as well as with lymph node metastasis (P < 0.02, for all comparisons. All 24 patients with axillary lymph node metastases in comparison with those without lymph node (57.9% metastases had positive assays for Met. While all ten patients with tumor involvement in the margins of the resection had positive assays for Met in their lymphatic fluid, only 36 out of 52 patients (69.2% were positive for met assay. Finally, Met showed negative correlations with positive estrogen and progesterone receptor assays (P<0.02.From the results of this study it may concluded that Met can be detected in the axillary fluids of patients with breast cancer and its expression in the axillary drainage may be a potential prognostic factor. This finding might be useful in therapeutic considerations since a

  9. An improved car-following model accounting for the preceding car's taillight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Tang, Tie-Qiao; Yu, Shao-Wei

    2018-02-01

    During the deceleration process, the preceding car's taillight may have influences on its following car's driving behavior. In this paper, we propose an extended car-following model with consideration of the preceding car's taillight. Two typical situations are used to simulate each car's movement and study the effects of the preceding car's taillight on the driving behavior. Meanwhile, sensitivity analysis of the model parameter is in detail discussed. The numerical results show that the proposed model can improve the stability of traffic flow and the traffic safety can be enhanced without a decrease of efficiency especially when cars pass through a signalized intersection.

  10. Epigenetic Methylation of Parathyroid CaR and VDR Promoters in Experimental Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Hofman-Bang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary hyperparathyroidism (s-HPT in uremia is characterized by decreased expression in the parathyroids of calcium sensing (CaR and vitamin D receptors (VDR. Parathyroid hormone (PTH is normalized despite low levels of CaR and VDR after experimental reversal of uremia. The expression of CaR in parathyroid cultures decreases rapidly. Methylation of promoter regions is often detected during epigenetic downregulation of gene expression. Therefore, using an experimental rat model, we examined changes in methylation levels of parathyroid CaR and VDR promoters in vivo and in vitro. Methods. Uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. Melting temperature profiling of CaR and VDR PCR products after bisulfite treatment of genomic DNA from rat parathyroids was performed. Real-time PCR measured expression of PTH, CaR, VDR, and klotho genes in vitro. Results. Parathyroids from uremic rats had similar low levels of methylation in vivo and in vitro. In culture, a significant downregulation of CaR, VDR, and klotho within two hours of incubation was observed, while housekeeping genes remained stable for 24 hours. Conclusion. In uremic s-HPT and in vitro, no overall changes in methylation levels in the promoter regions of parathyroid CaR and VDR genes were found. Thus, epigenetic methylation of these promoters does not explain decreased parathyroid expression of CaR and VDR genes in uremic s-HPT.

  11. Car insurance information management system

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A customer information system is a typical information management system. It involves three aspects, the backstage database establishment, the application development and the system maintenance. A car insurance information management system is based on browser/server structure. Microsoft SQL Server establishes the backstage database. Active Server Pages, from Microsoft as well is used as the interface layer. The objective of this thesis was to apply ASP to the dynamic storage of a web page...

  12. Light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus: evidence that CarS acts as an anti-repressor of CarA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, D E; Hodgson, D A

    2001-11-01

    In the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus, carotenoids are produced in response to illumination, as a result of expression of the crt carotenoid biosynthesis genes. The majority of crt genes are clustered in the crtEBDC operon, which is repressed in the dark by CarA. Genetic data suggest that, in the light, CarS is synthesized and achieves activation of the crtEBDC operon by removing the repressive action of CarA. As CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif, the relief of CarA-mediated repression was postulated to result from a direct interaction between these two proteins. Use of the yeast two-hybrid system demonstrated direct interaction between CarA and CarS. The two-hybrid system also implied that CarA and, possibly, CarS are capable of homodimerization. Direct evidence for CarS anti-repressor action was provided in vitro. A glutathione S-transferase (GST)-CarA protein fusion was shown to bind specifically to a palindromic operator sequence within the crtEBDC promoter. CarA was prevented from binding to its operator, and prebound CarA was removed by the addition of purified CarS. CarS is therefore an anti-repressor.

  13. Multiphoton Scattering Tomography with Coherent States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Tomás; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2017-10-13

    In this work we develop an experimental procedure to interrogate the single- and multiphoton scattering matrices of an unknown quantum system interacting with propagating photons. Our proposal requires coherent state laser or microwave inputs and homodyne detection at the scatterer's output, and provides simultaneous information about multiple-elastic and inelastic-segments of the scattering matrix. The method is resilient to detector noise and its errors can be made arbitrarily small by combining experiments at various laser powers. Finally, we show that the tomography of scattering has to be performed using pulsed lasers to efficiently gather information about the nonlinear processes in the scatterer.

  14. CAR-T cells are serial killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Alexander J; Jenkins, Misty R; Ritchie, David S; Prince, H Miles; Trapani, Joseph A; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K; Neeson, Paul J

    2015-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have enjoyed unprecedented clinical success against haematological malignancies in recent years. However, several aspects of CAR T cell biology remain unknown. We recently compared CAR and T cell receptor (TCR)-based killing in the same effector cell and showed that CAR T cells can not only efficiently kill single tumor targets, they can also kill multiple tumor targets in a sequential manner. Single and serial killing events were not sustained long term due to CAR down-regulation after 20 hours.

  15. Consumer Behavior towards Safer Car Purchasing Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairil Anwar Abu Kassim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, the car safety level has been elevated through regulations and a consumer-based approach, i.e. the New Car Assessment Program in Southeast Asian Countries (ASEAN NCAP. Nevertheless, the availability of information on consumers’ car purchasing decisions towards safety is still limited in Malaysia. Thus, this study was aimed at evaluating consumers’ purchasing decisions of their present cars and investigating their awareness of ASEAN NCAP. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed among consumers visiting different car showrooms and dealer shops. The findings suggest that safety was considered as one of the top three factors by the respondents when purchasing their present cars. Awareness of ASEAN NCAP has increased as compared to a previous study. This information is essential for policy makers, manufacturers and other stakeholders to assist in setting priorities with regard to the promotion of car safety in the country.

  16. Substitution between cars within the household

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Borger, Bruno; Mulalic, Ismir; Rouwendal, Jan

    2016-01-01

    .98 and 1.41 for the primary and secondary cars, respectively. Accounting for substitution effects, these figures reduce to, respectively, 0.32 and 0.45. Consistent with substitution behaviour, we find that the fuel price elasticity of fuel demand exceeds the elasticity of kilometre demands with respect......In this paper we study the demand for car kilometres in two-car households, focusing on the substitution between cars of different fuel efficiency in response to fuel price changes. We use a large sample of detailed Danish data on two-car households to estimate – for each car owned by the household...... – own and cross-price effects of increases in fuel costs per kilometre. The empirical results show that failure to capture substitution between cars within the household can result in substantial misspecification biases. Ignoring substitution, the basic model yielded fuel price elasticities of 0...

  17. Substitution between Cars within the Household

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Borger, Bruno; Mulalic, Ismir; Rouwendal, Jan

    In this paper we study the demand for car kilometres in two-car households, focusing on the substitution between cars in response to fuel price changes. We use a large sample of detailed Danish data on two-car households to estimate—for each car owned by the household—own and cross-price effects...... of increases in fuel costs per kilometre. The empirical results show that failure to capture substitution between cars within the household can result in substantial misspecification biases. Ignoring substitution, we estimate fuel price elasticities of –0.81 and -0.65 for the primary and secondary cars......, respectively. When we do take into account the substitution effect, these figures reduce to, respectively, -0.32 and -0.45. We further estimate an alternative version of the model to test the hypothesis that substitution in response to higher fuel prices will be predominantly from the least to the most fuel...

  18. Upgrade of the automatic analysis system in the TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic: New image recognition classifier and fault condition detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makili, L.; Vega, J.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Pastor, I.; Pereira, A.; Farias, G.; Portas, A.; Perez-Risco, D.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, M. C.; Busch, P.

    2010-01-01

    An automatic image classification system based on support vector machines (SVM) has been in operation for years in the TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic. It recognizes five different types of images: CCD camera background, measurement of stray light without plasma or in a collapsed discharge,

  19. Correction of the spectral calibration of the Joint European Torus core light detecting and ranging Thomson scattering diagnostic using ray tracing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawke, J.; Scannell, R.; Maslov, M.; Migozzi, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    This work isolated the cause of the observed discrepancy between the electron temperature (T-e) measurements before and after the JET Core LIDAR Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic was upgraded. In the upgrade process, stray light filters positioned just before the detectors were removed from the

  20. 49 CFR 215.121 - Defective car body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defective car body. 215.121 Section 215.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components Car Bodies § 215.121 Defective car body. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if: (a) Any portion of...

  1. Preferences for Alternative Fuel Vehicles of Company Car Drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, M.J.; Hoen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Costs of car ownership for company cars drivers and private car owners are very different. Car use, car choice decisions and preferences for car characteristics may therefore differ substantially between these two markets. In this paper, we present results of a study on the preferences of company

  2. Rayleigh's Scattering Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiets, Sergey; Gorelik, Andrey

    Mie’s waves while sounding within coincident volumes. Being sensitive to the size of scatters, Mie’s waves can give us additional information about particle size distribution. But how about using several wavelengths corresponding to Rayleigh’s diffraction on scatters only? Can any effects be detected in such a case and what performance characteristics of the equipment are required to detect them? The deceptive simplicity of the negative answer to the first part of the question posed will disappear if one collects different definitions of Rayleigh's scattering and consider them more closely than usually. Several definitions borrowed from the introductory texts and most popular textbooks and articles can be seen as one of the reasons for the research presented in the report. Hopefully, based on the comparison of them all, anyone could easily conclude that Rayleigh's scattering has been analyzed extensively, but despite this extensive analysis made fundamental ambiguities in introductory texts are not eliminated completely to date. Moreover, there may be found unreasonably many examples on how these ambiguities have already caused an error to be foreseen, published on the one article, amplified in another one, then cited with approval in the third one, before being finally corrected. Everything indicated that in the light of all the lesions learned and based on modern experimental data, it is time to address these issues again. After the discussion of ambiguities of Rayleigh's scattering concepts, the development of the corrections to original ideas looks relatively easy. In particular, there may be distinguished at least three characteristic regions of the revised models application from the point of view of the scattered field statistical averaging. The authors of the report suggest naming them Rayleigh’s region, Einstein’s region and the region with compensations of the scattering intensity. The most important fact is that the limits of applicability of all

  3. Resonance Rayleigh scattering, second-order scattering and frequency doubling scattering methods for the indirect determination of penicillin antibiotics based on the formation of Fe3[Fe(CN)6]2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hui; Liu, Zhongfang; Liu, Shaopu; Yi, Aoer

    2008-06-15

    Under the HCl solution and heating condition, penicillin antibiotics such as amoxicillin (AMO), ampicillin (AMP), sodium cloxacillin (CLO), sodium carbenicillin (CAR) and sodium benzylpenicillin (BEN) could react with Fe(III) to produce Fe(II) which further reacted with Fe(CN)(6)(3-) to form a Fe(3)[Fe(CN)(6)](2) complex. By virtue of hydrophobic force and Van der Waals force, the complex aggregated to form Fe(3)[Fe(CN)(6)](2) nanoparticles with an average diameter of 45 nm. This resulted in a significant enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and non-linear scattering such as second-order scattering (SOS) and frequency doubling scattering (FDS). The increments of scattering intensity (DeltaI) were directly proportional to the concentrations of the antibiotics in a certain range. The detection limits for the five penicillin antibiotics were 2.9-6.1 ng ml(-1) for RRS method, 4.0-6.8 ng ml(-1) for SOS method and 7.4-16.2 ng ml(-1) for FDS method, respectively. Among them, the RRS method exhibited the highest sensitivity and the AMO system was more sensitive than other antibiotics systems. Based on the above researches, a new highly sensitive and simple method for the indirect determination of penicillin antibiotics has been developed. It can be applied to the determination of penicillin antibiotics in capsule, tablet, human serum and urine samples. In this work, the spectral characteristics of absorption, RRS, SOS and FDS spectra, the optimum conditions of the reaction and the influencing factors were investigated. In addition, the reaction mechanism was discussed.

  4. 49 CFR 231.8 - Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with short side sills and end platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... clearance, within 30 inches of side of car, until car is shopped for work amounting to practically... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with... APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.8 Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with short side sills and end...

  5. Detection of Missing Assemblies and Estimation of the Scattering Densities in a VSC-24 Dry Storage Cask with Cosmic-Ray-Muon-Based Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhengzhi; Hayward, Jason; Liao, Can; Yang, Haori

    2017-01-01

    Highly energetic, cosmic-ray muons can easily penetrate a dry storage cask and yield information about the material inside it by making use of the physics of multiple Coulomb scattering. Work by others has shown this information may be used for verification of dry storage cask contents after continuity of knowledge has been lost. In our modeling and simulation approach, we use ideal planar radiation detectors to record the trajectories and momentum of both incident and exiting cosmic ray muon...

  6. On scattered subword complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Kása, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Special scattered subwords, in which the gaps are of length from a given set, are defined. The scattered subword complexity, which is the number of such scattered subwords, is computed for rainbow words.

  7. Evaluation of the light scattering and the turbidity microtiter plate-based methods for the detection of the excipient-mediated drug precipitation inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruševska, Marija; Urleb, Uroš; Peternel, Luka

    2013-11-01

    The excipient-mediated precipitation inhibition is classically determined by the quantification of the dissolved compound in the solution. In this study, two alternative approaches were evaluated, one is the light scattering (nephelometer) and other is the turbidity (plate reader) microtiter plate-based methods which are based on the quantification of the compound precipitate. Following the optimization of the nephelometer settings (beam focus, laser gain) and the experimental conditions, the screening of 23 excipients on the precipitation inhibition of poorly soluble fenofibrate and dipyridamole was performed. The light scattering method resulted in excellent correlation (r>0.91) between the calculated precipitation inhibitor parameters (PIPs) and the precipitation inhibition index (PI(classical)) obtained by the classical approach for fenofibrate and dipyridamole. Among the evaluated PIPs AUC100 (nephelometer) resulted in only four false positives and lack of false negatives. In the case of the turbidity-based method a good correlation of the PI(classical) was obtained for the PIP maximal optical density (OD(max), r=0.91), however, only for fenofibrate. In the case of the OD(max) (plate reader) five false positives and two false negatives were identified. In conclusion, the light scattering-based method outperformed the turbidity-based one and could be reliably used for identification of novel precipitation inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The fatal injuries of car drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, A; Chambost, M; Chiron, M

    2009-01-30

    We often refer to road fatalities without knowing exactly what injuries are responsible for them. Based on the Rhône Road Trauma Registry this paper sets out to describe the topography, nature and frequency of the fatal injuries sustained by car drivers. Mean annual mortality at the wheel of a car, computed by dividing the total number of drivers killed (n=383) by the population of the Rhône Département (1.6 million) during the period 1996-2004 was 5.41 males per 100,000 and 1.41 females per 100,000, with 78% of the casualties residing in the Département. A reduction has been observed since 2003. Three-quarters of the casualties died at the scene of the crash. The results confirm the effectiveness of seat belts. The observed lethality was 0.43% for unbelted drivers and 2.7% for belted drivers (RR=0.16 [0.12; 0.21]). The injuries were analyzed for the 287 killed drivers whose deaths could be explained by the described injuries (at least one AIS 4+ injury). Of these, 41% had an ISS of 75 (at least one AIS 6 injury), 21% had an ISS of between 40 and 74, 33% an ISS of between 25 and 40, and 6% an ISS of between 16 and 24. In the case of all the AIS 4+ injuries, the three most frequent locations for injuries were the thorax only (30% of casualties), the head only (23%) and a combination of the two (18%). Abdominal injuries occurred in only 10% of casualties and spinal injuries in 9% of casualties. In the thorax, the most common injury was flail chest with haemothorax or pneumothorax. In the case of the head, the most frequent injuries were to the brain (haemorrhage, haematoma and axonal injuries). Complex fractures of the base of the skull were the second most common craniocephalic injuries. In spite of the use of restraint devices, the thorax and head are still the priority vital areas for protection in the case of car drivers. For one in four of the fatalities, death cannot be explained by any of the injuries we know about. As road traffic accidents are considered

  9. Scattering from Rock and Rock Outcrops

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Scattering from Rock and Rock Outcrops Derek R. Olson The Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 30 State...In terms of target detection and classification, scattering from exposed rock on the seafloor, (i.e., individual rocks and rock outcrops) presents...levels, and other statistical measures of acoustic scattering from rocks and rock outcrops is therefore critical. Unfortunately (and curiously

  10. Driving CAR T-cells forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Hollie J.; Rafiq, Sarwish; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2017-01-01

    The engineered expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on the surface of T cells enables the redirection of T-cell specificity. Early clinical trials using CAR T cells for the treatment of patients with cancer showed modest results, but the impressive outcomes of several trials of CD19-targeted CAR T cells in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies have generated an increased enthusiasm for this approach. Important lessons have been derived from clinical trials of CD19-specific CAR T cells, and ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in haematological and solid malignancies. In this Review, we discuss these trials and present strategies that can increase the antitumour efficacy and safety of CAR T-cell therapy. Given the fast-moving nature of this field, we only discuss studies with direct translational application currently or soon-to-be tested in the clinical setting. PMID:27000958

  11. MODERN ELECTRIC CARS OF TESLA MOTORS COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Vynakov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This overview article shows the advantages of a modern electric car as compared with internal combustion cars by the example of the electric vehicles of Tesla Motors Company. It (в смысле- статья describes the history of this firm, provides technical and tactical characteristics of three modifications of electric vehicles produced by Tesla Motors. Modern electric cars are not less powerful than cars with combustion engines both in speed and acceleration amount. They are reliable, economical and safe in operation. With every year the maximum range of an electric car is increasing and its battery charging time is decreasing.Solving the problem of environmental safety, the governments of most countries are trying to encourage people to switch to electric cars by creating subsidy programs, lending and abolition of taxation. Therefore, the advent of an electric vehicle in all major cities of the world is inevitable.

  12. Research and Development Trends of Car Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Li, Zhixiong; Xie, Guotao

    With the rapid development of the world economy, road transport has become increasingly busy. An unexpected incident would cause serious traffic disaster due to traffic accidents. To solve this problem, the intelligent transportation system (ITS), which is important for the health developments of the city transportation, has become a hot topic. The car networking provides a new way for intelligent transportation system. It can ensure intelligent control and monitoring of urban road with high performance. This paper described the concept of car networking and related technology both in oversea and domestic. The importance of car networking to achieve vehicle and details of the car networking related technologies were illustrated firstly. Then, attentions focus on the research nodus of the car networking. Lastly, the development trend of car networking research was discussed.

  13. Diesel cars in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a better understanding of the causes of the recent increased interest in diesel cars, thereby providing insight into the related behavior of institutions and individuals. This knowledge may improve the formulation of federal policies for diesel, electric, and other more energy-efficient car systems. The study describes developments in the diesel car field over the past few years, and discusses the present status of diesel cars. Historical data were assembled on diesel car sales and on parameters that might have affected the sales. Information is included on the following items related to diesel cars: buyers preferences and why; fuel economy and availability; energy conservation potential; and exhaust emissions, their control and air pollution effects. (LCL)

  14. Functional analysis of the Phycomyces carRA gene encoding the enzymes phytoene synthase and lycopene cyclase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Sanz

    Full Text Available Phycomyces carRA gene encodes a protein with two domains. Domain R is characterized by red carR mutants that accumulate lycopene. Domain A is characterized by white carA mutants that do not accumulate significant amounts of carotenoids. The carRA-encoded protein was identified as the lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase enzyme by sequence homology with other proteins. However, no direct data showing the function of this protein have been reported so far. Different Mucor circinelloides mutants altered at the phytoene synthase, the lycopene cyclase or both activities were transformed with the Phycomyces carRA gene. Fully transcribed carRA mRNA molecules were detected by Northern assays in the transformants and the correct processing of the carRA messenger was verified by RT-PCR. These results showed that Phycomyces carRA gene was correctly expressed in Mucor. Carotenoids analysis in these transformants showed the presence of ß-carotene, absent in the untransformed strains, providing functional evidence that the Phycomyces carRA gene complements the M. circinelloides mutations. Co-transformation of the carRA cDNA in E. coli with different combinations of the carotenoid structural genes from Erwinia uredovora was also performed. Newly formed carotenoids were accumulated showing that the Phycomyces CarRA protein does contain lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase activities. The heterologous expression of the carRA gene and the functional complementation of the mentioned activities are not very efficient in E. coli. However, the simultaneous presence of both carRA and carB gene products from Phycomyces increases the efficiency of these enzymes, presumably due to an interaction mechanism.

  15. Bidirectional optical scattering facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Goniometric optical scatter instrument (GOSI)The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) quantifies the angular distribution of light scattered from a...

  16. Prediction of future car forms based on historical trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijendra Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cars are one of the most important products that affects our daily life. Manufacturers of cars are inclined to know factors that affect the sales of cars and how to influence them. Car is a very competitive product whose technology is already matured. Thus, purchase decisions of a car depend on factors such as, aesthetics, ergonomics, features available and price. Exterior form and colour of a car are the most important factors that influence likeness of the car. We did a case study on car aesthetics (form, colour, shape, and user focus with more than 500 car advertisements over the past 70 years, appearing in various car magazines. Results show that form of cars has changed from sharp to smooth over the years, and white colour cars are becoming more popular. Additionally, car size is becoming smaller and increasingly focused towards family. Thus, manufacturers are recommended to develop compact, efficient and hybrid cars.

  17. Air quality inside passenger cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Faber

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle interior is a specific environment of relatively small volume, with variety of materials placed inside, including hard and soft plastics, adhesives, paints, lubricants and many others. As a result, particularly in case of newly produced vehicles, large amounts and numbers of volatile species, especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs, may be emitted and have influence vehicle interior air quality (VIAQ. Despite the fact that many of these compounds may not be harmful for human health, some of them may be toxic, and this is the reason for increasing concern of vehicle manufacturers and users recently. The level of contamination varies from one vehicle to another and may be influenced by atmospheric conditions, external pollution, user habits, quality of materials used and others. The main aim of this paper was to present current knowledge status on VIAQ, with indication of main air pollutants and their concentrations. Vehicle interior air quality is discussed on the basis of studies on new and used cars in different conditions and locations. Main sources of VOCs presence inside car cabin are discussed in this paper with additional information regarding materials emissions. Differences in sampling and analytical methodologies were not debated, however, since the results differs largely in the scope of both number and amount of VOCs, a need of testing methods harmonization is indicated. Presented data may be helpful for legislative requirements introduction.

  18. Spatially dependent Rabi oscillations: An approach to sub-diffraction-limited coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeker, Willem; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.; Gross, P.; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) that is modulated by periodically depleting the ground-state population through Rabi oscillations driven by an additional control laser. We find that such a process generates optical sidebands in the CARS spectrum

  19. Car windshield behavior transient analysis by FDTD

    OpenAIRE

    Jauregui Tellería, Ricardo; Pous Solà, Marc; Vives, Yolanda; Fernández Chimeno, Mireya; Riu Costa, Pere Joan; Silva Martínez, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    The present article studies the influence of a car heatable windshield by means of an equivalent material that allows an appropriate meshing of the vehicle. This study has been performed analyzing the propagation of an electromagnetic radiated transient pulse generated by a wire inside a car with and without the windshield. The Finite Differences Time Domain (FDTD) is the method used to obtain the field coupled to antennas located inside and outside the car. We concluded that it is impo...

  20. Using Searchable Encryption to Protect Privacy in Connected Cars

    OpenAIRE

    Matousek, Matthias; Bösch, Christoph; Kargl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Providing vehicles with extended connectivity introduces new opportunities for services, and also security applications such as misbehavior detection. However, for many applications, personal data needs to be processed by the system providers, which impairs the privacy of the vehicle users. While focusing our research on new possibilities of connected car security, we follow privacy by design principles. We explore the utilisation of various privacy-enhancing technologies (PET) in ord...

  1. Stock-car racing makes intuitive physicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Formula One races involve cars festooned with gadgets and complex electronic devices, in which millions of dollars are spent refining a vehicle's aerodynamics and reducing its weight. But in events run by America's National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR), cars hurtle round an oval track at speeds of about 300 km h-1 without the help of the complex sensors that are employed in Formula One cars. To avoid crashing, drivers must make their own adjustments to track conditions, engine problems and the traffic around them.

  2. PASSENGER CAR TRAVEL CHARACTERISTICS IN SINGAPORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.F. FWA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Singapore is known for its successful implementation of land transport management measures in the form of car-use restraining schemes and car-ownership control policy. This paper presents a study that examines how these management measures have affected the travel characteristics of car owners in Singapore. This is achieved by analyzing the changes in passenger car travel characteristics from 1990 to 2005. In 1990 and again in 2005, a vehicle-based travel diary survey was conducted to determine the travel characteristics of car owners. For each participating car owner, the details of all trips made over an average period of 4 weeks were collected. The 1990 survey covered 115 cars and generated 11,638 sets of trip data, while the 2005 survey involved 108 cars that produced 11,336 sets of trip data. These data were processed to provide information of travel characteristics in travel speed, travel distance, travel duration, trip purpose, passenger occupancy level, time that travel was made, and the choice of road class. Comparisons of the car travel characteristics in 1990 and 2005 were made to identify major trends of changes. An attempt is also made to relate these changes to the land transport management measures and policies implemented during the 15-year study period.

  3. Fe3O4@Graphene Oxide@Ag Particles for Surface Magnet Solid-Phase Extraction Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SMSPE-SERS): From Sample Pretreatment to Detection All-in-One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yi; Deng, Rong; Yang, Liyuan; Yu, Shihua; Xu, Shuping; Xu, Weiqing

    2016-06-08

    A multifunctional magnetic graphene surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was fabricated successfully by the layer-by-layer assembly of silver and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles (NPs) on the magnetic ferroferric oxide particles (Fe3O4@GO@Ag). This ternary particle possesses magnetic properties, SERS activity, and adsorption ability simultaneously. Owing to the multifunction of this Fe3O4@GO@Ag ternary complex, we put forward a new method called a surface magnetic solid-phase extraction (SMSPE) technique, for the SERS detections of pesticide residues on the fruit peels. SMSPE integrates many sample pretreatment procedures, such as surface extraction, separation sample, and detection, all-in-one. So this method shows great superiority in simplicity, rapidity, and high efficiency above other standard methods. The whole detection process can be finished within 20 min including the sample pretreatment and SERS detection. Owing to the high density of Ag NPs, the detection sensitivity is high enough that the lowest detectable concentrations are 0.48 and 40 ng/cm(2) for thiram and thiabendazole, which are much lower than the maximal residue limits in fruit prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This multifunctional ternary particle and its corresponding analytical method have been proven to be applicable for practical samples and also valuable for other surface analysis.

  4. Identification of scintillation signatures on GPS signals originating from plasma structures detected with EISCAT incoherent scatter radar along the same line of sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Biagio; Coleman, Chris; Skone, Susan; Häggström, Ingemar; Mitchell, Cathryn; Da Dalt, Federico; Panicciari, Tommaso; Kinrade, Joe; Bust, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric scintillation originates from the scattering of electromagnetic waves through spatial gradients in the plasma density distribution, drifting across a given propagation direction. Ionospheric scintillation represents a disruptive manifestation of adverse space weather conditions through degradation of the reliability and continuity of satellite telecommunication and navigation systems and services (e.g., European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, EGNOS). The purpose of the experiment presented here was to determine the contribution of auroral ionization structures to GPS scintillation. European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) measurements were obtained along the same line of sight of a given GPS satellite observed from Tromso and followed by means of the EISCAT UHF radar to causally identify plasma structures that give rise to scintillation on the co-aligned GPS radio link. Large-scale structures associated with the poleward edge of the ionospheric trough, with auroral arcs in the nightside auroral oval and with particle precipitation at the onset of a substorm were indeed identified as responsible for enhanced phase scintillation at L band. For the first time it was observed that the observed large-scale structures did not cascade into smaller-scale structures, leading to enhanced phase scintillation without amplitude scintillation. More measurements and theory are necessary to understand the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of large-scale to small-scale energy cascade and to reproduce the observations. This aspect is fundamental to model the scattering of radio waves propagating through these ionization structures. New insights from this experiment allow a better characterization of the impact that space weather can have on satellite telecommunications and navigation services.

  5. CAR models: next-generation CAR modifications for enhanced T-cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Abate-Daga, Daniel; Davila, Marco L

    2016-01-01

    T cells genetically targeted with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to B-cell malignancies have demonstrated tremendous clinical outcomes. With the proof in principle for CAR T cells as a therapy for B-cell malignancies being established, current and future research is being focused on adapting CAR technology to other cancers, as well as enhancing its efficacy and/or safety. The modular nature of the CAR, extracellular antigen-binding domain fused to a transmembrane domain and intracellular T...

  6. The influence of positionality in car-purchasing behaviour on the downsizing of new cars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, Anco; Geurs, Karst Teunis

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results from stated choice experiments looking at the influence of positionality in peoples’ choices of passenger cars in the Netherlands. It provides evidence that cars are positional goods and that selected car attributes such as size, engine capacity and interior add to their

  7. First steps towards a generic sample preparation scheme for inorganic engineered nanoparticles in a complex matrix for detection, characterization, and quantification by asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering and ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stephan; Legros, Samuel; Löschner, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a multi-step generic procedure to systematically develop sample preparation methods for the detection, characterization, and quantification of inorganic engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in a complex matrix was successfully demonstrated. The research focused on the optimization...... content by asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation coupled to a multi-angle light scattering detector and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Following the proposed generic procedure SiO2-ENPs were separated from a tomato soup. Two potential sample preparation methods were tested these being...... of the sample preparation, aiming to achieve a complete separation of ENPs from a complex matrix without altering the ENP size distribution and with minimal loss of ENPs. The separated ENPs were detected and further characterized in terms of particle size distribution and quantified in terms of elemental mass...

  8. CERN car stickers for 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The stickers on your vehicles will cease to be valid at the end of 2013. We kindly request that you inform us as soon as possible if you no longer own a vehicle that is in our records. In particular, please inform the CERN Registration Service (Building 55, first floor) if you receive a sticker for a vehicle that you no longer own.   Stickers for 2014 are valid immediately and can be displayed as soon as you receive them. The Guards Service will continue to allow cars displaying a 2013 sticker into the CERN site until no later than 31 January 2014. After that date, the Guards Service will be obliged to deny access to any vehicles not displaying a valid sticker. Please see Operational Circular No. 2 for more details. We wish you a pleasant day and happy holidays, GS/DI security and access control service

  9. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  10. Micellar Surfactant Association in the Presence of a Glucoside-based Amphiphile Detected via High-Throughput Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanic, Vesna [Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source, Campinas (Brazil); Broadbent, Charlotte [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Engineering Dept.; DiMasi, Elaine [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Photon Sciences Division; Galleguillos, Ramiro [Lubrizol Advanced Materials, Cleveland, OH (United States); Woodward, Valerie [Lubrizol Advanced Materials, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-11-14

    The interactions of mixtures of anionic and amphoteric surfactants with sugar amphiphiles were studied via high throughput small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The sugar amphiphile was composed of Caprate, Caprylate, and Oleate mixed ester of methyl glucoside, MeGCCO. Optimal surfactant interactions are sought which have desirable physical properties, which must be identified in a cost effective manner that can access the large phase space of possible molecular combinations. X-ray scattering patterns obtained via high throughput SAXS can probe a combinatorial sample space and reveal the incorporation of MeGCCO into the micelles and the molecular associations between surfactant molecules. Such data make it possible to efficiently assess the effects of the new amphiphiles in the formulation. A specific finding of this study is that formulations containing comparatively monodisperse and homogeneous surfactant mixtures can be reliably tuned by addition of NaCl, which swells the surfactant micelles with a monotonic dependence on salt concentration. In contrast, the presence of multiple different surfactants destroys clear correlations with NaCl concentration, even in otherwise similar series of formulations.

  11. Methods and apparatus for transparent display using scattering nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Qiu, Wenjun; Zhen, Bo; Shapira, Ofer; Soljacic, Marin

    2016-05-10

    Transparent displays enable many useful applications, including heads-up displays for cars and aircraft as well as displays on eyeglasses and glass windows. Unfortunately, transparent displays made of organic light-emitting diodes are typically expensive and opaque. Heads-up displays often require fixed light sources and have limited viewing angles. And transparent displays that use frequency conversion are typically energy inefficient. Conversely, the present transparent displays operate by scattering visible light from resonant nanoparticles with narrowband scattering cross sections and small absorption cross sections. More specifically, projecting an image onto a transparent screen doped with nanoparticles that selectively scatter light at the image wavelength(s) yields an image on the screen visible to an observer. Because the nanoparticles scatter light at only certain wavelengths, the screen is practically transparent under ambient light. Exemplary transparent scattering displays can be simple, inexpensive, scalable to large sizes, viewable over wide angular ranges, energy efficient, and transparent simultaneously.

  12. Methods and apparatus for transparent display using scattering nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Qiu, Wenjun; Zhen, Bo; Shapira, Ofer; Soljacic, Marin

    2017-06-14

    Transparent displays enable many useful applications, including heads-up displays for cars and aircraft as well as displays on eyeglasses and glass windows. Unfortunately, transparent displays made of organic light-emitting diodes are typically expensive and opaque. Heads-up displays often require fixed light sources and have limited viewing angles. And transparent displays that use frequency conversion are typically energy inefficient. Conversely, the present transparent displays operate by scattering visible light from resonant nanoparticles with narrowband scattering cross sections and small absorption cross sections. More specifically, projecting an image onto a transparent screen doped with nanoparticles that selectively scatter light at the image wavelength(s) yields an image on the screen visible to an observer. Because the nanoparticles scatter light at only certain wavelengths, the screen is practically transparent under ambient light. Exemplary transparent scattering displays can be simple, inexpensive, scalable to large sizes, viewable over wide angular ranges, energy efficient, and transparent simultaneously.

  13. 49 CFR 238.311 - Single car test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... railroad shall perform a single car test of the brake system of a car or vehicle described in paragraph (a... defective brake system on the car. (e) Except as provided in paragraph (f) of this section, a railroad shall perform a single car test of the brake system of a car or vehicle described in paragraph (a) of this...

  14. Ultrafast broadband Fourier-transform CARS spectroscopy operating at 50,000 spectra/second

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamitsu, Miu; Sakaki, Yusuke; Nakamura, Tasuku; Podagatlapalli, G. Krishna; Ideguchi, Takuro; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-02-01

    We present a coherent Raman scattering (CRS) spectroscopy technique achieving a CRS spectral acquisition rate of 50,000 spectra/second over a Raman spectral region of 200 - 1430 cm-1 with a resolution of 4.2 cm-1. This ultrafast, broadband and high-resolution CRS spectroscopic performance is realized by a polygonal Fourier-domain delay line serving as an ultra-rapid optical-path-length scanner in a broadband Fourier-transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy platform. We present a theoretical description of the technique and demonstrate continuous, ultrafast, broadband, and high-resolution CARS spectroscopy on a liquid toluene sample using our proof-of-concept setup.

  15. Cars beyond Otto's Internal Combustion Engines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001-11-01

    Nov 1, 2001 ... A vehicle which fails in any of these requirements is unlikely to achieve anything but a niche market share. This article is an appraisal of a variety of proposed electrochemical systems, viz. rechargeable batteries, fuel cells and supercapacitors, for an electric car. It is surmised that a viable electric car could ...

  16. MODERN ELECTRIC CARS OF TESLA MOTORS COMPANY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O. F. Vynakov; E. V. Savolova; A. I. Skrynnyk

    2016-01-01

    This overview article shows the advantages of a modern electric car as compared with internal combustion cars by the example of the electric vehicles of Tesla Motors Company. It (в смысле- статья...

  17. Price anomalies in the used car market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooreman, P.; Haan, M.A.

    Using two different samples - one based on newspaper advertisements, the other Internet-based - we identify some price anomalies in the used car market in the Netherlands. First, prices of used cars depend on their age in calendar years rather than months. Second, there is some evidence that

  18. 3D MODELING FOR CAR BODY DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISPAS Marius

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the method of designing the body of a car. There are several ways to create the exterior shape of a car, but in the following part we will use 3D StudioMax .

  19. CARs in the Lead Against Multiple Myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormhøj, Maria; Bedoya, Felipe; Frigault, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    The recent clinical success of CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy in chronic and acute leukemia has led to increased interest in broadening this technology to other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Now, advances are being made using CAR T cell technology to t...

  20. Push rod for moving mine cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtokman, I.G.; Apukhtin, A.S.; Dudnik, M.Z.; Remizov, I.P.; Shakhtar, P.S.

    1981-01-01

    In the operation of the known pushrods for haulage of cars on horizontal shafts, it becomes necessary to slow down the moving cars. In normal working modes, braking of the cars is guaranteed by counter engagement of the linear motors. However when emergency situations develop, for example if there is some lack of voltage in the network, it becomes necessary to brake the cars which this device cannot guarantee. The purpose of the invention is to brake the cars with disconnection of power. The goal is achieved because the push rod containing a frame with inductors attached to it installed on the sides of the rail path opposite each other, in which the cabs of the cars fill the role of the rotor, the support stands are connected to the inductors by means of springs, and the frame with inductors is hinged to the support stand and has mechanism for regulating the gap between the inductors and the cars, made in the form of rollers attached to the frame for interaction with the outer sidewalls of the car is equipped with friction elements installed on the frame and electromagnets with spring-rods installed on the support stands arranged with the possibility of interacting with the frame, and each friction element is arranged with the possibility of interacting with the rollers.

  1. The Hungarian car insurance cartel saga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cseres, K.J.; Szilágyi, P.; Rodger, B.

    2013-01-01

    his chapter discusses the landmark Hungarian case relating to the car insurance and repair markets, which involved both vertical and horizontal agreements. The case concerned the horizontal relationship between Hungary’s two largest insurance companies and their vertical relationships with car

  2. A Radio-Controlled Car Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Watching a radio-controlled car zip along a sidewalk or street has become a common sight. Within this toy are the basic ingredients of a mobile robot, used by industry for a variety of important and potentially dangerous tasks. In this challenge, students consider modifying an of-the-shelf, radio-controlled car, adapting it for a robotic task.

  3. Environmental impact of scrapping old cars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wee, Bert van; Moll, Henri C.; Dirks, Jessica

    Many countries introduced scrapping programs in the 90s, partly legitimated by environmental impact reductions. However, reducing the age of the current car fleet may result in an increase of life-cycle CO2 emissions. This will probably also be true for cars to be produced in future unless fuel

  4. Designing CAR T cells for glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Marcela V

    2015-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells directed against CD19 can mediate long-term durable remissions in B cell malignancies, but bringing a new target antigen to the clinic requires extensive modeling to avoid on-target and off-target toxicity. We recently described a systematic approach to test a new CAR directed against EGFR variant III.

  5. Zoom zoom: racing CARs for multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Marcela V.; June, Carl H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Chimeric antigen receptors re-direct T cells to surface antigens. Discovery and validation of appropriate target antigens expands the possible indications for CAR-T cells. BCMA is expressed only on mature B cells and plasma cells and promotes their survival. BCMA is a promising target for CAR-T cells in multiple myeloma. PMID:23444214

  6. 49 CFR 174.110 - Car magazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Car magazine. 174.110 Section 174.110...) Materials § 174.110 Car magazine. When specially authorized by the carrier, Division 1.1 or 1.2 (explosive... packages of Class 1 (explosive) materials are placed in a “magazine” box made of sound lumber not less than...

  7. Compton scatter tomography in TOF-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hamidreza; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Ay, Mohammadreza; Ghafarian, Pardis

    2017-10-01

    Scatter coincidences contain hidden information about the activity distribution on the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging system. However, in conventional reconstruction, the scattered data cause the blurring of images and thus are estimated and subtracted from detected coincidences. List mode format provides a new aspect to use time of flight (TOF) and energy information of each coincidence in the reconstruction process. In this study, a novel approach is proposed to reconstruct activity distribution using the scattered data in the PET system. For each single scattering coincidence, a scattering angle can be determined by the recorded energy of the detected photons, and then possible locations of scattering can be calculated based on the scattering angle. Geometry equations show that these sites lie on two arcs in 2D mode or the surface of a prolate spheroid in 3D mode, passing through the pair of detector elements. The proposed method uses a novel and flexible technique to estimate source origin locations from the possible scattering locations, using the TOF information. Evaluations were based on a Monte-Carlo simulation of uniform and non-uniform phantoms at different resolutions of time and detector energy. The results show that although the energy uncertainties deteriorate the image spatial resolution in the proposed method, the time resolution has more impact on image quality than the energy resolution. With progress of the TOF system, the reconstruction using the scattered data can be used in a complementary manner, or to improve image quality in the next generation of PET systems.

  8. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  9. The kinematic advantage of electric cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration of a common car with with a turbocharged diesel engine is compared to the same type with an electric motor in terms of kinematics. Starting from a state of rest, the electric car reaches a distant spot earlier than the diesel car, even though the latter has a better specification for engine power and average acceleration from 0 to 100 km h-1. A three phase model of acceleration as a function of time fits the data of the electric car accurately. The first phase is a quadratic growth of acceleration in time. It is shown that the tenfold higher coefficient for the first phase accounts for most of the kinematic advantage of the electric car.

  10. Broadband single-pulse CARS spectra in a fired internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klick, D; Marko, K A; Rimai, L

    1981-04-01

    The first known broadband single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements within the cylinder of a firing internal combustion engine are reported. Postcombustion temperature and carbon monoxide concentration are probed with 1-mm(3) spatial resolution and 10-nsec temporal resolution. Space- and time-resolved measurements, as presented here, are shown to be necessary for the study of fluctuating systems such as engines.

  11. Modelling and optimization of car-to-car compatibility - Modellierung und optimierung von pkw-pkw-kompatibilität

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, H.G.; Nastic, T.; Huibers, J.H.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper simple and more detailed MADYMO multibody models were used to simulate the car structure for improving the car-to-car compatibility of the whole car fleet. As a first step, survey studies were performed to develop a method for the optimization of car design with respect to frontal and

  12. Detection and characterization of nanoparticles in suspension at low concentrations using the X-ray total scattering pair distribution function technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terban, Maxwell W; Johnson, Matthew; Di Michiel, Marco; Billinge, Simon J L

    2015-03-12

    Difference atomic pair distribution function methods have been applied to detect and characterize nanoparticles suspended in a solvent at very dilute concentrations. We specifically consider nanoparticles of a pharmaceutical compound in aqueous solution using X-ray PDF methods, a challenging case due to the low atomic number of the nanoparticle species. The nanoparticles were unambiguously detected at the level of 0.25 wt%. Even at these low concentrations the signals were highly reproducible, allowing for reliable detection and quantitative analysis of the nanoparticle structure.

  13. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingshan Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous and sequential CAR-T cells are being studied for clinical applications. Multi-target CAR-engineered T cells are also entering clinical trials. T cell receptor-engineered CAR-T and universal CAR-T cells represent new frontiers in CAR-T cell development. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of CAR constructs and registered clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China and provided a quick glimpse of the landscape of CAR-T studies in China.

  14. Biological cell classification by multiangle light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, G.C.; Crowell, J.M.; Mullaney, P.F.

    1975-06-03

    The specification is directed to an apparatus and method for detecting light scattering from a biological cell. Light, preferably from a coherent source of radiation, intercepts an individual biological cell in a stream of cells passing through the beam. Light scattered from the cell is detected at a selected number of angles between 0 and 90/sup 0/ to the longitudinal axis of the beam with a circular array of light responsive elements which produce signals representative of the intensity of light incident thereon. Signals from the elements are processed to determine the light-scattering pattern of the cell and therefrom its identity.

  15. Development of photoelectric balanced car based on the linear CCD sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The smart car is designed based on Freescale’s MC9S12XS128 and a linear CCD camera. The linear CCD collects the road information and sends it to MCU through the operational amplifier. The PID control algorithm, the proportional–integral–derivative control algorithm, is adopted synthetically to control the smart car. First, the smart car’s inclination and angular velocity are detect through the accelerometers and gyro sensors, then the PD control algorithm, the proportional–derivative control algorithm, is employed to make the smart car have the ability of two-wheeled self-balancing. Second, the speed of wheel obtained by the encoder is fed back to the MCU by way of pulse signal, then the PI control algorithm, the proportional–integral control algorithm, is employed to make the speed of smart car reach the set point in the shortest possible time and stabilize at the set point. Finally, the PD control algorithm is used to regulate the smart car’s turning angle to make the smart car respond quickly while the smart car is passing the curve path. The smart car can realize the self-balancing control of two wheels and track automatically the black and while lines to march.

  16. Eta Car: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Nebular and Stellar Confusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, T.R.; Sonneborn, G.; Jensen, A.G.; Nielsen, K.E.; Vieira Kover, G.; Hillier, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Observations in the far-UV provide a unique opportunity to investigate the very massive star Eta Car and its hot binary companion, Eta Car B. Eta Car was observed with FUSE over a large portion of the 5.54 year spectroscopic period before and after the 2003.5 minimum. The observed spectrum is defined by strong stellar wind signatures, primarily from Eta Car A, complicated by the strong absorptions of the ejecta surrounding Eta Car plus interstellar absorption. The Homunculus and Little Homunculus are massive bipolar ejecta historically associable with LBV outbursts in the 1840s and the 1890s and are linked to absorptions at -513 and -146 km/s, respectively. The FUSE spectra are confused by the extended nebulosity and thermal drifting of the FUSE co-pointed instruments. Interpretation is further complicated by two B-stars sufficiently close to h Car to be included most of the time in the large FUSE aperture. Followup observations partially succeeded in obtaining spectra of at least one of these B-stars through the smaller apertures, allowing potential separation of the B-star contributions and h Car. A complete analysis of all available spectra is currently underway. Our ultimate goals are to directly detect the hot secondary star if possible with FUSE and to identify the absorption contributions to the overall spectrum especially of the stellar members and the massive ejecta.

  17. Characteristics of particulate matter emissions from toy cars with electric motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Williams, Brent J; Biswas, Pratim

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol emissions from toy cars with electric motors were characterized. Particle emission rates from the toy cars, as high as 7.47×10(7) particles/s, were measured. This emission rate is lower than other indoor sources such as smoking and cooking. The particles emitted from toy cars are generated from spark discharges inside the electric motors that power the toy cars. Size distribution measurements indicated that most particles were below 100 nm in diameter. Copper was the dominant inorganic species in these particles. By deploying aerosol mass spectrometers, high concentrations of particulate organic matter were also detected and characterized in detail. Several organic compounds were identified using a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography. The mass size distribution of particulate organic matter was bimodal. The formation mechanism of particulate organic matter from toy cars was elucidated. A possible new source of indoor air pollution, particles from electric motors in toy cars, was identified. This study characterized aerosol emissions from toy cars in detail. Most of these particles have a diameter less than 100 nm. Copper and some organics are the major components of these particles. Conditions that minimize these emissions were determined.

  18. Measurement of Micro Vibration of Car by Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Yosuke; Masuyama, Kosuke; Nakamura, Testuo; Bamba, Takeshi; Watanabe, Kajiro

    Recently, there are various accidents and crimes related to the car. In some cases, the accidents and the crimes can be prevented if it is possible to detect a human who is in the car. For example, we can prevent a baby who is left in a car under the hot weather from dehydration or death occurred by heat inside disease. In another case, it is estimated that the United States currently has as many as 12 million illegal immigrants. In order to prevent further influx of illegal immigrants, the police are physically searching incoming vehicles at national boundaries aiming at finding those who are hiding inside. However, the physical inspections require much manpower cost and time. An inspection method to see inside the vehicles through X-ray images has also been used for this end. But the cost and the installation places are the problems of the large-scale X-ray system. Proposed in this paper is a piezoelectric ceramic system to handily measure the micro vibrations of motor vehicles. And applying the algorithm of Support Vector Machine (SVM), the existence of human body inside vehicles can be detected. The experiment was carried out using four types of vehicles: a mini car; an auto mobile; a van; and a truck weighing 1.5 tons. As the results, the correct determination ratio was 91.2% for the experiment with the piezoelectric ceramic under the front wheels and 97.0% under the rear wheels, when the vehicle used for the examination had also been used together with other three types of vehicles to obtain SVM training data. When the vehicle used for the examination had not been used together with the other three to obtain SVM training data, on the other hand, the correct determination ratio was 93.7% for the experiment with the piezoelectric ceramic under the front wheels and 95.7% under the rear wheels.

  19. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering under electric field stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitaine, Erwan; Ould Moussa, Nawel; Louot, Christophe; Lefort, Claire; Pagnoux, Dominique; Duclère, Jean-René; Kaneyasu, Junya F.; Kano, Hideaki; Duponchel, Ludovic; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    We introduce an experiment using electro-CARS, an electro-optical method based on the combination of ultrabroadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS) spectroscopy and electric field stimulation. We demonstrate that this method can effectively discriminate the resonant CARS signal from the nonresonant background owing to a phenomenon of molecular orientation in the sample medium. Such molecular orientation is intrinsically related to the induction of an electric dipole moment by the applied static electric field. Evidence of the electro-CARS effect is obtained with a solution of n -alkanes (CnH2 n +2 , 15 ≤n ≤40 ), for which an enhancement of the CARS signal-to-noise ratio is achieved in the case of CH2 and CH3 symmetric/asymmetric stretching vibrations. Additionally, an electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation experiment is performed in order to corroborate the orientational organization of molecules due to the electric field excitation. Finally, we use a simple mathematical approach to compare the vibrational information extracted from electro-CARS measurements with spontaneous Raman data and to highlight the impact of electric stimulation on the vibrational signal.

  20. Temperature measurements in a wall stabilized steady flame using CARS

    KAUST Repository

    Sesha Giri, Krishna

    2017-01-05

    Flame quenching by heat loss to a surface continues to be an active area of combustion research. Close wall temperature measurements in an isothermal wall-stabilized flame are reported in this work. Conventional N-vibrational Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) thermometry as close as 275 μm to a convex wall cooled with water has been carried out. The standard deviation of mean temperatures is observed to be ~6.5% for high temperatures (>2000K) and ~14% in the lower range (<500K). Methane/air and ethylene/air stoichiometric flames for various global strain rates based on exit bulk velocities are plotted and compared. CH* chemiluminescence is employed to determine the flame location relative to the wall. Flame locations are shown to move closer to the wall with increasing strain rates in addition to higher near-wall temperatures. Peak temperatures for ethylene are considerably higher (~250-300K) than peak temperatures for methane. Preheat zone profiles are similar for different strain rates across fuels. This work demonstrates close wall precise temperature measurments using CARS.

  1. Lectures in scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sitenko, A G

    1971-01-01

    Lectures in Scattering Theory discusses problems in quantum mechanics and the principles of the non-relativistic theory of potential scattering. This book describes in detail the properties of the scattering matrix and its connection with physically observable quantities. This text presents a stationary formulation of the scattering problem and the wave functions of a particle found in an external field. This book also examines the analytic properties of the scattering matrix, dispersion relations, complex angular moments, as well as the separable representation of the scattering amplitude. Th

  2. Emergency information systems for cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukkarasu, M.; Vani Manasa, N.; Kumar, K. Rajesh; Sundar, S.

    2017-11-01

    The main objective of this work is to create a Health Care monitoring and Guidance system for persons who are travelling in outdoor environments like cars. GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) and GPS (Global Positioning System) technologies are separately and combined today in many applications in our day to day life. The GSM module will send a message along with the GPS location to the end user through text, and a call is initiated to the user for further instructions. The Global Positioning System (GPS) will give the location of the interested vehicle. This system helps the doctor or anyone to monitor the accident who is outdoor and has less help. This will help the hospital to monitor the accident as well as guide the injured through difficult situations. Using a buzzer, the persons nearby will come to know that the person is in danger or in poor health conditions. This project provides a good two-way communication with the injured and the hospital to assist them to give first aid before an ambulance arrives. So, this paper devices a novel technique to assist the people who just met with accident through GPS and GSM.

  3. Electron Scattering From Atoms, Molecules, Nuclei, and Bulk Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, Colm T

    2005-01-01

    Topics that are covered include electron scattering in the scanning TEM; basic theory of inelastic electron imaging; study of confined atoms by electron excitation; helium bubbles created in extreme pressure with application to nuclear safety; lithium ion implantation; electron and positron scattering from clusters; electron scattering from physi- and chemi-absorbed molecules on surfaces; coincidence studies; electron scattering from biological molecules; electron spectroscopy as a tool for environmental science; electron scattering in the presence of intense fields; electron scattering from astrophysical molecules; electon interatctions an detection of x-ray radiation.

  4. A new SERS: scattering enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Joel N.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can be used to obtain detailed chemical information about a system without the need for chemical markers. It has been widely used for a variety of applications such as cancer diagnosis and material characterization. However, Raman scattering is a highly inefficient process, where only one in 1011 scattered photons carry the needed information. Several methods have been developed to enhance this inherently weak effect, including surface enhanced Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. These techniques suffer from drawbacks limiting their commercial use, such as the need for spatial localization of target molecules to a `hot spot', or the need for complex laser systems. Here, we present a simple instrument to enhance spontaneous Raman scattering using elastic light scattering. Elastic scattering is used to substantially increase the interaction volume. Provided that the scattering medium exhibits very low absorption in the spectral range of interest, a large enhancement factor can be attained in a simple and inexpensive setting. In our experiments, we demonstrate an enhancement of 107 in Raman signal intensity. The proposed novel device is equally applicable for analyzing solids, liquids, and gases.

  5. Characterization of aggregates of surface modified fullerenes by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astefanei, Alina; Kok, Wim Th; Bäuerlein, Patrick; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; de Voogt, Pim; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-08-21

    Fullerenes are carbon nanoparticles with widespread biomedical, commercial and industrial applications. Attributes such as their tendency to aggregate and aggregate size and shape impact their ability to be transported into and through the environment and living tissues. Knowledge of these properties is therefore valuable for their human and environmental risk assessment as well as to control their synthesis and manufacture. In this work, asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) was used for the first time to study the size distribution of surface modified fullerenes with both polyhydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups in aqueous solutions having different pH (6.5-11) and ionic strength values (0-200mM) of environmental relevance. Fractionation key parameters such as flow rates, flow programming, and membrane material were optimized for the selected fullerenes. The aggregation of the compounds studied appeared to be indifferent to changes in solution pH, but was affected by changes in the ionic strength. Polyhydroxy-fullerenes were found to be present mostly as 4nm aggregates in water without added salt, but showed more aggregation at high ionic strength, with an up to 10-fold increase in their mean hydrodynamic radii (200mM), due to a decrease in the electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticles. Carboxy-fullerenes showed a much stronger aggregation degree in water (50-100nm). Their average size and recoveries decreased with the increase in the salt concentration. This behavior can be due to enhanced adsorption of the large particles to the membrane at high ionic strength, because of their higher hydrophobicity and much larger particle sizes compared to polyhydroxy-fullerenes. The method performance was evaluated by calculating the run-to-run precision of the retention time (hydrodynamic radii), and the obtained RSD values were lower than 1%. MALS measurements showed aggregate sizes that were in good

  6. PC-based car license plate reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chung-Mu; Shu, Shyh-Yeong; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chen, Yie-Wern; Wen, Kuang-Pu

    1992-11-01

    A car license plate reader (CLPR) using fuzzy inference and neural network algorithm has been developed in Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) and installed in highway toll stations to identify stolen cars. It takes an average of 0.7 seconds to recognize a car license plate by using a PC with 80486-50 CPU. The recognition rate of the system is about 97%. The techniques of CLPR include vehicle sensing, image grab control, optic pre- processing, lighting, and optic character recognition (OCR). The CLPR can be used in vehicle flow statistics, the checking of stolen vehicles, automatic charging systems in parking lots or garage management, and so on.

  7. THEORETICAL BASIS OF MOTOR CAR QUALITY EVALUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bazhinova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive assessment of the quality of cars, which is based on the integral parameters of comfort, reliability, safety, environmental and technical solutions are considered and defined. The amount of parameters that define the quality level of the car use throughout the country is defined. Mathematical formulas and quality indicators of the integral index are developed. The integral quality index of vehicles allows comparing the vehicles of different classes based on external operating conditions. The numerical values of the integral index determines the quality of the car.

  8. Omnidirectional Active Vision for Evolutionary Car Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Mototaka; van der Blij, Jacob; Floreano, Dario

    2006-01-01

    We describe a set of simulations to evolve omnidirectional active vision, an artificial retina scanning over images taken via an omnidirectional camera, being applied to a car driving task. While the retina can immediately access features in any direction, it is asked to select behaviorally-relevant features so as to drive the car on the road. Neural controllers which direct both the retinal movement and the system behavior, i.e., the speed and the steering angle of the car, are tested in thr...

  9. REPAIR TECHNOLOGY IMPROVEMENT OF SPECIALIZED FREIGHT CARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Bubnov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The volume of cargo transportation demands the introduction of a new generation of cars that would be able to provide all the needs of carriers. But this is impossible without the implementation of renovation repair facilities with the introduction of new technologies and modernization of the repair process. Repair of rolling stock is a key factor that must proceed with the establishment of new cars, as not all of the inventions may be repaired in car-repair depots, most of which are obsolete. The purpose is to analyze the possibility of increasing the efficiency of the repair process by introducing new repair technologies or improving the existing ones. It will improve not only the quality of the repair, but also its rate. Methodology. Works on improving the designs of freight cars are held by many design organizations in almost all industrialized countries. It makes repair organizations (depots and car-repair plants to upgrade the repair process. Achievements of-this goal is possible by improving the technology renovation and reorganization through the use of flexible flow technologies, which to date are the most effective in the repair of rolling stock. Findings. When performing the analysis it was determined that there are different designs of cars. More of cars are all-purpose and their repair does not cause difficulties for car-repair business. However, the number of specialized cars is also significant, and the technology of their repair should be improved. One of the reasons is that many models, such as tank wagons for the carriage of sulfur, are intended for the carriage of dangerous goods and their failure at the time of motion is not permitted. Originality. Firstly the authors have defined direction at improving technologies of repair specialized cars. Practical value. Actual improvement in the construction of cars is to improve the existing repair facilities. In addition, the repair technology using nowadays when repairing

  10. Development of a size-exclusion HPLC method with evaporative light-scattering detection for the quantitation of polysorbate 80 in Houttuynia cordata injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi; Li, Xiao D; Lin, Rui C; Jin, Shao H

    2010-01-01

    A rapid and accurate size-exclusion HPLC method for the quantitation of polysorbate 80 (PS80) in Houttuynia cordata injection, a Chinese traditional medicine, was developed and validated. The assay was conducted on an Agilent 1100 HPLC system with a TosoHaas TSKgel G2000 SWxL column (30 cm x 7.8 mm, 5 pm particle size) and an Alltech evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD) 2000. The mobile phase was 20 mmoL/L ammonium acetate-acetonitrile (90 + 10, v/v) delivered at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min under isocratic conditions. The ELSD was operated in the impactor "off" mode, the drift tube temperature was set at 110 degrees C, and nitrogen flow was maintained at 2.3 L/min. The LOD was 0.25 mg/mL. Linearity was obtained between the log of concentration (C) and the log of peak area (Y) of PS80 in the range of 0.5-20 mg/mL according to the equation: Log Y 1.4529 Log C - 0.8232 (r2 = 0.9976). An RSD of 1.6% (n = 6) for the determination demonstrated the good precision of the optimized method. PS80 content in several commercial H. cordata injection products from different manufacturers was determined. The data for PS80 content is useful in evaluation of the safety of the products from different manufacturers.

  11. Shape evolution with temperature of a thermotolerant protein (PeaT1) in solution detected by small angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xueqing; Liu, Quan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Kunhao; Li, Tang; Cai, Quan; Mo, Guang; Cheng, Weidong; Wang, Dehong; Gong, Yu; Chen, Zhongjun; Qiu, Dewen; Wu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    The protein elicitor from Alternaria tenuissima (PeaT1) presented excellent thermotolerance and potential application in agriculture as a pesticide. Previous synchrotron radiation circular dichroism study demonstrated that the secondary structures in PeaT1 protein are reversible with temperature change. To further clarify the mechanism of its thermotolerance, synchrotron radiation small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) technique was used to study the shape change of PeaT1 protein with temperature in this article. Ab initio structure restorations based on the SAXS data revealed that PeaT1 protein has a prolate shape with a P₂ symmetry axis along the prolate anisometric direction. With temperature increase, a gooseneck vase-like (25°C), to jug-like (55°C), then to oval (85°C) shape change can be found, and these shape changes are also approximately reversible with temperature decrease. PeaT1 protein contains two homogenous molecules, and each of them consists of F, NAC, T, and UBA domains. The structures of the four domains were predicted. Simulated annealing algorithm was used to superimpose the domain structures onto the SAXS shapes. It was found that all the structural domains have position rotation and translation with temperature change, but the NAC domains are relatively stable, playing a role of frame. This shape change information provides clues for further exploring its biological function and application. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. An exploration study to find important factors influencing on brand in car accessory market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Supplying car accessory is one of the most important growing industries in the world. Every year, millions of cars are produced and people need to have the access to necessary car accessory. In this paper, we present an exploration study to detect important factors influencing car accessory market. The proposed study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale consists of 16 questions, distributes it among 200 experts and analyses it using factor analysis. Cronbach alpha and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy are calculated as 0.823 and 0.863, which validate the overall questionnaire. The results indicate that there are three influencing factors including brand capability, brand characteristics and consumers’ believe.

  13. Application of parallel gradient high performance liquid chromatography with ultra-violet, evaporative light scattering and electrospray mass spectrometric detection for the quantitative quality control of the compound file to support pharmaceutical discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Anthony W; Taylor, Mark R; Parnas, Barry L; Williams, Gareth; Girdler, Richard; Waghorn, Peter; Wright, Adrian G; Pullen, Frank S

    2008-05-02

    The success of drug discovery assays, using plate-based technologies, relies heavily on the quality of the substrates being tested. Sample purity, identity and concentration must be assured for a screening hit to be validated. Most major pharmaceutical companies maintain large liquid screening files with often in excess of one million stock solutions, typically dissolved in DMSO. However, due to the inherent inaccuracies of high-throughput gravimetric analysis and automated dilution, stock solution concentrations can vary significantly from the assumed nominal value. Here, we present a rapid and effective method for measuring purity, identity and concentration of these stock solutions using four high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns with parallel ultraviolet spectrophotometry (UV), electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) with a throughput of 1 min per sample.

  14. Genetics of chemical carcinogenesis--II. Papilloma induction and malignant conversion in susceptible (Car-s) and resistant (Car-R) lines of mice produced by bidirectional selective breeding and in their (Car-S X Car-R) F1 hybrids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pioli, C; Saran, A; Mouton, D; Troiani, C; Doria, G; Covelli, V; Neveu, T; Biozzi, G

    1994-01-01

    Susceptible (Car-S) and resistant (Car-R) lines of mice separated by 10 consecutive generations of bidirectional selective breeding present a very large difference in responsiveness to two-stage skin carcinogenesis...

  15. Essential Role of the Coxsackie - and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) in Development of the Lymphatic System in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, Mohamad Amr; Haiko, Paula; Tammela, Tuomas; Alitalo, Kari; Philipson, Lennart; Fuxe, Jonas; Sollerbrant, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule predominantly associated with epithelial tight junctions in adult tissues. CAR is also expressed in cardiomyocytes and essential for heart development up to embryonic day 11.5, but not thereafter. CAR is not expressed in vascular endothelial cells but was recently detected in neonatal lymphatic vessels, suggesting that CAR could play a role in the development of the lymphatic system. To address this, we generated mice carrying a conditional deletion of the CAR gene (Cxadr) and knocked out CAR in the mouse embryo at different time points during post-cardiac development. Deletion of Cxadr from E12.5, but not from E13.5, resulted in subcutaneous edema, hemorrhage and embryonic death. Subcutaneous lymphatic vessels were dilated and structurally abnormal with gaps and holes present at lymphatic endothelial cell-cell junctions. Furthermore, lymphatic vessels were filled with erythrocytes showing a defect in the separation between the blood and lymphatic systems. Regionally, erythrocytes leaked out into the interstitium from leaky lymphatic vessels explaining the hemorrhage detected in CAR-deficient mouse embryos. The results show that CAR plays an essential role in development of the lymphatic vasculature in the mouse embryo by promoting appropriate formation of lymphatic endothelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:22624044

  16. Au-Ag Core-Shell Nanospheres for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection of Sudan I and Sudan II in Chili Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Pei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Au-Ag core-shell (Au@Ag bimetallic nanospheres synthesized by a facile seed-growth method are proposed as a substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS to detect azo-group dyes including Sudan I and Sudan II. Au@Ag nanospheres with a series of particle sizes (diameter: 30–120 nm and silver shell thicknesses (6–51 nm were synthesized and compared for their morphological and optical properties to obtain optimum enhancement effect. Normal Raman, SERS, infrared, and ultraviolet-visible were used to investigate the optical absorption properties of Sudan I and Sudan II as well as the enhancement mechanism of Au@Ag substrates. The nanospheres with particle size of 73 ± 6 nm in diameter and silver layer of 27 ± 2 nm resulted in the highest enhancement effect and could be used to detect Sudan I and Sudan II standard solutions at levels as low as 0.4 and 0.1 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, Sudan I and Sudan II in chili powder could be detected at 0.6 and 0.4 mg/kg, respectively. Sudan I and Sudan II with similar structures in complicated food matrices could be distinguished through applying principal component analysis, indicating good selectivity of the SERS method for detection of banned additives in food stuffs at trace levels.

  17. CAR models: next-generation CAR modifications for enhanced T-cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Abate-Daga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available T cells genetically targeted with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR to B-cell malignancies have demonstrated tremendous clinical outcomes. With the proof in principle for CAR T cells as a therapy for B-cell malignancies being established, current and future research is being focused on adapting CAR technology to other cancers, as well as enhancing its efficacy and/or safety. The modular nature of the CAR, extracellular antigen-binding domain fused to a transmembrane domain and intracellular T-cell signaling domains, allows for optimization by replacement of the various components. These modifications are creating a whole new class of therapeutic CARs. In this review, we discuss the recent major advances in CAR design and how these modifications will impact its clinical application.

  18. Computer Security: your car, my control

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2015-01-01

    We have discussed the Internet of Things (IoT) and its security implications already in past issues of the CERN Bulletin, for example in “Today’s paranoia, tomorrow’s reality” (see here). Unfortunately, tomorrow has come. At this years's Black Hat conference researchers presented their findings on how easily your car can be hacked and controlled remotely. Sigh.   While these researchers have just shown that they can wirelessly hijack a Jeep Cherokee, others have performed similar studies with SmartCars, Fords, a Tesla, a Corvette, BMWs, Chryslers and Mercedes! With the increasing computerisation of cars, the engine management system, air conditioning, anti-lock braking system, electronic stability programme, etc. are linked to the infotainment, navigation and communication systems, opening the door for these vehicles to be hacked remotely. The now prevalent Bluetooth connection with smartphones is one entry vector to attack your car remotely...

  19. Humanitarian reform: a view from CAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Lanzer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As the Humanitarian Coordinator in the Central AfricanRepublic (CAR, it is my job to ensure that the UN andhumanitarian organisations work together to meet needsas efficiently as we can.

  20. Electric cars as current buffers; Strompuffer Elektroauto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, M.

    2008-01-02

    At the second Eurosolar Storage Conference in Bonn, experts agreed that electric cars suited for grid connection have great power storage potential. In the case of heat, water stores are still the most important instrument. (orig.)

  1. Papers on vehicle size : cars and trucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    The four papers in this volume describe analyses of car size : trends and truck occupant injuries and fatalities. All four were : written between June 1985 and December 1987. The topics : addressed include where heavy truck accidents occur, injury an...

  2. CARs in the Lead Against Multiple Myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormhøj, Maria; Bedoya, Felipe; Frigault, Matthew J; Maus, Marcela V

    2017-04-01

    The recent clinical success of CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy in chronic and acute leukemia has led to increased interest in broadening this technology to other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Now, advances are being made using CAR T cell technology to target myeloma antigens such as B cell maturation antigen (BCMA), CD138, and kappa-light chain as well as CD19 on putative myeloma stem cells. To date, only a limited number of multiple myeloma patients have received CAR T cell therapy but preliminary results have been encouraging. In this review, we summarize the recently reported results of clinical trials conducted utilizing CAR T cell therapy in multiple myeloma (MM).

  3. Single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy employing an octave spanning pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Suda, Akira; Tanaka, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kannari, Fumihiko; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Hideaki; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2009-07-06

    We demonstrate two complementary types of microscopy using an identical setup for single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging, which employs an ultrabroadband laser pulse with a spectral bandwidth of 4800 cm(-1) and enables the suppression of nonresonant CARS signals. One is a novel type of microscopy that uses spectral phase modulation for the selective excitation of a single Raman mode. The selective excitation is achieved by the modulated pulse focusing its difference-frequency spectrum into a narrow spectral region. Another type is Fourier-transform CARS (FT-CARS) microspectroscopy based on the measurement of the CARS spectrum obtained from the Fourier-transform of the interferometric autocorrelation (IAC) signal. Vibrational spectral imaging of chemical and biological samples is demonstrated using the two types of microscopy.

  4. Quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury using circularly polarized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kideog; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2017-08-01

    We report the quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury using the circularly polarized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CP-CARS) technique together with Stokes parameters in the Poincaré sphere. The pump and Stokes excitation beams are circularly polarized to suppress both the linear polarization-dependent artifacts and the nonresonant background of tissue CARS imaging, enabling quantitative CP-CARS image analysis. This study shows that CP-CARS imaging uncovers significantly increased phase retardance of injured spinal cord tissue as compared to normal tissue, suggesting that CP-CARS is an appealing label-free imaging tool for determining the degree of tissue phase retardance, which could serve as a unique diagnostic parameter associated with nervous tissue injury.

  5. Effects of tissue fixation on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images of brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Steiner, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is an emerging multiphoton technique for the label-free histopathology of the central nervous system, by imaging the lipid content within the tissue. In order to apply the technique on standard histology sections, it is important to know the effects of tissue fixation on the CARS image. Here, we report the effects of two common fixation methods, namely with formalin and methanol-acetone, on mouse brain and human glioblastoma tissue. The variations induced by fixation on the CARS contrast and intensity were compared and interpreted using Raman microspectroscopy. The results show that, whenever unfixed cryosections cannot be used, fixation with formalin constitutes an alternative which does not deteriorate substantially the contrast generated by the different brain structures in the CARS image. Fixation with methanol-acetone strongly modifies the tissue lipid content and is therefore incompatible with the CARS imaging.

  6. GLYCAN-DIRECTED CAR-T CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Migliorini, Denis; King, Tiffany R; Mandel, Ulla; June, Carl H; Posey, Avery D

    2018-01-23

    Cancer immunotherapy is rapidly advancing in the treatment of a variety of hematopoietic cancers, including pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and diffuse large B cell lymphoma, with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells. CARs are genetically encoded artificial T cell receptors that combine the antigen specificity of an antibody with the machinery of T cell activation. However, implementation of CAR technology in the treatment of solid tumors has been progressing much slower. Solid tumors are characterized by a number of challenges that need to be overcome, including cellular heterogeneity, immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME), and, in particular, few known cancer-specific targets. Post-translational modifications that differentially occur in malignant cells generate valid cell surface, cancer-specific targets for CAR-T cells. We previously demonstrated that CAR-T cells targeting an aberrant O-glycosylation of MUC1, a common cancer marker associated with changes in cell adhesion, tumor growth, and poor prognosis, could control malignant growth in mouse models. Here, we discuss the field of glycan-directed CAR-T cells and review the different classes of antibodies specific for glycan-targeting, including the generation of high affinity O-glycopeptide antibodies. Finally, we discuss historic and recently investigated glycan targets for CAR-T cells and provide our perspective on how targeting the tumor glycoproteome and/or glycome will improve CAR-T immunotherapy. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Bluetooth based function control in a car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, P.; Sumanth, N.; Jude, S.

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to show the various functions that can be controlled in a Car using the Wireless Bluetooth Technology. Due to the portable and wireless nature of this technology, it is easier for the end user to operate the functions in a car. The functions that are built into the system can be used from a distance of 10 meters. The Passive Keyless System and the Remote Keyless System methodologies are adopted. These are operated by the ATMEGA328P microcontroller.

  8. Noise mapping inside a car cabin

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Kim; Sjøj, Sidsel Marie Nørholm; Jacobsen, Finn; Haddad, Karim; Hald, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The mapping of noise is of considerable interest in the car industry where a good noise mapping can make it much easier to identify the sources that generate the noise and eventually reduce the individual contributions to the noise. The methods used for this purpose include delay-and-sum beamforming and spherical harmonics beamforming. These methods have a poor spatial esolution at low frequencies, and since much noise generated in cars is dominated by low frequencies the methods are not opti...

  9. Red, Yellow, and Green: A psychological perspective on car purchase and implications for subsequent car use

    OpenAIRE

    Nayum, Alim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT - Red, Yellow, and Green: A psychological perspective on car purchase and implications for subsequent car use - Research on consumer behaviors having high impact on natural resources and the environment is considered important for developing measures for a sustainable future. This thesis focuses on one of such consumer behaviors – purchases and use of new passenger cars. The primary aim of the thesis is to examine the effects of socio-psychological factors in ...

  10. SODA-IIoT4ConnectedCars: Spread updates between cars with limited Internet access :

    OpenAIRE

    Boudguiga, Aymen; Quesnel, Flavien; Bouzerna, Nabil

    2017-01-01

    International audience; A blockchain infrastructure, combined with cryptographic signatures, can improve availability and accountability for the deployment of IoT updates.However, cars with limited or intermittent Internet access may have difficulties in downloading full updates fromthe blockchain. Therefore, we allow cars that successfully downloaded updates to share them with other cars by means of a Peer-to-Peer (P2P) mechanism.

  11. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and bio-compatibility, nanodiamonds (NDs) are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical, and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent NDs have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centers with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing NDs exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp3 vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and ND size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of NDs internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively. PMID:25305746

  12. Car radiator burns: a prevention issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitts, Angela; Alden, Nicole E; Conlin, Tara; Yurt, Roger W

    2004-01-01

    Scald burns continue to be the major cause of injury to patients admitted to the burn center. Scald burns occurring from car radiator fluid comprise a significant subgroup. Although manufacturer warning labels have been placed on car radiators, these burns continue to occur. This retrospective review looks at all patients admitted to our burn center who suffered scald burns from car radiator fluid to assess the extent of this problem. During the study period, 86 patients were identified as having suffered scald burns as a result of contact with car radiator fluid. Seventy-one percent of the burn injuries occurred in the summer months. The areas most commonly burned were the head and upper extremities. Burn prevention efforts have improved greatly over the years; however, this study demonstrates that scald burns from car radiator fluid continue to cause physical, emotional, and financial devastation. The current radiator warning labels alone are not effective. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has proposed a new federal motor vehicle safety standard to aid in decreasing the number of scald burns from car radiators. The results of this study were submitted to the United States Department of Transportation for inclusion in a docket for federal legislation supporting these safety measures.

  13. A Self-Referencing Detection of Microorganisms Using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoprobes in a Test-in-a-Tube Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxu Yu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Anisotropic nanoparticles (i.e., silver nanocubes were functionalized with target-specific antibodies and Raman active tags to serve as nanoprobes for the rapid detection of bacteria in a test-in-a-tube platform. A self-referencing scheme was developed and implemented in which surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS signatures of the targets were observed superimposed with the SERS signals of the Raman tags. The assessment through the dual signals (superimposed target and tag Raman signatures supported a specific recognition of the targets in a single step with no washing/separation needed to a sensitivity of 102 CFU/mL, even in the presence of non-target bacteria at a 10 times higher concentration. The self-referencing protocol implemented with a portable Raman spectrometer potentially can become an easy-to-use, field-deployable spectroscopic sensor for onsite detection of pathogenic microorganisms.

  14. Rotational superradiant scattering in a vortex flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Theo; Patrick, Sam; Coutant, Antonin; Richartz, Maurício; Tedford, Edmund W.; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2017-09-01

    When an incident wave scatters off of an obstacle, it is partially reflected and partially transmitted. In theory, if the obstacle is rotating, waves can be amplified in the process, extracting energy from the scatterer. Here we describe in detail the first laboratory detection of this phenomenon, known as superradiance. We observed that waves propagating on the surface of water can be amplified after being scattered by a draining vortex. The maximum amplification measured was 14% +/- 8%, obtained for 3.70 Hz waves, in a 6.25-cm-deep fluid, consistent with the superradiant scattering caused by rapid rotation. We expect our experimental findings to be relevant to black-hole physics, since shallow water waves scattering on a draining fluid constitute an analogue of a black hole, as well as to hydrodynamics, due to the close relation to over-reflection instabilities.

  15. Non-label bioimaging utilizing scattering lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Ichimura, Taro; Fujita, Hideaki

    2017-04-01

    Optical microscopy is an indispensable tool for medical and life sciences. Especially, the microscopes utilized with scattering light offer a detailed internal observation of living specimens in real time because of their non-labeling and non-invasive capability. We here focus on two kinds of scattering lights, Raman scattering light and second harmonic generation light. Raman scattering light includes the information of all the molecular vibration modes of the molecules, and can be used to distinguish types and/or state of cell. Second harmonic generation light is derived from electric polarity of proteins in the specimen, and enables to detect their structural change. In this conference, we would like to introduce our challenges to extract biological information from those scattering lights.

  16. MUSIC algorithms for rebar detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimene, Raffaele; Leone, Giovanni; Dell'Aversano, Angela

    2013-12-01

    The MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) algorithm is employed to detect and localize an unknown number of scattering objects which are small in size as compared to the wavelength. The ensemble of objects to be detected consists of both strong and weak scatterers. This represents a scattering environment challenging for detection purposes as strong scatterers tend to mask the weak ones. Consequently, the detection of more weakly scattering objects is not always guaranteed and can be completely impaired when the noise corrupting data is of a relatively high level. To overcome this drawback, here a new technique is proposed, starting from the idea of applying a two-stage MUSIC algorithm. In the first stage strong scatterers are detected. Then, information concerning their number and location is employed in the second stage focusing only on the weak scatterers. The role of an adequate scattering model is emphasized to improve drastically detection performance in realistic scenarios.

  17. 49 CFR 215.119 - Defective freight car truck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Suspension System § 215.119 Defective freight car truck. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if the car has— (a) A side frame or bolster that— (1) Is broken; or (2) Has a crack of 1/4 of an... support the brake beam. Car Bodies ...

  18. Car User Taxes, Quality Characteristics, and Fuel Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Borger, B.; Rouwendal, J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the impact of car user taxes on vehicle quality and demand for kilometres. First, holding car prices fixed, we find that a higher fuel tax leads households to choose cars of better fuel efficiency, provided that the demand for car use is inelastic. Surprisingly, a higher kilometre tax

  19. Modelling strategic responses to car and fuel taxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, P.; Kooreman, P.

    We develop a model to analyse the interactions between actors involved in car and fuel taxation: consumers, car producers, fuel producers and the government. Heterogeneous consumers choose between two versions of a car that differ in engine type (diesel or gasoline). Car manufacturers and fuel

  20. Modeling Strategic Interactions to Car and Fuel Taxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, P.; Kooreman, P.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a model to analyse the interactions between actors involved in car and fuel taxation: consumers, car producers, fuel producers and the government. Heterogeneous consumers choose between two versions of a car that differ in engine type (diesel or gasoline). Car manufacturers and fuel