WorldWideScience

Sample records for scatterer size estimations

  1. Gas bubble size estimation in peat soils from EM wave scattering observed with ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Neil; Slater, Lee

    2017-04-01

    The size of biogenic gas bubbles in peatlands is believed to regulate ebullition of carbon gases to the atmosphere. The measurement of electromagnetic (EM) wave travel times using ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a proven field-scale method for indirect estimation of volumetric gas content. However, there is also the possibility that information on the size of the gas bubbles can be determined from the analysis of the spectral content of GPR signals as scattering attenuation possesses a frequency dependence for bubbles smaller than the EM wavelength (Rayleigh-type scattering). Theoretical modeling shows that GPR data acquired with typical antenna frequencies are likely to be affected by bubble size in peat soils. Analysis of GPR data from two recent studies on peat monoliths where biogenic gas production was documented produced results consistent with the model predictions. Using the approach, zero offset cross-borehole GPR data in a northern peatland suggest that large bubble clusters (i.e., 0.05 m radius) occur in peat. These findings broaden the utility of GPR for providing information on biogenic gas dynamics in peatlands.

  2. Estimation of the particle size distribution of colloids from multiangle dynamic light scattering measurements with particle swarm optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Antonio Bermeo Varón

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithms are applied to estimate the particle size distribution (PSD of a colloidal system from the average PSD diameters, which are measured by multi-angle dynamic light scattering. The system is considered a nonlinear inverse problem, and for this reason the estimation procedure requires a Tikhonov regularization method. The inverse problem is solved through several PSO strategies. The evaluated PSOs are tested through three simulated examples corresponding to polysty-rene (PS latexes with different PSDs, and two experimental examples obtained by simply mixing 2 PS standards. In general, the evalu-ation results of the PSOs are excellent; and particularly, the PSO with the Trelea’s parameter set shows a better performance than other implemented PSOs.

  3. Surface scattering dominated magnetotransport for improved quantitative estimation of particle size in Ag{sub 100−x}Co{sub x} nanogranular films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Chaudhary, Sujeet, E-mail: sujeetc@physics.iitd.ac.in; Pandya, Dinesh K.

    2014-12-15

    The size and distribution of cobalt particles in 100 nm thin films of Ag{sub 100−x}Co{sub x} (x=11.8–21.1 at%) co-sputtered at room temperature are determined from the fitting of their room temperature magnetoresistance data by Langevin function using a log-normal particle moment distribution. The systematically combined magnetoresistance and magnetization data indicates the narrow distribution and the progressively interacting nature of the magnetic particles with increase in ‘x’. Instead of the conventional magnetization data, the magnetotransport data is proposed for improved quantitative estimation of the particle size owing to their capability to track the surface effects associated with the ultrafine nanoparticles. The particle sizes obtained in the range of 3.9–6.4 nm from this alternate approach are in excellent agreement with those determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). On the other hand, the particle sizes determined from the magnetization measurements are systematically larger than determined from TEM. The particle size probing ability of magnetotransport is interpreted by explicitly taking account of the spin-dependent electron scattering within the magnetic particles as well as scattering from the surface of magnetic particle. - Highlights: • MR is proposed for improved quantitative estimation of the particle size. • Particle size obtained from MR is in excellent agreement with TEM. • Particle size determined from the magnetization data is overestimated from TEM. • Role of surface scattering in obtaining the particle size is explored.

  4. Sizing of Microparticles from Angular Scattering Ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Karamehmedovic, Mirza

    This technical note deals with light scattering measurements for sizing of micrometer-scale particles in a suspension.......This technical note deals with light scattering measurements for sizing of micrometer-scale particles in a suspension....

  5. Filler Network Model of Filled Rubber Materials to Estimate System Size Dependence of Two-Dimensional Small-Angle Scattering Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagita, Katsumi; Tominaga, Tetsuo; Hatazoe, Takumi; Sone, Takuo; Takano, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    We proposed a filler network toy (FN-toy) model in order to approximately forecast changes in two-dimensional scattering patterns (2DSPs) of nanoparticles (NPs) in crosslinked polymer networks in ultrasmall-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) experiments under uniaxial elongation. It enables us to estimate the system size dependence of the 2DSP of the NPs. In the FN-toy model, we considered NPs connected by harmonic springs with excluded-volume interactions among the NPs. In this study, we used the NP configurations estimated by reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) analysis for USAXS data observed in SPring-8 experiments on filler-filled styrene butadiene rubber (SBR). In the FN-toy model, we set a bond between every pair of NPs whose distance is less than Cd, where d is the diameter of an NP and C is a parameter that characterizes network properties. We determined the optimal value of C by comparison with 2DSPs of the NPs at 200% elongation for end-modified and unmodified SBR. These 2DSPs are obtained from the results of a large-scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulation with 8,192 NPs and 160 million Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles in previous works. For the end-modified SBR, the fitted value is C = 1.367 and for the unmodified SBR, C = 1.258. The difference in C can be regarded as originating from the difference in polymer-NP interactions. We found that the harmonic potential used in the current FN-toy model is not sufficient to reproduce stress-strain curves and local structures of NPs obtained in the previous CGMD simulations, although the FN-toy model can reproduce the 2DSPs. Using the FN-toy model with the fitted value of C, we calculated the 2DSPs of 65,536 and 524,288 NPs, whose initial positions were estimated by RMC analysis for the same USAXS data. It was found that CGMD simulations with 10 billion LJ particles and 524,288 NPs can provide a high-resolution 2DSP that is comparable to the 2DSP observed in USAXS experiments.

  6. Robust Optical Richness Estimation with Reduced Scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rykoff, E.S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Koester, B.P.; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Rozo, E.; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Annis, J.; /Fermilab; Evrard, A.E.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Hansen, S.M.; /Lick Observ.; Hao, J.; /Fermilab; Johnston, D.E.; /Fermilab; McKay, T.A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-07

    Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. (2009b), and evaluate their impact on the scatter in X-ray luminosity at fixed richness. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that {sigma}{sub ln L{sub X}|{lambda}} = 0.63 {+-} 0.02 for clusters with M{sub 500c} {approx}> 1.6 x 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is {sigma}{sub ln M|{lambda}} {approx} 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a-priori calibrations of the red-sequence. We also demonstrate that the recovered richness is robust to up to 50% uncertainties in the galaxy background, as well as to the choice of photometric filter employed, so long as the filters span the 4000 {angstrom} break of red-sequence galaxies. Consequently, our richness estimator can be used to compare richness estimates of different clusters, even if they do not share the same photometric data. Appendix A includes 'easy-bake' instructions for implementing our optimal richness estimator, and we are releasing an implementation of the code that works with SDSS data, as well as an augmented maxBCG catalog with the {lambda} richness measured for each cluster.

  7. Size Estimates in Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Di Cristo, Michele

    2014-01-06

    Detection of inclusions or obstacles inside a body by boundary measurements is an inverse problems very useful in practical applications. When only finite numbers of measurements are available, we try to detect some information on the embedded object such as its size. In this talk we review some recent results on several inverse problems. The idea is to provide constructive upper and lower estimates of the area/volume of the unknown defect in terms of a quantity related to the work that can be expressed with the available boundary data.

  8. Fast analytical scatter estimation using graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingleby, Harry; Lippuner, Jonas; Rickey, Daniel W; Li, Yue; Elbakri, Idris

    2015-01-01

    To develop a fast patient-specific analytical estimator of first-order Compton and Rayleigh scatter in cone-beam computed tomography, implemented using graphics processing units. The authors developed an analytical estimator for first-order Compton and Rayleigh scatter in a cone-beam computed tomography geometry. The estimator was coded using NVIDIA's CUDA environment for execution on an NVIDIA graphics processing unit. Performance of the analytical estimator was validated by comparison with high-count Monte Carlo simulations for two different numerical phantoms. Monoenergetic analytical simulations were compared with monoenergetic and polyenergetic Monte Carlo simulations. Analytical and Monte Carlo scatter estimates were compared both qualitatively, from visual inspection of images and profiles, and quantitatively, using a scaled root-mean-square difference metric. Reconstruction of simulated cone-beam projection data of an anthropomorphic breast phantom illustrated the potential of this method as a component of a scatter correction algorithm. The monoenergetic analytical and Monte Carlo scatter estimates showed very good agreement. The monoenergetic analytical estimates showed good agreement for Compton single scatter and reasonable agreement for Rayleigh single scatter when compared with polyenergetic Monte Carlo estimates. For a voxelized phantom with dimensions 128 × 128 × 128 voxels and a detector with 256 × 256 pixels, the analytical estimator required 669 seconds for a single projection, using a single NVIDIA 9800 GX2 video card. Accounting for first order scatter in cone-beam image reconstruction improves the contrast to noise ratio of the reconstructed images. The analytical scatter estimator, implemented using graphics processing units, provides rapid and accurate estimates of single scatter and with further acceleration and a method to account for multiple scatter may be useful for practical scatter correction schemes.

  9. Estimating population size with correlated sampling unit estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    David C. Bowden; Gary C. White; Alan B. Franklin; Joseph L. Ganey

    2003-01-01

    Finite population sampling theory is useful in estimating total population size (abundance) from abundance estimates of each sampled unit (quadrat). We develop estimators that allow correlated quadrat abundance estimates, even for quadrats in different sampling strata. Correlated quadrat abundance estimates based on mark–recapture or distance sampling methods occur...

  10. Dynamic light scattering study of peanut agglutinin: Size, shape and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 5. Dynamic light scattering study of peanut agglutinin: Size, shape and urea denaturation ... Peanut agglutinin (PNA) is a homotetrameric protein with a unique open quaternary structure. PNA shows non-two state profile in chaotrope induced denaturation. It passes ...

  11. Estimating Search Engine Index Size Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Bosch, Antal; Bogers, Toine; De Kunder, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    One of the determining factors of the quality of Web search engines is the size of their index. In addition to its influence on search result quality, the size of the indexed Web can also tell us something about which parts of the WWW are directly accessible to the everyday user. We propose a novel...... method of estimating the size of a Web search engine’s index by extrapolating from document frequencies of words observed in a large static corpus of Web pages. In addition, we provide a unique longitudinal perspective on the size of Google and Bing’s indices over a nine-year period, from March 2006...... until January 2015. We find that index size estimates of these two search engines tend to vary dramatically over time, with Google generally possessing a larger index than Bing. This result raises doubts about the reliability of previous one-off estimates of the size of the indexed Web. We find...

  12. Online submicron particle sizing by dynamic light scattering using autodilution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, David F.; Elings, V. B.

    1989-01-01

    Efficient production of a wide range of commercial products based on submicron colloidal dispersions would benefit from instrumentation for online particle sizing, permitting real time monitoring and control of the particle size distribution. Recent advances in the technology of dynamic light scattering (DLS), especially improvements in algorithms for inversion of the intensity autocorrelation function, have made it ideally suited to the measurement of simple particle size distributions in the difficult submicron region. Crucial to the success of an online DSL based instrument is a simple mechanism for automatically sampling and diluting the starting concentrated sample suspension, yielding a final concentration which is optimal for the light scattering measurement. A proprietary method and apparatus was developed for performing this function, designed to be used with a DLS based particle sizing instrument. A PC/AT computer is used as a smart controller for the valves in the sampler diluter, as well as an input-output communicator, video display and data storage device. Quantitative results are presented for a latex suspension and an oil-in-water emulsion.

  13. Estimating software development project size, using probabilistic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes the quantitative process of managing the size of software development projects by Purchasers (Clients) and Vendors (Development Houses) where there are no historical databases. Probabilistic approach was used to estimate the software project size, using the data collected when we developed a ...

  14. A correction algorithm for particle size distribution measurements made with the forward-scattering spectrometer probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James A.; Hovenac, Edward A.

    1989-01-01

    A correction algorithm for evaluating the particle size distribution measurements of atmospheric aerosols obtained with a forward-scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) is examined. A model based on Poisson statistics is employed to calculate the average diameter and rms width of the particle size distribution. The dead time and coincidence errors in the measured number density are estimated. The model generated data are compared with a Monte Carlo simulation of the FSSP operation. It is observed that the correlation between the actual and measured size distribution is nonlinear. It is noted that the algorithm permits more accurate calculation of the average diameter and rms width of the distribution compared to uncorrected measured quantities.

  15. DOA estimation for local scattered CDMA signals by particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jhih-Chung

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation of local scattered code-division multiple access (CDMA) signals based on a particle swarm optimization (PSO) search. For conventional spectral searching estimators with local scattering, the searching complexity and estimating accuracy strictly depend on the number of search grids used during the search. In order to obtain high-resolution and accurate DOA estimation, a smaller grid size is needed. This is time consuming and it is unclear how to determine the required number of search grids. In this paper, a modified PSO is presented to reduce the required search grids for the conventional spectral searching estimator with the effects of local scattering. Finally, several computer simulations are provided for illustration and comparison.

  16. Light scattering by lunar-like particle size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Jay D.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental input to models of light scattering from planetary regoliths is the mean phase function of the regolith particles. Using the known size distribution for typical lunar soils, the mean phase function and mean linear polarization for a regolith volume element of spherical particles of any composition were calculated from Mie theory. The two contour plots given here summarize the changes in the mean phase function and linear polarization with changes in the real part of the complex index of refraction, n - ik, for k equals 0.01, the visible wavelength 0.55 micrometers, and the particle size distribution of the typical mature lunar soil 72141. A second figure is a similar index-phase surface, except with k equals 0.1. The index-phase surfaces from this survey are a first order description of scattering by lunar-like regoliths of spherical particles of arbitrary composition. They form the basis of functions that span a large range of parameter-space.

  17. Basic Statistical Concepts for Sample Size Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vithal K Dhulkhed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For grant proposals the investigator has to include an estimation of sample size .The size of the sample should be adequate enough so that there is sufficient data to reliably answer the research question being addressed by the study. At the very planning stage of the study the investigator has to involve the statistician. To have meaningful dialogue with the statistician every research worker should be familiar with the basic concepts of statistics. This paper is concerned with simple principles of sample size calculation. Concepts are explained based on logic rather than rigorous mathematical calculations to help him assimilate the fundamentals.

  18. [Research on particle size and size distribution of nanocrystals in urines by laser light scattering method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mu-Hua; Zhao, Mei-Xia; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper laser light scattering method was used to investigate the particle size and size distribution of nanoparticles simultaneously in urines of lithogenic patients and healthy persons. This method is economic, rapid, accurate and easy to operate. The results showed that healthy urines are more stable than lithogenic urines. In urines of healthy human, the ultrafine crystals were well scattered and not aggregated with a smaller size. However, the ultrafine crystals in lithogenic urine have a broad size distribution, which increases the aggregation trend of nanocrystals. Based on the intensity-autocorrelation curve, the stability of urine samples of both healthy human and lithogenic patients was comparatively investigated. The relationship between the measurement results and the methods of handling sample was studied. The results show that a stable urine sample can be obtained by diluting the urine with a ratio of 20%, then centrifuging it at 4,000 round per minute for 15 minutes or filtrating it with 1.2 microm cellulose acetate filter. The results of laser light scattering method are consistent with that obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The reasons for the stability of urines are explained from the points of Van der Waals force, urine viscosity, pH value, ionic strength, surface charge and zeta potential of the ultrafine crystals, and so on. The results in this paper provide a new thought for preventing formation and recurrence of urinary stones.

  19. Retrieval of phytoplankton cell size from chlorophyll a specific absorption and scattering spectra of phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Wang, Guifen; Li, Cai; Xu, Zhantang; Cao, Wenxi; Shen, Fang

    2017-10-20

    Phytoplankton cell size is an important property that affects diverse ecological and biogeochemical processes, and analysis of the absorption and scattering spectra of phytoplankton can provide important information about phytoplankton size. In this study, an inversion method for extracting quantitative phytoplankton cell size data from these spectra was developed. This inversion method requires two inputs: chlorophyll a specific absorption and scattering spectra of phytoplankton. The average equivalent-volume spherical diameter (ESD v ) was calculated as the single size approximation for the log-normal particle size distribution (PSD) of the algal suspension. The performance of this method for retrieving cell size was assessed using the datasets from cultures of 12 phytoplankton species. The estimations of a(λ) and b(λ) for the phytoplankton population using ESD v had mean error values of 5.8%-6.9% and 7.0%-10.6%, respectively, compared to the a(λ) and b(λ) for the phytoplankton populations using the log-normal PSD. The estimated values of C i ESD v were in good agreement with the measurements, with r 2 =0.88 and relative root mean square error (NRMSE)=25.3%, and relatively good performances were also found for the retrieval of ESD v with r 2 =0.78 and NRMSE=23.9%.

  20. Regularized Tyler's Scatter Estimator: Existence, Uniqueness, and Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Babu, Prabhu; Palomar, Daniel P.

    2014-10-01

    This paper considers the regularized Tyler's scatter estimator for elliptical distributions, which has received considerable attention recently. Various types of shrinkage Tyler's estimators have been proposed in the literature and proved work effectively in the "small n large p" scenario. Nevertheless, the existence and uniqueness properties of the estimators are not thoroughly studied, and in certain cases the algorithms may fail to converge. In this work, we provide a general result that analyzes the sufficient condition for the existence of a family of shrinkage Tyler's estimators, which quantitatively shows that regularization indeed reduces the number of required samples for estimation and the convergence of the algorithms for the estimators. For two specific shrinkage Tyler's estimators, we also proved that the condition is necessary and the estimator is unique. Finally, we show that the two estimators are actually equivalent. Numerical algorithms are also derived based on the majorization-minimization framework, under which the convergence is analyzed systematically.

  1. Size-dependent Measurements of the Scattering Properties of Planetary Regolith Analogs: A Challenge to Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatek, J. L.; Hapke, B. W.; Nelson, R. M.; Hale, A. S.; Smythe, W. D.

    2003-01-01

    The nature of the scattering of light is thought to be well understood when the medium is made up of independent scatterers that are much larger than the wavelength of that light. This is not the case when the size of the scattering objects is similar to or smaller than the wavelength or the scatterers are not independent. In an attempt to examine the applicability of independent particle scattering models, to planetary regoliths, a dataset of experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions.

  2. Impaired hand size estimation in CRPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltz, Elena; Seifert, Frank; Lanz, Stefan; Müller, Rüdiger; Maihöfner, Christian

    2011-10-01

    A triad of clinical symptoms, ie, autonomic, motor and sensory dysfunctions, characterizes complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS). Sensory dysfunction comprises sensory loss or spontaneous and stimulus-evoked pain. Furthermore, a disturbance in the body schema may occur. In the present study, patients with CRPS of the upper extremity and healthy controls estimated their hand sizes on the basis of expanded or compressed schematic drawings of hands. In patients with CRPS we found an impairment in accurate hand size estimation; patients estimated their own CRPS-affected hand to be larger than it actually was when measured objectively. Moreover, overestimation correlated significantly with disease duration, neglect score, and increase of two-point-discrimination-thresholds (TPDT) compared to the unaffected hand and to control subjects' estimations. In line with previous functional imaging studies in CRPS patients demonstrating changes in central somatotopic maps, we suggest an involvement of the central nervous system in this disruption of the body schema. Potential cortical areas may be the primary somatosensory and posterior parietal cortices, which have been proposed to play a critical role in integrating visuospatial information. CRPS patients perceive their affected hand to be bigger than it is. The magnitude of this overestimation correlates with disease duration, decreased tactile thresholds, and neglect-score. Suggesting a disrupted body schema as the source of this impairment, our findings corroborate the current assumption of a CNS involvement in CRPS. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of neutron scattering data: Visualization and parameter estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauchamp, J.J.; Fedorov, V.; Hamilton, W.A.; Yethiraj, M.

    1998-09-01

    Traditionally, small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS) data analysis requires measurements of the signal and corrections due to the empty sample container, detector efficiency and time-dependent background. These corrections are then made on a pixel-by-pixel basis and estimates of relevant parameters (e.g., the radius of gyration) are made using the corrected data. This study was carried out in order to determine whether treatment of the detector efficiency and empty sample cell in a more statistically sound way would significantly reduce the uncertainties in the parameter estimators. Elements of experiment design are shortly discussed in this paper. For instance, we studied the way the time for a measurement should be optimally divided between the counting for signal, background and detector efficiency. In Section 2 we introduce the commonly accepted models for small-angle neutron and x-scattering and confine ourselves to the Guinier and Rayleigh models and their minor generalizations. The traditional approaches of data analysis are discussed only to the extent necessary to allow their comparison with the proposed techniques. Section 3 describes the main stages of the proposed method: visual data exploration, fitting the detector sensitivity function, and fitting a compound model. This model includes three additive terms describing scattering by the sampler, scattering with an empty container and a background noise. We compare a few alternatives for the first term by applying various scatter plots and computing sums of standardized squared residuals. Possible corrections due to smearing effects and randomness of estimated parameters are also shortly discussed. In Section 4 the robustness of the estimators with respect to low and upper bounds imposed on the momentum value is discussed. We show that for the available data set the most accurate and stable estimates are generated by models containing double terms either of Guinier's or Rayleigh

  4. Robust estimation of scattering in pulsar timing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentati, L.; Kerr, M.; Dai, S.; Shannon, R. M.; Hobbs, G.; Osłowski, S.

    2017-06-01

    We present a robust approach to incorporating models for the time-variable broadening of the pulse profile due to scattering in the ionized interstellar medium into profile-domain pulsar timing analysis. We use this approach to simultaneously estimate temporal variations in both the dispersion measure (DM) and scattering, together with a model for the pulse profile that includes smooth evolution as a function of frequency, and the pulsar's timing model. We show that fixing the scattering time-scales when forming time-of-arrival estimates, as has been suggested in the context of traditional pulsar timing analysis, can significantly underestimate the uncertainties in both DM and the arrival time of the pulse, leading to bias in the timing parameters. We apply our method using a new, publicly available, GPU-accelerated code, both to simulations and observations of the millisecond pulsar PSR J1643-1224. This pulsar is known to exhibit significant scattering variability compared to typical millisecond pulsars, and we find including low-frequency (pulsar timing is ideally suited.

  5. Software sizing, cost estimation and scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, William G.

    1988-01-01

    The Technology Implementation and Support Section at Martin Marietta Astronautics Group Denver is tasked with software development analysis, data collection, software productivity improvement and developing and applying various computerized software tools and models. The computerized tools are parametric models that reflect actuals taken from the large data base of completed software development projects. Martin Marietta's data base consists of over 300 completed projects and hundreds of cost estimating relationships (CERs) that are used in sizing, costing, scheduling and productivity improvement equations, studies, models and computerized tools.

  6. Size effects on the scattering matrices of clay particles: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Munoz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present experimental scattering matrix elements as functions of the scattering angle of two sets of three samples of clays (yellow, green, and white. The measurements were performed in Amsterdam at a wavelength of 633 nm, and at the IAA cosmic dust laboratory in Granada at 647 nm. We study the impact of different sizes on the measured scattering matrix elements.

  7. Size effects on the scattering matrices of clay particles: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Olga; Moreno, F.; Dabrowska, D. D.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2011-09-01

    We present experimental scattering matrix elements as functions of the scattering angle of two sets of three samples of clays (yellow, green and white). The measurements were performed in Amsterdam at 633 nm and at the IAA cosmic laboratory in Granada at 647 nm. We study the impact of different sizes on the measured scattering matrix elements.

  8. Second order statistics of bilinear forms of robust scatter estimators

    KAUST Repository

    Kammoun, Abla

    2015-08-12

    This paper lies in the lineage of recent works studying the asymptotic behaviour of robust-scatter estimators in the case where the number of observations and the dimension of the population covariance matrix grow at infinity with the same pace. In particular, we analyze the fluctuations of bilinear forms of the robust shrinkage estimator of covariance matrix. We show that this result can be leveraged in order to improve the design of robust detection methods. As an example, we provide an improved generalized likelihood ratio based detector which combines robustness to impulsive observations and optimality across the shrinkage parameter, the optimality being considered for the false alarm regulation.

  9. Retrieving composition and sizes of oceanic particle subpopulations from the volume scattering function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Twardowski, Michael; Lewis, Marlon

    2011-03-20

    For a particle population with known size, composition, structure, and shape distributions, its volume scattering function (VSF) can be estimated from first principles through a governing relationship, the Fredholm linear integral equation of the first kind. Inverting the Fredholm equation to derive the composition and size distribution of particles from measured VSFs remains challenging because 1) the solution depends on the kernel function, and 2) the kernel function needs to be constructed to avoid singularity. In this study, a thorough review of the earlier and current inversion techniques is provided. An inversion method based on nonnegative least squares is presented and evaluated using the VSFs measured by a prototype volume scattering meter at the LEO-15 site off the New Jersey coast. The kernel function was built by a compilation of individual subpopulations, each of which follows a lognormal size distribution and whose characteristic size and refractive index altogether cover the entire ranges of natural variability of potential marine particles of the region. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to ensure the kernel function being constructed is neither singular nor pathological. A total of 126 potential subpopulations were identified, among which 11 are common in more than half of the inversions and only five consistently present (>90% of measurements). These five subpopulations can be interpreted as small colloidal type particles of sizes around 0.02 μm, submicrometer detritus-type particles (n(r)=1.02, r(mode)=0.2 μm), two micrometer-sized subpopulations with one relatively soft (n(r)=1.04 and r(mode)=1.6 μm) and the other relatively refringent (n(r)=1.10 and r(mode)=3.2 μm), and bubbles of relatively large sizes (n(r)=0.75 and r(mode)=10 μm). Reconstructed PSDs feature a bimodal shape, with the smaller peak dominated by the colloidal subpopulations and the larger particles closely approximated by a power-law function. The Junge

  10. Estimating the location of a tunnel using interferometric times of Rayleigh-wave scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaslilar, A.; Harmankaya, U.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Draganov, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by a technique called seismic interferometry, we estimate the location of a scatterer using scattered waves. We isolate the scattered wavefield and evaluate the result of correlating scattered waves at different receiver locations. The cross-correlation eliminates the travel path between a

  11. Studying time of flight imaging through scattering media across multiple size scales (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Light scattering is a primary obstacle to optical imaging in a variety of different environments and across many size and time scales. Scattering complicates imaging on large scales when imaging through the atmosphere when imaging from airborne or space borne platforms, through marine fog, or through fog and dust in vehicle navigation, for example in self driving cars. On smaller scales, scattering is the major obstacle when imaging through human tissue in biomedical applications. Despite the large variety of participating materials and size scales, light transport in all these environments is usually described with very similar scattering models that are defined by the same small set of parameters, including scattering and absorption length and phase function. We attempt a study of scattering and methods of imaging through scattering across different scales and media, particularly with respect to the use of time of flight information. We can show that using time of flight, in addition to spatial information, provides distinct advantages in scattering environments. By performing a comparative study of scattering across scales and media, we are able to suggest scale models for scattering environments to aid lab research. We also can transfer knowledge and methodology between different fields.

  12. Muon energy estimate through multiple scattering with the MACRO detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Auriemma, G; Bakari, D; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Candela, A; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Cassese, F; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; De Deo, M; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; Derkaoui, J; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Dincecco, M; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Gray, L; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lindozzi, M; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rrhioua, A; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra, P; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Tatananni, E; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R

    2002-01-01

    Muon energy measurement represents an important issue for any experiment addressing neutrino-induced up-going muon studies. Since the neutrino oscillation probability depends on the neutrino energy, a measurement of the muon energy adds an important piece of information concerning the neutrino system. We show in this paper how the MACRO limited streamer tube system can be operated in drift mode by using the TDCs included in the QTPs, an electronics designed for magnetic monopole search. An improvement of the space resolution is obtained, through an analysis of the multiple scattering of muon tracks as they pass through our detector. This information can be used further to obtain an estimate of the energy of muons crossing the detector. Here we present the results of two dedicated tests, performed at CERN PS-T9 and SPS-X7 beam lines, to provide a full check of the electronics and to exploit the feasibility of such a multiple scattering analysis. We show that by using a neural network approach, we are able to r...

  13. Structure function for high-concentration biophantoms of polydisperse scatterer sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Aiguo; O'Brien, William

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic backscattering coefficient (BSC) has been used extensively to characterize tissue. In most cases, sparse scatterer concentrations are assumed. However, many types of tissues have dense scattering media. This study addresses the problem of dense media scattering by taking into account the correlation among scatterers using the structure functions. The effect of scatterer polydispersity on the structure functions is investigated. Structure function models based on polydisperse scatterers are theoretically developed and experimentally evaluated against the structure functions obtained from cell pellet biophantoms. The biophantoms were constructed by placing live cells of known concentration in coagulation media to form a clot. The BSCs of the biophantoms were estimated using single-element transducers over the frequency range from 11 to 105 MHz. Experimental structure functions were obtained by comparing the BSCs of two cell concentrations. The structure functions predicted by the models agreed with the experimental structure functions. Fitting the models yielded cell radius estimates that were consistent with direct light microscope measures. The results demonstrate the role of scatterer position correlation on dense media scattering, and the significance of scatterer polydispersity on structure functions. This work may lead to more accurate modeling of ultrasonic scattering in dense medium for improved tissue characterization.

  14. Comparison of particle size of cracking catalyst determined by laser light scattering and dry sieve methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dishman, K.L.; Doolin, P.K.; Hoffman, J.F. (Ashland Petroleum Co., Ashland, KY (United States))

    1993-07-01

    A method of interconversion of dry sieve and laser light scattering particle size values has been developed for cracking catalysts. Values obtained by light scattering techniques were consistently larger than those obtained by dry sieve analysis. The differences were primarily due to lack of sphericity of the particles. The particle size distribution determined by light scattering techniques was based on an average particle diameter. Conversely, the sieve measured the smallest diameter of the particle which can pass through the opening. Microscopic examination of commercial cracking catalysts confirmed their nonuniformity. The sphericity of the catalyst particles decreased as particle size increased. Therefore, the divergence between the laser light scattering and dry sieving value became greater as the catalyst particle size increased.

  15. Development of an ejecta particle size measurement diagnostic based on Mie scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, Martin Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Buttler, William Tillman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Frayer, Daniel K. [National Security Tech, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grover, Michael [National Security Technologies, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Special Technologies Lab.; Monfared, Shabnam Kalighi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stevens, Gerald D. [National Security Technologies, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Special Technologies Lab.; Stone, Benjamin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Turley, William Dale [National Security Technologies, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Special Technologies Lab.

    2017-09-27

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of extracting the size of particles ejected from shocked metal surfaces (ejecta) from the angular distribution of light scattered by a cloud of such particles. The basis of the technique is the Mie theory of scattering, and implicit in this approach are the assumptions that the scattering particles are spherical and that single scattering conditions prevail. The meaning of this latter assumption, as far as experimental conditions are concerned, will become clear later. The solution to Maxwell’s equations for spherical particles illuminated by a plane electromagnetic wave was derived by Gustav Mie more than 100 years ago, but several modern treatises discuss this solution in great detail. The solution is a complicated series expansion of the scattered electric field, as well as the field within the particle, from which the total scattering and absorption cross sections as well as the angular distribution of scattered intensity can be calculated numerically. The detailed nature of the scattering is determined by the complex index of refraction of the particle material as well as the particle size parameter, x, which is the product of the wavenumber of the incident light and the particle radius, i.e. x = 2rπ= λ. Figure 1 shows the angular distribution of scattered light for different particle size parameters and two orthogonal incident light polarizations as calculated using the Mie solution. It is obvious that the scattering pattern is strongly dependent on the particle size parameter, becoming more forward-directed and less polarizationdependent as the particle size parameter increases. This trend forms the basis for the diagnostic design.

  16. Mie forward scattering - Improved semiempirical approximation with application to particle size distribution inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fymat, A. L.; Mease, K. D.

    1981-01-01

    The approximation of Penndorf (1962) and Shifrin-Punina (1968) to the Mie solution at forward scattering angles are extended to small size parameters. The proposed semiempirical approximation accurately represents the Mie results down to x = 0.5-1 for refractive index m = 1.33, and to x = 2.0 for larger index values. The implications of the result for the inversion of particle size distribution from single scattering data in the forward direction are discussed.

  17. Better Size Estimation for Sparse Matrix Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amossen, Rasmus Resen; Campagna, Andrea; Pagh, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of doing fast and reliable estimation of the number of non-zero entries in a sparse Boolean matrix product. Let n denote the total number of non-zero entries in the input matrices. We show how to compute a 1 ± ε approximation (with small probability of error) in expected...

  18. Estimation of population size using open capture-recapture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, T.L.; Amstrup, Steven C.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important needs for wildlife managers is an accurate estimate of population size. Yet, for many species, including most marine species and large mammals, accurate and precise estimation of numbers is one of the most difficult of all research challenges. Open-population capture-recapture models have proven useful in many situations to estimate survival probabilities but typically have not been used to estimate population size. We show that open-population models can be used to estimate population size by developing a Horvitz-Thompson-type estimate of population size and an estimator of its variance. Our population size estimate keys on the probability of capture at each trap occasion and therefore is quite general and can be made a function of external covariates measured during the study. Here we define the estimator and investigate its bias, variance, and variance estimator via computer simulation. Computer simulations make extensive use of real data taken from a study of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in the Beaufort Sea. The population size estimator is shown to be useful because it was negligibly biased in all situations studied. The variance estimator is shown to be useful in all situations, but caution is warranted in cases of extreme capture heterogeneity.

  19. Mass-specific scattering coefficient for natural minerogenic particle populations: particle size distribution effect and closure analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Feng; Effler, Steve W

    2012-05-01

    The relationship between the particulate scattering coefficient (b(p)) and the concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM), as represented by the mass-specific scattering coefficient of particulates (b(p)*=b(p)/SPM), depends on particle size distribution (PSD). This dependence is quantified for minerogenic particle populations in this paper through calculations of b(p)* for common minerals as idealized populations (monodispersed spheres); contemporaneous measurements of b(p), SPM, and light-scattering attributes of mineral particles with scanning electron microscopy interfaced with automated image and x-ray analyses (SAX), for a connected stream-reservoir system where minerogenic particles dominate b(p); and estimates of b(p) and its size dependency (through SAX results-driven Mie theory calculations), particle volume concentration, and b(p)*. Modest changes in minerogenic PSDs are shown to result in substantial variations in b(p)*. Good closure of the SAX-based estimates of b(p) and particle volume concentration with bulk measurements is demonstrated. Converging relationships between b(p)* and particle size, developed from three approaches, were well described by power law expressions.

  20. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Measurements of Magnetic Cluster Sizes in Magnetic Recording Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-06-17

    We describe Small Angle Neutron Scattering measurements of the magnetic cluster size distributions for several longitudinal magnetic recording media. We find that the average magnetic cluster size is slightly larger than the average physical grain size, that there is a broad distribution of cluster sizes, and that the cluster size is inversely correlated to the media signal-to-noise ratio. These results show that intergranular magnetic coupling in these media is small and they provide empirical data for the cluster-size distribution that can be incorporated into models of magnetic recording.

  1. Software Size Estimation Using Expert Estimation: A Fuzzy Logic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    For decades software managers have been using formal methodologies such as the Constructive Cost Model and Function Points to estimate the effort of software projects during the early stages of project development. While some research shows these methodologies to be effective, many software managers feel that they are overly complicated to use and…

  2. Estimation of Optimal Size of Plots for Experiments with Radiometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experimental error can lead to rework and, consequently, to the loss of financial and human resources. One way to reduce this problem is the estimation of the optimum size of experimental plot to carry out the treatments. The objective of this study was to estimate the optimal size of plots for reflectance measurements in ...

  3. Cramér-Rao Bound Study of Multiple Scattering Effects in Target Separation Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin A. Marengo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The information about the distance of separation between two-point targets that is contained in scattering data is explored in the context of the scalar Helmholtz operator via the Fisher information and associated Cramér-Rao bound (CRB relevant to unbiased target separation estimation. The CRB results are obtained for the exact multiple scattering model and, for reference, also for the single scattering or Born approximation model applicable to weak scatterers. The effects of the sensing configuration and the scattering parameters in target separation estimation are analyzed. Conditions under which the targets' separation cannot be estimated are discussed for both models. Conditions for multiple scattering to be useful or detrimental to target separation estimation are discussed and illustrated.

  4. Anomalous diffraction approximation to the light scattering coefficient spectra of marine particles with power-law size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matciak, Maciej

    2012-12-03

    Based on anomalous diffraction approximation, analytical expressions for the scattering coefficient of marine particles with power-law size distribution in the infinite domain of sizes (0, ∞) were derived. Comparison with the exact Mie solution for the light scattering by spheres indicated that the obtained expressions can describe the relative spectral variability of the scattering coefficient well. This is demonstrated and discussed for the scattering spectra of main types of marine particulates characterized by different optical properties.

  5. Direction of Arrival Estimation in the presence of Scatterer in noisy environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Aslam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm to estimate direction of arrival (DOA of an incoming wave received at an array antenna in the scenario where the incoming wave is contaminated by the additive white Gaussian noise and scattered by arbitrary shaped 3D scatterer(s. We present different simulation examples to show the validity of the proposed method. It is observed that the proposed algorithm is capable of closely estimating the DOA of an incoming wave irrespective of the shape of the scatterer provided the decision is made over multiple iterations. Moreover, presence of noise affects the estimate especially in the case of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR that gives a relatively large estimation error. However, for larger SNR the DOA estimation is primarily dependent on the scatterer only.

  6. Estimate of the particle size in nanoparticles of magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paresque, M.C.; Castro, J.A.; Campos, M.F.; Oliveira, E.M.; Liuzzi, M.A.S.C. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full Text: Nanocrystalline particles of Fe3O4 were produced by co-precipitation in aquous mean. The particle size of magnetite is a very important parameter, because for particle size around 30 nm there is a transition superparamagnetic for ferromagnetic. This transition profoundly affects the properties of the nanofluid. The Langevin model allows an estimate of the particle size, directly from measured hysteresis curves. In this study, the particle size was also determined by x-ray diffraction with Rietveld analysis and by a Laser Particle Size Analyzer equipment. These two methods pointed out particle size around 20 nm. (author)

  7. Size-dependent endocytosis of gold nanoparticles studied by three-dimensional mapping of plasmonic scattering images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chia-Wei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the endocytosis process of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs is important for the drug delivery and photodynamic therapy applications. The endocytosis in living cells is usually studied by fluorescent microscopy. The fluorescent labeling suffers from photobleaching. Besides, quantitative estimation of the cellular uptake is not easy. In this paper, the size-dependent endocytosis of AuNPs was investigated by using plasmonic scattering images without any labeling. Results The scattering images of AuNPs and the vesicles were mapped by using an optical sectioning microscopy with dark-field illumination. AuNPs have large optical scatterings at 550-600 nm wavelengths due to localized surface plasmon resonances. Using an enhanced contrast between yellow and blue CCD images, AuNPs can be well distinguished from cellular organelles. The tracking of AuNPs coated with aptamers for surface mucin glycoprotein shows that AuNPs attached to extracellular matrix and moved towards center of the cell. Most 75-nm-AuNPs moved to the top of cells, while many 45-nm-AuNPs entered cells through endocytosis and accumulated in endocytic vesicles. The amounts of cellular uptake decreased with the increase of particle size. Conclusions We quantitatively studied the endocytosis of AuNPs with different sizes in various cancer cells. The plasmonic scattering images confirm the size-dependent endocytosis of AuNPs. The 45-nm-AuNP is better for drug delivery due to its higher uptake rate. On the other hand, large AuNPs are immobilized on the cell membrane. They can be used to reconstruct the cell morphology.

  8. Flow microfluorometric and light-scatter measurement of nuclear and cytoplasmic size in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Hansen, K.M.; Crissman, H.A.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for rapid measurement of nuclear and cytoplasmic size relationships in mammalian cell populations has been developed. Based on fluorescence staining of either the nucleus alone or in combination with the cytoplasm using two-color fluorescence methods, this technique permits the simultaneous determination of nuclear and cytoplasmic diameters from fluorescence and light-scatter measurements. Cells stained in liquid suspension pass through a flow chamber at a constant velocity, intersecting a laser beam which excites cell fluorescence and causes light scatter. Depending upon which analysis procedure is used, optical sensors measure nuclear fluorescence and light scatter (whole cell size) or two-color nuclear and cytoplasmic fluorescence from individual cells crossing the laser beam. The time durations of signals generated by the nucleus and cytoplasm are converted electronically into signals proportional to the respective diameters and are displayed as frequency distribution histograms. Illustrative examples of measurements on uniform microspheres, cultured mammalian cells and human exfoliated gynecologic cells are presented.

  9. Size distribution and radial density profile of synaptic vesicles by SAXS and light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castorph, Simon; Salditt, Tim [Institute for X-ray Physics, Goettingen (Germany); Holt, Matthew; Jahn, Reinhard [Max Plank Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany); Sztucki, Michael [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2008-07-01

    Synaptic vesicles are small membraneous organelles within the nerve terminal, encapsulating neurotransmitters by a lipid bilayer. The transport of the neurotransmitter, the fusion at the plasma membrane, and the release of the stored neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft are since long know as essential step in nerve conduction of the chemical synapse. A detailed structural view of these molecular mechanisms is still lacking, not withstanding the enormous progress in the field during recent years. From measurements and quantitative fitting of small angle X-ray scattering curves and dynamic light scattering the averaged structural properties of synaptic vesicles can be determined. We present SAXS measurements and fits revealing the width of the size distribution function and details of the radial scattering length profile of synaptic vesicles from rat brain. Representative values for the inner and outer radius and the size polydispersity as well as the density and width of the outer protein layer are obtained.

  10. Body-size distribution, biomass estimates and life histories of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The body-size distributions and biomass estimates of Caenis (Ephemeroptera: Caenidae), Cloeon (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae), Coenagrionidae (Odonata), Micronecta (Hemiptera: Corixidae), Chironominae (Diptera: Chironomidae) and Orthocladiinae (Diptera: Chironomidae), the most common and abundant insect taxa ...

  11. Estimates of software size from state machine designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, R. N.; Gaffney, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The length, or size (in number of Source Lines of Code) of programs represented as state machines, it is demonstrated, can be reliably estimated in terms of the number of internal state machine variables.

  12. Calculation of the cluster size distribution functions and small-angle neutron scattering data for C60/N-methylpyrrolidone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropin, T. V.; Jargalan, N.; Avdeev, M. V.; Kyzyma, O. A.; Sangaa, D.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2014-01-01

    The aggregate growth in a C60/N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) solution has been considered in the framework of the approach developed earlier for describing the cluster growth kinetics in fullerene polar solutions. The final cluster size distribution functions in model solutions have been estimated for two fullerene aggregation models including the influence of complex formation on the cluster growth using extrapolations of the characteristics of the cluster state and distribution parameters. Based on the obtained results, the model curves of small-angle neutron scattering have been calculated for a C60/NMP solution at various values of the model parameters.

  13. Effective single scattering albedo estimation using regional climate model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by modifying the optical parameterization of Regional Climate model (RegCM), the authors have computed and compared the Effective Single-Scattering Albedo (ESSA) which is a representative of VIS spectral region. The arid, semi-arid...

  14. Estimation of various scattering parameters and 2-DEG mobilities ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron transport at high electric fields and temperatures is .... where d and u being the material density and sound velocity, respectively and Ec1 is the acoustic ... electric field. This effect is usually referred to as piezoelectric effect. As a result, charged carriers may be scattered by longitudinal-mode acoustical phonons and.

  15. Effects of sample size on KERNEL home range estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, D.E.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Kernohan, Brian J.; Brundige, Gary C.; Raedeke, Kenneth J.; Gitzen, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Kernel methods for estimating home range are being used increasingly in wildlife research, but the effect of sample size on their accuracy is not known. We used computer simulations of 10-200 points/home range and compared accuracy of home range estimates produced by fixed and adaptive kernels with the reference (REF) and least-squares cross-validation (LSCV) methods for determining the amount of smoothing. Simulated home ranges varied from simple to complex shapes created by mixing bivariate normal distributions. We used the size of the 95% home range area and the relative mean squared error of the surface fit to assess the accuracy of the kernel home range estimates. For both measures, the bias and variance approached an asymptote at about 50 observations/home range. The fixed kernel with smoothing selected by LSCV provided the least-biased estimates of the 95% home range area. All kernel methods produced similar surface fit for most simulations, but the fixed kernel with LSCV had the lowest frequency and magnitude of very poor estimates. We reviewed 101 papers published in The Journal of Wildlife Management (JWM) between 1980 and 1997 that estimated animal home ranges. A minority of these papers used nonparametric utilization distribution (UD) estimators, and most did not adequately report sample sizes. We recommend that home range studies using kernel estimates use LSCV to determine the amount of smoothing, obtain a minimum of 30 observations per animal (but preferably a?Y50), and report sample sizes in published results.

  16. Sizing aerosolized fractal nanoparticle aggregates through Bayesian analysis of wide-angle light scattering (WALS) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Franz J. T.; Will, Stefan; Daun, Kyle J.

    2016-11-01

    Inferring the size distribution of aerosolized fractal aggregates from the angular distribution of elastically scattered light is a mathematically ill-posed problem. This paper presents a procedure for analyzing Wide-Angle Light Scattering (WALS) data using Bayesian inference. The outcome is probability densities for the recovered size distribution and aggregate morphology parameters. This technique is applied to both synthetic data and experimental data collected on soot-laden aerosols, using a measurement equation derived from Rayleigh-Debye-Gans fractal aggregate (RDG-FA) theory. In the case of experimental data, the recovered aggregate size distribution parameters are generally consistent with TEM-derived values, but the accuracy is impaired by the well-known limited accuracy of RDG-FA theory. Finally, we show how this bias could potentially be avoided using the approximation error technique.

  17. Estimating the location of a tunnel using correlation and inversion of Rayleigh wave scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasililar, A.; Harmankaya, U.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Draganov, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of near-surface scatterers, such as cavities, tunnels, abandoned mine shafts, and buried objects, is important to mitigate geohazards and environmental hazards. By inversion of travel times of cross-correlated scattered waves, due to the incident Rayleigh waves, we estimate the

  18. Treatment effect on biases in size estimation in spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiban, Youssef; Fruth, Martina B; Pauli, Paul; Kinateder, Max; Reichenberger, Jonas; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    The current study investigates biases in size estimations made by spider-phobic and healthy participants before and after treatment. Forty-one spider-phobic and 20 healthy participants received virtual reality (VR) exposure treatment and were then asked to rate the size of a real spider immediately before and, on average, 15days after the treatment. During the VR exposure treatment skin conductance response was assessed. Prior to the treatment, both groups tended to overestimate the size of the spider, but this size estimation bias was significantly larger in the phobic group than in the control group. The VR exposure treatment reduced this bias, which was reflected in a significantly smaller size rating post treatment. However, the size estimation bias was unrelated to the skin conductance response. Our results confirm the hypothesis that size estimation by spider-phobic patients is biased. This bias is not stable over time and can be decreased with adequate treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mie scattering by ensembles of particles with very large size parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, S.; Voshchinnikov, N. V.

    2004-09-01

    We present a computer program for the simulation of Mie scattering in case of arbitrarily large size parameters. The elements of the scattering matrix, efficiency factors as well as the corresponding cross-sections, the albedo and the scattering asymmetry parameter are calculated. Single particles as well as particle ensembles consisting of several components and particle size distributions can be considered. Program summary Title of program: miex Catalogue identifier: ADUD Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUD Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Computers: Any machine running standard FORTRAN 90; miex has been tested on an Intel Celeron processor (Redhat Linux 9.0, Intel Fortran Compiler 7.1), an Intel XEON processor (SuSE Linux 9.0, Intel Fortran Compiler 8.0), and a Sun-Blade-1000 (OS 8.5, Sun Workshop Compiler Fortran 90 2.0). Installations: standard Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: Redhat Linux 9.0, SuSE Linux 9.0, Sun OS 8.5 Programming language used: Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data: 1 MByte - several 100 MByte (see Appendix A for examples) No. of bits in a word: 8 No. of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78238 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1015805 Distributed format: tar.gz Nature of the physical problem: Among a variety of applications, Mie scattering is of essential importance for the continuum radiative transfer in cosmic dust configurations. In this particular case, Mie theory describes the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with spherical dust grains on the basis of their complex refractive index and size parameter. Both, broad grain size distributions (radii a: nanometers-millimeters) and a very wide

  20. Development and Characterization of Dynamic Light Scattering Instrumentation to Determine Nanoparticle Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Sam; Harding, Jacob; Holman, Kate; Sebastian, Tj; Simpson, Jeff

    Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) provides a high-throughput and accurate measurement of particle sizes for monodisperse (MD), spherical nanoparticles (NPs). We report on the development and characterization of homebuilt DLS instrumentation to measure the size of MD NPs of gold and polystyrene. HeNe and Ar-ion lasers comprise the excitation sources for the scattering experiment. An avalanche photodiode detects the scattered light and an autocorrelation card analyzes the signal to provide a measurement of the translational diffusion coefficient, which allows for the determination of NP diameter. We have tested our apparatus using commercially-produced gold NPs in the range of 10nm to 200nm. Given the strong temperature-dependence of the viscosity, periodic ambient temperature measurements were used to produce dynamic values for viscosity and hence minimize uncertainty in the determination of NP size. Additionally, we will compare our DLS results to NP size measurements obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). S.H., K.H., T.J.S. and J.H. acknowledge support from Towson University. J.R.S. acknowledges support from NSF - CBET #1236083.

  1. A POSSIBLE DIVOT IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE KUIPER BELT'S SCATTERING OBJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankman, C.; Gladman, B. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agriculture Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kaib, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queens University (Canada); Kavelaars, J. J. [National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Petit, J. M. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon (France)

    2013-02-10

    Via joint analysis of a calibrated telescopic survey, which found scattering Kuiper Belt objects, and models of their expected orbital distribution, we explore the scattering-object (SO) size distribution. Although for D > 100 km the number of objects quickly rise as diameters decrease, we find a relative lack of smaller objects, ruling out a single power law at greater than 99% confidence. After studying traditional ''knees'' in the size distribution, we explore other formulations and find that, surprisingly, our analysis is consistent with a very sudden decrease (a divot) in the number distribution as diameters decrease below 100 km, which then rises again as a power law. Motivated by other dynamically hot populations and the Centaurs, we argue for a divot size distribution where the number of smaller objects rises again as expected via collisional equilibrium. Extrapolation yields enough kilometer-scale SOs to supply the nearby Jupiter-family comets. Our interpretation is that this divot feature is a preserved relic of the size distribution made by planetesimal formation, now ''frozen in'' to portions of the Kuiper Belt sharing a ''hot'' orbital inclination distribution, explaining several puzzles in Kuiper Belt science. Additionally, we show that to match today's SO inclination distribution, the supply source that was scattered outward must have already been vertically heated to the of order 10 Degree-Sign .

  2. Estimation of canopy structure parameters from multiangular measurements of scattering components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Kristian; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    Structure parameters for characterization of vegetation canopies are often estimated from remote optical measurements. Existing methods include those based on measurements of gap fraction, spectral vegetation indices, or the inversion of spectral canopy reflectance models. This paper proposes...... a novel method based on inversion of multiangular measurements of the abundances of light scattering components, which may be estimated using spectral unmixing. An algorithm is described for predicting the abundances of various scattering components using Monte Carlo simulation with a Poisson canopy model...

  3. Estimation of scattering from a moist rough surface with spheroidal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    x y. E. D K K g K K π. ∞. −∞. = ∫ ∫. (7). 1. 1. ( . ) d d ,. 2 z z x y x y. E. D K K g K K π. ∞. −∞. = ∫ ∫. (8) where. 1 exp( . ). x x y z g. jK. jK y jK Z. = +. +. Now the expression for transmission loss and absorption loss for the wave guide scattering pattern model under rough surface can be written as (Shimaru 1978), r abs r. 2 cos.

  4. Mie scattering from submicron-sized CO2 clusters formed in a supersonic expansion of a gas mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, S; Fukuda, Y; Sakaki, H; Yogo, A; Kanasaki, M; Kondo, K; Faenov, A Ya; Skobelev, I Yu; Pikuz, T A; Boldarev, A S; Gasilov, V A

    2013-09-09

    A detailed mathematical model is presented for a submicron-sized cluster formation in a binary gas mixture flowing through a three-staged conical nozzle. By measuring the angular distribution of light scattered from the clusters, the size of CO(2) clusters, produced in a supersonic expansion of the mixture gas of CO(2)(30%)/H(2)(70%) or CO(2)(10%)/He(90%), has been evaluated using the Mie scattering method. The mean sizes of CO(2) clusters are estimated to be 0.28 ± 0.03 μm for CO(2)/H(2) and 0.26 ± 0.04 μm for CO(2)/He, respectively. In addition, total gas density profiles in radial direction of the gas jet, measuring the phase shift of the light passing through the target by utilizing an interferometer, are found to be agreed with the numerical modeling within a factor of two. The dryness (= monomer/(monomer + cluster) ratio) in the targets is found to support the numerical modeling. The apparatus developed to evaluate the cluster-gas targets proved that our mathematical model of cluster formation is reliable enough for the binary gas mixture.

  5. Modelling complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of particle-size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Sam; Weltje, Gert Jan

    2014-05-01

    Estimates of particle-size made by operators in the field and laboratory represent a vast and relatively untapped data archive. The wide spatial distribution of particle-size estimates makes them ideal for constructing geological models and soil maps. This study uses a large data set from the Netherlands (n = 4837) containing both operator estimates of particle size and complete particle-size distributions measured by laser granulometry. This study introduces a logit-based constrained-cubic-spline (CCS) algorithm to interpolate complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates. The CCS model is compared to four other models: (i) a linear interpolation; (ii) a log-hyperbolic interpolation; (iii) an empirical logistic function; and (iv) an empirical arctan function. Operator estimates were found to be both inaccurate and imprecise; only 14% of samples were successfully classified using the Dutch classification scheme for fine sediment. Operator estimates of sediment particle-size encompass the same range of values as particle-size distributions measured by laser analysis. However, the distributions measured by laser analysis show that most of the sand percentage values lie between zero and one, so the majority of the variability in the data is lost because operator estimates are made to the nearest 1% at best, and more frequently to the nearest 5%. A method for constructing complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of sediment texture using a logit constrained cubit spline (CCS) interpolation algorithm is presented. This model and four other previously published methods are compared to establish the best approach to modelling particle-size distributions. The logit-CCS model is the most accurate method, although both logit-linear and log-linear interpolation models provide reasonable alternatives. Models based on empirical distribution functions are less accurate than interpolation algorithms for modelling particle-size distributions in

  6. Food models for portion size estimation of Asian foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanerolle, P; Thoradeniya, T; de Silva, A

    2013-08-01

    Novel portion size estimation aids relevant to the cognitive potential of children are necessary for an improved accuracy in dietary recall. We developed graduated realistic food models for Asian foods and tested their accuracy and precision in children. Food models were constructed for nine commonly consumed food items using a range of low cost materials. These were tested among a random sample of 80 school children (aged 10-16 years). A total of 719 estimations were made. A high percentage (68%) of correct estimations and high correlation (r > 0.95, P foods. Portion size estimation using realistic food models is found to be accurate and precise and is suitable for use in children. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  7. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  8. Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) of Aqueous C60 Aggregates with Dynamic Light Scattering Size and LC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current methods for the size determination of nanomaterials in aqueous suspension include dynamic or static light scattering and electron or atomic force microscopy techniques. Light scattering techniques are limited by poor resolution and the scattering intensity dependence on p...

  9. Identification of key aerosol populations through their size and composition resolved spectral scattering and absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Costabile

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing chemical and physical aerosol properties is important to understand their sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms in the atmosphere. This study proposes a scheme to classify aerosol populations based on their spectral optical properties (absorption and scattering. The scheme is obtained thanks to the outstanding set of information on particle size and composition these properties contain. The spectral variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo (dSSA, and the extinction, scattering and absorption Angstrom exponents (EAE, SAE and AAE, respectively were observed on the basis of two-year measurements of aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients at blue, green and red wavelengths performed in the suburbs of Rome (Italy. Optical measurements of various aerosol types were coupled to measurements of particle number size distributions and relevant optical properties simulations (Mie theory. These latter allowed the investigation of the role of the particle size and composition in the bulk aerosol properties observed. The combination of simulations and measurements suggested a general "paradigm" built on dSSA, SAE and AAE to optically classify aerosols. The paradigm proved suitable to identify the presence of key aerosol populations, including soot, biomass burning, organics, dust and marine particles. The work highlights that (i aerosol populations show distinctive combinations of SAE and dSSA times AAE, these variables being linked by a linear inverse relation varying with varying SSA; (ii fine particles show EAE > 1.5, whilst EAE 0.8, whilst ultrafine urban Aitken mode and soot particles show SSA < 0.8. The proposed paradigm agrees with aerosol observations performed during past major field campaigns, this indicating that relations concerning the paradigm have a general validity.

  10. Sampling strategies for estimating brook trout effective population size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew R. Whiteley; Jason A. Coombs; Mark Hudy; Zachary Robinson; Keith H. Nislow; Benjamin H. Letcher

    2012-01-01

    The influence of sampling strategy on estimates of effective population size (Ne) from single-sample genetic methods has not been rigorously examined, though these methods are increasingly used. For headwater salmonids, spatially close kin association among age-0 individuals suggests that sampling strategy (number of individuals and location from...

  11. Estimating the size of the homeless population in Budapest, Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David, B; Snijders, TAB

    In this study we try to estimate the size of the homeless population in Budapest by using two - non-standard - sampling methods: snowball sampling and capture-recapture method. Using two methods and three different data sets we are able to compare the methods as well as the results, and we also

  12. Estimated spatial requirements of the medium- to large-sized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conservation planning in the Cape Floristic Region (CFR) of South Africa, a recognised world plant diversity hotspot, required information on the estimated spatial requirements of selected medium- to large-sized mammals within each of 102 Broad Habitat Units (BHUs) delineated according to key biophysical parameters.

  13. Estimating population size of Saddle-billed Storks Ephippiorhynchus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Counting Saddle-billed Storks in a study area the size of the Kruger National Park, at 2.2 million ha, is difficult because the birds are long-lived, sparse in the landscape and have large home ranges. Aerial surveys conducted to date provide an estimate with no measure of data dispersion, thence precision. The aim of this ...

  14. Size matters: how accurate is clinical estimation of traumatic wound size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, N; Stevenson, H; Sahni, V

    2014-01-01

    The presentation of traumatic wounds is commonplace in the accident & emergency department. Often, these wounds need referral to specialist care, e.g. trauma & orthopaedic, plastic or maxillofacial surgeons. Documentation and communication of the size of the wound can influence management, e.g. Gustilo & Anderson classification of open fractures. Several papers acknowledge the variability in measurement of chronic wounds, but there is no data regarding accuracy of traumatic wound assessment. The authors hypothesised that the estimation of wound size and subsequent communication or documentation was often inaccurate, with high inter-observer variability. A study was designed to assess this hypothesis. A total of 7 scaled images of wounds related to trauma were obtained from an Internet search engine. The questionnaire asked 3 questions regarding mechanism of injury, relevant anatomy and proposed treatment, to simulate real patient assessment. One further question addressed the estimation of wound size. 50 doctors of varying experience across several specialities were surveyed. The images were analysed after data collection had finished to provide appropriate measurements, and compared to the questionnaire results by a researcher blinded to the demographics of the individual. Our results show that there is a high inter-observer variability and inaccuracy in the estimation of wound size. This inaccuracy was directional and affected by gender. Male doctors were more likely to overestimate the size of wounds, whilst their female colleagues were more likely to underestimate size. The estimation of wound size is a common requirement of clinical practice, and inaccurate interpretation of size may influence surgical management. Assessment using estimation was inaccurate, with high inter-observer variability. Assessment of traumatic wounds that require surgical management should be accurately measured, possibly using photography and ruler measurement. Copyright © 2012

  15. On the estimation of ice thickness from scattering observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. D.; Squire, V. A.

    2010-04-01

    This paper is inspired by the proposition that it may be possible to extract descriptive physical parameters - in particular the ice thickness, of a sea-ice field from ocean wave information. The motivation is that mathematical theory describing wave propagation in such media has reached a point where the inherent heterogeneity, expressed as pressure ridge keels and sails, leads, thickness variations and changes of material property and draught, can be fully assimilated exactly or through approximations whose limitations are understood. On the basis that leads have the major wave scattering effect for most sea-ice [Williams, T.D., Squire, V.A., 2004. Oblique scattering of plane flexural-gravity waves by heterogeneities in sea ice. Proc. R. Soc. Lon. Ser.-A 460 (2052), 3469-3497], a model two dimensional sea-ice sheet composed of a large number of such features, randomly dispersed, is constructed. The wide spacing approximation is used to predict how wave trains of different period will be affected, after first establishing that this produces results that are very close to the exact solution. Like Kohout and Meylan [Kohout, A.L., Meylan, M.H., 2008. An elastic plate model for wave attenuation and ice floe breaking in the marginal ice zone. J. Geophys. Res. 113, C09016, doi:10.1029/2007JC004434], we find that on average the magnitude of a wave transmitted by a field of leads decays exponentially with the number of leads. Then, by fitting a curve based on this assumption to the data, the thickness of the ice sheet is obtained. The attenuation coefficient can always be calculated numerically by ensemble averaging but in some cases more rapidly computed approximations work extremely well. Moreover, it is found that the underlying thickness can be determined to good accuracy by the method as long as Archimedean draught is correctly provided for, suggesting that waves can indeed be effective as a remote sensing agent to measure ice thickness in areas where pressure ridges

  16. Local scattering property scales flow speed estimation in laser speckle contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Peng; Chao, Zhen; Feng, Shihan; Yu, Hang; Ji, Yuanyuan; Li, Nan; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2015-07-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has been widely used in in vivo blood flow imaging. However, the effect of local scattering property (scattering coefficient µ s ) on blood flow speed estimation has not been well investigated. In this study, such an effect was quantified and involved in relation between speckle autocorrelation time τ c and flow speed v based on simulation flow experiments. For in vivo blood flow imaging, an improved estimation strategy was developed to eliminate the estimation bias due to the inhomogeneous distribution of the scattering property. Compared to traditional LSCI, a new estimation method significantly suppressed the imaging noise and improves the imaging contrast of vasculatures. Furthermore, the new method successfully captured the blood flow changes and vascular constriction patterns in rats’ cerebral cortex from normothermia to mild and moderate hypothermia.

  17. Lithiasis size estimation variability depending on image technical methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles Salido, Enrique; Aguilar García, Jesús; Lozano-Blasco, Jose María; Subirá Rios, Jorge; Beardo Villar, Pastora; Campoy-Martínez, Pedro; Medina-López, Rafael A

    2013-11-01

    The lithiasic size is a determining factor in selecting the most suitable treatment, surgical or medical. However, the method for obtaining a reliable lithiasic size is not standardized. Our objetives are to determine the differences between the estimated lithiasic sizes shown by plain radiography test and by computerized axial tomography (CT) scan (using different techniques) in relation to the actual size, and to establish which is the ideal type of imaging for this purpose. We present an in vitro model with lithiasis obtained in cooperation with four centers. lithiasis >0.5 cm, intact, and visible via simple radiography. A sample of 245 lithiases was obtained, with 87 rejected as they did not fulfill the inclusion criteria. Initially the three main actual diameters of each lithiasis were measured with a calibrator, then a plain X-ray and a CT scan were taken of the samples to determine the surface size in cm(2) for simple radiography; surface size and volume in cm(3) for CT scan, in bone window and soft tissue (Toshiba Aquillion 64, sections of 0.5 mm, 120 Kv, 250 mA). The tomographic area was calculated by employing the formula recommended by the European Association of Urology and scanner software. The actual, radiographic and tomographic measurements were taken by three different researchers who were unaware of the results obtained by the each other. The statistics program IBM SPSS Statistics(®) 19 was used. Differences were analyzed using the Wilcoxon sign test. The bone window CT scan slightly overestimated the actual lithiasic size (0.12 vs. 0.17 cm(3)), while in soft tissue window the actual volume was practically doubled (0.12 vs. 0.21 cm(3)) (p lithiasis measurements can be estimated, although the craniocaudal diameter measurement will be overestimated. Using soft tissue window gives an overestimated size.

  18. Uniformity trial size in estimates of plot size in restrict areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Vanderlei Schwertner

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe aim of this study was to determine the uniformity trial size when estimating optimum plot size in order to evaluate fresh phytomass in lettuce plants and fruit weight in sweet peppers. Production data, collected in uniformity trial on lettuce in a plastic greenhouse in both summer and winter, lettuce in plastic tunnels in autumn and winter, and sweet pepper in a plastic greenhouse in the summer-autumn and spring-summer seasons, were used to plan different uniformity trial sizes in crop rows. In all the experiments, each plant was evaluated individually and considered as a basic experimental unit. For each size in a uniformity trial, 3,000 resamples, randomly taken with replacement, were used to estimate optimum plot size. Uniformity trial using 27 basic experimental units to evaluate the fresh phytomass of lettuce plants, and with 29 basic experimental units to assess fruit weight in sweet pepper, are sufficient to estimate optimum plot size, with an amplitude of the 95% confidence interval of less than or equal to two basic experimental units.

  19. Estimating the size of the leprosy problem: the Bangladesh experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardus, J H; Croft, R P

    1995-06-01

    Assessing the size of the leprosy problem in a country is an important but difficult issue for the purpose of programme planning. Different methods have been proposed but often estimates have proved to be very different from reality. We have attempted to address this issue in Bangladesh, a country where official estimates are more than 5 times greater than the registered number of leprosy cases. A combination of methods, including surveys, data from leprosy control programmes and local knowledge based on the Delphi techniques have been combined to construct an estimate of the total number of cases in Bangladesh. This figure (173,196) is only 10% greater than the official estimate (136,000). It will be possible over the next few years to see how close this figure is to reality through data obtained from the National Leprosy Control Programme which is now rapidly developing to cover the whole country.

  20. Scattering Properties of Jovian Tropospheric Cloud Particles from Cassini/ISS: Mie Scattering Phase Function and Particle Size in the South Tropical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takao M.; Satoh, T.; Kasaba, Y.

    2010-10-01

    It is essential to know scattering properties (e.g., scattering phase function) of clouds for determination of vertical cloud structure. However, we cannot derive those from ground-based and Earth-orbit observations because of the limitation of solar phase angle as viewed from the Earth. Then, most previous studies have used the scattering phase function deduced from the Pioneer 10/IPP data (blue: 440 nm, red: 640nm) [Tomasko et al., 1978]. There are two shortcomings in the Pioneer scattering phase function. One is that we have to use this scattering phase function at red as a substitute for analyses of imaging photometry using CH4 bands (center: 727 and 890 nm), although clouds should have wavelength dependency. The other is that the red pass band of IPP was so broad (595-720 nm) that this scattering phase function in red just show wavelength-averaged scattering properties of clouds. To provide a new reference scattering phase function with wavelength dependency, we have analyzed the Cassini/ISS data in BL1 (451 nm), CB1 (619 nm), CB2 (750 nm), and CB3 (938 nm) over wide solar phase angles (3-141 degrees) during its Jovian flyby in 2000-2001. A simple cloud model which consists of a thin stratospheric haze, a semi-infinite cloud, and an intervening Rayleigh gas layers is adopted. Applying Mie theory to scattering by clouds, we deduce the scattering phase function of cloud and effective particle size in the South Tropical Zone. When we use the nominal value of reflective index for ammonia ice (Martonchik et al., 1984), we cannot obtain reasonable fit to the observed limb-darkening profiles. This would imply that we should consider possible effects on the impurity and/or the nonsphericiy of clouds. In this presentation, we will show detail model description and these results. Finally, we discuss scattering properties of clouds through comparison with previous works.

  1. Estimation of Nanoparticle Size Distributions by Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Rune; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2000-01-01

    . In this paper, we present an automated image analysis technique based on a deformable ellipse model that can perform this task. Results of using this technique are shown for both nearly spherical particles and more irregularly shaped particles. The technique proves to be a very useful tool for nanoparticle......Knowledge of the nanoparticle size distribution is important for the interpretation of experimental results in many studies of nanoparticle properties. An automated method is needed for accurate and robust estimation of particle size distribution from nanoparticle images with thousands of particles...

  2. Mesh Size Effects on Fracture Toughness Estimation by Damage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Shin Beom; Chang, Yoon Suk; Kim, Young Jin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mesh size effects on fracture toughness of SA508 carbon steel by damage model. To achieve this goal, a series of finite element analyses are carried out for CT (compact tension) and PCVN (pre-cracked V-notch) specimens. And Weibull stress model are adopted to derive toughness scale diagram. Finally, toughness scale diagram, which considered crack-tip mesh size effects, is derived from comparing estimated fracture toughness data between CT and PCVN specimens under -60 .deg. C and -80 .deg. C.

  3. Application of cokriging techniques for the estimation of hail size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnell, Carme; Rigo, Tomeu; Martin-Vide, Javier

    2018-01-01

    There are primarily two ways of estimating hail size: the first is the direct interpolation of point observations, and the second is the transformation of remote sensing fields into measurements of hail properties. Both techniques have advantages and limitations as regards generating the resultant map of hail damage. This paper presents a new methodology that combines the above mentioned techniques in an attempt to minimise the limitations and take advantage of the benefits of interpolation and the use of remote sensing data. The methodology was tested for several episodes with good results being obtained for the estimation of hail size at practically all the points analysed. The study area presents a large database of hail episodes, and for this reason, it constitutes an optimal test bench.

  4. Radiation scattering field of small-size betatrons in nondestructive testing under non-stationary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bespalov, V.I.; Lunev, V.I.; Sedoj, A.G.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Shtejn, M.M. (Tomskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Ehlektronnoj Introskopii)

    1984-01-01

    Data on absorbed dose spatial distribution in the air in the vicinity of MIB-4 and TB-15 small-size betatrons are presented. A technique of measuring with the help of photographic and thermoluminescent dosimetry are described. The measurement error did not exceed 5%. The scattered radiation field configuration around an accelerator is found to be determined mainly by its design features. The dose field has a complicated form. But if one knows a particular shape of the field, it is possible to choose regions close to the betatron that are most safe for the personnel and equipment under a given regime of accelerator operation.

  5. Estimation of LOCA break size using cascaded Fuzzy neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Geon Pil; Yoo, Kwae Hwan; Back, Ju Hyun; Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Operators of nuclear power plants may not be equipped with sufficient information during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), which can be fatal, or they may not have sufficient time to analyze the information they do have, even if this information is adequate. It is not easy to predict the progression of LOCAs in nuclear power plants. Therefore, accurate information on the LOCA break position and size should be provided to efficiently manage the accident. In this paper, the LOCA break size is predicted using a cascaded fuzzy neural network (CFNN) model. The input data of the CFNN model are the time-integrated values of each measurement signal for an initial short-time interval after a reactor scram. The training of the CFNN model is accomplished by a hybrid method combined with a genetic algorithm and a least squares method. As a result, LOCA break size is estimated exactly by the proposed CFNN model.

  6. Estimation of LOCA Break Size Using Cascaded Fuzzy Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geon Pil Choi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Operators of nuclear power plants may not be equipped with sufficient information during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA, which can be fatal, or they may not have sufficient time to analyze the information they do have, even if this information is adequate. It is not easy to predict the progression of LOCAs in nuclear power plants. Therefore, accurate information on the LOCA break position and size should be provided to efficiently manage the accident. In this paper, the LOCA break size is predicted using a cascaded fuzzy neural network (CFNN model. The input data of the CFNN model are the time-integrated values of each measurement signal for an initial short-time interval after a reactor scram. The training of the CFNN model is accomplished by a hybrid method combined with a genetic algorithm and a least squares method. As a result, LOCA break size is estimated exactly by the proposed CFNN model.

  7. Estimating a distribution function of the tumor size at metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J L; Prorok, P C

    1998-09-01

    In studying the relationship between the size of primary cancers and the occurrence of metastases, two quantities are of prime importance. The first is the distribution of tumor size at the point of metastatic transition, while the second is the probability that detectable metastases are present when cancer comes to medical attention. Kimmel and Flehinger (1991, Biometrics 47, 987-1004) developed a general nonparametric model and studied its two limiting cases. Because of unidentifiablity of their general model, a new identifiable model is introduced by making the hazard function for detecting a metastatic cancer a constant. The new model includes Kimmel and Flehinger's (1991) second limiting model as a special case. An estimator of the tumor size distribution at metastases is proposed. The result is applied to a set of colorectal cancer data.

  8. Optical properties of individual nano-sized gold particle pairs. Mie-scattering, fluorescence, and Raman-scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olk, Phillip

    2008-07-01

    This thesis examines and exploits the optical properties of pairs of MNPs. Pairs of MNPs offer two further parameters not existent at single MNPs, which both affect the local optical fields in their vicinity: the distance between them, and their relative orientation with respect to the polarisation of the excitation light. These properties are subject of three chapters: One section examines the distance-dependent and orientation-sensitive scattering cross section (SCS) of two equally sized MNPs. Both near- and far-field interactions affect the spectral position and spectral width of the SCS. Far-field coupling affects the SCS even in such a way that a two-particle system may show both a blue- and redshifted SCS, depending only on the distance between the two MNPs. The maximum distance for this effect is the coherence length of the illumination source - a fact of importance for SCS-based experiments using laser sources. Another part of this thesis examines the near-field between two MNPs and the dependence of the locally enhanced field on the relative particle orientation with respect to the polarisation of the excitation light. To attain a figure of merit, the intensity of fluorescence light from dye molecules in the surrounding medium was measured at various directions of polarisation. The field enhancement was turned into fluorescence enhancement, even providing a means for sensing the presence of very small MNPs of 12 nm in diameter. In order to quantify the near-field experimentally, a different technique is devised in a third section of this thesis - scanning particle-enhanced Raman microscopy (SPRM). This device comprises a scanning probe carrying an MNP which in turn is coated with a molecule of known Raman signature. By manoeuvring this outfit MNP into the vicinity of an illuminated second MNP and by measuring the Raman signal intensity, a spatial mapping of the field enhancement was possible. (orig.)

  9. Reliability of fish size estimates obtained from multibeam imaging sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Joseph E.; Magowan, Kevin J.; Brown, Lori M.; Fox, Dewayne A.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam imaging sonars have considerable potential for use in fisheries surveys because the video-like images are easy to interpret, and they contain information about fish size, shape, and swimming behavior, as well as characteristics of occupied habitats. We examined images obtained using a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) multibeam sonar for Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus, striped bass Morone saxatilis, white perch M. americana, and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus of known size (20–141 cm) to determine the reliability of length estimates. For ranges up to 11 m, percent measurement error (sonar estimate – total length)/total length × 100 varied by species but was not related to the fish's range or aspect angle (orientation relative to the sonar beam). Least-square mean percent error was significantly different from 0.0 for Atlantic sturgeon (x̄  =  −8.34, SE  =  2.39) and white perch (x̄  = 14.48, SE  =  3.99) but not striped bass (x̄  =  3.71, SE  =  2.58) or channel catfish (x̄  = 3.97, SE  =  5.16). Underestimating lengths of Atlantic sturgeon may be due to difficulty in detecting the snout or the longer dorsal lobe of the heterocercal tail. White perch was the smallest species tested, and it had the largest percent measurement errors (both positive and negative) and the lowest percentage of images classified as good or acceptable. Automated length estimates for the four species using Echoview software varied with position in the view-field. Estimates tended to be low at more extreme azimuthal angles (fish's angle off-axis within the view-field), but mean and maximum estimates were highly correlated with total length. Software estimates also were biased by fish images partially outside the view-field and when acoustic crosstalk occurred (when a fish perpendicular to the sonar and at relatively close range is detected in the side lobes of adjacent beams). These sources of

  10. Design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope for particle sizing via goniometry and optical scatter imaging in transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Vincent M; Jacques, Steven L

    2016-06-13

    Goniometry and optical scatter imaging have been used for optical determination of particle size based upon optical scattering. Polystyrene microspheres in suspension serve as a standard for system validation purposes. The design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope (DFHM) are reported. Of crucial importance is the appropriate scaling of scattering angle space in the conjugate Fourier plane. A detailed description of this calibration process is described. Spatial filtering of the acquired digital hologram to use photons scattered within a restricted angular range produces an image. A pair of images, one using photons narrowly scattered within 8 - 15° (LNA), and one using photons broadly scattered within 8 - 39° (HNA), are produced. An image based on the ratio of these two images, OSIR = HNA/LNA, following Boustany et al. (2002), yields a 2D Optical Scatter Image (OSI) whose contrast is based on the angular dependence of photon scattering and is sensitive to the microsphere size, especially in the 0.5-1.0µm range. Goniometric results are also given for polystyrene microspheres in suspension as additional proof of principle for particle sizing via the DFHM.

  11. Characterization of a large glycoprotein proteoglycan by size-exclusion chromatography combined with light and X-ray scattering methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yasushi; Inoko, Yoji

    2013-08-16

    The molecular weight and chain conformation of a proteoglycan derived from shark cartilage in solution were characterized by size-exclusion chromatography combined with low-angle laser light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering methods. The total molecular weight of the proteoglycan was 3.9±0.2 million and the molecular weight of the main component was about 2.0±0.2 million. The X-ray scattering data revealed that the main components of the proteoglycan are nearly equal to a chain with excluded volume and their persistence lengths range from 13.5 to 16.4nm. These results show that size-exclusion chromatography combined with low-angle laser light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements are complementarily useful for characterization of large biopolymers in solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Surfactant size effect on surface-enhanced Raman scattering intensity from silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Doo Ri; Chang, Sung-Jin; Huh, Yun Suk; Han, Young-Kyu; Lee, You-Jin; Yi, Gi-Ra; Kim, Soohyun; Lee, Gaehang

    2013-08-01

    We report on the synthesis of two types of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and the influence of adsorbed surfactant size on the NP surface for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals. Both particles were of similar size and morphology but were covered by surfactants of different sizes; one surfactant was sodium citrate (molecular weight: 258) and the other was sodium polyacrylate (molecular weight: 2100). For SERS measurement, 4-mecapobenzoic acid and 4-naphthalene thiol as Raman-active dyes were immobilized on the surface of each AgNP. The signals from Raman-active dyes on AgNPs covered with citrate displayed 10 times higher intensity than those from polyacrylate-stabilized AgNPs. Elemental analysis (EA) revealed that the average weight percentage of sulfur is 0.94 wt% and 0.12 wt% for citrate-stabilized and polyacrylate-stabilized AgNPs, respectively. The sulfur content difference was attributed to the size of the existing surfactant influencing the ligand exchange by steric hindrance and subsequently the amount of sulfur content of the particles. These experimental results suggest that the size of initial surfactant should be taken into account when synthesizing a metal particle for enhancing SERS signal.

  13. Particle size distribution: A key factor in estimating powder dustiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Lilao, Ana; Sanfélix Forner, Vicenta; Mallol Gasch, Gustavo; Monfort Gimeno, Eliseo

    2017-12-01

    A wide variety of raw materials, involving more than 20 samples of quartzes, feldspars, nephelines, carbonates, dolomites, sands, zircons, and alumina, were selected and characterised. Dustiness, i.e., a materials' tendency to generate dust on handling, was determined using the continuous drop method. These raw materials were selected to encompass a wide range of particle sizes (1.6-294 µm) and true densities (2650-4680 kg/m 3 ). The dustiness of the raw materials, i.e., their tendency to generate dust on handling, was determined using the continuous drop method. The influence of some key material parameters (particle size distribution, flowability, and specific surface area) on dustiness was assessed. In this regard, dustiness was found to be significantly affected by particle size distribution. Data analysis enabled development of a model for predicting the dustiness of the studied materials, assuming that dustiness depended on the particle fraction susceptible to emission and on the bulk material's susceptibility to release these particles. On the one hand, the developed model allows the dustiness mechanisms to be better understood. In this regard, it may be noted that relative emission increased with mean particle size. However, this did not necessarily imply that dustiness did, because dustiness also depended on the fraction of particles susceptible to be emitted. On the other hand, the developed model enables dustiness to be estimated using just the particle size distribution data. The quality of the fits was quite good and the fact that only particle size distribution data are needed facilitates industrial application, since these data are usually known by raw materials managers, thus making additional tests unnecessary. This model may therefore be deemed a key tool in drawing up efficient preventive and/or corrective measures to reduce dust emissions during bulk powder processing, both inside and outside industrial facilities. It is recommended, however

  14. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy techniques for size determination of polyurethane nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giehl Zanetti-Ramos, Betina [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)], E-mail: betinagzramos@pq.cnpq.br; Beddin Fritzen-Garcia, Mauricia [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil); Schweitzer de Oliveira, Cristian; Avelino Pasa, Andre [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficie, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Soldi, Valdir [Grupo de Estudos em Materiais Polimericos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borsali, Redouane [Centre de Recherche sur les Macromolecules Vegetales CERMAV/CNRS, 38041 - Grenoble (France); Creczynski-Pasa, Tania Beatriz [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)

    2009-03-01

    Nanoparticles have applications in various industrial fields principally in drug delivery. Nowadays, there are several processes for manufacturing colloidal polymeric systems and methods of preparation as well as of characterization. In this work, Dynamic Light Scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy techniques were used to characterize polyurethane nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by miniemulsion technique. The lipophilic monomers, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and natural triol, were emulsified in water containing surfactant. In some formulations the poly(ethylene glycol) was used as co-monomer to obtain the hydrophilic and pegylated nanoparticles. Polyurethane nanoparticles observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) were spherical with diameter around 209 nm for nanoparticles prepared without PEG. From AFM imaging two populations of nanoparticles were observed in the formulation prepared with PEG (218 and 127 nm) while dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed a monodisperse size distribution around 250 nm of diameters for both formulations. The polydispersity index of the formulations and the experimental procedures could influence the particle size determination with these techniques.

  15. Elastodynamic wave scattering by finite-sized resonant scatterers at the surface of a horizontally layered halfspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombaert, Geert; Clouteau, Didier

    2009-04-01

    The present paper deals with the multiple scattering by randomly distributed elastodynamic systems at the surface of a horizontally layered elastic halfspace due to an incident plane wave. Instead of solving this problem for a particular configuration of the system, multiple scattering theory is used to compute the ensemble response statistics. The Dyson equation is used to calculate the mean field, while the nonstationary second order statistics are obtained by means of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. This allows for the determination of the mean square response of the system in the time and frequency domains. This model is used to study multiple scattering between buildings under seismic excitation. The influence of multiple scattering on the seismic site response is verified. Furthermore, the influence of the footprint and the damping of the buildings are investigated. The results are compared to results of a coupled finite element/boundary element solution for a group of buildings.

  16. WE-EF-207-10: Striped Ratio Grids: A New Concept for Scatter Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, S [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a new method for estimating scatter in x-ray imaging. We propose the “striped ratio grid,” an anti-scatter grid with alternating stripes of high scatter rejection (attained, for example, by high grid ratio) and low scatter rejection. To minimize artifacts, stripes are oriented parallel to the direction of the ramp filter. Signal discontinuities at the boundaries between stripes provide information on local scatter content, although these discontinuities are contaminated by variation in primary radiation. Methods: We emulated a striped ratio grid by imaging phantoms with two sequential CT scans, one with and one without a conventional grid, and processed them together to mimic a striped ratio grid. Two phantoms were scanned with the emulated striped ratio grid and compared with a conventional anti-scatter grid and a fan-beam acquisition, which served as ground truth. A nonlinear image processing algorithm was developed to mitigate the problem of primary variation. Results: The emulated striped ratio grid reduced scatter more effectively than the conventional grid alone. Contrast is thereby improved in projection imaging. In CT imaging, cupping is markedly reduced. Artifacts introduced by the striped ratio grid appear to be minimal. Conclusion: Striped ratio grids could be a simple and effective evolution of conventional anti-scatter grids. Unlike several other approaches currently under investigation for scatter management, striped ratio grids require minimal computation, little new hardware (at least for systems which already use removable grids) and impose few assumptions on the nature of the object being scanned.

  17. Estimation of individual reference intervals in small sample sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ase Marie; Garde, Anne Helene; Eller, Nanna Hurwitz

    2007-01-01

    In occupational health studies, the study groups most often comprise healthy subjects performing their work. Sampling is often planned in the most practical way, e.g., sampling of blood in the morning at the work site just after the work starts. Optimal use of reference intervals requires...... of that order of magnitude for all topics in question. Therefore, new methods to estimate reference intervals for small sample sizes are needed. We present an alternative method based on variance component models. The models are based on data from 37 men and 84 women taking into account biological variation...... presented in this study. The presented method enables occupational health researchers to calculate reference intervals for specific groups, i.e. smokers versus non-smokers, etc. In conclusion, the variance component models provide an appropriate tool to estimate reference intervals based on small sample...

  18. Estimating Functions of Distributions Defined over Spaces of Unknown Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Wolpert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider Bayesian estimation of information-theoretic quantities from data, using a Dirichlet prior. Acknowledging the uncertainty of the event space size m and the Dirichlet prior’s concentration parameter c, we treat both as random variables set by a hyperprior. We show that the associated hyperprior, P(c, m, obeys a simple “Irrelevance of Unseen Variables” (IUV desideratum iff P(c, m = P(cP(m. Thus, requiring IUV greatly reduces the number of degrees of freedom of the hyperprior. Some information-theoretic quantities can be expressed multiple ways, in terms of different event spaces, e.g., mutual information. With all hyperpriors (implicitly used in earlier work, different choices of this event space lead to different posterior expected values of these information-theoretic quantities. We show that there is no such dependence on the choice of event space for a hyperprior that obeys IUV. We also derive a result that allows us to exploit IUV to greatly simplify calculations, like the posterior expected mutual information or posterior expected multi-information. We also use computer experiments to favorably compare an IUV-based estimator of entropy to three alternative methods in common use. We end by discussing how seemingly innocuous changes to the formalization of an estimation problem can substantially affect the resultant estimates of posterior expectations.

  19. Estimates of the Spectral Aerosol Single Sea Scattering Albedo and Aerosol Radiative Effects during SAFARI 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Pilewskie, Peter; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.

    2003-01-01

    Using measurements of the spectral solar radiative flux and optical depth for 2 days (24 August and 6 September 2000) during the SAFARI 2000 intensive field experiment and a detailed radiative transfer model, we estimate the spectral single scattering albedo of the aerosol layer. The single scattering albedo is similar on the 2 days even though the optical depth for the aerosol layer was quite different. The aerosol single scattering albedo was between 0.85 and 0.90 at 350 nm, decreasing to 0.6 in the near infrared. The magnitude and decrease with wavelength of the single scattering albedo are consistent with the absorption properties of small black carbon particles. We estimate the uncertainty in the single scattering albedo due to the uncertainty in the measured fractional absorption and optical depths. The uncertainty in the single scattering albedo is significantly less on the high-optical-depth day (6 September) than on the low-optical-depth day (24 August). On the high-optical-depth day, the uncertainty in the single scattering albedo is 0.02 in the midvisible whereas on the low-optical-depth day the uncertainty is 0.08 in the midvisible. On both days, the uncertainty becomes larger in the near infrared. We compute the radiative effect of the aerosol by comparing calculations with and without the aerosol. The effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is to cool the atmosphere by 13 W/sq m on 24 August and 17 W/sq m on 6 September. The effect on the downward flux at the surface is a reduction of 57 W/sq m on 24 August and 200 W/sq m on 6 September. The aerosol effect on the downward flux at the surface is in good agreement with the results reported from the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX).

  20. Variance component estimates for alternative litter size traits in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, A M; Tiezzi, F; Maltecca, C; Gray, K A; Knauer, M T

    2015-11-01

    Litter size at d 5 (LS5) has been shown to be an effective trait to increase total number born (TNB) while simultaneously decreasing preweaning mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal litter size day for selection (i.e., other than d 5). Traits included TNB, number born alive (NBA), litter size at d 2, 5, 10, 30 (LS2, LS5, LS10, LS30, respectively), litter size at weaning (LSW), number weaned (NW), piglet mortality at d 30 (MortD30), and average piglet birth weight (BirthWt). Litter size traits were assigned to biological litters and treated as a trait of the sow. In contrast, NW was the number of piglets weaned by the nurse dam. Bivariate animal models included farm, year-season, and parity as fixed effects. Number born alive was fit as a covariate for BirthWt. Random effects included additive genetics and the permanent environment of the sow. Variance components were plotted for TNB, NBA, and LS2 to LS30 using univariate animal models to determine how variances changed over time. Additive genetic variance was minimized at d 7 in Large White and at d 14 in Landrace pigs. Total phenotypic variance for litter size traits decreased over the first 10 d and then stabilized. Heritability estimates increased between TNB and LS30. Genetic correlations between TNB, NBA, and LS2 to LS29 with LS30 plateaued within the first 10 d. A genetic correlation with LS30 of 0.95 was reached at d 4 for Large White and at d 8 for Landrace pigs. Heritability estimates ranged from 0.07 to 0.13 for litter size traits and MortD30. Birth weight had an h of 0.24 and 0.26 for Large White and Landrace pigs, respectively. Genetic correlations among LS30, LSW, and NW ranged from 0.97 to 1.00. In the Large White breed, genetic correlations between MortD30 with TNB and LS30 were 0.23 and -0.64, respectively. These correlations were 0.10 and -0.61 in the Landrace breed. A high genetic correlation of 0.98 and 0.97 was observed between LS10 and NW for Large White and

  1. Size And Shape of Detergent Micelles Determined By Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, Jan; Columbus, Linda; Chu, Vincent B.; Lesley, Scott A.; Doniach, Sebastian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL /Pasteur Inst., Paris /Scripps Res. Inst. /Novartis Res. Found.

    2009-04-29

    We present a systematic analysis of the aggregation number and shape of micelles formed by nine detergents commonly used in the study of membrane proteins. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements are reported for glucosides with 8 and 9 alkyl carbons (OG/NG), maltosides and phosphocholines with 10 and 12 alkyl carbons (DM/DDM and FC-10/FC-12), 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine (DHPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (LPPG), and 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate (CHAPS). The SAXS intensities are well described by two-component ellipsoid models, with a dense outer shell corresponding to the detergent head groups and a less electron dense hydrophobic core. These models provide an intermediate resolution view of micelle size and shape. In addition, we show that Guinier analysis of the forward scattering intensity can be used to obtain an independent and model-free measurement of the micelle aggregation number and radius of gyration. This approach has the advantage of being easily generalizable to protein-detergent complexes, where simple geometric models are inapplicable. Furthermore, we have discovered that the position of the second maximum in the scattering intensity provides a direct measurement of the characteristic head group-head group spacing across the micelle core. Our results for the micellar aggregation numbers and dimensions agree favorably with literature values as far as they are available. We de novo determine the shape of FC-10, FC-12, DM, LPPG, and CHAPS micelles and the aggregation numbers of FC-10 and OG to be ca. 50 and 250, respectively. Combined, these data provide a comprehensive view of the determinants of micelle formation and serve as a starting point to correlate detergent properties with detergent-protein interactions.

  2. UAV remote sensing atmospheric degradation image restoration based on multiple scattering APSF estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiang; Dai, Ming; Yin, Chuan-li

    2017-09-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) remote imaging is affected by the bad weather, and the obtained images have the disadvantages of low contrast, complex texture and blurring. In this paper, we propose a blind deconvolution model based on multiple scattering atmosphere point spread function (APSF) estimation to recovery the remote sensing image. According to Narasimhan analytical theory, a new multiple scattering restoration model is established based on the improved dichromatic model. Then using the L0 norm sparse priors of gradient and dark channel to estimate APSF blur kernel, the fast Fourier transform is used to recover the original clear image by Wiener filtering. By comparing with other state-of-the-art methods, the proposed method can correctly estimate blur kernel, effectively remove the atmospheric degradation phenomena, preserve image detail information and increase the quality evaluation indexes.

  3. Matched, mismatched, and robust scatter matrix estimation and hypothesis testing in complex t-distributed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunati, Stefano; Gini, Fulvio; Greco, Maria S.

    2016-12-01

    Scatter matrix estimation and hypothesis testing are fundamental inference problems in a wide variety of signal processing applications. In this paper, we investigate and compare the matched, mismatched, and robust approaches to solve these problems in the context of the complex elliptically symmetric (CES) distributions. The matched approach is when the estimation and detection algorithms are tailored on the correct data distribution, whereas the mismatched approach refers to the case when the scatter matrix estimator and the decision rule are derived under a model assumption that is not correct. The robust approach aims at providing good estimation and detection performance, even if suboptimal, over a large set of possible data models, irrespective of the actual data distribution. Specifically, due to its central importance in both the statistical and engineering applications, we assume for the input data a complex t-distribution. We analyze scatter matrix estimators derived under the three different approaches and compare their mean square error (MSE) with the constrained Cramér-Rao bound (CCRB) and the constrained misspecified Cramér-Rao bound (CMCRB). In addition, the detection performance and false alarm rate (FAR) of the various detection algorithms are compared with that of the clairvoyant optimum detector.

  4. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of locally advanced breast cancer by estimation of its scatterer properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadayyon, Hadi [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory, E-mail: Gregory.Czarnota@sunnybrook.ca [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1P5 (Canada); Wirtzfeld, Lauren [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Wright, Frances C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Tumor grading is an important part of breast cancer diagnosis and currently requires biopsy as its standard. Here, the authors investigate quantitative ultrasound parameters in locally advanced breast cancers that can potentially separate tumors from normal breast tissue and differentiate tumor grades. Methods: Ultrasound images and radiofrequency data from 42 locally advanced breast cancer patients were acquired and analyzed. Parameters related to the linear regression of the power spectrum—midband fit, slope, and 0-MHz-intercept—were determined from breast tumors and normal breast tissues. Mean scatterer spacing was estimated from the spectral autocorrelation, and the effective scatterer diameter and effective acoustic concentration were estimated from the Gaussian form factor. Parametric maps of each quantitative ultrasound parameter were constructed from the gated radiofrequency segments in tumor and normal tissue regions of interest. In addition to the mean values of the parametric maps, higher order statistical features, computed from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were also determined and used for characterization. Finally, linear and quadratic discriminant analyses were performed using combinations of quantitative ultrasound parameters to classify breast tissues. Results: Quantitative ultrasound parameters were found to be statistically different between tumor and normal tissue (p < 0.05). The combination of effective acoustic concentration and mean scatterer spacing could separate tumor from normal tissue with 82% accuracy, while the addition of effective scatterer diameter to the combination did not provide significant improvement (83% accuracy). Furthermore, the two advanced parameters, including effective scatterer diameter and mean scatterer spacing, were found to be statistically differentiating among grade I, II, and III tumors (p = 0.014 for scatterer spacing, p = 0.035 for effective scatterer diameter). The separation of the tumor

  5. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Anthony J.; Prebble, Clare E.M.; Marshall, Andrea D.; Bennett, Michael B.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P.; Pierce, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432–917 cm total length (TL) (mean ± SD = 673 ± 118.8 cm, N = 122) in southern Mozambique and from 420–990 cm TL (mean ± SD = 641 ± 133 cm, N = 46) in Tanzania. By combining measurements of stranded individuals with photogrammetry measurements of free-swimming sharks, we calculated length at 50% maturity for males in Mozambique at 916 cm TL. Repeat measurements of individual whale sharks measured over periods from 347–1,068 days yielded implausible growth rates, suggesting that the growth increment over this period was not large enough to be detected using laser photogrammetry, and that the method is best applied to estimating growth rates over longer (decadal) time periods. The sex ratio of both populations was biased towards males (74% in Mozambique, 89% in Tanzania), the majority of which were immature (98% in Mozambique, 94% in Tanzania). The population structure for these two aggregations was similar to most other documented whale shark aggregations around the world. Information on small (sharks, mature individuals, and females in this region is lacking, but necessary to inform conservation initiatives for this globally threatened species. PMID:25870776

  6. Size validity of plasma-metamaterial cloaking monitored by scattering wave in finite-difference time-domain method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambina, Alexandre; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Iwai, Akinori; Miyagi, Shigeyuki; Sakai, Osamu

    2018-01-01

    Limitation of the cloak-size reduction is investigated numerically by a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. A metallic pole that imitates an antenna is cloaked with an anisotropic and parameter-gradient medium against electromagnetic-wave propagation in microwave range. The cloaking structure is a metamaterial submerged in a plasma confined in a vacuum chamber made of glass. The smooth-permittivity plasma can be compressed in the radial direction, which enables us to decrease the size of the cloak. Theoretical analysis is performed numerically by comparing scattering waves in various cases; there exists a high reduction of the scattering wave when the radius of the cloak is larger than a quarter of one wavelength. This result indicates that the required size of the cloaking layer is more than an object scale in the Rayleigh scattering regime.

  7. Information-weighted constrained regularization for particle size distribution recovery in multiangle dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Shen, Jin; Thomas, John C; Huang, Yu; Zhu, Xinjun; Clementi, Luis A; Vega, Jorge R

    2018-01-08

    In particle size measurement with dynamic light scattering (DLS), it is difficult to get an accurate recovery of a bimodal particle size distribution (PSD) with a peak position ratio less than ~2:1, especially when large particles (>350nm) are present. This is due to the inherent noise in the autocorrelation function (ACF) data and the scarce utilization of PSD information during the inversion process. In this paper, the PSD information distribution in the ACF data is investigated. It was found that the initial decay section of the ACF contains more information, especially for a bimodal PSD. Based on this, an information-weighted constrained regularization (IWCR) method is proposed in this paper and applied in multiangle DLS analysis for bimodal PSD recovery. By using larger (or smaller) coefficients for weighting the ACF data, more (or less) weight can then be given to the initial part of the ACF. In this way, the IWCR method can enhance utilization of the PSD information in the ACF data, and effectively weaken the effect of noise at large delay time on PSD recovery. Using this method, bimodal PSDs (with nominal diameters of 400:608 nm, 448:608 nm, 500:600 nm) were recovered successfully from simulated data and it appears that the IWCR method can improve the recovery resolution for closely spaced bimodal particles. Results of the PSD recovery from experimental DLS data confirm the performance of this method.

  8. Light propagation in finite-sized photonic crystals: multiple scattering using an electric field integral equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We present an accurate, stable, and efficient solution to the Lippmann–Schwinger equation for electromagnetic scattering in two dimensions. The method is well suited for multiple scattering problems and may be applied to problems with scatterers of arbitrary shape or non-homogenous background mat...

  9. Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd BenDor

    Full Text Available Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration. This debate has occurred in the absence of broad-scale empirical research on economic output and employment resulting from environmental restoration, restoration-related conservation, and mitigation actions - the activities that are part of what we term the "restoration economy." In this article, we provide a high-level accounting of the size and scope of the restoration economy in terms of employment, value added, and overall economic output on a national scale. We conducted a national survey of businesses that participate in restoration work in order to estimate the total sales and number of jobs directly associated with the restoration economy, and to provide a profile of this nascent sector in terms of type of restoration work, industrial classification, workforce needs, and growth potential. We use survey results as inputs into a national input-output model (IMPLAN 3.1 in order to estimate the indirect and induced economic impacts of restoration activities. Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales annually. This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business linkages and increased household spending.

  10. Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenDor, Todd; Lester, T William; Livengood, Avery; Davis, Adam; Yonavjak, Logan

    2015-01-01

    Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration. This debate has occurred in the absence of broad-scale empirical research on economic output and employment resulting from environmental restoration, restoration-related conservation, and mitigation actions - the activities that are part of what we term the "restoration economy." In this article, we provide a high-level accounting of the size and scope of the restoration economy in terms of employment, value added, and overall economic output on a national scale. We conducted a national survey of businesses that participate in restoration work in order to estimate the total sales and number of jobs directly associated with the restoration economy, and to provide a profile of this nascent sector in terms of type of restoration work, industrial classification, workforce needs, and growth potential. We use survey results as inputs into a national input-output model (IMPLAN 3.1) in order to estimate the indirect and induced economic impacts of restoration activities. Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales) annually. This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business) linkages and increased household spending.

  11. Estimation of Raindrop size Distribution over Darjeeling (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shyam; Mitra, Amitabha

    2016-07-01

    A study of rain drop size distribution (DSD) model over Darjeeling (27001'N, 88015'E), India, has been carried out using a Micro Rain Radar (MRR). In this article on the basis of MRR which measured DSD (number of rain drop size and rain rates with the time interval of one minute), at the particular heights and the different rain rates. It starts the simulating data for using the general formula moment of the gamma DSD; however, Applying the method by DSD model of exponential, lognormal, and gamma, to check the true estimation of drop size distributions and it has been estimated by the lower order moments and higher order moments for gamma Distributions. It shows the DSD at different altitudes from 150 m to 2000 m, in the vertical steps of 500 m. however it has been simulated the DSD data about 2 km out of 4.5 km. (I). At the height of 150 m where most of DSD behaves gamma Distributions according to the moments order of low and the moments order of high, However, where occupying low concentrations for any rain rates, (ii). Upper altitudes from 450 m to 2000 m as where as shown most of DSD behaves gamma Distributions according to the moments order of high only, However, where occupying high concentrations for any rain rates. DSD at the altitudes of 2 km and even more 4.5 km (as not shown) but every height behaves more or less similar manner except at the height of 150 m, The DSD of empirical model has been derived on the basis of fit parameters evaluated from experimental data. It is observed that data fits well in gamma distribution for Darjeeling. And relation between slope (ΛɅ) and shape (μµ) which bears the best resemblance at the height of 150m (ground surface) at the lower order moments by the linear fit for any rain rates. In higher altitudes obtained where shape (μ) and slope (ΛɅ) which is not making any resemblance by the linear fit or polynomial fit for any rain rates in Darjeeling.

  12. Electromagnetic scattering on fractional Brownian surfaces and estimation of the Hurst exponent

    OpenAIRE

    Guérin, Charles-Antoine; Saillard, Marc

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Fractional Brownian motion is known to be a realistic model for many natural rough surfaces. It is defined by means of a single parameter, the Hurst exponent, which determines the fractal characteristics of the surface. We propose a method to estimate the Hurst exponent of a fractional Brownian profile from the electromagnetic scattering data. The method is developed in the framework of three usual approximations, with different domains of validity: the Kirchhoff appro...

  13. Sample Size Calculations for Population Size Estimation Studies Using Multiplier Methods With Respondent-Driven Sampling Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Elizabeth; Chabata, Sungai T; Thompson, Jennifer A; Cowan, Frances M; Hargreaves, James R

    2017-09-14

    While guidance exists for obtaining population size estimates using multiplier methods with respondent-driven sampling surveys, we lack specific guidance for making sample size decisions. To guide the design of multiplier method population size estimation studies using respondent-driven sampling surveys to reduce the random error around the estimate obtained. The population size estimate is obtained by dividing the number of individuals receiving a service or the number of unique objects distributed (M) by the proportion of individuals in a representative survey who report receipt of the service or object (P). We have developed an approach to sample size calculation, interpreting methods to estimate the variance around estimates obtained using multiplier methods in conjunction with research into design effects and respondent-driven sampling. We describe an application to estimate the number of female sex workers in Harare, Zimbabwe. There is high variance in estimates. Random error around the size estimate reflects uncertainty from M and P, particularly when the estimate of P in the respondent-driven sampling survey is low. As expected, sample size requirements are higher when the design effect of the survey is assumed to be greater. We suggest a method for investigating the effects of sample size on the precision of a population size estimate obtained using multipler methods and respondent-driven sampling. Uncertainty in the size estimate is high, particularly when P is small, so balancing against other potential sources of bias, we advise researchers to consider longer service attendance reference periods and to distribute more unique objects, which is likely to result in a higher estimate of P in the respondent-driven sampling survey.

  14. Estimation of aerosol mass scattering efficiencies under high mass loading: case study for the megacity of Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhen; Jiang, Jingkun; Chen, Changhong; Gao, Jian; Wang, Shuxiao; Watson, John G; Wang, Hongli; Deng, Jianguo; Wang, Buying; Zhou, Min; Chow, Judith C; Pitchford, Marc L; Hao, Jiming

    2015-01-20

    Aerosol mass scattering efficiency (MSE), used for the scattering coefficient apportionment of aerosol species, is often studied under the condition of low aerosol mass loading in developed countries. Severe pollution episodes with high particle concentration frequently happened in eastern urban China in recent years. Based on synchronous measurement of aerosol physical, chemical, and optical properties at the megacity of Shanghai for two months during autumn 2012, we studied MSE characteristics at high aerosol mass loading. Their relationships with mass concentrations and size distributions were examined. It was found that MSE values from the original US IMPROVE algorithm could not represent the actual aerosol characteristics in eastern China. It results in an underestimation of the measured ambient scattering coefficient by 36%. MSE values in Shanghai were estimated to be 3.5 ± 0.55 m(2)/g for ammonia sulfate, 4.3 ± 0.63 m(2)/g for ammonia nitrate, and 4.5 ± 0.73 m(2)/g for organic matter, respectively. MSEs for three components increased rapidly with increasing mass concentration in low aerosol mass loading, then kept at a stable level after a threshold mass concentration of 12–24 μg/m(3). During severe pollution episodes, particle growth from an initial peak diameter of 200–300 nm to a peak diameter of 500–600 nm accounts for the rapid increase in MSEs at high aerosol mass loading, that is, particle diameter becomes closer to the wavelength of visible lights. This study provides insights of aerosol scattering properties at high aerosol concentrations and implies the necessity of MSE localization for extinction apportionment, especially for the polluted regions.

  15. Scattering Properties of Jovian Tropospheric Cloud Particles Inferred from Cassini/ISS: Mie Scattering Phase Function and Particle Size in South Tropical Zone III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Satoh, T.; Kasaba, Y.

    2010-12-01

    nm), CB2 (750 nm), and CB3 (938 nm) over wide solar phase angles (3-141 degrees) during its Jovian flyby in 2000-2001. A simple cloud model which consists of a thin stratospheric haze, a semi-infinite cloud, and an intervening Rayleigh gas layers is adopted. Applying Mie theory to scattering by clouds, we deduce the scattering phase function of cloud and effective particle size in the South Tropical Zone. When we use the nominal value of reflective index for ammonia ice (Martonchik et al., 1984), we cannot obtain reasonable fit to the observed limb-darkening profiles. This would imply that we should consider possible effects on the impurity and/or the nonsphericiy of clouds. In this presentation, we will show detail model description and these results. Finally, we discuss scattering properties of clouds through comparison with previous works.

  16. ESTIMATING SOIL PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION FOR SICILIAN SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bagarello

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil particle-size distribution (PSD is commonly used for soil classification and for estimating soil behavior. An accurate mathematical representation of the PSD is required to estimate soil hydraulic properties and to compare texture measurements from different classification systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Haverkamp and Parlange (HP and Fredlund et al. (F PSD models to fit 243 measured PSDs from a wide range of 38 005_Bagarello(547_33 18-11-2009 11:55 Pagina 38 soil textures in Sicily and to test the effect of the number of measured particle diameters on the fitting of the theoretical PSD. For each soil textural class, the best fitting performance, established using three statistical indices (MXE, ME, RMSE, was obtained for the F model with three fitting parameters. In particular, this model performed better in the fine-textured soils than the coarse-textured ones but a good performance (i.e., RMSE < 0.03 was detected for the majority of the investigated soil textural classes, i.e. clay, silty-clay, silty-clay-loam, silt-loam, clay-loam, loamy-sand, and loam classes. Decreasing the number of measured data pairs from 14 to eight determined a worse fitting of the theoretical distribution to the measured one. It was concluded that the F model with three fitting parameters has a wide applicability for Sicilian soils and that the comparison of different PSD investigations can be affected by the number of measured data pairs.

  17. Non-regularized inversion method from light scattering applied to ferrofluid magnetization curves for magnetic size distribution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijssel, Jos van; Kuipers, Bonny W.M.; Erné, Ben H., E-mail: B.H.Erne@uu.nl

    2014-03-15

    A numerical inversion method known from the analysis of light scattering by colloidal dispersions is now applied to magnetization curves of ferrofluids. The distribution of magnetic particle sizes or dipole moments is determined without assuming that the distribution is unimodal or of a particular shape. The inversion method enforces positive number densities via a non-negative least squares procedure. It is tested successfully on experimental and simulated data for ferrofluid samples with known multimodal size distributions. The created computer program MINORIM is made available on the web. - Highlights: • A method from light scattering is applied to analyze ferrofluid magnetization curves. • A magnetic size distribution is obtained without prior assumption of its shape. • The method is tested successfully on ferrofluids with a known size distribution. • The practical limits of the method are explored with simulated data including noise. • This method is implemented in the program MINORIM, freely available online.

  18. Determining Sample Size for Accurate Estimation of the Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algina, James; Olejnik, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Discusses determining sample size for estimation of the squared multiple correlation coefficient and presents regression equations that permit determination of the sample size for estimating this parameter for up to 20 predictor variables. (SLD)

  19. Taphonomy of child-sized remains: a study of scattering and scavenging in Virginia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Robert J; Lord, Wayne D

    2006-05-01

    Child-sized pig carcasses (Sus scrofa) were placed in surface deposit and buried scenarios in a wooded area of Virginia from May 1998 through December 2000, to examine the taphonomic effects of decompositional changes, predator scavenging, and the extent of remains scattering. Changes were observed through on-site examination, charting of remains, and recorded video imaging. Analysis of data revealed that utilization of corpses as food sources by vertebrates was dependent upon invertebrate colonization. Vertebrates avoided feeding on the corpses while invertebrate colonization was active, and would feed before invertebrates successfully colonized a corpse, or would wait until the invertebrate populations migrated away from the corpse. Among vertebrates, there was no apparent succession order for the animals utilizing the remains as a food source. Different vertebrates would feed at different times based upon diurnal or nocturnal predilection. Analysis noted an accidental cooperative relationship between the invertebrates and vertebrates scavenging on the corpses. Certain vertebrates gained access to the internal tissues by utilizing openings in the corpses caused by invertebrate and other vertebrate scavenging. Alternately, carrion-frequenting insects were afforded access to previously inaccessible colonization sites as a result of scavenging vertebrate activities.

  20. On the correct estimation of gap fraction: how to remove scattering effects in the gap fraction measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Welles, J.; Norman, J.

    2011-12-01

    Correct estimation of gap fraction is essential to quantify canopy architectural variables such as leaf area index and clumping index, which mainly control land-atmosphere interactions. However, gap fraction measurements from optical sensors are contaminated by scattered radiation by canopy and ground surface. In this study, we propose a simple invertible bidirectional transmission model to remove scattering effects from gap fraction measurements. The model shows that 1) scattering factor appears highest where leaf area index is 1-2 in non-clumped canopy, 2) relative scattering factor (scattering factor/measured gap fraction) increases with leaf area index, 3) bright land surface (e.g. snow and bright soil) can contribute a significant scattering factor, 4) the scattering factor is not marginal even in highly diffused sky condition. By incorporating the model with LAI2200 data collected in an open savanna ecosystem, we find that the scattering factor causes significant underestimation of leaf area index (25%) and significant overestimation of clumping index (6 %). The results highlight that some LAI-2000-based LAI estimates from around the world may be underestimated, particularly in highly clumped broad-leaf canopies. Fortunately, the importance of scattering could be assessed with software from LICOR, Inc., which will incorporate the scattering model from this study in a post processing mode after data has been collected by a LAI-2000 or LAI-2200.

  1. Deeply Virtual Compton scattering at CERN. What is the size of the proton?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joerg, Philipp

    2017-04-27

    Tremendous efforts have been made to understand the Englert-Brout-Higgs-Guralnik-Hagen-Kibble mechanism, which led to the successful discovery of the Higgs Boson and the clarification of the origin of the mass of fundamental particles. However, it is often forgotten that the vast majority of visible matter is given by baryons, which gain most of their mass dynamically within poorly known non-perturbative quantum chromodynamics processes. The best laboratory to study the underlying mechanisms of non-perturbative quantum chromodynamics is still given by the nucleon and the central question of how the macroscopic properties of a nucleon like its mass, spin and size can be comprehensively decomposed into the microscopic description in terms of quarks, antiquarks and gluons remains still open. A major part of the COMPASS-II program is dedicated to the investigation of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), which aim for the most complete description of the partonic structure of the nucleon, comprising both, spacial and kinematic distributions. By including transverse degrees of freedom, a three dimensional picture of baryonic matter is created, which will revolutionise our understanding of what comprises 99 percent of the visible matter. GPDs are experimentally accessible via lepton-induced exclusive reactions, in particular the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP). At COMPASS, those processes are investigated using a high intensity muon beam of 160 GeV/c together with a 2.5 m-long liquid hydrogen target and an open field two stage spectrometer, to detect and identify charged and neutral particles. In order to optimize the selection of exclusive reactions at those energies, the target is surrounded by a new barrel-shaped time-of-flight system, which detects the recoiling target particles. A pilot run dedicated to the measurement of Generalized Parton distributions performed in 2012 allows for detailed performance studies

  2. Characterizing Single-Scattering Properties of Snow Aggregate Particles Integrated over Size Distributions in the Microwave Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, K.; Van Aartsen, B.; Haddad, Z. S.; Tanelli, S.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Olson, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 7000 snow aggregate particles have been synthesized, using a heuristic aggregation algorithm, from 9 realistic snowflake habits simulated using the now famous Snowfake ice crystal growth model. These particles exhibit mass-dimension relations consistent with those derived from observations. In addition, ranging from 0.1 to 3.5 mm in liquid-equivalent diameter, the sizes of these particle cover ranges wide enough for assemblies of realistic particle size distributions. The single-scattering properties, such as scattering/absorption/extinction/backscatter cross sections, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, as well as the scattering matrix, are obtained for each aggregate particle using the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) code DDSCAT at 13 microwave frequencies, ranging from 10 to 190 GHz. Preliminary radiative transfer calculations show that the single-scattering properties so obtained yield much more reasonable brightness temperatures than those derived from "fluffy sphere" Mie approximations. However, in order to achieve better retrievals involving these complex particles, we need to be able to characterize their single-scattering with only a few parameters. In this study, we present such an attempt using a pair of generalized effective radii, expressed as ratios of particle volume to particle surface area and to orientation-averaged particle cross section, in addition to mass content. It is shown that these effective radii are indeed effective in characterizing the PSD-integrated single-scattering properties of these complex particles. Pristine ice crystals simulated using the "Snowfake" ice crystal growth mode (3rd row from top) and example aggregates generated using the corresponding pristine particles (bottom 3 rows, i.e. 4th to 6th rows from top).

  3. Facing the estimation of effective population size based on molecular markers: comparison of estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Mena, Belen; Verrier, Etienne; Hospital, Frederic

    We performed a simulation study of several estimators of the effective population size (Ne): NeH = estimator based on the rate of decrease in heterozygosity; NeT = estimator based on the temporal method; NeLD = linkage disequilibrium-based method. We first focused on NeH, which presented...... under scenarios of 3 and 20 bi-allelic loci. Increasing the number of loci largely improved the performance of NeT and NeLD. We highlight the value of NeT and NeLD when large numbers of bi-allelic loci are available, which is nowadays the case for SNPs markers....... an increase in the variability of values over time. The distance from the mean and the median to the true Ne increased over time too. This was caused by the fixation of alleles through time due to genetic drift and the changes in the distribution of allele frequencies. We compared the three estimators of Ne...

  4. Nanometer-scale sizing accuracy of particle suspensions on an unmodified cell phone using elastic light scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary J Smith

    Full Text Available We report on the construction of a Fourier plane imaging system attached to a cell phone. By illuminating particle suspensions with a collimated beam from an inexpensive diode laser, angularly resolved scattering patterns are imaged by the phone's camera. Analyzing these patterns with Mie theory results in predictions of size distributions of the particles in suspension. Despite using consumer grade electronics, we extracted size distributions of sphere suspensions with better than 20 nm accuracy in determining the mean size. We also show results from milk, yeast, and blood cells. Performing these measurements on a portable device presents opportunities for field-testing of food quality, process monitoring, and medical diagnosis.

  5. Nanometer-scale sizing accuracy of particle suspensions on an unmodified cell phone using elastic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary J; Chu, Kaiqin; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    We report on the construction of a Fourier plane imaging system attached to a cell phone. By illuminating particle suspensions with a collimated beam from an inexpensive diode laser, angularly resolved scattering patterns are imaged by the phone's camera. Analyzing these patterns with Mie theory results in predictions of size distributions of the particles in suspension. Despite using consumer grade electronics, we extracted size distributions of sphere suspensions with better than 20 nm accuracy in determining the mean size. We also show results from milk, yeast, and blood cells. Performing these measurements on a portable device presents opportunities for field-testing of food quality, process monitoring, and medical diagnosis.

  6. Software Functional Size: For Cost Estimation and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Baris; Turetken, Oktay; Demirors, Onur

    Determining software characteristics that will effectively support project planning, execution, monitoring and closure remains to be one of the prevalent challenges software project managers face. Functional size measures were introduced to quantify one of the primary characteristics of software. Although functional size measurement methods have not been without criticisms, they have significant promises for software project management. In this paper, we explore the contributions of functional size measurement to project management. We identified diverse uses of functional size by performing a literature survey and investigating how functional size measurement can be incorporated into project management practices by mapping the uses of functional size to the knowledge areas defined in project management body of knowledge (PMBOK).

  7. Experimental Study Using Functional Size Measurement in Building Estimation Models for Software Project Size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Condori-Fernandez, Nelly; Daneva, Maia; Buglione, Luigi; Ormandjieva, Olga; Ormandjieva, O.; Constantinides, C.; Abran, A.; Lee, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment that investigates the predictability of software project size from software product size. The predictability research problem is analyzed at the stage of early requirements by accounting the size of functional requirements as well as the size of non-functional

  8. Deep sea animal density and size estimated using a Dual-frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON) offshore the island of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorli, Giacomo; Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Neuheimer, Anna B.; Copeland, Adrienne; Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2018-01-01

    Pelagic animals that form deep sea scattering layers (DSLs) represent an important link in the food web between zooplankton and top predators. While estimating the composition, density and location of the DSL is important to understand mesopelagic ecosystem dynamics and to predict top predators' distribution, DSL composition and density are often estimated from trawls which may be biased in terms of extrusion, avoidance, and gear-associated biases. Instead, location and biomass of DSLs can be estimated from active acoustic techniques, though estimates are often in aggregate without regard to size or taxon specific information. For the first time in the open ocean, we used a DIDSON sonar to characterize the fauna in DSLs. Estimates of the numerical density and length of animals at different depths and locations along the Kona coast of the Island of Hawaii were determined. Data were collected below and inside the DSLs with the sonar mounted on a profiler. A total of 7068 animals were counted and sized. We estimated numerical densities ranging from 1 to 7 animals/m3 and individuals as long as 3 m were detected. These numerical densities were orders of magnitude higher than those estimated from trawls and average sizes of animals were much larger as well. A mixed model was used to characterize numerical density and length of animals as a function of deep sea layer sampled, location, time of day, and day of the year. Numerical density and length of animals varied by month, with numerical density also a function of depth. The DIDSON proved to be a good tool for open-ocean/deep-sea estimation of the numerical density and size of marine animals, especially larger ones. Further work is needed to understand how this methodology relates to estimates of volume backscatters obtained with standard echosounding techniques, density measures obtained with other sampling methodologies, and to precisely evaluate sampling biases.

  9. Estimation of Food Guide Pyramid Serving Sizes by College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaust, Gretchen; Foster, Irene M.

    2000-01-01

    College students (n=158) used the Food Guide Pyramid to select serving sizes on a questionnaire (73% had been instructed in its use). Overall mean scores (31% correct) indicated they generally did not know recommended serving sizes. Those who had read about or received instruction in the pyramid had higher mean scores. (SK)

  10. Inferring Saving in Training Time From Effect Size Estimates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burright, Burke

    2000-01-01

    .... Students' time saving represents a major potential benefit of using them. This paper fills a methodology gap in estimating the students' timesaving benefit of asynchronous training technologies...

  11. Estimation of bulk optical properties of turbid media from hyperspectral scatter imaging measurements: metamodeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aernouts, Ben; Erkinbaev, Chyngyz; Watté, Rodrigo; Van Beers, Robbe; Do Trong, Nghia Nguyen; Nicolai, Bart; Saeys, Wouter

    2015-10-05

    In many research areas and application domains, the bulk optical properties of biological materials are of great interest. Unfortunately, these properties cannot be obtained easily for complex turbid media. In this study, a metamodeling approach has been proposed and applied for the fast and accurate estimation of the bulk optical properties from contactless and non-destructive hyperspectral scatter imaging (HSI) measurements. A set of liquid optical phantoms, based on intralipid, methylene blue and water, were prepared and the Vis/NIR bulk optical properties were characterized with a double integrating sphere and unscattered transmittance setup. Accordingly, the phantoms were measured with the HSI technique and metamodels were constructed, relating the Vis/NIR reflectance images to the reference bulk optical properties of the samples. The independent inverse validation showed good prediction performance for the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient, with R(2)(p) values of 0.980 and 0.998, and RMSE(P) values of 0.032 cm(-1) and 0.197 cm(-1) respectively. The results clearly support the potential of this approach for fast and accurate estimation of the bulk optical properties of turbid media from contactless HSI measurements.

  12. Comparing methods to estimate Reineke’s maximum size-density relationship species boundary line slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis L. VanderSchaaf; Harold E. Burkhart

    2010-01-01

    Maximum size-density relationships (MSDR) provide natural resource managers useful information about the relationship between tree density and average tree size. Obtaining a valid estimate of how maximum tree density changes as average tree size changes is necessary to accurately describe these relationships. This paper examines three methods to estimate the slope of...

  13. Derivation of factors for estimating the scatter of diagnostic x-rays from walls and ceiling slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C J; Sutton, D G; Magee, J; McVey, S; Williams, J R; Peet, D

    2012-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning rooms and interventional x-ray facilities with heavy workloads may require the installation of shielding to protect against radiation scattered from walls or ceiling slabs. This is particularly important for the protection of those operating x-ray equipment from within control cubicles who may be exposed to radiation scattered from the ceiling over the top of the protective barrier and round the side if a cubicle door is not included. Data available on the magnitude of this tertiary scatter from concrete slabs are limited. Moreover, there is no way in which tertiary scatter levels can be estimated easily for specific facilities. There is a need for a suitable method for quantification of tertiary scatter because of the increases in workloads of complex x-ray facilities. In this study diagnostic x-ray air kerma levels scattered from concrete and brick walls have been measured to verify scatter factors. The results have been used in a simulation of tertiary scatter for x-ray facilities involving summation of scatter contributions from elements across concrete ceiling slabs. The majority of the ceiling scatter air kerma to which staff behind a barrier will be exposed arises from the area between the patient/x-ray tube and the staff. The level depends primarily on the heights of the ceiling and protective barrier. A method has been developed to allow tertiary scatter levels to be calculated using a simple equation based on a standard arrangement for rooms with different ceiling and barrier heights. Coefficients have been derived for a CT facility and an interventional suite to predict tertiary scatter levels from the workload, so that consideration can be given to the protection options available.

  14. Effect of particle shape and structure on the results of single-particle light-scattering size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umhauer, H; Bottlinger, M

    1991-11-20

    To evaluate quantitatively the influence exerted by the shape and structure of nonspherical, nonideal particles on the results of single-particle scattered-light size analysis, measurements were conducted with individual particles of different materials (glass, limestone, and quartz). For this purpose, the particles were suspended in an electrodynamic balance and repeatedly passed through the analyzer's measuring volume with a continually changing random orientation. The scattered-light signal spectra thus obtained specify the probability with which a certain pulse height is induced when the particle passes once through the measuring volume at a given coincidental orientation. The spectra reflect the material-characteristic influence. They allow the loss of resolution of common scattered-light size analyses to be assessed and algorithms (matrices) to be compiled with which the shape and structure influence may be mathematically eliminated. Because a shape and structure independent size parameter is also determined from the individual particles, exact calibration curves can be derived in which the shape and structure influence are incorporated.

  15. The influence of personal BMI on body size estimations and sensitivity to body size change in anorexia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Katri K; Bester, Andre; Cairns, Paul; Tovée, Martin J; Cornelissen, Piers L

    2015-03-01

    In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the influence of personal BMI on body size estimation in 42 women who have symptoms of anorexia (referred to henceforth as anorexia spectrum disorders, ANSD), and 100 healthy controls. Low BMI control participants over-estimate their size and high BMI controls under-estimate, a pattern which is predicted by a perceptual phenomenon called contraction bias. In addition, control participants' sensitivity to size change declines as their BMI increases as predicted by Weber's law. The responses of women with ANSD are very different. Low BMI participants who have ANSD are extremely accurate at estimating body size and are very sensitive to changes in body size in this BMI range. However, as BMI rises in the ANSD participant group, there is a rapid increase in over-estimation concurrent with a rapid decline in sensitivity to size change. We discuss the results in the context of signal detection theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiographic Estimation of the Location and Size of kidneys in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Radiography, Location, Kidney size, Local dogs. The kidneys of dogs and cats are located retroperitoneally (Bjorling, 1993). Visualization of the kidneys on radiographs is possible due to the contrast provided by the perirenal fat (Grandage, 1975). However, this perirenal fat rarely covers the ventral surface of the ...

  17. Size Estimation of Non-Cooperative Data Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khelghati, Mohammadreza; Hiemstra, Djoerd; van Keulen, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing amount of data in deep web sources (hidden from general search engines behind web forms), ac- cessing this data has gained more attention. In the algo- rithms applied for this purpose, it is the knowledge of a data source size that enables the algorithms to make accurate de-

  18. Estimating population size of Pygoscelid Penguins from TM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Charles E., Jr.; Schwaller, Mathew R.; Dahmer, Paul A.

    1987-01-01

    An estimate was made toward a continent wide population of penguins. The results indicate that Thematic Mapper data can be used to identify penguin rookeries due to the unique reflectance properties of guano. Strong correlations exist between nesting populations and rookery area occupied by the birds. These correlations allow estimation of the number of nesting pairs in colonies. The success of remote sensing and biometric analyses leads one to believe that a continent wide estimate of penguin populations is possible based on a timely sample employing ground based and remote sensing techniques. Satellite remote sensing along the coastline may well locate previously undiscovered penguin nesting sites, or locate rookeries which have been assumed to exist for over a half century, but never located. Observations which found that penguins are one of the most sensitive elements in the complex of Southern Ocean ecosystems motivated this study.

  19. Reliability of different mark-recapture methods for population size estimation tested against reference population sizes constructed from field data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annegret Grimm

    Full Text Available Reliable estimates of population size are fundamental in many ecological studies and biodiversity conservation. Selecting appropriate methods to estimate abundance is often very difficult, especially if data are scarce. Most studies concerning the reliability of different estimators used simulation data based on assumptions about capture variability that do not necessarily reflect conditions in natural populations. Here, we used data from an intensively studied closed population of the arboreal gecko Gehyra variegata to construct reference population sizes for assessing twelve different population size estimators in terms of bias, precision, accuracy, and their 95%-confidence intervals. Two of the reference populations reflect natural biological entities, whereas the other reference populations reflect artificial subsets of the population. Since individual heterogeneity was assumed, we tested modifications of the Lincoln-Petersen estimator, a set of models in programs MARK and CARE-2, and a truncated geometric distribution. Ranking of methods was similar across criteria. Models accounting for individual heterogeneity performed best in all assessment criteria. For populations from heterogeneous habitats without obvious covariates explaining individual heterogeneity, we recommend using the moment estimator or the interpolated jackknife estimator (both implemented in CAPTURE/MARK. If data for capture frequencies are substantial, we recommend the sample coverage or the estimating equation (both models implemented in CARE-2. Depending on the distribution of catchabilities, our proposed multiple Lincoln-Petersen and a truncated geometric distribution obtained comparably good results. The former usually resulted in a minimum population size and the latter can be recommended when there is a long tail of low capture probabilities. Models with covariates and mixture models performed poorly. Our approach identified suitable methods and extended options to

  20. Binocular open-view system to perform estimations of aberrations and scattering in the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Guerra, Carlos E; Aldaba, Mikel; Arjona, Montserrat; Pujol, Jaume

    2015-11-10

    We present a system that integrates a double-pass (DP) instrument and a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor to provide information not only on aberrations, but also on the scattering that occurs in the human eye. A binocular open-view design permits evaluations to be made under normal viewing conditions. Furthermore, the system is able to compensate for both the spherical and astigmatic refractive errors that occur during measurements by using devices with configurable optical power. The DP and HS techniques provide comparable data after estimating wavefront slopes with respect to the intersections of an ideal grid and compensating for residual errors caused by the optical defects of the measuring system. Once comparable data is obtained, it is possible to use this combined manner of assessment to provide information on scattering. Measurements in an artificial eye suggest that the characteristics of the ocular fundus may induce deviations of DP with respect to the HS data. These differences were quantified in terms of the modulation transfer function in young, healthy eyes measured in infrared light to demonstrate the potential use of the system in visual optics studies.

  1. The collapsed cone algorithm for 192Ir dosimetry using phantom-size adaptive multiple-scatter point kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Plamondon, Mathieu; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate how dose distributions calculated with the collapsed cone (CC) algorithm depend on the size of the water phantom used in deriving the point kernel for multiple scatter. A research version of the CC algorithm equipped with a set of selectable point kernels for multiple-scatter dose that had initially been derived in water phantoms of various dimensions was used. The new point kernels were generated using EGSnrc in spherical water phantoms of radii 5 cm, 7.5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm. Dose distributions derived with CC in water phantoms of different dimensions and in a CT-based clinical breast geometry were compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the Geant4-based brachytherapy specific MC code Algebra. Agreement with MC within 1% was obtained when the dimensions of the phantom used to derive the multiple-scatter kernel were similar to those of the calculation phantom. Doses are overestimated at phantom edges when kernels are derived in larger phantoms and underestimated when derived in smaller phantoms (by around 2% to 7% depending on distance from source and phantom dimensions). CC agrees well with MC in the high dose region of a breast implant and is superior to TG43 in determining skin doses for all multiple-scatter point kernel sizes. Increased agreement between CC and MC is achieved when the point kernel is comparable to breast dimensions. The investigated approximation in multiple scatter dose depends on the choice of point kernel in relation to phantom size and yields a significant fraction of the total dose only at distances of several centimeters from a source/implant which correspond to volumes of low doses. The current implementation of the CC algorithm utilizes a point kernel derived in a comparatively large (radius 20 cm) water phantom. A fixed point kernel leads to predictable behaviour of the algorithm with the worst case being a source/implant located well within a patient

  2. Estimation and application of 2-D scattering matrices for sparse array imaging of simulated damage in composite panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2017-02-01

    Reliable detection of damage in composites is critically important for failure prevention in the aerospace industry since these materials are more frequently being used in high stress applications. Structural health monitoring (SHM) via guided wave sensors mounted on or embedded within a composite structure can help detect and localize damage in real-time while potentially reducing overall maintenance costs. One approach to guided wave SHM is sparse array imaging via the minimum variance algorithm, and it has been shown in prior work that incorporating expected scattering from defects of interest can improve the quality of damage localization and characterization. For this study, simulated damage in the form of attached magnets was used for estimating scattering from recorded wavefield data. Data were recorded on a circle centered at the damage location from multiple incident directions before and after the magnets were attached. Baseline subtraction is used to estimate scattering patterns for each incident direction, and these patterns are combined and interpolated to form a full 2-D scattering matrix. This matrix is then incorporated into the minimum variance imaging algorithm, and the efficacy of this scattering estimation methodology is evaluated by comparing the resulting sparse array images to those generated using simpler scattering assumptions.

  3. A Hierarchical Approach to Persistent Scatterer Network Construction and Deformation Time Series Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a hierarchical approach to network construction and time series estimation in persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI for deformation analysis using the time series of high-resolution satellite SAR images. To balance between computational efficiency and solution accuracy, a dividing and conquering algorithm (i.e., two levels of PS networking and solution is proposed for extracting deformation rates of a study area. The algorithm has been tested using 40 high-resolution TerraSAR-X images collected between 2009 and 2010 over Tianjin in China for subsidence analysis, and validated by using the ground-based leveling measurements. The experimental results indicate that the hierarchical approach can remarkably reduce computing time and memory requirements, and the subsidence measurements derived from the hierarchical solution are in good agreement with the leveling data.

  4. An Update on Using the Range to Estimate σ When Determining Sample Sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhiel, George Steven; Markowski, Edward

    2017-04-01

    In this research, we develop a strategy for using a range estimator of σ when determining a sample size for estimating a mean. Previous research by Rhiel is extended to provide dn values for use in calculating a range estimate of σ when working with sampling frames up to size 1,000,000. This allows the use of the range estimator of σ with "big data." A strategy is presented for using the range estimator of σ for determining sample sizes based on the dn values developed in this study.

  5. Audiovisual Interval Size Estimation Is Associated with Early Musical Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kathryn Abel

    Full Text Available Although pitch is a fundamental attribute of auditory perception, substantial individual differences exist in our ability to perceive differences in pitch. Little is known about how these individual differences in the auditory modality might affect crossmodal processes such as audiovisual perception. In this study, we asked whether individual differences in pitch perception might affect audiovisual perception, as it relates to age of onset and number of years of musical training. Fifty-seven subjects made subjective ratings of interval size when given point-light displays of audio, visual, and audiovisual stimuli of sung intervals. Audiovisual stimuli were divided into congruent and incongruent (audiovisual-mismatched stimuli. Participants' ratings correlated strongly with interval size in audio-only, visual-only, and audiovisual-congruent conditions. In the audiovisual-incongruent condition, ratings correlated more with audio than with visual stimuli, particularly for subjects who had better pitch perception abilities and higher nonverbal IQ scores. To further investigate the effects of age of onset and length of musical training, subjects were divided into musically trained and untrained groups. Results showed that among subjects with musical training, the degree to which participants' ratings correlated with auditory interval size during incongruent audiovisual perception was correlated with both nonverbal IQ and age of onset of musical training. After partialing out nonverbal IQ, pitch discrimination thresholds were no longer associated with incongruent audio scores, whereas age of onset of musical training remained associated with incongruent audio scores. These findings invite future research on the developmental effects of musical training, particularly those relating to the process of audiovisual perception.

  6. Impurity scattering and size quantization effects in a single graphene nanoflake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, Julia; Leicht, Philipp; Blumenschein, Felix; Gragnaniello, Luca; Bergvall, Anders; Löfwander, Tomas; Fonin, Mikhail

    2017-02-01

    By using Fourier-transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy we measure the interference patterns produced by the impurity scattering of confined Dirac quasiparticles in epitaxial graphene nanoflakes. Upon comparison of the experimental results with tight-binding calculations of realistic model flakes, we show that the characteristic features observed in the Fourier-transformed local density of states are related to scattering between different transverse modes (subbands) of a graphene nanoflake and allow direct insight into the gapped electronic spectrum of graphene. We also observe a strong reduction of quasiparticle lifetime which is attributed to the interaction with the underlying substrate. In addition, we show that the distribution of the on-site energies at flower defects leads to an effectively broken pseudospin selection rule, where intravalley backscattering is allowed.

  7. Size Determination of Y2O3 Crystallites in MgO Composite Using Mie Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-07

    used to determine optimal growth parameters leading to minimized scattering in subsequent material part preparation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS nanocomposites...Therefore, when choosing a material to be a mid-IR gain medium, making sure it has a low maximum phonon energy will be crucial for minimizing quenching...regulation of Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 3 the pH of the solution was necessary to maximize nucleation and minimize

  8. Mark-resight approach as a tool to estimate population size of one of the world’s smallest goose populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Kevin Kuhlmann; Fælled, Casper Cæsar; Clausen, Preben

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the use of a mark–resight procedure to estimate total population size in a local goose population. Using colour-ring sightings of the increasingly scattered population of Light-bellied Brent Geese Branta bernicla hrota from their Danish staging areas, we estimate...... a total population size of 7845 birds (95% CI: 7252–8438). This is in good agreement with numbers obtained from total counts, emphasizing that this population, although steadily increasing, is still small compared with historic numbers....

  9. Comparing direct vs. indirect estimates of gene flow within a population of a scattered tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Klein, Etienne K

    2008-06-01

    The comparison between historical estimates of gene flow, using variance in allelic frequencies, and contemporary estimates of gene flow, using parentage assignment, is expected to provide insights into ecological and evolutionary processes at work within and among populations. Genetic variation at six microsatellite loci was used to quantify genetic structure in the insect-pollinated, animal-dispersed, low-density tree Sorbus torminalis L. Crantz, and to derive historical estimates of gene flow. The neighbourhood size and root-mean-squared dispersal distance inferred from seedling genotypes (N(b) = 70 individuals, sigma(e) = 417 m) were similar to those inferred from adult genotypes (N(b) = 114 individuals, sigma(e) = 472 m). We also used parentage analyses and a neighbourhood model approach after an evaluation of the statistical properties of this method on simulated data. From our data, we estimated even contributions of seed- and pollen-mediated dispersal to the genetic composition of established seedlings, with both fat-tailed pollen and seed dispersal kernels, and slightly higher mean distance of pollen dispersal (248 m) as compared to seed dispersal (135 m). The resulting contemporary estimate of gene dispersal distance (sigma(c) = 211 m) was approximately twofold smaller than the historical estimates. Besides different assumptions and statistical nuances of both approaches, this discrepancy is likely to reflect a recent restriction in the scale of gene flow which requires manager's attention in a context of increasing forest fragmentation.

  10. Estimation of census and effective population sizes: the increasing usefulness of DNA-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Luikart; Nils Ryman; David A. Tallmon; Michael K. Schwartz; Fred W. Allendorf

    2010-01-01

    Population census size (NC) and effective population sizes (Ne) are two crucial parameters that influence population viability, wildlife management decisions, and conservation planning. Genetic estimators of both NC and Ne are increasingly widely used because molecular markers are increasingly available, statistical methods are improving rapidly, and genetic estimators...

  11. HIGH RESOLUTION DEFORMATION TIME SERIES ESTIMATION FOR DISTRIBUTED SCATTERERS USING TERRASAR-X DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Goel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several SAR satellites such as TerraSAR-X, COSMO-SkyMed and Radarsat-2 have been launched. These satellites provide high resolution data suitable for sophisticated interferometric applications. With shorter repeat cycles, smaller orbital tubes and higher bandwidth of the satellites; deformation time series analysis of distributed scatterers (DSs is now supported by a practical data basis. Techniques for exploiting DSs in non-urban (rural areas include the Small Baseline Subset Algorithm (SBAS. However, it involves spatial phase unwrapping, and phase unwrapping errors are typically encountered in rural areas and are difficult to detect. In addition, the SBAS technique involves a rectangular multilooking of the differential interferograms to reduce phase noise, resulting in a loss of resolution and superposition of different objects on ground. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for deformation monitoring with a focus on DSs, wherein, there is no need to unwrap the differential interferograms and the deformation is mapped at object resolution. It is based on a robust object adaptive parameter estimation using single look differential interferograms, where, the local tilts of deformation velocity and local slopes of residual DEM in range and azimuth directions are estimated. We present here the technical details and a processing example of this newly developed algorithm.

  12. Blinded sample size re-estimation in three-arm trials with 'gold standard' design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mütze, Tobias; Friede, Tim

    2017-10-15

    In this article, we study blinded sample size re-estimation in the 'gold standard' design with internal pilot study for normally distributed outcomes. The 'gold standard' design is a three-arm clinical trial design that includes an active and a placebo control in addition to an experimental treatment. We focus on the absolute margin approach to hypothesis testing in three-arm trials at which the non-inferiority of the experimental treatment and the assay sensitivity are assessed by pairwise comparisons. We compare several blinded sample size re-estimation procedures in a simulation study assessing operating characteristics including power and type I error. We find that sample size re-estimation based on the popular one-sample variance estimator results in overpowered trials. Moreover, sample size re-estimation based on unbiased variance estimators such as the Xing-Ganju variance estimator results in underpowered trials, as it is expected because an overestimation of the variance and thus the sample size is in general required for the re-estimation procedure to eventually meet the target power. To overcome this problem, we propose an inflation factor for the sample size re-estimation with the Xing-Ganju variance estimator and show that this approach results in adequately powered trials. Because of favorable features of the Xing-Ganju variance estimator such as unbiasedness and a distribution independent of the group means, the inflation factor does not depend on the nuisance parameter and, therefore, can be calculated prior to a trial. Moreover, we prove that the sample size re-estimation based on the Xing-Ganju variance estimator does not bias the effect estimate. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Evaluating the performance of species richness estimators: sensitivity to sample grain size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hortal, Joaquín; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Gaspar, Clara

    2006-01-01

    scores in a number of estimators (the above-mentioned plus ICE, Chao2, Michaelis-Menten, Negative Exponential and Clench). The estimations from those four sample sizes were also highly correlated. 4.  Contrary to other studies, we conclude that most species richness estimators may be useful......Fifteen species richness estimators (three asymptotic based on species accumulation curves, 11 nonparametric, and one based in the species-area relationship) were compared by examining their performance in estimating the total species richness of epigean arthropods in the Azorean Laurisilva forests...... different sampling units on species richness estimations. 2.  Estimated species richness scores depended both on the estimator considered and on the grain size used to aggregate data. However, several estimators (ACE, Chao1, Jackknife1 and 2 and Bootstrap) were precise in spite of grain variations. Weibull...

  14. Using age on clothes size label to estimate weight in emergency paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Laura D; Williams, Andrew R

    2012-10-01

    To study formulae that estimate children's weight using their actual age. To determine whether using the age on their clothes size label in these formulae can estimate weight when their actual age is unknown. The actual age and age on the clothes labels of 188 children were inserted into formulae that estimate children's weight. These estimates were compared with their actual weight. Bland-Altman plots calculated the precision and accuracy of each of these estimates. In all formulae, using age on the clothes sizes label provided a more precise estimate than the child's actual age. In emergencies where a child's age is unknown, use of the age on their clothes label in weight-estimating formulae yields acceptable weight estimates. Even in situations where a child's age is known, the age on their clothes label may provide a more accurate and precise weight estimate than the actual age.

  15. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    The ability to deliver conformal dose distributions in radiation therapy through intensity modulation and the potential for tumor dose escalation to improve treatment outcome has necessitated an increase in localization accuracy of inter- and intra-fractional patient geometry. Megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using the treatment beam and onboard electronic portal imaging device is one option currently being studied for implementation in image-guided radiation therapy. However, routine clinical use is predicated upon continued improvements in image quality and patient dose delivered during acquisition. The formal statement of hypothesis for this investigation was that the conformity of planned to delivered dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy could be further enhanced through the application of kilovoltage scatter correction and intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging, and that normalized dose measurements could be acquired and inter-compared between multiple imaging geometries. The specific aims of this investigation were to: (1) incorporate the Feldkamp, Davis and Kress filtered backprojection algorithm into a program to reconstruct a voxelized linear attenuation coefficient dataset from a set of acquired megavoltage cone-beam CT projections, (2) characterize the effects on megavoltage cone-beam CT image quality resulting from the application of Intermediate View Interpolation and Intermediate View Reprojection techniques to limited-projection datasets, (3) incorporate the Scatter and Primary Estimation from Collimator Shadows (SPECS) algorithm into megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction and determine the set of SPECS parameters which maximize image quality and quantitative accuracy, and (4) evaluate the normalized axial dose distributions received during megavoltage cone-beam CT image acquisition using radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in anthropomorphic pelvic and head and

  16. Size matters: a comparison of anti- and pro-gay organizations' estimates of the size of the gay population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Matthew V

    2002-01-01

    This articles examines estimates of the size of the gay population that are provided in the Websites of pro- and anti-gay groups. There are marked differences in the estimates that are provided by these groups. While most pro-gay groups suggest that approximately ten percent of the population is gay, anti-gay groups argue that only 1-3 percent of the population is gay. While none of the pro-gay groups address the methodological problems associated with the Kinsey data, all of the anti-gay groups that address the issue of size discredit Kinsey's work and/or the ten percent estimate that comes from Kinsey's work and is often cited by pro-gay organizations.

  17. Complexity in Animal Communication: Estimating the Size of N-Gram Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new techniques that allow conditional entropy to estimate the combinatorics of symbols are applied to animal communication studies to estimate the communication’s repertoire size. By using the conditional entropy estimates at multiple orders, the paper estimates the total repertoire sizes for animal communication across bottlenose dolphins, humpback whales and several species of birds for an N-gram length of one to three. In addition to discussing the impact of this method on studies of animal communication complexity, the reliability of these estimates is compared to other methods through simulation. While entropy does undercount the total repertoire size due to rare N-grams, it gives a more accurate picture of the most frequently used repertoire than just repertoire size alone.

  18. Complexity in Animal Communication: Estimating the Size of N-Gram Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Reginald

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, new techniques that allow conditional entropy to estimate the combinatorics of symbols are applied to animal communication studies to estimate the communication's repertoire size. By using the conditional entropy estimates at multiple orders, the paper estimates the total repertoire sizes for animal communication across bottlenose dolphins, humpback whales, and several species of birds for N-grams length one to three. In addition to discussing the impact of this method on studies of animal communication complexity, the reliability of these estimates is compared to other methods through simulation. While entropy does undercount the total repertoire size due to rare N-grams, it gives a more accurate picture of the most frequently used repertoire than just repertoire size alone.

  19. Light scattering study on the size and structure of calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite flocs formed in sugar solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Judy; Rainey, Tom; Doherty, William O S

    2007-02-01

    The formation, flocculation and sedimentation of calcium phosphate particles are among the main physico-chemical reactions that occur during the clarification of cane sugar juice. The mechanisms through which processes occur in juice clarification are still poorly understood. This study (being part of a comprehensive investigation to unravel these mechanisms) reports on the size and structure of calcium phosphate particles and aggregates in water and sugar solutions at 20 degrees C using the small angle laser light scattering technique. The average size of the primary calcium phosphate particles was in the range 10.4+/-1.1 microm to 17.5+/-1.2 microm and the scattering exponents, which describe the structure of the calcium phosphate flocs, varied from 1.97 to 2.76. The flocs formed without flocculant are more compact in water than those formed in sugar solution. The compactness of the flocs was also affected by pH of the solution. This effect has been explained by considering the electrical double layer phenomenon.

  20. The international food unit: a new measurement aid that can improve portion size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, T; Weltert, M; Rollo, M E; Smith, S P; Jia, W; Collins, C E; Sun, M

    2017-09-12

    Portion size education tools, aids and interventions can be effective in helping prevent weight gain. However consumers have difficulties in estimating food portion sizes and are confused by inconsistencies in measurement units and terminologies currently used. Visual cues are an important mediator of portion size estimation, but standardized measurement units are required. In the current study, we present a new food volume estimation tool and test the ability of young adults to accurately quantify food volumes. The International Food Unit™ (IFU™) is a 4x4x4 cm cube (64cm(3)), subdivided into eight 2 cm sub-cubes for estimating smaller food volumes. Compared with currently used measures such as cups and spoons, the IFU™ standardizes estimation of food volumes with metric measures. The IFU™ design is based on binary dimensional increments and the cubic shape facilitates portion size education and training, memory and recall, and computer processing which is binary in nature. The performance of the IFU™ was tested in a randomized between-subject experiment (n = 128 adults, 66 men) that estimated volumes of 17 foods using four methods; the IFU™ cube, a deformable modelling clay cube, a household measuring cup or no aid (weight estimation). Estimation errors were compared between groups using Kruskall-Wallis tests and post-hoc comparisons. Estimation errors differed significantly between groups (H(3) = 28.48, p food portions and similar for 5 food portions. Weight estimation was associated with a median error of 23.5% (IQR = 79.8). The IFU™ improves volume estimation accuracy compared to other methods. The cubic shape was perceived as favourable, with subdivision and multiplication facilitating volume estimation. Further studies should investigate whether the IFU™ can facilitate portion size training and whether portion size education using the IFU™ is effective and sustainable without the aid. A 3-dimensional IFU™ could serve as a reference

  1. A scattering methodology for droplet sizing of e-cigarette aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratte, Pascal; Cosandey, Stéphane; Goujon-Ginglinger, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the droplet size distribution of inhalable aerosols is important to predict aerosol deposition yield at various respiratory tract locations in human. Optical methodologies are usually preferred over the multi-stage cascade impactor for high-throughput measurements of aerosol particle/droplet size distributions. Evaluate the Laser Aerosol Spectrometer technology based on Polystyrene Sphere Latex (PSL) calibration curve applied for the experimental determination of droplet size distributions in the diameter range typical of commercial e-cigarette aerosols (147-1361 nm). This calibration procedure was tested for a TSI Laser Aerosol Spectrometer (LAS) operating at a wavelength of 633 nm and assessed against model di-ethyl-hexyl-sebacat (DEHS) droplets and e-cigarette aerosols. The PSL size response was measured, and intra- and between-day standard deviations calculated. DEHS droplet sizes were underestimated by 15-20% by the LAS when the PSL calibration curve was used; however, the intra- and between-day relative standard deviations were cigarette aerosols ranged from 130-191 nm to 225-293 nm, respectively, similar to published values. The LAS instrument can be used to measure e-cigarette aerosol droplet size distributions with a bias underestimating the expected value by 15-20% when using a precise PSL calibration curve. Controlled variability of DEHS size measurements can be achieved with the LAS system; however, this method can only be applied to test aerosols having a refractive index close to that of PSL particles used for calibration.

  2. Solution of two-dimensional electromagnetic scattering problem by FDTD with optimal step size, based on a semi-norm analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monsefi, Farid [Division of Applied Mathematics, The School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, MDH, Västerås, Sweden and School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, IDT, Mälardalen University, MDH Väs (Sweden); Carlsson, Linus; Silvestrov, Sergei [Division of Applied Mathematics, The School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, MDH, Västerås (Sweden); Rančić, Milica [Division of Applied Mathematics, The School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, MDH, Västerås, Sweden and Department of Theoretical Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Electronic Engineering, University (Serbia); Otterskog, Magnus [School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, IDT, Mälardalen University, MDH Västerås (Sweden)

    2014-12-10

    To solve the electromagnetic scattering problem in two dimensions, the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is used. The order of convergence of the FDTD algorithm, solving the two-dimensional Maxwell’s curl equations, is estimated in two different computer implementations: with and without an obstacle in the numerical domain of the FDTD scheme. This constitutes an electromagnetic scattering problem where a lumped sinusoidal current source, as a source of electromagnetic radiation, is included inside the boundary. Confined within the boundary, a specific kind of Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC) is chosen and the outside of the boundary is in form of a Perfect Electric Conducting (PEC) surface. Inserted in the computer implementation, a semi-norm has been applied to compare different step sizes in the FDTD scheme. First, the domain of the problem is chosen to be the free-space without any obstacles. In the second part of the computer implementations, a PEC surface is included as the obstacle. The numerical instability of the algorithms can be rather easily avoided with respect to the Courant stability condition, which is frequently used in applying the general FDTD algorithm.

  3. Facile Synthesis of Micron-Sized Hollow Silver Spheres as Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A well-designed type of micron-sized hollow silver sphere was successfully synthesized by a simple hard-template method to be used as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. 4 Å molecular sieves were employed as a removable solid template. [Ag(NH32]+ was absorbed as the precursor on the surface of the molecular sieve. Formaldehyde was selected as a reducing agent to reduce [Ag(NH32]+, resulting in the formation of a micron-sized silver shell on the surface of the 4 Å molecular sieves. The micron-sized hollow silver spheres were obtained by removing the molecular sieve template. SEM and XRD were used to characterize the structure of the micron-sized hollow silver spheres. The as-prepared micro-silver spheres exhibited robust SERS activity in the presence of adsorbed 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA with excitation at 632.8 nm, and the enhancement factor reached ~1.5 × 106. This synthetic process represents a promising method for preparing various hollow metal nanoparticles.

  4. Estimation of pore size distribution using concentric double pulsed-field gradient NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamini, Dan; Nevo, Uri

    2013-05-01

    Estimation of pore size distribution of well calibrated phantoms using NMR is demonstrated here for the first time. Porous materials are a central constituent in fields as diverse as biology, geology, and oil drilling. Noninvasive characterization of monodisperse porous samples using conventional pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR is a well-established method. However, estimation of pore size distribution of heterogeneous polydisperse systems, which comprise most of the materials found in nature, remains extremely challenging. Concentric double pulsed-field gradient (CDPFG) is a 2-D technique where both q (the amplitude of the diffusion gradient) and φ (the relative angle between the gradient pairs) are varied. A recent prediction indicates this method should produce a more accurate and robust estimation of pore size distribution than its conventional 1-D versions. Five well defined size distribution phantoms, consisting of 1-5 different pore sizes in the range of 5-25 μm were used. The estimated pore size distributions were all in good agreement with the known theoretical size distributions, and were obtained without any a priori assumption on the size distribution model. These findings support that in addition to its theoretical benefits, the CDPFG method is experimentally reliable. Furthermore, by adding the angle parameter, sensitivity to small compartment sizes is increased without the use of strong gradients, thus making CDPFG safe for biological applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Collagen Orientation and Crystallite Size in Human Dentin: A Small Angle X-ray Scattering Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pople, John A

    2001-03-29

    The mechanical properties of dentin are largely determined by the intertubular dentin matrix, which is a complex composite of type I collagen fibers and a carbonate-rich apatite mineral phase. The authors perform a small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) study on fully mineralized human dentin to quantify this fiber/mineral composite architecture from the nanoscopic through continuum length scales. The SAXS results were consistent with nucleation and growth of the apatite phase within periodic gaps in the collagen fibers. These mineralized fibers were perpendicular to the dentinal tubules and parallel with the mineralization growth front. Within the plane of the mineralization front, the mineralized collagen fibers were isotropic near the pulp, but became mildly anisotropic in the mid-dentin. Analysis of the data also indicated that near the pulp the mineral crystallites were approximately needle-like, and progressed to a more plate-like shape near the dentino-enamel junction. The thickness of these crystallites, {approx} 5 nm, did not vary significantly with position in the tooth. These results were considered within the context of dentinogenesis and maturation.

  6. A Study on Flaw Sizing and Location Estimation in Tapered Dissimilar Metal Welds on Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dongjin; Kim, Yongsik [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The dissimilar metal welds (DMW) were used to join the carbon steel reactor pressure vessel to the stainless steel main recirculation piping or reactor coolant piping. The safe end was used as the same or similar metal at an attachment area. The DMW requires a periodic inspection because it is highly susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). However, the inspection of DMW for NPPs in Korea is difficult owing to the physical constraint as well as the diffraction scattering and/or reflection on the weld interface when using the conventional ultrasonic technique. Also, manual procedure only deals with the flaw detection and length sizing. The purpose of this study is the development of procedures for accurate defect assessment in DMW. This research aimed to increase the reliability and sensitivity of flaw sizing in dissimilar metal welds. The current manual ultrasonic technique for tapered DMW (KPD-UT-10) is mainly being applied to the length sizing and detection of flaws. In order to estimate the growth of the defect, depth sizing of flaws is required.

  7. Automated nodule location and size estimation using a multi-scale Laplacian of Gaussian filtering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapatnakul, Artit C; Fotin, Sergei V; Reeves, Anthony P; Biancardi, Alberto M; Yankelevitz, David F; Henschke, Claudia I

    2009-01-01

    Estimation of nodule location and size is an important pre-processing step in some nodule segmentation algorithms to determine the size and location of the region of interest. Ideally, such estimation methods will consistently find the same nodule location regardless of where the the seed point (provided either manually or by a nodule detection algorithm) is placed relative to the "true" center of the nodule, and the size should be a reasonable estimate of the true nodule size. We developed a method that estimates nodule location and size using multi-scale Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) filtering. Nodule candidates near a given seed point are found by searching for blob-like regions with high filter response. The candidates are then pruned according to filter response and location, and the remaining candidates are sorted by size and the largest candidate selected. This method was compared to a previously published template-based method. The methods were evaluated on the basis of stability of the estimated nodule location to changes in the initial seed point and how well the size estimates agreed with volumes determined by a semi-automated nodule segmentation method. The LoG method exhibited better stability to changes in the seed point, with 93% of nodules having the same estimated location even when the seed point was altered, compared to only 52% of nodules for the template-based method. Both methods also showed good agreement with sizes determined by a nodule segmentation method, with an average relative size difference of 5% and -5% for the LoG and template-based methods respectively.

  8. Sample size for estimation of the Pearson correlation coefficient in cherry tomato tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Giacomini Sari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the required sample size for estimation of the Pearson coefficient of correlation between cherry tomato variables. Two uniformity tests were set up in a protected environment in the spring/summer of 2014. The observed variables in each plant were mean fruit length, mean fruit width, mean fruit weight, number of bunches, number of fruits per bunch, number of fruits, and total weight of fruits, with calculation of the Pearson correlation matrix between them. Sixty eight sample sizes were planned for one greenhouse and 48 for another, with the initial sample size of 10 plants, and the others were obtained by adding five plants. For each planned sample size, 3000 estimates of the Pearson correlation coefficient were obtained through bootstrap re-samplings with replacement. The sample size for each correlation coefficient was determined when the 95% confidence interval amplitude value was less than or equal to 0.4. Obtaining estimates of the Pearson correlation coefficient with high precision is difficult for parameters with a weak linear relation. Accordingly, a larger sample size is necessary to estimate them. Linear relations involving variables dealing with size and number of fruits per plant have less precision. To estimate the coefficient of correlation between productivity variables of cherry tomato, with a confidence interval of 95% equal to 0.4, it is necessary to sample 275 plants in a 250m² greenhouse, and 200 plants in a 200m² greenhouse.

  9. ON ESTIMATION AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING OF THE GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY THE SALTYKOV METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Gulbin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of validity of unfolding the grain size distribution with the back-substitution method. Due to the ill-conditioned nature of unfolding matrices, it is necessary to evaluate the accuracy and precision of parameter estimation and to verify the possibility of expected grain size distribution testing on the basis of intersection size histogram data. In order to review these questions, the computer modeling was used to compare size distributions obtained stereologically with those possessed by three-dimensional model aggregates of grains with a specified shape and random size. Results of simulations are reported and ways of improving the conventional stereological techniques are suggested. It is shown that new improvements in estimating and testing procedures enable grain size distributions to be unfolded more efficiently.

  10. Post-stratified estimation: with-in strata and total sample size recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    James A. Westfall; Paul L. Patterson; John W. Coulston

    2011-01-01

    Post-stratification is used to reduce the variance of estimates of the mean. Because the stratification is not fixed in advance, within-strata sample sizes can be quite small. The survey statistics literature provides some guidance on minimum within-strata sample sizes; however, the recommendations and justifications are inconsistent and apply broadly for many...

  11. Estimation of optimal size of plots for experiments with radiometer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-29

    Jul 29, 2015 ... Estimation of optimal size of plots for experiments with radiometer in beans. Roger Nabeyama Michels1*, Marcelo Giovanetti Canteri2, Inês Cristina de Batista Fonseca2,. Marcelo ... with beans, the size of the portions differ according to the ... obtained through the minor form: 0.45 m × 1 m (Table 1). The.

  12. The Impact of Sample Size and Other Factors When Estimating Multilevel Logistic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeneberger, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    The design of research studies utilizing binary multilevel models must necessarily incorporate knowledge of multiple factors, including estimation method, variance component size, or number of predictors, in addition to sample sizes. This Monte Carlo study examined the performance of random effect binary outcome multilevel models under varying…

  13. How Many Words Do Children Know? A Corpus-Based Estimation of Children's Total Vocabulary Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segbers, Jutta; Schroeder, Sascha

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present a new method for estimating children's total vocabulary size based on a language corpus in German. We drew a virtual sample of different lexicon sizes from a corpus and let the virtual sample "take" a vocabulary test by comparing whether the items were included in the virtual lexicons or not. This enabled us to…

  14. The efficient and unbiased estimation of nuclear size variability using the 'selector'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMillan, A M; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1992-01-01

    The selector was used to make an unbiased estimation of nuclear size variability in one benign naevocellular skin tumour and one cutaneous malignant melanoma. The results showed that the estimates obtained using the selector were comparable to those obtained using the more time consuming Cavalieri...

  15. Modeling grain-size dependent bias in estimating forest area: a regional application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolan Zheng; Linda S. Heath; Mark J. Ducey

    2008-01-01

    A better understanding of scaling-up effects on estimating important landscape characteristics (e.g. forest percentage) is critical for improving ecological applications over large areas. This study illustrated effects of changing grain sizes on regional forest estimates in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan of the USA using 30-m land-cover maps (1992 and 2001)...

  16. Assessing the accuracy of wildland fire situation analysis (WFSA) fire size and suppression cost estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; Peter. Noordijk

    2005-01-01

    To determine the optimal suppression strategy for escaped wildfires, federal land managers are requiredto conduct a wildland fire situation analysis (WFSA). As part of the WFSA process, fire managers estimate final fire size and suppression costs. Estimates from 58 WFSAs conducted during the 2002 fire season are compared to actual outcomes. Results indicate that...

  17. Taylor dispersion analysis compared to dynamic light scattering for the size analysis of therapeutic peptides and proteins and their aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawe, Andrea; Hulse, Wendy L; Jiskoot, Wim; Forbes, Robert T

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) as a novel method for determination of hydrodynamic radius of therapeutic peptides and proteins in non-stressed and stressed formulations and to compare it with dynamic light scattering (DLS). The hydrodynamic radius of oxytocin, bovine serum albumin, various monoclonal antibodies (type IgG) and etanercept at concentrations between 0.05 and 50 mg/ml was determined by TDA and DLS. IgGs and etanercept were stressed (elevated temperatures) and analyzed by TDA, DLS and HP-SEC. TDA and DLS were comparable in sizing non-stressed peptides and proteins in a concentration range of about 0.5 to 50 mg/ml. TDA performed well even at lower concentrations, where DLS tends to provide theoretically high values of the Z-average radius. However, because of differences in the detection physics, DLS was more weighted towards the detection of aggregates in stressed formulations than TDA. Advantageously, TDA was also able to size the small peptide oxytocin, which was not feasible by DLS. TDA allows the accurate determination of the hydrodynamic radius of peptides and proteins over a wide concentration range, with little interference from excipients present in the sample. It is marginally less sensitive than DLS in detecting size increase for stressed protein samples.

  18. Response for light scattered in the ocular fundus from double-pass and Hartmann-Shack estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Guerra, Carlos E; Aldaba, Mikel; Arjona, Montserrat; Díaz-Doutón, Fernando; Martínez-Roda, Joan A; Pujol, Jaume

    2016-11-01

    Double-pass (DP) and Hartmann-Shack (HS) are complementary techniques based on reflections of light in the ocular fundus that may be used to estimate the optical properties of the human eye. Under conventional data processing, both of these assessment modes provide information on aberrations. In addition, DP data contain the effects of scattering. In the ocular fundus, this phenomenon may arise from the interaction of light with not only the retina, but also deeper layers up to which certain wavelengths may penetrate. In this work, we estimate the response of the ocular fundus to incident light by fitting the deviations between DP and HS estimations using an exponential model. In measurements with negligible intraocular scattering, such differences may be related to the lateral spreading of light that occurs in the ocular fundus due to the diffusive properties of the media at the working wavelength. The proposed model was applied in young healthy eyes to evaluate the performance of scattering in such a population. Besides giving a parameter with information on the ocular fundus, the model contributes to the understanding of the differences between DP and HS estimations.

  19. Acoustic Estimates of Distribution and Biomass of Different Acoustic Scattering Types Between the New England Shelf Break and Slope Waters

    KAUST Repository

    McLaren, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Due to their great ecological significance, mesopelagic fishes are attracting a wider audience on account of the large biomass they represent. Data from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) provided the opportunity to explore an unknown region of the North-West Atlantic, adjacent to one of the most productive fisheries in the world. Acoustic data collected during the cruise required the identification of acoustically distinct scattering types to make inferences on the migrations, distributions and biomass of mesopelagic scattering layers. Six scattering types were identified by the proposed method in our data and traces their migrations and distributions in the top 200m of the water column. This method was able to detect and trace the movements of three scattering types to 1000m depth, two of which can be further subdivided. This process of identification enabled the development of three physically-derived target-strength models adapted to traceable acoustic scattering types for the analysis of biomass and length distribution to 1000m depth. The abundance and distribution of acoustic targets varied closely in relation to varying physical environments associated with a warm core ring in the New England continental Shelf break region. The continental shelf break produces biomass density estimates that are twice as high as the warm core ring and the surrounding continental slope waters are an order of magnitude lower than either estimate. Biomass associated with distinct layers is assessed and any benefits brought about by upwelling at the edge of the warm core ring are shown not to result in higher abundance of deepwater species. Finally, asymmetric diurnal migrations in shelf break waters contrasts markedly with the symmetry of migrating layers within the warm ring, both in structure and density estimates, supporting a theory of predatorial and nutritional constraints to migrating pelagic species.

  20. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the

  1. Size-based estimation of the status of fish stocks: simulation analysis and comparison with age-based estimations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkalis, Alexandros; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Nielsen, Anders

    Estimation of the status of fish stocks is important for sustainable management. Data limitations and data quality hinder this task. The commonly used age-based approaches require information about individual age, which is costly and relatively inaccurate. In contrast, the size of organisms...... is linked to physiology more directly than is age, and can be measured easier with less cost. In this work we used a single-species size-based model to estimate the fishing mortality (F) and the status of the stock, quantified by the ratio F/Fmsy between actual fishing mortality and the fishing mortality...... which leads to the maximum sustainable yield. A simulation analysis was done to investigate the sensitivity of the estimation and its improvement when stock specific life history information is available. To evaluate our approach with real observations, data-rich fish stocks, like the North Sea cod...

  2. Resonance estimates for single spin asymmetries in elastic electron-nucleon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara Pasquini; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2004-07-01

    We discuss the target and beam normal spin asymmetries in elastic electron-nucleon scattering which depend on the imaginary part of two-photon exchange processes between electron and nucleon. We express this imaginary part as a phase space integral over the doubly virtual Compton scattering tensor on the nucleon. We use unitarity to model the doubly virtual Compton scattering tensor in the resonance region in terms of {gamma}* N {yields} {pi} N electroabsorption amplitudes. Taking those amplitudes from a phenomenological analysis of pion electroproduction observables, we present results for beam and target normal single spin asymmetries for elastic electron-nucleon scattering for beam energies below 1 GeV and in the 1-3 GeV region, where several experiments are performed or are in progress.

  3. Neurocognitive aspects of body size estimation - A study of contemporary dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Bizerra

    Full Text Available Abstract Dancers use multiple forms of body language when performing their functions in the contemporary dance scene. Some neurocognitive aspects are involved in dance, and we highlight the aspect of body image, in particular, the dimensional aspect of the body perception. The aim of this study is to analyze the perceptual aspect of body image (body size estimation and its possible association with the motor aspect (dynamic balance involved in the practice of dance, comparing contemporary dancers with physically active and inactive individuals. The sample consisted of 48 subjects divided into four groups: 1 Professional Group (PG; 2 Dance Student Group (SG; 3 Physically Active Group (AG; and 4 Physically Inactive Group (IG.Two tests were used: the Image Marking Procedure (body size estimation and the Star Excursion Balance Test (dynamic balance. Was observed that dancing and exercising contribute to a proper body size estimation, but cannot be considered the only determining factor. Although dancers have higher ability in the motor test (dynamic balance, no direct relation to the perception of body size was observed, leading us to conclude it is a skill task/dependent acquired by repeating and training. In this study, we found a statistical significant association between educational level and body size estimation. The study opens new horizons in relation to the understanding of factors involved in the construction of the body size estimation.

  4. Dietary iron-loaded rat liver haemosiderin and ferritin: in situ measurement of iron core nanoparticle size and cluster structure using anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovell, Eliza; Buckley, Craig E.; Chua-anusorn, Wanida; Cookson, David; Kirby, Nigel; Saunders, Martin; St. Pierre, Timothy G.

    2009-03-01

    The morphology, particle size distribution and cluster structure of the hydrated iron(III) oxyhydroxide particles associated with haemosiderin and ferritin in dietary iron-loaded rat liver tissue have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering (ASAXS). Rat liver tissue was removed from a series of female Porton rats which had been fed an iron-rich diet until sacrifice at various ages from 2-24 months. Hepatic iron concentrations ranged from 1 to 65 mg Fe g-1 dry tissue. TEM studies showed both dispersed and clustered iron-containing nanoparticles. The dispersed particles were found to have mean sizes (±standard deviation) of 54 ± 8 Å for the iron-loaded animals and 55 ± 7 Å for the controls. Superposition of particles in TEM images prevented direct measurement of nanoparticulate size in the clusters. The ASAXS data were modelled to provide a quantitative estimate of both the size and spacing of iron oxyhydroxide particles in the bulk samples. The modelling yielded close-packed particles with sizes of 60 to 78 Å which when corrected for anomalous scattering suggests sizes from 54 to 70 Å. Particle size distributions are of particular importance since they determine the surface iron to core iron ratios, which in turn are expected to be related to the molar toxicity of iron deposits in cells.

  5. Gluttonous predators: how to estimate prey size when there are too many prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS. Araújo

    Full Text Available Prey size is an important factor in food consumption. In studies of feeding ecology, prey items are usually measured individually using calipers or ocular micrometers. Among amphibians and reptiles, there are species that feed on large numbers of small prey items (e.g. ants, termites. This high intake makes it difficult to estimate prey size consumed by these animals. We addressed this problem by developing and evaluating a procedure for subsampling the stomach contents of such predators in order to estimate prey size. Specifically, we developed a protocol based on a bootstrap procedure to obtain a subsample with a precision error of at the most 5%, with a confidence level of at least 95%. This guideline should reduce the sampling effort and facilitate future studies on the feeding habits of amphibians and reptiles, and also provide a means of obtaining precise estimates of prey size.

  6. Body size estimation and body dissatisfaction in eating disorder patients and normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, F; Probst, M; Meermann, R; Vandereycken, W

    1994-11-01

    In this study comparing 41 eating disorder patients and 34 female controls, the video distortion technique was used to test the accuracy of body size estimation and to assess the ideal body image. No difference was found in the estimation of actual body sizes, although the accuracy of estimation was quite variable in both bulimics and anorexics. With regard to the ideal body image, significant differences were found: All bulimics and 92.6% of the controls wished to be thinner versus 42.9% of the anorexics (23.8% wished to be larger). Looking at subjective body experience, as measured with a self-report questionnaire (Body Attitudes Test), body dissatisfaction appeared to be negatively correlated with the ideal body image but not with the estimation of actual body sizes.

  7. Body mass estimates of hominin fossils and the evolution of human body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Mark; Hatala, Kevin G; Jungers, William L; Richmond, Brian G

    2015-08-01

    Body size directly influences an animal's place in the natural world, including its energy requirements, home range size, relative brain size, locomotion, diet, life history, and behavior. Thus, an understanding of the biology of extinct organisms, including species in our own lineage, requires accurate estimates of body size. Since the last major review of hominin body size based on postcranial morphology over 20 years ago, new fossils have been discovered, species attributions have been clarified, and methods improved. Here, we present the most comprehensive and thoroughly vetted set of individual fossil hominin body mass predictions to date, and estimation equations based on a large (n = 220) sample of modern humans of known body masses. We also present species averages based exclusively on fossils with reliable taxonomic attributions, estimates of species averages by sex, and a metric for levels of sexual dimorphism. Finally, we identify individual traits that appear to be the most reliable for mass estimation for each fossil species, for use when only one measurement is available for a fossil. Our results show that many early hominins were generally smaller-bodied than previously thought, an outcome likely due to larger estimates in previous studies resulting from the use of large-bodied modern human reference samples. Current evidence indicates that modern human-like large size first appeared by at least 3-3.5 Ma in some Australopithecus afarensis individuals. Our results challenge an evolutionary model arguing that body size increased from Australopithecus to early Homo. Instead, we show that there is no reliable evidence that the body size of non-erectus early Homo differed from that of australopiths, and confirm that Homo erectus evolved larger average body size than earlier hominins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Validity of Dynamic Light Scattering Method to Analyze a Range of Gold and Copper Nanoparticle Sizes Attained by Solids Laser Ablation in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Golubenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of metals possess a whole series of features, concerned with it’s sizes, this leads to appearing or unusual electromagnetic and optical properties, which are untypical for particulates.An extended method of receiving nanoparticles by means of laser radiation is pulse laser ablation of hard targets in liquid medium.Varying the parameters of laser radiation, such as wavelength of laser radiation, energy density, etc., we can operate the size and shape of the resultant particles.The greatest trend of application in medicine have the nanoparticles of iron, copper, silver, silicon, magnesium, gold and zinc.The subject matter in this work is nanoparticles of copper and gold, received by means of laser ablation of hard targets in liquid medium.The aim of exploration, represented in the article, is the estimation of application of the dynamic light scattering method for determination of the range of nanoparticles sizes in the colloidal solution.For studying of the laser ablation process was chosen the second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength of 532 nm. Special attention was spared for the description of the experiment technique of receiving of nanoparticles.As the liquid medium ethanol and distillation water were used.For exploration of the received colloidal system have been used the next methods: DLS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.The results of measuring by DLS method showed that colloidal solution of the copper in the ethanol is the steady system. Copper nanoparticle’s size reaches 200 nm and is staying in the same size for some time.Received system from the gold’s nanoparticles is polydisperse, unsteady and has a big range of the nanoparticle’s sizes. This fact was confirmed by means of photos, got from the TEM FEI Tecnai G2F20 + GIF and SEM Helios NanoLab 660. The range of the gold nanoparticle’s sizes is from 5 to 60 nm. So, it has been proved that the DLS method is

  9. Estimation of the ancestral effective population sizes of African great apes under different selection regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-08-01

    Reliable estimates of ancestral effective population sizes are necessary to unveil the population-level phenomena that shaped the phylogeny and molecular evolution of the African great apes. Although several methods have previously been applied to infer ancestral effective population sizes, an analysis of the influence of the selective regime on the estimates of ancestral demography has not been thoroughly conducted. In this study, three independent data sets under different selective regimes were used were composed to tackle this issue. The results showed that selection had a significant impact on the estimates of ancestral effective population sizes of the African great apes. The inference of the ancestral demography of African great apes was affected by the selection regime. The effects, however, were not homogeneous along the ancestral populations of great apes. The effective population size of the ancestor of humans and chimpanzees was more impacted by the selection regime when compared to the same parameter in the ancestor of humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Because the selection regime influenced the estimates of ancestral effective population size, it is reasonable to assume that a portion of the discrepancy found in previous studies that inferred the ancestral effective population size may be attributable to the differential action of selection on the genes sampled.

  10. Finite-size effects on the lattice dynamics in spin crossover nanomaterials. I. Nuclear inelastic scattering investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasek, Mirko; Félix, Gautier; Peng, Haonan; Rat, Sylvain; Terki, Férial; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Salmon, Lionel; Molnár, Gábor; Nicolazzi, William; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2017-07-01

    We report the investigation of the size evolution of lattice dynamics in spin crossover coordination nanoparticles of [ Fe (pyrazine ) (Ni (CN) 4) ] through nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) measurements. Vibrational properties in these bistable molecular materials are of paramount importance and NIS permits access to the partial vibrational density of states in both spin states [high spin (HS) and low spin (LS)] from which thermodynamical and mechanical properties can be extracted. We show that the size reduction leads to the presence of inactive metal centers with the coexistence of HS and LS vibrational modes. The confinement effect has only weak impact on the vibrational properties of nanoparticles, especially on the optical modes which remain almost unchanged. On the other hand, the acoustic modes are much more affected which results in the increase of the vibrational entropy and also the Debye sound velocity in the smallest particles (spin states. This stiffening may be due to the elastic surface stress exerted by the external environment. An evidence of the influence of the host matrix on the vibrational properties of the nanoparticles is also highlighted through the matrix dependence of the sound velocity.

  11. Effects of Sample Size on Estimates of Population Growth Rates Calculated with Matrix Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Ian J.; Bruna, Emilio M.; Bolker, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Matrix models are widely used to study the dynamics and demography of populations. An important but overlooked issue is how the number of individuals sampled influences estimates of the population growth rate (λ) calculated with matrix models. Even unbiased estimates of vital rates do not ensure unbiased estimates of λ–Jensen's Inequality implies that even when the estimates of the vital rates are accurate, small sample sizes lead to biased estimates of λ due to increased sampling variance. We investigated if sampling variability and the distribution of sampling effort among size classes lead to biases in estimates of λ. Methodology/Principal Findings Using data from a long-term field study of plant demography, we simulated the effects of sampling variance by drawing vital rates and calculating λ for increasingly larger populations drawn from a total population of 3842 plants. We then compared these estimates of λ with those based on the entire population and calculated the resulting bias. Finally, we conducted a review of the literature to determine the sample sizes typically used when parameterizing matrix models used to study plant demography. Conclusions/Significance We found significant bias at small sample sizes when survival was low (survival = 0.5), and that sampling with a more-realistic inverse J-shaped population structure exacerbated this bias. However our simulations also demonstrate that these biases rapidly become negligible with increasing sample sizes or as survival increases. For many of the sample sizes used in demographic studies, matrix models are probably robust to the biases resulting from sampling variance of vital rates. However, this conclusion may depend on the structure of populations or the distribution of sampling effort in ways that are unexplored. We suggest more intensive sampling of populations when individual survival is low and greater sampling of stages with high elasticities. PMID:18769483

  12. Effects of sample size on estimates of population growth rates calculated with matrix models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J Fiske

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Matrix models are widely used to study the dynamics and demography of populations. An important but overlooked issue is how the number of individuals sampled influences estimates of the population growth rate (lambda calculated with matrix models. Even unbiased estimates of vital rates do not ensure unbiased estimates of lambda-Jensen's Inequality implies that even when the estimates of the vital rates are accurate, small sample sizes lead to biased estimates of lambda due to increased sampling variance. We investigated if sampling variability and the distribution of sampling effort among size classes lead to biases in estimates of lambda. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data from a long-term field study of plant demography, we simulated the effects of sampling variance by drawing vital rates and calculating lambda for increasingly larger populations drawn from a total population of 3842 plants. We then compared these estimates of lambda with those based on the entire population and calculated the resulting bias. Finally, we conducted a review of the literature to determine the sample sizes typically used when parameterizing matrix models used to study plant demography. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found significant bias at small sample sizes when survival was low (survival = 0.5, and that sampling with a more-realistic inverse J-shaped population structure exacerbated this bias. However our simulations also demonstrate that these biases rapidly become negligible with increasing sample sizes or as survival increases. For many of the sample sizes used in demographic studies, matrix models are probably robust to the biases resulting from sampling variance of vital rates. However, this conclusion may depend on the structure of populations or the distribution of sampling effort in ways that are unexplored. We suggest more intensive sampling of populations when individual survival is low and greater sampling of stages with high

  13. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: impact on tumor size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ji Eun; Kim, Sung Hun; Lee, Ah Won

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p=0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; penhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimating the Size of a Large Network and its Communities from a Random Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Karbasi, Amin; Crawford, Forrest W

    2016-01-01

    Most real-world networks are too large to be measured or studied directly and there is substantial interest in estimating global network properties from smaller sub-samples. One of the most important global properties is the number of vertices/nodes in the network. Estimating the number of vertices in a large network is a major challenge in computer science, epidemiology, demography, and intelligence analysis. In this paper we consider a population random graph G = (V, E) from the stochastic block model (SBM) with K communities/blocks. A sample is obtained by randomly choosing a subset W ⊆ V and letting G(W) be the induced subgraph in G of the vertices in W. In addition to G(W), we observe the total degree of each sampled vertex and its block membership. Given this partial information, we propose an efficient PopULation Size Estimation algorithm, called PULSE, that accurately estimates the size of the whole population as well as the size of each community. To support our theoretical analysis, we perform an exhaustive set of experiments to study the effects of sample size, K, and SBM model parameters on the accuracy of the estimates. The experimental results also demonstrate that PULSE significantly outperforms a widely-used method called the network scale-up estimator in a wide variety of scenarios.

  15. Completeness of the fossil record: Estimating losses due to small body size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Roger A.; Maxwell, Phillip A.; Crampton, James S.; Beu, Alan G.; Jones, Craig M.; Marshall, Bruce A.

    2006-04-01

    Size bias in the fossil record limits its use for interpreting patterns of past biodiversity and ecological change. Using comparative size frequency distributions of exceptionally good regional records of New Zealand Holocene and Cenozoic Mollusca in museum archive collections, we derive first-order estimates of the magnitude of the bias against small body size and the effect of this bias on completeness of the fossil record. Our database of 3907 fossil species represents an original living pool of 9086 species, from which ˜36% have been removed by size culling, 27% from the smallest size class (<5 mm). In contrast, non-size-related losses compose only 21% of the total. In soft rocks, the loss of small taxa can be reduced by nearly 50% through the employment of exhaustive collection and preparation techniques.

  16. Size effects and charge transport in metals: Quantum theory of the resistivity of nanometric metallic structures arising from electron scattering by grain boundaries and by rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Raul C.; Arenas, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    1977; (iii) The current in the sample should be proportional to TN, the probability that an electron traverses N consecutive (disordered) grains found along a mean free path; MS assumed that TN = 1. We review unpublished details of a quantum transport theory based upon a model of diffusive transport and Kubo's linear response formalism recently published [Arenas et al., Appl. Surf. Sci. 329, 184 (2015)], which permits estimating the increase in resistivity of a metallic specimen (over the bulk resistivity) under the combined effects of electron scattering by phonons, impurities, disordered grain boundaries, and rough surfaces limiting the sample. We evaluate the predicting power of both the MS theory and of the new quantum model on samples where the temperature dependence of the resistivity has been measured between 4 K and 300 K, and where surface roughness and grain size distribution has been measured on each sample via independent experiments. We find that the quantum theory does exhibit a predicting power, whereas the predicting power of the MS model as well as the significance and reliability of its fitting parameters seems questionable. We explore the power of the new theory by comparing, for the first time, the resistivity predicted and measured on nanometric Cu wires of (approximately) rectangular cross section employed in building integrated circuits, based upon a quantum description of electron motion.

  17. The effects of fresh and rapid desiccated tissue on estimates of Ophiopogoneae genome size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyan Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fresh plant material is usually used for genome size estimation by flow cytometry (FCM. Lack of fresh material is cited as one of the main reasons for the dearth of studies on plants from remote locations. Genome sizes in fresh versus desiccated tissue of 16 Ophiopogoneae species and five model plant species were estimated. Our results indicated that desiccated tissue was suitable for genome size estimation; this method enables broader geographic sampling of plants when fresh tissue collection is not feasible. To be useful, after dessication the Ophiopogoneae sample should be green without brown or yellow markings; it should be stored in deep freezer at −80 °C, and the storage time should be no more than 6 months.

  18. Estimating Effect Sizes and Expected Replication Probabilities from GWAS Summary Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Dominic; Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K

    2016-01-01

    -scores, as such knowledge would enhance causal SNP and gene discovery, help elucidate mechanistic pathways, and inform future study design. Here we present a parsimonious methodology for modeling effect sizes and replication probabilities, relying only on summary statistics from GWAS substudies, and a scheme allowing......Genome-wide Association Studies (GWAS) result in millions of summary statistics ("z-scores") for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with phenotypes. These rich datasets afford deep insights into the nature and extent of genetic contributions to complex phenotypes such as psychiatric...... 9.3 million SNP z-scores in both cases. We show that, over a broad range of z-scores and sample sizes, the model accurately predicts expectation estimates of true effect sizes and replication probabilities in multistage GWAS designs. We assess the degree to which effect sizes are over-estimated when...

  19. Estimation of Tree Size Diversity Using Object Oriented Texture Analysis and Aster Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozdemir Senturk

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the potential of object-based texture parameters extracted from 15m spatial resolution ASTER imagery for estimating tree size diversity in a Mediterranean forested landscape in Turkey. Tree size diversity based on tree basal area was determined using the Shannon index and Gini Coefficient at the sampling plot level. Image texture parameters were calculated based on the grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM for various image segmentation levels. Analyses of relationships between tree size diversity and texture parameters found that relationships between the Gini Coefficient and the GLCM values were the most statistically significant, with the highest correlation (r=0.69 being with GLCM Homogeneity values. In contrast, Shannon Index values were weakly correlated with image derived texture parameters. The results suggest that 15m resolution Aster imagery has considerable potential in estimating tree size diversity based on the Gini Coefficient for heterogeneous Mediterranean forests.

  20. Sample size estimation and sampling techniques for selecting a representative sample

    OpenAIRE

    Aamir Omair

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this article is to provide a general understanding of the concepts of sampling as applied to health-related research. Sample Size Estimation: It is important to select a representative sample in quantitative research in order to be able to generalize the results to the target population. The sample should be of the required sample size and must be selected using an appropriate probability sampling technique. There are many hidden biases which can adversely affect ...

  1. Brief Report: Body Image in Autism: Evidence from Body Size Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Kosuke; Tojo, Yoshikuni; Hakarino, Koichiro; Saito, Atsuko; Hasegawa, Toshikazu; Kumagaya, Shinichiro

    2018-02-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficulties with social interaction and communication. First-hand accounts written by individuals with ASD have shown the existence of other atypical characteristics such as difficulties with body awareness. However, few studies have examined whether such atypicalities are found more generally among individuals with ASD. We examined body image (i.e., self-body awareness) by asking individuals with ASD and typically developing (TD) individuals to estimate their own body size (shoulder width). Results show that TD individuals estimated their shoulder width more accurately than individuals with ASD. This study suggests that individuals with ASD often experience misperceptions in their body size.

  2. Grid Size Selection for Nonlinear Least-Squares Optimization in Spectral Estimation and Array Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Kjær; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    2016-01-01

    In many spectral estimation and array processing problems, the process of finding estimates of model parameters often involves the optimisation of a cost function containing multiple peaks and dips. Such non-convex problems are hard to solve using traditional optimisation algorithms developed...... for convex problems, and computationally intensive grid searches are therefore often used instead. In this paper, we establish an analytical connection between the grid size and the parametrisation of the cost function so that the grid size can be selected as coarsely as possible to lower the computation...

  3. DIRECT AND INDIRECT ESTIMATES OF NEIGHBORHOOD AND EFFECTIVE POPULATION SIZE IN A TROPICAL PALM, ASTROCARYUM MEXICANUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguiarte, Luis E; Búrquez, Alberto; Rodríguez, Jorge; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Sarukhán, José; Pinero, Daniel

    1993-02-01

    To estimate the relative importance of genetic drift, the effective population size ∗∗∗(Ne ) can be used. Here we present estimates of the effective population size and related measures in Astrocaryum mexicanum, a tropical palm from Los Tuxtlas rain forest, Veracruz, Mexico. Seed and pollen dispersal were measured. Seeds are primarily dispersed by gravity and secondarily dispersed by small mammals. Mean primary and secondary dispersal distances for seeds were found to be small (0.78 m and 2.35 m, respectively). A. mexicanum is beetle pollinated and pollen movements were measured by different methods: a) using fluorescent dyes, b) as the minimum distance between active female and male inflorescences, and c) using rare allozyme alleles as genetic markers. All three estimates of pollen dispersal were similar, with a mean of approximately 20 m. Using the seed and pollen dispersal data, the genetic neighborhood area (A) was estimated to be 2,551 m(2) . To obtain the effective population size, three different overlapping generation methods were used to estimate an effective density with demographic data from six permanent plots. The effective density ranged from 0.040 to 0.351 individuals per m(2) . The product of effective density and neighborhood area yields a direct estimate of the neighborhood effective population size (Nb ). Nb ranged from 102 to 895 individuals. Indirect estimates of population size and migration rate (Nm) were obtained using Fst for five different allozymic loci for both adults and seeds. We obtained a range of Nm from 1.2 to 19.7 in adults and a range of Nm from 4.0 to 82.6 for seeds. We discuss possible causes of the smaller indirect estimates of Nm relative to the direct and compare our estimates with values from other plant populations. Gene dispersal distances, neighborhood size, and effective population size in A. mexicanum are relatively high, suggesting that natural selection, rather than genetic drift, may play a dominant role in

  4. Equations for hydraulic conductivity estimation from particle size distribution: A dimensional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Peng; François, Bertrand; Lambert, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    Estimating hydraulic conductivity from particle size distribution (PSD) is an important issue for various engineering problems. Classical models such as Hazen model, Beyer model, and Kozeny-Carman model usually regard the grain diameter at 10% passing (d10) as an effective grain size and the effects of particle size uniformity (in Beyer model) or porosity (in Kozeny-Carman model) are sometimes embedded. This technical note applies the dimensional analysis (Buckingham's ∏ theorem) to analyze the relationship between hydraulic conductivity and particle size distribution (PSD). The porosity is regarded as a dependent variable on the grain size distribution in unconsolidated conditions. It indicates that the coefficient of grain size uniformity and a dimensionless group representing the gravity effect, which is proportional to the mean grain volume, are the main two determinative parameters for estimating hydraulic conductivity. Regression analysis is then carried out on a database comprising 431 samples collected from different depositional environments and new equations are developed for hydraulic conductivity estimation. The new equation, validated in specimens beyond the database, shows an improved prediction comparing to using the classic models.

  5. A simple method for estimating the size of nuclei on fractal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    Determining the size of nuclei on complex surfaces remains a big challenge in aspects of biological, material and chemical engineering. Here the author reported a simple method to estimate the size of the nuclei in contact with complex (fractal) surfaces. The established approach was based on the assumptions of contact area proportionality for determining nucleation density and the scaling congruence between nuclei and surfaces for identifying contact regimes. It showed three different regimes governing the equations for estimating the nucleation site density. Nuclei in the size large enough could eliminate the effect of fractal structure. Nuclei in the size small enough could lead to the independence of nucleation site density on fractal parameters. Only when nuclei match the fractal scales, the nucleation site density is associated with the fractal parameters and the size of the nuclei in a coupling pattern. The method was validated by the experimental data reported in the literature. The method may provide an effective way to estimate the size of nuclei on fractal surfaces, through which a number of promising applications in relative fields can be envisioned.

  6. Estimating search engine index size variability: a 9-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Antal; Bogers, Toine; de Kunder, Maurice

    One of the determining factors of the quality of Web search engines is the size of their index. In addition to its influence on search result quality, the size of the indexed Web can also tell us something about which parts of the WWW are directly accessible to the everyday user. We propose a novel method of estimating the size of a Web search engine's index by extrapolating from document frequencies of words observed in a large static corpus of Web pages. In addition, we provide a unique longitudinal perspective on the size of Google and Bing's indices over a nine-year period, from March 2006 until January 2015. We find that index size estimates of these two search engines tend to vary dramatically over time, with Google generally possessing a larger index than Bing. This result raises doubts about the reliability of previous one-off estimates of the size of the indexed Web. We find that much, if not all of this variability can be explained by changes in the indexing and ranking infrastructure of Google and Bing. This casts further doubt on whether Web search engines can be used reliably for cross-sectional webometric studies.

  7. Iterative-Promoting Variable Step-size Least Mean Square Algorithm For Adaptive Sparse Channel Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Beiyi; Gui, Guan; Xu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Least mean square (LMS) type adaptive algorithms have attracted much attention due to their low computational complexity. In the scenarios of sparse channel estimation, zero-attracting LMS (ZA-LMS), reweighted ZA-LMS (RZA-LMS) and reweighted -norm LMS (RL1-LMS) have been proposed to exploit channel sparsity. However, these proposed algorithms may hard to make tradeoff between convergence speed and estimation performance with only one step-size. To solve this problem, we propose three sparse i...

  8. Identifying grain-size dependent errors on global forest area estimates and carbon studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolan Zheng; Linda S. Heath; Mark J. Ducey

    2008-01-01

    Satellite-derived coarse-resolution data are typically used for conducting global analyses. But the forest areas estimated from coarse-resolution maps (e.g., 1 km) inevitably differ from a corresponding fine-resolution map (such as a 30-m map) that would be closer to ground truth. A better understanding of changes in grain size on area estimation will improve our...

  9. TECHNIQUE OF ESTIMATE OF ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT LASER RADIATION IN BORON DOPED DIAMONDS BY INTENSITY OF RAMAN SCATTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Poklonskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of measurements of Raman scattering at the room temperature in air in boron doped synthetic diamonds (five with boron concentrations 2·1017; 6·1017; 2·1018; 1,7·1019; 1·1020 cm–3 and one intentionally undoped are presented. The laser with wavelength 532 nm was used for Raman scattering excitation. Dependences of integral intensity and halfwidth of diamond Raman line with respect to the doping level are presented. In the geometrical optics approximation an expression for doped to undoped integral intensity ratio is obtained. Qualitative estimates of conductivity of the studied samples are conducted. The obtained results can be applied for mapping of near-surface laser radiation absorption coefficient of synthetic single crystal diamonds and for their quality control.

  10. Estimation of T-cell repertoire diversity and clonal size distribution by Poisson abundance models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Nuno; Paulino, Carlos Daniel; Carneiro, Jorge

    2010-02-28

    The answer to many fundamental questions in Immunology requires the quantitative characterization of the T-cell repertoire, namely T cell receptor (TCR) diversity and clonal size distribution. An increasing number of repertoire studies are based on sequencing of the TCR variable regions in T-cell samples from which one tries to estimate the diversity of the original T-cell populations. Hitherto, estimation of TCR diversity was tackled either by a "standard" method that assumes a homogeneous clonal size distribution, or by non-parametric methods, such as the abundance-coverage and incidence-coverage estimators. However, both methods show caveats. On the one hand, the samples exhibit clonal size distributions with heavy right tails, a feature that is incompatible with the assumption of an equal frequency of every TCR sequence in the repertoire. Thus, this "standard" method produces inaccurate estimates. On the other hand, non-parametric estimators are robust in a wide range of situations, but per se provide no information about the clonal size distribution. This paper redeploys Poisson abundance models from Ecology to overcome the limitations of the above inferential procedures. These models assume that each TCR variant is sampled according to a Poisson distribution with a specific sampling rate, itself varying according to some Exponential, Gamma, or Lognormal distribution, or still an appropriate mixture of Exponential distributions. With these models, one can estimate the clonal size distribution in addition to TCR diversity of the repertoire. A procedure is suggested to evaluate robustness of diversity estimates with respect to the most abundant sampled TCR sequences. For illustrative purposes, previously published data on mice with limited TCR diversity are analyzed. Two of the presented models are more consistent with the data and give the most robust TCR diversity estimates. They suggest that clonal sizes follow either a Lognormal or an appropriate mixture of

  11. Genome-wide estimates of coancestry, inbreeding and effective population size in the Spanish Holstein population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Teresa Rodríguez-Ramilo

    Full Text Available Estimates of effective population size in the Holstein cattle breed have usually been low despite the large number of animals that constitute this breed. Effective population size is inversely related to the rates at which coancestry and inbreeding increase and these rates have been high as a consequence of intense and accurate selection. Traditionally, coancestry and inbreeding coefficients have been calculated from pedigree data. However, the development of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms has increased the interest of calculating these coefficients from molecular data in order to improve their accuracy. In this study, genomic estimates of coancestry, inbreeding and effective population size were obtained in the Spanish Holstein population and then compared with pedigree-based estimates. A total of 11,135 animals genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip were available for the study. After applying filtering criteria, the final genomic dataset included 36,693 autosomal SNPs and 10,569 animals. Pedigree data from those genotyped animals included 31,203 animals. These individuals represented only the last five generations in order to homogenise the amount of pedigree information across animals. Genomic estimates of coancestry and inbreeding were obtained from identity by descent segments (coancestry or runs of homozygosity (inbreeding. The results indicate that the percentage of variance of pedigree-based coancestry estimates explained by genomic coancestry estimates was higher than that for inbreeding. Estimates of effective population size obtained from genome-wide and pedigree information were consistent and ranged from about 66 to 79. These low values emphasize the need of controlling the rate of increase of coancestry and inbreeding in Holstein selection programmes.

  12. Genome-wide estimates of coancestry, inbreeding and effective population size in the Spanish Holstein population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ramilo, Silvia Teresa; Fernández, Jesús; Toro, Miguel Angel; Hernández, Delfino; Villanueva, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of effective population size in the Holstein cattle breed have usually been low despite the large number of animals that constitute this breed. Effective population size is inversely related to the rates at which coancestry and inbreeding increase and these rates have been high as a consequence of intense and accurate selection. Traditionally, coancestry and inbreeding coefficients have been calculated from pedigree data. However, the development of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms has increased the interest of calculating these coefficients from molecular data in order to improve their accuracy. In this study, genomic estimates of coancestry, inbreeding and effective population size were obtained in the Spanish Holstein population and then compared with pedigree-based estimates. A total of 11,135 animals genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip were available for the study. After applying filtering criteria, the final genomic dataset included 36,693 autosomal SNPs and 10,569 animals. Pedigree data from those genotyped animals included 31,203 animals. These individuals represented only the last five generations in order to homogenise the amount of pedigree information across animals. Genomic estimates of coancestry and inbreeding were obtained from identity by descent segments (coancestry) or runs of homozygosity (inbreeding). The results indicate that the percentage of variance of pedigree-based coancestry estimates explained by genomic coancestry estimates was higher than that for inbreeding. Estimates of effective population size obtained from genome-wide and pedigree information were consistent and ranged from about 66 to 79. These low values emphasize the need of controlling the rate of increase of coancestry and inbreeding in Holstein selection programmes.

  13. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: Impact on tumor size estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun, E-mail: rad-ksh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ah Won [Department of Hospital Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Objective: To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Methods: Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. Results: The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p = 0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; p < 0.001). The tumor of women negative for HER2 was more accurately estimated than those of women positive for HER2 (72.2% vs. 51.6%; p = 0.047). Conclusion: Moderate and marked background parenchymal enhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size.

  14. Sample Size Calculation for Estimating or Testing a Nonzero Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, K.; Xia, Yanping

    2008-01-01

    The problems of hypothesis testing and interval estimation of the squared multiple correlation coefficient of a multivariate normal distribution are considered. It is shown that available one-sided tests are uniformly most powerful, and the one-sided confidence intervals are uniformly most accurate. An exact method of calculating sample size to…

  15. Spatially-explicit estimation of Wright's neighborhood size in continuous populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Shirk; Samuel A. Cushman

    2014-01-01

    Effective population size (Ne) is an important parameter in conservation genetics because it quantifies a population's capacity to resist loss of genetic diversity due to inbreeding and drift. The classical approach to estimate Ne from genetic data involves grouping sampled individuals into discretely defined subpopulations assumed to be panmictic. Importantly,...

  16. Bias Corrections for Standardized Effect Size Estimates Used with Single-Subject Experimental Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugille, Maaike; Moeyaert, Mariola; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Ferron, John M.; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2014-01-01

    A multilevel meta-analysis can combine the results of several single-subject experimental design studies. However, the estimated effects are biased if the effect sizes are standardized and the number of measurement occasions is small. In this study, the authors investigated 4 approaches to correct for this bias. First, the standardized effect…

  17. B-graph sampling to estimate the size of a hidden population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreen, M.; Bogaerts, S.

    2015-01-01

    Link-tracing designs are often used to estimate the size of hidden populations by utilizing the relational links between their members. A major problem in studies of hidden populations is the lack of a convenient sampling frame. The most frequently applied design in studies of hidden populations is

  18. Effect of sieve mesh size on the estimation of benthic invertebrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterisation of benthic invertebrate communities, taxonomic abundance and composition provides information that is used during river bioassessment. However, the mesh size of the sieves used during processing of invertebrate samples may affect the estimation of taxonomic abundance and composition. In the current ...

  19. The use of 65Zn for estimating group size of brown hyaenas Hyaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R.J. van Aarde and J.D. Skinner. Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria. The applicability of a method of estimating group size based on the labelling of an individual within a group of hyaenas with the zinc isotope 65Zn is evaluated. This isotope is detectable in faeces and the method is based on the.

  20. Estimating the size of the potential market for the Kyoto flexibility mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Zhong Xiang

    1999-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol incorporates emissions trading, joint implementation and the clean development mechanism to help Annex I countries to meet their Kyoto targets at a lower overall cost. This paper aims to estimate the size of the potential market for all three flexibility mechanisms under the Kyoto

  1. Estimating the ratio of pond size to irrigated soybean land in Mississippi: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Ouyang; G. Feng; J. Read; T. D. Leininger; J. N. Jenkins

    2016-01-01

    Although more on-farm storage ponds have been constructed in recent years to mitigate groundwater resources depletion in Mississippi, little effort has been devoted to estimating the ratio of on-farm water storage pond size to irrigated crop land based on pond metric and its hydrogeological conditions.  In this study, two simulation scenarios were chosen to...

  2. Accounting for One-Group Clustering in Effect-Size Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citkowicz, Martyna; Hedges, Larry V.

    2013-01-01

    In some instances, intentionally or not, study designs are such that there is clustering in one group but not in the other. This paper describes methods for computing effect size estimates and their variances when there is clustering in only one group and the analysis has not taken that clustering into account. The authors provide the effect size…

  3. Estimation of direct response to truncation selection of litter size in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimation of direct response to truncation selection of litter size in largewhite flock of swine in MidWestern Nigeria. ... Correlation coefficient among the traits was low and not significant with reproduction (FRINT) and LITSZ being negatively correlated. LITSZ, WWT and FRINT showed positive response to selection while ...

  4. Use Of Crop Canopy Size To Estimate Water Requirements Of Vegetable Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planting time, plant density, variety, and cultural practices vary widely for horticultural crops. It is difficult to estimate crop water requirements for crops with these variations. Canopy size, or factional ground cover, as an indicator of intercepted sunlight, is related to crop water use. We...

  5. An Introduction to Confidence Intervals for Both Statistical Estimates and Effect Sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraro, Mary Margaret

    This paper summarizes methods of estimating confidence intervals, including classical intervals and intervals for effect sizes. The recent American Psychological Association (APA) Task Force on Statistical Inference report suggested that confidence intervals should always be reported, and the fifth edition of the APA "Publication Manual"…

  6. Limits to the reliability of size-based fishing status estimation for data-poor stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkalis, Alexandros; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Nielsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    in more than 60% of the cases, and almost always correctly assess whether a stock is subject to overfishing. Adding information about age, i.e., assuming that growth rate and asymptotic size are known, does not improve the estimation. Only knowledge of the ratio between mortality and growth led...

  7. Estimating group size and population density of Eurasian badgers Meles meles by quantifying latrine use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyttens, F.A.M.; Long, B.; Fawcett, T.W.; Skinner, A.; Brown, J.A.; Cheeseman, C.L.; Roddam, A.W.; MacDonald, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    1. Conservation issues and a potential role in disease transmission generate the continued need to census Eurasian badgers Meles metes, but direct counts and sett counts present difficulties. The feasibility of estimating social group size and population density of badgers by quantifying their use

  8. Estimating the ratio of pond size to irrigated soybeans land in Mississippi: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although more on-farm storage ponds have been constructed in recent years to mitigate groundwater resources depletion in Mississippi, little effort has been devoted to estimating the ratio of pond size to irrigated crop land based on pond matric and its hydrological conditions. Knowledge of this ra...

  9. "TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region. IV. Size/albedo characterization of 15 scattered disk and detached objects observed with Herschel-PACS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Fornasier, S.; Kiss, C.; Pal, A.; Müller, T. G.; Vilenius, E.; Stansberry, J.; Mommert, M.; Delsanti, A.; Mueller, M.; Peixinho, N.; Henry, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Thirouin, A.; Protopapa, S.; Duffard, R.; Szalai, N.; Lim, T.; Ejeta, C.; Hartogh, P.; Harris, A. W.; Rengel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Physical characterization of trans-Neptunian objects, a primitive population of the outer solar system, may provide constraints on their formation and evolution. Aims: The goal of this work is to characterize a set of 15 scattered disk (SDOs) and detached objects, in terms of their size,

  10. "TNOs are Cool" : A survey of the trans-Neptunian region IV. Size/albedo characterization of 15 scattered disk and detached objects observed with Herschel-PACS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Fornasier, S.; Kiss, C.; Pal, A.; Mueller, T. G.; Vilenius, E.; Stansberry, J.; Mommert, M.; Delsanti, A.; Mueller, M.; Peixinho, N.; Henry, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Thirouin, A.; Protopapa, S.; Duffard, R.; Szalai, N.; Lim, T.; Ejeta, C.; Hartogh, P.; Harris, A. W.; Rengel, M.

    Context. Physical characterization of trans-Neptunian objects, a primitive population of the outer solar system, may provide constraints on their formation and evolution. Aims. The goal of this work is to characterize a set of 15 scattered disk (SDOs) and detached objects, in terms of their size,

  11. Estimation of quantum correlations in magnetic materials by neutron scattering data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ben-Qiong, E-mail: losenq@caep.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wu, Lian-Ao, E-mail: lianaowu@gmail.com [Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science, The Basque Country University (EHU/UPV), PO Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain); Zeng, Guo-Mo [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Song, Jian-Ming; Luo, Wei; Lei, Yang; Sun, Guang-Ai; Chen, Bo; Peng, Shu-Ming [Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-10-24

    We demonstrate that inelastic neutron scattering technique can be used to indirectly detect and measure the macroscopic quantum correlations quantified by both entanglement and discord in a quantum magnetic material, VODPO{sub 4}⋅1/2 D{sub 2}O. The amount of quantum correlations is obtained by analyzing the neutron scattering data of magnetic excitations in isolated V{sup 4+} spin dimers. Our quantitative analysis shows that the critical temperature of this material can reach as high as T{sub c}=82.5 K, where quantum entanglement drops to zero. Significantly, quantum discord can even survive at T{sub c}=300 K and may be used in room temperature quantum devices. Taking into account the spin–orbit (SO) coupling, we also predict theoretically that entanglement can be significantly enhanced and the critical temperature T{sub c} increases with the strength of spin–orbit coupling. - Highlights: • We predict macroscopic quantum correlations in VODPO{sub 4} ⋅ 0.5D{sub 2}O by analyzing neutron scattering experimental data. • The critical temperature of VODPO{sub 4} ⋅ 0.5D{sub 2}O can reach as high as 82.5 K, where entanglement drops to 0. • Quantum discord can even survive at room temperature. • Entanglement can be enhanced and the critical temperature increases with the strength of DM interaction.

  12. Estimating population size of a nocturnal burrow-nesting seabird using acoustic monitoring and habitat mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Oppel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Population size assessments for nocturnal burrow-nesting seabirds are logistically challenging because these species are active in colonies only during darkness and often nest on remote islands where manual inspections of breeding burrows are not feasible. Many seabird species are highly vocal, and recent technological innovations now make it possible to record and quantify vocal activity in seabird colonies. Here we test the hypothesis that remotely recorded vocal activity in Cory’s shearwater (Calonectris borealis breeding colonies in the North Atlantic increases with nest density, and combined this relationship with cliff habitat mapping to estimate the population size of Cory’s shearwaters on the island of Corvo (Azores. We deployed acoustic recording devices in 9 Cory’s shearwater colonies of known size to establish a relationship between vocal activity and local nest density (slope = 1.07, R2 = 0.86, p < 0.001. We used this relationship to predict the nest density in various cliff habitat types and produced a habitat map of breeding cliffs to extrapolate nest density around the island of Corvo. The mean predicted nest density on Corvo ranged from 6.6 (2.1–16.2 to 27.8 (19.5–36.4 nests/ha. Extrapolation of habitat-specific nest densities across the cliff area of Corvo resulted in an estimate of 6326 Cory’s shearwater nests (95% confidence interval: 3735–10,524. This population size estimate is similar to previous assessments, but is too imprecise to detect moderate changes in population size over time. While estimating absolute population size from acoustic recordings may not be sufficiently precise, the strong positive relationship that we found between local nest density and recorded calling rate indicates that passive acoustic monitoring may be useful to document relative changes in seabird populations over time.

  13. Remote estimation of phytoplankton size fractions using the spectral shape of light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengqiang; Ishizaka, Joji; Hirawake, Toru; Watanabe, Yuji; Zhu, Yuanli; Hayashi, Masataka; Yoo, Sinjae

    2015-04-20

    Phytoplankton size structure plays an important role in ocean biogeochemical processes. The light absorption spectra of phytoplankton provide a great potential for retrieving phytoplankton size structure because of the strong dependence on the packaging effect caused by phytoplankton cell size and on different pigment compositions related to phytoplankton taxonomy. In this study, we investigated the variability in light absorption spectra of phytoplankton in relation to the size structure. Based on this, a new approach was proposed for estimating phytoplankton size fractions. Our approach use the spectral shape of the normalized phytoplankton absorption coefficient (a(ph)(λ)) through principal component analysis (PCA). Values of a(ph)(λ) were normalized to remove biomass effects, and PCA was conducted to separate the spectral variance of normalized a(ph)(λ) into uncorrelated principal components (PCs). Spectral variations captured by the first four PC modes were used to build relationships with phytoplankton size fractions. The results showed that PCA had powerful ability to capture spectral variations in normalized a(ph)(λ), which were significantly related to phytoplankton size fractions. For both hyperspectral a(ph)(λ) and multiband a(ph)(λ), our approach is applicable. We evaluated our approach using wide in situ data collected from coastal waters and the global ocean, and the results demonstrated a good and robust performance in estimating phytoplankton size fractions in various regions. The model performance was further evaluated by a(ph)(λ) derived from in situ remote sensing reflectance (R(rs)(λ)) with a quasi-analytical algorithm. Using R(rs)(λ) only at six bands, accurate estimations of phytoplankton size fractions were obtained, with R(2) values of 0.85, 0.61, and 0.76, and root mean-square errors of 0.130, 0.126, and 0.112 for micro-, nano-, and picophytoplankton, respectively. Our approach provides practical basis for remote estimation of

  14. In vivo lateral blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tiantian; Hozan, Mohsen; Bashford, Gregory R

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we proposed blood measurement using speckle size estimation, which estimates the lateral component of blood flow within a single image frame based on the observation that the speckle pattern corresponding to blood reflectors (typically red blood cells) stretches (i.e., is "smeared") if blood flow is in the same direction as the electronically controlled transducer line selection in a 2-D image. In this observational study, the clinical viability of ultrasound blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation was investigated and compared with that of conventional spectral Doppler of carotid artery blood flow data collected from human patients in vivo. Ten patients (six male, four female) were recruited. Right carotid artery blood flow data were collected in an interleaved fashion (alternating Doppler and B-mode A-lines) with an Antares Ultrasound Imaging System and transferred to a PC via the Axius Ultrasound Research Interface. The scanning velocity was 77 cm/s, and a 4-s interval of flow data were collected from each subject to cover three to five complete cardiac cycles. Conventional spectral Doppler data were collected simultaneously to compare with estimates made by speckle size estimation. The results indicate that the peak systolic velocities measured with the two methods are comparable (within ±10%) if the scan velocity is greater than or equal to the flow velocity. When scan velocity is slower than peak systolic velocity, the speckle stretch method asymptotes to the scan velocity. Thus, the speckle stretch method is able to accurately measure pure lateral flow, which conventional Doppler cannot do. In addition, an initial comparison of the speckle size estimation and color Doppler methods with respect to computational complexity and data acquisition time indicated potential time savings in blood flow velocity estimation using speckle size estimation. Further studies are needed for calculation of the speckle stretch method

  15. A simple method for estimating genetic diversity in large populations from finite sample sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajora Om P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sample size is one of the critical factors affecting the accuracy of the estimation of population genetic diversity parameters. Small sample sizes often lead to significant errors in determining the allelic richness, which is one of the most important and commonly used estimators of genetic diversity in populations. Correct estimation of allelic richness in natural populations is challenging since they often do not conform to model assumptions. Here, we introduce a simple and robust approach to estimate the genetic diversity in large natural populations based on the empirical data for finite sample sizes. Results We developed a non-linear regression model to infer genetic diversity estimates in large natural populations from finite sample sizes. The allelic richness values predicted by our model were in good agreement with those observed in the simulated data sets and the true allelic richness observed in the source populations. The model has been validated using simulated population genetic data sets with different evolutionary scenarios implied in the simulated populations, as well as large microsatellite and allozyme experimental data sets for four conifer species with contrasting patterns of inherent genetic diversity and mating systems. Our model was a better predictor for allelic richness in natural populations than the widely-used Ewens sampling formula, coalescent approach, and rarefaction algorithm. Conclusions Our regression model was capable of accurately estimating allelic richness in natural populations regardless of the species and marker system. This regression modeling approach is free from assumptions and can be widely used for population genetic and conservation applications.

  16. Estimates of the size of the Baltic grey seal population based on photo-identification data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lex Hiby

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The size of the year 2000 summer population of grey seals in the Baltic Sea was estimated using identification of individual seals from photographs taken over a period of 6 years. Photos were taken at haul-out sites within all major grey seal areas in the semi-closed Baltic Sea. The point estimate is 15,631, based on a value for annual survival of identification markings of 0.904, which was also estimated using the photo-id data, with 95% confidence limits from 9,592 to 19,005. The estimate is subject to an unknown, but probably small, upward bias resulting from the risk of failure to identify all individuals in the photographs used for the analysis. An estimated minimum of 15,950 seals were counted at moulting haul-outs in 2003, which thus provides a lower bound on the population size in that year and represents 80% of the photo-id point estimate.

  17. Extracting chemical information from spectral data with multiplicative light scattering effects by optical path-length estimation and correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zeng-Ping; Morris, Julian; Martin, Elaine

    2006-11-15

    When analyzing complex mixtures that exhibit sample-to-sample variability using spectroscopic instrumentation, the variation in the optical path length, resulting from the physical variations inherent within the individual samples, will result in significant multiplicative light scattering perturbations. Although a number of algorithms have been proposed to address the effect of multiplicative light scattering, each has associated with it a number of underlying assumptions, which necessitates additional information relating to the spectra being attained. This information is difficult to obtain in practice and frequently is not available. Thus, with a view to removing the need for the attainment of additional information, a new algorithm, optical path-length estimation and correction (OPLEC), is proposed. The methodology is applied to two near-infrared transmittance spectral data sets (powder mixture data and wheat kernel data), and the results are compared with the extended multiplicative signal correction (EMSC) and extended inverted signal correction (EISC) algorithms. Within the study, it is concluded that the EMSC algorithm cannot be applied to the wheat kernel data set due to core information for the implementation of the algorithm not being available, while the analysis of the powder mixture data using EISC resulted in incorrect conclusions being drawn and hence a calibration model whose performance was unacceptable. In contrast, OPLEC was observed to effectively mitigate the detrimental effects of physical light scattering and significantly improve the prediction accuracy of the calibration models for the two spectral data sets investigated without any additional information pertaining to the calibration samples being required.

  18. Estimation of Effective Transmission Loss Due to Subtropical Hydrometeor Scatters using a 3D Rain Cell Model for Centimeter and Millimeter Wave Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, J. S.; Owolawi, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of hydrometeor scattering on microwave radio communication down links continues to be of interest as the number of the ground and earth space terminals continually grows The interference resulting from the hydrometeor scattering usually leads to the reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR) at the affected terminal and at worst can even end up in total link outage. In this paper, an attempt has been made to compute the effective transmission loss due to subtropical hydrometeors on vertically polarized signals in Earth-satellite propagation paths in the Ku, Ka and V band frequencies based on the modified Capsoni 3D rain cell model. The 3D rain cell model has been adopted and modified using the subtropical log-normal distributions of raindrop sizes and introducing the equivalent path length through rain in the estimation of the attenuation instead of the usual specific attenuation in order to account for the attenuation of both wanted and unwanted paths to the receiver. The co-channels, interference at the same frequency is very prone to the higher amount of unwanted signal at the elevation considered. The importance of joint transmission is also considered.

  19. New method to estimate the sample size for calculation of a proportion assuming binomial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Adriana; Muniesa, Ana; Ferreira, Chelo; de Blas, Ignacio

    2013-10-01

    Nowadays the formula to calculate the sample size for estimate a proportion (as prevalence) is based on the Normal distribution, however it would be based on a Binomial distribution which confidence interval was possible to be calculated using the Wilson Score method. By comparing the two formulae (Normal and Binomial distributions), the variation of the amplitude of the confidence intervals is relevant in the tails and the center of the curves. In order to calculate the needed sample size we have simulated an iterative sampling procedure, which shows an underestimation of the sample size for values of prevalence closed to 0 or 1, and also an overestimation for values closed to 0.5. Attending to these results we proposed an algorithm based on Wilson Score method that provides similar values for the sample size than empirically obtained by simulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Body Size Estimation from Early to Middle Childhood: Stability of Underestimation, BMI, and Gender Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsbekk, Silje; Klöckner, Christian A; Fildes, Alison; Kristoffersen, Pernille; Rognsås, Stine L; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Individuals who are overweight are more likely to underestimate their body size than those who are normal weight, and overweight underestimators are less likely to engage in weight loss efforts. Underestimation of body size might represent a barrier to prevention and treatment of overweight; thus insight in how underestimation of body size develops and tracks through the childhood years is needed. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine stability in children's underestimation of body size, exploring predictors of underestimation over time. The prospective path from underestimation to BMI was also tested. In a Norwegian cohort of 6 year olds, followed up at ages 8 and 10 (analysis sample: n = 793) body size estimation was captured by the Children's Body Image Scale, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. Overall, children were more likely to underestimate than overestimate their body size. Individual stability in underestimation was modest, but significant. Higher BMI predicted future underestimation, even when previous underestimation was adjusted for, but there was no evidence for the opposite direction of influence. Boys were more likely than girls to underestimate their body size at ages 8 and 10 (age 8: 38.0% vs. 24.1%; Age 10: 57.9% vs. 30.8%) and showed a steeper increase in underestimation with age compared to girls. In conclusion, the majority of 6, 8, and 10-year olds correctly estimate their body size (prevalence ranging from 40 to 70% depending on age and gender), although a substantial portion perceived themselves to be thinner than they actually were. Higher BMI forecasted future underestimation, but underestimation did not increase the risk for excessive weight gain in middle childhood.

  1. Body Size Estimation from Early to Middle Childhood: Stability of Underestimation, BMI, and Gender Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje Steinsbekk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Individuals who are overweight are more likely to underestimate their body size than those who are normal weight, and overweight underestimators are less likely to engage in weight loss efforts. Underestimation of body size might represent a barrier to prevention and treatment of overweight; thus insight in how underestimation of body size develops and tracks through the childhood years is needed. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine stability in children’s underestimation of body size, exploring predictors of underestimation over time. The prospective path from underestimation to BMI was also tested. In a Norwegian cohort of 6 year olds, followed up at ages 8 and 10 (analysis sample: n = 793 body size estimation was captured by the Children’s Body Image Scale, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. Overall, children were more likely to underestimate than overestimate their body size. Individual stability in underestimation was modest, but significant. Higher BMI predicted future underestimation, even when previous underestimation was adjusted for, but there was no evidence for the opposite direction of influence. Boys were more likely than girls to underestimate their body size at ages 8 and 10 (age 8: 38.0% vs. 24.1%; Age 10: 57.9% vs. 30.8% and showed a steeper increase in underestimation with age compared to girls. In conclusion, the majority of 6, 8, and 10-year olds correctly estimate their body size (prevalence ranging from 40 to 70% depending on age and gender, although a substantial portion perceived themselves to be thinner than they actually were. Higher BMI forecasted future underestimation, but underestimation did not increase the risk for excessive weight gain in middle childhood.

  2. Effects of insecticide exposure on movement and population size estimates of predatory ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasifka, Jarrad R; Lopez, Miriam D; Hellmich, Richard L; Prasifka, Patricia L

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of arthropod population size may paradoxically increase following insecticide applications. Research with ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) suggests that such unusual results reflect increased arthropod movement and capture in traps rather than real changes in population size. However, it is unclear whether direct (hyperactivity) or indirect (prey-mediated) mechanisms produce increased movement. Video tracking of Scarites quadriceps Chaudior indicated that brief exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin or tefluthrin increased total distance moved, maximum velocity and percentage of time moving. Repeated measurements on individual beetles indicated that movement decreased 240 min after initial lambda-cyhalothrin exposure, but increased again following a second exposure, suggesting hyperactivity could lead to increased trap captures in the field. Two field experiments in which ground beetles were collected after lambda-cyhalothrin or permethrin application attempted to detect increases in population size estimates as a result of hyperactivity. Field trials used mark-release-recapture methods in small plots and natural carabid populations in larger plots, but found no significant short-term (field results suggests mechanisms other than hyperactivity may better explain unusual changes in population size estimates. When traps are used as a primary sampling tool, unexpected population-level effects should be interpreted carefully or with additional data less influenced by arthropod activity.

  3. PHENIX: An R package to estimate a size-controlled phenotypic integration index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torices, Rubén; Muñoz-Pajares, A Jesús

    2015-05-01

    Organisms usually show intercorrelations between all or some of their components leading to phenotypic integration, which may have deep consequences on the evolution of phenotypes. One of the main difficulties with phenotypic integration studies is how to correct the integration measures for size. This has been considered a challenging task. In this paper, we introduce an R package (PHENIX: PHENotypic Integration indeX), in which we provide functions to estimate a size-controlled phenotypic integration index, a bootstrapping method to calculate confidence intervals, and a randomization method to simulate null distributions and test the statistical significance of the integration. PHENIX is an open source package written in R. As usual for R packages, the manual and sample data are available at: http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/PHENIX/index.html. Functions included in this package easily estimate phenotypic integration by controlling a third variable (e.g., the size of the studied organ). PHENIX helps to estimate and test the statistical significance of the magnitude of integration using one of the most-used methodological approaches, while taking size into account.

  4. Estimating the Size of a Large Network and its Communities from a Random Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Lin; Crawford, Forrest W

    2016-01-01

    Most real-world networks are too large to be measured or studied directly and there is substantial interest in estimating global network properties from smaller sub-samples. One of the most important global properties is the number of vertices/nodes in the network. Estimating the number of vertices in a large network is a major challenge in computer science, epidemiology, demography, and intelligence analysis. In this paper we consider a population random graph G = (V;E) from the stochastic block model (SBM) with K communities/blocks. A sample is obtained by randomly choosing a subset W and letting G(W) be the induced subgraph in G of the vertices in W. In addition to G(W), we observe the total degree of each sampled vertex and its block membership. Given this partial information, we propose an efficient PopULation Size Estimation algorithm, called PULSE, that correctly estimates the size of the whole population as well as the size of each community. To support our theoretical analysis, we perform an exhausti...

  5. Estimation of body-size traits by photogrammetry in large mammals to inform conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joel

    2012-10-01

    Photography, including remote imagery and camera traps, has contributed substantially to conservation. However, the potential to use photography to understand demography and inform policy is limited. To have practical value, remote assessments must be reasonably accurate and widely deployable. Prior efforts to develop noninvasive methods of estimating trait size have been motivated by a desire to answer evolutionary questions, measure physiological growth, or, in the case of illegal trade, assess economics of horn sizes; but rarely have such methods been directed at conservation. Here I demonstrate a simple, noninvasive photographic technique and address how knowledge of values of individual-specific metrics bears on conservation policy. I used 10 years of data on juvenile moose (Alces alces) to examine whether body size and probability of survival are positively correlated in cold climates. I investigated whether the presence of mothers improved juvenile survival. The posited latter relation is relevant to policy because harvest of adult females has been permitted in some Canadian and American jurisdictions under the assumption that probability of survival of young is independent of maternal presence. The accuracy of estimates of head sizes made from photographs exceeded 98%. The estimates revealed that overwinter juvenile survival had no relation to the juvenile's estimated mass (p change in harvest policy will increase survival. Furthermore, photographic imaging of growth of individual juvenile muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) over 3 Arctic winters revealed annual variability in size, which supports the idea that noninvasive monitoring may allow one to detect how some environmental conditions ultimately affect body growth. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  6. Analytical inversions in remote sensing of particle size distributions. I - Multispectral extinctions in the anomalous diffraction approximation. II Angular and spectral scattering in diffraction approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to analytical inversions in the remote sensing of particle size distributions, noting multispectral extinctions in anomalous diffraction approximation and angular and spectral scattering in diffraction approximation. A closed-form analytical inverse solution is derived in order to reconstruct the size distribution of atmospheric aerosols. The anomalous diffraction approximation to Mie's solution is used to describe the particles. Experimental data yield the geometrical area of aerosol polydispersion. Size distribution is thus found from a set of multispectral extinction measurements. In terms of the angular and spectral scattering of light in a narrow forward cone, it is shown that an analytical inverse solution may also be found for the Fraunhofer approximation to the Kirchhoff diffraction, and for an improved expression of this approximation due to Penndorf (1962) and Shifrin-Punina (1968).

  7. Population size estimation of female sex workers in Iran: Synthesis of methods and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Hamid; Karamouzian, Mohammad; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; McFarland, Willi; Mirzazadeh, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Estimating the number of key populations at risk of HIV is essential for planning, monitoring, and evaluating prevention, care, and treatment programmes. We conducted this study to estimate the number of female sex workers (FSW) in major cities of Iran. We used three population size estimation methods (i.e., wisdom of the crowds, multiplier method, and network scale-up) to calculate the number of FSW in 13 cities in Iran. The wisdom of the crowds and multiplier methods were integrated into a nationwide bio-behavioural surveillance survey in 2015, and the network scale-up method was included in a national survey of the general population in 2014. The median of the three methods was used to calculate the proportion of the adult female population who practice sex work in the 13 cities. These figures were then extrapolated to provide a national population size estimation of FSW across urban areas. The population size of FSW was 91,500 (95% Uncertainty Intervals [UIs] 61,400-117,700), corresponding to 1.43% (95% UIs 0.96-1.84) of the adult (i.e., 15-49 year-old) female population living in these 13 cities. The projected numbers of FSW for all 31 provincial capital cities were 130,800 (95% UIs 87,800-168,200) and 228,700 (95% UIs 153,500-294,300) for all urban settings in Iran. Using methods of comparable rigor, our study provided a data-driven national estimate of the population size of FSW in urban areas of Iran. Our findings provide vital information for enhancing HIV programme planning and lay a foundation for assessing the impact of harm reduction efforts within this marginalized population.

  8. Sample size estimation and sampling techniques for selecting a representative sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Omair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this article is to provide a general understanding of the concepts of sampling as applied to health-related research. Sample Size Estimation: It is important to select a representative sample in quantitative research in order to be able to generalize the results to the target population. The sample should be of the required sample size and must be selected using an appropriate probability sampling technique. There are many hidden biases which can adversely affect the outcome of the study. Important factors to consider for estimating the sample size include the size of the study population, confidence level, expected proportion of the outcome variable (for categorical variables/standard deviation of the outcome variable (for numerical variables, and the required precision (margin of accuracy from the study. The more the precision required, the greater is the required sample size. Sampling Techniques: The probability sampling techniques applied for health related research include simple random sampling, systematic random sampling, stratified random sampling, cluster sampling, and multistage sampling. These are more recommended than the nonprobability sampling techniques, because the results of the study can be generalized to the target population.

  9. Breast cancer size estimation with MRI in BRCA mutation carriers and other high risk patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, R.M., E-mail: r.mann@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bult, P., E-mail: p.bult@path.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Laarhoven, H.W.M. van, E-mail: h.vanlaarhoven@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Span, P.N., E-mail: p.span@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schlooz, M., E-mail: m.schlooz@chir.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Veltman, J., E-mail: j.veltman@zgt.nl [Hospital group Twente (ZGT), Department of Radiology, Almelo (Netherlands); Hoogerbrugge, N., E-mail: n.hoogerbrugge@gen.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Human Genetics, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Objective: To assess the value of breast MRI in size assessment of breast cancers in high risk patients, including those with a BRCA 1 or 2 mutation. Guidelines recommend invariably breast MRI screening for these patients and therapy is thus based on these findings. However, the accuracy of breast MRI for staging purposes is only tested in sporadic cancers. Methods: We assessed concordance of radiologic staging using MRI with histopathology in 49 tumors in 46 high risk patients (23 BRCA1, 12 BRCA2 and 11 Non-BRCA patients). The size of the total tumor area (TTA) was compared to pathology. In invasive carcinomas (n = 45) the size of the largest focus (LF) was also addressed. Results: Correlation of MRI measurements with pathology was 0.862 for TTA and 0.793 for LF. TTA was underestimated in 8(16%), overestimated in 5(10%), and correctly measured in 36(73%) cases. LF was underestimated in 4(9%), overestimated in 5(11%), and correctly measured in 36(80%) cases. Impact of BRCA 1 or 2 mutations on the quality of size estimation was not observed. Conclusions: Tumor size estimation using breast MRI in high risk patients is comparable to its performance in sporadic cancers. Therefore, breast MRI can safely be used for treatment planning.

  10. A simple nomogram for sample size for estimating sensitivity and specificity of medical tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra Rajeev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity and specificity measure inherent validity of a diagnostic test against a gold standard. Researchers develop new diagnostic methods to reduce the cost, risk, invasiveness, and time. Adequate sample size is a must to precisely estimate the validity of a diagnostic test. In practice, researchers generally decide about the sample size arbitrarily either at their convenience, or from the previous literature. We have devised a simple nomogram that yields statistically valid sample size for anticipated sensitivity or anticipated specificity. MS Excel version 2007 was used to derive the values required to plot the nomogram using varying absolute precision, known prevalence of disease, and 95% confidence level using the formula already available in the literature. The nomogram plot was obtained by suitably arranging the lines and distances to conform to this formula. This nomogram could be easily used to determine the sample size for estimating the sensitivity or specificity of a diagnostic test with required precision and 95% confidence level. Sample size at 90% and 99% confidence level, respectively, can also be obtained by just multiplying 0.70 and 1.75 with the number obtained for the 95% confidence level. A nomogram instantly provides the required number of subjects by just moving the ruler and can be repeatedly used without redoing the calculations. This can also be applied for reverse calculations. This nomogram is not applicable for testing of the hypothesis set-up and is applicable only when both diagnostic test and gold standard results have a dichotomous category.

  11. Body Image in Anorexia Nervosa: Body Size Estimation Utilising a Biological Motion Task and Eyetracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipou, Andrea; Rossell, Susan Lee; Gurvich, Caroline; Castle, David Jonathan; Troje, Nikolaus Friedrich; Abel, Larry Allen

    2016-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric condition characterised by a distortion of body image. However, whether individuals with AN can accurately perceive the size of other individuals' bodies is unclear. In the current study, 24 women with AN and 24 healthy control participants undertook two biological motion tasks while eyetracking was performed: to identify the gender and to indicate the walkers' body size. Anorexia nervosa participants tended to 'hyperscan' stimuli but did not demonstrate differences in how visual attention was directed to different body areas, relative to controls. Groups also did not differ in their estimation of body size. The hyperscanning behaviours suggest increased anxiety to disorder-relevant stimuli in AN. The lack of group difference in the estimation of body size suggests that the AN group was able to judge the body size of others accurately. The findings are discussed in terms of body image distortion specific to oneself in AN. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  12. Estimating effective population size from temporally spaced samples with a novel, efficient maximum-likelihood algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Tin-Yu J; Burt, Austin

    2015-05-01

    The effective population size [Formula: see text] is a key parameter in population genetics and evolutionary biology, as it quantifies the expected distribution of changes in allele frequency due to genetic drift. Several methods of estimating [Formula: see text] have been described, the most direct of which uses allele frequencies measured at two or more time points. A new likelihood-based estimator [Formula: see text] for contemporary effective population size using temporal data is developed in this article. The existing likelihood methods are computationally intensive and unable to handle the case when the underlying [Formula: see text] is large. This article tries to work around this problem by using a hidden Markov algorithm and applying continuous approximations to allele frequencies and transition probabilities. Extensive simulations are run to evaluate the performance of the proposed estimator [Formula: see text], and the results show that it is more accurate and has lower variance than previous methods. The new estimator also reduces the computational time by at least 1000-fold and relaxes the upper bound of [Formula: see text] to several million, hence allowing the estimation of larger [Formula: see text]. Finally, we demonstrate how this algorithm can cope with nonconstant [Formula: see text] scenarios and be used as a likelihood-ratio test to test for the equality of [Formula: see text] throughout the sampling horizon. An R package "NB" is now available for download to implement the method described in this article. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  13. Sediment grain size estimation using airborne remote sensing, field sampling, and robust statistic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Elena; Pereda, Raúl; Luis, Julio Manuel de; Medina, Raúl; Viguri, Javier

    2011-10-01

    Remote sensing has been used since the 1980s to study parameters in relation with coastal zones. It was not until the beginning of the twenty-first century that it started to acquire imagery with good temporal and spectral resolution. This has encouraged the development of reliable imagery acquisition systems that consider remote sensing as a water management tool. Nevertheless, the spatial resolution that it provides is not adapted to carry out coastal studies. This article introduces a new methodology for estimating the most fundamental physical property of intertidal sediment, the grain size, in coastal zones. The study combines hyperspectral information (CASI-2 flight), robust statistic, and simultaneous field work (chemical and radiometric sampling), performed over Santander Bay, Spain. Field data acquisition was used to build a spectral library in order to study different atmospheric correction algorithms for CASI-2 data and to develop algorithms to estimate grain size in an estuary. Two robust estimation techniques (MVE and MCD multivariate M-estimators of location and scale) were applied to CASI-2 imagery, and the results showed that robust adjustments give acceptable and meaningful algorithms. These adjustments have given the following R(2) estimated results: 0.93 in the case of sandy loam contribution, 0.94 for the silty loam, and 0.67 for clay loam. The robust statistic is a powerful tool for large dataset.

  14. Prospective Changes in Body Image Dissatisfaction among Adolescent Bariatric Patients: The Importance of Body Size Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, M.B.; Eshleman, K.E.; Reiter-Purtill, J.; Zeller, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Body image dissatisfaction (BID) is pervasive among patients presenting for bariatric surgery but significantly improves post-operatively. These findings are based primarily on studies of adults. Objective The objective of this study was to examine changes in BID among adolescents with extreme obesity from baseline/preoperative to 6 and 12 months following bariatric surgery using body size estimation. Setting Pediatric Medical Center. Methods BID was prospectively assessed among 16 adolescent bariatric patients (Mage=16.3±1.2, MBMI=66.2±12.0, 67% female) using a standard visual/perceptual measure [i.e., Stunkard Figure Rating Scale. Participants identified Current and Ideal body size, with a discrepancy score (Current – Ideal) indicating BID. Body size estimation ratings were compared to attitudinal (i.e., IWQOL-Kids: Body Esteem and Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents: Physical Appearance) body image scores, BMI (kg/m2), and Total weight-related quality of life (WRQOL). Results There was a significant reduction in Current body size (7.9 to 6.4, pbody size was related to BMI and %EWL but not attitudinal body image at each time point. Smaller Discrepancy (Current – Ideal) was associated with higher Total WRQOL (r=−0.68), with a trend towards significance for Body Esteem (r=−0.65) at 12 months. Conclusions Adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery experience significantly decreased BID within the first 12 months post-surgery, with the most substantial change between baseline and 6 months. Post-operative WRQOL is more closely associated to body size discrepancy than current body size. PMID:22154271

  15. Sediment Size Effects in Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter-Derived Estimates of Suspended Sediment Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Öztürk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Backscatter output from a 10 MHz acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV was used to quantify suspended sediment concentrations in a laboratory setting using sand-sized particles. The experiments included (a well-sorted sand samples ranging in size from 0.112 to 0.420 mm, obtained by the sieving of construction sand, (b different, known mixtures of these well-sorted fractions, and (c sieved natural beach sand with median sizes ranging from 0.112 to 0.325 mm. The tested concentrations ranged from 25 to 3000 mg•L−1. The backscatter output was empirically related to concentration and sediment size, and when non-dimensionalized by acoustic wavelength, a dimensionless sediment size gradation coefficient. Size-dependent upper and lower bounds on measurable concentrations were also established empirically. The range of measurable conditions is broad enough to make the approach useful for sand sizes and concentrations commonly encountered in nature. A new method is proposed to determine concentrations in cases of mixed-size sediment suspensions when only calibration data for well-sorted constituent sands are available. This approach could potentially allow better estimates when the suspended load is derived from but is not fully representative of the bed material, and when the size characteristics of the suspended material are varying in time over the period of interest. Differences in results between the construction and beach sands suggest that sediment shape may also need to be considered, and point to the importance of calibrating to sediments encountered at the site of interest.

  16. WAXS fat subtraction model to estimate differential linear scattering coefficients of fatless breast tissue: Phantom materials evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca; McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Develop a method to subtract fat tissue contributions to wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) signals of breast biopsies in order to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficients μ{sub s} of fatless tissue. Cancerous and fibroglandular tissue can then be compared independent of fat content. In this work phantom materials with known compositions were used to test the efficacy of the WAXS subtraction model. Methods: Each sample 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm thick was interrogated by a 50 kV 2.7 mm diameter beam for 3 min. A 25 mm{sup 2} by 1 mm thick CdTe detector allowed measurements of a portion of the θ = 6° scattered field. A scatter technique provided means to estimate the incident spectrum N{sub 0}(E) needed in the calculations of μ{sub s}[x(E, θ)] where x is the momentum transfer argument. Values of μ{sup ¯}{sub s} for composite phantoms consisting of three plastic layers were estimated and compared to the values obtained via the sum μ{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ∑}(x)=ν{sub 1}μ{sub s1}(x)+ν{sub 2}μ{sub s2}(x)+ν{sub 3}μ{sub s3}(x), where ν{sub i} is the fractional volume of the ith plastic component. Water, polystyrene, and a volume mixture of 0.6 water + 0.4 polystyrene labelled as fibphan were chosen to mimic cancer, fat, and fibroglandular tissue, respectively. A WAXS subtraction model was used to remove the polystyrene signal from tissue composite phantoms so that the μ{sub s} of water and fibphan could be estimated. Although the composite samples were layered, simulations were performed to test the models under nonlayered conditions. Results: The well known μ{sub s} signal of water was reproduced effectively between 0.5 < x < 1.6 nm{sup −1}. The μ{sup ¯}{sub s} obtained for the heterogeneous samples agreed with μ{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ∑}. Polystyrene signals were subtracted successfully from composite phantoms. The simulations validated the usefulness of the WAXS models for nonlayered biopsies. Conclusions: The methodology to

  17. Fruit Size Determines the Role of Three Scatter-Hoarding Rodents as Dispersers or Seed Predators of a Fleshy-Fruited Atacama Desert Shrub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loayza, Andrea P.; Squeo, Francisco A.

    2016-01-01

    Scatter-hoarding rodents can act as both predators and dispersers for many large-seeded plants because they cache seeds for future use, but occasionally forget them in sites with high survival and establishment probabilities. The most important fruit or seed trait influencing rodent foraging behavior is seed size; rodents prefer large seeds because they have higher nutritional content, but this preference can be counterbalanced by the higher costs of handling larger seeds. We designed a cafeteria experiment to assess whether fruit and seed size of Myrcianthes coquimbensis, an endangered desert shrub, influence the decision-making process during foraging by three species of scatter-hoarding rodents differing in body size: Abrothrix olivaceus, Phyllotis darwini and Octodon degus. We found that the size of fruits and seeds influenced foraging behavior in the three rodent species; the probability of a fruit being harvested and hoarded was higher for larger fruits than for smaller ones. Patterns of fruit size preference were not affected by rodent size; all species were able to hoard fruits within the entire range of sizes offered. Finally, fruit and seed size had no effect on the probability of seed predation, rodents typically ate only the fleshy pulp of the fruits offered and discarded whole, intact seeds. In conclusion, our results reveal that larger M. coquimbensis fruits have higher probabilities of being harvested, and ultimately of its seeds being hoarded and dispersed by scatter-hoarding rodents. As this plant has no other dispersers, rodents play an important role in its recruitment dynamics. PMID:27861550

  18. Nautilus at Risk – Estimating Population Size and Demography of Nautilus pompilius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Andrew; Bradshaw, Corey J. A.; Marshall, Justin

    2011-01-01

    The low fecundity, late maturity, long gestation and long life span of Nautilus suggest that this species is vulnerable to over-exploitation. Demand from the ornamental shell trade has contributed to their rapid decline in localized populations. More data from wild populations are needed to design management plans which ensure Nautilus persistence. We used a variety of techniques including capture-mark-recapture, baited remote underwater video systems, ultrasonic telemetry and remotely operated vehicles to estimate population size, growth rates, distribution and demographic characteristics of an unexploited Nautilus pompilius population at Osprey Reef (Coral Sea, Australia). We estimated a small and dispersed population of between 844 and 4467 individuals (14.6–77.4 km−2) dominated by males (83∶17 male∶female) and comprised of few juveniles (remote underwater video systems provide confidence for their more widespread use to assess efficiently the size and density of exploited and unexploited Nautilus populations worldwide. PMID:21347360

  19. ANN based Estimation of Ultra High Energy (UHE) Shower Size using Radio Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kalpana Roy; Datta, Pranayee; Sarma, Kandarpa Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Size estimation is a challenging area in the field of Ultra High Energy (UHE) showers where actual measurements are always associated with uncertainty of events and imperfections in detection mechanisms. The subtle variations resulting out of such factors incorporate certain random behaviour in the readings provided by shower detectors for subsequent processing. Field strength recorded by radio detectors may also be affected by this statistical nature. Hence there is a necessity of development of a system which can remain immune to such random behaviour and provide resilient readings to subsequent stages. Here, we propose a system based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) which accepts radio field strength recorded by radio detectors and provides estimates of shower sizes in the UHE region. The ANN in feed-forward form is trained with a range of shower events with which it can effectively handle the randomness observed in the detector reading due to imperfections in the experimental apparatus and related set-up.

  20. Sample size for estimation of the Pearson correlation coefficient in cherry tomato tests

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Giacomini Sari; Alessandro Dal’Col Lúcio; Cinthya Souza Santana; Dionatan Ketzer Krysczun; André Luís Tischler; Lucas Drebes

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the required sample size for estimation of the Pearson coefficient of correlation between cherry tomato variables. Two uniformity tests were set up in a protected environment in the spring/summer of 2014. The observed variables in each plant were mean fruit length, mean fruit width, mean fruit weight, number of bunches, number of fruits per bunch, number of fruits, and total weight of fruits, with calculation of the Pearson correlation matrix b...

  1. Estimating species and size composition of rockfishes to verify targets in acoustic surveys of untrawlable areas

    OpenAIRE

    Rooper, Christopher N.; Martin, Michael H.; Butler, John L.; Jones, Darin T.; Zimmermann, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Rockfish (Sebastes spp.) biomass is difficult to assess with standard bottom trawl or acoustic surveys because of their propensity to aggregate near the seafloor in highrelief areas that are inaccessible to sampling by trawling. We compared the ability of a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), a modified bottom trawl, and a stereo drop camera system (SDC) to identify rockfish species and estimate their size composition. The ability to discriminate species was highest for the bottom trawl...

  2. Estimates of the Size and Characteristics of the Resident Nonimmigrant Population in the United States: January 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report presents estimates of the size and characteristics of the resident nonimmigrant population in the United States. The estimates are daily averages for the...

  3. Beam Size Estimation from Luminosity Scans at the LHC During 2015 Proton Physics Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hostettler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    As a complementary method for measuring the beam size for high-intensity beams at 6.5 TeV flat-top energy, beam separation scans were done regularly at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during 2015 proton physics operation. The luminosities measured by the CMS experiment during the scans were used to derive the convoluted beam size and orbit offset bunch-by-bunch. This contribution will elaborate on the method used to derive plane-by-plane, bunch-by-bunch emittances from the scan data, including uncertainties and corrections. The measurements are then compared to beam size estimations from absolute luminosity, synchrotron light telescopes, and wire scanners. In particular, the evolution of the emittance over the course of several hours in collisions is studied and bunch-by-bunch differences are highlighted.

  4. A Method of Selecting the Block Size of BMM for Estimating Extreme Loads in Engineering Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme loads have a significant effect on the fatigue damage of components. The block maximum method (BMM is widely used to estimate extreme values in various fields. Selecting a reasonable block size for BMM is crucial to ensure that proper extreme values are extracted to get extreme sample to estimate extreme values. Aiming at this issue, this study proposed a comprehensive evaluation approach based on multiple-criteria decision making (MCDM method to select a proper block size. A wheel loader with six sections in one operating cycle was illustrated as an example. First, spading sections of each operating cycle were extracted and connected as extreme loads often occur at that section. Then extreme sample was obtained by BMM for fitting the generalized extreme value (GEV distribution. Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S test, Pearson’s Chi-Square (χ2 test, and average deviation in Probability Distribution Function (PDF are selected as the fitting test. The comprehensive weights are calculated by the maximum entropy principle. Finally, the optimal block size corresponding to the minimum comprehensive evaluation indicator is obtained and the result exhibited a good fitting effect. The proposed method can also be flexibly used in various situations to select a block size.

  5. Mammographic extent of microcalcifications and oestrogen receptor expression affect preoperative breast carcinoma in situ size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernet-Tomas, Maria; Mojal, Sergi; Gamero, Rocío; Nicolau, Pau; Rodríguez-Arana, Ana; Plancarte, Francisco; Corominas, Josep M; Serrano-Munne, Laia; Carreras, Ramon; Sabadell, Dolors

    2017-05-01

    The aim of our study was to establish which clinical, radiologic and pathologic factors could predict the risk of under- and overestimation of the breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) size when preoperatively measuring the maximum mammographic extent of microcalcifications (MEM). We made a retrospective review of patients with a DCIS treated in our Breast Unit between May 2005 and May 2012. Clinical, pathologic and radiologic data were evaluated as possible predictive factors for over- or underestimation of DCIS size when measuring MEM. We obtained precise measurements of MEM in 82 patients (84 DCIS lesions). Maximum MEM measurement correctly estimated maximum pathology size in 57 lesions (68.7 %). Patients with a correctly estimated DCIS, with an underestimated DCIS and with an overestimated DCIS significantly differed in DCIS ER expression (p = 0.022) and in maximum MEM measurement (p = 0.000). Constructing two ROC curves, we found that a maximum MEM measurement ≥25 mm and ER expression ≥90 % were both discrimination points for overestimation and ER ≤ 45 % was a discrimination point for underestimation. Using these cutoff points, we defined four groups of patients with different risks of over- and underestimation. Risk of over- or underestimation of DCIS size through MEM measurement depends on DCIS ER expression and MEM itself. Identifying which patients are at a significant risk of over- or underestimation could help the breast surgeon when discussing the surgical options with the patient.

  6. Application of the variability-size relationship to atmospheric aerosol studies: estimating aerosol lifetimes and ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol variability is examined as function of particle size for data collected over the Northern Indian Ocean in February 1999 as part of the INDOEX experiment. It was found that for particles believed to be of terrestrial or oceanic origin, the variability correlated with the average number concentration. For particles that are thought to be formed and grow in the atmosphere through coagulation and condensation an anticorrelation was observed, the minimum in variability coinciding with the maximum in the number concentration. Three altitude ranges were examined (0--1, 4--8 and 8--13 km and the minimum in variability was found to occur at lower particle sizes in the free troposphere (0.065 mm than in the boundary layer (0.165 mm. The observed variability has been compared to that generated by a numerical model in order to determine the relative importance of the physical processes. Modelled variability of 0.02 mm particles caused by nucleation was not observed in the measurements. A previously derived empirical relationship for aerosol residence time was compared with the measured variability as a function of bin size. The aerosol variability / residence time relationship was characterised by a coefficient (b at all altitudes and for both correlating and anticorrelating regimes. By combining the derived coefficient with the model predicted lifetime for 0.020 mm particles we estimated residence times and ages as a function of particle size and altitude. General agreement was found with previous estimates of aerosol residence time. In the upper atmosphere aerosols of 0.065 mm in size have residence times of approximately 1 month and can be transported on a hemispheric scale. The same size aerosol has a lifetime one order of magnitude less in the boundary layer and therefore will not be transported far from the source regions.

  7. Prospective changes in body image dissatisfaction among adolescent bariatric patients: the importance of body size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Megan B; Eshleman, Kate E; Reiter-Purtill, Jennifer; Zeller, Meg H

    2012-01-01

    Body image dissatisfaction (BID) is pervasive among patients presenting for bariatric surgery but improves significantly postoperatively. These findings have been determined primarily from studies of adults. The objective of the present study was to examine the changes in BID among adolescents with extreme obesity from baseline/preoperatively to 6 and 12 months after receiving bariatric surgery at a pediatric medical center using body size estimation. BID was prospectively assessed among 16 adolescent bariatric patients (mean age 16.3 ± 1.2 years, mean body mass index [BMI] 66.2 ± 12.0, 67% female) using a standard visual/perceptual measure (i.e., Stunkard Figure Rating Scale). Participants identified their current and ideal body size, with a discrepancy score (current minus ideal) indicating BID. The body size estimation ratings were compared with attitudinal (i.e., Impact of Weight on Quality Of Life-Kids: Body Esteem and Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents: Physical Appearance) body image scores, BMI, and total weight-related quality of life. A significant reduction occurred in the current body size (from 7.9 to 6.4, P trend toward significance for body esteem (r = -.65) at 12 months. Adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery experience a significantly decreased BID within the first 12 months after surgery, with the most substantial change occurring from baseline to 6 months. The postoperative weight-related quality of life is more closely associated with the body size discrepancy than with the current body size. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Low is large: spatial location and pitch interact in voice-based body size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Isenstein, Sari G E; Montano, Kelyn J; O'Connor, Jillian J M; Feinberg, David R

    2017-05-01

    The binding of incongruent cues poses a challenge for multimodal perception. Indeed, although taller objects emit sounds from higher elevations, low-pitched sounds are perceptually mapped both to large size and to low elevation. In the present study, we examined how these incongruent vertical spatial cues (up is more) and pitch cues (low is large) to size interact, and whether similar biases influence size perception along the horizontal axis. In Experiment 1, we measured listeners' voice-based judgments of human body size using pitch-manipulated voices projected from a high versus a low, and a right versus a left, spatial location. Listeners associated low spatial locations with largeness for lowered-pitch but not for raised-pitch voices, demonstrating that pitch overrode vertical-elevation cues. Listeners associated rightward spatial locations with largeness, regardless of voice pitch. In Experiment 2, listeners performed the task while sitting or standing, allowing us to examine self-referential cues to elevation in size estimation. Listeners associated vertically low and rightward spatial cues with largeness more for lowered- than for raised-pitch voices. These correspondences were robust to sex (of both the voice and the listener) and head elevation (standing or sitting); however, horizontal correspondences were amplified when participants stood. Moreover, when participants were standing, their judgments of how much larger men's voices sounded than women's increased when the voices were projected from the low speaker. Our results provide novel evidence for a multidimensional spatial mapping of pitch that is generalizable to human voices and that affects performance in an indirect, ecologically relevant spatial task (body size estimation). These findings suggest that crossmodal pitch correspondences evoke both low-level and higher-level cognitive processes.

  9. Interpreting surveys to estimate the size of the monarch butterfly population: Pitfalls and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasants, John M.; Zalucki, Myron P.; Oberhauser, Karen S.; Brower, Lincoln P.; Taylor, Orley R.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the change in the size of the eastern North American monarch butterfly summer population, studies have used long-term data sets of counts of adult butterflies or eggs per milkweed stem. Despite the observed decline in the monarch population as measured at overwintering sites in Mexico, these studies found no decline in summer counts in the Midwest, the core of the summer breeding range, leading to a suggestion that the cause of the monarch population decline is not the loss of Midwest agricultural milkweeds but increased mortality during the fall migration. Using these counts to estimate population size, however, does not account for the shift of monarch activity from agricultural fields to non-agricultural sites over the past 20 years, as a result of the loss of agricultural milkweeds due to the near-ubiquitous use of glyphosate herbicides. We present the counter-hypotheses that the proportion of the monarch population present in non-agricultural habitats, where counts are made, has increased and that counts reflect both population size and the proportion of the population observed. We use data on the historical change in the proportion of milkweeds, and thus monarch activity, in agricultural fields and non-agricultural habitats to show why using counts can produce misleading conclusions about population size. We then separate out the shifting proportion effect from the counts to estimate the population size and show that these corrected summer monarch counts show a decline over time and are correlated with the size of the overwintering population. In addition, we present evidence against the hypothesis of increased mortality during migration. The milkweed limitation hypothesis for monarch decline remains supported and conservation efforts focusing on adding milkweeds to the landscape in the summer breeding region have a sound scientific basis.

  10. Variance estimation, design effects, and sample size calculations for respondent-driven sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salganik, Matthew J

    2006-11-01

    Hidden populations, such as injection drug users and sex workers, are central to a number of public health problems. However, because of the nature of these groups, it is difficult to collect accurate information about them, and this difficulty complicates disease prevention efforts. A recently developed statistical approach called respondent-driven sampling improves our ability to study hidden populations by allowing researchers to make unbiased estimates of the prevalence of certain traits in these populations. Yet, not enough is known about the sample-to-sample variability of these prevalence estimates. In this paper, we present a bootstrap method for constructing confidence intervals around respondent-driven sampling estimates and demonstrate in simulations that it outperforms the naive method currently in use. We also use simulations and real data to estimate the design effects for respondent-driven sampling in a number of situations. We conclude with practical advice about the power calculations that are needed to determine the appropriate sample size for a study using respondent-driven sampling. In general, we recommend a sample size twice as large as would be needed under simple random sampling.

  11. Prediction accuracy of a sample-size estimation method for ROC studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Dev P

    2010-05-01

    Sample-size estimation is an important consideration when planning a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study. The aim of this work was to assess the prediction accuracy of a sample-size estimation method using the Monte Carlo simulation method. Two ROC ratings simulators characterized by low reader and high case variabilities (LH) and high reader and low case variabilities (HL) were used to generate pilot data sets in two modalities. Dorfman-Berbaum-Metz multiple-reader multiple-case (DBM-MRMC) analysis of the ratings yielded estimates of the modality-reader, modality-case, and error variances. These were input to the Hillis-Berbaum (HB) sample-size estimation method, which predicted the number of cases needed to achieve 80% power for 10 readers and an effect size of 0.06 in the pivotal study. Predictions that generalized to readers and cases (random-all), to cases only (random-cases), and to readers only (random-readers) were generated. A prediction-accuracy index defined as the probability that any single prediction yields true power in the 75%-90% range was used to assess the HB method. For random-case generalization, the HB-method prediction-accuracy was reasonable, approximately 50% for five readers and 100 cases in the pilot study. Prediction-accuracy was generally higher under LH conditions than under HL conditions. Under ideal conditions (many readers in the pilot study) the DBM-MRMC-based HB method overestimated the number of cases. The overestimates could be explained by the larger modality-reader variance estimates when reader variability was large (HL). The largest benefit of increasing the number of readers in the pilot study was realized for LH, where 15 readers were enough to yield prediction accuracy >50% under all generalization conditions, but the benefit was lesser for HL where prediction accuracy was approximately 36% for 15 readers under random-all and random-reader conditions. The HB method tends to overestimate the number of cases

  12. Revealing life-history traits by contrasting genetic estimations with predictions of effective population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Gili; Renan, Sharon; Templeton, Alan R; Bouskila, Amos; Saltz, David; Rubenstein, Daniel I; Bar-David, Shirli

    2017-12-22

    Effective population size, a central concept in conservation biology, is now routinely estimated from genetic surveys, and can also be theoretically-predicted from demographic, life-history and mating-system hypotheses. However, by evaluating the consistency of theoretical predictions with empirically-estimated effective size, insights can be gained regarding life-history characteristics, as well as the relative impact of different life-history traits on genetic drift. These insights can be used to design and inform management strategies aimed at increasing effective population size. Here we describe and demonstrate this approach by addressing the conservation of a reintroduced population of Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus). We estimate the variance effective size (Nev ) from genetic data (Nev = 24.3), and we formulate predictions for the impacts on Nev of demography, polygyny, female variance in life-time reproductive success, and heritability of female reproductive success. By contrasting the genetic estimation with theoretical predictions, we find that polygyny is the strongest factor effecting genetic drift, as only when accounting for polygyny were predictions consistent with the genetically-measured Nev , with 10.6% mating males per generation when heritability of female RS was unaccounted for (polygyny responsible for 81% decrease in Nev ), and 19.5% when it was accounted for (polygyny responsible for 67% decrease in Nev ). Heritability of female reproductive success was also found to affect Nev , with hf2 = 0.91 (heritability responsible for 41% decrease in Nev ). The low effective population size is of concern, and we suggest specific management actions focusing on factors identified as strongly affecting Nev -increasing the availability of artificial water sources to increase number of dominant males contributing to the gene pool. This approach - evaluating life-history hypotheses, in light of their impact on effective population size, and contrasting

  13. Estimation of Effective Population Size in the Sapsaree: A Korean Native Dog (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alam

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Effective population size (Ne is an important measure to understand population structure and genetic variability in animal species. The objective of this study was to estimate Ne in Sapsaree dogs using the information of rate of inbreeding and genomic data that were obtained from pedigree and the Illumina CanineSNP20 (20K and CanineHD (170K beadchips, respectively. Three SNP panels, i.e. Sap134 (20K, Sap60 (170K, and Sap183 (the combined panel from the 20K and 170K, were used to genotype 134, 60, and 183 animal samples, respectively. The Ne estimates based on inbreeding rate ranged from 16 to 51 about five to 13 generations ago. With the use of SNP genotypes, two methods were applied for Ne estimation, i.e. pair-wise r2 values using a simple expectation of distance and r2 values under a non-linear regression with respective distances assuming a finite population size. The average pair-wise Ne estimates across generations using the pairs of SNPs that were located within 5 Mb in the Sap134, Sap60, and Sap183 panels, were 1,486, 1,025 and 1,293, respectively. Under the non-linear regression method, the average Ne estimates were 1,601, 528, and 1,129 for the respective panels. Also, the point estimates of past Ne at 5, 20, and 50 generations ago ranged between 64 to 75, 245 to 286, and 573 to 646, respectively, indicating a significant Ne reduction in the last several generations. These results suggest a strong necessity for minimizing inbreeding through the application of genomic selection or other breeding strategies to increase Ne, so as to maintain genetic variation and to avoid future bottlenecks in the Sapsaree population.

  14. Speed of sound estimation for dual-stage virtual source ultrasound beamforming using point scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Manyou; Rohling, Robert; Lampe, Lutz

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic transmit aperture beamforming is an increasingly used method to improve resolution in biomedical ultrasound imaging. Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) is an implementation of this concept which features a relatively low computation complexity. Moreover, it can be implemented in a dual-stage architecture, where the first stage only applies simple single receive-focused delay-and-sum (srDAS) operations, while the second, more complex stage is performed either locally or remotely using more powerful processing. However, like traditional DAS-based beamforming methods, SASB is susceptible to inaccurate speed-of-sound (SOS) information. In this paper, we show how SOS estimation can be implemented using the srDAS beamformed image, and integrated into the dual-stage implementation of SASB, in an effort to obtain high resolution images with relatively low-cost hardware. Our approach builds on an existing per-channel radio frequency data-based direct estimation method, and applies an iterative refinement of the estimate. We use this estimate for SOS compensation, without the need to repeat the first stage beamforming. The proposed and previous methods are tested on both simulation and experimental studies. The accuracy of our SOS estimation method is on average 0.38% in simulation studies and 0.55% in phantom experiments, when the underlying SOS in the media is within the range 1450-1620 m/s. Using the estimated SOS, the beamforming lateral resolution of SASB is improved on average 52.6% in simulation studies and 50.0% in phantom experiments.

  15. Accuracy in the estimates of zucchini production related to the plot size and number of harvests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Dal'Col Lúcio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The productive variability in horticultural crops affects the planning and quality of the experiments, inflating the error and leading to wrong conclusions with low experimental accuracy and reliability. The objective of this study was to dimension the plot size and number of harvests that are necessary so that there is improvement in the accuracy of zucchini production. The production data used was the one from the uniformity trials where the basic units (BU were identified with the number of crop row and were numbered according to the position inside the row. With the values of individual production, (fresh fruit biomass different plots sizes were simulated by summing up the adjacent BUs in the crop rows and the two forms of harvesting groups. For each plot size simulated and their respective harvests, a variation coefficient (% was estimated at the crop row. A response surface design was applied, with a dependent variable in the variation coefficient and, with the independent variable, the plot size and number of harvests. Best combination between plot size and number of harvests is seven plants and half the productive cycle in both growing seasons.

  16. Reliability and validity of food portion size estimation from images using manual flexible digital virtual meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Alicia; Dadabhoy, Hafza; Ryan, Courtney; Dholakia, Ruchita; Baranowski, Janice; Li, Yuecheng; Yan, Guifang; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui; Baranowski, Tom

    2018-02-12

    The eButton takes frontal images at 4s intervals throughout the day. A three-dimensional manually administered wire mesh procedure has been developed to quantify portion sizes from the two-dimensional images. The present paper reports a test of the inter-rater reliability and validity of use of the wire mesh procedure. Seventeen foods of diverse shapes and sizes served on plates, bowls and cups were selected to rigorously test the portion assessment procedure. A dietitian not involved in inter-rater reliability assessment used standard cups to independently measure the quantities of foods to generate the 'true' value for a total of seventy-five 'served' and seventy-five smaller 'left' images with diverse portion sizes. The images appeared on the computer to which the digital wire meshes were applied. Two dietitians and three engineers independently estimated portion size of the larger ('served') and smaller ('left') images for the same foods. The engineers had higher reliability and validity than the dietitians. The dietitians had lower reliabilities and validities for the smaller more irregular images, but the engineers did not, suggesting training could overcome this limitation. The lower reliabilities and validities for foods served in bowls, compared with plates, suggest difficulties with the curved nature of the bowls. The wire mesh procedure is an important step forward in quantifying portion size, which has been subject to substantial self-report error. Improved training procedures are needed to overcome the identified problems.

  17. Joint inversion of NMR and SIP data to estimate pore size distribution of geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qifei; Zhang, Chi

    2018-03-01

    There are growing interests in using geophysical tools to characterize the microstructure of geomaterials because of the non-invasive nature and the applicability in field. In these applications, multiple types of geophysical data sets are usually processed separately, which may be inadequate to constrain the key feature of target variables. Therefore, simultaneous processing of multiple data sets could potentially improve the resolution. In this study, we propose a method to estimate pore size distribution by joint inversion of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2 relaxation and spectral induced polarization (SIP) spectra. The petrophysical relation between NMR T2 relaxation time and SIP relaxation time is incorporated in a nonlinear least squares problem formulation, which is solved using Gauss-Newton method. The joint inversion scheme is applied to a synthetic sample and a Berea sandstone sample. The jointly estimated pore size distributions are very close to the true model and results from other experimental method. Even when the knowledge of the petrophysical models of the sample is incomplete, the joint inversion can still capture the main features of the pore size distribution of the samples, including the general shape and relative peak positions of the distribution curves. It is also found from the numerical example that the surface relaxivity of the sample could be extracted with the joint inversion of NMR and SIP data if the diffusion coefficient of the ions in the electrical double layer is known. Comparing to individual inversions, the joint inversion could improve the resolution of the estimated pore size distribution because of the addition of extra data sets. The proposed approach might constitute a first step towards a comprehensive joint inversion that can extract the full pore geometry information of a geomaterial from NMR and SIP data.

  18. Micro-Doppler Estimation and Analysis of Slow Moving Objects in Forward Scattering Radar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Syamsul Azmir Raja Abdullah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Micro-Doppler signature can convey information of detected targets and has been used for target recognition in many Radar systems. Nevertheless, micro-Doppler for the specific Forward Scattering Radar (FSR system has yet to be analyzed and investigated in detail; consequently, information carried by the micro-Doppler in FSR is not fully understood. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of FSR in detecting and extracting micro-Doppler signature generated from a target’s micro-motions. Comprehensive theoretical analyses and simulation results followed by experimental investigations into the feasibility of using the FSR for detecting micro-Doppler signatures are presented in this paper. The obtained results verified that the FSR system is capable of detecting micro-Doppler signature of a swinging pendulum placed on a moving trolley and discriminating different swinging speeds. Furthermore, human movement and micro-Doppler from hand motions can be detected and monitored by using the FSR system which resembles a potential application for human gait monitoring and classification.

  19. Estimating the settling velocity of bioclastic sediment using common grain-size analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Michael V. W.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Falter, James L.; Buscombe, Daniel D.

    2017-01-01

    Most techniques for estimating settling velocities of natural particles have been developed for siliciclastic sediments. Therefore, to understand how these techniques apply to bioclastic environments, measured settling velocities of bioclastic sedimentary deposits sampled from a nearshore fringing reef in Western Australia were compared with settling velocities calculated using results from several common grain-size analysis techniques (sieve, laser diffraction and image analysis) and established models. The effects of sediment density and shape were also examined using a range of density values and three different models of settling velocity. Sediment density was found to have a significant effect on calculated settling velocity, causing a range in normalized root-mean-square error of up to 28%, depending upon settling velocity model and grain-size method. Accounting for particle shape reduced errors in predicted settling velocity by 3% to 6% and removed any velocity-dependent bias, which is particularly important for the fastest settling fractions. When shape was accounted for and measured density was used, normalized root-mean-square errors were 4%, 10% and 18% for laser diffraction, sieve and image analysis, respectively. The results of this study show that established models of settling velocity that account for particle shape can be used to estimate settling velocity of irregularly shaped, sand-sized bioclastic sediments from sieve, laser diffraction, or image analysis-derived measures of grain size with a limited amount of error. Collectively, these findings will allow for grain-size data measured with different methods to be accurately converted to settling velocity for comparison. This will facilitate greater understanding of the hydraulic properties of bioclastic sediment which can help to increase our general knowledge of sediment dynamics in these environments.

  20. Length and volume of morphologically normal kidneys in Korean Children: Ultrasound measurement and estimation using body size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Hwee; Kim, Myung Joon; Lim, Sok Hwan; Lee, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Eun [Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate the relationship between anthropometric measurements and renal length and volume measured with ultrasound in Korean children who have morphologically normal kidneys, and to create simple equations to estimate the renal sizes using the anthropometric measurements. We examined 794 Korean children under 18 years of age including a total of 394 boys and 400 girls without renal problems. The maximum renal length (L) (cm), orthogonal anterior-posterior diameter (D) (cm) and width (W) (cm) of each kidney were measured on ultrasound. Kidney volume was calculated as 0.523 x L x D x W (cm{sup 3}). Anthropometric indices including height (cm), weight (kg) and body mass index (m{sup 2}/kg) were collected through a medical record review. We used linear regression analysis to create simple equations to estimate the renal length and the volume with those anthropometric indices that were mostly correlated with the US-measured renal sizes. Renal length showed the strongest significant correlation with patient height (R2, 0.874 and 0.875 for the right and left kidneys, respectively, p < 0.001). Renal volume showed the strongest significant correlation with patient weight (R2, 0.842 and 0.854 for the right and left kidneys, respectively, p < 0.001). The following equations were developed to describe these relationships with an estimated 95% range of renal length and volume (R2, 0.826-0.884, p < 0.001): renal length = 2.383 + 0.045 x Height (± 1.135) and = 2.374 + 0.047 x Height (± 1.173) for the right and left kidneys, respectively; and renal volume 7.941 + 1.246 x Weight (± 15.920) and = 7.303 + 1.532 x Weight (± 18.704) for the right and left kidneys, respectively. Scatter plots between height and renal length and between weight and renal volume have been established from Korean children and simple equations between them have been developed for use in clinical practice.

  1. A study of light scattering by wavelength-sized particles covered by much smaller grains using the superposition T-matrix method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Dlugach

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By using the results of a direct, numerically exact solution of the Maxwell equations we analyze the behavior of the light scattering characteristics for polydisperse spherical particles covered with a large number of smaller grains. We show that the effect of the presence of microscopic dust on the surfaces of wavelength-sized particles depends on the particle absorption and the relative size of irregularities. In our computations, a new parallel superposition T-matrix code developed for use on parallel computer clusters is applied.

  2. Integrating citizen-science data with movement models to estimate the size of a migratory golden eagle population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Dennhardt; Adam E. Duerr; David Brandes; Todd E. Katzner

    2015-01-01

    Estimating population size is fundamental to conservation and management. Population size is typically estimated using survey data, computer models, or both. Some of the most extensive and often least expensive survey data are those collected by citizen-scientists. A challenge to citizen-scientists is that the vagility of many organisms can complicate data collection....

  3. Hydraulic Conductivity Estimates from Particle Size Distributions of Sediments from the Los Alamos Chromium Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.; Reimus, P. W.; Ding, M.

    2015-12-01

    Chromium used in Los Alamos National Laboratory cooling towers was released as effluent onto laboratory property between 1956 and 1972. As a result, the underlying regional aquifer is contaminated with chromium (VI), a toxin and carcinogen. The highest concentration of chromium is ~1 ppm in monitoring well R-42, exceeding the New Mexico drinking water standard of 50 ppb. The chromium plume is currently being investigated to identify an effective remediation method. Geologic heterogeneity within the aquifer causes the hydraulic conductivity within the plume to be spatially variable. This variability, particularly with depth, is crucial for predicting plume transport behavior. Though pump tests are useful for obtaining estimates of site specific hydraulic conductivity, they tend to interrogate hydraulic properties of only the most conductive strata. Variations in particle size distribution as a function of depth can complement pump test data by providing estimates of vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity. Samples were collected from five different sonically-drilled core holes within the chromium plume at depths ranging from 732'-1125' below the surface. To obtain particle size distributions, the samples were sieved into six different fractions from the fine sands to gravel range (>4 mm, 2-4 mm, 1.4-2 mm, 0.355-1.4 mm, 180-355 µm, and smaller than 180 µm). The Kozeny-Carmen equation (k=(δg/µ)(dm2/180)(Φ3/(1-Φ)2)), was used to estimate permeability from the particle size distribution data. Pump tests estimated a hydraulic conductivity varying between 1 and 50 feet per day. The Kozeny-Carmen equation narrowed this estimate down to an average value of 2.635 feet per day for the samples analyzed, with a range of 0.971 ft/day to 6.069 ft/day. The results of this study show that the Kozeny-Carmen equation provides quite specific estimates of hydraulic conductivity in the Los Alamos aquifer. More importantly, it provides pertinent information on the expected

  4. Effect of intravenous streptokinase on the relation between initial ST-predicted size and final QRS-estimated size of acute myocardial infarcts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, P; Grande, P; Saunamäki, K

    1990-01-01

    who did not receive streptokinase as a control group. Final myocardial infarct size, which was estimated from the QRS score, was predicted from the admission standard ECG by previously developed formulas based on ST segment elevation. In the 40 control patients there was no change from ST......-predicted to final QRS-estimated infarct size (median 17.7% versus 18.3%; p = NS). In the 33 patients in the streptokinase group, there was a highly significant decrease from predicted to final myocardial infarct size (median 21.9% versus 16.2%; p less than 0.0002). This decrease was found for both anterior (median...

  5. Factors influencing ascertainment bias of microsatellite allele sizes: impact on estimates of mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biao; Kimmel, Marek

    2013-10-01

    Microsatellite loci play an important role as markers for identification, disease gene mapping, and evolutionary studies. Mutation rate, which is of fundamental importance, can be obtained from interspecies comparisons, which, however, are subject to ascertainment bias. This bias arises, for example, when a locus is selected on the basis of its large allele size in one species (cognate species 1), in which it is first discovered. This bias is reflected in average allele length in any noncognate species 2 being smaller than that in species 1. This phenomenon was observed in various pairs of species, including comparisons of allele sizes in human and chimpanzee. Various mechanisms were proposed to explain observed differences in mean allele lengths between two species. Here, we examine the framework of a single-step asymmetric and unrestricted stepwise mutation model with genetic drift. Analysis is based on coalescent theory. Analytical results are confirmed by simulations using the simuPOP software. The mechanism of ascertainment bias in this model is a tighter correlation of allele sizes within a cognate species 1 than of allele sizes in two different species 1 and 2. We present computations of the expected average allele size difference, given the mutation rate, population sizes of species 1 and 2, time of separation of species 1 and 2, and the age of the allele. We show that when the past demographic histories of the cognate and noncognate taxa are different, the rate and directionality of mutations affect the allele sizes in the two taxa differently from the simple effect of ascertainment bias. This effect may exaggerate or reverse the effect of difference in mutation rates. We reanalyze literature data, which indicate that despite the bias, the microsatellite mutation rate estimate in the ancestral population is consistently greater than that in either human or chimpanzee and the mutation rate estimate in human exceeds or equals that in chimpanzee with the rate

  6. Can high resolution 3D topographic surveys provide reliable grain size estimates in gravel bed rivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, E.; Smith, M. W.; Klaar, M. J.; Brown, L. E.

    2017-09-01

    High resolution topographic surveys such as those provided by Structure-from-Motion (SfM) contain a wealth of information that is not always exploited in the generation of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). In particular, several authors have related sub-metre scale topographic variability (or 'surface roughness') to sediment grain size by deriving empirical relationships between the two. In fluvial applications, such relationships permit rapid analysis of the spatial distribution of grain size over entire river reaches, providing improved data to drive three-dimensional hydraulic models, allowing rapid geomorphic monitoring of sub-reach river restoration projects, and enabling more robust characterisation of riverbed habitats. However, comparison of previously published roughness-grain-size relationships shows substantial variability between field sites. Using a combination of over 300 laboratory and field-based SfM surveys, we demonstrate the influence of inherent survey error, irregularity of natural gravels, particle shape, grain packing structure, sorting, and form roughness on roughness-grain-size relationships. Roughness analysis from SfM datasets can accurately predict the diameter of smooth hemispheres, though natural, irregular gravels result in a higher roughness value for a given diameter and different grain shapes yield different relationships. A suite of empirical relationships is presented as a decision tree which improves predictions of grain size. By accounting for differences in patch facies, large improvements in D50 prediction are possible. SfM is capable of providing accurate grain size estimates, although further refinement is needed for poorly sorted gravel patches, for which c-axis percentiles are better predicted than b-axis percentiles.

  7. Real-time, ray casting-based scatter dose estimation for c-arm x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnewaini, Zaid; Langer, Eric; Schaber, Philipp; David, Matthias; Kretz, Dominik; Steil, Volker; Hesser, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    usually detected was mainly from primary scattering (photons), whereas percentage differences between 2.8-20% are found on the side opposite to the x-ray source, where the lowest doses were detected. Dose calculation time of our approach was 0.85 seconds. The proposed approach yields a fast scatter dose estimation where we could run the Monte Carlo simulation only once for each x-ray tube angulation to get the Phase Space Files (PSF) for being used later by our ray casting approach to calculate the dose from only photons which will hit an movable elliptical cylinder shaped phantom and getting an output file for the positions of those hits to be used for visualizing the scatter dose propagation on the phantom surface. With dose calculation times of less than one second, we are saving much time compared to using a Monte Carlo simulation instead. With our approach, larger deviations occur only in regions with very low doses, whereas it provides a high precision in high-dose regions. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. CATCH ESTIMATION AND SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF BILLFISHES LANDED IN PORT OF BENOA, BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Setyadji

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Billfishes are generally considered as by-product in tuna long line fisheries that have high economic value in the market. By far, the information about Indian Ocean billfish biology and fisheries especially in Indonesia is very limited. This research aimed to elucidate the estimation of production and size distribution of billfishes landed in port of Benoa during 2010 (February – December through daily observation at the processing plants. The result showed that the landings dominated by Swordfish (Xiphias gladius 54.9%, Blue marlin (Makaira mazara 17.8% and Black marlin (Makaira indica 13.0% respectively, followed by small amount of striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax, sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus, and shortbil spearfish (Tetrapturus Angustirostris. Generally the individual size of billfishes range between 68 and 206 cm (PFL, and showing negative allometric pattern except on swordfish that was isometric. Most of the billfish landed haven’t reached their first sexual maturity.

  9. Disagreement of diameter and volume measurements for pulmonary nodule size estimation in CT lung cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; Walter, Joan E; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Ooijen, Peter M A; De Bock, Geertruida H; de Koning, Harry J; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2017-10-22

    We studied 2240 indeterminate solid nodules (volume 50-500mm3) to determine the correlation of diameter and semi-automated volume measurements for pulmonary nodule size estimation. Intra-nodular diameter variation, defined as maximum minus minimum diameter through the nodule's center, varied by 2.8 mm (median, IQR:2.2-3.7 mm), so above the 1.5 mm cutoff for nodule growth used in Lung CT Screening Reporting and Data System (Lung-RADS). Using mean or maximum axial diameter to assess nodule volume led to a substantial mean overestimation of nodule volume of 47.2% and 85.1%, respectively, compared to semi-automated volume. Thus, size of indeterminate nodules is poorly represented by diameter. Pre-results, ISRCTN63545820. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Error and bias in size estimates of whale sharks: implications for understanding demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Ana M M; Thums, Michele; Brooks, Kim; Meekan, Mark G

    2016-03-01

    Body size and age at maturity are indicative of the vulnerability of a species to extinction. However, they are both difficult to estimate for large animals that cannot be restrained for measurement. For very large species such as whale sharks, body size is commonly estimated visually, potentially resulting in the addition of errors and bias. Here, we investigate the errors and bias associated with total lengths of whale sharks estimated visually by comparing them with measurements collected using a stereo-video camera system at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia. Using linear mixed-effects models, we found that visual lengths were biased towards underestimation with increasing size of the shark. When using the stereo-video camera, the number of larger individuals that were possibly mature (or close to maturity) that were detected increased by approximately 10%. Mean lengths calculated by each method were, however, comparable (5.002 ± 1.194 and 6.128 ± 1.609 m, s.d.), confirming that the population at Ningaloo is mostly composed of immature sharks based on published lengths at maturity. We then collated data sets of total lengths sampled from aggregations of whale sharks worldwide between 1995 and 2013. Except for locations in the East Pacific where large females have been reported, these aggregations also largely consisted of juveniles (mean lengths less than 7 m). Sightings of the largest individuals were limited and occurred mostly prior to 2006. This result highlights the urgent need to locate and quantify the numbers of mature male and female whale sharks in order to ascertain the conservation status and ensure persistence of the species.

  11. Estimation of typical food portion sizes for children of different ages in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrieden, Wendy L; Longbottom, Patricia J; Adamson, Ashley J; Ogston, Simon A; Payne, Anne; Haleem, Mohammad A; Barton, Karen L

    2008-06-01

    It is often the case in dietary assessment that it is not practicable to weigh individual intakes of foods eaten. The aim of the work described was to estimate typical food portion weights for children of different ages. Using the data available from the British National Diet and Nutrition Surveys of children aged 1 1/2-4 1/2 years (1992-1993) and young people aged 4-18 years (1997), descriptive statistics were obtained, and predicted weights were calculated by linear, quadratic and exponential regression for each age group. Following comparison of energy and nutrient intakes calculated from actual (from an earlier weighed intake study) and estimated portion weights, the final list of typical portion sizes was based on median portion weights for the 1-3- and 4-6-year age groups, and age-adjusted means using linear regression for the 7-10-, 11-14- and 15-18-year age groups. The number of foods recorded by fifty or more children was 133 for each of the younger age groups (1-3 and 4-6 years) and seventy-five for each of the older age groups. The food portion weights covered all food groups. All portion sizes increased with age with the exception of milk in tea or coffee. The present study draws on a unique source of weighed data on food portions of a large sample of children that is unlikely to be repeated and therefore provides the best possible estimates of children's food portion sizes in the UK.

  12. Object-Oriented Software Metrics for Predicting Reusability and Estimating Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, D. Peter; Tran, Tuyet-Lan; Sherif, Josef S.; Lee, Susan S.

    1995-01-01

    As object-oriented software development methods come into more widespread use, basic questions of software quality assurance must be reconsidered. We will highlight efforts now underway at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to both assess the quality of software systems developed using object oriented technology and develop guidelines for future development of such systems. The current focus is on design and code reusability., and system size estimation. A number of metrics are proposed and two software systems measured and analyzed. The preliminary results reported here should be useful to software development and quality assurance personnel working in C++ implementation environment.

  13. Estimating prey size and number in crayfish-eating snakes, genus Regina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godley, J.S.; McDiarmid, R.W.; Rojas, N.N.

    1984-01-01

    Snakes of the genus Regina feed almost exclusively on crayfish. The paired, symmetrical gastroliths of crayfish are not digested and are detectable from x-rays of the snake. Gastrolith length is directly proportional to carapace length and can be obtained from x-rays. Carapace length can be converted to kcal of ingested energy. Using these relationships and repeated captures of radio-telemetered Regina, estimates of food consumption and energy intake by freeliving snakes are feasible. New information on prey selectivity, feeding behavior, and predator-prey size relations in Regina grahami and R. septemvittata are presented and compared with similar data for other snakes.

  14. A reduced estimate of the number of kilometre-sized near-Earth asteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, D; Helin, E; Lawrence, K; Pravdo, S

    2000-01-13

    Near-Earth asteroids are small (diameters 1 km has been estimated to be in the range 1,000-2,000, which translates to an approximately 1% chance of a catastrophic collision with the Earth in the next millennium. These numbers are, however, poorly constrained because of the limitations of previous searches using photographic plates. (One kilometre is below the size of a body whose impact on the Earth would produce global effects.) Here we report an analysis of our survey for near-Earth asteroids that uses improved detection technologies. We find that the total number of asteroids with diameters > 1 km is about half the earlier estimates. At the current rate of discovery of near-Earth asteroids, 90% will probably have been detected within the next 20 years.

  15. A variable step-size strategy for distributed estimation over adaptive networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Saeed, Muhammad O.; Zerguine, Azzedine; Zummo, Salam A.

    2013-12-01

    A lot of work has been done recently to develop algorithms that utilize the distributed structure of an ad hoc wireless sensor network to estimate a certain parameter of interest. One such algorithm is called diffusion least-mean squares (DLMS). This algorithm estimates the parameter of interest using the cooperation between neighboring sensors within the network. The present work proposes an improvement on the DLMS algorithm by using a variable step-size LMS (VSSLMS) algorithm. In this work, first, the well-known variants of VSSLMS algorithms are compared with each other in order to select the most suitable algorithm which provides the best trade-off between performance and complexity. Second, the detailed convergence and steady-state analyses of the selected VSSLMS algorithm are performed. Finally, extensive simulations are carried out to test the robustness of the proposed algorithm under different scenarios. Moreover, the simulation results are found to corroborate the theoretical findings very well.

  16. The influence of body size on adult skeletal age estimation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Catherine E

    2015-01-01

    Accurate age estimations are essential to archaeological and forensic analyses. However, reliability for adult skeletal age estimations is poor, especially for individuals over the age of 40 years. This is the first study to show that body size influences skeletal age estimation. The İşcan et al., Lovejoy et al., Buckberry and Chamberlain, and Suchey-Brooks age methods were tested on 764 adult skeletons from the Hamann-Todd and William Bass Collections. Statures ranged from 1.30 to 1.93 m and body masses ranged from 24.0 to 99.8 kg. Transition analysis was used to evaluate the differences in the age estimations. For all four methods, the smallest individuals have the lowest ages at transition and the largest individuals have the highest ages at transition. Short and light individuals are consistently underaged, while tall and heavy individuals are consistently overaged. When femoral length and femoral head diameter are compared with the log-age model, results show the same trend as the known stature and body mass measurements. The skeletal remains of underweight individuals have fewer age markers while those of obese individuals have increased surface degeneration and osteophytic lipping. Tissue type and mechanical loading have been shown to affect bone turnover rates, and may explain the differing patterns of skeletal aging. From an archaeological perspective, the underaging of light, short individuals suggests the need to revisit the current research consensus on the young mortality rates of past populations. From a forensic perspective, understanding the influence of body size will impact efforts to identify victims of mass disasters, genocides, and homicides. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Pulsed Laser Ablation-Induced Green Synthesis of TiO2 Nanoparticles and Application of Novel Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Technique for Nanoparticle Size and Size Distribution Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep; Vihinen, Jorma; Frankberg, Erkka; Hyvärinen, Leo; Honkanen, Mari; Levänen, Erkki

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to introduce small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) as a promising technique for measuring size and size distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles. In this manuscript, pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) has been demonstrated as a quick and simple technique for synthesizing TiO2 nanoparticles directly into deionized water as a suspension from titanium targets. Spherical TiO2 nanoparticles with diameters in the range 4-35 nm were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed highly crystalline nanoparticles that comprised of two main photoactive phases of TiO2: anatase and rutile. However, presence of minor amounts of brookite was also reported. The traditional methods for nanoparticle size and size distribution analysis such as electron microscopy-based methods are time-consuming. In this study, we have proposed and validated SAXS as a promising method for characterization of laser-ablated TiO2 nanoparticles for their size and size distribution by comparing SAXS- and TEM-measured nanoparticle size and size distribution. SAXS- and TEM-measured size distributions closely followed each other for each sample, and size distributions in both showed maxima at the same nanoparticle size. The SAXS-measured nanoparticle diameters were slightly larger than the respective diameters measured by TEM. This was because SAXS measures an agglomerate consisting of several particles as one big particle which slightly increased the mean diameter. TEM- and SAXS-measured mean diameters when plotted together showed similar trend in the variation in the size as the laser power was changed which along with extremely similar size distributions for TEM and SAXS validated the application of SAXS for size distribution measurement of the synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles.

  18. Effects of social organization, trap arrangement and density, sampling scale, and population density on bias in population size estimation using some common mark-recapture estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manan; Joshi, Amitabh; Vidya, T N C

    2017-01-01

    Mark-recapture estimators are commonly used for population size estimation, and typically yield unbiased estimates for most solitary species with low to moderate home range sizes. However, these methods assume independence of captures among individuals, an assumption that is clearly violated in social species that show fission-fusion dynamics, such as the Asian elephant. In the specific case of Asian elephants, doubts have been raised about the accuracy of population size estimates. More importantly, the potential problem for the use of mark-recapture methods posed by social organization in general has not been systematically addressed. We developed an individual-based simulation framework to systematically examine the potential effects of type of social organization, as well as other factors such as trap density and arrangement, spatial scale of sampling, and population density, on bias in population sizes estimated by POPAN, Robust Design, and Robust Design with detection heterogeneity. In the present study, we ran simulations with biological, demographic and ecological parameters relevant to Asian elephant populations, but the simulation framework is easily extended to address questions relevant to other social species. We collected capture history data from the simulations, and used those data to test for bias in population size estimation. Social organization significantly affected bias in most analyses, but the effect sizes were variable, depending on other factors. Social organization tended to introduce large bias when trap arrangement was uniform and sampling effort was low. POPAN clearly outperformed the two Robust Design models we tested, yielding close to zero bias if traps were arranged at random in the study area, and when population density and trap density were not too low. Social organization did not have a major effect on bias for these parameter combinations at which POPAN gave more or less unbiased population size estimates. Therefore, the

  19. [The application of network scale-up method on female sex workers and clients size estimation in Taizhou city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Xi-ping; Bao, Shui-lian; Yang, Hai-tao; Xu, Jin-shui; Qiu, Tao; Zhang, Xiang; Pan, Long; Zhu, Zhong-kui; Guo, Wei; Wang, Lu

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the size of female sex workers and clients in Taizhou city. A household survey using network scale-up method (NSUM) was conducted among the 3000 community residents in Taizhou city from August to October in 2011, which aimed to estimate the social network size (c value) of Taizhou residents, and the c value was adjusted by demographic characteristics, back estimation and outlier elimination. Using the adjusted c value, the number of acquaintance of female sex workers or clients and the respect level toward female sex workers or clients were used to estimate the size of female sex workers and clients. A total of 2783 valid questionnaires were collected, among which 1380 (49.6%) were collected from Taixing city, 1403 (50.4%) were collected from Jingjiang city. 1334 respondents were male (47.9%) and 1449 (47.9%) respondents were female. The mean age was (39.4 ± 10.7) years. The average personal social network size using original data for Taizhou residents was 525, which differed from place, sex, age, educational level and marriage status. Using the remaining known populations through back estimation, the social network size was 419 and became 424 after the elimination of outliers. The estimated population size for female sex worker was 6370 (95%CI: 5886 - 6853), which accounted for 0.52% (6370/1 229 980) of the total number of female aged from 15 to 49. The estimated population size for clients was 15 202 (95%CI: 14 560 - 15 847), which accounted for 1.28% (15 202/1 190 340) of the total number of males aged from 15 to 49 and the ration of clients to female sex worker was 2.39:1. NSUM is an easy and quick way to estimate the size of female sex workers or clients, but the estimated sizes are subject to bias and error due to estimate effect and sample representativeness.

  20. Towards quality assessed characterization of nanomaterial: Transfer of validated protocols for size measurement by dynamic light scattering and evaluation of zeta potential by electrophoretic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenne, F; Rustique, E; Botton, J; Coty, J-B; Lanusse, G; Ait Lahcen, M; Rio, L; Zandanel, C; Lemarchand, C; Germain, M; Negri, L; Couffin, A-C; Barratt, G; Vauthier, C

    2017-08-07

    Quality control analysis of nanomaterials has been identified as a major issue to pursue their development in different industrial fields including nanomedicine. One difficulty is the lack of standardized and validated protocols suitable to achieve their characterization. In a previous work, we have developed standardized protocols for the evaluation of the size and zeta potential of nanomaterials based on methods described in the ISO standard and have performed validation of each one. The present work was aimed to transfer these protocols in three independent receiving laboratories. No official guideline was described in the literature to achieve such a transfer. A comparative study for receiving laboratories equipped with the same instrument as the sending laboratory was designed based on the Code of Federal Regulation edited by the Food and Drug Administration. For the receiving laboratory equipped with an instrument working at a different wavelength, a new validation was designed and applied. Corresponding statistical methods were used for the analysis of the results. A successful transfer of the protocols in all receiving laboratories was achieved. All laboratories recorded consistent results applying in blind the protocol of size measurements on two samples of nanomaterials from which included one reference. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Lesion size estimator of cardiac radiofrequency ablation at different common locations with different tip temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Chi; Choy, Young Bin; Haemmerich, Dieter; Vorperian, Vicken R; Webster, John G

    2004-10-01

    Finite element method (FEM) analysis has become a common method to analyze the lesion formation during temperature-controlled radiofrequency (RF) cardiac ablation. We present a process of FEM modeling a system including blood, myocardium, and an ablation catheter with a thermistor embedded at the tip. The simulation used a simple proportional-integral (PI) controller to control the entire process operated in temperature-controlled mode. Several factors affect the lesion size such as target temperature, blood flow rate, and application time. We simulated the time response of RF ablation at different locations by using different target temperatures. The applied sites were divided into two groups each with a different convective heat transfer coefficient. The first group was high-flow such as the atrioventricular (AV) node and the atrial aspect of the AV annulus, and the other was low-flow such as beneath the valve or inside the coronary sinus. Results showed the change of lesion depth and lesion width with time, under different conditions. We collected data for all conditions and used it to create a database. We implemented a user-interface, the lesion size estimator, where the user enters set temperature and location. Based on the database, the software estimated lesion dimensions during different applied durations. This software could be used as a first-step predictor to help the electrophysiologist choose treatment parameters.

  2. Estimating everyday portion size using a 'method of constant stimuli': in a student sample, portion size is predicted by gender, dietary behaviour, and hunger, but not BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Rogers, Peter J; Pothos, Emmanuel M; Calitri, Raff; Tapper, Katy

    2008-09-01

    This paper (i) explores the proposition that body weight is associated with large portion sizes and (ii) introduces a new technique for measuring everyday portion size. In our paradigm, the participant is shown a picture of a food portion and is asked to indicate whether it is larger or smaller than their usual portion. After responding to a range of different portions an estimate of everyday portion size is calculated using probit analysis. Importantly, this estimate is likely to be robust because it is based on many responses. First-year undergraduate students (N=151) completed our procedure for 12 commonly consumed foods. As expected, portion sizes were predicted by gender and by a measure of dieting and dietary restraint. Furthermore, consistent with reports of hungry supermarket shoppers, portion-size estimates tended to be higher in hungry individuals. However, we found no evidence for a relationship between BMI and portion size in any of the test foods. We consider reasons why this finding should be anticipated. In particular, we suggest that the difference in total energy expenditure of individuals with a higher and lower BMI is too small to be detected as a concomitant difference in portion size (at least in our sample).

  3. Measurement of nanoparticle size, suspension polydispersity, and stability using near-field optical trapping and light scattering (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Perry; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticles are becoming ubiquitous in applications including diagnostic assays, drug delivery and therapeutics. However, there remain challenges in the quality control of these products. Here we present methods for the orthogonal measurement of these parameters by tracking the motion of the nanoparticle in all three special dimensions as it interacts with an optical waveguide. These simultaneous measurements from a single particle basis address some of the gaps left by current measurement technologies such as nanoparticle tracking analysis, ζ-potential measurements, and absorption spectroscopy. As nanoparticles suspended in a microfluidic channel interact with the evanescent field of an optical waveguide, they experience forces and resulting motion in three dimensions: along the propagation axis of the waveguide (x-direction) they are propelled by the optical forces, parallel to the plane of the waveguide and perpendicular to the optical propagation axis (y-direction) they experience an optical gradient force generated from the waveguide mode profile which confines them in a harmonic potential well, and normal to the surface of the waveguide they experience an exponential downward optical force balanced by the surface interactions that confines the particle in an asymmetric well. Building on our Nanophotonic Force Microscopy technique, in this talk we will explain how to simultaneously use the motion in the y-direction to estimate the size of the particle, the comparative velocity in the x-direction to measure the polydispersity of a particle population, and the motion in the z-direction to measure the potential energy landscape of the interaction, providing insight into the colloidal stability.

  4. Power-law correlations and finite-size effects in silica particle aggregates studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freltoft, T.; Kjems, Jørgen; Sinha, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering from normal, compressed, and water-suspended powders of aggregates of fine silica particles has been studied. The samples possessed average densities ranging from 0.008 to 0.45 g/cm3. Assuming power-law correlations between particles and a finite correlation length ξ......, the authors derive the scattering function S(q) from specific models for particle-particle correlation in these systems. S(q) was found to provide a satisfactory fit to the data for all samples studied. The fractal dimension df corresponding to the power-law correlation was 2.61±0.1 for all dry samples, and 2...

  5. Population size estimation of men who have sex with men through the network scale-up method in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ezoe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Men who have sex with men (MSM are one of the groups most at risk for HIV infection in Japan. However, size estimates of MSM populations have not been conducted with sufficient frequency and rigor because of the difficulty, high cost and stigma associated with reaching such populations. This study examined an innovative and simple method for estimating the size of the MSM population in Japan. We combined an internet survey with the network scale-up method, a social network method for estimating the size of hard-to-reach populations, for the first time in Japan. METHODS AND FINDINGS: An internet survey was conducted among 1,500 internet users who registered with a nationwide internet-research agency. The survey participants were asked how many members of particular groups with known population sizes (firepersons, police officers, and military personnel they knew as acquaintances. The participants were also asked to identify the number of their acquaintances whom they understood to be MSM. Using these survey results with the network scale-up method, the personal network size and MSM population size were estimated. The personal network size was estimated to be 363.5 regardless of the sex of the acquaintances and 174.0 for only male acquaintances. The estimated MSM prevalence among the total male population in Japan was 0.0402% without adjustment, and 2.87% after adjusting for the transmission error of MSM. CONCLUSIONS: The estimated personal network size and MSM prevalence seen in this study were comparable to those from previous survey results based on the direct-estimation method. Estimating population sizes through combining an internet survey with the network scale-up method appeared to be an effective method from the perspectives of rapidity, simplicity, and low cost as compared with more-conventional methods.

  6. Estimation of source parameters and scaling relations for moderate size earthquakes in North-West Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas; Kumar, Dinesh; Chopra, Sumer

    2016-10-01

    The scaling relation and self similarity of earthquake process have been investigated by estimating the source parameters of 34 moderate size earthquakes (mb 3.4-5.8) occurred in the NW Himalaya. The spectral analysis of body waves of 217 accelerograms recorded at 48 sites have been carried out using in the present analysis. The Brune's ω-2 model has been adopted for this purpose. The average ratio of the P-wave corner frequency, fc(P), to the S-wave corner frequency, fc(S), has been found to be 1.39 with fc(P) > fc(S) for 90% of the events analyzed here. This implies the shift in the corner frequency in agreement with many other similar studies done for different regions. The static stress drop values for all the events analyzed here lie in the range 10-100 bars average stress drop value of the order of 43 ± 19 bars for the region. This suggests the likely estimate of the dynamic stress drop, which is 2-3 times the static stress drop, is in the range of about 80-120 bars. This suggests the relatively high seismic hazard in the NW Himalaya as high frequency strong ground motions are governed by the stress drop. The estimated values of stress drop do not show significant variation with seismic moment for the range 5 × 1014-2 × 1017 N m. This observation along with the cube root scaling of corner frequencies suggests the self similarity of the moderate size earthquakes in the region. The scaling relation between seismic moment and corner frequency Mo fc3 = 3.47 ×1016Nm /s3 estimated in the present study can be utilized to estimate the source dimension given the seismic moment of the earthquake for the hazard assessment. The present study puts the constrains on the important parameters stress drop and source dimension required for the synthesis of strong ground motion from the future expected earthquakes in the region. Therefore, the present study is useful for the seismic hazard and risk related studies for NW Himalaya.

  7. Comparison of known food weights with image-based portion-size automated estimation and adolescents' self-reported portion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christina D; Chae, Junghoon; Schap, TusaRebecca E; Kerr, Deborah A; Delp, Edward J; Ebert, David S; Boushey, Carol J

    2012-03-01

    Diet is a critical element of diabetes self-management. An emerging area of research is the use of images for dietary records using mobile telephones with embedded cameras. These tools are being designed to reduce user burden and to improve accuracy of portion-size estimation through automation. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess the error of automatically determined portion weights compared to known portion weights of foods and (2) to compare the error between automation and human. Adolescents (n = 15) captured images of their eating occasions over a 24 h period. All foods and beverages served were weighed. Adolescents self-reported portion sizes for one meal. Image analysis was used to estimate portion weights. Data analysis compared known weights, automated weights, and self-reported portions. For the 19 foods, the mean ratio of automated weight estimate to known weight ranged from 0.89 to 4.61, and 9 foods were within 0.80 to 1.20. The largest error was for lettuce and the most accurate was strawberry jam. The children were fairly accurate with portion estimates for two foods (sausage links, toast) using one type of estimation aid and two foods (sausage links, scrambled eggs) using another aid. The automated method was fairly accurate for two foods (sausage links, jam); however, the 95% confidence intervals for the automated estimates were consistently narrower than human estimates. The ability of humans to estimate portion sizes of foods remains a problem and a perceived burden. Errors in automated portion-size estimation can be systematically addressed while minimizing the burden on people. Future applications that take over the burden of these processes may translate to better diabetes self-management. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  8. B-Graph Sampling to Estimate the Size of a Hidden Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spreen Marinus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Link-tracing designs are often used to estimate the size of hidden populations by utilizing the relational links between their members. A major problem in studies of hidden populations is the lack of a convenient sampling frame. The most frequently applied design in studies of hidden populations is respondent-driven sampling in which no sampling frame is used. However, in some studies multiple but incomplete sampling frames are available. In this article, we introduce the B-graph design that can be used in such situations. In this design, all available incomplete sampling frames are joined and turned into one sampling frame, from which a random sample is drawn and selected respondents are asked to mention their contacts. By considering the population as a bipartite graph of a two-mode network (those from the sampling frame and those who are not on the frame, the number of respondents who are directly linked to the sampling frame members can be estimated using Chao’s and Zelterman’s estimators for sparse data. The B-graph sampling design is illustrated using the data of a social network study from Utrecht, the Netherlands.

  9. Multiple sensitive estimation and optimal sample size allocation in the item sum technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Pier Francesco; Rueda García, María Del Mar; Cobo Rodríguez, Beatriz

    2017-09-27

    For surveys of sensitive issues in life sciences, statistical procedures can be used to reduce nonresponse and social desirability response bias. Both of these phenomena provoke nonsampling errors that are difficult to deal with and can seriously flaw the validity of the analyses. The item sum technique (IST) is a very recent indirect questioning method derived from the item count technique that seeks to procure more reliable responses on quantitative items than direct questioning while preserving respondents' anonymity. This article addresses two important questions concerning the IST: (i) its implementation when two or more sensitive variables are investigated and efficient estimates of their unknown population means are required; (ii) the determination of the optimal sample size to achieve minimum variance estimates. These aspects are of great relevance for survey practitioners engaged in sensitive research and, to the best of our knowledge, were not studied so far. In this article, theoretical results for multiple estimation and optimal allocation are obtained under a generic sampling design and then particularized to simple random sampling and stratified sampling designs. Theoretical considerations are integrated with a number of simulation studies based on data from two real surveys and conducted to ascertain the efficiency gain derived from optimal allocation in different situations. One of the surveys concerns cannabis consumption among university students. Our findings highlight some methodological advances that can be obtained in life sciences IST surveys when optimal allocation is achieved. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Sizing up arthropod genomes: an evaluation of the impact of environmental variation on genome size estimates by flow cytometry and the use of qPCR as a method of estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, T Ryan; Nathwani, Paula; Bonnett, Tiffany R; Huber, Dezene P W

    2013-09-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate both a pre-existing method and a newly proposed approach for the estimation of nuclear genome sizes in arthropods. First, concerns regarding the reliability of the well-established method of flow cytometry relating to impacts of rearing conditions on genome size estimates were examined. Contrary to previous reports, a more carefully controlled test found negligible environmental effects on genome size estimates in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. Second, a more recently touted method based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was examined in terms of ease of use, efficiency, and (most importantly) accuracy using four test species: the flies Drosophila melanogaster and Musca domestica and the beetles Tribolium castaneum and Dendroctonus ponderosa. The results of this analysis demonstrated that qPCR has the tendency to produce substantially different genome size estimates from other established techniques while also being far less efficient than existing methods.

  11. Measurement of size-dependent single scattering albedo of fresh biomass burning aerosols using the extinction-minus-scattering technique with a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and nephelometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning (BB aerosols have a significant effect on regional climate, and represent a significant uncertainty in our understanding of climate change. Using a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and integrating nephelometry, the single scattering albedo (SSA and Ångstrom absorption exponent (AAE were measured for several North American biomass fuels. This was done for several particle diameters for the smoldering and flaming stage of white pine, red oak, and cedar combustion. Measurements were done over a wider wavelength range than any previous direct measurement of BB particles. While the offline sampling system used in this work shows promise, some changes in particle size distribution were observed, and a thorough evaluation of this method is required. The uncertainty of SSA was 6 %, with the truncation angle correction of the nephelometer being the largest contributor to error. While scattering and extinction did show wavelength dependence, SSA did not. SSA values ranged from 0.46 to 0.74, and were not uniformly greater for the smoldering stage than the flaming stage. SSA values changed with particle size, and not systematically so, suggesting the proportion of tar balls to fractal black carbon change with fuel type/state and particle size. SSA differences of 0.15–0.4 or greater can be attributed to fuel type or fuel state for fresh soot. AAE values were quite high (1.59–5.57, despite SSA being lower than is typically observed in wildfires. The SSA and AAE values in this work do not fit well with current schemes that relate these factors to the modified combustion efficiency of a burn. Combustion stage, particle size, fuel type, and fuel condition were found to have the most significant effects on the intrinsic optical properties of fresh soot, though additional factors influence aged soot.

  12. Comparing capture-recapture methods for estimation of the size of small and medium-sized populations using empirical data on commercial turkey farms in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Allaki, Farouk; Christensen, Jette; Vallières, André

    2015-06-01

    The study objectives were (1) to conduct a systematic review of the performance of capture-recapture methods; (2) to use empirical data to estimate population size in a small-sized population (turkey breeder farms) and a medium-sized population (meat turkey farms) by applying two-source capture-recapture methods (the Lincoln-Petersen, the Chapman, and Chao's lower-bound estimators) and multi-source capture-recapture methods (the log-linear modeling and sample coverage approaches); and (3) to compare the performance of these methods in predicting the true population sizes (2007 data). Our set-up was unique in that we knew the population sizes for turkey breeder farms (99) and meat turkey farms (592) in Canada in 2007, which we applied as our true population sizes, and had surveillance data from the Canadian Notifiable Avian Influenza Surveillance System (2008-2012). We defined each calendar year of sampling as a data source. We confirmed that the two-source capture-recapture methods were sensitive to the violation of the local independence assumption. The log-linear modeling and sample coverage approaches yielded estimates that were closer to the true population sizes than were the estimates provided by the two-source methods for both populations. The performance of both multi-source capture-recapture methods depended on the number of data sources analyzed and the size of the population. Simulation studies are recommended to better understand the limits of each multi-source capture-recapture method. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Transmission Bottleneck Size Estimation from Pathogen Deep-Sequencing Data, with an Application to Human Influenza A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel Leonard, Ashley; Weissman, Daniel B; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Ghedin, Elodie; Koelle, Katia

    2017-07-15

    The bottleneck governing infectious disease transmission describes the size of the pathogen population transferred from the donor to the recipient host. Accurate quantification of the bottleneck size is particularly important for rapidly evolving pathogens such as influenza virus, as narrow bottlenecks reduce the amount of transferred viral genetic diversity and, thus, may decrease the rate of viral adaptation. Previous studies have estimated bottleneck sizes governing viral transmission by using statistical analyses of variants identified in pathogen sequencing data. These analyses, however, did not account for variant calling thresholds and stochastic viral replication dynamics within recipient hosts. Because these factors can skew bottleneck size estimates, we introduce a new method for inferring bottleneck sizes that accounts for these factors. Through the use of a simulated data set, we first show that our method, based on beta-binomial sampling, accurately recovers transmission bottleneck sizes, whereas other methods fail to do so. We then apply our method to a data set of influenza A virus (IAV) infections for which viral deep-sequencing data from transmission pairs are available. We find that the IAV transmission bottleneck size estimates in this study are highly variable across transmission pairs, while the mean bottleneck size of 196 virions is consistent with a previous estimate for this data set. Furthermore, regression analysis shows a positive association between estimated bottleneck size and donor infection severity, as measured by temperature. These results support findings from experimental transmission studies showing that bottleneck sizes across transmission events can be variable and influenced in part by epidemiological factors. IMPORTANCE The transmission bottleneck size describes the size of the pathogen population transferred from the donor to the recipient host and may affect the rate of pathogen adaptation within host populations. Recent

  14. Distance software: design and analysis of distance sampling surveys for estimating population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Len; Buckland, Stephen T; Rexstad, Eric A; Laake, Jeff L; Strindberg, Samantha; Hedley, Sharon L; Bishop, Jon Rb; Marques, Tiago A; Burnham, Kenneth P

    2010-02-01

    1.Distance sampling is a widely used technique for estimating the size or density of biological populations. Many distance sampling designs and most analyses use the software Distance.2.We briefly review distance sampling and its assumptions, outline the history, structure and capabilities of Distance, and provide hints on its use.3.Good survey design is a crucial prerequisite for obtaining reliable results. Distance has a survey design engine, with a built-in geographic information system, that allows properties of different proposed designs to be examined via simulation, and survey plans to be generated.4.A first step in analysis of distance sampling data is modelling the probability of detection. Distance contains three increasingly sophisticated analysis engines for this: conventional distance sampling, which models detection probability as a function of distance from the transect and assumes all objects at zero distance are detected; multiple-covariate distance sampling, which allows covariates in addition to distance; and mark-recapture distance sampling, which relaxes the assumption of certain detection at zero distance.5.All three engines allow estimation of density or abundance, stratified if required, with associated measures of precision calculated either analytically or via the bootstrap.6.Advanced analysis topics covered include the use of multipliers to allow analysis of indirect surveys (such as dung or nest surveys), the density surface modelling analysis engine for spatial and habitat modelling, and information about accessing the analysis engines directly from other software.7.Synthesis and applications. Distance sampling is a key method for producing abundance and density estimates in challenging field conditions. The theory underlying the methods continues to expand to cope with realistic estimation situations. In step with theoretical developments, state-of-the-art software that implements these methods is described that makes the methods

  15. Estimating head and neck tissue dose from x-ray scatter to physicians performing x-ray guided cardiovascular procedures: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterly, Kenneth A; Schueler, Beth A; Grams, Michael P; Sturchio, Glenn M

    2017-03-20

    Physicians performing x-ray guided interventional procedures have a keen interest in radiation safety. Radiation dose to tissues and organs of the head and neck are of particular interest because they are not routinely protected by wearable radiation safety devices. This study was conducted to facilitate estimation of radiation dose to tissues of the head and neck of interventional physicians based on the dose recorded by a personal dosimeter worn on the left collar. Scatter beam qualities maximum energy and HVL were measured for 40 scatter beams emitting from an anthropomorphic patient phantom. Variables of the scatter beams included scatter angle (35° and 90°), primary beam peak tube potential (60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp), and 5 Cu spectral filter thicknesses (0-0.9 mm). Four reference scatter beam qualities were selected to represent the range of scatter beams realized in a typical practice. A general radiographic x-ray tube was tuned to produce scatter-equivalent radiographic beams and used to simultaneously expose the head and neck of an anthropomorphic operator phantom and radiochromic film. The geometric relationship between the x-ray source of the scatter-equivalent beams and the operator phantom was set to mimic that between a patient and physician performing an invasive cardiovascular procedure. Dose to the exterior surface of the operator phantom was measured with both 3 × 3 cm2 pieces of film and personal dosimeters positioned at the location of the left collar. All films were scanned with a calibrated flatbed scanner, which converted the film's reflective density to dose. Films from the transverse planes of the operator phantom provided 2D maps of the dose distribution within the phantom. These dose maps were normalized by the dose at the left collar, providing 2D percent of left collar dose (LCD) maps. The percent LCD maps were overlain with bony anatomy CT images of the operator phantom and estimates of percent LCD to the left, right and whole

  16. Integrating Breeding Bird Survey and demographic data to estimate Wood Duck population size in the Atlantic Flyway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Guthrie S.; Sauer, John; Boomer, G. Scott; Devers, Patrick K.; Garrettson, Pamela R.

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) uses data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) to assist in monitoring and management of some migratory birds. However, BBS analyses provide indices of population change rather than estimates of population size, precluding their use in developing abundance-based objectives and limiting applicability to harvest management. Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) are important harvested birds in the Atlantic Flyway (AF) that are difficult to detect during aerial surveys because they prefer forested habitat. We integrated Wood Duck count data from a ground-plot survey in the northeastern U.S. with AF-wide BBS, banding, parts collection, and harvest data to derive estimates of population size for the AF. Overlapping results between the smaller-scale intensive ground-plot survey and the BBS in the northeastern U.S. provided a means for scaling BBS indices to the breeding population size estimates. We applied these scaling factors to BBS results for portions of the AF lacking intensive surveys. Banding data provided estimates of annual survival and harvest rates; the latter, when combined with parts-collection data, provided estimates of recruitment. We used the harvest data to estimate fall population size. Our estimates of breeding population size and variability from the integrated population model (N̄ = 0.99 million, SD = 0.04) were similar to estimates of breeding population size based solely on data from the AF ground-plot surveys and the BBS (N̄ = 1.01 million, SD = 0.04) from 1998 to 2015. Integrating BBS data with other data provided reliable population size estimates for Wood Ducks at a scale useful for harvest and habitat management in the AF, and allowed us to derive estimates of important demographic parameters (e.g., seasonal survival rates, sex ratio) that were not directly informed by data.

  17. Scattering of acoustic waves by small crustaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, I. B.; Tarasov, L. L.

    2003-03-01

    Features of underwater sound scattering by small crustaceans are considered. The scattering data are obtained with the use of unique instrumentation that allows one to measure quantitative scattering characteristics (backscattering cross sections and angular scattering patterns) for crustaceans of different sizes, at different frequencies (20 200 kHz) and different insonification aspects. A computational model of crustaceans is considered with allowance for both the soft tissues of the main massive part of the animal's body and the stiff armour. The model proves to be advantageous for explaining some scattering features observed in the experiments. The scattering cross sections of crustaceans measured by other researchers are presented in a unified form appropriate for comparison. Based on such a quantitative comparison, relatively simple approximate empirical formulas are proposed for estimating the backscattering cross sections of small (within several centimeters) marine crustaceans in a broad frequency range.

  18. Estimation of the effective population size (Ne) and its application in the management of small populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Mena, Belen

    2016-01-01

    Effective population size (Ne) is an important concept to understand the evolution of a population. In conservation, Ne is used to assess the threat status of a population, evaluate its genetic viability in the future and set conservation priorities. An accurate estimation of Ne is thus essential...... is that genetic drift is homogeneous throughout the genome. We explored the variability of Ne throughout the genome of the Danish Holstein cattle, using temporally-spaced samples of individuals genotyped with a 54K SNP chip. We found heterogeneity in Ne across the genome both between chromosomes and in genomic...... the population against threat status thresholds. When molecular markers are not available, populations can be managed using pedigree information. However, this is challenging to do so for group-living species since individuals and their parentage are difficult to determine. We adapted a pedigree-based method...

  19. Estimates of linkage disequilibrium and effective population size in rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallejo Roger L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of molecular genetic technologies for broodstock management and selective breeding of aquaculture species is becoming increasingly more common with the continued development of genome tools and reagents. Several laboratories have produced genetic maps for rainbow trout to aid in the identification of loci affecting phenotypes of interest. These maps have resulted in the identification of many quantitative/qualitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in traits associated with albinism, disease resistance, temperature tolerance, sex determination, embryonic development rate, spawning date, condition factor and growth. Unfortunately, the elucidation of the precise allelic variation and/or genes underlying phenotypic diversity has yet to be achieved in this species having low marker densities and lacking a whole genome reference sequence. Experimental designs which integrate segregation analyses with linkage disequilibrium (LD approaches facilitate the discovery of genes affecting important traits. To date the extent of LD has been characterized for humans and several agriculturally important livestock species but not for rainbow trout. Results We observed that the level of LD between syntenic loci decayed rapidly at distances greater than 2 cM which is similar to observations of LD in other agriculturally important species including cattle, sheep, pigs and chickens. However, in some cases significant LD was also observed up to 50 cM. Our estimate of effective population size based on genome wide estimates of LD for the NCCCWA broodstock population was 145, indicating that this population will respond well to high selection intensity. However, the range of effective population size based on individual chromosomes was 75.51 - 203.35, possibly indicating that suites of genes on each chromosome are disproportionately under selection pressures. Conclusions Our results indicate that large numbers of markers, more than

  20. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragment size estimates: How big was the parent body?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    The impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter in July, 1994, was the largest, most energetic impact event on a planet ever witnessed. Because it broke up during a close encounter with Jupiter in 1992, it was bright enough to be discovered more than a year prior to impact, allowing the scientific community an unprecedented opportunity to assess the effects such an event would have. Many excellent observations were made from Earth-based telescopes, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Galileo spacecraft en route to Jupiter. In this paper, these observations are used in conjunction with computational simulations performed with the CTH shock-physics hydrocode to determine the sizes of the fifteen fragments that made discernible impact features on the planet. To do this, CTH was equipped with a radiative ablation model and a post-processing radiative ray-trace capability that enabled light-flux predictions (often called the impact flash) for the viewing geometries of Galileo and ground-based observers. The five events recorded by Galileo were calibrated to give fragment size estimates. Compared against ground-based and HST observations, these estimates were extended using a least-squares analysis to assess the impacts of the remaining ten fragments. Some of the largest impacts (L, G and K) were greater that 1 km in diameter but the density of the fragments was low, about 0.25 g/cm{sup 3}. The volume of the combined fifteen fragments would make a sphere 1.8 km in diameter. Assuming a pre-breakup density of 0.5 g/cm{sup 3}, the parent body of Shoemaker-Levy 9 had a probable diameter of 1.4 km. The total kinetic energy of all the impacts was equivalent to the explosive yield of 300 Gigatons of TNT.

  1. Estimation of phytoplankton size fractions based on spectral features of remote sensing ocean color data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuchuan; Li, Lin; Song, Kaishan; Cassar, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Through its influence on the structure of pelagic ecosystems, phytoplankton size distribution (pico-, nano-, and micro-plankton) is believed to play a key role in "the biological pump." In this paper, an algorithm is proposed to estimate phytoplankton size fractions (PSF) for micro-, nano-, and pico-plankton (fm, fn, and fp, respectively) from the spectral features of remote-sensing data. From remote-sensing reflectance spectrum (Rrs(λ)), the algorithm constructs four types of spectral features: a normalized Rrs(λ), band ratios, continuum-removed spectra, and spectral curvatures. Using support vector machine recursive feature elimination, the algorithm ranks the constructed spectral features and Rrs(λ) according to their sensitivities to PSF which is then regressed against the sensitive spectral features through support vector regression. The algorithm is validated with (1) simulated Rrs(λ) and PSF, and (2) Rrs(λ) obtained by Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and PSF determined from High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigments. The validation results show the overall effectiveness of the algorithm in estimating PSF, with R2 of (1) 0.938 (fm) for the simulated SeaWiFS data set; and (2) 0.617 (fm), 0.475 (fn), and 0.587 (fp) for the SeaWiFS satellite data set. The validation results also indicate that continuum-removed spectra and spectral curvatures are the dominant spectral features sensitive to PSF with their wavelengths mainly centered on the pigment-absorption domain. Global spatial distributions of fm, fn, and fp were mapped with monthly SeaWiFS images. Overall, their biogeographical distributions are consistent with our current understanding that pico-plankton account for a large proportion of total phytoplankton biomass in oligotrophic regions, nano-plankton in transitional areas, and micro-plankton in high-productivity regions.

  2. An approach to automatic detection of body parts and their size estimation from computed tomography image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Mausumi; Stoeckel, Jonathan; M. S., Dinesh

    2009-02-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems usually require information about regions of interest in images, like: lungs (for nodule detection), colon (for identifying polyps), etc. Many times, it is computationally intensive to process large data sets as in CT to find these areas of interest. A fast and accurate recognition of the different regions of interest in the human body from images is therefore necessary. In this paper we propose a fast and efficient algorithm that can detect the organs of interest in a CT volume and estimate their sizes. Instead of analyzing the whole 3D volume; which is computationally expensive, a binary search technique is adapted to search in a few slices. The slices selected in the search process is segmented and different regions are labeled. Decision over whether the image belongs to a lung or colon or both is based on the count of lung/colon pixels in the slice. Once the detection is done we look for the start and end slice of the body part to have an estimate of their sizes. The algorithm involves certain search decisions based on some predefined threshold values which are empirically chosen from a training data set. The effectiveness of our technique is confirmed by applying it on an independent test data set. Detection accuracy of 100% is obtained on a test set. This algorithm can be integrated in a CAD system for running the right application, or can be used in pre-sets for visualization purposes and other post-processing like image registration etc.

  3. Asian elephants in China: estimating population size and evaluating habitat suitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available We monitored the last remaining Asian elephant populations in China over the past decade. Using DNA tools and repeat genotyping, we estimated the population sizes from 654 dung samples collected from various areas. Combined with morphological individual identifications from over 6,300 elephant photographs taken in the wild, we estimated that the total Asian elephant population size in China is between 221 and 245. Population genetic structure and diversity were examined using a 556-bp fragment of mitochondrial DNA, and 24 unique haplotypes were detected from DNA analysis of 178 individuals. A phylogenetic analysis revealed two highly divergent clades of Asian elephants, α and β, present in Chinese populations. Four populations (Mengla, Shangyong, Mengyang, and Pu'Er carried mtDNA from the α clade, and only one population (Nangunhe carried mtDNA belonging to the β clade. Moreover, high genetic divergence was observed between the Nangunhe population and the other four populations; however, genetic diversity among the five populations was low, possibly due to limited gene flow because of habitat fragmentation. The expansion of rubber plantations, crop cultivation, and villages along rivers and roads had caused extensive degradation of natural forest in these areas. This had resulted in the loss and fragmentation of elephant habitats and had formed artificial barriers that inhibited elephant migration. Using Geographic Information System, Global Positioning System, and Remote Sensing technology, we found that the area occupied by rubber plantations, tea farms, and urban settlements had dramatically increased over the past 40 years, resulting in the loss and fragmentation of elephant habitats and forming artificial barriers that inhibit elephant migration. The restoration of ecological corridors to facilitate gene exchange among isolated elephant populations and the establishment of cross-boundary protected areas between China and Laos to secure

  4. Asian elephants in China: estimating population size and evaluating habitat suitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Dong, Lu; Lin, Liu; Feng, Limin; Yan, Fan; Wang, Lanxin; Guo, Xianming; Luo, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    We monitored the last remaining Asian elephant populations in China over the past decade. Using DNA tools and repeat genotyping, we estimated the population sizes from 654 dung samples collected from various areas. Combined with morphological individual identifications from over 6,300 elephant photographs taken in the wild, we estimated that the total Asian elephant population size in China is between 221 and 245. Population genetic structure and diversity were examined using a 556-bp fragment of mitochondrial DNA, and 24 unique haplotypes were detected from DNA analysis of 178 individuals. A phylogenetic analysis revealed two highly divergent clades of Asian elephants, α and β, present in Chinese populations. Four populations (Mengla, Shangyong, Mengyang, and Pu'Er) carried mtDNA from the α clade, and only one population (Nangunhe) carried mtDNA belonging to the β clade. Moreover, high genetic divergence was observed between the Nangunhe population and the other four populations; however, genetic diversity among the five populations was low, possibly due to limited gene flow because of habitat fragmentation. The expansion of rubber plantations, crop cultivation, and villages along rivers and roads had caused extensive degradation of natural forest in these areas. This had resulted in the loss and fragmentation of elephant habitats and had formed artificial barriers that inhibited elephant migration. Using Geographic Information System, Global Positioning System, and Remote Sensing technology, we found that the area occupied by rubber plantations, tea farms, and urban settlements had dramatically increased over the past 40 years, resulting in the loss and fragmentation of elephant habitats and forming artificial barriers that inhibit elephant migration. The restoration of ecological corridors to facilitate gene exchange among isolated elephant populations and the establishment of cross-boundary protected areas between China and Laos to secure their natural

  5. Evaluation of duck habitat and estimation of duck population sizes with a remote-sensing-based system

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During 1987-90, we used high-altitude photography, aerial videography, counts, and models to estimate sizes of breeding populations of dabbling ducks (Anatinae) and...

  6. Estimates of the Number and Size of Rocks Within Reach of the Robotic Arm During Phoenix Surface Operations on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M.; Sizemore, H. G.; Huertas, A.; Tamppari, L.; Mellon, M. T.

    2008-03-01

    The size-frequency distributions of rocks in HiRISE images follow exponential models developed from lander measurements of smaller rocks and are extrapolated to smaller diameter to estimate the number of rocks in the Phoenix robotic arm workspace.

  7. Short-term genetic changes: evaluating effective population size estimates in a comprehensively described brown trout (Salmo trutta) population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serbezov, Dimitar; Jorde, Per Erik; Bernatchez, Louis; Olsen, Esben Moland; Vøllestad, L Asbjørn

    2012-01-01

    The effective population size (N(e)) is notoriously difficult to accurately estimate in wild populations as it is influenced by a number of parameters that are difficult to delineate in natural systems...

  8. Estimating Soil Water Retention Curve Using The Particle Size Distribution Based on Fractal Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Chari

    2016-02-01

    showed that the fractal dimension of particle size distributions obtained with both methods were not significantly different from each other. DSWRCwas also using the suction-moisture . The results indicate that all three fractal dimensions related to soil texture and clay content of the soil increases. Linear regression relationships between Dm1 and Dm2 with DSWRC was created using 48 soil samples in order to determine the coefficient of 0.902 and 0.871 . Then, based on relationships obtained from the four methods (1- Dm1 = DSWRC, 2-regression equationswere obtained Dm1, 3- Dm2 = DSWRC and 4. The regression equation obtained Dm2. DSWRC expression was used to express DSWRC. Various models for the determination of soil moisture suction according to statistical indicators normalized root mean square error, mean error, relative error.And mean geometric modeling efficiency was evaluated. The results of all four fractalsare close to each other and in most soils it is consistent with the measured data. Models predict the ability to work well in sandy loam soil fractal models and the predicted measured moisture value is less than the estimated fractal dimension- less than its actual value is the moisture curve. Conclusions: In this study, the work of Skaggs et al. (24 was used and it was amended by Fooladmand and Sepaskhah (8 grading curve using the percentage of developed sand, silt and clay . The fractal dimension of the particle size distribution was obtained.The fractal dimension particle size of the radius of the particle size of sand, silt and clay were used, respectively.In general, the study of fractals to simulate the effectiveness of retention curve proved successful. And soon it was found that the use of data, such as sand, silt and clay retention curve can be estimated with reasonable accuracy.

  9. ESTIMATING THE SIZE OF LATE VENEER IMPACTORS FROM IMPACT-INDUCED MIXING ON MERCURY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Barr, A. C., E-mail: rivera-valentin@brown.edu [Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, 324 Brook Street, Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    Late accretion of a ''veneer'' of compositionally diverse planetesimals may introduce chemical heterogeneity in the mantles of the terrestrial planets. The size of the late veneer objects is an important control on the angular momenta, eccentricities, and inclinations of the terrestrial planets, but current estimates range from meter-scale bodies to objects with diameters of thousands of kilometers. We use a three-dimensional global Monte Carlo model of impact cratering, excavation, and ejecta blanket formation to show that evidence of mantle heterogeneity can be preserved within ejecta blankets of mantle-exhuming impacts on terrestrial planets. Compositionally distinct provinces implanted at the time of the late veneer are most likely to be preserved in bodies whose subsequent geodynamical evolution is limited. Mercury may have avoided intensive mixing by solid-state convection during much of its history. Its subsequent bombardment may have then excavated evidence of primordial mantle heterogeneity introduced by the late veneer. Simple geometric arguments can predict the amount of mantle material in the ejecta blanket of mantle-exhuming impacts, and deviations in composition relative to geometric predictions can constrain the length-scale of chemical heterogeneities in the subsurface. A marked change in the relationship between mantle and ejecta composition occurs when chemically distinct provinces are ∼250 km in diameter; thus, evidence of bombardment by thousand-kilometer-sized objects should be readily apparent from the variation in compositions of ejecta blankets in Mercury's ancient cratered terrains.

  10. A comparison of different estimation methods for simulation-based sample size determination in longitudinal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahçecitapar, Melike Kaya

    2017-07-01

    Determining sample size necessary for correct results is a crucial step in the design of longitudinal studies. Simulation-based statistical power calculation is a flexible approach to determine number of subjects and repeated measures of longitudinal studies especially in complex design. Several papers have provided sample size/statistical power calculations for longitudinal studies incorporating data analysis by linear mixed effects models (LMMs). In this study, different estimation methods (methods based on maximum likelihood (ML) and restricted ML) with different iterative algorithms (quasi-Newton and ridge-stabilized Newton-Raphson) in fitting LMMs to generated longitudinal data for simulation-based power calculation are compared. This study examines statistical power of F-test statistics for parameter representing difference in responses over time from two treatment groups in the LMM with a longitudinal covariate. The most common procedures in SAS, such as PROC GLIMMIX using quasi-Newton algorithm and PROC MIXED using ridge-stabilized algorithm are used for analyzing generated longitudinal data in simulation. It is seen that both procedures present similar results. Moreover, it is found that the magnitude of the parameter of interest in the model for simulations affect statistical power calculations in both procedures substantially.

  11. Punitive laws, key population size estimates, and Global AIDS Response Progress Reports: an ecological study of 154 countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara LM Davis

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Criminalization of same-sex sexuality is associated with implausibly low or absent MSM size estimates. Low size estimates may contribute to official denial of the existence of MSM; to failure to adequately address their needs; and to inflated HIV service coverage reports that paint a false picture of success. To enable and measure progress in the HIV response, UN agencies should lead a collaborative process to systematically, independently and rigorously gather data on laws and their enforcement.

  12. Estimates of the Size Distribution of Meteoric Smoke Particles From Rocket-Borne Impact Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsen, Tarjei; Havnes, Ove; Mann, Ingrid

    2017-11-01

    Ice particles populating noctilucent clouds and being responsible for polar mesospheric summer echoes exist around the mesopause in the altitude range from 80 to 90 km during polar summer. The particles are observed when temperatures around the mesopause reach a minimum, and it is presumed that they consist of water ice with inclusions of smaller mesospheric smoke particles (MSPs). This work provides estimates of the mean size distribution of MSPs through analysis of collision fragments of the ice particles populating the mesospheric dust layers. We have analyzed data from two triplets of mechanically identical rocket probes, MUltiple Dust Detector (MUDD), which are Faraday bucket detectors with impact grids that partly fragments incoming ice particles. The MUDD probes were launched from Andøya Space Center (69°17'N, 16°1'E) on two payloads during the MAXIDUSTY campaign on 30 June and 8 July 2016, respectively. Our analysis shows that it is unlikely that ice particles produce significant current to the detector, and that MSPs dominate the recorded current. The size distributions obtained from these currents, which reflect the MSP sizes, are described by inverse power laws with exponents of k˜ [3.3 ± 0.7, 3.7 ± 0.5] and k˜ [3.6 ± 0.8, 4.4 ± 0.3] for the respective flights. We derived two k values for each flight depending on whether the charging probability is proportional to area or volume of fragments. We also confirm that MSPs are probably abundant inside mesospheric ice particles larger than a few nanometers, and the volume filling factor can be a few percent for reasonable assumptions of particle properties.

  13. Fast Automatic Step Size Estimation for Gradient Descent Optimization of Image Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yuchuan; van Lew, Baldur; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Staring, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Fast automatic image registration is an important prerequisite for image-guided clinical procedures. However, due to the large number of voxels in an image and the complexity of registration algorithms, this process is often very slow. Stochastic gradient descent is a powerful method to iteratively solve the registration problem, but relies for convergence on a proper selection of the optimization step size. This selection is difficult to perform manually, since it depends on the input data, similarity measure and transformation model. The Adaptive Stochastic Gradient Descent (ASGD) method is an automatic approach, but it comes at a high computational cost. In this paper, we propose a new computationally efficient method (fast ASGD) to automatically determine the step size for gradient descent methods, by considering the observed distribution of the voxel displacements between iterations. A relation between the step size and the expectation and variance of the observed distribution is derived. While ASGD has quadratic complexity with respect to the transformation parameters, fast ASGD only has linear complexity. Extensive validation has been performed on different datasets with different modalities, inter/intra subjects, different similarity measures and transformation models. For all experiments, we obtained similar accuracy as ASGD. Moreover, the estimation time of fast ASGD is reduced to a very small value, from 40 s to less than 1 s when the number of parameters is 105, almost 40 times faster. Depending on the registration settings, the total registration time is reduced by a factor of 2.5-7 × for the experiments in this paper.

  14. Atmospheric number size distributions of soot particles and estimation of emission factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rose

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Number fractions of externally mixed particles of four different sizes (30, 50, 80, and 150 nm in diameter were measured using a Volatility Tandem DMA. The system was operated in a street canyon (Eisenbahnstrasse, EI and at an urban background site (Institute for Tropospheric Research, IfT, both in the city of Leipzig, Germany as well as at a rural site (Melpitz (ME, a village near Leipzig. Intensive campaigns of 3–5 weeks each took place in summer 2003 as well as in winter 2003/04. The data set thus obtained provides mean number fractions of externally mixed soot particles of atmospheric aerosols in differently polluted areas and different seasons (e.g. at 80 nm on working days, 60% (EI, 22% (IfT, and 6% (ME in summer and 26% (IfT, and 13% (ME in winter. Furthermore, a new method is used to calculate the size distribution of these externally mixed soot particles from parallel number size distribution measurements. A decrease of the externally mixed soot fraction with decreasing urbanity and a diurnal variation linked to the daily traffic changes demonstrate, that the traffic emissions have a significant impact on the soot fraction in urban areas. This influence becomes less in rural areas, due to atmospheric mixing and transformation processes. For estimating the source strength of soot particles emitted by vehicles (veh, soot particle emission factors were calculated using the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM. The emission factor for an average vehicle was found to be (1.5±0.4·1014 #(km·veh. The separation of the emission factor into passenger cars ((5.8±2·1013} #(km·veh and trucks ((2.5±0.9·1015 #(km·veh yielded in a 40-times higher emission factor for trucks compared to passenger cars.

  15. Gear and seasonal bias associated with abundance and size structure estimates for lentic freshwater fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jesse R.; Quist, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    All freshwater fish sampling methods are biased toward particular species, sizes, and sexes and are further influenced by season, habitat, and fish behavior changes over time. However, little is known about gear-specific biases for many common fish species because few multiple-gear comparison studies exist that have incorporated seasonal dynamics. We sampled six lakes and impoundments representing a diversity of trophic and physical conditions in Iowa, USA, using multiple gear types (i.e., standard modified fyke net, mini-modified fyke net, sinking experimental gill net, bag seine, benthic trawl, boat-mounted electrofisher used diurnally and nocturnally) to determine the influence of sampling methodology and season on fisheries assessments. Specifically, we describe the influence of season on catch per unit effort, proportional size distribution, and the number of samples required to obtain 125 stock-length individuals for 12 species of recreational and ecological importance. Mean catch per unit effort generally peaked in the spring and fall as a result of increased sampling effectiveness in shallow areas and seasonal changes in habitat use (e.g., movement offshore during summer). Mean proportional size distribution decreased from spring to fall for white bass Morone chrysops, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, and black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, suggesting selectivity for large and presumably sexually mature individuals in the spring and summer. Overall, the mean number of samples required to sample 125 stock-length individuals was minimized in the fall with sinking experimental gill nets, a boat-mounted electrofisher used at night, and standard modified nets for 11 of the 12 species evaluated. Our results provide fisheries scientists with relative comparisons between several recommended standard sampling methods and illustrate the effects of seasonal variation on estimates of population indices that will be critical to

  16. Population Size Estimation of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Tbilisi, Georgia; Multiple Methods and Triangulation of Findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lela Sulaberidze

    Full Text Available An accurate estimation of the population size of men who have sex with men (MSM is critical to the success of HIV program planning and to monitoring of the response to epidemic as a whole, but is quite often missing. In this study, our aim was to estimate the population size of MSM in Tbilisi, Georgia and compare it with other estimates in the region.In the absence of a gold standard for estimating the population size of MSM, this study reports a range of methods, including network scale-up, mobile/web apps multiplier, service and unique object multiplier, network-based capture-recapture, Handcock RDS-based and Wisdom of Crowds methods. To apply all these methods, two surveys were conducted: first, a household survey among 1,015 adults from the general population, and second, a respondent driven sample of 210 MSM. We also conducted a literature review of MSM size estimation in Eastern European and Central Asian countries.The median population size of MSM generated from all previously mentioned methods was estimated to be 5,100 (95% Confidence Interval (CI: 3,243~9,088. This corresponds to 1.42% (95%CI: 0.9%~2.53% of the adult male population in Tbilisi.Our size estimates of the MSM population (1.42% (95%CI: 0.9%~2.53% of the adult male population in Tbilisi fall within ranges reported in other Eastern European and Central Asian countries. These estimates can provide valuable information for country level HIV prevention program planning and evaluation. Furthermore, we believe, that our results will narrow the gap in data availability on the estimates of the population size of MSM in the region.

  17. Application of the LSQR algorithm in non-parametric estimation of aerosol size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Lew, Zhongyuan; Ruan, Liming; Tan, Heping; Luo, Kun

    2016-05-01

    Based on the Least Squares QR decomposition (LSQR) algorithm, the aerosol size distribution (ASD) is retrieved in non-parametric approach. The direct problem is solved by the Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA) and the Lambert-Beer Law. An optimal wavelength selection method is developed to improve the retrieval accuracy of the ASD. The proposed optimal wavelength set is selected by the method which can make the measurement signals sensitive to wavelength and decrease the degree of the ill-condition of coefficient matrix of linear systems effectively to enhance the anti-interference ability of retrieval results. Two common kinds of monomodal and bimodal ASDs, log-normal (L-N) and Gamma distributions, are estimated, respectively. Numerical tests show that the LSQR algorithm can be successfully applied to retrieve the ASD with high stability in the presence of random noise and low susceptibility to the shape of distributions. Finally, the experimental measurement ASD over Harbin in China is recovered reasonably. All the results confirm that the LSQR algorithm combined with the optimal wavelength selection method is an effective and reliable technique in non-parametric estimation of ASD.

  18. SIMPLE METHOD OF SIZE-SPECIFIC DOSE ESTIMATES CALCULATION FROM PATIENT WEIGHT ON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriuchijima, Akiko; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Takahito; Tsushima, Yoshito; Ogura, Akio

    2017-07-28

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new and simple methodology for calculating mean size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) over the entire scan range (mSSDE) from weight and volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). We retrospectively analyzed data from a dose index registry. Scan areas were divided into two regions: chest and abdomen-pelvis. The original mSSDE was calculated by a commercially available software. The conversion formulas for mSSDE were estimated from weight and CTDIvol (SSDEweight) in each region. SSDEweight were compared with the original mSSDE using Bland-Altman analysis. Root mean square differences were 1.4 mGy for chest and 1.5 mGy for abdomen-pelvis. Our method using formulae can calculate SSDEweight using weight and CTDIvol without a dedicated software, and can be used to calculate DRL to optimize CT exposure doses. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Effects of sample size on estimation of rainfall extremes at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Boessenkool

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High precipitation quantiles tend to rise with temperature, following the so-called Clausius–Clapeyron (CC scaling. It is often reported that the CC-scaling relation breaks down and even reverts for very high temperatures. In our study, we investigate this reversal using observational climate data from 142 stations across Germany. One of the suggested meteorological explanations for the breakdown is limited moisture supply. Here we argue that, instead, it could simply originate from undersampling. As rainfall frequency generally decreases with higher temperatures, rainfall intensities as dictated by CC scaling are less likely to be recorded than for moderate temperatures. Empirical quantiles are conventionally estimated from order statistics via various forms of plotting position formulas. They have in common that their largest representable return period is given by the sample size. In small samples, high quantiles are underestimated accordingly. The small-sample effect is weaker, or disappears completely, when using parametric quantile estimates from a generalized Pareto distribution (GPD fitted with L moments. For those, we obtain quantiles of rainfall intensities that continue to rise with temperature.

  20. Effects of sample size on estimation of rainfall extremes at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessenkool, Berry; Bürger, Gerd; Heistermann, Maik

    2017-09-01

    High precipitation quantiles tend to rise with temperature, following the so-called Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) scaling. It is often reported that the CC-scaling relation breaks down and even reverts for very high temperatures. In our study, we investigate this reversal using observational climate data from 142 stations across Germany. One of the suggested meteorological explanations for the breakdown is limited moisture supply. Here we argue that, instead, it could simply originate from undersampling. As rainfall frequency generally decreases with higher temperatures, rainfall intensities as dictated by CC scaling are less likely to be recorded than for moderate temperatures. Empirical quantiles are conventionally estimated from order statistics via various forms of plotting position formulas. They have in common that their largest representable return period is given by the sample size. In small samples, high quantiles are underestimated accordingly. The small-sample effect is weaker, or disappears completely, when using parametric quantile estimates from a generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) fitted with L moments. For those, we obtain quantiles of rainfall intensities that continue to rise with temperature.

  1. THE SIZE-SPECIFIC DOSE ESTIMATE (SSDE) FOR TRUNCATED COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IMAGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anam, Choirul; Haryanto, Freddy; Widita, Rena; Arif, Idam; Dougherty, Geoff

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate truncated axial computed tomography (CT) images in the clinical environment and to produce correction factors for abdomen, thoracic and head regions based on clinical data, in order to accurately predict the water-equivalent diameter (DW) and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE). We investigated axial images of 75 patients who underwent CT examinations. Truncated axial images were characterized by the truncation percentage (TP). Correction factors were calculated by using the value of DW for a certain TP (truncated image) divided by the value of DW for TP = 0% (the non-truncated image). Most of the thorax images acquired for this study were truncated images (86.2%), in the abdomen region about half of the images were truncated (48.1%), and in the head region only a small portion were truncated (9.1%). In the thorax region the value of TP for the truncated images varied up to 50%, in the abdomen region it varied up to 35%, and in the head region it was smaller than 10%. We have shown how to accurately estimate DW and SSDE by applying a correction factor to the truncated images. The correction factors increase exponentially with increasing TP. The corrected DW and SSDE for the truncated images were significant in the thoracic region, but were not significant in the abdomen and head regions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Comparison of the effects of two bongo net mesh sizes on the estimation of abundance and size of Engraulidae eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Menegassi del Favero

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studies of ichthyoplankton retention by nets of different mesh sizes are important because they help in choosing a sampler when planning collection and the establishment of correction factors. These factors make it possible to compare studies performed with nets of different mesh sizes. In most studies of mesh retention of fish eggs, the taxonomic identification is done at the family level, resulting in the loss of detailed information. We separated Engraulidae eggs, obtained with 0.333 mm and 0.505 mm mesh bongo nets at 172 oceanographic stations in the southeastern Brazilian Bight, into four groups based on their morphometric characteristics. The difference in the abundance of eggs caught by the two nets was not significant for those groups with highest volume, types A and B, but in type C (Engraulis anchoita, the most eccentric, and in type D, of the smallest volume, the difference was significant. However, no significant difference was observed in the egg size sampled with each net for E. anchoita and type D, which exhibited higher abundance in the 0.333 mm mesh net and minor axis varying from 0.45-0.71 mm, smaller than the 0.505 mm mesh aperture and the mesh diagonal.

  3. Sensitivity analysis and calibration of population size estimates obtained with the zero-truncated Poisson regression model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruyff, M.J.L.F.; Van der Heijden, P.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Zero-truncated regression models for count data can be used to estimate the size of an elusive population. A frequently encountered problem is that the Poisson model underestimates the population size due to unobserved heterogeneity, while the negative binomial model is not identified. A sensitivity

  4. Determination of proton size from pi sup + p and pi sup - p scattering at T subpi sub sup+- = 277-640 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Haque, S; Rahman, M A; Rahman, S N; Rana, M M

    2003-01-01

    The pion-nucleon interaction above the DELTA (1232) resonance and in the region of low-lying pion-nucleon resonances is studied. pi sup+-p elastic scattering at T subpi sub sup+-1% = 277 - 640 MeV characterized by diffraction maxima and minima has been analyzed through the strong absorption model due to Frahn and Venter. The proton radius is determined from the best fit values of the cut-off angular momentum to be 0.85 fm with a spread of 0.15 fm. The higher energy pions scan a lower value while the lower energy pions yield a higher value for the size of the proton. The energy averaged radius of the proton size of 0.85 fm obtained in the present analysis is in excellent agreement with proton charge radius of 0.86 fm quoted in the literature.

  5. Robust Variance Estimation with Dependent Effect Sizes: Practical Considerations Including a Software Tutorial in Stata and SPSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Tipton, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Methodologists have recently proposed robust variance estimation as one way to handle dependent effect sizes in meta-analysis. Software macros for robust variance estimation in meta-analysis are currently available for Stata (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX, USA) and SPSS (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA), yet there is little guidance for authors regarding…

  6. A study of the scattering properties of an ensemble of rectangular prisms of different composition, size distribution and aspect ratios: a possible application to cometary dust grains?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilaplana, Rosario [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada, EPSA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Pz. Ferrandiz y Carbonell, 2, E-03801. Alcoy. (Spain); Moreno, Fernando [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, C/ Camino bajo de Huetor, 24, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Molina, Antonio [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, C/ Camino bajo de Huetor, 24, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Granada, C/ Fuente nueva, s/n, E-18010, Granada (Spain)

    2005-01-01

    We have approached the scattering properties of cometary dust using size and shape distributions of non-spherical randomly oriented compact particles having non-homogeneous composition. In our model we have used inhomogeneous rectangular prisms in which the aspect ratio between the main axes and the index of the power law size distribution are varied. Two different compositions have been considered. The first one is silicate with carbon inclusions mixed with dirty ice, while the second one is silicate with carbon inclusions. We have obtained that both the width and the depth of the negative polarization branch have a clear dependence on the aspect ratio of the rectangular prisms and the composition. The best fits to the linear polarization curve of cometary grains have been obtained by a non constant distribution of rectangular prisms of the second composition where the elongate-shaped prisms prevail. Moreover, although the irregularity is not accurately represented by this type of distribution, curiously, its usage has shown that the scattering matrix element F{sub 34}/F{sub 11} is very sensitive to the aspect ratio of the particles constituting the synthetic sample.

  7. Do Adults Show a Curse of Knowledge in False-Belief Reasoning? A Robust Estimate of the True Effect Size

    OpenAIRE

    Ryskin, Rachel A.; Sarah Brown-Schmidt

    2014-01-01

    Seven experiments use large sample sizes to robustly estimate the effect size of a previous finding that adults are more likely to commit egocentric errors in a false-belief task when the egocentric response is plausible in light of their prior knowledge. We estimate the true effect size to be less than half of that reported in the original findings. Even though we found effects in the same direction as the original, they were substantively smaller; the original study would have had less than...

  8. The Inclusion of Raman Scattering Effects in the Combined Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model MOMO to Estimate the Influence of Raman Scattering in Case 1 Waters on Satellite Ocean Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bismarck, J.; Fischer, J.

    2011-12-01

    source, the MOMO program structure allows the inclusion of other elastic and inelastic sources, e.g. fluorescence effects. To estimate the influence of Raman scattered light from case 1 waters on satellite remote sensing applications, tables with Raman fractions where computed for water-leaving and top-of-atmosphere radiances for the spectral channels of the OLCI imaging spectrometer on the upcoming ESA remote sensing satellite SENTINEL-3. The tables where generated for different chlorophyll concentrations, incorporating a bio optical model, and accounting for possible variations of salinity (0 - 40 PSU) and temperature (5° - 30° C) of the water. These results, also pointing out the importance of the inclusion of clear Water Raman scattering contributions in ocean and atmosphere remote sensing applications, are presented.

  9. Magnon-induced interband spin-flip scattering contribution to resistivity and magnetoresistance in a nanocrystalline itinerant-electron ferromagnet: Effect of crystallite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madduri, P. V. Prakash; Kaul, S. N.

    2017-05-01

    We report the results of an exhaustive study of `zero-field' electrical resistivity ρ (T ) and magnetoresistance (MR) (in magnetic fields up to 90 kOe) over the temperature range 1.8-300 K in nanocrystalline (nc-) Ni with average crystallite size d ranging from 10 nm to 40 nm. A quantitative comparison of our results with the predictions of the recent self-consistent calculations permits us to unambiguously identify the scattering mechanisms responsible for ρ (T ) and MR in different temperature ranges and accurately determine their relative magnitudes in nc-Ni samples of different d . Like in bulk 3 d transition metal ferromagnets, ρ varies with temperature as T2 at T ≲15 K. Contrary to the widely-held view that the T2 variation of ρ at low temperatures arises from the electron-magnon (e -m ) scattering, this contribution to ρ (T ) is shown to originate from the electron-electron (Baber) scattering. In the temperature range 15 K≤T ≤300 K, the phonon-induced non-spin-flip (NSF) intraband [i.e., s↑↓-s↑↓ , d↑↓-d↑↓ electron-phonon (e -p )] scattering and magnon-induced spin-flip (SF) interband (i.e., s↑↓-d↓↑e -m ) scattering contributions completely account for the intrinsic resistivity. The former contribution dominates over the latter at T >T whereas the reverse is true at temperatures 15 K ≤T T , ρe -m(T ,H =0 ) becomes comparable in magnitude to ρe -p(T ,H =0 ) for d ≥25 nm. By contrast, the MR in nc-Ni is entirely due to the s↑↓-d↓↑e -m scattering. The present work clearly brings out the importance of the thermal renormalization of magnon mass (caused mainly by the magnon-magnon interactions) over the temperature range 15 K≤T ≤300 K. Irrespective of the value of d (including the bulk, d =∞ ), phonon-induced s↑↓-s↑↓ , d↑↓-d↑↓ transitions are more frequent than the e -p s↑↓-d↑↓ transitions over the entire temperature range 1.8 K≤T ≤300 K. The saturation magnetization at 0 K, spin

  10. SAMPLE SIZE DETERMINATION IN CLINICAL TRIALS BASED ON APPROXIMATION OF VARIANCE ESTIMATED FROM LIMITED PRIMARY OR PILOT STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B SOLEYMANI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In many casses the estimation of variance which is used to determine sample size in clinical trials, derives from limited primary or pilot studies in which number of samples is small. since in such casses the estimation of variance may be much far from the real variance, the size of samples is suspected to be less or more than what is really needed. In this article an attempt has been made to give a solution to this problem. in the case of normal distribution. Based on distribution of (n-1 S2/?2 which is chi-square for normal variables, an appropriate estimation of variance is determined an used to calculate sample size. Also, total probability to ensure specific precision and power has been achived. In method presented here, The probability for getting desired precision and power is more than that of usual method, but results of two methods get closer when sample size increases in primary studies.

  11. Estimating the size of illicit tobacco consumption in Brazil: findings from the global adult tobacco survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Roberto Magno; Szklo, André Salem; Souza, Mirian Carvalho de; de Almeida, Liz Maria

    2017-01-01

    Brazil experienced a large decline in smoking prevalence between 2008 and 2013. Tax rate increases since 2007 and a new tobacco tax structure in 2012 may have played an important role in this decline. However, continuous tax rate increases pushed up cigarette prices over personal income growth and, therefore, some consumers, especially lower income individuals, may have migrated to cheaper illicit cigarettes. To use tobacco surveillance data to estimate the size of illicit tobacco consumption before and after excise tax increases. We defined a threshold price and compared it with purchasing prices obtained from two representative surveys conducted in 2008 and 2013 to estimate the proportion of illicit cigarette use among daily smokers. Generalised linear model was specified to understand whether the absolute difference in proportions over time differed by sociodemographic groups and consumption levels. Our findings were validated using an alternative method. Total proportion of illicit daily consumption increased from 16.6% to 31.1% between 2008 and 2013. We observed a pattern of unadjusted absolute decreases in cigarette smoking prevalence and increases in the proportion of illicit consumption, irrespective of gender, age, educational level, area of residence and amount of cigarettes consumed. The strategy of raising taxes has increased government revenues, reduced smoking prevalence and resulted in an increased illicit trade. Surveillance data can be used to provide information on illicit tobacco trade to help in the implementation of WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) article 15 and the FCTC Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Fabrication of small-sized silver NPs/graphene sheets for high-quality surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Fu, Honggang; Zhao, Tianshou; Wang, Lei; Tan, Taixing

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, small-sized and highly dispersed Ag nanoparticles (NPs) supported on graphene nanosheets are fabricated via a strategy for etching a copper template with Ag(+). Firstly, big-sized Cu NPs are supported on graphene, and then the small-sized and highly dispersed Ag NPs are supported on graphene by replacement reaction, mainly making use of graphene passing electrons between Cu and Ag(+). The graphene used in the experiment is prepared by in situ self-generating template and has good dispersion, excellent crystallinity and little defects. Thus, in the process of Ag/graphene synthesis, there is no any intervention of surfactant, which ensures that SERS activity sites have not been passivated. And, the little defects of graphene benefit the excellent conductivity of graphene and ensured the replacement reaction between Cu and Ag(+). The obtained material exhibits significant high-quality and distinctive SERS activity. Especially, a serial new peak of p-aminothiophenol (PATP) is observed, this is suggested two reasons: one is "surface geometry" of the PATP on small-sized Ag NPs and another is the charge-transfer between Ag and graphene. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Comparison of NMR and Dynamic Light Scattering for Measuring Diffusion Coefficients of Formulated Insulin: Implications for Particle Size Distribution Measurements in Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sharadrao M; Keire, David A; Chen, Kang

    2017-11-01

    Particle size distribution, a measurable physicochemical quantity, is a critical quality attribute of drug products that needs to be controlled in drug manufacturing. The non-invasive methods of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Diffusion Ordered SpectroscopY (DOSY) NMR can be used to measure diffusion coefficient and derive the corresponding hydrodynamic radius. However, little is known about their use and sensitivity as analytical tools for particle size measurement of formulated protein therapeutics. Here, DLS and DOSY-NMR methods are shown to be orthogonal and yield identical diffusion coefficient results for a homogenous monomeric protein standard, ribonuclease A. However, different diffusion coefficients were observed for five insulin drug products measured using the two methods. DOSY-NMR yielded an averaged diffusion coefficient among fast exchanging insulin oligomers, ranging between dimer and hexamer in size. By contrast, DLS showed several distinct species, including dimer, hexamer, dodecamer and other aggregates. The heterogeneity or polydisperse nature of insulin oligomers in formulation caused DOSY-NMR and DLS results to differ from each other. DLS measurements provided more quality attributes and higher sensitivity to larger aggregates than DOSY-NMR. Nevertheless, each method was sensitive to a different range of particle sizes and complemented each other. The application of both methods increases the assurance of complex drug quality in this similarity comparison.

  14. Fitting state-space integral projection models to size-structured time series data to estimate unknown parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J Wilson; Nickols, Kerry J; Malone, Daniel; Carr, Mark H; Starr, Richard M; Cordoleani, Flora; Baskett, Marissa L; Hastings, Alan; Botsford, Louis W

    2016-12-01

    Integral projection models (IPMs) have a number of advantages over matrix-model approaches for analyzing size-structured population dynamics, because the latter require parameter estimates for each age or stage transition. However, IPMs still require appropriate data. Typically they are parameterized using individual-scale relationships between body size and demographic rates, but these are not always available. We present an alternative approach for estimating demographic parameters from time series of size-structured survey data using a Bayesian state-space IPM (SSIPM). By fitting an IPM in a state-space framework, we estimate unknown parameters and explicitly account for process and measurement error in a dataset to estimate the underlying process model dynamics. We tested our method by fitting SSIPMs to simulated data; the model fit the simulated size distributions well and estimated unknown demographic parameters accurately. We then illustrated our method using nine years of annual surveys of the density and size distribution of two fish species (blue rockfish, Sebastes mystinus, and gopher rockfish, S. carnatus) at seven kelp forest sites in California. The SSIPM produced reasonable fits to the data, and estimated fishing rates for both species that were higher than our Bayesian prior estimates based on coast-wide stock assessment estimates of harvest. That improvement reinforces the value of being able to estimate demographic parameters from local-scale monitoring data. We highlight a number of key decision points in SSIPM development (e.g., open vs. closed demography, number of particles in the state-space filter) so that users can apply the method to their own datasets. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. The Effect of Childhood Family Size on Fertility in Adulthood: New Evidence From IV Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Sara; Kaldager Hart, Rannveig

    2017-02-01

    Although fertility is positively correlated across generations, the causal effect of children's experience with larger sibships on their own fertility in adulthood is poorly understood. With the sex composition of the two firstborn children as an instrumental variable, we estimate the effect of sibship size on adult fertility using high-quality data from Norwegian administrative registers. Our study sample is all firstborns or second-borns during the 1960s in Norwegian families with at least two children (approximately 110,000 men and 104,000 women). An additional sibling has a positive effect on male fertility, mainly causing them to have three children themselves, but has a negative effect on female fertility at the same margin. Investigation into mediators reveals that mothers of girls shift relatively less time from market to family work when an additional child is born. We speculate that this scarcity in parents' time makes girls aware of the strains of life in large families, leading them to limit their own number of children in adulthood.

  16. Estimated size of the population at risk of severe adverse events after smallpox vaccination in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yael; Anis, Emilia; Kaliner, Ehud; Grotto, Itamar; Danon, Yehuda L

    2012-10-19

    The population at risk of adverse events after smallpox vaccination has increased in recent years. This has important implications for preparedness strategies against bioterrorism with the variola virus. The aim of the study was to estimate the size of this special population in Israel. The study was conducted in January 2010. Data on patients with contraindications to smallpox vaccination, as delineated by the Israel Ministry of Health for planning post-event strategies, were retrieved from the computerized records of the Department of AIDS and Tuberculosis and the Transplantation Center of the Israel Ministry of Health. In addition, the database of the main Health Maintenance Organization in Israel which insures 60% of the national population was searched using ICD-9 codes and specific medications issued in the last quarter of 2009. Of the 7,563,800 persons residing in Israel in January 2010, 326,318 were at risk of an adverse event after smallpox vaccination. Approximately 4.3% of the Israeli population should not be exposed to the currently used smallpox vaccine. This knowledge is important to ensure the effectiveness of mass vaccination programs in the event of a bioterror attack. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimation of wildfire size and risk changes due to fuels treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, M.A.; Moran, C.J.; Wimberly, M.C.; Baer, A.D.; Finney, M.A.; Beckendorf, K.L.; Eidenshink, J.; Zhu, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Human land use practices, altered climates, and shifting forest and fire management policies have increased the frequency of large wildfires several-fold. Mitigation of potential fire behaviour and fire severity have increasingly been attempted through pre-fire alteration of wildland fuels using mechanical treatments and prescribed fires. Despite annual treatment of more than a million hectares of land, quantitative assessments of the effectiveness of existing fuel treatments at reducing the size of actual wildfires or how they might alter the risk of burning across landscapes are currently lacking. Here, we present a method for estimating spatial probabilities of burning as a function of extant fuels treatments for any wildland fire-affected landscape. We examined the landscape effects of more than 72 000 ha of wildland fuel treatments involved in 14 large wildfires that burned 314 000 ha of forests in nine US states between 2002 and 2010. Fuels treatments altered the probability of fire occurrence both positively and negatively across landscapes, effectively redistributing fire risk by changing surface fire spread rates and reducing the likelihood of crowning behaviour. Trade offs are created between formation of large areas with low probabilities of increased burning and smaller, well-defined regions with reduced fire risk.

  18. How Big Is It Really? Assessing the Efficacy of Indirect Estimates of Body Size in Asian Elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon N; Mumby, Hannah S; Crawley, Jennie A H; Mar, Khyne U; Htut, Win; Thura Soe, Aung; Aung, Htoo Htoo; Lummaa, Virpi

    2016-01-01

    Information on an organism's body size is pivotal in understanding its life history and fitness, as well as helping inform conservation measures. However, for many species, particularly large-bodied wild animals, taking accurate body size measurements can be a challenge. Various means to estimate body size have been employed, from more direct methods such as using photogrammetry to obtain height or length measurements, to indirect prediction of weight using other body morphometrics or even the size of dung boli. It is often unclear how accurate these measures are because they cannot be compared to objective measures. Here, we investigate how well existing estimation equations predict the actual body weight of Asian elephants Elephas maximus, using body measurements (height, chest girth, length, foot circumference and neck circumference) taken directly from a large population of semi-captive animals in Myanmar (n = 404). We then define new and better fitting formulas to predict body weight in Myanmar elephants from these readily available measures. We also investigate whether the important parameters height and chest girth can be estimated from photographs (n = 151). Our results show considerable variation in the ability of existing estimation equations to predict weight, and that the equations proposed in this paper predict weight better in almost all circumstances. We also find that measurements from standardised photographs reflect body height and chest girth after applying minor adjustments. Our results have implications for size estimation of large wild animals in the field, as well as for management in captive settings.

  19. How Big Is It Really? Assessing the Efficacy of Indirect Estimates of Body Size in Asian Elephants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon N Chapman

    Full Text Available Information on an organism's body size is pivotal in understanding its life history and fitness, as well as helping inform conservation measures. However, for many species, particularly large-bodied wild animals, taking accurate body size measurements can be a challenge. Various means to estimate body size have been employed, from more direct methods such as using photogrammetry to obtain height or length measurements, to indirect prediction of weight using other body morphometrics or even the size of dung boli. It is often unclear how accurate these measures are because they cannot be compared to objective measures. Here, we investigate how well existing estimation equations predict the actual body weight of Asian elephants Elephas maximus, using body measurements (height, chest girth, length, foot circumference and neck circumference taken directly from a large population of semi-captive animals in Myanmar (n = 404. We then define new and better fitting formulas to predict body weight in Myanmar elephants from these readily available measures. We also investigate whether the important parameters height and chest girth can be estimated from photographs (n = 151. Our results show considerable variation in the ability of existing estimation equations to predict weight, and that the equations proposed in this paper predict weight better in almost all circumstances. We also find that measurements from standardised photographs reflect body height and chest girth after applying minor adjustments. Our results have implications for size estimation of large wild animals in the field, as well as for management in captive settings.

  20. Using the Microsoft Kinect for patient size estimation and radiation dose normalization: proof of concept and initial validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Tessa S; Couch, Gregory; Couch, Timothy J; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2013-08-01

    Monitoring patients' imaging-related radiation is currently a hot topic, but there are many obstacles to accurate, patient-specific dose estimation. While some, such as easier access to dose data and parameters, have been overcome, the challenge remains as to how accurately these dose estimates reflect the actual dose received by the patient. The main parameter that is often not considered is patient size. There are many surrogates-weight, body mass index, effective diameter-but none of these truly reflect the three-dimensional "size" of an individual. In this work, we present and evaluate a novel approach to estimating patient volume using the Microsoft Kinect™, a combination RGB camera-infrared depth sensor device. The goal of using this device is to generate a three-dimensional estimate of patient size, in order to more effectively model the dimensions of the anatomy of interest and not only enable better normalization of dose estimates but also promote more patient-specific protocoling of future CT examinations. Preliminary testing and validation of this system reveals good correlation when individuals are standing upright with their arms by their sides, but demonstrates some variation with arm position. Further evaluation and testing is necessary with multiple patient positions and in both adult and pediatric patients. Correlation with other patient size metrics will also be helpful, as the ideal measure of patient "size" may in fact be a combination of existing metrics and newly developed techniques.

  1. Beak measurements of octopus ( Octopus variabilis) in Jiaozhou Bay and their use in size and biomass estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ying; Ren, Yiping; Meng, Wenrong; Li, Long; Mao, Xia; Han, Dongyan; Ma, Qiuyun

    2013-09-01

    Cephalopods play key roles in global marine ecosystems as both predators and preys. Regressive estimation of original size and weight of cephalopod from beak measurements is a powerful tool of interrogating the feeding ecology of predators at higher trophic levels. In this study, regressive relationships among beak measurements and body length and weight were determined for an octopus species ( Octopus variabilis), an important endemic cephalopod species in the northwest Pacific Ocean. A total of 193 individuals (63 males and 130 females) were collected at a monthly interval from Jiaozhou Bay, China. Regressive relationships among 6 beak measurements (upper hood length, UHL; upper crest length, UCL; lower hood length, LHL; lower crest length, LCL; and upper and lower beak weights) and mantle length (ML), total length (TL) and body weight (W) were determined. Results showed that the relationships between beak size and TL and beak size and ML were linearly regressive, while those between beak size and W fitted a power function model. LHL and UCL were the most useful measurements for estimating the size and biomass of O. variabilis. The relationships among beak measurements and body length (either ML or TL) were not significantly different between two sexes; while those among several beak measurements (UHL, LHL and LBW) and body weight (W) were sexually different. Since male individuals of this species have a slightly greater body weight distribution than female individuals, the body weight was not an appropriate measurement for estimating size and biomass, especially when the sex of individuals in the stomachs of predators was unknown. These relationships provided essential information for future use in size and biomass estimation of O. variabilis, as well as the estimation of predator/prey size ratios in the diet of top predators.

  2. From stock bottle to vaccine: Elucidating the particle size distributions of aluminum adjuvants using dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shardlow, Emma; Mold, Matthew; Exley, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    The physicochemical properties of aluminum salts are key determinants of their resultant adjuvanticity in vivo when administered as part of a vaccine. While there are links between particle size and the efficacy of the immune response, the limited literature directly characterizing the PSD of aluminum adjuvants has stymied the elucidation of such a relationship for these materials. Hence, this comparative study was undertaken to monitor the PSD of aluminum adjuvants throughout the process of vaccine formulation using DLS. A significant proportion of the stock suspensions was highly agglomerated (>6.5µm), although a large degree of disaggregation was observed upon the dilution of all materials into saline. Adju-Phos® yielded the largest particles in this diluent (4251±137nm); however, the higher affinity of BSA for the surface of Alhydrogel® resulted in a comparable size being observed for both commercial adjuvants when this protein was included in the formulation. These results suggest that the PSD of aluminum adjuvants is greatly influenced by dilution and the degree of protein adsorption experienced within the vaccine itself. The size of the resultant antigen-adjuvant complex may be important for its immunological recognition and subsequent clearance from the injection site.

  3. Accuracy of burn size estimation in patients transferred to adult Burn Units in Sydney, Australia: an audit of 698 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Varun; Raymond, Andrew P; Issler, Andrea C; Lajevardi, Sepehr S; Chang, Ling-Yun; Maitz, Peter K M; Kennedy, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare burn size estimation between referring centres and Burn Units in adult patients transferred to Burn Units in Sydney, Australia. A review of all adults transferred to Burn Units in Sydney, Australia between January 2009 and August 2013 was performed. The TBSA estimated by the referring institution was compared with the TBSA measured at the Burns Unit. There were 698 adults transferred to a Burns Unit. Equivalent TBSA estimation between the referring hospital and Burns Unit occurred in 30% of patients. Overestimation occurred at a ratio exceeding 3:1 with respect to underestimation, with the difference between the referring institutions and Burns Unit estimation being statistically significant (Pburn-injured patients as well as in patients transferred more than 48h after the burn (Pburn (Ppatients, severe burns (≥20% TBSA) were found to have more satisfactory burn size estimations compared with less severe injuries (burn size assessment by referring centres. The systemic tendency for overestimation occurs throughout the entire TBSA spectrum, and persists with increasing time after the burn. Underestimation occurs less frequently but rises with increasing time after the burn and with increasing TBSA. Severe burns (≥20% TBSA) are more accurately estimated by the referring hospital. The inaccuracies in burn size assessment have the potential to result in suboptimal treatment and inappropriate referral to specialised Burn Units. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurement of bubble size distributions in vesiculated rocks with implications for quantitative estimation of eruption processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toramaru, Atsushi

    1990-10-01

    This paper outlines methods for determining a bubble size distribution (BSD) and the moments of the BSD function in vesiculated clasts produced by volcanic eruptions. It reports the results of applications of the methods to 11 natural samples and discusses the implications for quantitative estimates of eruption processes. The analysis is based on a quantitative morphological (stereological) method for 2-dimensional imaging of cross-sections of samples. One method determines, with some assumptions, the complete shape of the BSD function from the chord lengths cut by bubbles. The other determines the 1st, 2nd and 3rd moments of distribution functions by measurement of the number of bubbles per unit area, the surface area per unit volume, and the volume fraction of bubbles. Comparison of procedures and results of these two distinct methods shows that the latter yields rather more reliable results than the former, though the results coincide in absolute and relative magnitudes. Results of the analysis for vesiculated rocks from eleven subPlinian to Plinian eruptions show some interesting systematic correlations both between moments of the BSD and between a moment and the eruption column height or the SiO 2 content of magma. These correlations are successfully interpreted in terms of the nucleation and growth processes of bubbles in ascending magmas. This suggests that bubble coalescence does not predominate in sub-Plinian to Plinian explosive eruptions. The moment-moment correlations put constraints on the style of the nucleation and growth process of bubbles. The scaling argument suggests that a single nucleation event and subsequent growth with any kind of bubble interaction under continuous depressurization, which leads to an intermediate growth law between the diffusional growth ( R m ∝ t {2}/{3}) at a constant depressurization rate and the Ostwald ripening ( R m ∝ t {1}/{3}) under a constant pressure, where Rm and t are the mean radius of bubble and the

  5. A simple and fast method to study the hydrodynamic size difference of protein disulfide isomerase in oxidized and reduced form using gold nanoparticles and dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianyu; Cherubin, Patrick; Cilenti, Lucia; Teter, Ken; Huo, Qun

    2016-02-07

    The hydrodynamic dimension of a protein is a reflection of both its molecular weight and its tertiary structures. Studying the hydrodynamic dimensions of proteins in solutions can help elucidate the structural properties of proteins. Here we report a simple and fast method to measure the hydrodyamic size of a relatively small protein, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), using gold nanoparticle probes combined with dynamic light scattering. Proteins can readily adsorb to citrate-capped gold nanoparticles to form a protein corona. By measuring the average diameter of the gold nanoparticles before and after protein corona formation, the hydrodynamic diameter of the protein can be deduced from the net particle size increase of the assay solution. This study found that when the disulfide bonds in PDI are reduced to thiols, the reduced PDI exhibits a smaller hydrodynamic diameter than the oxided PDI. This finding is in good agreement with the X-ray diffraction analysis of PDI in single crystals. In comparison with other techniques that are used for protein hydrodynamic size analysis, the current method is easy to use, requires a trace amount of protein samples, with results obtained in minutes instead of hours.

  6. Quantitative Correlation between Viscosity of Concentrated MAb Solutions and Particle Size Parameters Obtained from Small-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Masakazu; Moriyama, Chifumi; Yamazaki, Tadao; Imaeda, Yoshimi; Koga, Akiko

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between viscosity of concentrated MAb solutions and particle size parameters obtained from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The viscosity of three MAb solutions (MAb1, MAb2, and MAb3; 40-200 mg/mL) was measured by electromagnetically spinning viscometer. The protein interactions of MAb solutions (at 60 mg/mL) was evaluated by SAXS. The phase behavior of 60 mg/mL MAb solutions in a low-salt buffer was observed after 1 week storage at 25°C. The MAb1 solutions exhibited the highest viscosity among the three MAbs in the buffer containing 50 mM NaCl. Viscosity of MAb1 solutions decreased with increasing temperature, increasing salt concentration, and addition of amino acids. Viscosity of MAb1 solutions was lowest in the buffer containing histidine, arginine, and aspartic acid. Particle size parameters obtained from SAXS measurements correlated very well with the viscosity of MAb solutions at 200 mg/mL. MAb1 exhibited liquid-liquid phase separation at a low salt concentration. Simultaneous addition of basic and acidic amino acids effectively suppressed intermolecular attractive interactions and decreased viscosity of MAb1 solutions. SAXS can be performed using a small volume of samples; therefore, the particle size parameters obtained from SAXS at intermediate protein concentration could be used to screen for low viscosity antibodies in the early development stage.

  7. Estimating the location and size of retinal injections from orthogonal images of an intact retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, J J Johannes; Savier, Elise; Sterratt, David C; Reber, Michaël; Eglen, Stephen J

    2015-11-21

    To study the mapping from the retina to the brain, typically a small region of the retina is injected with a dye, which then propagates to the retina's target structures. To determine the location of the injection, usually the retina is dissected out of the eye, flattened and then imaged, causing tears and stretching of the retina. The location of the injection is then estimated from the image of the flattened retina. Here we propose a new method that avoids dissection of the retina. We have developed IntactEye, a software package that uses two orthogonal images of the intact retina to locate focal injections of a dye. The two images are taken while the retina is still inside the eye. This bypasses the dissection step, avoiding unnecessary damage to the retina, and speeds up data acquisition. By using the native spherical coordinates of the eye, we avoid distortions caused by interpreting a curved structure in a flat coordinate system. Our method compares well to the projection method and to the Retistruct package, which both use the flattened retina as a starting point. We have tested the method also on synthetic data, where the injection location is known. Our method has been designed for analysing mouse retinas, where there are no visible landmarks for discerning retinal orientation, but can also be applied to retinas from other species. IntactEye allows the user to precisely specify the location and size of a retinal injection from two orthogonal images taken of the eye. We are solving the abstract problem of locating a point on a spherical object from two orthogonal images, which might have applications outside the field of neuroscience.

  8. Mnemiopsis leidyi (Ctenophora) in Narragansett Bay, 1975-1979: Abundance, size composition and estimation of grazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deason, Ellen E.

    1982-08-01

    Surveys of the distribution, abundance and size of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi were carried out in Narragansett Bay, R.I. over a 5-year period, 1975-1979. Yearly variations were observed in time of initiation of the ctenophore increase and maximum abundance. Biomass maxima ranged from 0·2 to 3 g dry weight m -3 at Station 2 in lower Narragansett Bay while maximum abundance varied from 20 to 100 animals m -3. Ctenophores less than 1 cm in length generally composed up to 50% of the biomass and 95% of the numerical abundance during the peak of the M. leidyi pulse. During the 1978 maxima and the declining stages of the pulse each year, 100% of the population was composed of small animals. M. leidyi populations increased earlier, reached greater maximum abundances, and were more highly dominated by small animals in the upper bay than toward the mouth of the bay. The averageclearance rate of M. leidyi larvae feeding on A. tonsa at 22°C was 0·36 l mg -1 dry weight day -1, with apparent selection for nauplii relative to copepodites. Predation and excretion rates applied to ctenophore biomass estimated for Narragansett Bay indicated that M. leidyi excretion is minor but predation removed a bay-wide mean of 20% of the zooplankton standing stock daily during August of 1975 and 1976. Variation in M. leidyi predation at Station 2 was inversely related to mean zooplankton biomass during August and September, which increased 4-fold during the 5-year period.

  9. Double hard scattering without double counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Markus; Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Schönwald, Kay

    2017-06-01

    Double parton scattering in proton-proton collisions includes kinematic regions in which two partons inside a proton originate from the perturbative splitting of a single parton. This leads to a double counting problem between single and double hard scattering. We present a solution to this problem, which allows for the definition of double parton distributions as operator matrix elements in a proton, and which can be used at higher orders in perturbation theory. We show how the evaluation of double hard scattering in this framework can provide a rough estimate for the size of the higher-order contributions to single hard scattering that are affected by double counting. In a numeric study, we identify situations in which these higher-order contributions must be explicitly calculated and included if one wants to attain an accuracy at which double hard scattering becomes relevant, and other situations where such contributions may be neglected.

  10. Double hard scattering without double counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gaunt, Jonathan R. [VU Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands). NIKHEF Theory Group; Schoenwald, Kay [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Double parton scattering in proton-proton collisions includes kinematic regions in which two partons inside a proton originate from the perturbative splitting of a single parton. This leads to a double counting problem between single and double hard scattering. We present a solution to this problem, which allows for the definition of double parton distributions as operator matrix elements in a proton, and which can be used at higher orders in perturbation theory. We show how the evaluation of double hard scattering in this framework can provide a rough estimate for the size of the higher-order contributions to single hard scattering that are affected by double counting. In a numeric study, we identify situations in which these higher-order contributions must be explicitly calculated and included if one wants to attain an accuracy at which double hard scattering becomes relevant, and other situations where such contributions may be neglected.

  11. ESTIMATION OF NEUTRON SCATTER CORRECTION FOR CALIBRATION OF PERSONNEL DOSIMETER AND DOSERATEMETER AGAINST 241Am-Be SOURCE-MONTE CARLO SIMULATION AND MEASUREMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawn, Sandipan; Bakshi, A K; Sathian, Deepa; Selvam, T Palani

    2017-06-15

    Neutron scatter contributions as a function of distance along the transverse axis of 241Am-Be source were estimated by three different methods such as shadow cone, semi-empirical and Monte Carlo. The Monte Carlo-based FLUKA code was used to simulate the existing room used for the calibration of CR-39 detector as well as LB6411 doseratemeter for selected distances from 241Am-Be source. The modified 241Am-Be spectra at different irradiation geometries such as at different source detector distances, behind the shadow cone, at the surface of the water phantom were also evaluated using Monte Carlo calculations. Neutron scatter contributions, estimated using three different methods compare reasonably well. It is proposed to use the scattering correction factors estimated through Monte Carlo simulation and other methods for the calibration of CR-39 detector and doseratemeter at 0.75 and 1 m distance from the source. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Inverse Probability Weighted Generalised Empirical Likelihood Estimators : Firm Size and R&D Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inkmann, J.

    2005-01-01

    The inverse probability weighted Generalised Empirical Likelihood (IPW-GEL) estimator is proposed for the estimation of the parameters of a vector of possibly non-linear unconditional moment functions in the presence of conditionally independent sample selection or attrition.The estimator is applied

  13. Core-size regulated aggregation/disaggregation of citrate-coated gold nanoparticles (5-50 nm) and dissolved organic matter: Extinction, emission, and scattering evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Milad Rabbani; Pallem, Vasanta L.; Stretz, Holly A.; Wells, Martha J. M.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of the interactions between gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) is significant in the development of detection devices for environmental sensing, studies of environmental fate and transport, and advances in antifouling water treatment membranes. The specific objective of this research was to spectroscopically investigate the fundamental interactions between citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (CT-GNPs) and DOM. Studies indicated that 30 and 50 nm diameter GNPs promoted disaggregation of the DOM. This result-disaggregation of an environmentally important polyelectrolyte-will be quite useful regarding antifouling properties in water treatment and water-based sensing applications. Furthermore, resonance Rayleigh scattering results showed significant enhancement in the UV range which can be useful to characterize DOM and can be exploited as an analytical tool to better sense and improve our comprehension of nanomaterial interactions with environmental systems. CT-GNPs having core size diameters of 5, 10, 30, and 50 nm were studied in the absence and presence of added DOM at 2 and 8 ppm at low ionic strength and near neutral pH (6.0-6.5) approximating surface water conditions. Interactions were monitored by cross-interpretation among ultraviolet (UV)-visible extinction spectroscopy, excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy (emission and Rayleigh scattering), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). This comprehensive combination of spectroscopic analyses lends new insights into the antifouling behavior of GNPs. The CT-GNP-5 and -10 controls emitted light and aggregated. In contrast, the CT-GNP-30 and CT-GNP-50 controls scattered light intensely, but did not aggregate and did not emit light. The presence of any CT-GNP did not affect the extinction spectra of DOM, and the presence of DOM did not affect the extinction spectra of the CT-GNPs. The emission spectra (visible range) differed only slightly between calculated and actual

  14. Detecting spatial structures in throughfall data: The effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and variogram estimation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Beate; Zimmermann, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    In the last decades, an increasing number of studies analyzed spatial patterns in throughfall by means of variograms. The estimation of the variogram from sample data requires an appropriate sampling scheme: most importantly, a large sample and a layout of sampling locations that often has to serve both variogram estimation and geostatistical prediction. While some recommendations on these aspects exist, they focus on Gaussian data and high ratios of the variogram range to the extent of the study area. However, many hydrological data, and throughfall data in particular, do not follow a Gaussian distribution. In this study, we examined the effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and calculation method on variogram estimation of throughfall data. For our investigation, we first generated non-Gaussian random fields based on throughfall data with large outliers. Subsequently, we sampled the fields with three extents (plots with edge lengths of 25 m, 50 m, and 100 m), four common sampling designs (two grid-based layouts, transect and random sampling) and five sample sizes (50, 100, 150, 200, 400). We then estimated the variogram parameters by method-of-moments (non-robust and robust estimators) and residual maximum likelihood. Our key findings are threefold. First, the choice of the extent has a substantial influence on the estimation of the variogram. A comparatively small ratio of the extent to the correlation length is beneficial for variogram estimation. Second, a combination of a minimum sample size of 150, a design that ensures the sampling of small distances and variogram estimation by residual maximum likelihood offers a good compromise between accuracy and efficiency. Third, studies relying on method-of-moments based variogram estimation may have to employ at least 200 sampling points for reliable variogram estimates. These suggested sample sizes exceed the number recommended by studies dealing with Gaussian data by up to 100 %. Given that most previous

  15. A proposed 2D framework for estimation of pore size distribution by double pulsed field gradient NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamini, Dan; Katz, Yaniv; Nevo, Uri

    2012-12-14

    Reconstructing a pore size distribution of porous materials is valuable for applications in materials sciences, oil well logging, biology, and medicine. The major drawback of NMR based methods is an intrinsic limitation in the reconstruction which arises from the ill-conditioned nature of the pore size distribution problem. Consequently, while estimation of the average pore size was already demonstrated experimentally, reliable evaluation of pore size distribution remains a challenging task. In this paper we address this problem by analyzing the mathematical characteristics that create the difficulty and by proposing an NMR methodology and a numerical analysis. We demonstrate analytically that an accurate reconstruction of pore size distribution is problematic with the current known strategies for conducting a single or a double pulsed field gradient (s-PFG, d-PFG) experiment. We then present a method for choosing the experimental parameters that would significantly improve the estimation of the size distribution. We show that experimental variation of both q (the amplitude of the diffusion gradient) and ϕ (the relative angle between the gradient pairs) is significantly favorable over single and double-PFG applied with variation of only one parameter. Finally, we suggest a unified methodology (termed Concentric d-PFG) that defines a multidimensional approach where each data point in the experiment is characterized by ϕ and q. The addition of the angle parameter makes the experiment sensitive to small compartment sizes without the need to use strong gradients, thus making it feasible for in-vivo biological applications.

  16. A novel statistical method to estimate the effective SNP size in vertebrate genomes and categorized genomic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhongming

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The local environment of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs contains abundant genetic information for the study of mechanisms of mutation, genome evolution, and causes of diseases. Recent studies revealed that neighboring-nucleotide biases on SNPs were strong and the genome-wide bias patterns could be represented by a small subset of the total SNPs. It remains unsolved for the estimation of the effective SNP size, the number of SNPs that are sufficient to represent the bias patterns observed from the whole SNP data. Results To estimate the effective SNP size, we developed a novel statistical method, SNPKS, which considers both the statistical and biological significances. SNPKS consists of two major steps: to obtain an initial effective size by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS test and to find an intermediate effective size by interval evaluation. The SNPKS algorithm was implemented in computer programs and applied to the real SNP data. The effective SNP size was estimated to be 38,200, 39,300, 38,000, and 38,700 in the human, chimpanzee, dog, and mouse genomes, respectively, and 39,100, 39,600, 39,200, and 42,200 in human intergenic, genic, intronic, and CpG island regions, respectively. Conclusion SNPKS is the first statistical method to estimate the effective SNP size. It runs efficiently and greatly outperforms the algorithm implemented in SNPNB. The application of SNPKS to the real SNP data revealed the similar small effective SNP size (38,000 – 42,200 in the human, chimpanzee, dog, and mouse genomes as well as in human genomic regions. The findings suggest strong influence of genetic factors across vertebrate genomes.

  17. Estimating age ratios and size of pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Monson

    Full Text Available During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010-2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m(2 (std. err. = 0.02, herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03-0.06 and we documented ∼30,000 animals along ∼1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0-2 yr-olds tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species.

  18. Estimating age ratios and size of Pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Daniel H.; Udevitz, Mark S.; Jay, Chadwick V.

    2013-01-01

    During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance) to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010–2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m2 (std. err. = 0.02), herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03–0.06) and we documented ~30,000 animals along ~1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0–2 yr-olds) tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying) will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species.

  19. Estimating age ratios and size of pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Daniel H; Udevitz, Mark S; Jay, Chadwick V

    2013-01-01

    During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance) to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010-2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m(2) (std. err. = 0.02), herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03-0.06) and we documented ∼30,000 animals along ∼1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0-2 yr-olds) tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying) will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species.

  20. Analytical solutions to sampling effects in drop size distribution measurements during stationary rainfall: Estimation of bulk rainfall variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijlenhoet, R.; Porrà, J.M.; Sempere Torres, D.; Creutin, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    A stochastic model of the microstructure of rainfall is used to derive explicit expressions for the magnitude of the sampling fluctuations in rainfall properties estimated from raindrop size measurements in stationary rainfall. The model is a marked point process, in which the points represent the

  1. An Estimation of the Number and Size of Atoms in a Printed Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Beth; Collett, Edward; Tabor-Morris, Anne; Croman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Elementary school students learn that atoms are very, very small. Students are also taught that atoms (and molecules) are the fundamental constituents of the material world. Numerical values of their size are often given, but, nevertheless, it is difficult to imagine their size relative to one's everyday surroundings. In order for students to…

  2. Estimating sample size for a small-quadrat method of botanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in eight plant communities in the Nylsvley Nature Reserve. Illustrates with a table. Keywords: Botanical surveys; Grass density; Grasslands; Mixed Bushveld; Nylsvley Nature Reserve; Quadrat size species density; Small-quadrat method; Species density; Species richness; botany; sample size; method; survey; south africa

  3. Do Multiple-Choice Options Inflate Estimates of Vocabulary Size on the VST?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Validated under a Rasch framework (Beglar, 2010), the Vocabulary Size Test (VST) (Nation & Beglar, 2007) is an increasingly popular measure of decontextualized written receptive vocabulary size in the field of second language acquisition. However, although the validation indicates that the test has high internal reliability, still unaddressed…

  4. Loanwords and Vocabulary Size Test Scores: A Case of Different Estimates for Different L1 Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Batia; McLean, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The article investigated how the inclusion of loanwords in vocabulary size tests affected the test scores of two L1 groups of EFL learners: Hebrew and Japanese. New BNC- and COCA-based vocabulary size tests were constructed in three modalities: word form recall, word form recognition, and word meaning recall. Depending on the test modality, the…

  5. Estimation of the Shape Parameter of Ged Distribution for a Small Sample Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purczyński Jan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new method of estimating the shape parameter of generalized error distribution (GED, called ‘approximated moment method’, was proposed. The following estimators were considered: the one obtained through the maximum likelihood method (MLM, approximated fast estimator (AFE, and approximated moment method (AMM. The quality of estimator was evaluated on the basis of the value of the relative mean square error. Computer simulations were conducted using random number generators for the following shape parameters: s = 0.5, s = 1.0 (Laplace distribution s = 2.0 (Gaussian distribution and s = 3.0.

  6. Do adults show a curse of knowledge in false-belief reasoning? A robust estimate of the true effect size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryskin, Rachel A; Brown-Schmidt, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Seven experiments use large sample sizes to robustly estimate the effect size of a previous finding that adults are more likely to commit egocentric errors in a false-belief task when the egocentric response is plausible in light of their prior knowledge. We estimate the true effect size to be less than half of that reported in the original findings. Even though we found effects in the same direction as the original, they were substantively smaller; the original study would have had less than 33% power to detect an effect of this magnitude. The influence of plausibility on the curse of knowledge in adults appears to be small enough that its impact on real-life perspective-taking may need to be reevaluated.

  7. Do adults show a curse of knowledge in false-belief reasoning? A robust estimate of the true effect size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Ryskin

    Full Text Available Seven experiments use large sample sizes to robustly estimate the effect size of a previous finding that adults are more likely to commit egocentric errors in a false-belief task when the egocentric response is plausible in light of their prior knowledge. We estimate the true effect size to be less than half of that reported in the original findings. Even though we found effects in the same direction as the original, they were substantively smaller; the original study would have had less than 33% power to detect an effect of this magnitude. The influence of plausibility on the curse of knowledge in adults appears to be small enough that its impact on real-life perspective-taking may need to be reevaluated.

  8. Development of a size-exclusion HPLC method with evaporative light-scattering detection for the quantitation of polysorbate 80 in Houttuynia cordata injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi; Li, Xiao D; Lin, Rui C; Jin, Shao H

    2010-01-01

    A rapid and accurate size-exclusion HPLC method for the quantitation of polysorbate 80 (PS80) in Houttuynia cordata injection, a Chinese traditional medicine, was developed and validated. The assay was conducted on an Agilent 1100 HPLC system with a TosoHaas TSKgel G2000 SWxL column (30 cm x 7.8 mm, 5 pm particle size) and an Alltech evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD) 2000. The mobile phase was 20 mmoL/L ammonium acetate-acetonitrile (90 + 10, v/v) delivered at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min under isocratic conditions. The ELSD was operated in the impactor "off" mode, the drift tube temperature was set at 110 degrees C, and nitrogen flow was maintained at 2.3 L/min. The LOD was 0.25 mg/mL. Linearity was obtained between the log of concentration (C) and the log of peak area (Y) of PS80 in the range of 0.5-20 mg/mL according to the equation: Log Y 1.4529 Log C - 0.8232 (r2 = 0.9976). An RSD of 1.6% (n = 6) for the determination demonstrated the good precision of the optimized method. PS80 content in several commercial H. cordata injection products from different manufacturers was determined. The data for PS80 content is useful in evaluation of the safety of the products from different manufacturers.

  9. Sample size requirements to estimate key design parameters from external pilot randomised controlled trials: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, M Dawn; Dimairo, Munyaradzi; Shephard, Neil; Hayman, Alex; Whitehead, Amy; Walters, Stephen J

    2014-07-03

    External pilot or feasibility studies can be used to estimate key unknown parameters to inform the design of the definitive randomised controlled trial (RCT). However, there is little consensus on how large pilot studies need to be, and some suggest inflating estimates to adjust for the lack of precision when planning the definitive RCT. We use a simulation approach to illustrate the sampling distribution of the standard deviation for continuous outcomes and the event rate for binary outcomes. We present the impact of increasing the pilot sample size on the precision and bias of these estimates, and predicted power under three realistic scenarios. We also illustrate the consequences of using a confidence interval argument to inflate estimates so the required power is achieved with a pre-specified level of confidence. We limit our attention to external pilot and feasibility studies prior to a two-parallel-balanced-group superiority RCT. For normally distributed outcomes, the relative gain in precision of the pooled standard deviation (SDp) is less than 10% (for each five subjects added per group) once the total sample size is 70. For true proportions between 0.1 and 0.5, we find the gain in precision for each five subjects added to the pilot sample is less than 5% once the sample size is 60. Adjusting the required sample sizes for the imprecision in the pilot study estimates can result in excessively large definitive RCTs and also requires a pilot sample size of 60 to 90 for the true effect sizes considered here. We recommend that an external pilot study has at least 70 measured subjects (35 per group) when estimating the SDp for a continuous outcome. If the event rate in an intervention group needs to be estimated by the pilot then a total of 60 to 100 subjects is required. Hence if the primary outcome is binary a total of at least 120 subjects (60 in each group) may be required in the pilot trial. It is very much more efficient to use a larger pilot study, than to

  10. Estimating the Size of the MSM Population in Metro Vancouver, Canada, Using Multiple Methods and Diverse Data Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Ashleigh J; Lachowsky, Nathan J; Sereda, Paul; Cui, Zishan; Wong, Jason; Wong, Stanley; Jollimore, Jody; Raymond, Henry Fisher; Hottes, Travis Salway; Roth, Eric A; Hogg, Robert S; Moore, David M

    2017-06-19

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected by HIV globally, regionally in Canada, and locally in Vancouver. Lack of reliable population size estimates of MSM impedes effective implementation of health care services and limits our understanding of the HIV epidemic. We estimated the population size of MSM residing in Metro Vancouver drawing on four data sources: the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), a cross-sectional bio-behavioural MSM survey, HIV testing services data from sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics serving MSM, and online social networking site Facebook. Estimates were calculated using (1) direct estimates from the CCHS, (2) "Wisdom of the Crowds" (WOTC), and (3) the multiplier method using data from a bio-behavioural MSM survey, clinic-based HIV testing, and online social media network site Facebook. Data sources requiring greater public disclosure of sexual orientation resulted in our mid-range population estimates (Facebook 23,760, CCHS 30,605). The WOTC method produced the lowest estimate, 10,000. The multiplier method using STI clinic HIV testing data produced the largest estimate, 41,777. The median of all estimates was 27,183, representing 2.9% of the Metro Vancouver census male adult population, with an interquartile range of 1.1-4.5%. Using multiple data sources, our estimates of the MSM population in Metro Vancouver are similar to population prevalence estimates based on population data from other industrialized nations. These findings will support understanding of the HIV burden among MSM and corresponding public health and health services planning for this key population.

  11. SU-E-T-298: Small Field Total Scatter Factors Using a Commercial Scintillator Detector: Calibration Parameters Are Not Independent of Field Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jornet, N; Carrasco de Fez, P; Jordi, O; Latorre-Musoll, A; Eudaldo, T; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Ribas Morales, M [Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy in total scatter factor (Sc,p) determination for small fields using commercial plastic scintillator detector (PSD). The manufacturer's spectral discrimination method to subtract Cerenkov light from the signal is discussed. Methods: Sc,p for field sizes ranging from 0.5 to 10 cm were measured using PSD Exradin (Standard Imaging) connected to two channel electrometer measuring the signals in two different spectral regions to subtract the Cerenkov signal from the PSD signal. A Pinpoint ionisation chamber 31006 (PTW) and a non-shielded semiconductor detector EFD (Scanditronix) were used for comparison. Measures were performed for a 6 MV X-ray beam. The Sc,p are measured at 10 cm depth in water for a SSD=100 cm and normalized to a 10'10 cm{sup 2} field size at the isocenter. All detectors were placed with their symmetry axis parallel to the beam axis.We followed the manufacturer's recommended calibration methodology to subtract the Cerenkov contribution to the signal as well as a modified method using smaller field sizes. The Sc,p calculated by using both calibration methodologies were compared. Results: Sc,p measured with the semiconductor and the PinPoint detectors agree, within 1.5%, for field sizes between 10'10 and 1'1 cm{sup 2}. Sc,p measured with the PSD using the manufacturer's calibration methodology were systematically 4% higher than those measured with the semiconductor detector for field sizes smaller than 5'5 cm{sup 2}. By using a modified calibration methodology for smalls fields and keeping the manufacturer calibration methodology for fields larger than 5'5cm{sup 2} field Sc,p matched semiconductor results within 2% field sizes larger than 1.5 cm. Conclusion: The calibration methodology proposed by the manufacturer is not appropriate for dose measurements in small fields. The calibration parameters are not independent of the incident radiation spectrum for this PSD. This work was

  12. Estimating group size: effects of category membership, differential construal and selective exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosveld, W.; Koomen, W.; van der Pligt, J.

    1996-01-01

    Examined the role of category membership, differential construal, and selective exposure in consensus estimation concerning the social categorization of religion. 54 involved and less involved Christians and 40 non-believers were asked to estimate the percentage of Christians in the Netherlands

  13. Numerical method for estimating the size of chaotic regions of phase space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henyey, F.S.; Pomphrey, N.

    1987-10-01

    A numerical method for estimating irregular volumes of phase space is derived. The estimate weights the irregular area on a surface of section with the average return time to the section. We illustrate the method by application to the stadium and oval billiard systems and also apply the method to the continuous Henon-Heiles system. 15 refs., 10 figs. (LSP)

  14. Electromagnetic Scattering from Vegetation Canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabandi, Kamal

    Satellite-borne imaging radar has been proposed by the remote sensing community as a potential sensor for the acquisition of quantitative information about forested area on a global scale. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to develop retrieved algorithms that can provide reasonable estimate of vegetation biomass, leaf moisture content, and other physical parameters of tree canopies from multifrequency/multipolarization observations of their radar backscattering coefficients. Retrieval algorithms often are called "inverse problem" because their input/output parameters are the inverse of those associated with the direct problem, which in the present case refers to the development of a radar scattering model that relates the radar response to the canopy architecture and associated parameters. This thesis provides electromagnetic solutions to several problems associated with scattering from tree canopies. The forest canopy is modelled in the form of layers comprised of randomly distributed particles with known statistical properties. In Chapters 2-8 effective scattering models for different constituent particles of vegetation canopies are developed by employing appropriate asymptotic solutions and approximations. The effects of various physical features of the particles, such as curvature and variation in thickness for planar leaves and roughness for tree trunks, on their scattering behavior are examined. In Chapter 9 the scattering problem of inhomogeneous layered media is formulated via the vector radiative transfer equations and a first-order solution for the radar scattering coefficients is obtained. The radiative transfer solution is formulated in terms of two sets of input functions: the scattering matrices of the constituent particles, which are given in Chapters 2-8, and the size and orientation distribution functions of the particles. The radar scattering model and associated input functions can be used to conduct sensitivity analyses to determine the

  15. Evaluation of the linkage-disequilibrium method for the estimation of effective population size when generations overlap: an empirical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, María; Tenesa, Albert; Woolliams, John A; Fernández, Almudena; Villanueva, Beatriz

    2015-11-11

    Within the genetic methods for estimating effective population size (N e ), the method based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) has advantages over other methods, although its accuracy when applied to populations with overlapping generations is a matter of controversy. It is also unclear the best way to account for mutation and sample size when this method is implemented. Here we have addressed the applicability of this method using genome-wide information when generations overlap by profiting from having available a complete and accurate pedigree from an experimental population of Iberian pigs. Precise pedigree-based estimates of N e were considered as a baseline against which to compare LD-based estimates. We assumed six different statistical models that varied in the adjustments made for mutation and sample size. The approach allowed us to determine the most suitable statistical model of adjustment when the LD method is used for species with overlapping generations. A novel approach used here was to treat different generations as replicates of the same population in order to assess the error of the LD-based N e estimates. LD-based N e estimates obtained by estimating the mutation parameter from the data and by correcting sample size using the 1/2n term were the closest to pedigree-based estimates. The N e at the time of the foundation of the herd (26 generations ago) was 20.8 ± 3.7 (average and SD across replicates), while the pedigree-based estimate was 21. From that time on, this trend was in good agreement with that followed by pedigree-based N e. Our results showed that when using genome-wide information, the LD method is accurate and broadly applicable to small populations even when generations overlap. This supports the use of the method for estimating N e when pedigree information is unavailable in order to effectively monitor and manage populations and to early detect population declines. To our knowledge this is the first study using replicates of

  16. Hierarchical distance-sampling models to estimate population size and habitat-specific abundance of an island endemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillett, T Scott; Chandler, Richard B; Royle, J Andrew; Kery, Marc; Morrison, Scott A

    2012-10-01

    Population size and habitat-specific abundance estimates are essential for conservation management. A major impediment to obtaining such estimates is that few statistical models are able to simultaneously account for both spatial variation in abundance and heterogeneity in detection probability, and still be amenable to large-scale applications. The hierarchical distance-sampling model of J. A. Royle, D. K. Dawson, and S. Bates provides a practical solution. Here, we extend this model to estimate habitat-specific abundance and rangewide population size of a bird species of management concern, the Island Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma insularis), which occurs solely on Santa Cruz Island, California, USA. We surveyed 307 randomly selected, 300 m diameter, point locations throughout the 250-km2 island during October 2008 and April 2009. Population size was estimated to be 2267 (95% CI 1613-3007) and 1705 (1212-2369) during the fall and spring respectively, considerably lower than a previously published but statistically problematic estimate of 12 500. This large discrepancy emphasizes the importance of proper survey design and analysis for obtaining reliable information for management decisions. Jays were most abundant in low-elevation chaparral habitat; the detection function depended primarily on the percent cover of chaparral and forest within count circles. Vegetation change on the island has been dramatic in recent decades, due to release from herbivory following the eradication of feral sheep (Ovis aries) from the majority of the island in the mid-1980s. We applied best-fit fall and spring models of habitat-specific jay abundance to a vegetation map from 1985, and estimated the population size of A. insularis was 1400-1500 at that time. The 20-30% increase in the jay population suggests that the species has benefited from the recovery of native vegetation since sheep removal. Nevertheless, this jay's tiny range and small population size make it vulnerable to natural

  17. Methods to estimate effective population size using pedigree data: Examples in dog, sheep, cattle and horse

    OpenAIRE

    Mary-Huard, Tristan; Verrier, Etienne; Danvy, Sophie; Charvolin Lemaire, Eleonore; Danchin-Burge, Coralie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective population sizes of 140 populations (including 60 dog breeds, 40 sheep breeds, 20 cattle breeds and 20 horse breeds) were computed using pedigree information and six different computation methods. Simple demographical information (number of breeding males and females), variance of progeny size, or evolution of identity by descent probabilities based on coancestry or inbreeding were used as well as identity by descent rate between two successive generations or individual ...

  18. Methods to estimate effective population size using pedigree data: Examples in dog, sheep, cattle and horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Grégoire; Mary-Huard, Tristan; Verrier, Etienne; Danvy, Sophie; Charvolin, Eleonore; Danchin-Burge, Coralie

    2013-01-02

    Effective population sizes of 140 populations (including 60 dog breeds, 40 sheep breeds, 20 cattle breeds and 20 horse breeds) were computed using pedigree information and six different computation methods. Simple demographical information (number of breeding males and females), variance of progeny size, or evolution of identity by descent probabilities based on coancestry or inbreeding were used as well as identity by descent rate between two successive generations or individual identity by descent rate. Depending on breed and method, effective population sizes ranged from 15 to 133 056, computation method and interaction between computation method and species showing a significant effect on effective population size (P dog breeds increased inbreeding, methods taking into account the evolution of inbreeding produced lower effective population sizes than those taking into account evolution of coancestry. The correlation level between the simplest method (number of breeding males and females, requiring no genealogical information) and the most sophisticated one ranged from 0.44 to 0.60 according to species. When choosing a method to compute effective population size, particular attention should be paid to the species and the specific genetic structure of the population studied.

  19. Estimation of the target stem-cell population size in chronic myeloid leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radivoyevitch, T. [Department of Biometry and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Ramsey, M.J.; Tucker, J.D. [Biology and Biotechnology Research Program, L-452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Estimation of the number of hematopoietic stem cells capable of causing chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is relevant to the development of biologically based risk models of radiation-induced CML. Through a comparison of the age structure of CML incidence data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and the age structure of chromosomal translocations found in healthy subjects, the number of CML target stem cells is estimated for individuals above 20 years of age. The estimation involves three steps. First, CML incidence among adults is fit to an exponentially increasing function of age. Next, assuming a relatively short waiting time distribution between BCR-ABL induction and the appearance of CML, an exponential age function with rate constants fixed to the values found for CML is fitted to the translocation data. Finally, assuming that translocations are equally likely to occur between any two points in the genome, the parameter estimates found in the first two steps are used to estimate the number of target stem cells for CML. The population-averaged estimates of this number are found to be 1.86 x 10{sup 8} for men and 1.21 x 10{sup 8} for women; the 95% confidence intervals of these estimates are (1.34 x 10{sup 8}, 2.50 x 10{sup 8}) and (0.84 x 10{sup 8}, 1.83 x 10{sup 8}), respectively. (orig.)

  20. The Potential Distributions, and Estimated Spatial Requirements and Population Sizes, of the Medium to Large-sized Mammals in the Planning Domain of the Greater Addo Elephant National Park Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerley, G I H; Cowling, R M; Boshoff, A F; Wilson, S L

    2002-01-01

    .... Conservation planning in the GAENP planning domain requires systematic information on the potential distributions and estimated spatial requirements, and population sizes of the medium to largesized mammals...

  1. A study of the chain stiffness and extension of alginates, in vitro epimerized alginates, and periodate-oxidized alginates using size-exclusion chromatography combined with light scattering and viscosity detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vold, Inger Mari Nygård; Kristiansen, Kåre A; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2006-07-01

    A series of alginates isolated from the stem and leaf of a brown algae (Laminaria hyperborea), bacterial mannuronan, in vitro epimerized mannuronans, and periodate oxidized alginates were analyzed by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) combined with online multiangle laser light scattering (MALS) and viscometry (collectively abbreviated SMV). Selected samples were also analyzed off-line using low-angle laser light scattering and capillary viscometry. Excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained for properly purified samples. In contrast, abnormal results were obtained for some industrial samples due to the presence of particulate material. Naturally occurring alginates and in vitro epimerized mannuronans were found to obey essentially the same RG-M and [eta]-M relations, and hence, the same Mark-Houwink-Sakurada (MHS) equations (valid for I = 0.10 M): 20 000 g/mol < M < 100 000 g/mol, [eta] = 0.0054 .M(1.00); 100 000 g/mol < M < 1 000 000 g/mol, [eta] = 0.071 .M(0.89). Application of the wormlike chain model to the [eta]-M data obtained by SMV yielded persistence lengths (q) of 15 nm for all alginates at an ionic strength of 0.17 M. Intrinsic viscosities corresponding to infinite ionic strength were estimated on the basis of Smidsrød's B-parameter, and the wormlike chain model then yielded q = 12 nm. Periodate oxidized alginates showed, in contrast, a pronounced decrease in persistence length with increasing degree of oxidation, reaching values below 4 nm at 44% oxidation. Periodate oxidation also resulted in some depolymerization, even in the presence of a free-radical scavenger.

  2. Use of the grain-size distribution for estimation of the soil-water characteristic curve

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fredlund M.D; Wilson G.W; Fredlund D.G

    2002-01-01

    .... The soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC), along with the saturated soil properties, has proven to provide a satisfactory basis for estimating the permeability function and shear strength functions for an unsaturated soil...

  3. Estimating sample size for landscape-scale mark-recapture studies of North American migratory tree bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Laura E.; Lukacs, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Concern for migratory tree-roosting bats in North America has grown because of possible population declines from wind energy development. This concern has driven interest in estimating population-level changes. Mark-recapture methodology is one possible analytical framework for assessing bat population changes, but sample size requirements to produce reliable estimates have not been estimated. To illustrate the sample sizes necessary for a mark-recapture-based monitoring program we conducted power analyses using a statistical model that allows reencounters of live and dead marked individuals. We ran 1,000 simulations for each of five broad sample size categories in a Burnham joint model, and then compared the proportion of simulations in which 95% confidence intervals overlapped between and among years for a 4-year study. Additionally, we conducted sensitivity analyses of sample size to various capture probabilities and recovery probabilities. More than 50,000 individuals per year would need to be captured and released to accurately determine 10% and 15% declines in annual survival. To detect more dramatic declines of 33% or 50% survival over four years, then sample sizes of 25,000 or 10,000 per year, respectively, would be sufficient. Sensitivity analyses reveal that increasing recovery of dead marked individuals may be more valuable than increasing capture probability of marked individuals. Because of the extraordinary effort that would be required, we advise caution should such a mark-recapture effort be initiated because of the difficulty in attaining reliable estimates. We make recommendations for what techniques show the most promise for mark-recapture studies of bats because some techniques violate the assumptions of mark-recapture methodology when used to mark bats.

  4. Estimation of rice grain yield from dual-polarization Radarsat-2 SAR data by integrating a rice canopy scattering model and a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Bin; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Cuizhen

    2017-05-01

    Fast and accurate estimation of rice yield plays a role in forecasting rice productivity for ensuring regional or national food security. Microwave synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data has been proved to have a great potential for rice monitoring and parameters retrieval. In this study, a rice canopy scattering model (RCSM) was revised and then was applied to simulate the backscatter of rice canopy. The combination of RCSM and genetic algorithm (GA) was proposed for retrieving two important rice parameters relating to grain yield, ear length and ear number density, from a C-band, dual-polarization (HH and HV) Radarsat-2 SAR data. The stability of retrieved results of GA inversion was also evaluated by changing various parameter configurations. Results show that RCSM can effectively simulate backscattering coefficients of rice canopy at HH and HV mode with an error of technology with better accuracy. The rice ear length are estimated with error of technology for operational yield estimation.

  5. The Examination of Model Fit Indexes with Different Estimation Methods under Different Sample Sizes in Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayfer SAYIN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In adjustment studies of scales and in terms of cross validity at scale development, confirmatory factor analysis is conducted. Confirmatory factor analysis, multivariate statistics, is estimated via various parameter estimation methods and utilizes several fit indexes for evaluating the model fit. In this study, model fit indexes utilized in confirmatory factor analysis are examined with different parameter estimation methods under different sample sizes. For the purpose of this study, answers of 60, 100, 250, 500 and 1000 students who attended PISA 2012 program were pulled from the answers to two dimensional “thoughts on the importance of mathematics” dimension. Estimations were based on methods of maximum likelihood (ML, unweighted least squares (ULS and generalized least squares (GLS. As a result of the study, it was found that model fit indexes were affected by the conditions, however some fit indexes were affected less than others and vice versa. In order to analyze these, some suggestions were made.

  6. Size-specific, scanner-independent organ dose estimates in contiguous axial and helical head CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Kyle; Bostani, Maryam; Cagnon, Chris; Zankl, Maria; Sepahdari, Ali R; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2014-12-01

    AAPM Task Group 204 introduced size-specific dose estimates for pediatric and adult patients undergoing body CT examinations. This investigation extends that work to head CT exams by using Monte Carlo simulations to develop size-specific, scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients. Using eight patient models from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms, dose to the brain and lens of the eye was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations of contiguous axial and helical scans for 64-slice multidetector CT scanners from four major manufacturers. For each patient model and scan mode, scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients were calculated by normalizing organ dose by scanner-specific 16 cm CTDIvol values and averaging across all scanners. Head size was measured using both geometric and attenuation-based size metrics. Head perimeter and effective diameter (ED), both geometric size metrics, were measured directly from the GSF data at the first slice superior to the eyes. Because the GSF models' pixel data are provided in terms of organ identification numbers instead of CT numbers, an indirect estimate of water equivalent diameter (WED), an attenuation-based size metric, was determined based on the relationships between WED and both ED and perimeter for a sample of patient data. Correlations between CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients and the various patient size metrics were then explored. The analysis of the patient data revealed a best-fit linear relationship (R(2) of 0.87) between ED and WED across a wide variety of patient sizes. Using this relationship along with ED determined from the GSF data, WED was estimated for each GSF model. An exponential relationship between CTDIvol normalized organ dose and WED was observed for both contiguous axial and helical scanning. For head perimeter and ED measured directly from the GSF data, an exponential relationship between CTDIvol normalized organ dose and patient size was

  7. Dietary assessment in minority ethnic groups: a systematic review of instruments for portion-size estimation in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almiron-Roig, Eva; Aitken, Amanda; Galloway, Catherine; Ellahi, Basma

    2017-03-01

    Dietary assessment in minority ethnic groups is critical for surveillance programs and for implementing effective interventions. A major challenge is the accurate estimation of portion sizes for traditional foods and dishes. The aim of this systematic review was to assess records published up to 2014 describing a portion-size estimation element (PSEE) applicable to the dietary assessment of UK-residing ethnic minorities. Electronic databases, internet sites, and theses repositories were searched, generating 5683 titles, from which 57 eligible full-text records were reviewed. Forty-two publications about minority ethnic groups (n = 20) or autochthonous populations (n = 22) were included. The most common PSEEs (47%) were combination tools (eg, food models and portion-size lists), followed by portion-size lists in questionnaires/guides (19%) and image-based and volumetric tools (17% each). Only 17% of PSEEs had been validated against weighed data. When developing ethnic-specific dietary assessment tools, it is important to consider customary portion sizes by sex and age, traditional household utensil usage, and population literacy levels. Combining multiple PSEEs may increase accuracy, but such methods require validation.

  8. Size distribution estimation of cavitation bubble cloud via bubbles dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Liu, Xiaodong; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposed an acoustic technique to estimate size distribution of a cavitation bubble cloud induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) based on the dissolution of bubble cloud trapped by a wide beam of low acoustic pressure, after the acoustic exposure of FUS is turned off. Dissolution of cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with degassed saline or saturated saline has been respectively studied to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of FUS on size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  9. Estimating Divergence Time and Ancestral Effective Population Size of Bornean and Sumatran Orangutan Subspecies Using a Coalescent Hidden Markov Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailund, Thomas; Dutheil, Julien; Hobolth, Asger

    2011-01-01

    , and the ancestral effective population size. The model is efficient enough to allow inference on whole-genome data sets. We first investigate the power and consistency of the model with coalescent simulations and then apply it to the whole-genome sequences of the two orangutan sub-species, Bornean (P. p. pygmaeus......) and Sumatran (P. p. abelii) orangutans from the Orangutan Genome Project. We estimate the speciation time between the two sub-species to be thousand years ago and the effective population size of the ancestral orangutan species to be , consistent with recent results based on smaller data sets. We also report...

  10. Estimating the size of a methane emission point source at different scales: from local to landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Riddick

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available High methane (CH4 mixing ratios (up to 4 ppm have occurred sporadically at our measurement site in Haddenham, Cambridgeshire, since July 2012. Isotopic measurements and back trajectories show that the source is the Waterbeach Waste Management Park 7 km SE of Haddenham. To investigate this further, measurements were made on 30 June and 1 July 2015 at other locations nearer to the source. Landfill emissions have been estimated using three different approaches at different scales; near source using the WindTrax inversion dispersion model, middle distance using a Gaussian plume (GP model and at the landscape scale using the Numerical Atmospheric Modelling Environment (NAME Inversion Technique for Emission Modelling (InTEM inversion. The emission estimates derived using the WindTrax and Gaussian plume (GP approaches agree well for the period of intense observations. Applying the Gaussian plume approach to all periods of elevated measurements seen at Haddenham produces year-round and monthly landfill emission estimates with an estimated annual emission of 11.6 Gg CH4 yr−1. The monthly emission estimates are highest in winter (2160 kg h−1 in February and lowest in summer (620 kg h−1 in July. These data identify the effects of environmental conditions on landfill CH4 production and highlight the importance of year-round measurements to capture seasonal variability in CH4 emission.

  11. Analysis of nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in Fe-base materials by means of small angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, G.

    2008-12-15

    Thermonuclear fusion of light atoms is considered since decades as an unlimited, safe and reliable source of energy that could eventually replace classical sources based on fossil fuel or nuclear fuel. Fusion reactor technology and materials studies are important parts of the fusion energy development program. For the time being, the most promising materials for structural applications in the future fusion power reactors are the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels for which the greatest technology maturity has been achieved, i.e., qualified fabrication routes, welding technology and a general industrial experience are almost available. The most important issues concerning the future use of RAFM steels in fusion power reactors are derived from their irradiation by 14 MeV neutrons that are the product, together with 3.5 MeV helium ions, of the envisaged fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium nuclei. Indeed, exposure of metallic materials to intense fluxes of 14 MeV neutrons will result in the formation of severe displacement damage (about 20-30 dpa per year) and high amounts of helium, which are at the origin of significant changes in the physical and mechanical properties of materials, such as hardening and embrittlement effects. This PhD Thesis work was aimed at investigating how far the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique could be used for detecting and characterizing nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in RAFM steels. Indeed, the resolution limit of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is about 1 nm in weak beam TEM imaging, and it is usually thought that a large number of irradiation-induced effects have a size below 1 nm in RAFM steels and that these very small defects actually contribute to the irradiation-induced hardening and embrittlement of RAFM steels occurring at irradiation temperatures below about 400 °C. The aim of this work was achieved by combining SANS experiments on unirradiated and irradiated specimens

  12. Biased estimates of fitness consequences of brood size manipulation through correlated effects on natal dispersal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinbergen, JM

    2005-01-01

    1. Dispersal of parents and offspring in relation to manipulated brood size were analysed in the great tit Parus major (L.) to study the potential confusion between dispersal and survival. The study area consisted of eight woodlots interspersed with nonbreeding habitat. The maximum distance between

  13. How much data resides in a web collection: how to estimate size of a web collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khelghati, Mohammadreza; Hiemstra, Djoerd; van Keulen, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    With increasing amount of data in deep web sources (hidden from general search engines behind web forms), accessing this data has gained more attention. In the algorithms applied for this purpose, it is the knowledge of a data source size that enables the algorithms to make accurate decisions in

  14. Improved Patient Size Estimates for Accurate Dose Calculations in Abdomen Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang-Lae [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The radiation dose of CT (computed tomography) is generally represented by the CTDI (CT dose index). CTDI, however, does not accurately predict the actual patient doses for different human body sizes because it relies on a cylinder-shaped head (diameter : 16 cm) and body (diameter : 32 cm) phantom. The purpose of this study was to eliminate the drawbacks of the conventional CTDI and to provide more accurate radiation dose information. Projection radiographs were obtained from water cylinder phantoms of various sizes, and the sizes of the water cylinder phantoms were calculated and verified using attenuation profiles. The effective diameter was also calculated using the attenuation of the abdominal projection radiographs of 10 patients. When the results of the attenuation-based method and the geometry-based method shown were compared with the results of the reconstructed-axial-CT-image-based method, the effective diameter of the attenuation-based method was found to be similar to the effective diameter of the reconstructed-axial-CT-image-based method, with a difference of less than 3.8%, but the geometry-based method showed a difference of less than 11.4%. This paper proposes a new method of accurately computing the radiation dose of CT based on the patient sizes. This method computes and provides the exact patient dose before the CT scan, and can therefore be effectively used for imaging and dose control.

  15. Sample sizes to control error estimates in determining soil bulk density in California forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youzhi Han; Jianwei Zhang; Kim G. Mattson; Weidong Zhang; Thomas A. Weber

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing forest soil properties with high variability is challenging, sometimes requiring large numbers of soil samples. Soil bulk density is a standard variable needed along with element concentrations to calculate nutrient pools. This study aimed to determine the optimal sample size, the number of observation (n), for predicting the soil bulk density with a...

  16. Estimating average tree crown size using high-resolution airborne data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brovkina, Olga; Latypov, I.; Cienciala, E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, may 13 (2015), 096053-1-096053-13 ISSN 1931-3195 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk OC09001 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : crown size * airborne data * spruce * granulometry Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 0.937, year: 2015

  17. Size matters: point pattern analysis biases the estimation of spatial properties of stomata distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naulin, Paulette I; Valenzuela, Gerardo; Estay, Sergio A

    2017-03-01

    Stomata distribution is an example of biological patterning. Formal methods used to study stomata patterning are generally based on point-pattern analysis, which assumes that stomata are points and ignores the constraints imposed by size on the placement of neighbors. The inclusion of size in the analysis requires the use of a null model based on finite-size object geometry. In this study, we compare the results obtained by analyzing samples from several species using point and disc null models. The results show that depending on the null model used, there was a 20% reduction in the number of samples classified as uniform; these results suggest that stomata patterning is not as general as currently reported. Some samples changed drastically from being classified as uniform to being classified as clustered. In samples of Arabidopsis thaliana, only the disc model identified clustering at high densities of stomata. This reinforces the importance of selecting an appropriate null model to avoid incorrect inferences about underlying biological mechanisms. Based on the results gathered here, we encourage researchers to abandon point-pattern analysis when studying stomata patterning; more realistic conclusions can be drawn from finite-size object analysis. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Breast cancer size estimation with MRI in BRCA mutation carriers and other high risk patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mann, R. M.; Bult, P.; van Laarhoven, H. W. M.; Span, P. N.; Schlooz, M.; Veltman, J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of breast MRI in size assessment of breast cancers in high risk patients, including those with a BRCA 1 or 2 mutation. Guidelines recommend invariably breast MRI screening for these patients and therapy is thus based on these findings. However, the accuracy of breast

  19. Estimates of zooplankton abundance and size distribution with the Optical Plankton Counter (OPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai; Petersen, D.; Schnack, D.

    1997-01-01

    The capability of the Optical Plankton Count er (OPC) to examine the abundance and size distribution of zooplankton was tested in Storfjorden, Norway, in June 1993. Selected material obtained from net sampling was measured with a laboratory version of the OPC and compared with microscope analysis...

  20. Effect of sample moisture content on XRD-estimated cellulose crystallinity index and crystallite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Sally A. Ralph; Carlos Baez; Richard S. Reiner; Steve P. Verrill

    2017-01-01

    Although X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been the most widely used technique to investigate crystallinity index (CrI) and crystallite size (L200) of cellulose materials, there are not many studies that have taken into account the role of sample moisture on these measurements. The present investigation focuses on a variety of celluloses and cellulose...

  1. A Comparison of Uniform DIF Effect Size Estimators under the MIMIC and Rasch Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Myers, Nicholas D.; Ahn, Soyeon; Penfield, Randall D.

    2013-01-01

    The Rasch model, a member of a larger group of models within item response theory, is widely used in empirical studies. Detection of uniform differential item functioning (DIF) within the Rasch model typically employs null hypothesis testing with a concomitant consideration of effect size (e.g., signed area [SA]). Parametric equivalence between…

  2. Geothermal hydrothermal direct heat use: US market size and market penetration estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Sawy, A.H.; Entingh, D.J.

    1980-09-01

    This study estimates the future regional and national market penetration path of hydrothermal geothermal direct heat applications in the United States. A Technology Substitution Model (MARPEN) is developed and used to estimate the energy market shares captured by low-temperature (50 to 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal geothermal energy systems over the period 1985 to 2020. The sensitivity of hydrothermal direct heat market shares to various government hydrothermal commercialization policies is examined. Several substantive recommendations to help accelerate commercialization of geothermal direct heat utilization in the United States are indicated and possible additional analyses are discussed.

  3. Estimating population size of the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii in fish-ponds (Brenne, Central France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coignet A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, was discovered in 2007 in the “Parc naturel régional (PNR de la Brenne” (France. Ten colonized sites have been identified in the park to date, including two new sites discovered in 2011. The present study aims at establishing a protocol suitable for estimating the population size of P. clarkii by the use of a Capture-Mark-Recapture (CMR technique in a chain of five connected fish-ponds. Results show different cohorts of individuals among seasons and fish-ponds. However, trapping effort was not efficient enough to obtain an accurate estimate of the population size of this species in a fish-pond larger than 2 − 3 ha. On the other hand, the adopted protocol appeared useful to assess, in smaller fish-ponds, the effect of intensive trapping and other control methods on P. clarkii populations.

  4. Estimating effective population size from linkage disequilibrium between unlinked loci: theory and application to fruit fly outbreak populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Sved

    Full Text Available There is a substantial literature on the use of linkage disequilibrium (LD to estimate effective population size using unlinked loci. The Ne estimates are extremely sensitive to the sampling process, and there is currently no theory to cope with the possible biases. We derive formulae for the analysis of idealised populations mating at random with multi-allelic (microsatellite loci. The 'Burrows composite index' is introduced in a novel way with a 'composite haplotype table'. We show that in a sample of diploid size S, the mean value of x2 or r2 from the composite haplotype table is biased by a factor of 1-1/(2S-12, rather than the usual factor 1+1/(2S-1 for a conventional haplotype table. But analysis of population data using these formulae leads to Ne estimates that are unrealistically low. We provide theory and simulation to show that this bias towards low Ne estimates is due to null alleles, and introduce a randomised permutation correction to compensate for the bias. We also consider the effect of introducing a within-locus disequilibrium factor to r2, and find that this factor leads to a bias in the Ne estimate. However this bias can be overcome using the same randomised permutation correction, to yield an altered r2 with lower variance than the original r2, and one that is also insensitive to null alleles. The resulting formulae are used to provide Ne estimates on 40 samples of the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni, from populations with widely divergent Ne expectations. Linkage relationships are known for most of the microsatellite loci in this species. We find that there is little difference in the estimated Ne values from using known unlinked loci as compared to using all loci, which is important for conservation studies where linkage relationships are unknown.

  5. Estimating effective population size from linkage disequilibrium between unlinked loci: theory and application to fruit fly outbreak populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sved, John A; Cameron, Emilie C; Gilchrist, A Stuart

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial literature on the use of linkage disequilibrium (LD) to estimate effective population size using unlinked loci. The Ne estimates are extremely sensitive to the sampling process, and there is currently no theory to cope with the possible biases. We derive formulae for the analysis of idealised populations mating at random with multi-allelic (microsatellite) loci. The 'Burrows composite index' is introduced in a novel way with a 'composite haplotype table'. We show that in a sample of diploid size S, the mean value of x2 or r2 from the composite haplotype table is biased by a factor of 1-1/(2S-1)2, rather than the usual factor 1+1/(2S-1) for a conventional haplotype table. But analysis of population data using these formulae leads to Ne estimates that are unrealistically low. We provide theory and simulation to show that this bias towards low Ne estimates is due to null alleles, and introduce a randomised permutation correction to compensate for the bias. We also consider the effect of introducing a within-locus disequilibrium factor to r2, and find that this factor leads to a bias in the Ne estimate. However this bias can be overcome using the same randomised permutation correction, to yield an altered r2 with lower variance than the original r2, and one that is also insensitive to null alleles. The resulting formulae are used to provide Ne estimates on 40 samples of the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni, from populations with widely divergent Ne expectations. Linkage relationships are known for most of the microsatellite loci in this species. We find that there is little difference in the estimated Ne values from using known unlinked loci as compared to using all loci, which is important for conservation studies where linkage relationships are unknown.

  6. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation of Aqueous C60 Nanoparticles with Size Determination by Dynamic Light Scattering and Quantification by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A size separation method was developed for aqueous C60 fullerene aggregates (aqu/C60) using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a dynamic light scattering detector in flow through mode. Surfactants, which are commonly used in AF4, were avoided as they may al...

  7. Preoperative estimation of tibial nail length--because size does matter.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galbraith, J G

    2012-11-01

    Selecting the correct tibial nail length is essential for satisfactory outcomes. Nails that are inserted and are found to be of inappropriate length should be removed. Accurate preoperative nail estimation has the potential to reduce intra-operative errors, operative time and radiation exposure.

  8. Application of proper orthogonal decomposition and radial basis functions for crack size estimation using particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaissa, B.; Köppen, M.; Abdel Wahab, M.; Khatir, S.

    2017-05-01

    Complex engineering problems require simulations, which are computationally expensive in cases of inverse identification tasks since they commonly requires hundreds of thousands of simulations. This paper propose a method based on model reduction for crack size estimation, combining the proper orthogonal decomposition method with radial basis functions. The reduced model is validated by comparing the obtained boundary displacements with the corresponding results from a finite element model. This inverse procedure is formulated as the minimization of the difference between the measured and computed values of displacement at selected boundary nodes, called sensor points, using particle swarm optimization algorithm. Convex and a non-convex specimens have been considered for investigations of crack presence, and identification of its size, different crack sizes have been tested to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  9. Assessing terpene content variability of whitebark pine in order to estimate representative sample size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Milena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In studies of population variability, particular attention has to be paid to the selection of a representative sample. The aim of this study was to assess the size of the new representative sample on the basis of the variability of chemical content of the initial sample on the example of a whitebark pine population. Statistical analysis included the content of 19 characteristics (terpene hydrocarbons and their derivates of the initial sample of 10 elements (trees. It was determined that the new sample should contain 20 trees so that the mean value calculated from it represents a basic set with a probability higher than 95 %. Determination of the lower limit of the representative sample size that guarantees a satisfactory reliability of generalization proved to be very important in order to achieve cost efficiency of the research. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI-173011, br. TR-37002 i br. III-43007

  10. Analysis of EBSD Grain Size Measurements Using Microstructure Simulations and a Customizable Pattern Matching Library for Grain Perimeter Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Y. A.; Rooney, S. C. K.; Payton, E. J.

    2017-05-01

    Grain size data from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps are often reported as the mean of the circle equivalent diameters of the measured grain areas. Circle equivalent diameters are not directly comparable to the lineal intercept measurements more historically common for grain size characterization in analog optical microscopy. While the value of mean lineal intercept is the same in 2D and 3D for a given probe direction, the mean 2D circle equivalent section diameter is not directly related to any 3D property. Estimation of mean lineal intercept from circle equivalent diameter is usually carried out by again assuming feature circularity, despite the obvious corners that are inherent to grains from the requirements of space filling. A direct conversion between section areas and lineal intercepts can be performed if the grain perimeters are known. In the present work, a novel pattern matching library approach is investigated for measurement of grain perimeters using simulated 2D EBSD maps. The results are compared to alternative approaches for perimeter measurement and assessed with respect to spatial resolution, grain size distribution parameters, and relevant ASTM and ISO measurement standards. The benefits and drawbacks of each approach are discussed. Empirical estimators for conversion between lineal intercept, circle equivalent diameter, and ASTM grain size number are presented.

  11. Media influences on body size estimation in anorexia and bulimia. An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, K; Waller, G

    1993-06-01

    Anorexic and bulimic women overestimate their body sizes substantially more than comparison women, but little is known about the factors that influence this overestimation. This study examined the influence of media portrayal of idealized female bodies in women's fashion magazines. Comparison women were not affected by the nature of the photographs that they saw, but eating-disordered women were--they overestimated more when they had seen the pictures of women than when they saw photographs of neutral objects.

  12. Kinematic vorticity number – a tool for estimating vortex sizes and circulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Schielicke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of extratropical vortices on a global scale is mainly characterised by their size and by the magnitude of their circulation. However, the determination of these properties is still a great challenge since a vortex has no clear delimitations but is part of the flow field itself. In this work, we introduce a kinematic vortex size determination method based on the kinematic vorticity number Wk to atmospheric flows. Wk relates the local rate-of-rotation to the local rate-of-deformation at every point in the field and a vortex core is identified as a simply connected region where the rotation prevails over the deformation. Additionally, considering the sign of vorticity in the extended Wk-method allows to identify highs and lows in different vertical layers of the atmosphere and to study vertical as well as horizontal vortex interactions. We will test the Wk-method in different idealised -D (superposition of two lows/low and jet and real -D flow situations (winter storm affecting Europe and compare the results with traditional methods based on the pressure and the vorticity fields. In comparison to these traditional methods, the Wk-method is able to extract vortex core sizes even in shear-dominated regions that occur frequently in the upper troposphere. Furthermore, statistics of the size and circulation distributions of cyclones will be given. Since the Wk-method identifies vortex cores, the identified radii are subsynoptic with a broad peak around 300–500 km at the 1000 hPa level. However, the total circulating area is not only restricted to the core. In general, circulations are in the order of 107 m2/s with only a few cyclones in the order of 108 m2/s.

  13. Estimating the sample mean and standard deviation from the sample size, median, range and/or interquartile range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiang; Wang, Wenqian; Liu, Jiming; Tong, Tiejun

    2014-12-19

    In systematic reviews and meta-analysis, researchers often pool the results of the sample mean and standard deviation from a set of similar clinical trials. A number of the trials, however, reported the study using the median, the minimum and maximum values, and/or the first and third quartiles. Hence, in order to combine results, one may have to estimate the sample mean and standard deviation for such trials. In this paper, we propose to improve the existing literature in several directions. First, we show that the sample standard deviation estimation in Hozo et al.'s method (BMC Med Res Methodol 5:13, 2005) has some serious limitations and is always less satisfactory in practice. Inspired by this, we propose a new estimation method by incorporating the sample size. Second, we systematically study the sample mean and standard deviation estimation problem under several other interesting settings where the interquartile range is also available for the trials. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed methods through simulation studies for the three frequently encountered scenarios, respectively. For the first two scenarios, our method greatly improves existing methods and provides a nearly unbiased estimate of the true sample standard deviation for normal data and a slightly biased estimate for skewed data. For the third scenario, our method still performs very well for both normal data and skewed data. Furthermore, we compare the estimators of the sample mean and standard deviation under all three scenarios and present some suggestions on which scenario is preferred in real-world applications. In this paper, we discuss different approximation methods in the estimation of the sample mean and standard deviation and propose some new estimation methods to improve the existing literature. We conclude our work with a summary table (an Excel spread sheet including all formulas) that serves as a comprehensive guidance for performing meta-analysis in different

  14. Particle size distribution and respiratory deposition estimates of airborne perfluoroalkyl acids during the haze period in the megacity of Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mengjie; Lyu, Yan; Xu, Tingting; Yao, Bo; Song, Weihua; Li, Mei; Yang, Xin; Cheng, Tiantao; Li, Xiang

    2017-11-16

    This study presents the particle size distribution and respiratory deposition estimates of airborne perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) during the haze period. Size-segregated haze aerosols were collected from an urban location in Shanghai using an eight-stage air sampler. The samples were analyzed for eight PFAAs using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The quantification results showed that the concentrations of particle-bound Σ 8PFAAs ranged from 0.26 to 1.90 ng m-3 (mean: 1.44 ng m-3). All of the measured PFAAs particle size distributions had a bimodal mode that peaked respectively in accumulation size range (0.4 size ranges (Dp > 2.1 μm), but the width of each distribution somewhat varied by compound. The emission source, molecular weight, and volatility of the PFAAs were important factors influencing the size distribution of particle-bound PFAAs. Of these compounds, PFUnDA presented a strong accumulation in the fine size range (average 75% associated with particles size distribution, with a 2-fold higher risk for the fine particle fraction compared to the coarse particle fraction at urban sites. Approximately 30.3-82.0% of PFAA deposition (∑PFAA: 72.5%) in the alveolar region was associated with particles particles to the total PFAAs concentration in urban air was only 28-57% (∑8PFAAs: 48%). These results suggested that fine particles are significant contributors to the deposition of PFAAs in the alveolar region of the lung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): effects of container size adjustments on estimates of alcohol consumption across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Mills, Britain A; Harris, T Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine discrepancies in alcohol consumption estimates between a self-reported standard quantity-frequency measure and an adjusted version based on respondents' typically used container size. Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 Hispanic individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. The survey-weighted response rate was 76%. Personal interviews lasting an average of 1 hour were conducted in respondents' homes in either English or Spanish. The overall effect of container adjustment was to increase estimates of ethanol consumption by 68% for women (range across Hispanic groups: 17%-99%) and 30% for men (range: 14%-42%). With the exception of female Cuban American, Mexican American, and South/Central American beer drinkers and male Cuban American wine drinkers, all percentage differences between unadjusted and container-adjusted estimates were positive. Second, container adjustments produced the largest change for volume of distilled spirits, followed by wine and beer. Container size adjustments generally produced larger percentage increases in consumption estimates for the higher volume drinkers, especially the upper tertile of female drinkers. Self-reported alcohol consumption based on standard drinks underreports consumption when compared with reports based on the amount of alcohol poured into commonly used containers.

  16. Estimation of Body Weight from Body Size Measurements and Body Condition Scores in Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Carsten; Kristensen, T.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of hip height and width, body condition score, and relevant demographic information to predict body weight (BW) of dairy cows. Seven regression models were developed from data from 972 observations of 554 cows. Parity, hip height, hip width......, and body condition score were consistently associated with BW. The coefficients of multiple determination varied from 80 to 89%. The number of significant terms and the parameter estimates of the models differed markedly among groups of cows. Apparently, these differences were due to breed and feeding...... regimen. Results from this study indicate that a reliable model for estimating BW of very different dairy cows maintained in a wide range of environments can be developed using body condition score, demographic information, and measurements of hip height and hip width. However, for management purposes...

  17. Estimation of (co)variances for genomic regions of flexible sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars P; Janss, Luc; Madsen, Per

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multi-trait genomic models in a Bayesian context can be used to estimate genomic (co)variances, either for a complete genome or for genomic regions (e.g. per chromosome) for the purpose of multi-trait genomic selection or to gain further insight into the genomic architecture of related...... traits such as mammary disease traits in dairy cattle. METHODS: Data on progeny means of six traits related to mastitis resistance in dairy cattle (general mastitis resistance and five pathogen-specific mastitis resistance traits) were analyzed using a bivariate Bayesian SNP-based genomic model...... with a common prior distribution for the marker allele substitution effects and estimation of the hyperparameters in this prior distribution from the progeny means data. From the Markov chain Monte Carlo samples of the allele substitution effects, genomic (co)variances were calculated on a whole-genome level...

  18. Estimating the size of the homeless adolescent population across seven cities in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Stark

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Government of Cambodia has committed to supporting family care for vulnerable children, including homeless populations. Collecting baseline data on the numbers and characteristics of homeless adolescents was prioritized to illuminate the scope of the issue, mobilize resources and direct the response. Methods Administrative zones across seven cities were purposively selected to cover the main urban areas known to have homeless populations in Cambodia. A complete enumeration of homeless individuals between the ages of 13 and 17 was attempted in the selected areas. In addition, a second independent count was conducted to enable a statistical estimation of completeness based on overlap across counts. This technique is known as capture-recapture. Adolescents were also interviewed about their schooling, health and other circumstances. Results After adjustment by the capture-recapture corrective multipliers (range: 3.53 -27.08, the study yielded an estimate of 2,697 13–17 year old homeless adolescents across all seven cities. The total number of homeless boys counted was significantly greater than homeless girls, especially in older ages. Conclusions To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time capture-recapture methods have been applied to a homeless estimation of this scale in a resource-limited setting. Findings suggest the number of homeless adolescents in Cambodia is much greater than one would expect if relying on single count data alone and that this population faces many hardships.

  19. Rayleigh's Scattering Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiets, Sergey; Gorelik, Andrey

    This report is devoted to a discussion of applicability limits of Rayleigh’s scattering model. Implicitly, Rayleigh’s ideas are being used in a wide range of remote sensing applications. To begin with it must be noted that most techniques which have been developed to date for measurements by means of active instruments for remote sensing in case of the target is a set of distributed moving scatters are only hopes, to say so, on measurements per se. The problem is that almost all of such techniques use a priori information about the microstructure of the object of interest during whole measurement session. As one can find in the literature, this approach may happily be applied to systems with identical particles. However, it is not the case with respect to scattering targets that consist of particles of different kind or having a particle size distribution. It must be especially noted that the microstructure of most of such targets changes significantly with time and/or space. Therefore, the true measurement techniques designed to be applicable in such conditions must be not only adaptable in order to take into account a variety of models of an echo interpretation, but also have a well-developed set of clear-cut criteria of applicability and exact means of accuracy estimation. So such techniques will require much more parameters to be measured. In spite of the fact that there is still room for some improvements within classical models and approaches, it is multiwavelength approach that may be seen as the most promising way of development towards obtaining an adequate set of the measured parameters required for true measurement techniques. At the same time, Rayleigh’s scattering is an invariant in regard to a change of the wavelength as it follows from the point of view dominating nowadays. In the light of such an idea, the synergy between multivawelength measurements may be achieved - to a certain extent - by means of the synchronous usage of Rayleigh’s and

  20. Depictive and metric body size estimation in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölbert, Simone Claire; Klein, Lukas; Thaler, Anne; Mohler, Betty J; Brozzo, Chiara; Martus, Peter; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Zipfel, Stephan; Giel, Katrin Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    A distorted representation of one's own body is a diagnostic criterion and core psychopathology of both anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Despite recent technical advances in research, it is still unknown whether this body image disturbance is characterized by body dissatisfaction and a low ideal weight and/or includes a distorted perception or processing of body size. In this article, we provide an update and meta-analysis of 42 articles summarizing measures and results for body size estimation (BSE) from 926 individuals with AN, 536 individuals with BN and 1920 controls. We replicate findings that individuals with AN and BN overestimate their body size as compared to controls (ES=0.63). Our meta-regression shows that metric methods (BSE by direct or indirect spatial measures) yield larger effect sizes than depictive methods (BSE by evaluating distorted pictures), and that effect sizes are larger for patients with BN than for patients with AN. To interpret these results, we suggest a revised theoretical framework for BSE that accounts for differences between depictive and metric BSE methods regarding the underlying body representations (conceptual vs. perceptual, implicit vs. explicit). We also discuss clinical implications and argue for the importance of multimethod approaches to investigate body image disturbance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative assessment of islet cell products: estimating the accuracy of the existing protocol and accounting for islet size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Peter; Wang, Xiaojing; Khan, Aisha; Bernal, Andres; Fraker, Chris; Inverardi, Luca; Ricordi, Camillo

    2009-01-01

    The ability to consistently and reliably assess the total number and the size distribution of isolated pancreatic islet cells from a small sample is of crucial relevance for the adequate characterization of islet cell preparations used for research or transplantation purposes. Here, data from a large number of isolations were used to establish a continuous probability density function describing the size distribution of human pancreatic islets. This function was then used to generate a polymeric microsphere mixture with a composition resembling those of isolated islets, which, in turn, was used to quantitatively assess the accuracy, reliability, and operator-dependent variability of the currently utilized manual standard procedure of quantification of islet cell preparation. Furthermore, on the basis of the best fit probability density function, which corresponds to a Weibull distribution, a slightly modified scale of islet equivalent number (IEQ) conversion factors is proposed that incorporates the size distribution of islets and accounts for the decreasing probability of finding larger islets within each size group. Compared to the current calculation method, these factors introduce a 4-8% downward correction of the total IEQ estimate, but they reflect a statistically more accurate contribution of differently sized islets.

  2. Non-Directional Radiation Spread Modeling and Non-Invasive Estimating the Radiation Scattering and Absorption Parameters in Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Makarov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article dwells on a development of new non-invasive measurement methods of optical parameters of biological tissues, which are responsible for the scattering and absorption of monochromatic radiation. It is known from the theory of radiation transfer [1] that for strongly scattering media, to which many biological tissues pertain, such parameters are parameters of diffusion approximation, as well as a scattering coefficient and an anisotropy parameter.Based on statistical modeling the paper examines a spread of non-directional radiation from a Lambert light beam with the natural polarization that illuminates a surface of the biological tissue. Statistical modeling is based on the Monte Carlo method [2]. Thus, to have the correct energy coefficient values of Fresnel reflection and transmission in simulation of such radiation by Monte Carlo method the author uses his finding that is a function of the statistical representation for the incidence of model photons [3]. The paper describes in detail a principle of fixing the power transmitted by the non-directional radiation into biological tissue [3], and the equations of a power balance in this case.Further, the paper describes the diffusion approximation of a radiation transfer theory, often used in simulation of radiation propagation in strongly scattering media and shows its application in case of fixing the power transmitted into the tissue. Thus, to represent an uneven power distribution is used an approximating expression in conditions of fixing a total input power. The paper reveals behavior peculiarities of solution on the surface of the biological tissue inside and outside of the incident beam. It is shown that the solution in the region outside of the incident beam (especially far away from it, essentially, depends neither on the particular power distribution across the surface, being a part of the tissue, nor on the refractive index of the biological tissue. It is determined only by

  3. Why circumstellar disks are so faint in scattered light : the case of HD 100546

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, G. D.; Min, M.; Dominik, C.; Debes, J. H.; Schneider, G.

    Context. Scattered light images of circumstellar disks play an important role in characterizing the planet forming environments around young stars. The characteristic size of the scattering dust grains can be estimated from the observed brightness asymmetry between the near and far side of the disk,

  4. Why circumstellar disks are so faint in scattered light: the case of HD 100546

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, G.D.; Min, M.; Dominik, C.; Debes, J.H.; Schneider, G.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Scattered light images of circumstellar disks play an important role in characterizing the planet forming environments around young stars. The characteristic size of the scattering dust grains can be estimated from the observed brightness asymmetry between the near and far side of the disk,

  5. Estimation of density and population size and recommendations for monitoring trends of Bahama parrots on Great Abaco and Great Inagua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Milan, F. F.; Collazo, J.A.; Stahala, C.; Moore, W.J.; Davis, A.; Herring, G.; Steinkamp, M.; Pagliaro, R.; Thompson, J.L.; Bracey, W.

    2005-01-01

    Once abundant and widely distributed, the Bahama parrot (Amazona leucocephala bahamensis) currently inhabits only the Great Abaco and Great lnagua Islands of the Bahamas. In January 2003 and May 2002-2004, we conducted point-transect surveys (a type of distance sampling) to estimate density and population size and make recommendations for monitoring trends. Density ranged from 0.061 (SE = 0.013) to 0.085 (SE = 0.018) parrots/ha and population size ranged from 1,600 (SE = 354) to 2,386 (SE = 508) parrots when extrapolated to the 26,154 ha and 28,162 ha covered by surveys on Abaco in May 2002 and 2003, respectively. Density was 0.183 (SE = 0.049) and 0.153 (SE = 0.042) parrots/ha and population size was 5,344 (SE = 1,431) and 4,450 (SE = 1,435) parrots when extrapolated to the 29,174 ha covered by surveys on Inagua in May 2003 and 2004, respectively. Because parrot distribution was clumped, we would need to survey 213-882 points on Abaco and 258-1,659 points on Inagua to obtain a CV of 10-20% for estimated density. Cluster size and its variability and clumping increased in wintertime, making surveys imprecise and cost-ineffective. Surveys were reasonably precise and cost-effective in springtime, and we recommend conducting them when parrots are pairing and selecting nesting sites. Survey data should be collected yearly as part of an integrated monitoring strategy to estimate density and other key demographic parameters and improve our understanding of the ecological dynamics of these geographically isolated parrot populations at risk of extinction.

  6. Estimating required information size by quantifying diversity in random-effects model meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Thorlund, Kristian; Brok, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    -analysis. RESULTS: We devise a measure of diversity (D2) in a meta-analysis, which is the relative variance reduction when the meta-analysis model is changed from a random-effects into a fixed-effect model. D2 is the percentage that the between-trial variability constitutes of the sum of the between...... an intervention effect suggested by trials with low-risk of bias. METHODS: Information size calculations need to consider the total model variance in a meta-analysis to control type I and type II errors. Here, we derive an adjusting factor for the required information size under any random-effects model meta...... and interpreted using several simulations and clinical examples. In addition we show mathematically that diversity is equal to or greater than inconsistency, that is D2 >or= I2, for all meta-analyses. CONCLUSION: We conclude that D2 seems a better alternative than I2 to consider model variation in any random...

  7. New insights into protein-protein interaction data lead to increased estimates of the S. cerevisiae interactome size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry-Mieg Nicolas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As protein interactions mediate most cellular mechanisms, protein-protein interaction networks are essential in the study of cellular processes. Consequently, several large-scale interactome mapping projects have been undertaken, and protein-protein interactions are being distilled into databases through literature curation; yet protein-protein interaction data are still far from comprehensive, even in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Estimating the interactome size is important for evaluating the completeness of current datasets, in order to measure the remaining efforts that are required. Results We examined the yeast interactome from a new perspective, by taking into account how thoroughly proteins have been studied. We discovered that the set of literature-curated protein-protein interactions is qualitatively different when restricted to proteins that have received extensive attention from the scientific community. In particular, these interactions are less often supported by yeast two-hybrid, and more often by more complex experiments such as biochemical activity assays. Our analysis showed that high-throughput and literature-curated interactome datasets are more correlated than commonly assumed, but that this bias can be corrected for by focusing on well-studied proteins. We thus propose a simple and reliable method to estimate the size of an interactome, combining literature-curated data involving well-studied proteins with high-throughput data. It yields an estimate of at least 37, 600 direct physical protein-protein interactions in S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Our method leads to higher and more accurate estimates of the interactome size, as it accounts for interactions that are genuine yet difficult to detect with commonly-used experimental assays. This shows that we are even further from completing the yeast interactome map than previously expected.

  8. Chlamydia sequelae cost estimates used in current economic evaluations: does one-size-fit-all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Koh Jun; Soldan, Kate; Jit, Mark; Dunbar, J Kevin; Woodhall, Sarah C

    2017-02-01

    Current evidence suggests that chlamydia screening programmes can be cost-effective, conditional on assumptions within mathematical models. We explored differences in cost estimates used in published economic evaluations of chlamydia screening from seven countries (four papers each from UK and the Netherlands, two each from Sweden and Australia, and one each from Ireland, Canada and Denmark). From these studies, we extracted management cost estimates for seven major chlamydia sequelae. In order to compare the influence of different sequelae considered in each paper and their corresponding management costs on the total cost per case of untreated chlamydia, we applied reported unit sequelae management costs considered in each paper to a set of untreated infection to sequela progression probabilities. All costs were adjusted to 2013/2014 Great British Pound (GBP) values. Sequelae management costs ranged from £171 to £3635 (pelvic inflammatory disease); £953 to £3615 (ectopic pregnancy); £546 to £6752 (tubal factor infertility); £159 to £3341 (chronic pelvic pain); £22 to £1008 (epididymitis); £11 to £1459 (neonatal conjunctivitis) and £433 to £3992 (neonatal pneumonia). Total cost of sequelae per case of untreated chlamydia ranged from £37 to £412. There was substantial variation in cost per case of chlamydia sequelae used in published chlamydia screening economic evaluations, which likely arose from different assumptions about disease management pathways and the country perspectives taken. In light of this, when interpreting these studies, the reader should be satisfied that the cost estimates used sufficiently reflect the perspective taken and current disease management for their respective context. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Estimation of the particle size distribution slope with 3 methods: implications for the optical backscattering ratio and the bulk refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgis, A. P.; Drakopoulos, P. G.; Chaikalis, S.; Spyridakis, N.; Psarra, S.

    2017-09-01

    Within the framework of Perseus and AegeanMarTech projects, multidisciplinary bio-optics experiments were conducted in the optically complex, permanently stratified waters of the NE Aegean Sea. We were able to obtain the particle size distribution (PSD) slope, using different optical sensors: (a) WET Labs ECO-B3B backscattering sensor measuring VSF at three wavelengths (470, 532, and 650 nm); (b) WET Labs C-Star transmissometer (660 nm) and Chelsea ALPHAtracka MKII (470 nm); and (c) Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometry - LISST-Deep. Values of the PSD slope estimated by all three methods were found to be within the ranges predicted by Mie theory and the literature. The optical backscattering ratio, bbp, was calculated from bbp(660) and cp(660) and subsequently the bulk index of refraction (np) was estimated as a function of the backscattering ratio and the PSD slope. In July 2014, the values of np varied between 1.01 and >1.24 (mean 1.12+/-0.08), which fall between phytoplankton- and mineral-dominated waters. According to the spatial distribution of np two water layers could be identified, associated with different particle composition: (a) Black Sea water (BSW) and Levantine waters (LW) (from the surface to 65 m depth) that appear to be dominated by material with mean index of refraction 1.13; and (b) the near-bottom layer which exhibited high np, >1.24, the latter attributed to mineral particles with high bulk index of refraction resuspended from the sea floor.

  10. Recovering missing data: estimating position and size of caudal vertebrae in Staurikosaurus pricei Colbert, 1970

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando N. Grillo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Missing data is a common problem in paleontology. It makes it difficult to reconstruct extinct taxa accurately and restrains the inclusion of some taxa on comparative and biomechanical studies. Particularly, estimating the position of vertebrae on incomplete series is often non-empirical and does not allow precise estimation of missing parts. In this work we present a method for calculating the position of preserved middle sequences of caudal vertebrae in the saurischian dinosaur Staurikosaurus pricei, based on the length and height of preserved anterior and posterior caudal vertebral centra. Regression equations were used to estimate these dimensions for middle vertebrae and, consequently, to assess the position of the preserved middle sequences. It also allowed estimating these dimensions for non-preserved vertebrae. Results indicate that the preserved caudal vertebrae of Staurikosaurus may correspond to positions 1-3, 5, 7, 14-19/15-20, 24-25/25-26, and 29-47, and that at least 25 vertebrae had transverse processes. Total length of the tail was estimated in 134 cm and total body length was 220-225 cm.Dados lacunares são um problema comum na paleontologia. Eles dificultam a reconstrução acurada de táxons extintos e limitam a inclusão de alguns táxons em estudos comparativose biomecânicos. Particularmente, estimar a posição de vértebras em séries incompletas tem sido feito com base em métodos não empíricos que não permitem estimar corretamente as partes ausentes. Neste trabalho apresentamos uma metodologia que permite estimar a posição de sequências médias preservadas de vértebras caudais no dinossauro saurísquio Staurikosaurus pricei, com base no comprimento e altura dos centros das vértebras anteriores e posteriores preservadas. Equações de regressão foram usadas para estimar essas dimensões para as vértebras médias e, consequentemente, para posicionar as sequências médias preservadas e para estimar o tamanho das

  11. Estimating the reproductive number, total outbreak size, and reporting rates for Zika epidemics in South and Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah P. Shutt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As South and Central American countries prepare for increased birth defects from Zika virus outbreaks and plan for mitigation strategies to minimize ongoing and future outbreaks, understanding important characteristics of Zika outbreaks and how they vary across regions is a challenging and important problem. We developed a mathematical model for the 2015/2016 Zika virus outbreak dynamics in Colombia, El Salvador, and Suriname. We fit the model to publicly available data provided by the Pan American Health Organization, using Approximate Bayesian Computation to estimate parameter distributions and provide uncertainty quantification. The model indicated that a country-level analysis was not appropriate for Colombia. We then estimated the basic reproduction number to range between 4 and 6 for El Salvador and Suriname with a median of 4.3 and 5.3, respectively. We estimated the reporting rate to be around 16% in El Salvador and 18% in Suriname with estimated total outbreak sizes of 73,395 and 21,647 people, respectively. The uncertainty in parameter estimates highlights a need for research and data collection that will better constrain parameter ranges.

  12. Estimation of Fracture Toughness of Small-Sized Ultrafine-Grained Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryugin, E. E.; Suvorov, B. I.

    2015-10-01

    The results obtained from measurements of the crack resistance of a VT6 alloy (Ti-6.46Al-3.84V in wt.%) produced by refining coarse-crystalline structure down to an ultrafine-grained state, using a triaxial forging technique, are presented. The specific fracture energy γc is calculated by means of a new procedure developed for small-sized chevron-notched specimens. Severe plastic deformation is shown to cause a substantial reduction in γc at room temperature. Fracture surface structure found in the ultrafine-grained alloy under study contains local zones of a severely deformed material characterized by high pore concentration. This type of structure cannot be formed solely by crystallographic shearing along densely packed lattice planes. This is evidence for a significant role of rotation deformation modes in crack nucleation and growth on different structural scales of the material.

  13. Multiple estimates of effective population size for monitoring a long-lived vertebrate: An application to Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pauline L.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Luikart, Gordon; Paetkau, David; Whitman, Craig L.; van Manen, Frank T.

    2015-01-01

    Effective population size (Ne) is a key parameter for monitoring the genetic health of threatened populations because it reflects a population's evolutionary potential and risk of extinction due to genetic stochasticity. However, its application to wildlife monitoring has been limited because it is difficult to measure in natural populations. The isolated and well-studied population of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem provides a rare opportunity to examine the usefulness of different Ne estimators for monitoring. We genotyped 729 Yellowstone grizzly bears using 20 microsatellites and applied three single-sample estimators to examine contemporary trends in generation interval (GI), effective number of breeders (Nb) and Ne during 1982–2007. We also used multisample methods to estimate variance (NeV) and inbreeding Ne (NeI). Single-sample estimates revealed positive trajectories, with over a fourfold increase in Ne (≈100 to 450) and near doubling of the GI (≈8 to 14) from the 1980s to 2000s. NeV (240–319) and NeI (256) were comparable with the harmonic mean single-sample Ne (213) over the time period. Reanalysing historical data, we found NeV increased from ≈80 in the 1910s–1960s to ≈280 in the contemporary population. The estimated ratio of effective to total census size (Ne/Nc) was stable and high (0.42–0.66) compared to previous brown bear studies. These results support independent demographic evidence for Yellowstone grizzly bear population growth since the 1980s. They further demonstrate how genetic monitoring of Ne can complement demographic-based monitoring of Nc and vital rates, providing a valuable tool for wildlife managers.

  14. Endocranial volume of Australopithecus africanus: new CT-based estimates and the effects of missing data and small sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Simon; Gunz, Philipp; Weber, Gerhard W; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2012-04-01

    Estimation of endocranial volume in Australopithecus africanus is important in interpreting early hominin brain evolution. However, the number of individuals available for investigation is limited and most of these fossils are, to some degree, incomplete and/or distorted. Uncertainties of the required reconstruction ('missing data uncertainty') and the small sample size ('small sample uncertainty') both potentially bias estimates of the average and within-group variation of endocranial volume in A. africanus. We used CT scans, electronic preparation (segmentation), mirror-imaging and semilandmark-based geometric morphometrics to generate and reconstruct complete endocasts for Sts 5, Sts 60, Sts 71, StW 505, MLD 37/38, and Taung, and measured their endocranial volumes (EV). To get a sense of the reliability of these new EV estimates, we then used simulations based on samples of chimpanzees and humans to: (a) test the accuracy of our approach, (b) assess missing data uncertainty, and (c) appraise small sample uncertainty. Incorporating missing data uncertainty of the five adult individuals, A. africanus was found to have an average adult endocranial volume of 454-461 ml with a standard deviation of 66-75 ml. EV estimates for the juvenile Taung individual range from 402 to 407 ml. Our simulations show that missing data uncertainty is small given the missing portions of the investigated fossils, but that small sample sizes are problematic for estimating species average EV. It is important to take these uncertainties into account when different fossil groups are being compared. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple estimates of effective population size for monitoring a long-lived vertebrate: an application to Yellowstone grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pauline L; Haroldson, Mark A; Luikart, Gordon; Paetkau, David; Whitman, Craig; van Manen, Frank T

    2015-11-01

    Effective population size (N(e)) is a key parameter for monitoring the genetic health of threatened populations because it reflects a population's evolutionary potential and risk of extinction due to genetic stochasticity. However, its application to wildlife monitoring has been limited because it is difficult to measure in natural populations. The isolated and well-studied population of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem provides a rare opportunity to examine the usefulness of different N(e) estimators for monitoring. We genotyped 729 Yellowstone grizzly bears using 20 microsatellites and applied three single-sample estimators to examine contemporary trends in generation interval (GI), effective number of breeders (N(b)) and N(e) during 1982-2007. We also used multisample methods to estimate variance (N(eV)) and inbreeding N(e) (N(eI)). Single-sample estimates revealed positive trajectories, with over a fourfold increase in N(e) (≈100 to 450) and near doubling of the GI (≈8 to 14) from the 1980s to 2000s. N(eV) (240-319) and N(eI) (256) were comparable with the harmonic mean single-sample N(e) (213) over the time period. Reanalysing historical data, we found N(eV) increased from ≈80 in the 1910s-1960s to ≈280 in the contemporary population. The estimated ratio of effective to total census size (N(e) /N(c)) was stable and high (0.42-0.66) compared to previous brown bear studies. These results support independent demographic evidence for Yellowstone grizzly bear population growth since the 1980s. They further demonstrate how genetic monitoring of N(e) can complement demographic-based monitoring of N(c) and vital rates, providing a valuable tool for wildlife managers. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Influence of size of the spherical scatterers and the attenuation coefficient on the polarization memory based on the Electric Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Han, Hongwei; Zhong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    When light travels in water, the state of polarization of the incident light changes as the photons are scattered with suspended particles or reflected on the target surface. In order to increase the working distance, underwater polarized light imaging (UPLI) technology usually makes use of the different depolarization effect between the water body and target on the incident polarized light to filter the backscattered light. So it is significant to study the depolarization characteristics of polarized light in water. In this paper, a Field Monte Carlo (EMC) program is developed to simulate the transmission characteristics of polarized light in water with specific particle and attenuation coefficient. EMC method is different from the traditional Monte Carlo method which tracks the Stokes vector of the beam. It uses the Jones mechanism to characterize the polarization state of the photons. By tracking the two vertical components of the photonic vibrating electric vector, the polarization state and the depolarization effect of polarized light transmitted through a body of water can be obtained. The simulation results are based on horizontal polarization, vertical polarization, 45 degree linearly polarized light(LPL) and right circularly polarized light(CPL) as incident light , Stokes vectors of four types of received light is obtained respectively, and the related parameters are calculated to analyze the polarization memory performance. The numerical results show that water body have good polarization memory property and the influence of the particle size and the attenuation coefficient on the LPL is obvious than that circularly of the polarized light, and the CPL has better polarization memory ability.

  17. Inaccuracy and bias in adult skeletal age estimation: Assessing the reliability of eight methods on individuals of varying body sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Catherine E

    2017-06-01

    Accurate age estimations are essential for identifying human skeletal remains and narrowing missing persons searches. This study examines how BMI, body mass, and stature influence inaccuracy and bias in adult skeletal age estimations obtained using eight methods. 746 skeletons from the Hamann-Todd and William Bass Collections were used. Underweight BMI, light body mass, and short-stature individuals have the most error associated with their age estimates and are consistently under-aged between 3 to 13years. Obese BMI, heavy body mass, and tall-stature individuals are consistently over-aged between 3 to 8.5years. The most reliable methods for smaller-bodied individuals are Kunos et al. (first rib) and Buckberry-Chamberlain (auricular surface); for individuals in the average range, İşcan et al. (fourth ribs) and Passalacqua (sacrum); and for larger-bodied individuals, İşcan et al., Passalacqua, and Rougé-Maillart et al. (auricular surface and acetabulum). Lovejoy et al. (auricular surface) and Suchey-Brooks (pubic symphysis) produce consistent inaccuracy and bias scores across all body size groups. The least reliable method for smaller-bodied individuals is İşcan et al.; for larger-bodied individuals, Buckberry-Chamberlain; and across all body size groups, DiGangi et al. (first rib). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Accurate Estimation of Effective Population Size in the Korean Dairy Cattle Based on Linkage Disequilibrium Corrected by Genomic Relationship Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyun Shin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Linkage disequilibrium between markers or genetic variants underlying interesting traits affects many genomic methodologies. In many genomic methodologies, the effective population size (Ne is important to assess the genetic diversity of animal populations. In this study, dairy cattle were genotyped using the Illumina BovineHD Genotyping BeadChips for over 777,000 SNPs located across all autosomes, mitochondria and sex chromosomes, and 70,000 autosomal SNPs were selected randomly for the final analysis. We characterized more accurate linkage disequilibrium in a sample of 96 dairy cattle producing milk in Korea. Estimated linkage disequilibrium was relatively high between closely linked markers (>0.6 at 10 kb and decreased with increasing distance. Using formulae that related the expected linkage disequilibrium to Ne, and assuming a constant actual population size, Ne was estimated to be approximately 122 in this population. Historical Ne, calculated assuming linear population growth, was suggestive of a rapid increase Ne over the past 10 generations, and increased slowly thereafter. Additionally, we corrected the genomic relationship structure per chromosome in calculating r2 and estimated Ne. The observed Ne based on r2 corrected by genomics relationship structure can be rationalized using current knowledge of the history of the dairy cattle breeds producing milk in Korea.

  19. Quantitative PCR-based genome size estimation of the astigmatid mites Sarcoptes scabiei, Psoroptes ovis and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounsey Kate E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of genomic data available for mites limits our understanding of their biology. Evolving high-throughput sequencing technologies promise to deliver rapid advances in this area, however, estimates of genome size are initially required to ensure sufficient coverage. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR was used to estimate the genome sizes of the burrowing ectoparasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei, the non-burrowing ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis, and the free-living house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Additionally, the chromosome number of S. scabiei was determined by chromosomal spreads of embryonic cells derived from single eggs. Results S. scabiei cells were shown to contain 17 or 18 small (S. scabiei and P. ovis were 96 (± 7 Mb and 86 (± 2 Mb respectively, among the smallest arthropod genomes reported to date. The D. pteronyssinus genome was estimated to be larger than its parasitic counterparts, at 151 Mb in female mites and 218 Mb in male mites. Conclusions This data provides a starting point for understanding the genetic organisation and evolution of these astigmatid mites, informing future sequencing projects. A comparitive genomic approach including these three closely related mites is likely to reveal key insights on mite biology, parasitic adaptations and immune evasion.

  20. Solar thermal technology development: Estimated market size and energy cost savings. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, W. R.

    1983-02-01

    Estimated future energy cost savings associated with the development of cost-competitive solar thermal technologies (STT) are discussed. Analysis is restricted to STT in electric applications for 16 high-insolation/high-energy-price states. The fuel price scenarios and three 1990 STT system costs are considered, reflecting uncertainty over future fuel prices and STT cost projections. STT R&D is found to be unacceptably risky for private industry in the absence of federal support. Energy cost savings were projected to range from $0 to $10 billion (1990 values in 1981 dollars), dependng on the system cost and fuel price scenario. Normal R&D investment risks are accentuated because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) cartel can artificially manipulate oil prices and undercut growth of alternative energy sources. Federal participation in STT R&D to help capture the potential benefits of developing cost-competitive STT was found to be in the national interest.

  1. Fleet size estimation for spreading operation considering road geometry, weather and traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven I-Jy Chien

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extreme weather conditions(i.e. snow storm in winter time have caused significant travel disruptions and increased delay and traffic accidents. Snow plowing and salt spreading are the most common counter-measures for making our roads safer for motorists. To assist highway maintenance authorities with better planning and allocation of winter maintenance resources, this study introduces an analytical model to estimate the required number of trucks for spreading operation subjective to pre-specified service time constraints considering road geometry, weather and traffic. The complexity of the research problem lies in dealing with heterogeneous road geometry of road sections, truck capacities, spreading patterns, and traffic speeds under different weather conditions and time periods of an event. The proposed model is applied to two maintenance yards with seven road sections in New Jersey (USA, which demonstrates itself fairly practical to be implemented, considering diverse operational conditions.

  2. Estimating the Population Size and Genetic Diversity of Amur Tigers in Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Dou

    Full Text Available Over the past century, the endangered Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica has experienced a severe contraction in demography and geographic range because of habitat loss, poaching, and prey depletion. In its historical home in Northeast China, there appears to be a single tiger population that includes tigers in Southwest Primorye and Northeast China; however, the current demographic status of this population is uncertain. Information on the abundance, distribution and genetic diversity of this population for assessing the efficacy of conservation interventions are scarce. We used noninvasive genetic detection data from scats, capture-recapture models and an accumulation curve method to estimate the abundance of Amur tigers in Northeast China. We identified 11 individual tigers (6 females and 5 males using 10 microsatellite loci in three nature reserves between April 2013 and May 2015. These tigers are confined primarily to a Hunchun Nature Reserve along the border with Russia, with an estimated population abundance of 9-11 tigers during the winter of 2014-2015. They showed a low level of genetic diversity. The mean number of alleles per locus was 2.60 and expected and observed heterozygosity were 0.42 and 0.49, respectively. We also documented long-distance dispersal (~270 km of a male Amur tiger to Huangnihe Nature Reserve from the border, suggesting that the expansion of neighboring Russian populations may eventually help sustain Chinese populations. However, the small and isolated population recorded by this study demonstrate that there is an urgent need for more intensive regional management to create a tiger-permeable landscape and increased genetic connectivity with other populations.

  3. Estimating the Population Size and Genetic Diversity of Amur Tigers in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Hailong; Yang, Haitao; Feng, Limin; Mou, Pu; Wang, Tianming; Ge, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past century, the endangered Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) has experienced a severe contraction in demography and geographic range because of habitat loss, poaching, and prey depletion. In its historical home in Northeast China, there appears to be a single tiger population that includes tigers in Southwest Primorye and Northeast China; however, the current demographic status of this population is uncertain. Information on the abundance, distribution and genetic diversity of this population for assessing the efficacy of conservation interventions are scarce. We used noninvasive genetic detection data from scats, capture-recapture models and an accumulation curve method to estimate the abundance of Amur tigers in Northeast China. We identified 11 individual tigers (6 females and 5 males) using 10 microsatellite loci in three nature reserves between April 2013 and May 2015. These tigers are confined primarily to a Hunchun Nature Reserve along the border with Russia, with an estimated population abundance of 9-11 tigers during the winter of 2014-2015. They showed a low level of genetic diversity. The mean number of alleles per locus was 2.60 and expected and observed heterozygosity were 0.42 and 0.49, respectively. We also documented long-distance dispersal (~270 km) of a male Amur tiger to Huangnihe Nature Reserve from the border, suggesting that the expansion of neighboring Russian populations may eventually help sustain Chinese populations. However, the small and isolated population recorded by this study demonstrate that there is an urgent need for more intensive regional management to create a tiger-permeable landscape and increased genetic connectivity with other populations.

  4. Quality of coastal and estuarine essential fish habitats: estimations based on the size of juvenile common sole ( Solea solea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pape, O.; Holley, J.; Guérault, D.; Désaunay, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Survival and growth of early fish stages are maximal in coastal and estuarine habitats where natural shallow areas serve as nurseries for a variety of widely distributed species on the continental shelf. Processes occurring in these nursery grounds during the juvenile stage affect growth and may be important in regulating the year-class strength of fishes and population size. The need, therefore, exists to protect these essential fish habitats hence to develop indicators to estimate their quality. The purpose of the present study was to use the growth of juvenile sole as a means of comparing the quality of coastal and estuarine nursery habitats in the Bay of Biscay (France). These sole nurseries were clearly identified from studies based on trawl surveys carried out during the last two decades. The size of 1-group juveniles at the end of their second summer, as estimated from these surveys, is an indicator of growth in these habitats during the juvenile phase and can be used to compare habitat quality. A model taking into account the role of seawater temperature in spatial and interannual variations of juvenile size was developed to compare growth performance in the different nursery sectors. This study shows that the size of juvenile sole after two summers of life is not density-dependent, probably because the size of the population adapts to habitat capacity after high mortality during early-juvenile stages. Size is on one hand positively related to temperature and on the other hand higher in estuarine than in non-estuarine habitats. This high growth potential of juvenile fish in estuarine areas confirms the very important role played by estuaries as nursery grounds and the essential ecological interest of these limited areas in spite of their low water quality. If a general conclusion on habitat quality is to be reached about studies based on the growth of juvenile fish, it is necessary to use not only an integrative indicator of growth, like size

  5. The High-Precision Compact-Size Dithering Ring Laser Gyroscope Performance Estimate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N Enin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies characteristics of the basic errors of a small-sized laser gyro ЛГК-180 with a resonator perimeter of 18 cm at the average intervals of the measurement time (up to 14 hours in laboratory conditions by the method of Allan variations and other digital processing methods of the laser gyro (LG output signal. The claimed accuracy parameters of LGA-180 for a zero drift are experimentally verified on the stationary bench when measuring a vertical component of the angular velocity of the Earth's rotation. The zero drift and its turn-on reproducibility, a random walk are analysed. To reduce the noise effect on the device accuracy characteristics are used digital methods for suppressing intrinsic noise "Conditional sampling of straight regression lines" and "Image recognition of an ideal LG output signal". It is shown that for such parameters as zero drift in turn-on, the LG random walk and turn-on zero drift satisfy modern requirements.

  6. Estimation of the size of asphaltene aggregates produced by shear of crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmachowski, L.; Paczuski, M. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology, Plock (Poland). Inst. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated asphaltene aggregation in Russian Export Blend Crude Oil (REBCO) using a Couette device over a range of shear rates similar to that in pipelines transporting the crude oil. After each experiment an amount of n-heptane was added to a crude oil sample. A turbidimeter was used to observe the sedimentation behaviour of the obtained suspension. The behaviour was found to be highly dependent on the concentration of the crude oil in the mixture. The fractal dimension was determined upon analyzing the sedimentation velocity of asphaltene aggregates. The mutual dependence between the sedimentation velocity and the turbidity for different concentrations was also determined. The fractal dimension was shown to be very close to that of the diffusion limited process, suggesting that aggregates were formed during a secondary process induced by the addition of n-heptane. The earlier aggregates produced by shear of crude oil were monomers for the secondary aggregates. The affect of the shear rate on the settling velocity-turbidity relation was very weak, indicating that the size of asphaltene aggregates produced by crude oil shear does not change much with the shear rate.

  7. Estimation of the effective focal spot sizes in medical diagnostic X-ray tube assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabska, Iwona; Fabiszewska, Ewa; Pasicz, Katarzyna; Skrzyński, Witold

    2016-06-01

    For evaluation of the effective focal spot sizes (EFSS), a method suggested by the EN 60336:2005 standard (standard) could be used. In this study we checked whether it is possible to make some deviations from the requirements of the standard without a significant effect on the result. An image receptor with one intensifying screen or two intensifying screens may be used, but the optical value of the slit image shall be in the range of 1.0÷1.4 and the X-ray tube power shall be ranged of about 30%÷50% of the nominal anode input power. A precision scaled magnifier (magnification of 5÷10x and scale of 0.1 mm) may be used for the slit radiogram width measurement instead of a time-consuming scanning of the slit radiogram. These deviations from the requirements of the EN 60336:2005 standard allows to shorten measurement time and to decrease tube current value during X-ray exposures, which reduces the risk of the Xray tube damage.

  8. Estimating the size of unerupted canine and premolars in a mixed Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijeet Kadu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was carried out to determine the correlation between the sum of the mandibular permanent incisors and the combined mesiodistal crown diameters of the maxillary and mandibular canine and premolars in a sample of mixed Indian subjects, examine the applicability of the Tanaka and Johnston method of prediction in a mixed Indian population and develop a new prediction method for this specific population. Materials and Methods: The dental models of the dentition of 251 mixed Indian patients below the age of 21 years, who had upper and lower permanent canines and premolars erupted were selected for this study. All the measurements were made by an observer with modified Boley gauge with Vernier caliper. Results: The differences between the predicted widths of the canine and premolars with the Tanaka and Johnston equations and the actual widths were highly statistically significant, as indicated by t-tests. The actual widths of the maxillary canine and premolars showed a significant difference in size (P = 0.0001 from the widths predicted by the Tanaka and Johnston equation, as did the canine and premolars in the mandible (P = 0.0003. Conclusion: The current findings suggest that the accuracy of originally derived Tanaka and Johnston mixed dentition analysis method can be increased using a newly derived regression equations based on a local mixed Indian population.

  9. An Assessment of Transport Property Estimation Methods for Ammonia–Water Mixtures and Their Influence on Heat Exchanger Size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærn, Martin Ryhl; Modi, Anish; Jensen, Jonas Kjær

    2015-01-01

    Transport properties of fluids are indispensable for heat exchanger design. The methods for estimating the transport properties of ammonia–water mixtures are not well established in the literature. The few existent methods are developed from none or limited, sometimes inconsistent experimental...... of ammonia–water mixtures. Firstly, the different methods are introduced and compared at various temperatures and pressures. Secondly, their individual influence on the required heat exchanger size (surface area) is investigated. For this purpose, two case studies related to the use of the Kalina cycle...... the interpolative methods in contrast to the corresponding state methods. Nevertheless, all possible mixture transport property combinations used herein resulted in a heat exchanger size within 4.3 % difference for the flue-gas heat recovery boiler, and within 12.3 % difference for the oil-based boiler....

  10. Estimating the size of Uca tangeri (Crustacea: Ocypodidae without massive crab capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lourenço

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Uca tangeri (Eydoux, 1835 is the only species of fiddler crab that occurs in Portugal, where it mainly inhabits salt marshes in the south and southwest coasts. Individuals spend most of their time on and around their galleries, burrowing structures which they typically create and maintain in muddy substrate. Capturing fiddler crabs in nature is extremely difficult and can be destructive for their habitat. Once disturbed, U. tangeri tend to hide in their burrow, and their capture usually involves the destruction of the upper part of the burrow. In the present study, a method for estimating the carapace length of the fiddler indirectly, using the diameter of the burrow opening, is proposed. Significant sex-specific relationships between the diameter of the burrow opening and the occupant´s length were found. Although the mean length of the carapace was not significantly different between sexes, males were found to be associated with smaller galleries, probably in order to prevent larger males entering their galleries.

  11. Size estimates for fat inclusions in an isotropic Reissner–Mindlin plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morassi, Antonino; Rosset, Edi; Vessella, Sergio

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we consider the inverse problem of determining, within an elastic isotropic thick plate modelled by the Reissner–Mindlin theory, the possible presence of an inclusion made of a different elastic material. Under some a priori assumptions on the inclusion, we deduce constructive upper and lower estimates of the area of the inclusion in terms of a scalar quantity related to the work developed in deforming the plate by applying simultaneously a couple field and a transverse force field at the boundary of the plate. The approach allows us to consider plates with a boundary of Lipschitz class. The first author is supported by PRIN 2015TTJN95 ‘Identification and monitoring of complex structural systems’. The second author is supported by FRA 2016 ‘Problemi Inversi, dalla stabilità alla ricostruzione’, Università degli Studi di Trieste. The second and the third authors are supported by Progetto GNAMPA 2017 ‘Analisi di problemi inversi: stabilità e ricostruzione’, Istituto Nazionale di Alta Matematica (INdAM).

  12. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis to chromium from cement: Estimating the size of the problem in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Celestine C; Gamboni, Sarah E; Palmer, Amanda M; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2015-11-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) caused by chromium in cement is a significant occupational hazard. However, legislation in Europe over the past two decades to reduce the concentration of chromium in cement to <2 ppm through the addition of ferrous sulphate to cement, has seen a significant decrease in the incidence of chromium allergy. No such legislation exists in Australia. A retrospective analysis of results from the Patchcams database of patients attending the Occupational Dermatology Clinic at the Skin & Cancer Foundation, Melbourne, who were patch tested for chromium between 1 January 1993 to 31 December 2013, was conducted. Our review revealed that there has not been any significant change in the number of cases of ACD to chromium attributed to sensitisation through cement. Based on our data, we estimate that a minimum of 24 cases of chromium occupational ACD (OACD) from cement is found in Australia yearly, causing considerable morbidity, often associated with an inability to work, costly workers' compensation claims and sometimes the development of the disabling condition, persistent post-occupational dermatitis. These findings highlight the need for high-level discussions about adopting European legislation in Australia in order to reduce the likelihood of developing chromium OACD from cement. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  13. Preliminary Population Size Estimation of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Kazakhstan: Implications for HIV Testing and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Elwin; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Hunt, Timothy; Primbetova, Sholpan; Gun Lee, Yong; Berry, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the population size of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Kazakhstan and their HIV testing history. We conducted structured interviews with MSM in four geographically disparate cities-N = 400 (n = 100/city)-to implement four population estimation methods and ascertain HIV testing history. Approximately 3.2% of men-corresponding to ∼154,000 individuals-in Kazakhstan aged 18-59 are MSM. The 49.9% of the sample who reported taking an HIV test far exceeds the <1% reported as MSM in surveillance data. HIV testing surveillance in Kazakhstan has underestimated the number of MSM. This underscores the need to redress social and structural barriers to HIV testing and disclosure of sexual behavior experienced by MSM in Kazakhstan. Recommendations include promoting cultural sensitivity among testing staff through quality assurance and regular training, and increasing protection and public awareness through antidiscrimination policy development.

  14. The contribution of dominance and inbreeding depression in estimating variance components for litter size in Pannon White rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, I; Gorjanc, G; Curik, I; Farkas, J; Kiszlinger, H; Szendrő, Zs

    2013-08-01

    In a synthetic closed population of Pannon White rabbits, additive (VA ), dominance (VD ) and permanent environmental (VPe ) variance components as well as doe (bF d ) and litter (bF l ) inbreeding depression were estimated for the number of kits born alive (NBA), number of kits born dead (NBD) and total number of kits born (TNB). The data set consisted of 18,398 kindling records of 3883 does collected from 1992 to 2009. Six models were used to estimate dominance and inbreeding effects. The most complete model estimated VA and VD to contribute 5.5 ± 1.1% and 4.8 ± 2.4%, respectively, to total phenotypic variance (VP ) for NBA; the corresponding values for NBD were 1.9 ± 0.6% and 5.3 ± 2.4%, for TNB, 6.2 ± 1.0% and 8.1 ± 3.2% respectively. These results indicate the presence of considerable VD . Including dominance in the model generally reduced VA and VPe estimates, and had only a very small effect on inbreeding depression estimates. Including inbreeding covariates did not affect estimates of any variance component. A 10% increase in doe inbreeding significantly increased NBD (bF d  = 0.18 ± 0.07), while a 10% increase in litter inbreeding significantly reduced NBA (bF l  = -0.41 ± 0.11) and TNB (bF l  = -0.34 ± 0.10). These findings argue for including dominance effects in models of litter size traits in populations that exhibit significant dominance relationships. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Estimation of inbreeding and effective population size of full-blood Wagyu cattle registered with the American Wagyu Cattle Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scraggs, E; Zanella, R; Wojtowicz, A; Taylor, J F; Gaskins, C T; Reeves, J J; de Avila, J M; Neibergs, H L

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the population structure of full-blood (100%) Wagyu cattle registered in the United States with the American Wagyu Association, with the aim of estimating and comparing the levels of inbreeding from both pedigree and genotypic data. A total of 4132 full-blood Wagyu cattle pedigrees were assessed and used to compute the inbreeding coefficients (FIT and FST ) and the effective population size (Ne ) from pedigree data for the period 1994 to 2011. In addition to pedigree analysis, 47 full-blood Wagyu cattle representing eight prominent sire lines in the American Wagyu cattle population were genotyped using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip. Genotypic data were then used to estimate genomic inbreeding coefficients (FROH ) by calculating runs of homozygosity. The mean inbreeding coefficient based on the pedigree data was estimated at 4.80%. The effective population size averaged 17 between the years 1994 and 2011 with an increase of 42.9 in 2000 and a drop of 1.8 in 2011. Examination of the runs of homozygosity revealed that the 47 Wagyu cattle from the eight prominent sire lines had a mean genomic inbreeding coefficient (FROH ) estimated at 9.08% compared to a mean inbreeding coefficient based on pedigree data of 4.8%. These data suggest that the mean genotype inbreeding coefficient of full-blood Wagyu cattle exceeds the inbreeding coefficient identified by pedigree. Inbreeding has increased slowly at a rate of 0.03% per year over the past 17 years. Wagyu breeders should continue to utilize many sires from divergent lines and consider outcrossing to other breeds to enhance genetic diversity and minimize the adverse effects of inbreeding in Wagyu. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Estimating Size and Trend of the North Interlake Woodland Caribou Population Using Fecal-DNA and Capture-Recapture Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinga, Peter N; Arnason, Arni Neil; Manseau, Micheline; Cross, Dale; Whaley, Kent; Wilson, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    A critical step in recovery efforts for endangered and threatened species is the monitoring of population demographic parameters. As part of these efforts, we evaluated the use of fecal-DNA based capture-recapture methods to estimate population sizes and population rate of change for the North Interlake woodland caribou herd (Rangifer tarandus caribou), Manitoba, Canada. This herd is part of the boreal population of woodland caribou, listed as threatened under the federal Species at Risk Act (2003) and the provincial Manitoba Endangered Species Act (2006). Between 2004 and 2009 (9 surveys), we collected 1,080 fecal samples and identified 180 unique genotypes (102 females and 78 males). We used a robust design survey plan with 2 surveys in most years and analysed the data with Program MARK to estimate encounter rates (p), apparent survival rates (ϕ), rates of population change (λ), and population sizes (N). We estimated these demographic parameters for males and females and for 2 genetic clusters within the North Interlake. The population size estimates were larger for the Lower than the Upper North Interlake area and the proportion of males was lower in the Lower (33%) than the Upper North Interlake (49%). Population rate of change for the entire North Interlake area (2005-2009) using the robust design Pradel model was significantly <1.0 (λ = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.99) and varied between sex and area with the highest being for males in Lower North Interlake (λ = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.83-1.13) and the lowest being for females in Upper North Interlake (λ = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.69-0.97). The additivity of λ between sex and area is supported on the log scale and translates into males having a λ that is 0.09 greater than females and independent of sex, Lower North Interlake having a λ that is 0.06 greater than Upper North Interlake. Population estimates paralleled these declining trends, which correspond to trends observed in other fragmented populations of woodland caribou

  17. Impact of the capillary pressure-saturation pore-size distribution parameter on geological carbon sequestration estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Lin Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost estimates for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS are vital for policy and decision makers evaluating carbon capture and storage strategies. Numerical models are often used in feasibility studies for the different stages of carbon injection and redistribution. Knowledge of the capillary pressure-saturation function for a selected storage rock unit is essential in applications used for simulating multiphase fluid flow and transport. However, the parameters describing these functions (e.g. the van Genuchten m pore size distribution parameter are often not measured or neglected compared to other physical properties such as porosity and intrinsic permeability. In addition, the use of average instead of point estimates of m for numerical simulations of flow and transport can result in significant errors, especially in the case of coarse-grained sediments and fractured rocks. Such erroneous predictions can pose great risks and challenges to decision-making. We present a comparison of numerical simulation results based on average and point estimates of the van Genuchten m parameter for different porous media. Forward numerical simulations using the STOMP code were employed to illustrate the magnitudes of the differences in carbon sequestration predictions resulting from the use of height-averaged instead of point parameters. The model predictions were converted into cost estimates and the results indicate that varying m values in GCS modeling can cause cost differences of up to hundreds of millions dollars.

  18. ESTIMATING THE STRENGTH OF SINGLE-ENDED DISLOCATION SOURCES IN MICROMETER-SIZED SINGLE CRYSTALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, S I; Dimiduk, D M; Tang, M; Parthasarathy, T A; Uchic, M D; Woodward, C

    2007-05-03

    A recent study indicated that the behavior of single-ended dislocation sources contributes to the flow strength of micrometer-scale crystals. In this study 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulations of micrometer-sized volumes are used to calculate the effects of anisotropy of dislocation line tension (increasing Poisson's ratio, {nu}) on the strength of single-ended dislocation sources and, to compare them with the strength of double-ended sources of equal length. This is done by directly modeling their plastic response within a 1 micron cubed FCC Ni single crystal using DDS. In general, double-ended sources are stronger than single-ended sources of an equal length and exhibit no significant effects from truncating the long-range elastic fields at this scale. The double-ended source strength increases with Poisson ratio ({nu}), exhibiting an increase of about 50% at u = 0.38 (value for Ni) as compared to the value at {nu} = 0. Independent of dislocation line direction, for {nu} greater than 0.20, the strengths of single-ended sources depend upon the sense of the stress applied. The value for {alpha}, in the expression for strength, {tau} = {alpha}(L){micro}b/L is shown to vary from 0.4 to 0.84 depending upon the character of the dislocation and the direction of operation of the source at {nu} corresponding to that of Ni, 0.38 and a length of 933b. By varying the lengths of the sources from 933b to 233b, it was shown that the scaling of the strength of single-ended and double-ended sources with their length both follow a ln(L/b)/(L/b) dependence. Surface image stresses are shown to have little effect on the critical stress of single-ended sources at a length of {approx}250b or greater. The relationship between these findings and a recent statistical model for the hardening of small volumes is also discussed.

  19. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... 53—Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size... Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement (µg/m3) Ideal Sampler Fractional Sampling...

  20. An estimation of the p-adic sizes of common zeros of partial derivative polynomials of degree six

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminudin, S. S.; Sapar, S. H.; Atan, K. A. Mohd

    2014-07-01

    Let x¯ = (x1,x2,...,xn) be a vector in Zn with Z ring of integers and q be a positive integer, f a polynomial in x with coefficient in Z. The exponential sum associated with f is defined as S(f;q) = ∑ xmodq e2πif(x)/q, where the sum is taken over a complete set of residues modulo q. The value of S (f; q) depends on the estimate of cardinality |V|, the number of elements contained in the set V = {x¯ modq| f¯ x¯ ≡0¯modq} where f¯ x¯ is the partial derivatives of f with respect to x. To determine the cardinality of V, the p-adic sizes of common zeros of the partial derivative polynomials need to be obtained. In this paper, we estimate the p-adic sizes of common zeros of partial derivative polynomials of f(x,y) in Zp[x,y] with a sixth degree form by using Newton polyhedron technique. The polynomial is of the form f(x,y) = ax6+bx5y+cx4y2+sx+ty+k.

  1. Applying Effective Population Size Estimates of Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu and Yong to Conservation and Restoration Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Hong Huang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective population size (Ne is a crucial metric for evaluating the current status of genetic diversity and conservation management. Population of Kandelia obovata, a mangrove species that is patchily distributed along the estuaries off Southeastern China, is genetically structured. Here, we applied skyline analyses to infer the demographic history of K. obovata based on Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP data. Congruent trends of population growth rate among populations, but concurrent change in Ne estimates, were inferred in all populations. The recent rapid habitat expansion explains the high census population size but small Ne of populations in Northern Taiwan. Our study also revealed lower Ne of reforested populations than their sources. In silico demographic analyses simulate the small or biased sampling of seedlings for reforestation and revealed over 90% and 99% Ne reduction when only 1/2 and 1/10 samples were collected, respectively. These results emphasize the importance of a comprehensive sampling of seeds for restoration. Overall, this study rendered, not only the current Ne of K. obovata populations, but also indicates the importance of Ne estimation on restoration.

  2. How do you tell how big something is without direct measurement? Estimating grain size using an image's spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, D.; Rubin, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    It is possible to estimate geometric properties of objects in an image without directly measuring any part of those object's geometries, using the stochastic properties of the image as revealed by its Fourier transform. The caveats are: a) there must be a sufficient number of those objects; b) there must only be one type of object (and not some other type of object as well); and c) the required attribute of those objects (for example, size) is fairly homogeneous in space. It also helps if those objects have no preferred orientation, although this is not a strict requirement. This approach is emerging as a viable alternative to thresholding-based techniques for uncovering the two-dimensional outlines of objects, from which geometrical attributes can be measured directly. These direct measurements often require operator-defined coefficients, or even an approximate idea of the size of an object in advance in order to scale filters, and they are often very sensitive to the sequence of operations performed. Individually and collectively, these make thresholding-based methods relatively inflexible. One example where direct reliable statistical estimates of geometrical form have been possible from images is in estimating mean and standard deviation of particle sizes from images of sediment. This is done by uncovering typical length scales of the particles from the image's two-dimensional power spectrum, without the need for tunable parameters. The mean and standard deviation of sizes are accurately estimated without having to measure each grain directly and compile a particle size-distribution. Simple methods have been developed for the cases of: a) images composed of a sediment surface, where the entire image is composed of irregularly shaped touching particles and there is no apparent void fraction; and b) images of irregularly shaped dilute (spatially distributed and non-touching) particles. The process of developing and testing these techniques has been hampered by: a

  3. Scattering of Skyrmions

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    David Foster

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a detailed study of Skyrmion–Skyrmion scattering for two B=1 Skyrmions in the attractive channel where we observe two different scattering regimes. For large separation, the scattering can be approximated as interacting dipoles. We give a qualitative estimate when this approximation breaks down. For small separations we observe an additional short-range repulsion which is qualitatively similar to monopole scattering. We also observe the interesting effect of “rotation without rotating” whereby two Skyrmions, whose orientations remain constant while well-separated, change their orientation after scattering. We can explain this effect by following preimages through the scattering process, thereby measuring which part of an in-coming Skyrmion forms part of an out-going Skyrmion. This leads to a new way of visualising Skyrmions. Furthermore, we consider spinning Skyrmions and find interesting trajectories.

  4. Evaluation of Argos Telemetry Accuracy in the High-Arctic and Implications for the Estimation of Home-Range Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Christin

    Full Text Available Animal tracking through Argos satellite telemetry has enormous potential to test hypotheses in animal behavior, evolutionary ecology, or conservation biology. Yet the applicability of this technique cannot be fully assessed because no clear picture exists as to the conditions influencing the accuracy of Argos locations. Latitude, type of environment, and transmitter movement are among the main candidate factors affecting accuracy. A posteriori data filtering can remove "bad" locations, but again testing is still needed to refine filters. First, we evaluate experimentally the accuracy of Argos locations in a polar terrestrial environment (Nunavut, Canada, with both static and mobile transmitters transported by humans and coupled to GPS transmitters. We report static errors among the lowest published. However, the 68th error percentiles of mobile transmitters were 1.7 to 3.8 times greater than those of static transmitters. Second, we test how different filtering methods influence the quality of Argos location datasets. Accuracy of location datasets was best improved when filtering in locations of the best classes (LC3 and 2, while the Douglas Argos filter and a homemade speed filter yielded similar performance while retaining more locations. All filters effectively reduced the 68th error percentiles. Finally, we assess how location error impacted, at six spatial scales, two common estimators of home-range size (a proxy of animal space use behavior synthetizing movements, the minimum convex polygon and the fixed kernel estimator. Location error led to a sometimes dramatic overestimation of home-range size, especially at very local scales. We conclude that Argos telemetry is appropriate to study medium-size terrestrial animals in polar environments, but recommend that location errors are always measured and evaluated against research hypotheses, and that data are always filtered before analysis. How movement speed of transmitters affects location