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Sample records for scar attract olfactory

  1. Predators are attracted to the olfactory signals of prey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hughes, Nelika K; Price, Catherine J; Banks, Peter B

    2010-01-01

    .... Yet while most territorial mammals communicate using olfactory signals and olfactory hunting is widespread in predators, evidence for the attraction of predators to prey olfactory signals under field...

  2. Olfactory attractiveness of mixtures of some host plant and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple "Y" shaped olfactometer was used in laboratory studies on the olfactory attractiveness of mixtures in various proportions of industrial analogues of some host plant and conspecific-based semiochemicals, or their combinations with banana rhizome, to the banana weevil. The aim was to identify factors that influence ...

  3. Predators are attracted to the olfactory signals of prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelika K Hughes

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Predator attraction to prey social signals can force prey to trade-off the social imperatives to communicate against the profound effect of predation on their future fitness. These tradeoffs underlie theories on the design and evolution of conspecific signalling systems and have received much attention in visual and acoustic signalling modes. Yet while most territorial mammals communicate using olfactory signals and olfactory hunting is widespread in predators, evidence for the attraction of predators to prey olfactory signals under field conditions is lacking.To redress this fundamental issue, we examined the attraction of free-roaming predators to discrete patches of scents collected from groups of two and six adult, male house mice, Mus domesticus, which primarily communicate through olfaction. Olfactorily-hunting predators were rapidly attracted to mouse scent signals, visiting mouse scented locations sooner, and in greater number, than control locations. There were no effects of signal concentration on predator attraction to their prey's signals.This implies that communication will be costly if conspecific receivers and eavesdropping predators are simultaneously attracted to a signal. Significantly, our results also suggest that receivers may be at greater risk of predation when communicating than signallers, as receivers must visit risky patches of scent to perform their half of the communication equation, while signallers need not.

  4. Neuronal basis of innate olfactory attraction to ethanol in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Schneider

    Full Text Available The decision to move towards a mating partner or a food source is essential for life. The mechanisms underlying these behaviors are not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of octopamine - the invertebrate analogue of noradrenaline - in innate olfactory attraction to ethanol. We confirmed that preference is caused via an olfactory stimulus by dissecting the function of the olfactory co-receptor Orco (formally known as OR83b. Orco function is not required for ethanol recognition per se, however it plays a role in context dependent recognition of ethanol. Odor-evoked ethanol preference requires the function of Tbh (Tyramine β hydroxalyse, the rate-limiting enzyme of octopamine synthesis. In addition, neuronal activity in a subset of octopaminergic neurons is necessary for olfactory ethanol preference. Notably, a specific neuronal activation pattern of tyraminergic/octopaminergic neurons elicit preference and is therefore sufficient to induce preference. In contrast, dopamine dependent increase in locomotor activity is not sufficient for olfactory ethanol preference. Consistent with the role of noradrenaline in mammalian drug induced rewards, we provide evidence that in adult Drosophila the octopaminergic neurotransmitter functions as a reinforcer and that the molecular dissection of the innate attraction to ethanol uncovers the basic properties of a response selection system.

  5. Olfactory ensheathing cell-neurite alignment enhances neurite outgrowth in scar-like cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankan, Rana R.; Wanner, Ina B.; Phelps, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the adult CNS neurons after injury is strongly inhibited by the spinal cord lesion site environment that is composed primarily of the reactive astroglial scar and invading meningeal fibroblasts. Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation facilitates neuronal survival and functional recovery after a complete spinal cord transection, yet the mechanisms by which this recovery occurs remain unclear. We used a unique multicellular scar-like culture model to test if OECs promote neurite outgrowth in growth inhibitory areas. Astrocytes were mechanically injured and challenged by meningeal fibroblasts to produce key inhibitory elements of a spinal cord lesion. Neurite outgrowth of postnatal cerebral cortical neurons was assessed on three substrates: quiescent astrocyte control cultures, reactive astrocyte scar-like cultures, and scar-like cultures with OECs. Initial results showed that OECs enhanced total neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons in a scar-like environment by 60%. We then asked if the neurite growth-promoting properties of OECs depended on direct alignment between neuronal and OEC processes. Neurites that aligned with OECs were nearly three times longer when they grew on inhibitory meningeal fibroblast areas and twice as long on reactive astrocyte zones compared to neurites not associated with OECs. Our results show that OECs can independently enhance neurite elongation and that direct OEC-neurite cell contact can provide a permissive substrate that overcomes the inhibitory nature of the reactive astrocyte scar border and the fibroblast-rich spinal cord lesion core. PMID:25863021

  6. Select Drosophila glomeruli mediate innate olfactory attraction and aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmelhack, Julia L; Wang, Jing W

    2009-05-14

    Fruitflies show robust attraction to food odours, which usually excite several glomeruli. To understand how the representation of such odours leads to behaviour, we used genetic tools to dissect the contribution of each activated glomerulus. Apple cider vinegar triggers robust innate attraction at a relatively low concentration, which activates six glomeruli. By silencing individual glomeruli, here we show that the absence of activity in two glomeruli, DM1 and VA2, markedly reduces attraction. Conversely, when each of these two glomeruli was selectively activated, flies showed as robust an attraction to vinegar as wild-type flies. Notably, a higher concentration of vinegar excites an additional glomerulus and is less attractive to flies. We show that activation of the extra glomerulus is necessary and sufficient to mediate the behavioural switch. Together, these results indicate that individual glomeruli, rather than the entire pattern of active glomeruli, mediate innate behavioural output.

  7. Olfactory attraction of Drosophila suzukii by symbiotic acetic acid bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Mazzetto, Fabio

    2016-03-24

    Some species of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play relevant roles in the metabolism and physiology of Drosophila spp. and in some cases convey benefits to their hosts. The pest Drosophila suzukii harbors a set of AAB similar to those of other Drosophila species. Here, we investigate the potential to exploit the ability of AAB to produce volatile substances that attract female D. suzukii. Using a two-way olfactometer bioassay, we investigate the preference of D. suzukii for strains of AAB, and using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography–mass spectrometry we specifically characterize their volatile profiles to identify attractive and non-attractive components produced by strains from the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, and Komagataeibacter. Flies had a preference for one strain of Komagataeibacter and two strains of Gluconobacter. Analyses of the volatile profiles from the preferred Gluconobacter isolates found that acetic acid is distinctively emitted even after 2 days of bacterial growth, confirming the relevance of this volatile in the profile of this isolate for attracting flies. Analyses of the volatile profile from the preferred Komagataeibacter isolate showed that a different volatile in its profile could be responsible for attracting D. suzukii. Moreover, variation in the concentration of butyric acid derivatives found in some strains may influence the preference of D. suzukii. Our results indicate that Gluconobacter and Komagataeibacter strains isolated from D. suzukii have the potential to provide substances that could be exploited to develop sustainable mass-trapping-based control approaches. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  8. Age-specific olfactory attraction between Western honey bee drones (Apis mellifera) and its chemical basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Florian; Savarit, Fabrice; Lafon, Grégory; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    During the mating season, drones (males) of the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera) form congregations numbering thousands high in the air. Virgin queens arrive at these congregations after they have formed and mate on the fly with 15-20 drones. To explain the formation of drone congregations, a drone-produced aggregation pheromone has been proposed many years ago but due to the low accessibility of natural mating sites in bees, its study has progressed slowly. Recently, we used a walking simulator in controlled laboratory conditions to show that drones are indeed attracted by groups of other drones. Since these previous experiments were carried out with drones captured when flying out of the hive, it is currently unclear if this olfactory attraction behaviour is related to the drones' sexual maturity (usually reached between 9 and 12 days) and may thus be indicative of a possible role in congregation formation, or if it is observed at any age and may represent in-hive aggregation. We thus assessed here the dependency of drone olfactory attraction on their age. First, we performed behavioural experiments in the walking simulator to measure olfactory preferences of drones in three age groups from 2-3 to 12-15 days. Then, we performed chemical analyses in the same age groups to evaluate whether chemical substances produced by the drones may explain age differences in olfactory attraction. We show that honey bee drones are attracted by conspecifics of the same age when they are sexually mature (12-15 days old) but not when they are younger (2-3 and 7-8 days old). In parallel, our data show that drones' chemical profile changes with age, including its most volatile fraction. These results are discussed in the context of drone mutual attraction both within the hive and at drone congregations.

  9. Age-specific olfactory attraction between Western honey bee drones (Apis mellifera) and its chemical basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Florian; Savarit, Fabrice; Lafon, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    During the mating season, drones (males) of the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera) form congregations numbering thousands high in the air. Virgin queens arrive at these congregations after they have formed and mate on the fly with 15-20 drones. To explain the formation of drone congregations, a drone-produced aggregation pheromone has been proposed many years ago but due to the low accessibility of natural mating sites in bees, its study has progressed slowly. Recently, we used a walking simulator in controlled laboratory conditions to show that drones are indeed attracted by groups of other drones. Since these previous experiments were carried out with drones captured when flying out of the hive, it is currently unclear if this olfactory attraction behaviour is related to the drones’ sexual maturity (usually reached between 9 and 12 days) and may thus be indicative of a possible role in congregation formation, or if it is observed at any age and may represent in-hive aggregation. We thus assessed here the dependency of drone olfactory attraction on their age. First, we performed behavioural experiments in the walking simulator to measure olfactory preferences of drones in three age groups from 2-3 to 12-15 days. Then, we performed chemical analyses in the same age groups to evaluate whether chemical substances produced by the drones may explain age differences in olfactory attraction. We show that honey bee drones are attracted by conspecifics of the same age when they are sexually mature (12-15 days old) but not when they are younger (2-3 and 7-8 days old). In parallel, our data show that drones’ chemical profile changes with age, including its most volatile fraction. These results are discussed in the context of drone mutual attraction both within the hive and at drone congregations. PMID:28977020

  10. Age-specific olfactory attraction between Western honey bee drones (Apis mellifera and its chemical basis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Bastin

    Full Text Available During the mating season, drones (males of the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera form congregations numbering thousands high in the air. Virgin queens arrive at these congregations after they have formed and mate on the fly with 15-20 drones. To explain the formation of drone congregations, a drone-produced aggregation pheromone has been proposed many years ago but due to the low accessibility of natural mating sites in bees, its study has progressed slowly. Recently, we used a walking simulator in controlled laboratory conditions to show that drones are indeed attracted by groups of other drones. Since these previous experiments were carried out with drones captured when flying out of the hive, it is currently unclear if this olfactory attraction behaviour is related to the drones' sexual maturity (usually reached between 9 and 12 days and may thus be indicative of a possible role in congregation formation, or if it is observed at any age and may represent in-hive aggregation. We thus assessed here the dependency of drone olfactory attraction on their age. First, we performed behavioural experiments in the walking simulator to measure olfactory preferences of drones in three age groups from 2-3 to 12-15 days. Then, we performed chemical analyses in the same age groups to evaluate whether chemical substances produced by the drones may explain age differences in olfactory attraction. We show that honey bee drones are attracted by conspecifics of the same age when they are sexually mature (12-15 days old but not when they are younger (2-3 and 7-8 days old. In parallel, our data show that drones' chemical profile changes with age, including its most volatile fraction. These results are discussed in the context of drone mutual attraction both within the hive and at drone congregations.

  11. Olfactory attraction of the hornet Vespa velutina to honeybee colony odors and pheromones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Couto

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the last century, the number of biological invasions has continuously increased worldwide. Due to their environmental and economical consequences, invasive species are now a major concern. Social wasps are particularly efficient invaders because of their distinctive biology and behavior. Among them, the yellow-legged hornet, Vespa velutina, is a keen hunter of domestic honeybees. Its recent introduction to Europe may induce important beekeeping, pollination, and biodiversity problems. Hornets use olfactory cues for the long-range detection of food sources, in this case the location of honeybee colonies, but the exact nature of these cues remains unknown. Here, we studied the orientation behavior of V. velutina workers towards a range of hive products and protein sources, as well as towards prominent chemical substances emitted by these food sources. In a multiple choice test performed under controlled laboratory conditions, we found that hornets are strongly attracted to the odor of some hive products, especially pollen and honey. When testing specific compounds, the honeybee aggregation pheromone, geraniol, proved highly attractive. Pheromones produced by honeybee larvae or by the queen were also of interest to hornet workers, albeit to a lesser extent. Our results indicate that V. velutina workers are selectively attracted towards olfactory cues from hives (stored food, brood, and queen, which may signal a high prey density. This study opens new perspectives for understanding hornets' hunting behavior and paves the way for developing efficient trapping strategies against this invasive species.

  12. Olfactory attraction of the hornet Vespa velutina to honeybee colony odors and pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Antoine; Monceau, Karine; Bonnard, Olivier; Thiéry, Denis; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the last century, the number of biological invasions has continuously increased worldwide. Due to their environmental and economical consequences, invasive species are now a major concern. Social wasps are particularly efficient invaders because of their distinctive biology and behavior. Among them, the yellow-legged hornet, Vespa velutina, is a keen hunter of domestic honeybees. Its recent introduction to Europe may induce important beekeeping, pollination, and biodiversity problems. Hornets use olfactory cues for the long-range detection of food sources, in this case the location of honeybee colonies, but the exact nature of these cues remains unknown. Here, we studied the orientation behavior of V. velutina workers towards a range of hive products and protein sources, as well as towards prominent chemical substances emitted by these food sources. In a multiple choice test performed under controlled laboratory conditions, we found that hornets are strongly attracted to the odor of some hive products, especially pollen and honey. When testing specific compounds, the honeybee aggregation pheromone, geraniol, proved highly attractive. Pheromones produced by honeybee larvae or by the queen were also of interest to hornet workers, albeit to a lesser extent. Our results indicate that V. velutina workers are selectively attracted towards olfactory cues from hives (stored food, brood, and queen), which may signal a high prey density. This study opens new perspectives for understanding hornets' hunting behavior and paves the way for developing efficient trapping strategies against this invasive species.

  13. Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... never go away completely. If the way a scar looks bothers you, various treatments might minimize it. These include surgical revision, dermabrasion, laser treatments, injections, chemical peels, and creams.

  14. Opposite-sex attraction in male mice requires testosterone-dependent regulation of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellino, Roberta; Trova, Sara; Cimino, Irene; Farinetti, Alice; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/197768814; Panzica, Giancarlo; Giacobini, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia; Peretto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Opposite-sex attraction in most mammals depends on the fine-tuned integration of pheromonal stimuli with gonadal hormones in the brain circuits underlying sexual behaviour. Neural activity in these circuits is regulated by sensory processing in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), the first central

  15. Caspase inhibition in select olfactory neurons restores innate attraction behavior in aged Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Chihara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sensory and cognitive performance decline with age. Neural dysfunction caused by nerve death in senile dementia and neurodegenerative disease has been intensively studied; however, functional changes in neural circuits during the normal aging process are not well understood. Caspases are key regulators of cell death, a hallmark of age-related neurodegeneration. Using a genetic probe for caspase-3-like activity (DEVDase activity, we have mapped age-dependent neuronal changes in the adult brain throughout the lifespan of Drosophila. Spatio-temporally restricted caspase activation was observed in the antennal lobe and ellipsoid body, brain structures required for olfaction and visual place memory, respectively. We also found that caspase was activated in an age-dependent manner in specific subsets of Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, Or42b and Or92a neurons. These neurons are essential for mediating innate attraction to food-related odors. Furthermore, age-induced impairments of neural transmission and attraction behavior could be reversed by specific inhibition of caspase in these ORNs, indicating that caspase activation in Or42b and Or92a neurons is responsible for altering animal behavior during normal aging.

  16. Olfactory attractants and parity affect prenatal androgens and territoriality of coyote breeding pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Christopher J; Young, Julie K; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V; Mateo, Jill M; Santymire, Rachel M

    2016-10-15

    Hormones are fundamental mediators of personality traits intimately linked with reproductive success. Hence, alterations to endocrine factors may dramatically affect individual behavior that has subsequent fitness consequences. Yet it is unclear how hormonal or behavioral traits change with environmental stressors or over multiple reproductive opportunities, particularly for biparental fauna. To simulate an environmental stressor, we exposed captive coyote (Canis latrans) pairs to novel coyote odor attractants (i.e. commercial scent lures) mid-gestation to influence territorial behaviors, fecal glucocorticoid (FGMs) and fecal androgen metabolites (FAMs). In addition, we observed coyote pairs as first-time and experienced breeders to assess the influence of parity on our measures. Treatment pairs received the odors four times over a 20-day period, while control pairs received water. Odor-treated pairs scent-marked (e.g. urinated, ground scratched) and investigated odors more frequently than control pairs, and had higher FAMs when odors were provided. Pairs had higher FAMs as first-time versus experienced breeders, indicating that parity also affected androgen production during gestation. Moreover, repeatability in scent-marking behaviors corresponded with FGMs and FAMs, implying that coyote territoriality during gestation is underpinned by individually-specific hormone profiles. Our results suggest coyote androgens during gestation are sensitive to conspecific olfactory stimuli and prior breeding experience. Consequently, fluctuations in social or other environmental stimuli as well as increasing parity may acutely affect coyote traits essential to reproductive success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of olfactory and auditory priming on the attraction to foods with high energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambaron, S; Chisin, Q; Chabanet, C; Issanchou, S; Brand, G

    2015-12-01

    \\]\\Recent research suggests that non-attentively perceived stimuli may significantly influence consumers' food choices. The main objective of the present study was to determine whether an olfactory prime (a sweet-fatty odour) and a semantic auditory prime (a nutritional prevention message), both presented incidentally, either alone or in combination can influence subsequent food choices. The experiment included 147 participants who were assigned to four different conditions: a control condition, a scented condition, an auditory condition or an auditory-scented condition. All participants remained in the waiting room during15 min while they performed a 'lure' task. For the scented condition, the participants were unobtrusively exposed to a 'pain au chocolat' odour. Those in the auditory condition were exposed to an audiotape including radio podcasts and a nutritional message. A third group of participants was exposed to both olfactory and auditory stimuli simultaneously. In the control condition, no stimulation was given. Following this waiting period, all participants moved into a non-odorised test room where they were asked to choose, from dishes served buffet-style, the starter, main course and dessert that they would actually eat for lunch. The results showed that the participants primed with the odour of 'pain au chocolat' tended to choose more desserts with high energy density (i.e., a waffle) than the participants in the control condition (p = 0.06). Unexpectedly, the participants primed with the nutritional auditory message chose to consume more desserts with high energy density than the participants in the control condition (p = 0.03). In the last condition (odour and nutritional message), they chose to consume more desserts with high energy density than the participants in the control condition (p = 0.01), and the data reveal an additive effect of the two primes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Opposite-sex attraction in male mice requires testosterone-dependent regulation of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellino, Roberta; Trova, Sara; Cimino, Irene; Farinetti, Alice; Jongbloets, Bart C; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Panzica, Giancarlo; Giacobini, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia; Peretto, Paolo

    2016-10-26

    Opposite-sex attraction in most mammals depends on the fine-tuned integration of pheromonal stimuli with gonadal hormones in the brain circuits underlying sexual behaviour. Neural activity in these circuits is regulated by sensory processing in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), the first central station of the vomeronasal system. Recent evidence indicates adult neurogenesis in the AOB is involved in sex behaviour; however, the mechanisms underlying this function are unknown. By using Semaphorin 7A knockout (Sema7A ko) mice, which show a reduced number of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone neurons, small testicles and subfertility, and wild-type males castrated during adulthood, we demonstrate that the level of circulating testosterone regulates the sex-specific control of AOB neurogenesis and the vomeronasal system activation, which influences opposite-sex cue preference/attraction in mice. Overall, these data highlight adult neurogenesis as a hub for the integration of pheromonal and hormonal cues that control sex-specific responses in brain circuits.

  19. Season-long volatile emissions from peach and pear trees in situ, overlapping profiles, and olfactory attraction of an oligophagous fruit moth in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar-Rodriguez, A; Orschel, B; Dorn, S

    2013-03-01

    Insect herbivores that have more than one generation per year and reproduce on different host plants are confronted with substantial seasonal variation in the volatile blends emitted by their hosts. One way to deal with such variation is to respond to a specific set of compounds common to all host plants. The oriental fruit moth Cydia (=Grapholita) molesta is a highly damaging invasive pest. The stone fruit peach (Prunus persica) is its primary host, whereas pome fruits such as pear (Pyrus communis) are considered secondary hosts. In some parts of their geographic range, moth populations switch from stone to pome fruit orchards during the growing season. Here, we tested whether this temporal switch is facilitated by female responses to plant volatiles. We collected volatiles from peach and pear trees in situ and characterized their seasonal dynamics by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We also assessed the effects of the natural volatile blends released by the two plant species on female attraction by using Y-tube olfactometry. Finally, we related variations in volatile emissions to female olfactory responses. Our results indicate that the seasonal host switch from peach to pear is facilitated by the changing olfactory effect of the natural volatile blends being emitted. Peach volatiles were only attractive early and mid season, whereas pear volatiles were attractive from mid to late season. Blends from the various attractive stages shared a common set of five aldehydes, which are suggested to play an essential role in female attraction to host plants. Particular attention should be given to these aldehydes when designing candidate attractants for oriental fruit moth females.

  20. Studies on the attraction of Simulium damnosum s.l. (Diptera: Simuliidae) to its hosts. II. The nature of substances on the human skin responsible for atrractant olfactory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B H

    1977-03-01

    In the Cameroon rain-forest, electric fan traps, baited with trousers which had been worn by men for several days, captured more females of S. damnosum s.l. than did traps baited with worn shirts of similar material. A number of human body fluids were used as bait, but only sweat appeared to contain the olfactory attractant(s). The fluid portion of filtered arm sweat attracted more flies than did the residue. The attractant substances from human skin would not dissolve directly in organic solvents, but when an artificial sweat solution was used to swab men's arms and legs, and this was then saturated with salt and shaken with an organic solvent, the extract was attractive to S. damnosum. Treatment of attractive worn cloths with dilute aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide or mercuric chloride greatly reduced their attractiveness. A number of organic compounds which occur on the human skin were found to be ineffective as attractants.

  1. Acne Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ...

  2. Measuring Scars of Periodic Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1999-01-01

    The phenomenon of periodic orbit scarring of eigenstates of classically chaotic systems is attracting increasing attention. Scarring is one of the most important ``corrections'' to the ideal random eigenstates suggested by random matrix theory. This paper discusses measures of scars and in so doing also tries to clarify the concepts and effects of eigenfunction scarring. We propose a new, universal scar measure which takes into account an entire periodic orbit and the linearized dynamics in its vicinity. This measure is tuned to pick out those structures which are induced in quantum eigenstates by unstable periodic orbits and their manifolds. It gives enhanced scarring strength as measured by eigenstate overlaps and inverse participation ratios, especially for longer orbits. We also discuss off-resonance scars which appear naturally on either side of an unstable periodic orbit.

  3. Acne Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different skin problem. Image used with permission of Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. J Am Acad Dermatol 2001;45:116 . References: ... Images of acne scars used with permission of Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology . J Am Acad Dermatol 2001;45:109-17 ...

  4. Olfactory dreams, olfactory interest, and imagery : Relationships to olfactory memory

    OpenAIRE

    Arshamian, Artin

    2007-01-01

    Existing evidence for olfactory imagery is mixed and mainly based on reports from hallucinations and volitional imagery. Using a questionnaire, Stevenson and Case (2005) showed that olfactory dreams provided a good source for olfactory imagery studies. This study applied an extended version of the same questionnaire and examined olfactory dreams and their relation to real-life experienced odors, volitional imagery, and olfactory interest. Results showed that olfactory dreams were similar to r...

  5. The key role of 4-methyl-5-vinylthiazole in the attraction of scarab beetle pollinators: a unique olfactory floral signal shared by Annonaceae and Araceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Artur Campos Dália; Dötterl, Stefan; Kaiser, Roman; Silberbauer-Gottsberger, Ilse; Teichert, Holger; Gibernau, Marc; do Amaral Ferraz Navarro, Daniela Maria; Schlindwein, Clemens; Gottsberger, Gerhard

    2012-09-01

    Cyclocephaline scarabs are specialised scent-driven pollinators, implicated with the reproductive success of several Neotropical plant taxa. Night-blooming flowers pollinated by these beetles are thermogenic and release intense fragrances synchronized to pollinator activity. However, data on floral scent composition within such mutualistic interactions are scarce, and the identity of behaviorally active compounds involved is largely unknown. We performed GC-MS analyses of floral scents of four species of Annona (magnoliids, Annonaceae) and Caladium bicolor (monocots, Araceae), and demonstrated the chemical basis for the attraction of their effective pollinators. 4-Methyl-5-vinylthiazole, a nitrogen and sulphur-containing heterocyclic compound previously unreported in flowers, was found as a prominent constituent in all studied species. Field biotests confirmed that it is highly attractive to both male and female beetles of three species of the genus Cyclocephala, pollinators of the studied plant taxa. The origin of 4-methyl-5-vinylthiazole in plants might be associated with the metabolism of thiamine (vitamin B1), and we hypothesize that the presence of this compound in unrelated lineages of angiosperms is either linked to selective expression of a plesiomorphic biosynthetic pathway or to parallel evolution.

  6. Beta and gamma oscillatory activities associated with olfactory memory tasks: different rhythms for different functional networks?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, Claire; Ravel, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    .... The anatomy of the olfactory network (olfactory bulb, piriform, and entorhinal cortices) and its unique direct access to the limbic system makes it particularly attractive to study how sensory processing could be modulated by learning and memory...

  7. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment When the skin is injured from a cut ... A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving facial scars. “After the accident, I thought I would never ...

  8. Laser treatment of scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard E.

    1994-09-01

    Fifteen patients with erythematous/hypertrophic scar/span>s and eleven patients with post- inflammatory brown hyperpigmentation of scars were treated with flashlamp pump pulsed-dye lasers. The red scars were treated with a wavelength of 585 nm and a pulse width of 450 msec. The brown scars were treated with a wavelength of 510 nm and a pulse width of 300 nsec. The erythematous scars improved an average of 77% after 1.8 treatments, and 46% of these scars had complete resolution of the erythema. The hyperpigmented scars had an average improvement of 80% after 1.5 treatments, and 45% of these patients had complete resolution of the hyperpigmentation. An unexpected benefit of treatment of these scars was softening and flattening of the hypertrophic scar tissue and normalization of the surface of the scar. Repeated treatments were noted to result in cumulative and progressive improvement in all aspects of these scars.

  9. Topographical representation of odor hedonics in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermen, Florence; Midroit, Maëllie; Kuczewski, Nicola; Forest, Jérémy; Thévenet, Marc; Sacquet, Joëlle; Benetollo, Claire; Richard, Marion; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    Hedonic value is a dominant aspect of olfactory perception. Using optogenetic manipulation in freely behaving mice paired with immediate early gene mapping, we demonstrate that hedonic information is represented along the antero-posterior axis of the ventral olfactory bulb. Using this representation, we show that the degree of attractiveness of odors can be bidirectionally modulated by local manipulation of the olfactory bulb's neural networks in freely behaving mice.

  10. Assessment of Olfactory Memory in Olfactory Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Reichert, Johanna; Braunsteiner, Josephine; Schöpf, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    To assess all clinically relevant components of olfactory perception, examinations for olfactory sensitivity, discrimination, and identification are performed. Besides the standard perceptual test battery, episodic olfactory memory might offer additional information about olfactory abilities relative to these standard clinical tests. As both olfactory deficits and memory deficits are early symptoms in neurodegenerative disorders, olfactory memory may be of particular interest. However, to date little is known about episodic olfactory memory performance in patients with decreased olfactory function. This study includes the investigation of olfactory memory performance in 14 hyposmic patients (8 female, mean age 52.6 years) completing two episodic odor memory tests (Sniffin' Test of Odor Memory and Odor Memory Test). To control for a general impairment in memory function, a verbal and a figural memory test were carried out. A regression model with multiple predictors was calculated for both odor memory tests separately. Odor identification was identified as the only significant predictor for both odor memory tasks. From our results, we conclude that currently available olfactory memory tests are highly influenced by odor identification abilities, implying the need for the development and validation of additional tests in this field which could serve as additional olfactory perception variables for clinical assessment.

  11. Scar revision - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100098.htm Scar revision - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... entire body, and acts as a protective barrier. Scar tissue forms as skin heals after an injury ( ...

  12. Acne scar subcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Chandrashekar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcision is a simple and safe office surgery procedure for treatment of depressed acne scars. It can easily be combined with other treatments such as laser, dermaroller and scar revisions for maximum efficacy.

  13. Post-burn scars and scar contractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Arun

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The mortality and morbidity from burns have diminished tremendously over the last six to seven decades. However, these do not truly reflect whether the victim could go back to society as a useful person or not and lead a normal life because of the inevitable post-burn scars, contractures and other deformities which collectively have aesthetic and functional considerations. This article gives an overview of the post-burn scars and scar contractures, especially their prevention, minimisation and principles of management.

  14. Olfactory Neuroblastoma: Diagnostic Difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya MN,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory neuroblastoma is an uncommon malignant tumor of sinonasal tract arising from the olfactory neuro epithelium. The olfactory neuroblastomas presenting with divergent histomorphologies like, epithelial appearance of cells, lacking a neuro fibrillary background and absence of rosettes are difficult to diagnose. Such cases require immunohistochemistry to establish the diagnosis. We describe the clinical features, pathological and immunohistochemical findings of grade IV Olfactory neuroblastoma in a 57 year old man

  15. Scar prevention and remodeling: a review of the medical, surgical, topical and light treatment approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwin, Leonard Y; El Tal, Abdel Kader; Stiff, Mark A; Fakhouri, Tarek M

    2014-08-01

    Cosmetic, functional, and structural sequelae of scarring are innumerable, and measures exist to optimize and ultimately minimize these sequelae. To evaluate the innumerable methods available to decrease the cosmetic, functional, and structural repercussions of scarring, pubMed search of the English literature with key words scar, scar revision, scar prevention, scar treatment, scar remodeling, cicatrix, cicatrix treatment, and cicatrix remodeling was done. Original articles and reviews were examined and included. Seventy-nine manuscripts were reviewed. Techniques, comparisons, and results were reviewed and tabulated. Overall, though topical modalities are easier to use and are usually more attractive to the patient, the surgical approaches still prove to be superior and more reliable. However, advances in topical medications for scar modification are on the rise and a change towards medical treatment of scars may emerge as the next best approach. Comparison studies of the innumerable specific modalities for scar revision and prevention are impossible. Standardization of techniques is lacking. Scarring, the body's natural response to a wound, can create many adverse effects. At this point, the practice of sound, surgical fundamentals still trump the most advanced preventative methods and revision techniques. Advances in medical approaches are available, however, to assist the scarring process, which even the most advanced surgical fundamentals will ultimately lead to. Whether through newer topical therapies, light treatment, or classical surgical intervention, our treatment armamentarium of scars has expanded and will allow us to maximize scar prevention and to minimize scar morbidity. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  16. Story on Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doesn't and it bothers you, there are treatments that can make a scar less noticeable, such as skin-smoothing medicated creams, ... doctor to find out if any of these treatments would be right for ... bothering you about your scar and how you feel on the inside. Because ...

  17. Laser scar revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, Jason R; Alster, Tina S

    2002-01-01

    A variety of lasers can be used to treat scars and striae effectively. It is of paramount importance that the type of scar be properly classified on initial examination so that the most appropriate method of treatment can be chosen. Classification also allows the laser surgeon to discuss with the patient the anticipated response to treatment. The 585-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is the most appropriate system for treating hypertrophic scars, keloids, erythematous scars, and striae. The PDL carries a low risk of side effects and complications when operated at appropriate treatment parameters and time intervals. Atrophic scars are best treated with ablative CO2 and Er:YAG lasers; however, proliferative keloids and hypertrophic scars should not be vaporized because of the high risk of scar recurrence or progression. The appropriate choice and use of lasers can significantly improve most scars. As research in laser-skin interaction continues, further refinements in laser technology coupled with the addition of alternate treatment procedures will allow improved clinical efficacy and predictability.

  18. Facial attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Anthony C

    2014-11-01

    Facial attractiveness has important social consequences. Despite a widespread belief that beauty cannot be defined, in fact, there is considerable agreement across individuals and cultures on what is found attractive. By considering that attraction and mate choice are critical components of evolutionary selection, we can better understand the importance of beauty. There are many traits that are linked to facial attractiveness in humans and each may in some way impart benefits to individuals who act on their preferences. If a trait is reliably associated with some benefit to the perceiver, then we would expect individuals in a population to find that trait attractive. Such an approach has highlighted face traits such as age, health, symmetry, and averageness, which are proposed to be associated with benefits and so associated with facial attractiveness. This view may postulate that some traits will be universally attractive; however, this does not preclude variation. Indeed, it would be surprising if there existed a template of a perfect face that was not affected by experience, environment, context, or the specific needs of an individual. Research on facial attractiveness has documented how various face traits are associated with attractiveness and various factors that impact on an individual's judgments of facial attractiveness. Overall, facial attractiveness is complex, both in the number of traits that determine attraction and in the large number of factors that can alter attraction to particular faces. A fuller understanding of facial beauty will come with an understanding of how these various factors interact with each other. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:621-634. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1316 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Scar Ectopic Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Madhuri Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Scar ectopic pregnancy is the rarest form of ectopic pregnancy and has been increasingly diagnosed all over the world. This is a life-threatening form of abnormal implantation of embryo within the myometrium and fibrous tissues in a previous scar on the uterus, especially following caesarean section. With the increasing rate of caesarean section, there is a substantial increase in this condition with better understanding of this disease. The early and accurate diagnosis with timely management...

  20. Facial, Olfactory, and Vocal Cues to Female Reproductive Value

    OpenAIRE

    Susanne Röder; Bernhard Fink; Jones, Benedict C.

    2013-01-01

    Facial, olfactory, and vocal cues may advertise women's fertility. However, most of the evidence for this proposal has come from studies of changes in young adult women's attractiveness over the menstrual cycle. By contrast with this emphasis on changes in attractiveness over the menstrual cycle, possible changes in women's attractiveness over their lifespan have received little attention. The present study investigated men's ratings of young girls' (11–15 years old), adult women's (19–30 yea...

  1. Olfactory Perceptual Learning Requires Action of Noradrenaline in the Olfactory Bulb: Comparison with Olfactory Associative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinera, Jennifer; Kermen, Florence; Sacquet, Joëlle; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie; Richard, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenaline contributes to olfactory-guided behaviors but its role in olfactory learning during adulthood is poorly documented. We investigated its implication in olfactory associative and perceptual learning using local infusion of mixed a1-ß adrenergic receptor antagonist (labetalol) in the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We reported that…

  2. Scar massage for hypertrophic burns scarring-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, P; Plaza, A; Paratz, J

    2017-06-29

    Scar massage is used in burn units globally to improve functional and cosmetic outcomes of hypertrophic scarring following a burn, however, the evidence to support this therapy is unknown. To review the literature and assess the efficacy of scar massage in hypertrophic burn scars. MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched using the key words "burn", "burn injury", "thermal injury" and "scar", "hypertrophic scar" and "massage", "manipulation", "soft tissue mobilisation", "soft tissue manipulation". The articles were scored by the assessors using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and outcome measures on range of motion (ROM), cosmesis (vascularity, pliability, height), pain scores, pruritus, and psychological measures of depression and anxiety were extracted. Eight publications were included in the review with 258 human participants and 15 animal subjects who received scar massage following a thermal injury resulting in hypertrophic scarring. Outcome measures that demonstrated that scar massage was effective included scar thickness as measured with ultrasonography (p=0.001; g=-0.512); depression (Centre for Epidemiologic Studies - Depression [CES-D]) (p=0.031; g=-0.555); pain as measured with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) (p=0.000; g=-1.133) and scar characteristics including vascularity (p=0.000; g=-1.837), pliability (p=0.000; g=-1.270) and scar height (p=0.000; g=-2.054). Outcome measures that trended towards significance included a decrease in pruritus (p=0.095; g=-1.157). It appears that there is preliminary evidence to suggest that scar massage may be effective to decrease scar height, vascularity, pliability, pain, pruritus and depression in hypertrophic burns scaring. This review reflects the poor quality of evidence and lack of consistent and valid scar assessment tools. Controlled, clinical trials are needed to develop evidence-based guidelines for scar massage in hypertrophic burns scarring. Copyright © 2017

  3. Surgical scar revision: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods.

  4. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Corey

    Full Text Available The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs, the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling.

  5. Olfactory receptors in non-chemosensory tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NaNa Kang & JaeHyung Koo*

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptors (ORs detect volatile chemicals that lead tothe initial perception of smell in the brain. The olfactory receptor(OR is the first protein that recognizes odorants in theolfactory signal pathway and it is present in over 1,000 genesin mice. It is also the largest member of the G protein-coupledreceptors (GPCRs. Most ORs are extensively expressed in thenasal olfactory epithelium where they perform the appropriatephysiological functions that fit their location. However, recentwhole-genome sequencing shows that ORs have been foundoutside of the olfactory system, suggesting that ORs may playan important role in the ectopic expression of non-chemosensorytissues. The ectopic expressions of ORs and their physiologicalfunctions have attracted more attention recently sinceMOR23 and testicular hOR17-4 have been found to be involvedin skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and humansperm chemotaxis, respectively. When identifying additionalexpression profiles and functions of ORs in non-olfactorytissues, there are limitations posed by the small number ofantibodies available for similar OR genes. This review presentsthe results of a research series that identifies ectopic expressionsand functions of ORs in non-chemosensory tissues toprovide insight into future research directions.

  6. Altruists Attract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Farrelly

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Explaining human cooperation continues to present a challenge because it goes beyond what is predicted by established theories of kinship and reciprocal altruism. Little attention has been paid to the sexual selection hypothesis that proposes that cooperation can act as a display that attracts mates. The costs of cooperating are then offset not by kinship or reciprocation but by increased mating success. Here we present results from a series of experiments which show that, as predicted by the sexual selection hypothesis, people preferentially direct cooperative behavior towards more attractive members of the opposite sex. Furthermore, cooperative behavior increases the perceived attractiveness of the cooperator. Economically costly behaviors can therefore bring benefits through mate choice and sexual selection should be regarded as an evolutionary mechanism capable of promoting cooperation.

  7. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrhythmias Abuse Love and Romance Understanding Other People Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne Scars Be Removed? Print A A A ... acné? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — first you had to ...

  8. Interventions for acne scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hay, Rania; Shalaby, Khalid; Zaher, Hesham; Hafez, Vanessa; Chi, Ching-Chi; Dimitri, Sandra; Nabhan, Ashraf F; Layton, Alison M

    2016-04-03

    Acne scarring is a frequent complication of acne and resulting scars may negatively impact on an affected person's psychosocial and physical well-being. Although a wide range of interventions have been proposed, there is a lack of high-quality evidence on treatments for acne scars to better inform patients and their healthcare providers about the most effective and safe methods of managing this condition. This review aimed to examine treatments for atrophic and hypertrophic acne scars, but we have concentrated on facial atrophic scarring. To assess the effects of interventions for treating acne scars. We searched the following databases up to November 2015: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library (2015, Issue 10), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), and LILACS (from 1982). We also searched five trials registers, and checked the reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews for further references to randomised controlled trials. We include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which allocated participants (whether split-face or parallel arms) to any active intervention (or a combination) for treating acne scars. We excluded studies dealing only or mostly with keloid scars. Three review authors independently extracted data from each of the studies included in this review and evaluated the risks of bias. We resolved disagreements by discussion and arbitration supported by a method expert as required. Our primary outcomes were participant-reported scar improvement and any adverse effects serious enough to cause participants to withdraw from the study. We included 24 trials with 789 adult participants aged 18 years or older. Twenty trials enrolled men and women, three trials enrolled only women and one trial enrolled only men. We judged eight studies to be at low risk of bias for both sequence generation and allocation concealment. With regard to blinding we judged

  9. Acoustic Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviatt, Eric; Patsiaouris, Konstantinos; Denardo, Bruce

    2009-11-01

    A sound source of finite size produces a diverging traveling wave in an unbounded fluid. A rigid body that is small compared to the wavelength experiences an attractive radiation force (toward the source). An attractive force is also exerted on the fluid itself. The effect can be demonstrated with a styrofoam ball suspended near a loudspeaker that is producing sound of high amplitude and low frequency (for example, 100 Hz). The behavior can be understood and roughly calculated as a time-averaged Bernoulli effect. A rigorous scattering calculation yields a radiation force that is within a factor of two of the Bernoulli result. For a spherical wave, the force decreases as the inverse fifth power of the distance from the source. Applications of the phenomenon include ultrasonic filtration of liquids and the growth of supermassive black holes that emit sound waves in a surrounding plasma. An experiment is being conducted in an anechoic chamber with a 1-inch diameter aluminum ball that is suspended from an analytical balance. Directly below the ball is a baffled loudspeaker that exerts an attractive force that is measured by the balance.

  10. Acne Scar Treatment: A Multimodality Approach Tailored to Scar Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski-Larsen, Lisa A; Fabi, Sabrina G; McGraw, Timothy; Taylor, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Acne scarring can be classified into atrophic icepick, boxcar, and rolling scars in addition to keloidal and hypertrophic scars. Additionally, these scars can be erythematous, hyperpigmented, and/or hypopigmented. Each scar type has a different structural cause warranting a customized approach. Many cosmetic options exist to address these changes individually, but little literature exists about the safety and efficacy of combining such procedures and devices. A Medline search was performed on combination treatments because it relates to facial acne scarring, and results are summarized. Practical applications for these combinations of procedures are also discussed. Studies examining the efficacy and safety of ablative, nonablative, fractionated, and nonfractionated lasers, dermabrasion, chemical peels, needling, subcision, radiofrequency, stem cell therapy, fat transplantation, platelet-rich plasma, and hyaluronic acid dermal fillers for acne scars were found. The authors review their experience in combining these techniques. Review of the literature revealed multiple single options for facial acne scarring treatment with minimal evidence in the literature found on the safety and efficacy of combining such procedures and devices. The authors' experience is that combining acne scar treatment techniques can be performed safely and synergistically with optimal patient outcomes.

  11. Update on Postsurgical Scar Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commander, Sarah Jane; Chamata, Edward; Cox, Joshua; Dickey, Ryan M.; Lee, Edward I.

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative scar appearance is often a significant concern among patients, with many seeking advice from their surgeons regarding scar minimization. Numerous products are available that claim to decrease postoperative scar formation and improve wound healing. These products attempt to create an ideal environment for wound healing by targeting the three phases of wound healing: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. With that said, preoperative interventions, such as lifestyle modifications and optimization of medical comorbidities, and intraoperative interventions, such as adherence to meticulous operative techniques, are equally important for ideal scarring. In this article, the authors review the available options in postoperative scar management, addressing the benefits of multimodal perioperative intervention. Although numerous treatments exist, no single modality has been proven superior over others. Therefore, each patient should receive a personalized treatment regimen to optimize scar management. PMID:27478420

  12. Classical olfactory conditioning in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li Liu

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a serious pest of fruits and vegetables. Methyl eugenol (ME, a male attractant, is used to against this fly by mass trapping. Control effect may be influenced by learning, which could modify the olfactory response of the fly to this attractant. To collect the behavioral evidence, studies on the capability of this fly for olfactory learning are necessary. We investigated olfactory learning in male flies with a classical olfactory conditioning procedure using restrained individuals under laboratory conditions. The acquisition of the proboscis extension reflex was used as the criterion for conditioning. A high conditioned response level was found in oriental fruit flies when an odor was presented in paired association with a sucrose reward but not when the odor and sucrose were presented unpaired. We also found that the conditioning performance was influenced by the odor concentration, intertrial interval, and starvation time. A slight sensitization elicited by imbibing sucrose was observed. These results indicate that oriental fruit flies have a high capacity to form an olfactory memory as a result of classical conditioning.

  13. Scar outcomes in dermatological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Burcu; Sgarioto, Melissa; Hewitt, Daniel; Paver, Robert; Norman, Julia; Fernandez-Penas, Pablo

    2018-02-01

    Significant functional impairment and psychological burden may result from poor scar quality and its impact on patient's quality of life has been well-established. It is important to identify measures to reduce the risk of surgical complications. 212 patients undergoing dermatological surgery were recruited from March 2011 to February 2014. Their age, sex, surgical site, closure type, defect size (length and width), scar length, number of deep sutures, suture type and size were recorded. The patients were followed up at 6 weeks and 6 months for complications including abscess formation, granuloma formation, scar spreading, suture spitting and hypertrophic scar formation. At 6 weeks complications included suture spitting (14%), granuloma (11%), scar spreading (7%), hypertrophic scarring (3%) and abscess formation (1%), and at 6 months; scar spreading (17%), hypertrophic scarring (2%) and suture spitting (1%). In our multivariate analysis there were no predictors for spreading or spitting at 6 weeks, and only the defect size width was a predictor for granulomas in the stepwise analysis. For scar spreading at 6 months, younger age, site (trunk or limbs), higher number of deep sutures and surgeon were independent predictors (P sutures more superficially to the skin surface and was throwing more knots per closure; factors that we did not record in our study and merit further study. © 2017 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  14. Periorbital Scar Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Christopher B; Moe, Kristen S

    2017-02-01

    Periorbital scarring with eyelid retraction can have serious visual effects and can lead to loss of vision or even loss of the eye. Understanding of eyelid anatomy and the delicate balance of its structural supports is critical for the identification of the eyelid disorder responsible for the cicatrix and helps to guide treatment. The 2-finger test and lateral distraction of the lid can also be of significant help in proper diagnosis of the underlying disorder. Proper reconstruction with respect to the anterior and posterior lamellae helps to ensure a favorable outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Olfactory bulb volume in patients with posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Hang, W; Liu, G; Han, T

    2017-04-07

    Objective: To analyze the correlation between olfactory bulb(OB) volume and olfactory function in patients with posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction. Methods: Forty patients with posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction were compared with forty controls in terms of olfactory function T&T testing, OB volume assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). SPSS 17.0 software was used to analyze the data. Results: T&T olfactory testing revealed that patients with posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction had higher scores than controls(3.47±0.63 vs.1.39±0.19, t=4.317, Polfactory dysfunction were affected by the same extent of olfactory loss(3.52±0.66 vs.3.43±0.61, t=0.896, P>0.05). Both men and women as controls were affected by the same extent of olfactory loss(1.41±0.20 vs.1.38±0.17, t=1.073, P>0.05). OB volume of left side in patients with posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction were (36.15±3.16)mm(3,) right side were (39.28±3.76)mm(3,) average OB volume were (37.55±3.42)mm(3;) OB volume of left side in controls were (81.74±5.87)mm(3,) right side were (83.58±6.13)mm(3,) average OB volume were (82.59±5.99)mm(3;) OB volumes were lower in patients with posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction as compared with controls(t value were 4.815, 4.837 and 4.825, all Polfactory discriminate threshold was negatively correlated with average OB volume in posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction and controls(r value was-0.582, -0.564, both Polfactory discriminate threshold was positively correlated with impairment degree in patients with posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction(r value was 0.472, Polfactory dysfunction(r value was -0.397, Polfactory dysfunction as compared with controls. The OB volume is correlated with olfactory function. Impairment degree in patients with posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction is accordance with olfactory function lowering degree. Megnetic resonance imaging can be used as a supplementary diagnostic tool for patients with posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction.

  16. Cesarean scar pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kathrine Birch; Hoffmann, Elise; Rifbjerg Larsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study treatment modalities for cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs), focusing on efficacy and complications in relation to study quality. DESIGN: Systematic review. SETTING: Not applicable. PATIENT(S): A total of 2,037 women with CSP. INTERVENTION(S): Review of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Coch......OBJECTIVE: To study treatment modalities for cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs), focusing on efficacy and complications in relation to study quality. DESIGN: Systematic review. SETTING: Not applicable. PATIENT(S): A total of 2,037 women with CSP. INTERVENTION(S): Review of MEDLINE, EMBASE......, and Cochrane Library to find studies including five or more women. Data were extracted on primary treatment modality/efficacy, complications, and future fertility. The level of evidence was categorized according to Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine guidelines. Quality was assessed using The Cochrane...... Collaboration's Risk of Bias Tools for Randomized Controlled Trials and the modified Delphi techniques for case series. Meta-analysis was impossible owing to multifarious treatments. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Successful first-line treatment. Complications were hysterectomy, laparotomy, bleeding >1,000 m...

  17. Olfactory organ of Octopus vulgaris: morphology, plasticity, turnover and sensory characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Polese

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The cephalopod olfactory organ was described for the first time in 1844 by von Kölliker, who was attracted to the pair of small pits of ciliated cells on each side of the head, below the eyes close to the mantle edge, in both octopuses and squids. Several functional studies have been conducted on decapods but very little is known about octopods. The morphology of the octopus olfactory system has been studied, but only to a limited extent on post-hatching specimens, and the only paper on adult octopus gives a minimal description of the olfactory organ. Here, we describe the detailed morphology of young male and female Octopus vulgaris olfactory epithelium, and using a combination of classical morphology and 3D reconstruction techniques, we propose a new classification for O. vulgaris olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, using specific markers such as olfactory marker protein (OMP and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA we have been able to identify and differentially localize both mature olfactory sensory neurons and olfactory sensory neurons involved in epithelium turnover. Taken together, our data suggest that the O. vulgaris olfactory organ is extremely plastic, capable of changing its shape and also proliferating its cells in older specimens.

  18. Assessing the suitability of flowering herbs as parasitoid food sources: flower attractiveness and nectar accessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wäckers, F.L.

    2004-01-01

    Eleven insect-pollinated plant species were investigated with respect to their olfactory attractiveness and nectar accessibility for the parasitoid species Cotesia glomerata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Heterospilus prosopidis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), and Pimpla turionellae (Hymenoptera:

  19. Genetic diversity of canine olfactory receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitte Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution has resulted in large repertoires of olfactory receptor (OR genes, forming the largest gene families in mammalian genomes. Knowledge of the genetic diversity of olfactory receptors is essential if we are to understand the differences in olfactory sensory capability between individuals. Canine breeds constitute an attractive model system for such investigations. Results We sequenced 109 OR genes considered representative of the whole OR canine repertoire, which consists of more than 800 genes, in a cohort of 48 dogs of six different breeds. SNP frequency showed the overall level of polymorphism to be high. However, the distribution of SNP was highly heterogeneous among OR genes. More than 50% of OR genes were found to harbour a large number of SNP, whereas the rest were devoid of SNP or only slightly polymorphic. Heterogeneity was also observed across breeds, with 25% of the SNP breed-specific. Linkage disequilibrium within OR genes and OR clusters suggested a gene conversion process, consistent with a mean level of polymorphism higher than that observed for introns and intergenic sequences. A large proportion (47% of SNP induced amino-acid changes and the Ka/Ks ratio calculated for all alleles with a complete ORF indicated a low selective constraint with respect to the high level of redundancy of the olfactory combinatory code and an ongoing pseudogenisation process, which affects dog breeds differently. Conclusion Our demonstration of a high overall level of polymorphism, likely to modify the ligand-binding capacity of receptors distributed differently within the six breeds tested, is the first step towards understanding why Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherd Dogs have a much greater potential for use as sniffer dogs than Pekingese dogs or Greyhounds. Furthermore, the heterogeneity in OR polymorphism observed raises questions as to why, in a context in which most OR genes are highly polymorphic, a subset of

  20. Cutaneous Scarring: A Clinical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Baker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous scarring can cause patients symptoms ranging from the psychological to physical pain. Although the process of normal scarring is well described the ultimate cause of pathological scarring remains unknown. Similarly, exactly how early gestation fetuses can heal scarlessly remains unsolved. These questions are crucial in the search for a preventative or curative antiscarring agent. Such a discovery would be of enormous medical and commercial importance, not least because it may have application in other tissues. In the clinical context the assessment of scars is becoming more sophisticated and new physical, medical and surgical therapies are being introduced. This review aims to summarise some of the recent developments in scarring research for non-specialists and specialists alike.

  1. Olfactory consciousness and gamma oscillation couplings across the olfactory bulb, olfactory cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kensaku; Manabe, Hiroyuki; Narikiyo, Kimiya; Onisawa, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex receives multi-modality sensory inputs, including olfactory input, and is thought to be involved in conscious perception of the olfactory image of objects. Generation of olfactory consciousness may require neuronal circuit mechanisms for the “binding” of distributed neuronal activities, with each constituent neuron representing a specific component of an olfactory percept. The shortest neuronal pathway for odor signals to reach the orbitofrontal cortex is olfactory sensory neuron—olfactory bulb—olfactory cortex—orbitofrontal cortex, but other pathways exist, including transthalamic pathways. Here, we review studies on the structural organization and functional properties of the shortest pathway, and propose a model of neuronal circuit mechanisms underlying the temporal bindings of distributed neuronal activities in the olfactory cortex. We describe a hypothesis that suggests functional roles of gamma oscillations in the bindings. This hypothesis proposes that two types of projection neurons in the olfactory bulb, tufted cells and mitral cells, play distinct functional roles in bindings at neuronal circuits in the olfactory cortex: tufted cells provide specificity-projecting circuits which send odor information with early-onset fast gamma synchronization, while mitral cells give rise to dispersedly-projecting feed-forward binding circuits which transmit the response synchronization timing with later-onset slow gamma synchronization. This hypothesis also suggests a sequence of bindings in the olfactory cortex: a small-scale binding by the early-phase fast gamma synchrony of tufted cell inputs followed by a larger-scale binding due to the later-onset slow gamma synchrony of mitral cell inputs. We discuss that behavioral state, including wakefulness and sleep, regulates gamma oscillation couplings across the olfactory bulb, olfactory cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex. PMID:24137148

  2. Pathogenic bacteria induce aversive olfactory learning in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Lu, Hang; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2005-11-10

    Food can be hazardous, either through toxicity or through bacterial infections that follow the ingestion of a tainted food source. Because learning about food quality enhances survival, one of the most robust forms of olfactory learning is conditioned avoidance of tastes associated with visceral malaise. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans feeds on bacteria but is susceptible to infection by pathogenic bacteria in its natural environment. Here we show that C. elegans modifies its olfactory preferences after exposure to pathogenic bacteria, avoiding odours from the pathogen and increasing its attraction to odours from familiar nonpathogenic bacteria. Particular bacteria elicit specific changes in olfactory preferences that are suggestive of associative learning. Exposure to pathogenic bacteria increases serotonin in ADF chemosensory neurons by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Serotonin functions through MOD-1, a serotonin-gated chloride channel expressed in sensory interneurons, to promote aversive learning. An increase in serotonin may represent the negative reinforcing stimulus in pathogenic infection.

  3. Processing of Sensory Information in the Olfactory System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The olfactory system is an attractive model system due to the easy control of sensory input and the experimental accessibility in animal studies. The odorant signals are processed from receptor neurons to a neural network of mitral and granular cells while various types of nonlinear behaviour can...... and equation-free techniques allow for a better reproduction and understanding of recent experimental findings. Talks: Olfaction as a Model System for Sensory-Processing Neural Networks (Jens Midtgaard, University of Copenhagen, Denmark) Nonlinear Effects of Signal Transduction in Olfactory Sensory Neurons......, Bayer Technology Services) Axonal Pathfinding and Sorting in the Olfactory System (Noemi Hummel, ETH Zuerich, Switzerland; Simon Kokkendorff and Jens Starke, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark) Analysis of Macroscopic Network Activities (Jens Starke, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark...

  4. Can we smell without an olfactory bulb?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombaux, Philippe; Mouraux, André; Bertrand, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry; Hummel, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Lack of an olfactory bulb (OB) is typically associated with anosmia. We present a patient with subnormal olfactory function in whom the OB could not be detected with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Olfactory function was evaluated on two occasions. Orthonasal olfactory function was assessed with the "Sniffin' Sticks" test providing a score equivalent to hyposmia. Retronasal olfactory function was studied with "smell powders" indicating a decreased, but not absence of, olfactory function. Importantly, chemosensory event-related potentials were clearly present in response to olfactory and trigeminal stimuli. This indicates that olfactory function may be present in some subjects even when an OB can not be detected with MRI.

  5. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scar/span>s and keloids are pathological scar/span>s resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scar/span>s, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scar/span>s, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  6. Are olfactory receptors really olfactive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Any living organism interacts with and responds specifically to environmental molecules by expressing specific olfactory receptors. This specificity will be first examined in causal terms with particular emphasis on the mechanisms controlling olfactory gene expression, cell-to-cell interactions a...

  7. A novel neural substrate for the transformation of olfactory inputs into motor output.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Derjean

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that animals respond to odors by generating or modulating specific motor behaviors. These reactions are important for daily activities, reproduction, and survival. In the sea lamprey, mating occurs after ovulated females are attracted to spawning sites by male sex pheromones. The ubiquity and reliability of olfactory-motor behavioral responses in vertebrates suggest tight coupling between the olfactory system and brain areas controlling movements. However, the circuitry and the underlying cellular neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using lamprey brain preparations, and electrophysiology, calcium imaging, and tract tracing experiments, we describe the neural substrate responsible for transforming an olfactory input into a locomotor output. We found that olfactory stimulation with naturally occurring odors and pheromones induced large excitatory responses in reticulospinal cells, the command neurons for locomotion. We have also identified the anatomy and physiology of this circuit. The olfactory input was relayed in the medial part of the olfactory bulb, in the posterior tuberculum, in the mesencephalic locomotor region, to finally reach reticulospinal cells in the hindbrain. Activation of this olfactory-motor pathway generated rhythmic ventral root discharges and swimming movements. Our study bridges the gap between behavior and cellular neural mechanisms in vertebrates, identifying a specific subsystem within the CNS, dedicated to producing motor responses to olfactory inputs.

  8. Tuberculin reaction and BCG scar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Aaby, Peter

    2015-01-01

    rate ratio (MRR) comparing children with a BCG scar with those without was 0.42 (95% CI = 0.19; 0.93). There was a similar tendency for TST positivity: MRR = 0.47 (95% CI = 0.14; 1.54). For LBW children who had both a positive TST reaction and a scar, the MRR was 0.22 (95% CI = 0.05; 0.87). For NBW...

  9. Prognostic value of olfactory bulb volume measurement for recovery in postinfectious and posttraumatic olfactory loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombaux, Philippe; Huart, Caroline; Deggouj, Naima; Duprez, Thierry; Hummel, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Several prognostic factors influencing the recovery from olfactory dysfunction have been described. The aim of this study was to investigate whether olfactory bulb volume could be used as a new predictor of olfactory recovery in postinfectious and posttraumatic olfactory loss. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 4. Setting Tertiary university clinic, department of otolaryngology. A cohort of 60 patients with postinfectious (n = 28) and posttraumatic olfactory loss (n = 32) was investigated. Assessment of olfactory function was performed using orthonasal (Sniffin' Sticks test) and retronasal psychophysical olfactory tests, at the time of the diagnosis (t1) and 15 months later (t2). All patients were examined on 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging, and the olfactory bulbs volume was assessed using planimetric contouring at the time of the diagnosis (t1). Recovery rate was 25% in patients with posttraumatic olfactory loss and 36% in patients with postinfectious olfactory loss. There was a correlation between both orthonasal and retronasal olfactory testing and the initial measurement of the total olfactory bulb volume. In addition, we observed a significant correlation between changes in olfactory functions and initial measurement of the total olfactory bulb volume, with larger volumes relating to higher improvement of olfactory function. Finally, we found that none of the patients with a total olfactory bulb volume of 40 mm(3) or less exhibited recovery of olfactory function. Olfactory bulb volume seems to be a predictor of olfactory recovery in patients with postinfectious and posttraumatic olfactory loss.

  10. Olfactory dysfunction in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.J.; Zhao, N.; Fu, Y.; Zhang, D.Q.; Wang, J.; Qin, W.; Zhang, N.N.N.; Wood, K.; Liu, Y.; Yu, C.S.; Shi, F.D.; Yang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Few data were available for the understanding of olfactory function in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs). The aims of our study were to investigate the incidence of olfactory dysfunction and characterize olfactory structures, using MRI, in patients with NMOSDs. Olfactory function was

  11. Facial, olfactory, and vocal cues to female reproductive value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Susanne; Fink, Bernhard; Jones, Benedict C

    2013-06-01

    Facial, olfactory, and vocal cues may advertise women's fertility. However, most of the evidence for this proposal has come from studies of changes in young adult women's attractiveness over the menstrual cycle. By contrast with this emphasis on changes in attractiveness over the menstrual cycle, possible changes in women's attractiveness over their lifespan have received little attention. The present study investigated men's ratings of young girls' (11-15 years old), adult women's (19-30 years old) and circum-menopausal women's (50-65 years old) facial, body odor, and vocal attractiveness and femininity. Faces and voices, but not body odors, of young girls and adult women were perceived to be significantly more attractive and feminine than those of circum-menopausal women. These data suggest that facial and vocal cues may be cues to women's reproductive value, but that body odor cues do not necessarily advertise this information.

  12. Facial, Olfactory, and Vocal Cues to Female Reproductive Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Röder

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Facial, olfactory, and vocal cues may advertise women's fertility. However, most of the evidence for this proposal has come from studies of changes in young adult women's attractiveness over the menstrual cycle. By contrast with this emphasis on changes in attractiveness over the menstrual cycle, possible changes in women's attractiveness over their lifespan have received little attention. The present study investigated men's ratings of young girls' (11–15 years old, adult women's (19–30 years old and circum-menopausal women's (50–65 years old facial, body odor, and vocal attractiveness and femininity. Faces and voices, but not body odors, of young girls and adult women were perceived to be significantly more attractive and feminine than those of circum-menopausal women. These data suggest that facial and vocal cues may be cues to women's reproductive value, but that body odor cues do not necessarily advertise this information.

  13. Melatonin in the mammalian olfactory bulb

    OpenAIRE

    Corthell, J.T.; Olcese, J.; Trombley, P.Q.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone associated with circadian rhythms. A diurnal rhythm in olfactory sensitivity has been previously reported and melatonin receptor mRNAs have been observed in the olfactory bulb, but the effects of melatonin in the olfactory bulb have not been explored. First, we corroborated data from a previous study that identified melatonin receptor messenger RNAs in the olfactory bulb. We then investigated whether melatonin treatment would affect cells in the olfactory bulbs of ...

  14. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina,1 Alberto Goldman2 1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital, Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Abstract: Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. Keywords: acne, scars, dermal fillers, injection, extracellular matrix

  15. Olfactory Behaviour in Farm Animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clouard, C.M.; Bolhuis, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter presents several examples of how olfactory information and farming conditions affects the behaviour of farm animals and presents opportunities to improve the welfare and production of farm animals by making use of odours and olfaction.

  16. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyesh Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS. As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  17. Ruptured Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha BS

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A pregnancy with implantation on the scar of a past cesarean section is uncommon. However such pregnancies are on the rise due to the increasing number of lower segment cesarean section. One of the complications of such a pregnancy is uterine rupture in early pregnancy which can be life threatening to the patient. The following is a report of a patient who presented at 10 weeks of gestational age with features of hypovolemic shock and lower position of the gestational sac in relation to the uterus with normal fetal heart rate. The diagnosis of ruptured cesarean scar pregnancy was made only after laparotomy.

  18. Olfactory bulb volume in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriever, Valentin A; Reither, Nicole; Gerber, Johannes; Iannilli, Emilia; Hummel, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to investigate the volume of the olfactory bulb in smokers. Specifically, we wanted to see whether environmental influences may exert a negative influence on OB structure. Twenty-one smokers and 59 non-smokers, matched for age and sex, underwent olfactory testing by means of the Sniffin' Sticks testing device (measurement of odor threshold and identification abilities). In addition, they underwent an MR scan with 2-mm-thick T2-weighted fast spin-echo images without interslice gap in the coronal plane covering the anterior and middle segments of the base of the skull. Olfactory function was not different between the 2 groups; however, olfactory bulb volumes were smaller in smokers than in non-smokers (p = 0.006). The deficit seen at the level of the OB did not correlate with the duration of smoking. The current data indicate that smoking may have a negative effect on the olfactory system before this becomes obvious in terms of a decreased olfactory function.

  19. Olfactory Systems in Mate Recognition and Sexual Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, M.; Pillon, D.; Bakker, J.

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory signals play an important role so that breeding efforts are synchronized with appropriate social and environmental circumstances. In this context, the mammalian olfactory system is characterized by the existence of several olfactory subsystems that have evolved to process olfactory

  20. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pol, Robert A; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    ...% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case presentation...

  1. Clinical and histological results in the treatment of atrophic and hypertrophic scars using a combined method of radiofrequency, ultrasound, and transepidermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelles, Mario A; Martínez-Carpio, Pedro A

    2016-08-01

    Scars are problematic for thousands of patients. Scarring is a natural part of the healing process after an injury. However, the appearance of a scar and its treatment depend on multiple factors and on the experience of the therapist and the options available. Despite a plethora of rapidly evolving treatment options and technical advances, the management of atrophic and hypertrophic scars remains difficult. Innovative technologies provide an attractive alternative to conventional methods in the treatment of scars. The purpose of this trial was to determine the clinical and histological results of a method of treatment that combines radiofrequency, ultrasound, and transepidermal drug delivery. This was a prospective study conducted on 14 patients with scars of different sizes, types, and characteristics. All patients underwent six treatment sessions with the Legato device. Atrophic scars were treated with retinoic acid and hypertrophic scars with triamcinolone. Photographs and biopsies were taken before treatment and at 6 months after the last treatment session. The scars improved significantly (P histological images of scar tissue in six patients in whom attenuation in the range of 55-75% was achieved are shown. Biopsies show regenerative changes in the scar tissue, in both the epidermis and dermis. The method makes it possible to treat extensive, heterogeneous scars on different sites with good results that are similar and predictable. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  2. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but seve...

  3. Soft tissue trauma and scar revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Steven R; Sjogren, Phayvanh P

    2014-11-01

    Numerous techniques and treatments have been described for scar revision, with most studies focusing on the adult population. A comprehensive review of the literature reveals a paucity of references related specifically to scar revision in children. This review describes the available modalities in pediatric facial scar revision. The authors have integrated current practices in soft tissue trauma and scar revision, including closure techniques and materials, topical therapy, steroid injection, cutaneous laser therapy, and tissue expanders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Midcervical scar satisfaction in thyroidectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Amy R; Shipchandler, Taha Z; Cordes, Susan R

    2017-05-01

    Assess long-term patient satisfaction with conventional thyroidectomy scars and the impact of thyroidectomy scars on patient quality of life. Validated survey administration and retrospective review of clinical and demographic data. Patients who underwent conventional thyroidectomy through years 2000 to 2010 were identified and administered the validated Patient Scar Assessment Questionnaire. Mean satisfaction, appearance and scar-consciousness scores were determined. Thirty-seven patients also measured the length of their current scar. Patient demographic and operative data were collected retrospectively from the medical record. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and independent samples t testing. Sixty of 69 patients perceived the appearance of their scar to be "good" or "excellent." Sixty-three patients (91.3%) were satisfied with all scar outcomes; 67 (97.1%) were satisfied with the overall appearance of their scar. Mean total satisfaction score was 17.3 (scar; 65 (94.2%) reported no attempt to hide their scar. Seven patients (10.1%) indicated any likelihood of pursuing scar revision. Females had significantly higher total satisfaction scores, consciousness scores, and satisfaction with appearance scores. The effect of perceived scar length was significant for scar-consciousness, not patient satisfaction. The majority of patients were satisfied with their thyroidectomy scar appearance. Few patients reported a desire to hide the scar or pursue revision. Women were more likely to be dissatisfied than men. Length may play a role in scar consciousness. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1247-1252, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    OpenAIRE

    Wollina U; Goldman A

    2015-01-01

    Uwe Wollina,1 Alberto Goldman2 1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital, Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Abstract: Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore...

  6. Endometriosis in an episiotomy scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine islimye Taskin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis that is defined as the presence of functional endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity is seen 5-10% of reproductive age women. Endometriosis can be seen any other site of the body; but the most frequently affected areas are ovaries, pelvic peritoneum, uterosacral ligament and Douglas pouche. Several teories exist for the development of endometriosis including retrograde menstruation, venous or lymphatic metastasis and immun dysfunction. Endometriosis of the perineum and vulva are extremely rare with the most common sites being episiotomy scars. Scar endometriosis is likely to be caused by mechanical transplantation of endometrium from the uterine cavity into the wound at the time of the surgery. The primary treatment for scar endometriosis is total surgical excision of the lesion. It is important not to leave residual tissue during surgery to prevent the recurrence. Here we present a patient who had her vaginal delivery 5 years ago, have a complaint of painful vulvar lump at the right mediolateral episiotomy scar since 1 year during her every menstruation period and whose final diagnosis was endometriosis after surgical removal and histopathologic examination. Althought vulvar endometrosis is rare, it should be considered in the patients who had a vaginal delivery and complaining painful vulvar lump with swelling in her mestrual cycle. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(1.000: 164-166

  7. The smell of blue light: a new approach towards understanding an olfactory neuronal network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemens F Störtkuhl

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction is one of the most important senses throughout the animal kingdom. It enables animals to discriminate between a wide variety of attractive and repulsive odorants and often plays a decisive role in species specific communication. In recent years the analysis of olfactory systems both in vertebrates and invertebrates has attracted much scientific interest. In this context a pivotal question is how the properties and connectivities of individual neurons contribute to a functioning neuronal network that mediates odor-guided behavior. As a novel approach to analyze the role of individual neurons within a circuitry, techniques have been established that make use of light-sensitive proteins. In this review we introduce a non-invasive, optogenetic technique which was used to manipulate the activity of individual neurons in the olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Both channelrhodopsin-2 and the photosensitive adenylyl cyclase PAC α in individual olfactory receptor neurons of the olfactory system of Drosophila larvae allows stimulating individual receptor neurons by light. Depending on which particular olfactory receptor neuron is optogenetically activated, repulsion or attraction behavior can be induced, indicating which sensory neurons underlie which type of behavior.

  8. Objective Scar Assessment Tools: A Clinimetric Appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegen, P.D.H.M.; van der Wal, M.B.A.; Middelkoop, E.; van Zuijlen, P.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Scars may lead to an array of cosmetic, psychological, and functional problems. Different scar features can be distinguished (i.e., color, thickness, relief, pliability, and surface area) that are clinically relevant and contribute to the quality and judgment of a scar. Today, objective

  9. [Olfactory sensory perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Aler; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Valenzuela, Saúl; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Miralles, Rodolfo

    2011-03-01

    The five senses have had a fundamental importance for survival and socialization of human beings. From an evolutionary point of view the sense of smell is the oldest. This sense has a strong representation within the genome, allowing the existence of many types of receptors that allow us to capture multiple volatile odor producing molecules, sending electrical signals to higher centers to report the outside world. Several cortical areas are activated in the brain, which are interconnected to form an extensive and complex neural network, linking for example, areas involved with memory and emotions, thus giving this sense of perceptual richness. While the concept of flavor is largely related to the sense of taste, smell provides the necessary integration with the rest of the senses and higher functions. Fully understanding the sense of smell is relevant to health professionals. Knowing the characteristics of the receptors, the transduction processes and convergence of information in the higher centers involved, we can properly detect olfactory disorders in our patients.

  10. Virgin queen attraction toward males in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Florian; Cholé, Hanna; Lafon, Grégory; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2017-07-24

    Although the honeybee is a crucial agricultural agent and a prominent scientific model organism, crucial aspects of its reproductive behaviour are still unknown. During the mating season, honeybee males, the drones, gather in congregations 10-40 m above ground. Converging evidence suggests that drones emit a pheromone that can attract other drones, thereby increasing the size of the congregation. Virgin queens join the vicinity of the congregation after it has formed, and mate with as many as 20 males in mid-air. It is still unclear which sensory cues help virgin queens find drone congregations in the first place. Beside visual cues for long-range orientation, queens may use olfactory cues. We thus tested virgin queens' olfactory orientation on a walking simulator in which they have full control over odour stimulation. We show that sexually-mature virgin queens are attracted to the odour bouquet from a group of living drones. They are not attracted to the bouquet from a group of workers. In addition, non-sexually receptive females (workers) of the same age are not attracted to the drone odour bouquet. Interpreted in the context of mating, these results may suggest that virgin queens use volatile olfactory cues from the drones to find the congregations.

  11. Penguins are attracted to dimethyl sulphide at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kyran L B; Pichegru, Lorien; Ryan, Peter G

    2011-08-01

    Breeding Spheniscus penguins are central place foragers that feed primarily on schooling pelagic fish. They are visual hunters, but it is unclear how they locate prey patches on a coarse scale. Many petrels and storm petrels (Procellariiformes), the penguins' closest relatives, use olfactory cues to locate prey concentrations at sea, but this has not been demonstrated for penguins. Procellariiforms are attracted to a variety of olfactory cues, including dimethyl sulphide (DMS), an organosulphur compound released when phytoplankton is grazed, as well as fish odorants such as cod liver oil. A recent study found that African penguins Spheniscus demersus react to DMS on land. We confirm this result and show that African penguins are also attracted by DMS at sea. DMS-scented oil slicks attracted 2-3 times more penguins than control slicks, whereas penguins showed no response to slicks containing cod liver oil. The number of penguins attracted to DMS increased for at least 30 min, suggesting penguins could travel up to 2 km to reach scent cues. Repeats of land-based trials confirmed previous results showing DMS sensitivity of penguins on land. Our results also support the hypothesis that African penguins use DMS as an olfactory cue to locate prey patches at sea from a distance, which is particularly important given their slow commuting speed relative to that of flying seabirds.

  12. Integration of Visual and Olfactory Cues in Host Plant Identification by the Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yv, Fei L; Hai, Xiaoxia; Wang, Zhigang; Yan, Aihua; Liu, Bingxiang; Bi, Yongguo

    2015-01-01

    Some insects use host and mate cues, including odor, color, and shape, to locate and recognize their preferred hosts and mates. Previous research has shown that the Asian longicorn beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), uses olfactory cues to locate host plants and differentiate them from non-host plants. However, whether A. glabripennis adults use visual cues or a combination of visual and olfactory cues remains unclear. In this study, we tested the host location and recognition behavior in A. glabripennis, which infests a number of hardwood species and causes considerable economic losses in North America, Europe and Asia. We determined the relative importance of visual and olfactory cues from Acer negundo in host plant location and recognition, as well as in the discrimination of non-host plants (Sabina chinensis and Pinus bungeana), by female and male A. glabripennis. Visual and olfactory cues from the host plants (A. negundo), alone and combined, attracted significantly more females and males than equivalent cues from non-host plants (S. chinensis and P. bungeana). Furthermore, the combination of visual and olfactory cues of host plants attracted more adults than either cue alone, and visual cues alone attracted significantly more adults than olfactory cues alone. This finding suggests that adult A. glabripennis has an innate preference for the visual and/or olfactory cues of its host plants (A. negundo) over those of the non-host plant and visual cues are initially more important than olfactory cues for orientation; furthermore, this finding also suggests that adults integrate visual and olfactory cues to find their host plants. Our results indicate that different modalities of host plant cues should be considered together to understand fully the communication between host plants and Asian longhorned beetles.

  13. Integration of Visual and Olfactory Cues in Host Plant Identification by the Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei L Yv

    Full Text Available Some insects use host and mate cues, including odor, color, and shape, to locate and recognize their preferred hosts and mates. Previous research has shown that the Asian longicorn beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky, uses olfactory cues to locate host plants and differentiate them from non-host plants. However, whether A. glabripennis adults use visual cues or a combination of visual and olfactory cues remains unclear. In this study, we tested the host location and recognition behavior in A. glabripennis, which infests a number of hardwood species and causes considerable economic losses in North America, Europe and Asia. We determined the relative importance of visual and olfactory cues from Acer negundo in host plant location and recognition, as well as in the discrimination of non-host plants (Sabina chinensis and Pinus bungeana, by female and male A. glabripennis. Visual and olfactory cues from the host plants (A. negundo, alone and combined, attracted significantly more females and males than equivalent cues from non-host plants (S. chinensis and P. bungeana. Furthermore, the combination of visual and olfactory cues of host plants attracted more adults than either cue alone, and visual cues alone attracted significantly more adults than olfactory cues alone. This finding suggests that adult A. glabripennis has an innate preference for the visual and/or olfactory cues of its host plants (A. negundo over those of the non-host plant and visual cues are initially more important than olfactory cues for orientation; furthermore, this finding also suggests that adults integrate visual and olfactory cues to find their host plants. Our results indicate that different modalities of host plant cues should be considered together to understand fully the communication between host plants and Asian longhorned beetles.

  14. Echocardiography as a Screening Test for Myocardial Scarring in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Compton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is burdened with morbidity and mortality including tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. These complications are attributed in part to the formation of proarrhythmic scars in the myocardium. The presence of extensive LGE is a risk factor for adverse outcomes in HCM. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI is the standard for the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial scars. However, echocardiography represents an attractive screening tool for myocardial scarring. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of echocardiography to detect myocardial scars to the standard of cMRI-LGE. Methods. The cMRI studies and echocardiograms from 56 consecutive children with HCM were independently evaluated for the presence of cMRI-LGE and echocardiographic evidence of scarring by expert readers. Results. Echocardiography had a high sensitivity (93% and negative predictive value (94% in comparison to LGE. The false positive rate was high, leading to a low specificity (37% and a low positive predictive value (35%. Conclusions. Given the poor specificity and positive predictive value, echocardiography is not a suitable screening test for the presence of myocardial scarring in children with HCM. However, children without echocardiographic evidence of myocardial scarring may not need to undergo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to “rule in” LGE.

  15. Culture of Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Qizhi

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons, located in the nasal epithelium, detect and transmit odorant information to the central nervous system. This requires that these neurons form specific neuronal connections within the olfactory bulb and express receptors and signaling molecules specific for these functions. This protocol describes a primary olfactory sensory neuron culture technique that allows in vitro investigation of olfactory sensory neuron differentiation, axon outgrowth, odorant receptor expres...

  16. [Integrated diagnosis and treatment of scar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Y; Chen, J J

    2016-11-20

    Scar is the common disease in the field of burn and plastic surgery, and its diagnosis and treatment should be involved in overwhelming majority hospitals. There are many substandard methods and medical hidden dangers in diagnosis and treatment of scar, due to the unevenness of doctors' clinical experience. According to the classification of integral scar and diabrotic scar, the problems related to diagnosis and treatment of scar are systemically summarized and normalized in this article for decrease in the incidence of adverse events and medical hidden dangers.

  17. Forensic analysis of rockfall scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vilder, Saskia J.; Rosser, Nick J.; Brain, Matthew J.

    2017-10-01

    We characterise and analyse the detachment (scar) surfaces of rockfalls to understand the mechanisms that underpin their failure. Rockfall scars are variously weathered and comprised of both discontinuity release surfaces and surfaces indicative of fracturing through zones of previously intact rock, known as rock bridges. The presence of rock bridges and pre-existing discontinuities is challenging to quantify due to the difficulty in determining discontinuity persistence below the surface of a rock slope. Rock bridges form an important control in holding blocks onto rockslopes, with their frequency, extent and location commonly modelled from the surface exposure of daylighting discontinuities. We explore an alternative approach to assessing their role, by characterising failure scars. We analyse a database of multiple rockfall scar surfaces detailing the areal extent, shape, and location of broken rock bridges and weathered surfaces. Terrestrial laser scanning and gigapixel imagery were combined to record the detailed texture and surface morphology. From this, scar surfaces were mapped via automated classification based on RGB pixel values. Our analysis of the resulting data from scars on the North Yorkshire coast (UK) indicates a wide variation in both weathering and rock bridge properties, controlled by lithology and associated rock mass structure. Importantly, the proportion of rock bridges in a rockfall failure surface does not increase with failure size. Rather larger failures display fracturing through multiple rock bridges, and in contrast smaller failures fracture occurs only through a single critical rock bridge. This holds implications for how failure mechanisms change with rockfall size and shape. Additionally, the location of rock bridges with respect to the geometry of an incipient rockfall is shown to determine failure mode. Weathering can occur both along discontinuity surfaces and previously broken rock bridges, indicating the sequential stages of

  18. Sniffing and Oxytocin: Effects on Olfactory Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Ron

    2016-05-04

    In this issue of Neuron, Oettl et al. (2016) show how oxytocin can boost processing of olfactory information in female rats by a top-downregulation from the anterior olfactory nucleus onto the main olfactory bulb. As a result, interactions with juvenile conspecifics receive more attention and are longer memorized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reliability and Photographic Equivalency of the Scar Cosmesis Assessment and Rating (SCAR) Scale, an Outcome Measure for Postoperative Scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Until recently, no ideal valid, feasible, and reliable scar scale existed to effectively assess the quality of postoperative linear scars. The Scar Cosmesis Assessment and Rating (SCAR) scale was developed and validated as a tool to assess the quality of postoperative scars in clinical and research settings. To assess the reliability of using photographs in lieu of live patient scar rating assessments, and to determine the interrater and intrarater reliability of the SCAR scale. This was a reliability study to assess clinicians' interrater and intrarater reliability, as well as the reliability of using high-quality macrophotographs of postoperative scars. Patients were from a private practice dermatology clinic, with assessed scars representing a range of surgical procedures including those performed by dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and general surgeons. Assessments were performed by an international multidisciplinary team from dermatology, plastic surgery, surgical oncology, emergency medicine, and physiatry, using photographs and live patient assessments. A single photograph was assessed for each patient's scar. Data were obtained between August 3, 2015, and January 18, 2016. Data analysis occurred between January 18, 2016, and July 29, 2016. Using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), the scale was tested for photographic equivalency as well as interrater reliability and intrarater reliability by 5 raters on a set of 80 total patient scars, 20 of which were analyzed for photographic equivalency and the remaining 60 of which were analyzed for interrater and intrarater reliability. The SCAR scale that measures postoperative scar cosmesis, with scores ranging from 0 (best possible scar) to 15 (worst possible scar), based on 6 clinician and 2 patient items was used. Of those 60 in the photographic subgroup, 10 were rated using not only the SCAR scale but also the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale and the Vancouver Scar Scale, and 10 were

  20. Outcomes of ablative fractional laser scar treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-Woo; Hwang, Na-Hyun; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Park, Seung-Ha

    2015-04-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFL) systems are commonly used to treat various scars, and recent reports have indicated that early scar treatment with fractional lasers has good aesthetic results. Some scars respond dramatically to AFL treatment, incurring high levels of patient satisfaction; however, other scars respond poorly or became worse after treatment. This study was designed to clarify prognostic factors that predict AFL scar treatment outcomes. A total of 108 patients were included in this study. The fractional laser treatments were repeated every 4 weeks until the scar site was acceptable and no additional improvement was expected or the patient discontinued the treatment. The scar improvements were defined as changes in the Manchester scar scale (MSS) from before to after laser treatment. A digital camera was used to acquire digital photographs of the scars under the same light source, the same background, exposure, and white balance. This study developed a modification of the MSS for image analysis in which colour assessment was based on L*a*b* colour co-ordinates of the digital images. The mean MSS values prior to and after laser treatments were 11.6 ± 3.6 and 9.5 ± 2.9, respectively (p treatment improved the qualities of each scar, and the improvements were evident in colour and contour. Scar elevation, pigmentation, high vascularity, early onset of treatment, and the number of treatment sessions were directly related to scar improvement after AFL therapy (p treatments were effective methods for scar treatment. Clinicians can use these prognostic factors to determine treatment plans and to estimate scar improvement after AFL treatment.

  1. Comparison of non-ablative and ablative fractional laser treatments in a postoperative scar study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung U; Gantsetseg, Dorjsuren; Jung, Jin Young; Jung, Inhee; Shin, Sungsik; Lee, Ju Hee

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative scarring after thyroidectomy is a problem for both patients and clinicians. Recently, both non-ablative and ablative fractional laser (NFL and AFL) systems have attracted attention as potential therapies for the revision of thyroidectomy scars. The present split-scar study was designed to directly compare the efficacy of these two methods for the treatment of post-thyroidectomy scars. Twenty females (mean age 42.1 years, range 22-55) with scarring 2-3 months post-thyroidectomy were enrolled in the study. One half of the scar (chosen at random) was treated with NFL and the other half was treated with AFL. In each case, two treatments were given at 2-month intervals. Clinical photographs were taken at baseline, before each treatment, and at the final 3-month evaluation. Independent clinician grading of improvement and patient satisfaction were measured on a quartile scale. Color (erythema and melanin indices) and scar hardness were measured at baseline and at three months post-treatment with a dermaspectrometer and durometer, respectively. The mean clinical improvement grades for AFL and NFL were highly similar, 2.45 ± 0.99 and 2.35 ± 0.85, respectively, without statistical significance (P = 0.752). However, NFL treatment resulted in statistically significant changes in erythema and pigmentation (P = 0.035 and P = 0.003, respectively), and skin hardness was significantly reduced after AFL treatment (P = 0.026). Clinical improvement was not significantly different between the two systems; however, AFL was better at reducing scar hardness whereas NFL was superior for lightening color. These data suggest that a study assessing the feasibility of a combined approach for the revision of post-thyroidectomy scarring might be warranted. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Optimization of magnetophoretic-guided drug delivery to the olfactory region in a human nose model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Zhang, Ze; Si, Xiuhua April; Yang, Jing; Deng, Wu

    2016-08-01

    Magnetophoretic-guided delivery has been shown to be able to improve the olfactory doses. However, due to the complex nasal structure and quick decay of magnetic intensity, precise control of particle motion in the human nose remains a challenge. In this study, an optimization model was developed for magnetophoretic olfactory delivery systems. The performance of the model was evaluated using a baseline device design in an MRI-based human nose geometry. Three key components of the delivery system were examined, which included the particle release position, the front magnet to minimize nasal valve depositions, and the top magnet to attract particles into the olfactory region. Results show that the magnetophoretic olfactory delivery device can be significantly improved by optimizing the product and operational parameters. The olfactory delivery efficiency was increased by 1.5-fold compared to the baseline design. The top magnet height and strength were shown to be the most influential factor in olfactory delivery, followed by the drug release position and the front magnet strength. The optimization framework developed in this study can be easily adapted for the optimization of intranasal drug delivery to other regions such as paranasal sinuses.

  3. Olfactory training in patients with Parkinson's disease.

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    Antje Haehner

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Decrease of olfactory function in Parkinson's disease (PD is a well-investigated fact. Studies indicate that pharmacological treatment of PD fails to restore olfactory function in PD patients. The aim of this investigation was whether patients with PD would benefit from "training" with odors in terms of an improvement of their general olfactory function. It has been hypothesized that olfactory training should produce both an improved sensitivity towards the odors used in the training process and an overall increase of olfactory function. METHODS: We recruited 70 subjects with PD and olfactory loss into this single-center, prospective, controlled non-blinded study. Thirty-five patients were assigned to the olfactory training group and 35 subjects to the control group (no training. Olfactory training was performed over a period of 12 weeks while patients exposed themselves twice daily to four odors (phenyl ethyl alcohol: rose, eucalyptol: eucalyptus, citronellal: lemon, and eugenol: cloves. Olfactory testing was performed before and after training using the "Sniffin' Sticks" (thresholds for phenyl ethyl alcohol, tests for odor discrimination, and odor identification in addition to threshold tests for the odors used in the training process. RESULTS: Compared to baseline, trained PD patients experienced a significant increase in their olfactory function, which was observed for the Sniffin' Sticks test score and for thresholds for the odors used in the training process. Olfactory function was unchanged in PD patients who did not perform olfactory training. CONCLUSION: The present results indicate that olfactory training may increase olfactory sensitivity in PD patients.

  4. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Fabbrocini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options.

  5. A Case of Multiple Spontaneous Keloid Scars

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    Abdulhadi Jfri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Keloid scars result from an abnormal healing response to cutaneous injury or inflammation that extends beyond the borders of the original wound. Spontaneous keloid scars forming in the absence of any previous trauma or surgical procedure are rare. Certain syndromes have been associated with this phenomenon, and few reports have discussed the evidence of single spontaneous keloid scar, which raises the question whether they are really spontaneous. Here, we present a 27-year-old mentally retarded single female with orbital hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, repaired cleft lip and high-arched palate who presented with progressive multiple spontaneous keloid scars in different parts of her body which were confirmed histologically by the presence of typical keloidal collagen. This report supports the fact that keloid scars can appear spontaneously and are possibly linked to a genetic factor. Furthermore, it describes a new presentation of spontaneous keloid scars in the form of multiple large lesions in different sites of the body.

  6. Scar Revision Surgery: The Patient's Perspective

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    Benjamin H Miranda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInsufficient satisfaction outcome literature exists to assist consultations for scar revision surgery; such outcomes should reflect the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate scar revision patient satisfaction outcomes, according to specified patient-selection criteria.MethodsPatients (250 were randomly selected for telephone contacting regarding scar revisions undertaken between 2007-2011. Visual analogue scores were obtained for scars pre- and post-revision surgery. Surgery selection criteria were; 'presence' of sufficient time for scar maturation prior to revision, technical issues during or wound complications from the initial procedure that contributed to poor scarring, and 'absence' of site-specific or patient factors that negatively influence outcomes. Patient demographics, scar pathogenesis (elective vs. trauma, underlying issue (functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic and revision surgery details were also collected with the added use of a real-time, hospital database.ResultsTelephone contacting was achieved for 211 patients (214 scar revisions. Satisfaction outcomes were '2% worse, 16% no change, and 82% better'; a distribution maintained between body sites and despite whether surgery was functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic. Better outcomes were reported by patients who sustained traumatic scars vs. those who sustained scars by elective procedures (91.80% vs. 77.78%, P=0.016 and by females vs. males (85.52% vs. 75.36%, P<0.05, particularly in the elective group where males (36.17% were more likely to report no change or worse outcomes versus females (16.04% (P<0.01.ConclusionsSuccessful scar revision outcomes may be achieved using careful patient selection. This study provides useful information for referring general practitioners, and patient-surgeon consultations, when planning scar revision.

  7. Prevalence of scars and "mini-scars", and their impact on quality of life in Japanese patients with acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Nobukazu; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kawashima, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    There have been very few studies on the prevalence and severity of acne scars in Japanese patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of acne scars and their impact on the quality of life (QOL) in Japanese acne patients. Acne scars were classified as mini-scars (atrophic scars of ≥0.5 and scars (≥2 mm in diameter), and hypertrophic scars. The severity of acne and acne scars were evaluated. The background of patients and their QOL in relation to acne were assessed. Of 240 subjects, 218 (90.8%) had scars. All patients with scars had mini-scars; 61.2% and 14.2% of 240 had atrophic scars and hypertrophic scars, respectively. Severe scarring was found in patients who had experienced severe acne symptoms, although 15.0% of patients with scars had experienced only mild acne symptoms. The total Dermatology Life Quality Index score was significantly higher in patients with scars than in patients without scars (5.9 ± 4.4 vs 4.2 ± 4.1). Almost all the patients had small atrophic scars with a diameter of 0.5 or more and less than 2 mm, which we have termed "mini-scars". Acne scars had a negative impact on patient QOL. Early initiation of treatment is recommended to avoid acne scars. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Cutaneous osteosarcoma arising from a burn scar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min A.; Yi, Jaehyuck [Kyungpook National University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Jong Min [Kyungpook National University, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Tumors that develop in old burn scars are usually squamous cell carcinomas. Sarcomas have also been reported, albeit rarely. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of an extraskeletal osteosarcoma arising in a prior burn scar reported in the English-language literature, mainly discussing the clinicopathological features. Herein, we present a case of cutaneous osteosarcoma visualized as a mineralized soft-tissue mass arising from the scar associated with a previous skin burn over the back. This seems to be the first report describing the imaging features of a cutaneous osteosarcoma from an old burn scar. (orig.)

  9. Ruptured Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha BS; Sunanda Bharatnur; Samarth Virmani; Shripad Hebbar; Arijit Bishnu

    2017-01-01

    A pregnancy with implantation on the scar of a past cesarean section is uncommon. However such pregnancies are on the rise due to the increasing number of lower segment cesarean section. One of the complications of such a pregnancy is uterine rupture in early pregnancy which can be life threatening to the patient. The following is a report of a patient who presented at 10 weeks of gestational age with features of hypovolemic shock and lower position of the gestational sac in relation to the u...

  10. Evidence for partial overlap of male olfactory cues in lampreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Ke; Huertas, Mar; Baker, Cindy F.; Jia, Liang; Hayes, Michael C.; Li, Weiming; Johnson, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on a mosaic of complex information to find and evaluate mates. Pheromones, often comprised of multiple components, are considered to be particularly important for species-recognition in many species. While the evolution of species-specific pheromone blends is well-described in many insects, very few vertebrate pheromones have been studied in a macro-evolutionary context. Here, we report a phylogenetic comparison of multi-component male odours that guide reproduction in lampreys. Chemical profiling of sexually mature males from eleven species of lamprey, representing six of ten genera and two of three families, indicated the chemical profiles of sexually mature male odours are partially shared among species. Behavioural assays conducted with four species sympatric in the Laurentian Great Lakes indicated asymmetric female responses to heterospecific odours, where Petromyzon marinus were attracted to male odour collected from all species tested but other species generally preferred only the odour of conspecifics. Electro-olfactogram recordings from P. marinusindicated that although P. marinus exhibited behavioural responses to odours from males of all species, at least some of the compounds that elicited olfactory responses were different in conspecific male odours compared to heterospecific male odours. We conclude that some of the compounds released by sexually mature males are shared among species and elicit olfactory and behavioural responses in P. marinus, and suggest that our results provide evidence for partial overlap of male olfactory cues among lampreys. Further characterization of the chemical identities of odour components is needed to confirm shared pheromones among species.

  11. Papular Acne Scars of the Nose and Chin: An Under-recognised Variant of Acne Scarring

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Faisal R; Michael Kirk; Vishal Madan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scarring following acne vulgaris is common and can be of profound psychosocial consequence. Aims and Objectives: We have clinically noted a variant of acne scarring, overlooked by previous categorisation schemes, which we have denominated as papular acne scars of the nose and chin. We sought to characterise these novel entities further. Materials and Methods: Initially, we identified 14 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin in a cosmetic dermatology clinic, of whom...

  12. Immunohistochemical characterization of human olfactory tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Eric H; Wu, Enming; Curry, William T; Lin, Derrick T; Schwob, James E

    2011-08-01

    The pathophysiology underlying human olfactory disorders is poorly understood because biopsying the olfactory epithelium (OE) can be unrepresentative and extensive immunohistochemical analysis is lacking. Autopsy tissue enriches our grasp of normal and abnormal olfactory immunohistology and guides the sampling of the OE by biopsy. Furthermore, a comparison of the molecular phenotype of olfactory epithelial cells between rodents and humans will improve our ability to correlate human histopathology with olfactory dysfunction. An immunohistochemical analysis of human olfactory tissue using a comprehensive battery of proven antibodies. Human olfactory mucosa obtained from 21 autopsy specimens was analyzed with immunohistochemistry. The position and extent of olfactory mucosa was assayed by staining whole mounts (WMs) with neuronal markers. Sections of the OE were analyzed with an extensive group of antibodies directed against cytoskeletal proteins and transcription factors, as were surgical specimens from an esthesioneuroblastoma. Neuron-rich epithelium is always found inferior to the cribriform plate, even at advanced age, despite the interruptions in the neuroepithelial sheet caused by patchy respiratory metaplasia. The pattern of immunostaining with our antibody panel identifies two distinct types of basal cell progenitors in human OE similar to rodents. The panel also clarifies the complex composition of esthesioneuroblastoma. The extent of human olfactory mucosa at autopsy can easily be delineated as a function of age and neurologic disease. The similarities in human versus rodent OE will enable us to translate knowledge from experimental animals to humans and will extend our understanding of human olfactory pathophysiology. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of the Human Olfactory Bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammalli, Manjunath; Dey, Gourav; Madugundu, Anil K; Kumar, Manish; Rodrigues, Benvil; Gowda, Harsha; Siddaiah, Bychapur Gowrishankar; Mahadevan, Anita; Shankar, Susarla Krishna; Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya Keshava

    2017-08-01

    The importance of olfaction to human health and disease is often underappreciated. Olfactory dysfunction has been reported in association with a host of common complex diseases, including neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. For health, olfaction or the sense of smell is also important for most mammals, for optimal engagement with their environment. Indeed, animals have developed sophisticated olfactory systems to detect and interpret the rich information presented to them to assist in day-to-day activities such as locating food sources, differentiating food from poisons, identifying mates, promoting reproduction, avoiding predators, and averting death. In this context, the olfactory bulb is a vital component of the olfactory system receiving sensory information from the axons of the olfactory receptor neurons located in the nasal cavity and the first place that processes the olfactory information. We report in this study original observations on the human olfactory bulb proteome in healthy subjects, using a high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach. We identified 7750 nonredundant proteins from human olfactory bulbs. Bioinformatics analysis of these proteins showed their involvement in biological processes associated with signal transduction, metabolism, transport, and olfaction. These new observations provide a crucial baseline molecular profile of the human olfactory bulb proteome, and should assist the future discovery of biomarker proteins and novel diagnostics associated with diseases characterized by olfactory dysfunction.

  14. Extremely sparse olfactory inputs are sufficient to mediate innate aversion in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing J Gao

    Full Text Available Innate attraction and aversion to odorants are observed throughout the animal kingdom, but how olfactory circuits encode such valences is not well understood, despite extensive anatomical and functional knowledge. In Drosophila melanogaster, ~50 types of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs each express a unique receptor gene, and relay information to a cognate type of projection neurons (PNs. To examine the extent to which the population activity of ORNs is required for olfactory behavior, we developed a genetic strategy to block all ORN outputs, and then to restore output in specific types. Unlike attraction, aversion was unaffected by simultaneous silencing of many ORNs, and even single ORN types previously shown to convey neutral valence sufficed to mediate aversion. Thus, aversion may rely on specific activity patterns in individual ORNs rather than the number or identity of activated ORNs. ORN activity is relayed into the brain by downstream circuits, with excitatory PNs (ePN representing a major output. We found that silencing the majority of ePNs did not affect aversion, even when ePNs directly downstream of single restored ORN types were silenced. Our data demonstrate the robustness of olfactory aversion, and suggest that its circuit mechanism is qualitatively different from attraction.

  15. Suppressed inflammatory gene expression during human hypertrophic scar compared to normotrophic scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, L.J.; van der Veer, W.M.; de Jong, E.H.; Gibbs, S.; Niessen, F.B.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar formation is a result of adverse cutaneous wound healing. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar formation is still poorly understood. A problem next to the lack of suitable animal models is that often normal skin is compared to hypertrophic scar (HTscar) and not to normotrophic

  16. Olfactory dysfunction, olfactory bulb pathology and urban air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Osnaya, Norma; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Keefe, Sheyla; Palacios-Moreno, Juan; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Aiello-Mora, Mario; Maronpot, Robert R.; Doty, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    Mexico City (MC) residents are exposed to severe air pollution and exhibit olfactory bulb inflammation. We compared the olfactory function of individuals living under conditions of extreme air pollution to that of controls from a relatively clean environment and explore associations between olfaction scores, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status, and pollution exposure. The olfactory bulbs (OBs) of 35 MC and 9 controls 20.8 ± 8.5 y were assessed by light and electron microscopy. The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) was administered to 62 MC / 25 controls 21.2 ±2.7 y. MC subjects had significantly lower UPSIT scores: 34.24 ± 0.42 versus controls 35.76 ± 0.40, p=0.03. Olfaction deficits were present in 35.5% MC and 12% of controls. MC APOE ε 4 carriers failed 2.4 ± 0.54 items in the 10-item smell identification scale from the UPSIT related to Alzheimer's disease, while APOE 2/3 and 3/3 subjects failed 1.36 ± 0.16 items, p = 0.01. MC residents exhibited OB endothelial hyperplasia, neuronal accumulation of particles (2/35), and immunoreactivity to beta amyloid βA42 (29/35) and/or α-synuclein (4/35) in neurons, glial cells and/or blood vessels. Ultrafine particles were present in OBs endothelial cytoplasm and basement membranes. Control OBs were unremarkable. Air pollution exposure is associated with olfactory dysfunction and OB pathology, APOE 4 may confer greater susceptibility to such abnormalities, and ultrafine particles could play a key role in the OB pathology. This study contributes to our understanding of the influences of air pollution on olfaction and its potential contribution to neurodegeneration. PMID:19297138

  17. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, William J; Clarke, Samantha A; Quinn, T Alexander; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2015-09-20

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure, and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following a myocardial infarction, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Effectiveness of Autologous Fat Grafting in Adherent Scars: Results Obtained by a Comprehensive Scar Evaluation Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Mariëlle E H; Brouwer, Katrien M; van Trier, Antoine J M; Groot, Marloes L; Middelkoop, Esther; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, patients normally survive severe traumas such as burn injuries and necrotizing fasciitis. Large skin defects can be closed but the scars remain. Scars may become adherent to underlying structures when the subcutical fat layer is damaged. Autologous fat grafting provides the possibility of reconstructing a functional sliding layer underneath the scar. Autologous fat grafting is becoming increasingly popular for scar treatment, although large studies using validated evaluation tools are lacking. The authors therefore objectified the effectiveness of single-treatment autologous fat grafting on scar pliability using validated scar measurement tools. Forty patients with adherent scars receiving single-treatment autologous fat grafting were measured preoperatively and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome parameter was scar pliability, measured using the Cutometer. Scar quality was also evaluated by the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale and the DSM II ColorMeter. To prevent selection bias, measurements were performed following a standardized algorithm. The Cutometer parameters elasticity and maximal extension improved 22.5 percent (p Scar Assessment Scale scores improved from 3.6 to 2.9 on the observer scale, and from 5.1 to 3.8 on the patient scale (both p scar and normal skin remained unaltered. For the first time, the effect of autologous fat grafting on functional scar parameters was ascertained using a comprehensive scar evaluation protocol. The improved scar pliability supports the authors' hypothesis that the function of the subcutis can be restored to a certain extent by single-treatment autologous fat grafting. Therapeutic, IV.

  19. Profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Verbeurgt

    Full Text Available Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems, containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men. Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were

  20. Olfactory dysfunction in Iranian diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Mehdizadeh Seraj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory dysfunction is a known complication of diabetes and, despite its importance in the quality of life, is usually neglected due to its gradual progression. In this study, we aim to determine the prevalence and severity of olfactory dysfunction in diabetics and its association with microangiopathic complications of the disease (neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy. Excluding the confounding factors, a case-control study of 60 eligible subjects, divided into a group of 30 diabetic patients and a group of 30 control subjects was performed. We used "absorbent perfumer's paper strips" method to test the olfactory threshold. In our study, 60% of diabetics were found to have some degree of olfactory dysfunction and a significant difference (P<0.01 between the olfactory threshold of the case and control groups was observed. There were no significant associations between the olfactory dysfunction and age, sex, treatment duration and microangiopathic complications.

  1. Role of Centrifugal Projections to the Olfactory Bulb in Olfactory Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselycznyk, Carly L.; Zhang, Steven; Linster, Christine

    2006-01-01

    While there is evidence that feedback projections from cortical and neuromodulatory structures to the olfactory bulb are crucial for maintaining the oscillatory dynamics of olfactory bulb processing, it is not clear how changes in dynamics are related to odor perception. Using electrical lesions of the olfactory peduncle, sparing output from the…

  2. Prevention and curative management of hypertrophic scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, M.C.; Veer, van der W.M.; Ulrich, M.; Zuijlen, van P.P.; Niessen, F.B.; Middelkoop, E.

    2009-01-01

    Although hypertrophic scarring commonly occurs following burns, many aspects such as incidence of and optimal treatment for scar hypertrophy remain unclear. This review will focus on hypertrophic scar formation after burn in particular, exploring multiple treatment options and describing their

  3. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Robert A.; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case

  4. Answers to Common Questions about Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or more level with the surrounding skin. Another treatment that might be recommended is dermabrasion, a process of sanding down the scar surface, again in an effort to make it more level with the surrounding skin. What is a keloid? A keloid is a tumor of scar tissue ...

  5. Recurrent Carcinoma in Mastectomy Scars | Onuigbo | International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To study the patterns of recurrence of carcinoma in mastectomy scars. Methods: A 30?year retrospective analysis was carried out as regards surgical specimens . of mastectomy scars received by the author from numerous surgeons working in several hospitals with special reference to patients of the Igbo ethnic group.

  6. A Clinimetric Overview of Scar Assessment Scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, M.B.A.; Verhaegen, P.D.H.M.; Middelkoop, E.; van Zuijlen, P.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Standardized validated evaluation instruments are mandatory to increase the level of evidence in scar management. Scar assessment scales are potentially suitable for this purpose, but the most appropriate scale still needs to be determined. This review will elaborate on several clinically relevant

  7. SLEEP AND OLFACTORY CORTICAL PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eBarnes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many systems, sleep plays a vital role in memory consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. These processes together help store information of biological significance and reset synaptic circuits to facilitate acquisition of information in the future. In this review, we describe recent evidence of sleep-dependent changes in olfactory system structure and function which contribute to odor memory and perception. During slow-wave sleep, the piriform cortex becomes hypo-responsive to odor stimulation and instead displays sharp-wave activity similar to that observed within the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and other cortical and limbic regions is enhanced during slow-wave sleep compared to waking. This combination of conditions may allow odor memory consolidation to occur during a state of reduced external interference and facilitate association of odor memories with stored hedonic and contextual cues. Evidence consistent with sleep-dependent odor replay within olfactory cortical circuits is presented. These data suggest that both the strength and precision of odor memories is sleep-dependent. The work further emphasizes the critical role of synaptic plasticity and memory in not only odor memory but also basic odor perception. The work also suggests a possible link between sleep disturbances that are frequently co-morbid with a wide range of pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression and the known olfactory impairments associated with those disorders.

  8. Linear and Nonlinear Theory of Eigenfunction Scars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1998-01-01

    The theory of scarring of eigenfunctions of classically chaotic systems by short periodic orbits is extended in several ways. The influence of short-time linear recurrences on correlations and fluctuations at long times is emphasized. We include the contribution to scarring of nonlinear recurrences associated with homoclinic orbits, and treat the different scenarios of random and nonrandom long-time recurrences. The importance of the local classical structure around the periodic orbit is emphasized, and it is shown for an optimal choice of test basis in phase space, scars must persist in the semiclassical limit. The crucial role of symmetry is also discussed, which together with the nonlinear recurrences gives a much improved account of the actual strength of scars for given classical orbits and in individual wavefunctions. Quantitative measures of scarring are provided and comparisons are made with numerical data.

  9. Intelligence and Physical Attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    This brief research note aims to estimate the magnitude of the association between general intelligence and physical attractiveness with large nationally representative samples from two nations. In the United Kingdom, attractive children are more intelligent by 12.4 IQ points (r=0.381), whereas in the United States, the correlation between…

  10. Induction of associative olfactory memory by targeted activation of single olfactory neurons in Drosophila larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Takato; Lee, Chi-Yu; Yoshida-Kasikawa, Maki; Honjo, Ken; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo

    2014-04-25

    It has been postulated that associative memory is formed by at least two sets of external stimuli, CS and US, that are transmitted to the memory centers by distinctive conversing pathways. However, whether associative memory can be induced by the activation of only the olfactory CS and a biogenic amine-mediated US pathways remains to be elucidated. In this study, we substituted the reward signals with dTrpA1-mediated thermogenetic activation of octopaminergic neurons and the odor signals by ChR2-mediated optical activation of a specific class of olfactory neurons. We show that targeted activation of the olfactory receptor and the octopaminergic neurons is indeed sufficient for the formation of associative olfactory memory in the larval brain. We also show that targeted stimulation of only a single type of olfactory receptor neurons is sufficient to induce olfactory memory that is indistinguishable from natural memory induced by the activation of multiple olfactory receptor neurons.

  11. The effect of topical scar treatment on postoperative scar pain and pruritus after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chae-Gwan; Kim, Geon-Hyeong; Kim, Dong-Wook; In, Yong

    2014-04-01

    The surgical wound of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) needs continuous flexion and extension movement. Silicone gel treatment is widely used to treat hypertrophic scars and keloids since it is easily applied and prevents scar pain and itching. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of silicone gel applied to surgical scars of TKA on postoperative scar pain and pruritus. One hundred TKAs were randomized into a silicone gel group (silicone gel was applied to the wound after stitch-out for 1 month) or a placebo group. The postoperative scar pain and pruritus were evaluated with the use of a visual analog scale (VAS) at postoperative 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Scar assessment was done using the Vancouver scar scale by evaluating scar pigmentation, vascularity, pliability, and height. Although silicone gel group showed better pigmentation and height scales than placebo group (P scar pain and pruritus VAS scores between the groups (P > 0.05). Application of silicone gel had no beneficial effects on scar pain and itching relief during the early postoperative period of TKA. I-Randomized Controlled Trial.

  12. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2–3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case presentation A 66-year-old man presented with a painless, slow-growing lump in a small pox scar on his left shoulder. Histological biopsies showed the lesion to be a primary, well-differentiated cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. A CT scan of the thorax was conducted, which showed no signs of metastases. The complete lesion was then surgically excised, and histopathological examination revealed a radically excised cutaneous type leiomyosarcoma After 13 months’ review the patient was doing well with no evidence of tumour recurrence. Conclusions This is the first report of a CLM arising in a small pox scar. Although the extended time interval between scarring and malignant changes makes it difficult to advise strict follow-up for patients with small pox scars, one should be aware that atypical changes and/or symptoms occurring in a small pox scar could potentially mean malignant transformation. PMID:22799750

  13. Astrocyte scar formation aids CNS axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark A.; Burda, Joshua E.; Ren, Yilong; Ao, Yan; O’Shea, Timothy M.; Kawaguchi, Riki; Coppola, Giovanni; Khakh, Baljit S.; Deming, Timothy J.; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system (CNS). Astrocyte scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or deleting chronic astrocyte scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. In striking contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocyte scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents CNS axon regeneration. PMID:27027288

  14. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Robert A; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J

    2012-07-16

    Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. A 66-year-old man presented with a painless, slow-growing lump in a small pox scar on his left shoulder. Histological biopsies showed the lesion to be a primary, well-differentiated cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. A CT scan of the thorax was conducted, which showed no signs of metastases. The complete lesion was then surgically excised, and histopathological examination revealed a radically excised cutaneous type leiomyosarcoma After 13 months' review the patient was doing well with no evidence of tumour recurrence. This is the first report of a CLM arising in a small pox scar. Although the extended time interval between scarring and malignant changes makes it difficult to advise strict follow-up for patients with small pox scars, one should be aware that atypical changes and/or symptoms occurring in a small pox scar could potentially mean malignant transformation.

  15. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol Robert A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2–3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case presentation A 66-year-old man presented with a painless, slow-growing lump in a small pox scar on his left shoulder. Histological biopsies showed the lesion to be a primary, well-differentiated cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. A CT scan of the thorax was conducted, which showed no signs of metastases. The complete lesion was then surgically excised, and histopathological examination revealed a radically excised cutaneous type leiomyosarcoma After 13 months’ review the patient was doing well with no evidence of tumour recurrence. Conclusions This is the first report of a CLM arising in a small pox scar. Although the extended time interval between scarring and malignant changes makes it difficult to advise strict follow-up for patients with small pox scars, one should be aware that atypical changes and/or symptoms occurring in a small pox scar could potentially mean malignant transformation.

  16. Olfactory regulation of mosquito-host interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiebel, L.J.; Takken, W.

    2004-01-01

    Mosquitoes that act as disease vectors rely upon olfactory cues to direct several important behaviors that are fundamentally involved in establishing their overall vectorial capacity. Of these, the propensity to select humans for blood feeding is arguably the most important of these olfactory driven

  17. Attraction modulated by spacing of pheromone components and anti-attractants in a bark beetle and a moth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Martin N; Binyameen, Muhammad; Sadek, Medhat M; Schlyter, Fredrik

    2011-08-01

    Orientation for insects in olfactory landscapes with high semiochemical diversity may be a challenging task. The partitioning of odor plumes into filaments that are interspersed with pockets of 'clean air' may help filament discrimination and upwind flight to attractive sources in the face of inhibitory signals. We studied the effect of distance between odor sources on trap catches of the beetle, Ips typographus, and the moth, Spodoptera littoralis. Insects were tested both to spatially separated pheromone components [cis-verbenol and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol for Ips; (Z,E)-9,11-tetradecadienyl acetate and (Z,E)-9,12-tetradecadienyl acetate for Spodoptera], and to separated pheromone and anti-attractant sources [non-host volatile (NHV) blend for Ips; (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate for Spodoptera]. Trap catch data were complemented with simulations of plume structure and plume overlap from two separated sources using a photo ionization detector and soap bubble generators. Trap catches of the beetle and the moth were both affected when odor sources in the respective traps were increasingly separated. However, this effect on trap catch occurred at smaller (roughly by an order of magnitude) odor source separation distances for the moth than for the beetle. This may reflect differences between the respective olfactory systems and central processing. For both species, the changes in trap catches in response to separation of pheromone components occurred at similar spacing distances as for separation of pheromone and anti-attractant sources. Overlap between two simulated plumes depended on distance between the two sources. In addition, the number of detected filaments and their concentration decreased with downwind distance. This implies that the response to separated odor sources in the two species might take place under different olfactory conditions. Deploying multiple sources of anti-attractant around a pheromone trap indicated long-distance (meter scale) effects of NHV on

  18. Floral Reward, Advertisement and Attractiveness to Honey Bees in Dioecious Salix caprea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dötterl, Stefan; Glück, Ulrike; Jürgens, Andreas; Woodring, Joseph; Aas, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    In dioecious, zoophilous plants potential pollinators have to be attracted to both sexes and switch between individuals of both sexes for pollination to occur. It often has been suggested that males and females require different numbers of visits for maximum reproductive success because male fertility is more likely limited by access to mates, whereas female fertility is rather limited by resource availability. According to sexual selection theory, males therefore should invest more in pollinator attraction (advertisement, reward) than females. However, our knowledge on the sex specific investment in floral rewards and advertisement, and its effects on pollinator behaviour is limited. Here, we use an approach that includes chemical, spectrophotometric, and behavioural studies i) to elucidate differences in floral nectar reward and advertisement (visual, olfactory cues) in dioecious sallow, Salix caprea, ii) to determine the relative importance of visual and olfactory floral cues in attracting honey bee pollinators, and iii) to test for differential attractiveness of female and male inflorescence cues to honey bees. Nectar amount and sugar concentration are comparable, but sugar composition varies between the sexes. Olfactory sallow cues are more attractive to honey bees than visual cues; however, a combination of both cues elicits the strongest behavioural responses in bees. Male flowers are due to the yellow pollen more colourful and emit a higher amount of scent than females. Honey bees prefer the visual but not the olfactory display of males over those of females. In all, the data of our multifaceted study are consistent with the sexual selection theory and provide novel insights on how the model organism honey bee uses visual and olfactory floral cues for locating host plants. PMID:24676333

  19. Floral reward, advertisement and attractiveness to honey bees in dioecious Salix caprea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dötterl, Stefan; Glück, Ulrike; Jürgens, Andreas; Woodring, Joseph; Aas, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    In dioecious, zoophilous plants potential pollinators have to be attracted to both sexes and switch between individuals of both sexes for pollination to occur. It often has been suggested that males and females require different numbers of visits for maximum reproductive success because male fertility is more likely limited by access to mates, whereas female fertility is rather limited by resource availability. According to sexual selection theory, males therefore should invest more in pollinator attraction (advertisement, reward) than females. However, our knowledge on the sex specific investment in floral rewards and advertisement, and its effects on pollinator behaviour is limited. Here, we use an approach that includes chemical, spectrophotometric, and behavioural studies i) to elucidate differences in floral nectar reward and advertisement (visual, olfactory cues) in dioecious sallow, Salix caprea, ii) to determine the relative importance of visual and olfactory floral cues in attracting honey bee pollinators, and iii) to test for differential attractiveness of female and male inflorescence cues to honey bees. Nectar amount and sugar concentration are comparable, but sugar composition varies between the sexes. Olfactory sallow cues are more attractive to honey bees than visual cues; however, a combination of both cues elicits the strongest behavioural responses in bees. Male flowers are due to the yellow pollen more colourful and emit a higher amount of scent than females. Honey bees prefer the visual but not the olfactory display of males over those of females. In all, the data of our multifaceted study are consistent with the sexual selection theory and provide novel insights on how the model organism honey bee uses visual and olfactory floral cues for locating host plants.

  20. Floral reward, advertisement and attractiveness to honey bees in dioecious Salix caprea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Dötterl

    Full Text Available In dioecious, zoophilous plants potential pollinators have to be attracted to both sexes and switch between individuals of both sexes for pollination to occur. It often has been suggested that males and females require different numbers of visits for maximum reproductive success because male fertility is more likely limited by access to mates, whereas female fertility is rather limited by resource availability. According to sexual selection theory, males therefore should invest more in pollinator attraction (advertisement, reward than females. However, our knowledge on the sex specific investment in floral rewards and advertisement, and its effects on pollinator behaviour is limited. Here, we use an approach that includes chemical, spectrophotometric, and behavioural studies i to elucidate differences in floral nectar reward and advertisement (visual, olfactory cues in dioecious sallow, Salix caprea, ii to determine the relative importance of visual and olfactory floral cues in attracting honey bee pollinators, and iii to test for differential attractiveness of female and male inflorescence cues to honey bees. Nectar amount and sugar concentration are comparable, but sugar composition varies between the sexes. Olfactory sallow cues are more attractive to honey bees than visual cues; however, a combination of both cues elicits the strongest behavioural responses in bees. Male flowers are due to the yellow pollen more colourful and emit a higher amount of scent than females. Honey bees prefer the visual but not the olfactory display of males over those of females. In all, the data of our multifaceted study are consistent with the sexual selection theory and provide novel insights on how the model organism honey bee uses visual and olfactory floral cues for locating host plants.

  1. Duration and specificity of olfactory nonassociative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Kaitlin G; Radhakrishna, Sreya; Escanilla, Olga; Linster, Christiane

    2013-05-01

    Olfactory habituation is a simple form of nonassociative memory in which responsiveness to stable but behaviorally nonsignificant stimuli is decreased. Olfactory habituation has recently become a paradigm widely used to probe the neural substrate underlying olfactory perception and memory. This simple behavioral paradigm has been used successfully used to probe many aspects of olfactory processing, and it has recently become clear that the neural processes underlying olfactory habituation can depend on the task parameters used. We here further investigate memory specificity and duration using 2 variations in task parameters: the number of habituation trials and the time delay between habituation and cross-habituation testing. We find that memory specificity increases with the number of habituation trials but decreases with time after the last habituation trial.

  2. Olfactory neuroblastoma in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamate, Jyoji; Izawa, Takeshi; Ogata, Keiko; Kobayashi, Osamu; Okajima, Ryoko; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Kotani, Takao; Aoki, Mika

    2006-05-01

    An 11-year-old thoroughbred gelding was euthanatized because of right nasal cavity tumor. The tumor consisted of round to oval cells with a scanty cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nuclei. Homer-Wright rosettes and pseudorosettes, as well as microcysts were seen. Neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to vimentin, S-100 protein, and neuron-specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein and microtube-associated protein in varying degrees, indicating neurogenic nature. Based on these findings, this tumor was diagnosed as an olfactory neuroblastoma. Since this type is an uncommon tumor showing histological variety, the nature is discussed.

  3. Olfactory Dysfunction in Nasal Bone Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sug Won; Park, Beom; Lee, Tae Geun; Kim, Ji Ye

    2017-06-01

    All nasal bone fractures have the potential for worsening of olfactory function. However, few studies have studied the olfactory outcomes following reduction of nasal bone fractures. This study evaluates posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction in patients with nasal bone fracture before and after closed reduction. A prospective study was conducted for all patients presenting with nasal bone fracture (n=97). Each patient consenting to the study underwent the Korean version of Sniffin' Sticks test (KVSS II) before operation and at 6 month after closed reduction. The nasal fractures were divided according to the nasal bone fracture classification by Haug and Prather (Types I-IV). The olfactory scores were compared across fracture types and between preoperative and postoperative settings. Olfactory dysfunction was frequent after nasal fracture (45/97, 46.4%). Our olfactory assessment using the KVSS II test revealed that fracture reduction was not associated with improvements in the mean test score in Type I or Type II fractures. More specifically, the mean posttraumatic Threshold, discrimination and identification score decreased from 28.8 points prior to operation to 23.1 point at 6 months for Type II fracture with septal fracture. Our study has revealed two alarming trends regarding post-nasal fracture olfactory dysfunction. First, our study demonstrated that almost half (46.4%) of nasal fracture patients experience posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction. Second, closed reduction of these fractures does not lead to improvements olfaction at 6 months, which suggest that olfactory dysfunction is probably due to factors other than the fracture itself. The association should be further explored between injuries that lead to nasal fracture and the mechanism behind posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction.

  4. Focal Acne Scar Treatment (FAST), a new approach to atrophic acne scars: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Eric S; Sundick, Lauren

    2013-10-01

    Acne scars are a common concern in dermatology. Fractional CO2 laser resurfacing is a recent addition in our armamentarium of treatment options for acne scars and has been shown to be an excellent option for patients with atrophic acne scars. Patients with acne scars receiving fractional CO2 resurfacing usually have both the acne scars and surrounding unscarred areas treated in common practice. There has yet to be a study that looked at the implications of only focally treating the acne scars while leaving surrounding normal skin untreated. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a focal approach to fractional CO2 laser treatment for acne scars, coined "Focal Acne Scar Treatment" or "FAST" This retrospective case series was conducted at Schweiger Dermatology, in New York, NY, with patients treated from November 2011 through May 2012. Overall, six patients (ages 18 to 48) were treated with the fractional CO2 laser resurfacing, using a so called "FAST" technique treating only the acne scars and leaving normal skin untreated. Evaluation was based on physician and patient assessment of improvement at one week and four weeks post-treatment. All six patients treated with the Focal Acne Scar Treatment technique of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing had significant improvement post treatment ranging from 40% to 70% as estimated by the treating dermatologist and patient at four weeks post treatment. Patient satisfaction was high following FAST method. Temporary post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation was seen in two patients but resolved after a single 1550 nm Erbium Glass fractional laser treatment. The Focal Acne Scar Treatment technique is an effective method of improving the appearance of atrophic acne scars. Higher energy and density levels can be used when utilizing this technique, resulting in improved outcomes when compared with whole face fractional CO2 laser resurfacing. Healing is improved and faster with this technique and no increased incidence of permanent adverse

  5. Psychobiology of facial attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellerino, A

    2003-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an upsurge of interest in the research on facial attractiveness. The development of computer graphics has allowed to objectively investigate the conserved features of attractive faces. Averageness, symmetry and sex-specific traits have been associated with attractiveness. The effect of averageness is exemplified by blending a set of real faces into a chimeric face. This composite is more attractive than most of the faces used to create it. Beautiful faces are not simply average faces, however. If the female-specific features of a female composite face are enhanced, the resulting face is perceived as more attractive than the composite. In particular, smaller than average chin, smaller than average nose and higher than average forehead, all are traits associated with female's attractiveness. These traits have been interpreted as signs of high estrogen/testosterone ratio and therefore cues of high fertility. However, these same traits are also a species-specific characteristic of Homo sapiens that differentiates it from other hominid species. Preference for caricature of human features could represent a relic of species recognition mechanisms. Female preferences for male faces proved to be more variable than male preferences for female faces. Different facial traits are preferred in the choice of short-term and long-term partners. Preference for short term depend on the hormonal status and changes across the menstrual cycle and is influenced by contraceptive hormonal treatment. Psychological factors are also important sources of variance: female preferences correlate with self-perceived attractiveness, status in a relationship and degree of gender-conformity.

  6. Assessment of scar quality after cleft lip closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frans, F.A.; van Zuijlen, P.P.M.; Griot, J.P.W.D.; van der Horst, C.M.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess scar quality after cleft lip repair. Design: The linear scars of patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate were evaluated in a prospective study using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Linear regression was performed to identify which scar

  7. Assessment of scar quality after cleft lip closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frans, Franceline A.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.; Griot, J. P. W. Don; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess scar quality after cleft lip repair. The linear scars of patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate were evaluated in a prospective study using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Linear regression was performed to identify which scar characteristics were important

  8. Expression of connexin 57 in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunbo

    2011-11-01

    In the visual system, deletion of connexin 57 (Cx57) reduces gap junction coupling among horizontal cells and results in smaller receptive fields. To explore potential functions of Cx57 in olfaction, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry methods were used to investigate expression of Cx57 in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb. Hybridization signal was stronger in the olfactory epithelial layer compared to the connective tissue underneath. Within the sensory epithelial layer, hybridization signal was visible in sublayers containing cell bodies of basal cells and olfactory neurons but not evident at the apical sublayer comprising cell bodies of sustentacular cells. These Cx57 positive cells were clustered into small groups to form different patterns in the olfactory epithelium. However, individual patterns did not associate with specific regions of olfactory turbinates or specific olfactory receptor zones. Patched distribution of hybridization positive cells was also observed in the olfactory bulb and accessory olfactory bulb in layers where granule cells, mitral cells, and juxtaglomerular cells reside. Immunostaining was observed in the cell types described above but the intensity was weaker than that in the retina. This study has provided anatomical basis for future studies on the function of Cx57 in the olfactory system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Medical makeup for concealing facial scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Donna; Wong, Brian J F

    2012-10-01

    Surgical, laser, and pharmacological therapies are all used to correct scars and surgical incisions, though have limits with respect to how well facial skin can be restored or enhanced. The use of cosmetics has long been a relevant adjunct to all scar treatment modalities. In recent years, technical advancements in the chemistry and composition of cosmetic products have provided the patient with a broader range of products to employ for concealing scars. This review will provide an overview of contemporary methods for concealing facial scars, birthmarks, and pigmentary changes without the use of traditional/dated, heavy appearing camouflage products. Additionally, general guidelines and information will be provided with respect to identifying competent makeup artists for care of the medical patient. The article by no means is meant to be a tutorial, but rather serves as a starting point in this allied field of medicine. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Smelly primes - when olfactory primes do or do not work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, M. A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/141926600; Dijksterhuis, G. B.

    2014-01-01

    In applied olfactory cognition the effects that olfactory stimulation can have on (human) behavior are investigated. To enable an efficient application of olfactory stimuli a model of how they may lead to a change in behavior is proposed. To this end we use the concept of olfactory priming.

  11. Cesarean scar endometrioma: Case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çöl, Cavit; Yilmaz, Edip Erdal

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate endometrioma located at cesarean scatrix. METHODS: Medical data of 6 patients who presented to our institution with abdominal wall endometrioma were evaluated retrospectively and reviewed literature in this case series. The diagnostic approaches and treatment is discussed. RESULTS: All patients had a painful mass located at abdominal scars with history of cesarean section. The ages ranged from 31 to 34 and Doppler ultrasonography (US) detected hypoechoic mass with a mean diameter of 30 mm. Initial diagnosis was endometrioma in 4 and incisional hernia in 2 of 6 patients. Treatment was achieved with surgical excision in 5 patients, and one is followed by hormone suppression therapy with gonadotropin. CONCLUSION: Malignant or benign tumors of abdominal wall and incisional hernias should be kept in mind for diagnosis of endometrioma. Imaging methods like doppler US, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging should be used for differential diagnosis. Definitive diagnosis can only be made histopathologically. The treatment should be complete surgical excision and take care against intraoperative auto-inoculation of endometrial tissue in order to prevent recurrences. PMID:24868512

  12. Response of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to Screwworm Oviposition Attractant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, M F; Zhu, J J; Skoda, S R

    2015-07-01

    The sheep blowfly, Lucilia sericata Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae), causes sheep myiasis in various parts of the world. Female flies are attracted to sheep following various olfactory cues emanating from the sheep's body, and oviposit on suitable substrates on sheep ultimately causing myiasis. Earlier workers attempted to reduce fly population in the field, with some success, using traps baited with various attractants. This research was conducted to determine if L. sericata would respond to a recently developed synthetic attractant that has attracted gravid screwworms, Cochliomyia hominivorax Coquerel, and stimulated them to oviposit. Results of the laboratory bioassays demonstrated that gravid females L. sericata were attracted to substrates treated with the synthetic screwworm attractant composed of five compounds--dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, phenol, p-cresol, and indole. Tests with various combinations of these compounds suggest that the sulfur compounds and indole are the most important compounds to elicit attraction and stimulate oviposition, while phenol and p-cresol may have minor roles. Semiochemical baits based on these compounds may be useful in the field to trap gravid L. sericata. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Inhibition of prolyl 4-hydroxylase reduces scar hypertrophy in a rabbit model of cutaneous scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Injoong; Mogford, Jon E; Witschi, Claudia; Nafissi, Mehdi; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars result from excessive collagen deposition at sights of healing dermal wounds and can be functionally and cosmetically problematic. Pharmacological regulation of collagen synthesis and deposition is a direct approach to the control of scar tissue formation. We tested the ability of the phenanthrolinone derivative FG-1648 (in 0.5% Carbopol 971 PNF gel, pH 6.5), a prolyl 4-hydroxylase inhibitor, to reduce hypertrophic scar formation in a rabbit ear hypertrophic scar model. New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two treatment groups (n = 12 wounds per group with an equal number of controls): low-dose group: 0.5% FG-1648; high-dose group: 1% FG-1648. Left ears were used for treatment and right ear for control. Four 7-mm dermal ulcer wounds were made on each ear. The inhibitor was topically applied to the wound at the time of wounding and once daily up to postoperative day 7. Wounds were harvested at postoperative day 28 and scar hypertrophy quantified by measurement of the scar elevation index. All wounds showed complete healing. Treatment of wounds with 1% prolyl 4-hydroxylase inhibitor decreased the scar elevation index by 26% compared to control wounds (p < 0.01). Wounds treated with 0.5% FG-1648 inhibitor showed no difference in scar elevation compared to control wounds. These results suggest that inhibition of prolyl 4-hydroxylase may be a suitable agent for topical treatment for the prevention of hypertrophic scar tissue.

  14. Burn Scar Biomechanics Following Pressure Garment Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayne Y.; Willard, James J.; Supp, Dorothy M.; Roy, Sashwati; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Sen, Chandan K.; Powell, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The current standard of care for the prevention and treatment of scarring following burn injury is pressure garment therapy (PGT). Although this therapy has been used clinically for many years, controversy remains regarding its efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of PGT in a female Red Duroc pig (fRDP) burn model where wound depth could be tightly controlled. Methods Full-thickness burn wounds were generated on fRDPs. At day 28 post-burn, PGT was applied to half of the wounds (10 mmHg), with control wounds covered with garments exerting no compression. Scar area, perfusion, hardness, and elasticity were quantified at days 0, 28, 42, 56, and 72 using computerized planimetry, Laser Doppler and torsional ballistometry. Scar morphology was assessed at days 28, 56 and 76 using histology, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Results Pressure garment therapy significantly hindered scar contraction with control scars contracting to 64.6 + 13.9% original area at day 72 while PGT scars contracted to 82.7 + 17.9% original area. PGT significantly reduced skin hardness and increased skin strength by 1.3X. No difference in perfusion or blood vessel density was observed. Average collagen fiber diameter was greater in control burns than PGT. Conclusions PGT was effective at reducing scar contraction and improving biomechanics compared to control scars. These results confirm the efficacy of pressure garments and highlight the need to further investigate the role of pressure magnitude and time of therapy application to enhance their efficacy for optimal biomechanics and patient mobility. PMID:25989300

  15. Cesarean Scar Pregnancy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Vahedpoor

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Previous cesarean scar pregnancy if not detected early can be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the possibility of this pregnancy should be considered in pregnant women with uterine bleeding, abdominal pain as well as a history of cesarean section. It should be noted that after previous cesarean scar pregnancy was definitely diagnosed via ultrasound examination, treatment necessitates to be started utilizing methotrexate to ensure the future fertility of the mother.

  16. Preliminary Modeling and Simulation Study on Olfactory Cell Sensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Yang, Wei; Chen, Peihua; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    This paper introduced olfactory sensory neuron's whole-cell model with a concrete voltage-gated ionic channels and simulation. Though there are many models in olfactory sensory neuron and olfactory bulb, it remains uncertain how they express the logic of olfactory information processing. In this article, the olfactory neural network model is also introduced. This model specifies the connections among neural ensembles of the olfactory system. The simulation results of the neural network model are consistent with the observed olfactory biological characteristics such as 1/f-type power spectrum and oscillations.

  17. Attracting International Hotels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assaf, A. George; Josiassen, Alexander; Agbola, Frank Wogbe

    2015-01-01

    With the increased international competition facing hotel chains, it is essential that the next destination they enter is the most attractive option possible. The host destinations too have a keen interest in strategically positioning themselves in order to attract international hotels since...... their presence has several positive effects. Using, for the first time, actual on-location data we investigate the factors that matter most for international hotels when selecting host destinations. Specifically, we identify 23 factors that make a destination an attractive (or unattractive) location...... for international hotels. We then rank these. The results show that welcomeness, infrastructure, and crime rate are the three most important factors that influence the location of international hotels in host destinations....

  18. Attracting girls to physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Anne; Sui, Manling

    2013-03-01

    Large regional differences remain in the number of girls studying physics and the number of female physicists in academic positions. While many countries struggle with attracting female students to university studies in physics, climbing the academic ladder is the main challenge for these women. Furthermore, for many female physicists the working climate is not very supportive. The workshop Attracting Girls to Physics, organized as part of the 4th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, South Africa 2011, addressed attitudes among education-seeking teenagers and approaches for attracting young girls to physics through successful recruitment plans, including highlighting the broad spectrum of career opportunities for those with physics qualifications. The current paper presents findings, examples of best practices, and recommendations resulting from this workshop.

  19. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser in Treatment of Acne Scars

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scars appear as a result of skin damage during the process of the skin healing. There are two types of acne scars, depending on whether there is a loss or accumulation of collagen: atrophic and hypertrophic. In 80-90% it comes to scars with loss of collagen compared to smaller number of hypertrophic scars and keloids. AIM: The aim of the study was to determine efficiency and safety of fractional carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of acne scars. MATERIAL AN...

  20. [Odor sensing system and olfactory display].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2014-01-01

    In this review, an odor sensing system and an olfactory display are introduced into people in pharmacy. An odor sensing system consists of an array of sensors with partially overlapping specificities and pattern recognition technique. One of examples of odor sensing systems is a halitosis sensor which quantifies the mixture composition of three volatile sulfide compounds. A halitosis sensor was realized using a preconcentrator to raise sensitivity and an electrochemical sensor array to suppress the influence of humidity. Partial least squares (PLS) method was used to quantify the mixture composition. The experiment reveals that the sufficient accuracy was obtained. Moreover, the olfactory display, which present scents to human noses, is explained. A multi-component olfactory display enables the presentation of a variety of smells. The two types of multi-component olfactory display are described. The first one uses many solenoid valves with high speed switching. The valve ON frequency determines the concentration of the corresponding odor component. The latter one consists of miniaturized liquid pumps and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer. It enables the wearable olfactory display without smell persistence. Finally, the application of the olfactory display is demonstrated. Virtual ice cream shop with scents was made as a content of interactive art. People can enjoy harmony among vision, audition and olfaction. In conclusion, both odor sensing system and olfactory display can contribute to the field of human health care.

  1. Olfactory bulb as an alternative in neurotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Руслан Романович Новиков

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the ethical and legal aspects of transplantation of embryonic neural tissue, structure of the rat olfactory bulb. It is given substantiation for its use as a possible alternative version of the embryonic neural tissue at damage in the cerebral hemispheres in the experiment.Materials and methods. Detailed description of the fault model of the cerebral hemispheres of the brain of rats, olfactory bulb biopsy procedure, cultivation of olfactory bulb suspension and fetal neural tissue, comparison of the functional aspects of transplantation of the olfactory bulb and the embryonic neural tissue.Results. The obtained data are similar to structure of olfactory bulb and fetal tissues during culturing. Recovery in the motor areas varies by the time factor and less intense in the group of the olfactory bulb and the group without tissue transplantation.Conclusions. Comparative analysis of the effectiveness of transplantation of embryonic neural tissue and olfactory bulb in the injured brain allows us to speak about the positive results of these groups to the difference in the duration of the recovery process

  2. Imaging the olfactory tract (Cranial Nerve no.1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duprez, Thierry P. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Universite catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Avenue Hippocrate, 10, 1200-Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: Thierry.Duprez@uclouvain.be; Rombaux, Philippe [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Universite catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Avenue Hippocrate, 10, 1200-Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: Philippe.Rombaux@uclouvain.be

    2010-05-15

    This review paper browses pros and cons of the different radiological modalities for imaging the olfactory tract and highlights the potential benefits and limitation of more recent advances in MR and CT technology. A systematic pictorial overview of pathological conditions affecting olfactory sense is given. Techniques for collecting quantitative data on olfactory bulb volume and on olfactory sulcus depth are described. At last, insights into functional imaging of olfactory sense are shown.

  3. Analysis of Frequency of Use of Different Scar Assessment Scales Based on the Scar Condition and Treatment Method

    OpenAIRE

    Seong Hwan Bae; Yong Chan Bae

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of scars in various conditions is essential, but no consensus had been reached on the scar assessment scale to select for a given condition. We reviewed papers to determine the scar assessment scale selected depending on the scar condition and treatment method. We searched PubMed for articles published since 2000 with the contents of the scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale with a Journal Citation Report impact factor >0.5. Among them, 96 articles that conducted a scar evalu...

  4. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Shin; Homma, Ryota; Imamura, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the mitral cell layer, and granule cells in the granule cell layer. More recently, numerous studies have revealed the heterogeneous nature of each of these cell types, allowing them to be further divided into subclasses based on differences in morphological, molecular, and electrophysiological properties. In addition, technical developments and advances have resulted in an increasing number of studies regarding cell types other than the conventionally categorized ones described above, including short-axon cells and adult-generated interneurons. Thus, the expanding diversity of cells in the olfactory bulb is now being acknowledged. However, our current understanding of olfactory bulb neuronal circuits is mostly based on the conventional and simplest classification of cell types. Few studies have taken neuronal diversity into account for understanding the function of the neuronal circuits in this region of the brain. This oversight may contribute to the roadblocks in developing more precise and accurate models of olfactory neuronal networks. The purpose of this review is therefore to discuss the expanse of existing work on neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb up to this point, so as to provide an overall picture of the olfactory bulb circuit. PMID:25232305

  5. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin eNagayama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the mitral cell layer, and granule cells in the granule cell layer. More recently, numerous studies have revealed the heterogeneous nature of each of these cell types, allowing them to be further divided into subclasses based on differences in morphological, molecular, and electrophysiological properties. In addition, technical developments and advances have resulted in an increasing number of studies regarding cell types other than the conventionally categorized ones described above, including short-axon cells and adult-generated interneurons. Thus, the expanding diversity of cells in the olfactory bulb is now being acknowledged. However, our current understanding of olfactory bulb neuronal circuits is mostly based on the conventional and simplest classification of cell types. Few studies have taken neuronal diversity into account for understanding the function of the neuronal circuits in this region of the brain. This oversight may contribute to the roadblocks in developing more precise and accurate models of olfactory neuronal networks. The purpose of this review is therefore to discuss the expanse of existing work on neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb up to this point, so as to provide an overall picture of the olfactory bulb circuit.

  6. No-visible-scar cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz M. Wróblewski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS is a laparoscopic method providing a good cosmetic effect,but requiring the application of special ports and instruments enabling the surgeon to perform the procedure.We report three-ports cholecystectomy through umbilical and suprapubic incisions performed with typical laparos -copic instruments which calls no-visible-scar cholecystectomy (NVSC.Material and methods: Twenty patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis were qualified for NVSC. Typical CO2 pneumoperitoneumwas done after umbilical skin incision. Two ports of 5 mm were inserted in the maximum externaledges of this incision. After cystic duct and cystic artery dissection the right one was exchanged for a port of 11 mm.The second incision for the 11-mm trocar for the laparoscope was done in the suprapubic median line within the hairarea.Results: Cholecystectomies were performed without any conversion to classical laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LCHor open surgery. They were not technically identical due to the gradual improvement in the access and manipulationof instruments. The time of the intervention ranged from 2 hours during the introduction of the new method to 50 minfor the last procedures. No postoperative complications were observed and all patients were discharged not later thanafter conventional LCH.Conclusions: NVSC is a three-port laparoscopic intervention performed with typical laparoscopic instruments. It ismore convenient for the surgeon than single incision LCH, because the placement of the optic in the suprapubic regiongives more space for the instruments. It also provides a very good cosmetic effect of the intervention. The describedprocedure is easy to learn and in case of technical problems additional ports can be applied (as in typical LCH.

  7. [Olfactory bulb volume and depth of olfactory sulcus in patients with allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Gang; Hang, Wei

    2014-12-01

    To explore the olfactory abilities in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), analyze the correlation between olfactory bulb (OB) volume with depth of olfactory sulcus (OS) and olfactory function in patients with AR. One hundred patients with AR were compared with one hundred controls in terms of olfactory function T&T testing, OB volume and depth of OS assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). T&T testing and MRI were done after a year in 100 AR patients,the results were compared with the initial results. The OB volume in AR patients was (29.53±3.95) mm3 on the left, (29.67±14.21)mm3 on the right, (29.61±4.05) mm3 on average; The OB volume in controls was (48.93±6.73)mm3 on the left side, (48.81±7.43)mm3 on the right side, (48.85±7.11)mm3 on average; The OB volume in AR patients was less then the control group(t= 6.321, 6.141, 6.221, P0.05). Olfactory discriminate threshold was negatively correlated with OB volume in AR patients (r=-0.46, P0.05). Among 100 followed-up AR patients, 43 showed increased in OB volume and olfactory function after a year, but there was no statistical difference (t= 0. 811,0. 843, 0.826, P>0.05; Z=1.911, P>0.05) ,and the other 57 showed no significant changes of OB volume and olfactory function. In AR patients, the OB volume and olfactory function decreased, but the depth of OS had no significant changes. The OB volume is correlated with olfactory function, while the depth of OS is no correlated with olfactory function. Conservative treatment had some clinical significance on the recovery of olfactory function in patients with AR.

  8. Repeated formaldehyde inhalation impaired olfactory function and changed SNAP25 proteins in olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Yan, Weiqun; Bai, Yang; Zhu, Yingqiao; Ma, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Formaldehyde inhalation exposure, which can occur through occupational exposure, can lead to sensory irritation, neurotoxicity, mood disorders, and learning and memory impairment. However, its influence on olfactory function is unclear. To investigate the mechanism and the effect of repeated formaldehyde inhalation exposure on olfactory function. Rats were treated with formaldehyde inhalation (13·5±1·5 ppm, twice 30 minutes/day) for 14 days. Buried food pellet and locomotive activity tests were used to detect olfactory function and locomotion. Western blots were used to evaluate synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25) protein levels in the olfactory bulb (OB) lysate and synaptosome, as well as mature and immature olfactory sensory neuron markers, olfactory marker protein (OMP), and Tuj-1. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect SNAP25 mRNA amounts. Repeated formaldehyde inhalation exposure impaired olfactory function, whereas locomotive activities were unaffected. SNAP25 protein decreased significantly in the OB, but not in the occipital lobe. SNAP25 also decreased in the OB synaptosome when synaptophysin did not change after formaldehyde treatment. mRNA levels of SNAP25A and SNAP25B were unaffected. Mature and immature olfactory sensory neuron marker, OMP, and Tuj-1, did not change after formaldehyde treatment. Repeated formaldehyde exposure impaired olfactory function by disturbing SNAP25 protein in the OB.

  9. Analysis of olfactory function and the depth of olfactory sulcus in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Youn; Lee, Won Yong; Chung, Eun Joo; Dhong, Hun-Jong

    2007-08-15

    Olfactory deficit is known to occur frequently in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study aimed to explore olfactory deficit in PD and to investigate its possible correlation with the disease severity or the depth of the olfactory sulcus. Fifty-nine PD patients and 25 normal controls were examined by the odor identification test with the crosscultural smell identification test (CC-SIT). Among these subjects, the depth of the olfactory sulcus of 42 PD patients and 8 controls was measured in the plane of the posterior tangent through the eyeballs using the coronal view brain MRI. The CC-SIT scores of the PD patients were significantly lower than those of the normal control (P0.05). Our study confirms that CC-SIT is a helpful test in detecting the olfactory deficit in Korean PD patients. The absence of correlation of olfactory deficit with the disease severity or the depth of olfactory sulcus may suggest that olfactory loss precede the development of motor signs and not be a primary consequence of damage to the olfactory sulcus. Copyright (c) 2007 Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Vertical scar versus the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty : A 10-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwer, Lesley R.; van der Biezen, Jan Jaap; Spronk, Cees A.; van der Lei, Berend

    2012-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate whether the initial outcome of two types of reduction mammaplasty techniques (vertical scar reduction mammaplasty vs. the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty) remains stable in the long term: Sixty-nine patients who had undergone breast reduction

  11. Papular Acne Scars of the Nose and Chin: An Under-recognised Variant of Acne Scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Faisal R; Kirk, Michael; Madan, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Scarring following acne vulgaris is common and can be of profound psychosocial consequence. We have clinically noted a variant of acne scarring, overlooked by previous categorisation schemes, which we have denominated as papular acne scars of the nose and chin. We sought to characterise these novel entities further. Initially, we identified 14 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin in a cosmetic dermatology clinic, of whom two were female and rest were male. We then prospectively evaluated 100 consecutive patients attending our tertiary referral acne isotretinoin clinic and 49 patients attending a general dermatology clinic. Amongst 149 patients, from a general dermatology and tertiary acne clinic, soft papular scars were noted in four patients, distributed on the nose and chin. Three of the four patients were male, three patients had additional acne scars and the median age was 23.5. We have identified 18 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin and propose that this new category should be added to acne scarring classification schemes. Future work should be directed at corroborating the epidemiology of such lesions and describing effective treatment modalities.

  12. Papular acne scars of the nose and chin: An under-recognised variant of acne scarring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal R Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scarring following acne vulgaris is common and can be of profound psychosocial consequence. Aims and Objectives: We have clinically noted a variant of acne scarring, overlooked by previous categorisation schemes, which we have denominated as papular acne scars of the nose and chin. We sought to characterise these novel entities further. Materials and Methods: Initially, we identified 14 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin in a cosmetic dermatology clinic, of whom two were female and rest were male. We then prospectively evaluated 100 consecutive patients attending our tertiary referral acne isotretinoin clinic and 49 patients attending a general dermatology clinic. Results: Amongst 149 patients, from a general dermatology and tertiary acne clinic, soft papular scars were noted in four patients, distributed on the nose and chin. Three of the four patients were male, three patients had additional acne scars and the median age was 23.5. Conclusions: We have identified 18 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin and propose that this new category should be added to acne scarring classification schemes. Future work should be directed at corroborating the epidemiology of such lesions and describing effective treatment modalities.

  13. Modeling olfactory bulb evolution through primate phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive characterizations of primates have usually included a reduction in olfactory sensitivity. However, this inference of derivation and directionality assumes an ancestral state of olfaction, usually by comparison to a group of extant non-primate mammals. Thus, the accuracy of the inference depends on the assumed ancestral state. Here I present a phylogenetic model of continuous trait evolution that reconstructs olfactory bulb volumes for ancestral nodes of primates and mammal outgroups. Parent-daughter comparisons suggest that, relative to the ancestral euarchontan, the crown-primate node is plesiomorphic and that derived reduction in olfactory sensitivity is an attribute of the haplorhine lineage. The model also suggests a derived increase in olfactory sensitivity at the strepsirrhine node. This oppositional diversification of the strepsirrhine and haplorhine lineages from an intermediate and non-derived ancestor is inconsistent with a characterization of graded reduction through primate evolution.

  14. Methods to measure olfactory behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Junhui; Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Lu, Song; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-02-02

    Mice rely on the sense of olfaction to detect food sources, recognize social and mating partners, and avoid predators. Many behaviors of mice, including learning and memory, social interaction, fear, and anxiety are closely associated with their function of olfaction, and behavior tasks designed to evaluate those brain functions may use odors as cues. Accurate assessment of olfaction is not only essential for the study of olfactory system but also critical for proper interpretation of various mouse behaviors, especially learning and memory, emotionality and affect, and sociality. Here we describe a series of behavior experiments that offer multidimensional and quantitative assessments for mouse olfactory function, including olfactory habituation, discrimination, odor preference, odor detection sensitivity, and olfactory memory, with respect to both social and nonsocial odors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Improvement in corneal scarring following bacterial keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintic, S M; Srinivasan, M; Mascarenhas, J; Greninger, D A; Acharya, N R; Lietman, T M; Keenan, J D

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial keratitis results in corneal scarring and subsequent visual impairment. The long-term evolution of corneal scars has not been well described. In this case series, we identified patients who had improvement in corneal scarring and visual acuity from a clinical trial for bacterial keratitis. We searched the records of the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT) for patients who had improvement in vision between the 3-month and 12-month visits and reviewed their clinical photographs. Of the 500 patients enrolled in SCUT, five patients with large central corneal scars due to bacterial keratitis are presented. All experienced improvement in rigid contact lens-corrected visual acuity from months 3 to 12. All patients also had marked improvement in corneal opacity during the same time period. None of the patients opted to have penetrating keratoplasty. Corneal scars may continue to improve even many months after a bacterial corneal ulcer has healed. The corneal remodeling can be accompanied by considerable improvement in visual acuity, such that corneal transplantation may not be necessary.

  16. Cladistic Analysis of Olfactory and Vomeronasal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Gutierrez-Castellanos, Nicolás; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2010-01-01

    Most tetrapods possess two nasal organs for detecting chemicals in their environment, which are the sensory detectors of the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. The seventies’ view that the olfactory system was only devoted to sense volatiles, whereas the vomeronasal system was exclusively specialized for pheromone detection was challenged by accumulating data showing deep anatomical and functional interrelationships between both systems. In addition, the assumption that the vomeronasal system appeared as an adaptation to terrestrial life is being questioned as well. The aim of the present work is to use a comparative strategy to gain insight in our understanding of the evolution of chemical “cortex.” We have analyzed the organization of the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices of reptiles, marsupials, and placental mammals and we have compared our findings with data from other taxa in order to better understand the evolutionary history of the nasal sensory systems in vertebrates. The olfactory and vomeronsasal cortices have been re-investigated in garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis), short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), and rats (Rattus norvegicus) by tracing the efferents of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs using injections of neuroanatomical anterograde tracers (dextran-amines). In snakes, the medial olfactory tract is quite evident, whereas the main vomeronasal-recipient structure, the nucleus sphaericus is a folded cortical-like structure, located at the caudal edge of the amygdala. In marsupials, which are acallosal mammals, the rhinal fissure is relatively dorsal and the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices relatively expanded. Placental mammals, like marsupials, show partially overlapping olfactory and vomeronasal projections in the rostral basal telencephalon. These data raise the interesting question of how the telencephalon has been re-organized in different groups according to the biological relevance of chemical senses. PMID:21290004

  17. System identification of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Anmo J.; Lazar, Aurel A.; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B.

    2010-01-01

    The lack of a deeper understanding of how olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) encode odors has hindered the progress in understanding the olfactory signal processing in higher brain centers. Here we employ methods of system identification to investigate the encoding of time-varying odor stimuli and their representation for further processing in the spike domain by Drosophila OSNs. In order to apply system identification techniques, we built a novel low-turbulence odor delivery system that allowe...

  18. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alister U Nicol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odours and whether they can be investigated under anaesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odour smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anaesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odour under anaesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and GABA in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anaesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odour was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odour during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odour. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50% of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odours prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odour many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anaesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odours as well as in evoked glutamate and

  19. Cladistic analysis of olfactory and vomeronasal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alino eMartinez-Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most tetrapods possess two nasal organs for detecting chemicals in their environment, which are the sensory detectors of the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. The seventies’ view that the olfactory system was only devoted to sense volatiles, whereas the vomeronasal system was exclusively specialized for pheromone detection was challenged by accumulating data showing deep anatomical and functional interrelationships between both systems. In addition, the assumption that the vomeronasal system appeared as an adaptation to terrestrial life is being questioned as well. The aim of the present work is to use a comparative strategy to gain insight in our understanding of the evolution of chemical cortex. We have analyzed the organization of the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices of reptiles, marsupials and placental mammals and we have compared our findings with data from other taxa in order to better understand the evolutionary history of the nasal sensory systems in vertebrates. The olfactory and vomeronsasal cortices have been re-investigated in garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis, short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica and rats (Rattus norvegicus by tracing the efferents of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs using injections of neuroanatomical anterograde tracers (dextran-amines. In snakes, the medial olfactory tract is quite evident, whereas the main vomeronasal-recipient structure, the nucleus sphericus is a folded cortical-like structure, located at the caudal edge of the amygdala. In marsupials, which are acallosal mammals, the rhinal fissure is relatively dorsal and the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices relatively expanded. Placental mammals, like marsupials, show partially overlapping olfactory and vomeronasal projections in the rostral basal telencephalon. These data raise the interesting question of how the telencephalon has been re-organized in different groups according to the biological relevance of chemical senses.

  20. Conditional Deletion ofRic-8bin Olfactory Sensory Neurons Leads to Olfactory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Cleiton F; Nagai, Maíra H; Lyra, Cassandra S; Reis-Silva, Thiago M; Xavier, André M; Glezer, Isaias; Felicio, Luciano F; Malnic, Bettina

    2017-12-13

    The olfactory system can discriminate a vast number of odorants. This ability derives from the existence of a large family of odorant receptors expressed in the cilia of the olfactory sensory neurons. Odorant receptors signal through the olfactory-specific G-protein subunit, Gαolf. Ric-8b, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, interacts with Gαolf and can amplify odorant receptor signal transduction in vitro To explore the function of Ric-8b in vivo , we generated a tissue specific knock-out mouse by crossing OMP-Cre transgenic mice to Ric-8b floxed mice. We found that olfactory-specific Ric-8b knock-out mice of mixed sex do not express the Gαolf protein in the olfactory epithelium. We also found that in these mice, the mature olfactory sensory neuron layer is reduced, and that olfactory sensory neurons show increased rate of cell death compared with wild-type mice. Finally, behavioral tests showed that the olfactory-specific Ric-8b knock-out mice show an impaired sense of smell, even though their motivation and mobility behaviors remain normal. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Ric-8b is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) expressed in the olfactory epithelium and in the striatum. Ric-8b interacts with the olfactory Gαolf subunit, and can amplify odorant signaling through odorant receptors in vitro However, the functional significance of this GEF in the olfactory neurons in vivo remains unknown. We report that deletion of Ric-8b in olfactory sensory neurons prevents stable expression of Gαolf. In addition, we demonstrate that olfactory neurons lacking Ric-8b (and consequently Gαolf) are more susceptible to cell death. Ric-8b conditional knock-out mice display impaired olfactory guided behavior. Our results reveal that Ric-8b is essential for olfactory function, and suggest that it may also be essential for Gαolf-dependent functions in the brain. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/3712202-12$15.00/0.

  1. Timetable Attractiveness Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schittenhelm, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Timetable attractiveness is influenced by a set of key parameters that are described in this article. Regarding the superior structure of the timetable, the trend in Europe goes towards periodic regular interval timetables. Regular departures and focus on optimal transfer possibilities make...... these timetables attractive. The travel time in the timetable depends on the characteristics of the infrastructure and rolling stock, the heterogeneity of the planned train traffic and the necessary number of transfers on the passenger’s journey. Planned interdependencies between trains, such as transfers...... and heterogeneous traffic, add complexity to the timetable. The risk of spreading initial delays to other trains and parts of the network increases with the level of timetable complexity....

  2. CNPase Expression in Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Radtke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large body of work supports the proposal that transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs into nerve or spinal cord injuries can promote axonal regeneration and remyelination. Yet, some investigators have questioned whether the transplanted OECs associate with axons and form peripheral myelin, or if they recruit endogenous Schwann cells that form myelin. Olfactory bulbs from transgenic mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP under the control of the 2-3-cyclic nucleotide 3-phosphodiesterase (CNPase promoter were studied. CNPase is expressed in myelin-forming cells throughout their lineage. We examined CNPase expression in both in situ in the olfactory bulb and in vitro to determine if OECs express CNPase commensurate with their myelination potential. eGFP was observed in the outer nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. Dissociated OECs maintained in culture had both intense eGFP expression and CNPase immunostaining. Transplantation of OECs into transected peripheral nerve longitudinally associated with the regenerated axons. These data indicate that OECs in the outer nerve layer of the olfactory bulb of CNPase transgenic mice express CNPase. Thus, while OECs do not normally form myelin on olfactory nerve axons, their expression of CNPase is commensurate with their potential to form myelin when transplanted into injured peripheral nerve.

  3. Olfactory deficits in boys with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, R A; Sheehe, P R; McCanty, T; Vespasiano, M; Post, E M; Guzi, S; Wright, H

    1988-12-01

    An odor identification task was used to determine whether individuals with cleft palate (with or without cleft lip) also have an increased prevalence of olfactory deficits. Olfactory responses of 35 affected subjects (7 to 22 years of age) were compared with those of 68 subjects of comparable age without cleft palates. Subjects were requested to identify the smell of ten common household odors. They selected their responses from an alphabetized list of the test odorants. After a practice trial, the set of odorants was presented five times in randomized sequences. The percentage of correct responses increased with age for prepubertal and pubertal subjects without cleft palates. Although the olfactory scores of girls without cleft palates continued to increase after puberty, this trend was absent in boys. On the average, the girls with cleft palates, compared with only three of 34 boys without cleft palates, had olfactory scores less than 60% correct. There was no evidence of heterogeneity in the magnitude or direction of the relationship between any of the subtypes of cleft palate and olfactory dysfunction. In this study, cleft palate is more strongly associated with olfactory deficits in boys than in girls, suggesting the possibility that the deficit may be a sex-influenced trait.

  4. Scar Endometriosis at the Site of Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Hsu, Senzen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Scar endometriosis is a rare condition. We report a case of scar endometriosis occurring at the site of an old cesarean section scar. Case Report: A 29-year-old multiparous woman complained of painful sensation during menstruation for 2 years that occurred at the site of her cesarean section surgical scar. On examination, there was a firm nodule measuring 2 × 1.5 cm in size at the mid-point of the scar. In view of the possibility of scar endometriosis, the mass was completely ex...

  5. Watermarking scar as an ultimate copy protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braci, Sofiane; Miraoui, Abdelkader; Delpha, Claude; Boyer, Rémy

    2010-02-01

    Strong and powerful attacks are able to make the watermark extraction impossible even if there is some watermarking. In this work, we call this residual information the scar and we use it to prove the existence of an attacked watermark. We evaluate the Scar by the mutual information between the embedded watermark and the attacked copies. It is well known that the mutual information between two random variables gives an evaluation of the shared information between the two variables. Thus, the attack can compromise the correct decoding by removing partialy the watermarking information. However, it is possible to make the watermarking existence proof possible when the mutual information between the embedded message and the attacked copies is above a certain threshold. We propose a practical way to use the scar by measuring the correlation between the attacked watermark and the original one.

  6. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  7. Current Therapeutic Approach to Hypertrophic Scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrinka Bukvić Mokos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal scarring and its accompanying esthetic, functional, and psychological sequelae still pose significant challe nges. To date, there is no satisfactory prevention or treatment option for hypertrophic scars (HSs, which is mostly due to not completely comprehending the mechanisms underlying their formation. That is why the apprehension of regular and controlled physiological processes of scar formation is of utmost importance when facing hypertrophic scarring, its pathophysiology, prevention, and therapeutic approach. When treating HSs and choosing the best treatment and prevention modality, physicians can choose from a plethora of therapeutic options and many commercially available products, among which currently there is no efficient option that can successfully overcome impaired skin healing. This article reviews current therapeutic approach and emerging therapeutic strategies for the management of HSs, which should be individualized, based on an evaluation of the scar itself, patients’ expectations, and practical, evidence-based guidelines. Clinicians are encouraged to combine various prevention and treatment modalities where combination therapy that includes steroid injections, 5-fluorouracil, and pulsed-dye laser seems to be the most effective. On the other hand, the current therapeutic options are usually empirical and their results are unreliable and unpredictable. Therefore, there is an unmet need for an effective, targeted therapy and prevention, which would be based on an action or a modulation of a particular factor with clarified mechanism of action that has a beneficial effect on wound healing. As the extracellular matrix has a crucial role in cellular and extracellular events that lead to pathological scarring, targeting its components mostly by regulating bone morphogenetic proteins may throw up new therapeutic approach for reduction or prevention of HSs with functionally and cosmetically acceptable outcome.

  8. Quality of life and psychosocial impact of scarring and non-scarring alopecia in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoulis, Alexandros C; Christodoulou, Christos; Liakou, Aikaterini I; Kouris, Anargyros; Korkoliakou, Panagiota; Kaloudi, Eythymia; Kanelleas, Antonios; Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios

    2015-02-01

    Alopecia is a common dermatological condition with mostly cosmetic consequences that, nevertheless, has significant psychological and psychosocial impact. To assess the impact of alopecia on quality of life and certain psychological domains and to compare it between scarring and non-scarring alopecia in Greek adult women. Forty-four women, aged 18-70 years, with scarring (n = 19) or non-scarring alopecia (n = 25) were recruited. All patients were evaluated by Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES) and UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-LS). Women with scarring alopecia had higher scores in DLQI, HADS and UCLA- LS and lower scores in RSES, compared to women with non-scarring alopecia. A statistically significant difference between the two groups was documented for DLQI (p = 0.0067), HADS (p = 0.0008), and HADS-Anxiety (HADS-A) (p alopecia compared with non-scarring alopecia, probably depicting the poorer prognosis of the former. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Notch1 activity in the olfactory bulb is odour-dependent and contributes to olfactory behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brai, Emanuele; Marathe, Swananda; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Nimpf, Johannes; Kretz, Robert; Scotti, Alessandra; Alberi, Lavinia

    2014-11-01

    Notch signalling plays an important role in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory functions in both Drosophila and rodents. In this paper, we report that this feature is not restricted to hippocampal networks but also involves the olfactory bulb (OB). Odour discrimination and olfactory learning in rodents are essential for survival. Notch1 expression is enriched in mitral cells of the mouse OB. These principal neurons are responsive to specific input odorants and relay the signal to the olfactory cortex. Olfactory stimulation activates a subset of mitral cells, which show an increase in Notch activity. In Notch1cKOKln mice, the loss of Notch1 in mitral cells affects the magnitude of the neuronal response to olfactory stimuli. In addition, Notch1cKOKln mice display reduced olfactory aversion to propionic acid as compared to wildtype controls. This indicates, for the first time, that Notch1 is involved in olfactory processing and may contribute to olfactory behaviour. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Relation of the volume of the olfactory bulb to psychophysical measures of olfactory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazal, Patricia Portillo; Haehner, Antje; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to investigate whether changes in olfactory bulb volume relate to changes in specific olfactory functions. We studied currently available peer-reviewed articles on the volume of the human olfactory bulb that also included a psychophysical measure of olfactory function. In the present review, we observed a very clear and consistent correlation between general olfactory function and olfactory bulb (OB) volume. We were not able to find a clear relationship between a specific smell component and OB volume, even when analyzing pathologic conditions separately. In some cases, changes were observed for different subtests, but these changes did not significantly correlate with OB volume or had only a borderline correlation. In other cases, we found contradictory data. Several factors may contribute to the difficulties in finding correlations with the different components of smell: (1) the OB volume may be influenced by information from olfactory receptor neurons (bottom-up effect), information from central nervous system (top-down effect) and by direct damage; (2) most pathologic conditions affect more than one area of the olfactory pathway; (3) small sample sizes of hyposmic subjects were used. We believe that it is necessary to do further studies with larger numbers of subjects to answer the currently investigated question.

  11. Olfactory imprinting is correlated with changes in gene expression in the olfactory epithelia of the zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Maegan V; Newton, Lucy A; Lloyd, Russell C; Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2006-11-01

    Odors experienced as juveniles can have significant effects on the behavior of mature organisms. A dramatic example of this occurs in salmon, where the odors experienced by developing fish determine the river to which they return as adults. Further examples of olfactory memories are found in many animals including vertebrates and invertebrates. Yet, the cellular and molecular bases underlying the formation of olfactory memory are poorly understood. We have devised a series of experiments to determine whether zebrafish can form olfactory memories much like those observed in salmonids. Here we show for the first time that zebrafish form and retain olfactory memories of an artificial odorant, phenylethyl alcohol (PEA), experienced as juveniles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to PEA results in changes in gene expression within the olfactory sensory system. These changes are evident by in situ hybridization in the olfactory epithelium of the developing zebrafish. Strikingly, our analysis by in situ hybridization demonstrates that the transcription factor, otx2, is up regulated in the olfactory sensory epithelia in response to PEA. This increase is evident at 2-3 days postfertilization and is maintained in the adult animals. We propose that the changes in otx2 gene expression are manifest as an increase in the number of neuronal precursors in the cells olfactory epithelium of the odor-exposed fish. Thus, our results reveal a role for the environment in controlling gene expression in the developing peripheral nervous system. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The location of olfactory receptors within olfactory epithelium is independent of odorant volatility and solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFazio Anthony R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to study the pattern of olfactory receptor expression within the dorsal and ventral regions of the mouse olfactory epithelium. We hypothesized that olfactory receptors were distributed based on the chemical properties of their ligands: e.g. receptors for polar, hydrophilic and weakly volatile odorants would be present in the dorsal region of olfactory epithelium; while receptors for non-polar, more volatile odorants would be distributed to the ventral region. To test our hypothesis, we used micro-transplantation of cilia-enriched plasma membranes derived from dorsal or ventral regions of the olfactory epithelium into Xenopus oocytes for electrophysiological characterization against a panel of 100 odorants. Findings Odorants detected by ORs from the dorsal and ventral regions showed overlap in volatility and water solubility. We did not find evidence for a correlation between the solubility and volatility of odorants and the functional expression of olfactory receptors in the dorsal or ventral region of the olfactory epithelia. Conclusions No simple clustering or relationship between chemical properties of odorants could be associated with the different regions of the olfactory epithelium. These results suggest that the location of ORs within the epithelium is not organized based on the physico-chemical properties of their ligands.

  13. Olfactory processing and odor specificity: a meta-analysis of menstrual cycle variation in olfactory sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinec Nováková Lenka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-correlated variation in olfactory threshold, with women becoming more sensitive to odors mid-cycle, is somewhat supported by the literature but the evidence is not entirely consistent, with several studies finding no, or mixed, effects. It has been argued that cyclic shifts in olfactory threshold might be limited to odors relevant to the mating context.

  14. Attractiveness Is Multimodal: Beauty Is Also in the Nose and Ear of the Beholder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Groyecka

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Attractiveness plays a central role in human non-verbal communication and has been broadly examined in diverse subfields of contemporary psychology. Researchers have garnered compelling evidence in support of the evolutionary functions of physical attractiveness and its role in our daily lives, while at the same time, having largely ignored the significant contribution of non-visual modalities and the relationships among them. Acoustic and olfactory cues can, separately or in combination, strongly influence the perceived attractiveness of an individual and therefore attitudes and actions toward that person. Here, we discuss the relative importance of visual, auditory and olfactory traits in judgments of attractiveness, and review neural and behavioral studies that support the highly complex and multimodal nature of person perception. Further, we discuss three alternative evolutionary hypotheses aimed at explaining the function of multiple indices of attractiveness. In this review, we provide several lines of evidence supporting the importance of the voice, body odor, and facial and body appearance in the perception of attractiveness and mate preferences, and therefore the critical need to incorporate cross-modal perception and multisensory integration into future research on human physical attractiveness.

  15. Attractiveness Is Multimodal: Beauty Is Also in the Nose and Ear of the Beholder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groyecka, Agata; Pisanski, Katarzyna; Sorokowska, Agnieszka; Havlíček, Jan; Karwowski, Maciej; Puts, David; Roberts, S Craig; Sorokowski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Attractiveness plays a central role in human non-verbal communication and has been broadly examined in diverse subfields of contemporary psychology. Researchers have garnered compelling evidence in support of the evolutionary functions of physical attractiveness and its role in our daily lives, while at the same time, having largely ignored the significant contribution of non-visual modalities and the relationships among them. Acoustic and olfactory cues can, separately or in combination, strongly influence the perceived attractiveness of an individual and therefore attitudes and actions toward that person. Here, we discuss the relative importance of visual, auditory and olfactory traits in judgments of attractiveness, and review neural and behavioral studies that support the highly complex and multimodal nature of person perception. Further, we discuss three alternative evolutionary hypotheses aimed at explaining the function of multiple indices of attractiveness. In this review, we provide several lines of evidence supporting the importance of the voice, body odor, and facial and body appearance in the perception of attractiveness and mate preferences, and therefore the critical need to incorporate cross-modal perception and multisensory integration into future research on human physical attractiveness.

  16. Functional Regeneration Beyond the Glial Scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cregg, Jared M.; DePaul, Marc A.; Filous, Angela R.; Lang, Brad T.; Tran, Amanda; Silver, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes react to CNS injury by building a dense wall of filamentous processes around the lesion. Stromal cells quickly take up residence in the lesion core and synthesize connective tissue elements that contribute to fibrosis. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells proliferate within the lesion and help to entrap dystrophic axon tips. Here we review evidence that this aggregate scar acts as the major barrier to regeneration of axons after injury. We also consider several exciting new interventions that allow axons to regenerate beyond the glial scar, and discuss the implications of this work for the future of regeneration biology. PMID:24424280

  17. Scar treatment variations by skin type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Marty O; Bailey, J Kevin; Hom, David B

    2014-08-01

    Patients and clinicians use skin color attributes such as color uniformity, color distribution, and texture to infer physiologic health status. Normalization of skin color, surface texture, and height are important treatment goals in the treatment of scars. Skin color, structure, and response to trauma, vary with ethnicity. The incidence of hypertrophic and keloid scar formation is influenced by these inherent skin attributes. Skin type influences the response to various modalities including laser therapy and surgical intervention, and skin differences must be considered in treatment planning to achieve optimal results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transmission and scarring in graphene quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Liang; Lai Yingcheng; Ferry, David K; Akis, Richard; Goodnick, Stephen M [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2009-08-26

    We study electronic transport in quantum-dot structures made of graphene. Focusing on the rectangular dot geometry and utilizing the non-equilibrium Green's function to calculate the transmission in the tight-binding framework, we find significant fluctuations in the transmission as a function of the electron energy. The fluctuations are correlated with the formation of quantum scarring states, or pointer states in the dot. Both enhancement and suppression of transmission have been observed. As the size of the quantum dot is increased, more scarring states can be formed, leading to stronger transmission or conductance fluctuations.

  19. Chronic caesarian section scar pain treated with fascial scar release techniques: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Jennifer B; Steele-Thornborrow, Jessica L; Yuen, Jeremy S; Halkiotis, Melissa; Riggins, Elizabeth M

    2016-10-01

    To describe outcomes of two subjects with chronically painful Caesarian section (C-section) scars following an intervention of specific myofascial scar release techniques. Case series. Over 1.3 million C-sections are performed annually in the US. Anywhere from 7 to 18% of those will develop chronic scar pain. Although anecdotal evidence supporting the use of fascial release in reducing surgical scar pain exists, almost no research has been published. Two subjects who both underwent two C-sections resulting in chronic discomfort of 6-9 years duration participated in this study. Both reported premenstrual pain, pain upon pressure to the lower abdomen, and pain during bowel movements. Subject 1 also reported sharp pain with bed mobility. Four, 30-min treatment sessions over a period of two weeks consisted of stretching the scar until a release in tissue tension was felt by the treating therapist. Outcome measures included pain and pressure tolerance using a Pressure Algometer, measurements of scar flexibility using an Adheremeter, and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). These measures were collected at baseline, five days after the final treatment and at four weeks. Both subjects demonstrated improvements in all outcome measures. At four weeks, pressure tolerance at all point improved as much as 79% (p < 0.0001) and scar mobility increased in all directions at all points as much as 200% (p < 0.0001). Following treatment, both subjects rated their premenstrual pain for all previously painful activities at 0/10 for the first time since their surgeries. These results suggest that scar release techniques may help reduce chronic scar pain in women who have had C-section surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Attracting attention. Posters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Posters are useful in health education campaigns for announcing events, reinforcing messages communicated through other media, and providing a starting point for discussion. Posters should be clear enough to be understood on their own, sufficiently striking to attract attention, and displayed in places where they will be seen by the target population. The posters should be changed regularly or people will stop noticing them. All posters should be carefully planned and pretested with the intended target group. Use of color can help ensure that figures and symbols stand out from the background and lower case letters are easier to read than all capital letters. Finally, the lettering should be neat and even.

  1. Database of predicted SCAR markers in five fruit and three ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-03-04

    ; Paran and Michelmore 1993) markers were introduced to overcome the disadvantages of RAPD. It is easy to design SCAR primers if the target sequence is known. SCAR primers are longer (18–25 bases) than RAPD.

  2. Will stem cells bring hope to pathological skin scar treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiankun; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-08-01

    Pathological skin scars, such as keloids, aesthetically and psychosocially affect patients. The quest for scar reduction and the increasing recognition of patient satisfaction has led to the continued exploration of scar treatment. Stem cells are a promising source for tissue repair and regeneration. The multi-potency and secretory functions of these cells could offer possible treatments for pathological scars and have been examined in recent studies. Here, we analyze the factors that influence the formation of pathological skin scars, summarize recent research on pathological scar treatment with stem cells and elaborate on the possible mechanisms of this treatment. Additionally, other effects of stem cell treatments are also presented while evaluating potential side effects of stem cell-based pathological scar treatments. Thus, this review may provide meaningful guidance in the clinic for scar treatments with stem cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Before and After Photos: Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ...

  4. Short scar correction of the tuberous breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Liacyr; Accorsi, Affonso; Buss, Affonso; Pessĵa, Marcelo Castro Marçal

    2002-07-01

    This article describes the author's technique-an alternative form of short scar correction of tuberous breast. The historical background that suports the technique is described as well as the surgical sequence. Illustrative cases and postoperative results reached by author's technique are shown.

  5. Recombinant human endostatin reduces hypertrophic scar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Sixteen New Zealand white rabbits were used to establish HS models. Then, rabbit ears containing HS were randomly assigned to either the Endostar group or the control group. The changes of appearance and histology were evaluated using the naked eye, hematoxylin eosin staining, and a scar elevation index.

  6. Pulmonary scar carcinoma in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of both fibrosis and cancer.[2,3]. The Western Cape Province of South Africa (SA) has one of the highest recorded incidences of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in the world, and also carries a high burden of smoking-related diseases including lung cancer.[4] However, the potential association between pulmonary scarring and ...

  7. An idiosyncratic history of burn scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Jane A

    2015-03-01

    The history of burn scars can best be found in military medical history. The care of wounded soldiers documented in the Illiad reflected the trauma of the weapons of war, arrow, spear, sword, and ax. The introduction of gunpowder in the 14th century, increasingly sophisticated explosives, and in modern times, petroleum-driven vehicles, including airplanes, created a new subset of wounds requiring attention and post-survival scars challenging the quality of survival. This article selects from among a myriad of examples of modern military treatments as they relate to those survivors. Larrey, with Napolean's Grand Army, Sir Harold Gilles during and following World War I, and the Boston area preparation and response to the Cocoanut Grove Fire in 1942 are the principle topics examined. Recent modern interventions, related to the survival of horrific blast and burn injuries, with modern wound care and scar manipulation techniques provide context to the current ability to modify healing and scars. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  8. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited to...

  9. "Scars" connect classical and quantum theory

    CERN Multimedia

    Monteiro, T

    1990-01-01

    Chaotic systems are unstable and extremely sensitive to initial condititions. So far, scientists have been unable to demonstrate that the same kind of behaviour exists in quantum or microscopic systems. New connections have been discovered though between classical and quantum theory. One is the phenomena of 'scars' which cut through the wave function of a particle (1 page).

  10. Involvement of TRPV1 in the Olfactory Bulb in Rimonabant-Induced Olfactory Discrimination Deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung

    2016-02-29

    Rimonabant is well recognized as a cannabinoid CB₁ receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Rimonabant not only antagonizes the effects induced by exogenous cannabinoids and endocannabinoids at CB₁ receptors, it also exerts several pharmacological and behavioral effects independent of CB₁ receptor inactivation. For example, rimonabant can function as a low-potency mixed agonist/antagonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1). Hence, it is important to explain the underlying mechanisms of the diverse physiological effects induced by rimonabant with caution. Interestingly, CB₁ receptor has recently been suggested to play a role in olfactory functions. Olfaction not only is involved in food intake, visual perception and social interaction, but also is proposed as a putative marker for schizophrenia and autism. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether CB₁ receptor and TRPV1 played a role in olfactory functions. We first used the genetic disruption approach to examine the role of CB₁ receptor in olfactory functions and found that CB₁ knockout mice exhibited olfactory discrimination deficit. However, it is important to point out that these CB₁ knockout mice, despite their normal locomotivity, displayed deficiencies in the olfactory foraging and novel object exploration tasks. These results imply that general exploratory behaviors toward odorant and odorless objects are compromised in CB₁ knockout mice. We next turned to the pharmacological approach to examine the role of CB₁ receptor and TRPV1 in olfactory functions. We found that the short-term administration of rimonabant, injected systemically or directly into the olfactory bulb (OB), impaired olfactory discrimination that was rescued by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (CPZ), via the same route of rimonabant, in wild-type mice. These results suggest that TRPV1 in the OB is involved in rimonabant-induced olfactory discrimination deficit. However, the

  11. Effect of Olfactory Stimulus on the Flight Course of a Honeybee, Apis mellifera, in a Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Ikeno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the honeybee, Apis mellifera, uses olfactory stimulus as important information for orienting to food sources. Several studies on olfactory-induced orientation flight have been conducted in wind tunnels and in the field. From these studies, optical sensing is used as the main information with the addition of olfactory signals and the navigational course followed by these sensory information. However, it is not clear how olfactory information is reflected in the navigation of flight. In this study, we analyzed the detailed properties of flight when oriented to an odor source in a wind tunnel. We recorded flying bees with a video camera to analyze the flight area, speed, angular velocity and trajectory. After bees were trained to be attracted to a feeder, the flight trajectories with or without the olfactory stimulus located upwind of the feeder were compared. The results showed that honeybees flew back and forth in the proximity of the odor source, and the search range corresponded approximately to the odor spread area. It was also shown that the angular velocity was different inside and outside the odor spread area, and trajectories tended to be bent or curved just outside the area.

  12. The clinical outcome of cesarean scar pregnancies implanted "on the scar" versus "in the niche".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelin Agten, Andrea; Cali, Giuseppe; Monteagudo, Ana; Oviedo, Johana; Ramos, Joanne; Timor-Tritsch, Ilan

    2017-05-01

    The term cesarean scar pregnancy refers to placental implantation within the scar of a previous cesarean delivery. The rising numbers of cesarean deliveries in the last decades have led to an increased incidence of cesarean scar pregnancy. Complications of cesarean scar pregnancy include morbidly adherent placenta, uterine rupture, severe hemorrhage, and preterm labor. It is suspected that cesarean scar pregnancies that are implanted within a dehiscent scar ("niche") behave differently compared with those implanted on top of a well-healed scar. To date there are no studies that have compared pregnancy outcomes between cesarean scar pregnancies implanted either "on the scar" or "in the niche." The purpose of this study was to determine the pregnancy outcome of cesarean scar pregnancy implanted either "on the scar" or "in the niche." This was a retrospective 2-center study of 17 patients with cesarean scar pregnancy that was diagnosed from 5-9 weeks gestation (median, 8 weeks). All cesarean scar pregnancies were categorized as either implanted or "on the scar" (group A) or "in the niche" (group B), based on their first-trimester transvaginal ultrasound examination. Clinical outcomes based on gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, blood loss at delivery, neonate weight and placental histopathologic condition were compared between the groups with the use of the Mann-Whitney U test. Myometrial thickness overlying the placenta was compared among all the patients who required hysterectomy and those who did not with the use of the Mann-Whitney U test. Myometrial thickness was also correlated with gestational age at delivery with the use of Spearman's correlation. Group A consisted of 6 patients; group B consisted of 11 patients. Gestational age at delivery was lower in group B (median, 34 weeks; range, 20-36 weeks) than in group A (median, 38 weeks; range, 37-39 weeks; P=.001). In group A, 5 patients were delivered via cesarean delivery (with normal placenta), and

  13. SCAR knockouts in Dictyostelium: WASP assumes SCAR's position and upstream regulators in pseudopods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Veltman, Douwe M; King, Jason S; Machesky, Laura M; Insall, Robert H

    2012-01-01

    ...) assembles actin at clathrin-coated pits. We show that, unexpectedly, Dictyostelium discoideum SCAR knockouts could still spread, migrate, and chemotax using pseudopods driven by the Arp2/3 complex...

  14. The Development of Olfactory Organ of Lissotriton Vulgaris (Amphibia, Caudata)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M F Kovtun; Ya V Stepanyuk

    2015-01-01

      The Development of Olfactory Organ of Lissotriton vulgaris (Amphibia, Caudata). Kovtun, M. F, Stepanyuk, Ya. V. - Using common histological methods, the morphogenesis of olfactory analyzer peripheral part of Lissotriton vulgaris...

  15. The Development of Olfactory Organ of Lissotriton Vulgaris (Amphibia, Caudata)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. F. Kovtun; Ya. V. Stepanyuk

    2015-01-01

    The Development of Olfactory Organ of Lissotriton vulgaris (Amphibia, Caudata). Kovtun, M. F, Stepanyuk, Ya. V. - Using common histological methods, the morphogenesis of olfactory analyzer peripheral part of Lissotriton vulgaris...

  16. The hidden cost of skin scars: quality of life after skin scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, B C; McKenna, S P; Siddhi, K; McGrouther, D A; Bayat, A

    2008-09-01

    Surprisingly little is known about how skin scars affect patients' lives, though specialist clinical impressions suggest their impact is related to both their physical and psychosocial effects. Facial scars have been shown to cause high levels of anxiety and self-consciousness, but further work has been neglected. We aimed to explore the influence of skin scars on patients' quality of life (QoL) and identify potential implications for clinical practice. We adopted a needs-based approach to QoL and conducted semi-structured interviews with scar patients at a specialist clinic. Transcribed data underwent interpretative phenomenological analysis to identify common themes in individuals' personal experiences. Thirty-four scar patients (24 women; aged 14-70 years, mean=35.7 years, SD=17.9 years) with a wide range of scar type, severity and onset were recruited. Five hundred and seventy-three statements were identified from interview transcripts relating to need impairment by skin scars. These were subsequently classified into 44 themes covering five main areas: physical comfort and functioning; acceptability to self and others; social functioning; confidence in the nature and management of the condition; emotional well-being. The majority of respondents were unhappy with their scar's appearance due to their perceived stigma and psychological associations, and thus adopted different coping behaviours to hide or compensate for them. Often this made them unsociable and interfered with their communication skills, personal relationships, work life and leisure activities. Concerns about the diagnosis and persistent nature of scars were common, whilst unempathic management by general physicians and frustrations of current treatment compounded distress. There are five main areas of impact on the needs of scar patients that should be addressed in their management, which are greater and more complex than previously considered. Support services should be made available, along with

  17. Combination therapy in the management of atrophic acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5% patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5% patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7% patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1% patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2% patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100% patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars.

  18. Prevalence of scar contractures after burn : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, Anouk M; Mouton, Leonora J; Schouten, Hennie; Disseldorp, Laurien M; van der Schans, Cees P.; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    OBJECTIVE: Burn scar contractures are the pathological outcome of excessive scarring and ongoing scar contraction. Impairment of joint range of motion is a threat to performing activities in daily living. To direct treatment strategies to prevent and/or correct such contractures, insight into the

  19. The Use of Silicone Adhesives for Scar Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleasdale, Benjamin; Finnegan, Simon; Murray, Kathyryn; Kelly, Sean; Percival, Steven L

    2015-07-01

    Significance: This article discusses the history and developments of silicone gel sheeting (SGS) scar therapy. Furthermore, we review a breadth of literature to gain an insight into how and why topical silicone gels remain the favored treatment of medical experts in scar management. We also analyze an ever increasing number of alternative therapies claiming to provide enhanced scar reduction performance. Recent Advances: Topical silicone gel treatments seem to remain the first point of clinical recommendation in scar management. SGS has been used in scar therapy for over 30 years, during which its efficacy has been the subject of numerous clinical evaluations. Critical Issues: While the exact mechanisms by which SGS improves hypertrophic scars, keloid development and recovery are yet to be fully agreed upon, its ability to do so remains largely undisputed at present. However, there still is ongoing deliberation over the exact mechanism of action of silicone in improving a scar. At present it is likely that through occlusion of the scar site and hydration of the wound bed, the overactivity of scar-related cells is suppressed, and their activity normalized. Future Direction: The clinical support of topical silicone gel products, relative to all alternative scar therapies, is considered the internationally recommended first-line form of scar management, and favored by consensus among healthcare professionals. However, there still remains the need for further clinical evidence and a better understanding of the mechanism behind the benefit of silicone gel for use in the prevention of abnormal scarring.

  20. Currently known risk factors for hypertrophic skin scarring : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butzelaar, L.; Ulrich, M. M W; Mink Van Der Molen, A. B.; Niessen, F. B.; Beelen, R. H J

    2016-01-01

    SummaryObjective The study aims to provide an overview of risk factors for hypertrophic scarring. Background Hypertrophic skin scarring remains a major concern in medicine and causes considerable morbidity. Despite extensive research on this topic, the precise mechanism of excessive scarring is

  1. The Use of Silicone Adhesives for Scar Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleasdale, Benjamin; Finnegan, Simon; Murray, Kathyryn; Kelly, Sean; Percival, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: This article discusses the history and developments of silicone gel sheeting (SGS) scar therapy. Furthermore, we review a breadth of literature to gain an insight into how and why topical silicone gels remain the favored treatment of medical experts in scar management. We also analyze an ever increasing number of alternative therapies claiming to provide enhanced scar reduction performance. Recent Advances: Topical silicone gel treatments seem to remain the first point of clinical recommendation in scar management. SGS has been used in scar therapy for over 30 years, during which its efficacy has been the subject of numerous clinical evaluations. Critical Issues: While the exact mechanisms by which SGS improves hypertrophic scar/span>s, keloid development and recovery are yet to be fully agreed upon, its ability to do so remains largely undisputed at present. However, there still is ongoing deliberation over the exact mechanism of action of silicone in improving a scar. At present it is likely that through occlusion of the scar site and hydration of the wound bed, the overactivity of scar-related cells is suppressed, and their activity normalized. Future Direction: The clinical support of topical silicone gel products, relative to all alternative scar therapies, is considered the internationally recommended first-line form of scar management, and favored by consensus among healthcare professionals. However, there still remains the need for further clinical evidence and a better understanding of the mechanism behind the benefit of silicone gel for use in the prevention of abnormal scarring. PMID:26155385

  2. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  3. Therapeutic Improvement of Scarring: Mechanisms of Scarless and Scar-Forming Healing and Approaches to the Discovery of New Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick L. Occleston

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Scarring in the skin after trauma, surgery, burn or sports injury is a major medical problem, often resulting in loss of function, restriction of tissue movement and adverse psychological effects. Whilst various studies have utilised a range of model systems that have increased our understanding of the pathways and processes underlying scar formation, they have typically not translated to the development of effective therapeutic approaches for scar management. Existing treatments are unreliable and unpredictable and there are no prescription drugs for the prevention or treatment of dermal scarring. As a consequence, scar improvement still remains an area of clear medical need. Here we describe the basic science of scar-free and scar-forming healing, the utility of pre-clinical model systems, their translation to humans, and our pioneering approach to the discovery and development of therapeutic approaches for the prophylactic improvement of scarring in man

  4. Vertical scar versus the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty: a 10-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, Lesley R; van der Biezen, Jan Jaap; Spronk, Cees A; van der Lei, Berend

    2012-10-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate whether the initial outcome of two types of reduction mammaplasty techniques (vertical scar reduction mammaplasty vs. the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty) remains stable in the long term: Sixty-nine patients who had undergone breast reduction surgery in the period 1997-2000 at the Department of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery at the Medical Center of Leeuwarden were willing and able to participate in this study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess the degree of patient satisfaction. For subjective evaluation, the Strasser Grading System on photographs at the 3 months after surgery and after long-term follow-up (10 years) was used. The median general appreciation mark for the entire surgical procedure given by patients was 8 (1-10) on a scale from 1 to 10. Forty-six of the 69 patients could be scored according to Strasser: at 3 months in 17 patients (37%) the result was 'good', in 21 patients (46%) 'mediocre' and in eight patients (17%) 'poor'. After 10 years, in 37 of the patients (80%) the result was 'good', in six patients (13%) 'mediocre' and in three patients (7%) 'poor'. At 3 months, there was a higher incidence of bottoming out in the vertical scar group (one on two patients) as compared to the inverted-T scar group (one on 10 patients); however, at the 10-years follow-up bottoming out was 50% in the inverted-T scar group and 20% in the vertical scar group. Despite bottoming out, in both the vertical scar reduction mammaplasty technique and the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty technique, high patient satisfaction rates are achieved that remains for years. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Olfactory receptors in the mouse septal organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluza, Jan F; Gussing, Fredrik; Bohm, Staffan; Breer, Heinz; Strotmann, Jörg

    2004-05-15

    In this study we have identified a repertoire of chemosensory receptors expressed in the septal organ (SO). The results suggest that septal organ neurons are specified to express receptor genes belonging to class II olfactory receptors that are also expressed in the main olfactory epithelium. We found no evidence for the expression of members from the vomeronasal receptor gene families. In the SO, no topography analogous to the receptor expression zones of the main olfactory epithelium was evident. The majority of identified receptors corresponds to genes with restricted expression in the medial and lateral zones of the main olfactory epithelium. This coincides with the expression of olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) throughout the SO, which is considered as a marker for the medial-lateral zones. In contrast, NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 expression, a characteristic marker for the dorsal zone, was lacking in the SO. Most of the receptor types were found to be expressed in rather few SO neurons; as an exception, the receptor mOR244-3 was observed in a very high proportion of cells. Although a very high fraction of SO neurons expressed mOR244-3, we found no evidence for the coexpression of different receptors in individual cells. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. [Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, E; Bardet, E; Peuvrel, P; Martinet, L; Perrot, P; Baraer, F; Loirat, Y; Sartre, J-Y; Malard, O; Ferron, C; Dreno, B

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (LDR) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medicosurgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6h). The median dose was 20Gy (range, 15-40Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early - within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6cm (p=0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Early perioperative LDR brachytherapy delivering 20Gy at 5mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. 2009 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Judging attractiveness: Biases due to raters’ own attractiveness and intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Stacy Yen-Lin Sim; Jenna Saperia; Jill Anne Brown; Frank John Bernieri

    2015-01-01

    Tennis and Dabbs (1975) reported that physically attractive males showed a positivity bias when rating the attractiveness of others. The opposite pattern was observed for females. We attempted to replicate and extend these findings by: (1) using self-assessed attractiveness rather than the experimentally derived attractiveness measure used in previous research, (2) using face-to-face interactions with targets as opposed to using photographs, and (3) examining the effect of another ego-involvi...

  8. Spatial patterns of gene expression in the olfactory bulb

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, David M.; Yang, Yee Hwa; Scolnick, Jonathan A.; Brunet, Lisa J.; Marsh, Heather; Peng, Vivian; Okazaki, Yasushi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Speed, Terence P.; Ngai, John

    2004-01-01

    How olfactory sensory neurons converge on spatially invariant glomeruli in the olfactory bulb is largely unknown. In one model, olfactory sensory neurons interact with spatially restricted guidance cues in the bulb that orient and guide them to their target. Identifying differentially expressed molecules in the olfactory bulb has been extremely difficult, however, hindering a molecular analysis of convergence. Here, we describe several such genes that have been identified in a screen that com...

  9. [Olfactory esthesioneuroma manifesting as Schwartz-Bartter syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, P; Vitrey, D; Boursier, C; Brunot, J; Fléchaire, A

    2000-03-01

    Olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon neuroectodermal tumor originating from the olfactory epithelium, which is rarely associated with hormone excess syndrome. Asymptomatic olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma was diagnosed in a 22-year-old man who presented a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Following surgery, the immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the existence of neurophysin hormone in tumoral cells. This case provides evidence that olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma can be uncovered by inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion.

  10. Olfactory region schwannoma: Excision with preservation of olfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Salunke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory region schwannomas are rare, but when they occur, they commonly arise from the meningeal branches of the trigeminal nerve and may present without involvement of the olfaction. A 24 year old lady presented with hemifacial paraesthesias. Radiology revealed a large olfactory region enhancing lesion. She was operated through a transbasal with olfactory preserving approach. This manuscript highlights the importance of olfactory preservation in such lesions.

  11. Minocycline restores olfactory bulb volume and olfactory behavior after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siopi, Eleni; Calabria, Silvia; Plotkine, Michel; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Jafarian-Tehrani, Mehrnaz

    2012-01-20

    Permanent olfactory dysfunction can often arise after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and while one of the main causes is the immediate loss of neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB), the emergent neuroinflammatory environment following TBI may further promote OB deterioration. Therefore, we examined the effects of acute anti-inflammatory treatment with minocycline on post-TBI olfactory behavior and on OB surface. The mouse model of closed-head injury by mechanical percussion was applied to anesthetized Swiss mice. The treatment protocol included three injections of minocycline (i.p.) at 5 min (90 mg/kg), 3 h, and 9 h (45 mg/kg) post-TBI. An olfactory avoidance test was run up to 12 weeks post-TBI. The mice were then sacrificed and their OB surface was measured. Our results demonstrated a post-TBI olfactory behavior deficit that was significant up to at least 12 weeks post-TBI. Additionally, substantial post-TBI OB atrophy was observed that was strongly correlated with the behavioral impairment. Minocycline was able to attenuate both the olfactory lesions and corresponding functional deficit in the short and long term. These results emphasize the potential role of minocycline as a promising neuroprotective agent for the treatment of TBI-related olfactory bulb lesions and deficits.

  12. Self-Ratings of Olfactory Function Reflect Odor Annoyance Rather than Olfactory Acuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Antti; Tuorila, Hely; Kyvik, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS:: Self-ratings of olfactory function correlates often poorly with results of objective smell tests. We explored them relative to self-rating of odor annoyance, to odor identification ability, and to mean perceived intensity of odors, and estimated relative genetic and environ......OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS:: Self-ratings of olfactory function correlates often poorly with results of objective smell tests. We explored them relative to self-rating of odor annoyance, to odor identification ability, and to mean perceived intensity of odors, and estimated relative genetic...... Kingdom rated their sense of smell and annoyance caused by ambient smells (e.g., smells of foods) using seven categories, and performed odor identification and evaluation task for six scratch-and-sniff odor stimuli. RESULTS:: The self-rating of olfactory function correlated with the self-rating of odor......-rating of olfactory function and support earlier findings of discrepancy between subjective and objective measures of olfactory function. In addition, the results imply that the self-rating of olfactory function arises from experienced odor annoyance rather than from actual olfactory acuity....

  13. Small Island Visitor Attractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haven Allahar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a process framework for developing and managing visitor attractions (VA in small island developing states with Trinidad and Tobago, a two-island state in the Caribbean, as the case study. An extensive literature review was conducted, supported by field observations, individual depth interviews, and small and large focus group meetings. The process framework identified four sets of processes: national policy formulation and legislation; inventory, classification, evaluation, and ranking of VA; general operations management involving project management activities; and site specific activities of development, operations, and maintenance. The value of the framework lies in the fact that no similar framework applicable to small islands was covered in the literature and validation was obtained from a panel of experts and a cross section of tourism stakeholders in Tobago.

  14. Neural Correlates of Olfactory Learning: Critical Role of Centrifugal Neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Max L.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory system is well established for its remarkable capability of undergoing experience-dependent plasticity. Although this process involves changes at multiple stages throughout the central olfactory pathway, even the early stages of processing, such as the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex, can display a high degree of…

  15. Odorant organization in the olfactory bulb of the sea lamprey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Warren W; Boyes, Karl; McFadden, Charrie; Daghfous, Gheylen; Auclair, François; Zhang, Huiming; Li, Weiming; Dubuc, Réjean; Zielinski, Barbara S

    2017-04-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons innervate the olfactory bulb, where responses to different odorants generate a chemotopic map of increased neural activity within different bulbar regions. In this study, insight into the basal pattern of neural organization of the vertebrate olfactory bulb was gained by investigating the lamprey. Retrograde labelling established that lateral and dorsal bulbar territories receive the axons of sensory neurons broadly distributed in the main olfactory epithelium and that the medial region receives sensory neuron input only from neurons projecting from the accessory olfactory organ. The response duration for local field potential recordings was similar in the lateral and dorsal regions, and both were longer than medial responses. All three regions responded to amino acid odorants. The dorsal and medial regions, but not the lateral region, responded to steroids. These findings show evidence for olfactory streams in the sea lamprey olfactory bulb: the lateral region responds to amino acids from sensory input in the main olfactory epithelium, the dorsal region responds to steroids (taurocholic acid and pheromones) and to amino acids from sensory input in the main olfactory epithelium, and the medial bulbar region responds to amino acids and steroids stimulating the accessory olfactory organ. These findings indicate that olfactory subsystems are present at the base of vertebrate evolution and that regionality in the lamprey olfactory bulb has some aspects previously seen in other vertebrate species. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Individual olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secundo, Lavi; Snitz, Kobi; Weissler, Kineret; Pinchover, Liron; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Loewenthal, Ron; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Frumin, Idan; Bar-Zvi, Dana; Shushan, Sagit; Sobel, Noam

    2015-07-14

    Each person expresses a potentially unique subset of ∼ 400 different olfactory receptor subtypes. Given that the receptors we express partially determine the odors we smell, it follows that each person may have a unique nose; to capture this, we devised a sensitive test of olfactory perception we termed the "olfactory fingerprint." Olfactory fingerprints relied on matrices of perceived odorant similarity derived from descriptors applied to the odorants. We initially fingerprinted 89 individuals using 28 odors and 54 descriptors. We found that each person had a unique olfactory fingerprint (P people on earth. Olfactory perception, however, fluctuates over time, calling into question our proposed perceptual readout of presumably stable genetic makeup. To test whether fingerprints remain informative despite this temporal fluctuation, building on the linkage between olfactory receptors and HLA, we hypothesized that olfactory perception may relate to HLA. We obtained olfactory fingerprints and HLA typing for 130 individuals, and found that olfactory fingerprint matching using only four odorants was significantly related to HLA matching (P < 10(-4)), such that olfactory fingerprints can save 32% of HLA tests in a population screen (P < 10(-6)). In conclusion, a precise measure of olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information.

  17. Does post-infectious olfactory loss affect mood more severely than chronic sinusitis with olfactory loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong G; Lee, Jun-Seok; Park, Gi C

    2014-11-01

    Olfactory deficits that develop after viral upper respiratory infection (URI) may have different effects on patient depression index compared to chronic sinusitis with olfactory loss. However, there have been no controlled trials to evaluate the different effects of chronic sinusitis and URI on depression index. Prospective study of 25 subjects in two groups. This study enrolled 25 participants who were diagnosed with post-URI olfactory loss as the study group and 25 patients with chronic sinusitis and olfactory loss as a control group. Control group participants were matched for age, sex, and degree of olfactory loss (threshold, discrimination, and identification [TDI]). We compared the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores of each group and analyzed the correlation between TDI and BDI. The mean BDI score of the post-URI group was significantly higher than that of the control group (14.52 ± 6.59 vs. 9.32 ± 5.23; P=.002). Age, sex, and TDI score did not affect BDI score in the post-URI olfactory loss group. However, BDI score in the sinusitis group was inversely correlated with TDI score (R=-0.423; P=.035), and the BDI score of female subjects (11.00 ± 5.13) was significantly higher than that of male subjects (5.00 ± 2.16; P = .047). Post-URI olfactory loss affected patient mood more severely than chronic sinusitis with a similar degree of olfactory loss. This influence was not affected by sex, age, or TDI score in the post-URI olfactory loss group. 3b. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. On the surgical treatment of hypertrophic scars: a comprehensive guideline for the surgical treatment of hypertrophic scars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stekelenburg, C.M.; van der Wal, M.B.A.; Middelkoop, E.; Niessen, F.B.; van Zuijlen, P.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Treating the hypertrophic scar remains a challenging problem. It often leaves the clinician with the questions whether, when and how to treat a hypertrophic scar. Methods: This review will focus on the surgical treatment of hypertrophic scars considering the latest research in this

  19. Differences in collagen architecture between keloid, hypertrophic scar, normotrophic scar, and normal skin: An objective histopathological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegen, P.D.; Zuijlen, van P.P.; Pennings, N.M.; Marle, van J.; Niessen, F.B.; Horst, C.; Middelkoop, E.

    2009-01-01

    Normotrophic, hypertrophic, and keloidal scars are different types of scar formation, which all need a different approach in treatment. Therefore, it is important to differentiate between these types of scar, not only clinically but also histopathologically. Differences were explored for collagen

  20. Efficacy and Safety of a Novel 100% Silicone Scar Gel Treatment for Early Intervention in Scar Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David J

    2016-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new topical silicone gel for the early intervention in the management of scars. Design: In this 12-week, observational study, healthy subjects (n=15) with an accessible linear or hypertrophic scar were given the test product and instructed to apply twice daily. Subjects returned 14, 28, 56, and 84 days later for evaluation and recording of adverse events. Setting: Private practice of the author. Participants: Eligible subjects had a scar with a Vancouver Scar Scale total score ≥3 at baseline. Measurements: Improvement was evaluated by the Vancouver Scar Scale and Observer Scar Assessment Scale at baseline and at four follow-up visits. Results: The median total Vancouver Scar Scale score and median total Observer Scar Assessment Scale score decreased significantly from baseline at each visit, showing rapid and continuing improvement in the appearance of the scars. For Vancouver Scar Scale, significant differences of individual parameters from baseline began at 28 days for pliability and height, 56 days for vascularity, and 84 days for pigmentation. For Observer Scar Assessment Scale parameters, significant differences from baseline began at 14 days and continued until 84 days for vascularization, thickness, and pigmentation. Pain and pruritis scores were low at each visit. Overall, 84.6 percent of subjects rated the treatment as excellent, very good, or good after three months of treatment. No adverse events were reported. Conclusion: The test product improved the appearance of scars after three months of twice-daily treatment and without adverse events.

  1. Traumatic brain injury and olfactory deficits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortin, Audrey; Lefebvre, Mathilde Beaulieu; Ptito, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: Olfactory functions are not systematically evaluated following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study aimed at comparing two smell tests that are used in a clinical setting. RESEARCH DESIGN: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Alberta Smell...... Test were compared in terms of assessment time, cost and diagnosis. Parameters associated with olfactory loss such as injury severity, type of cerebral lesion and depressive data were considered. Forty-nine TBI patients admitted to an outpatient rehabilitation programme took part in this experiment....... RESULTS: The scores of the two smell tests were significantly correlated. Both tests indicated that patients with frontal lesion performed significantly worse than patients with other types of lesion. Mood and injury severity were not associated with olfactory impairment when age was taken into account...

  2. Olfactory coding in the turbulent realm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Jacob

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance olfactory search behaviors depend on odor detection dynamics. Due to turbulence, olfactory signals travel as bursts of variable concentration and spacing and are characterized by long-tail distributions of odor/no-odor events, challenging the computing capacities of olfactory systems. How animals encode complex olfactory scenes to track the plume far from the source remains unclear. Here we focus on the coding of the plume temporal dynamics in moths. We compare responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs and antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs to sequences of pheromone stimuli either with white-noise patterns or with realistic turbulent temporal structures simulating a large range of distances (8 to 64 m from the odor source. For the first time, we analyze what information is extracted by the olfactory system at large distances from the source. Neuronal responses are analyzed using linear-nonlinear models fitted with white-noise stimuli and used for predicting responses to turbulent stimuli. We found that neuronal firing rate is less correlated with the dynamic odor time course when distance to the source increases because of improper coding during long odor and no-odor events that characterize large distances. Rapid adaptation during long puffs does not preclude however the detection of puff transitions in PNs. Individual PNs but not individual ORNs encode the onset and offset of odor puffs for any temporal structure of stimuli. A higher spontaneous firing rate coupled to an inhibition phase at the end of PN responses contributes to this coding property. This allows PNs to decode the temporal structure of the odor plume at any distance to the source, an essential piece of information moths can use in their tracking behavior.

  3. Olfactory coding in the turbulent realm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Vincent; Monsempès, Christelle; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Lucas, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    Long-distance olfactory search behaviors depend on odor detection dynamics. Due to turbulence, olfactory signals travel as bursts of variable concentration and spacing and are characterized by long-tail distributions of odor/no-odor events, challenging the computing capacities of olfactory systems. How animals encode complex olfactory scenes to track the plume far from the source remains unclear. Here we focus on the coding of the plume temporal dynamics in moths. We compare responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) to sequences of pheromone stimuli either with white-noise patterns or with realistic turbulent temporal structures simulating a large range of distances (8 to 64 m) from the odor source. For the first time, we analyze what information is extracted by the olfactory system at large distances from the source. Neuronal responses are analyzed using linear-nonlinear models fitted with white-noise stimuli and used for predicting responses to turbulent stimuli. We found that neuronal firing rate is less correlated with the dynamic odor time course when distance to the source increases because of improper coding during long odor and no-odor events that characterize large distances. Rapid adaptation during long puffs does not preclude however the detection of puff transitions in PNs. Individual PNs but not individual ORNs encode the onset and offset of odor puffs for any temporal structure of stimuli. A higher spontaneous firing rate coupled to an inhibition phase at the end of PN responses contributes to this coding property. This allows PNs to decode the temporal structure of the odor plume at any distance to the source, an essential piece of information moths can use in their tracking behavior.

  4. Inhibitory neurotransmission and olfactory memory in honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hassani, Abdessalam Kacimi; Giurfa, Martin; Gauthier, Monique; Armengaud, Catherine

    2008-11-01

    In insects, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission through ligand-gated chloride channel receptors. Both GABA and glutamate have been identified in the olfactory circuit of the honeybee. Here we investigated the role of inhibitory transmission mediated by GABA and glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) in olfactory learning and memory in honeybees. We combined olfactory conditioning with injection of ivermectin, an agonist of GluCl receptors. We also injected a blocker of glutamate transporters (L-trans-PDC) or a GABA analog (TACA). We measured acquisition and retention 1, 24 and 48 h after the last acquisition trial. A low dose of ivermectin (0.01 ng/bee) impaired long-term olfactory memory (48 h) while a higher dose (0.05 ng/bee) had no effect. Double injections of ivermectin and L-trans-PDC or TACA had different effects on memory retention, depending on the doses and agents combined. When the low dose of ivermectin was injected after Ringer, long-term memory was again impaired (48 h). Such an effect was rescued by injection of both TACA and L-trans-PDC. A combination of the higher dose of ivermectin and TACA decreased retention at 48 h. We interpret these results as reflecting the involvement of both GluCl and GABA receptors in the impairment of olfactory long-term memory induced by ivermectin. These results illustrate the diversity of inhibitory transmission and its implication in long-term olfactory memory in honeybees.

  5. Linking adult olfactory neurogenesis to social behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia E Feierstein

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the adult brain, new neurons are added to two brain areas: the olfactory bulb and the hippocampus. Newly-generated neurons integrate into the preexisting circuits, bringing a set of unique properties, such as increased plasticity and responsiveness to stimuli. However, the functional implications of the constant addition of these neurons remain unclear, although they are believed to be important for learning and memory. The levels of neurogenesis are regulated by a variety of environmental factors, as well as during learning, suggesting that new neurons could be important for coping with changing environmental demands. Notably, neurogenesis has been shown to be physiologically regulated in relation to reproductive behavior: neurogenesis increases in female mice upon exposure to cues of the mating partners, during pregnancy and lactation, and in male mice upon exposure to their offspring. In this scenario, and because of the key contribution of olfaction to maternal behavior, we sought to investigate the contribution of adult-generated neurons in the olfactory system to maternal behavior and offspring recognition. To do so, we selectively disrupted neurogenesis in the olfactory pathway of female mice using focal irradiation. Disruption of adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb did not affect maternal behavior, or the ability of female mice to discriminate familiar from unfamiliar pups. However, reduction of olfactory neurogenesis resulted in abnormal social interaction of female mice, specifically with male conspecifics. Because the olfactory system is crucial for sex recognition, we suggest that the abnormal interaction with males could result from the inability to detect or discriminate male-specific odors and could therefore have implications for the recognition of potential mating partners. Here, I review the results of this and other studies, and discuss their implications for our understanding of the function of adult neurogenesis.

  6. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser in Treatment of Acne Scars

    OpenAIRE

    Andrej Petrov; Vesna Pljakovska

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scars appear as a result of skin damage during the process of the skin healing. There are two types of acne scars, depending on whether there is a loss or accumulation of collagen: atrophic and hypertrophic. In 80-90% it comes to scars with loss of collagen compared to smaller number of hypertrophic scars and keloids. AIM: The aim of the study was to determine efficiency and safety of fractional carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of acne scars. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The...

  7. [Surgical strategy for postburn cervical scar contracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shaoqing; Su, Weijie; Xi, Wenjing; Min, Peiru; Pu, Zheming; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-08-01

    To explore the surgical strategy for postburn cervical scar contracture. Sixty-five patients with scar contracture as a result of burn injury in the neck were hospitalized from July 2013 to July 2014. Release of cervical scar contracture was conducted according to different demands of the 3 anatomic subunits of neck, i.e. lower lip vermilion border-supramaxillary region, submaxillary region, and anterior region of neck. After release of contracture, platysma was released. For some cases with chin retrusion, genioplasty with horizontal osteotomy was performed. The coverage of wound followed the principle of similarity, i.e. the skin tissue covering the wound in the neck should be similar to the characters of skin around the wound in terms of color, texture, and thickness. Based on this principle, except for the preschool children in whom skin grafting was performed, the wounds of the other patients were covered by local skin flaps, adjacent skin flaps, or free skin flaps. All patients underwent release of scar and platysma, while 9 patients underwent genioplasty with horizontal osteotomy. Wounds were covered with local skin flaps in 32 patients, with adjacent skin flaps in 7 patients, with free skin flaps in 11 patients, and with skin grafts in 15 patients. All skin grafts and flaps survived. Good range of motion was achieved in the neck of all patients, with the cervicomental angle after reconstruction ranging from 90 to 120°. All patients were followed up for 6 to 24 months. Six patients who had undergone skin grafting were found to have some degrees of skin contracture, while none of the patients who had undergone flap coverage showed any signs of contracture recurrence. Restoration of the cervicomental angle is critical in the treatment of postburn cervical scar contracture, and the release of scar contracture should conform to the subunit principle. The coverage of wound should be based on the principle of similarity, with repair by skin flaps as the first

  8. Drug-induced Parkinson's disease modulates protein kinase A and Olfactory Marker Protein in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucignat, Carla; Caretta, Antonio

    2017-01-26

    Olfaction is often affected in parkinsonian patients, but dopaminergic cells in the olfactory bulb are not affected by some Parkinson-inducing drugs. We investigated whether the drug MPTP produces the olfactory deficits typical of Parkinson and affects the olfactory bulb in mice. Lesioned and control mice were tested for olfactory search, for motor and exploratory behavior. Brains and olfactory mucosa were investigated via immunohistochemistry for thyrosine hydroxylase, Olfactory Marker Protein and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase as an intracellular pathway involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission. MPTP induced motor impairment, but no deficit in olfactory search. Thyrosine hydroxylase did not differ in olfactory bulb, while a strong decrease was detected in substantia nigra and tegmentum of MPTP mice. Olfactory Marker Protein decreased in the olfactory bulb of MPTP mice, while a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase increased in the inner granular layer of MPTP mice. MPTP mice do not present behavioural deficits in olfactory search, yet immunoreactivity reveals modifications in the olfactory bulb, and suggests changes in intracellular signal processing, possibly linked to neuron survival after MPTP.

  9. Zinc-finger gene Fez in the olfactory sensory neurons regulates development of the olfactory bulb non-cell-autonomously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Tsutomu; Nakazawa, Masato; Yoshihara, Sei-ichi; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Kitamura, Kunio; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Hibi, Masahiko

    2006-04-01

    Fez is a zinc-finger gene encoding a transcriptional repressor that is expressed in the olfactory epithelium, hypothalamus, ventrolateral pallium and prethalamus at mid-gestation. To reveal its function, we generated Fez-deficient mice. The Fez-deficient mice showed several abnormalities in the olfactory system: (1) impaired axonal projection of the olfactory sensory neurons; (2) reduced size of the olfactory bulb; (3) abnormal layer formation in the olfactory bulb; and (4) aberrant rostral migration of the interneuron progenitors. Fez was not expressed in the projection neurons, interneurons or interneuron progenitors. Transgene-mediated expression of Fez in olfactory sensory neurons significantly rescued the abnormalities in olfactory axon projection and in the morphogenesis of the olfactory bulb in Fez-knockout mice. Thus, Fez is cell-autonomously required for the axon termination of olfactory sensory neurons, and Fez non-cell-autonomously controls layer formation and interneuron development in the olfactory bulb. These findings suggest that signals from olfactory sensory neurons contribute to the proper formation of the olfactory bulb.

  10. Measuring Olfactory Processes in Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellinck, Heather

    2017-09-04

    This paper briefly reviews the literature that describes olfactory acuity and odour discrimination learning. The results of current studies that examined the role of the neurotransmitters noradrenalin and acetylcholine in odour discrimination learning are discussed as are those that investigated pattern recognition and models of human disease. The methodology associated with such work is also described and its role in creating disparate results assessed. Recommendations for increasing the reliability and validity of experiments so as to further our understanding of olfactory processes in both healthy mice and those modelling human disease are made throughout the paper. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Suppressed inflammatory gene expression during human hypertrophic scar compared to normotrophic scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Lenie J; van der Veer, Willem M; de Jong, Etty H; Gibbs, Susan; Niessen, Frank B

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic scar formation is a result of adverse cutaneous wound healing. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar formation is still poorly understood. A problem next to the lack of suitable animal models is that often normal skin is compared to hypertrophic scar (HTscar) and not to normotrophic scar (NTscar) tissue. Another drawback is that often only one time period after wounding is studied, while scar formation is a dynamic process over a period of several months. In this study, we compared the expression of genes involved in inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and also macrophage infiltration in biopsies obtained before and up to 52 weeks after standard surgery in five patients who developed HTscar and six patients who developed NTscar. It was found that HTscar formation coincided with a prolonged decreased expression of inflammatory genes (TNFα, IL-1α, IL-1RN, CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2, CXCR2, C3 and IL-10) and an extended increased expression of ECM-related genes (PLAU, Col3A1, TGFβ3). This coincided with a delayed but prolonged infiltration of macrophages (type 2) in HTscar tissue compared to NTscar tissue. These findings were supported by immunohistochemical localization of proteins coding for select genes named above. Our study emphasizes that human cutaneous wound healing is a dynamic process that is needed to be studied over a period of time rather than a single point of time. Taken together, our results suggest innate immune stimulatory therapies may be a better option for improving scar quality than the currently used anti-inflammatory scar therapies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Scar dechanneling: new method for scar-related left ventricular tachycardia substrate ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berruezo, Antonio; Fernández-Armenta, Juan; Andreu, David; Penela, Diego; Herczku, Csaba; Evertz, Reinder; Cipolletta, Laura; Acosta, Juan; Borràs, Roger; Arbelo, Elena; Tolosana, Jose María; Brugada, Josep; Mont, Lluis

    2015-04-01

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) substrate ablation usually requires extensive ablation. Scar dechanneling technique may limit the extent of ablation needed. The study included 101 consecutive patients with left ventricular scar-related VT (75 ischemic patients; left ventricular ejection fraction, 36 ± 13%). Procedural end point was the elimination of all identified conducting channels (CCs) by ablation at the CC entrance followed by abolition of residual inducible VTs. By itself, scar dechanneling rendered noninducibility in 54.5% of patients; ablation of residual inducible VT increased noninducibility to 78.2%. Patients needing only scar dechanneling had a shorter procedure (213 ± 64 versus 244 ± 71 minutes; P = 0.027), fewer radiofrequency applications (19 ± 11% versus 27 ± 18%; P = 0.01), and external cardioversion/defibrillation shocks (20% versus 65.2%; P scar dechanneling alone had better event-free survival (80% versus 62%) and lower mortality (5% versus 11%). Incomplete CC-electrogram elimination was the only independent predictor (hazard ratio, 2.54 [1.06-6.10]) for the primary end point. Higher end point-free survival rates were observed in patients noninducible after scar dechanneling (log-rank P = 0.013) and those with complete CC-electrogram elimination (log-rank P = 0.013). The complications rate was 6.9%, with no deaths. Scar dechanneling alone results in low recurrence and mortality rates in more than half of patients despite the limited ablation extent required. Residual inducible VT ablation improves acute results, but patients who require it have worse outcomes. Recurrences are mainly related to incomplete CC-electrogram elimination. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Attracting Girls Into Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Hala M.; Kahil, Heba M.

    2005-10-01

    From our national statistics, it is evident that in the population of physicists there are considerably fewer women than men. Our role is to attract girls to physics and thus decrease this gap. The institutional structure in Egypt provides an equal opportunity for girls to study sciences, including physics. It is reckoned that girls refrain from studying physics due to a group of social and economic factors. We will discuss teaching physics at schools and present some ideas to develop it. The media should play a role in placing female physicists in the spotlight. Unfortunately, careers that require intellectual skills are considered men's careers. This necessitates that society changes the way it sees women and trusts more in their skills and talents. We therefore call for the cooperation of governmental and nongovernmental bodies, together with universities and the production sectors involved. This will ultimately lead to enhancing the entrepreneurial projects related to physics and technology on the one hand, and will encourage girls to find challenging opportunities on the other.

  14. The Development of Olfactory Organ of Lissotriton Vulgaris (Amphibia, Caudata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovtun M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Development of Olfactory Organ of Lissotriton vulgaris (Amphibia, Caudata. Kovtun, M. F, Stepanyuk, Ya. V. - Using common histological methods, the morphogenesis of olfactory analyzer peripheral part of Lissotriton vulgaris (Amphibia, Caudata was studied, during the developmental period starting with olfactory pit laying and finishing with definitive olfactory organ formation. Special attention is paid to vomeronasal organ and vomeronasal gland development. Reasoning from obtained data, we consider that vomeronasal organ emerged as the result of olfactory epithelium and nasal cavity differentiation.

  15. Olfactory cortical neurons read out a relative time code in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Rafi; Lanjuin, Anne; Madisen, Linda; Zeng, Hongkui; Murthy, Venkatesh N; Uchida, Naoshige

    2013-07-01

    Odor stimulation evokes complex spatiotemporal activity in the olfactory bulb, suggesting that both the identity of activated neurons and the timing of their activity convey information about odors. However, whether and how downstream neurons decipher these temporal patterns remains unknown. We addressed this question by measuring the spiking activity of downstream neurons while optogenetically stimulating two foci in the olfactory bulb with varying relative timing in mice. We found that the overall spike rates of piriform cortex neurons (PCNs) were sensitive to the relative timing of activation. Posterior PCNs showed higher sensitivity to relative input times than neurons in the anterior piriform cortex. In contrast, olfactory bulb neurons rarely showed such sensitivity. Thus, the brain can transform a relative time code in the periphery into a firing rate-based representation in central brain areas, providing evidence for the relevance of a relative time-based code in the olfactory bulb.

  16. Perianal episiotomy scar endometrioma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei Chiang; Kim, Kyo Nam; Kim, Soo Ah; Kim, Soon Yong [Sung Ae General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    Endometrioma is a common clinical condition, but cases in which an episiotomy scaris present are, however, rare: only two cases have been reported in obstetric journals, and one other in a radiologic journal. All three were in English. We encountered a case in which a solitary endometrioma was present in the perineal region beneath an episiotomy scar. An irregularly marginated hypoechoic mass was revealed by US, and a discrete homogeneous enhancing mass by CT. (author)

  17. "Marriage" abdominoplasty: a short scar technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestak, Kenneth C; Walgenbach, Klaus J; Azari, Kodi

    2002-05-01

    Short scar abdominoplasty-that is, a marriage of aggressive superwet lipoplasty, rectus abdominis muscle plication, and excision of lower abdominal skin and excess adipose tissue-can be used as an alternative to conventional abdominoplasty in properly selected patients. According to the authors, this technique offers the advantages of less invasive surgery, decreased pain, and faster return to work. (Aesthetic Surg J 2002;22:294-301.).

  18. Olfactory disfunction and its relation olfactory bulb volume in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinayar, S; Oner, S; Can, S; Kizilay, A; Kamisli, S; Sarac, K

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is the most frequently seen non-motor symptom of Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). The aim of this study is to analyze selective olfactory dysfunction, and olfactory bulb volume (OBV) in subtypes of IPD, and compare them with those of the healthy controls. Our study included 41 patients with IPD and age and gender matched 19 healthy controls. IPD patients were either tremor dominant (65.9%; TDPD) or non-tremor dominant (34.1%; NTDPD) type. All patients underwent neurological, ear, nose, and throat examinations, and orthonasal olfaction testing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique was used to measure the volume of the olfactory bulb. A significant decrease in olfactory identification scores was found in the patient group. The patients had difficulty in discriminating between odors of mothballs, chocolate, Turkish coffee and soap. OBV did not differ between the patient, and the control groups. In the TDPD group, odor identification ability was decreased when compared to the control group. However, odor test results of NTDPD, control and TDPD groups were similar. OBV estimates of the TDPD group were not different from those of the control group, while in the NTDPD group OBVs were found to be decreased. In all patients with Parkinson's disease OBV values did not vary with age of the patients, duration of the disease, age at onset of the disease, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores (UPDRS-m). Olfactory function is a complex process involving olfactory, and cortical structures as well. In Idiopathic Parkinson's disease, changes in OBV do not seem to be directly related to olfactory dysfunction.

  19. Reversible deafferentation of the adult zebrafish olfactory bulb affects glomerular distribution and olfactory-mediated behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskin, Taylor R; Byrd-Jacobs, Christine A

    2012-12-01

    The olfactory system is a useful model for studying central nervous system recovery from damage due to its neuroplasticity. We recently developed a novel method of deafferentation by repeated exposure of Triton X-100 to the olfactory organ of adult zebrafish. This long-term, reversible method of deafferentation allows both degeneration and regeneration to be observed in the olfactory bulb. The aim of the present study is to examine olfactory bulb innervation, glomerular patterns, and olfactory-mediated behavior with repeated Triton X-100 treatment and the potential for recovery following cessation of treatment. Olfactory bulbs of control, chronic-treated, and recovery animals were examined for the presence or absence of glomeruli that have been identified in the zebrafish glomerular map. Following chronic treatment, the number of glomeruli was dramatically reduced; however, partial innervation remained in the lateral region of the bulb. When animals were given time to recover, complete glomerular distribution returned. A behavioral assay was developed to determine if innervation remaining correlated with behavior of the fish. Chronic-treated fish did not respond to odorants involved with social behavior but continued to react to odorants that mediate feeding behavior. Following recovery, responses to odorants involved with social behavior returned. The morphological and behavioral effects of chronic Triton X-100 treatment in the olfactory system suggest there may be differential susceptibility or resistance to external damage in a subset of sensory neurons. The results of this study demonstrate the remarkable regenerative ability of the olfactory system following extensive and long-term injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Construction of functional neuronal circuitry in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies using molecular genetics, electrophysiology, in vivo imaging, and behavioral analyses have elucidated detailed connectivity and function of the mammalian olfactory circuits. The olfactory bulb is the first relay station of olfactory perception in the brain, but it is more than a simple relay: olfactory information is dynamically tuned by local olfactory bulb circuits and converted to spatiotemporal neural code for higher-order information processing. Because the olfactory bulb processes ∼1000 discrete input channels from different odorant receptors, it serves as a good model to study neuronal wiring specificity, from both functional and developmental aspects. This review summarizes our current understanding of the olfactory bulb circuitry from functional standpoint and discusses important future studies with particular focus on its development and plasticity. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Deconstructing the molecular architecture of olfactory areas using proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachén-Montes, Mercedes; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    The anatomy of the olfactory system is highly complex, comprising a system of olfactory receptors, pathways for the transmission of olfactory information, and structures for the recognition, discrimination, and memorization of odors. During the last years, proteomics has emerged as a large-scale comprehensive approach to characterize and quantify specific olfactory-related proteomes in different biological conditions such as olfactory learning, neurodegeneration, and ageing between others. The current work reviews recent applications of proteomics to olfaction with particular focus on quantitative proteome profiling studies performed on olfactory areas from laboratory animal models as well as proteomic characterizations performed on specific brain structures and fluids involved in human smell. Finally, we will also discuss the potential application of proteomics to study global proteome dynamics and posttranslationally modified proteomes in order to unravel cell-signaling networks that occur from peripheral structures to olfactory cortical areas during odor processing. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Updated international clinical recommendations on scar management: part 2--algorithms for scar prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Michael H; McGuire, Michael; Mustoe, Thomas A; Pusic, Andrea; Sachdev, Mukta; Waibel, Jill; Murcia, Crystal

    2014-08-01

    In 2002, an international advisory panel was convened to assess the scientific literature and develop evidence-based guidance for the prevention and treatment of pathologic scarring. Emerging clinical data, new treatment options, and technical advances warranted a renewed literature search and review of the initial advisory panel recommendations. To update the management algorithm for pathologic scarring to reflect best practice standards at present. Management recommendations were derived from clinical evidence amassed during a comprehensive literature search and from the clinical experience and consensus opinion of advisory panel members. A combination approach using multiple modalities provides the maximum potential for successful treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids. The advisory panel advocates a move toward more aggressive initial management of keloids, including earlier application of 5-fluorouracil. A growing body of clinical research supports a place in therapy for newer agents (e.g., bleomycin, onion extract, imiquimod, mitomycin C) and laser therapy (pulsed-dye, fractional) for scar management. Prevention and treatment of pathologic scarring requires individualized care built upon the principles of evidence-based medicine and continues to evolve in step with technological and scientific advances.

  3. Lateralized differences in olfactory function and olfactory bulb volume relate to nasal septum deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundag, Aytug; Salihoglu, Murat; Tekeli, Hakan; Saglam, Muzaffer; Cayonu, Melih; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    One of the most common reasons for partial nasal obstruction is nasal septal deviation (NSD). The effect of a partial lateralized nasal obstruction on olfactory bulb (OB) volume remains unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the side differences in olfactory function and OB in patients with serious NSD. Sixty-five volunteers were included: 22 patients with serious right NSD and 43 patients with left NSD. The patients' mean age was 22 years. All participants received volumetric magnetic resonance imaging scans of the entire brain and detailed lateralized olfactory tests. The majority of the patients exhibited an overall decreased olfactory function (as judged for the better nostril: functional anosmia in 3%, hyposmia in 72%, normosmia in 25%), which seems to be mostly due to the overall severe changes in nasal anatomy. As expected, olfactory function was significantly lower at the narrower side as indicated for odor thresholds, odor discrimination, and odor identification (P ≤ 0.005). When correlating relative scores and volumes (wider minus narrower side), a significantly positive correlation between the relative measures emerged for OB volume and odor identification, odor discrimination, and odor thresholds. Our study clearly highlights that septal deviation results in decreased olfactory function at the narrower side.

  4. The diversified function and potential therapy of ectopic olfactory receptors in non-olfactory tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Zhao, Hong; Fu, Nian; Chen, Linxi

    2017-03-24

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are mainly distributed in olfactory neurons and play a key role in detecting volatile odorants, eventually resulting in the production of smell perception. Recently, it is also reported that ORs are expressed in non-olfactory tissues including heart, lung, sperm, skin, and cancerous tissues. Interestingly, ectopic ORs are associated with the development of diseases in non-olfactory tissues. For instance, ectopic ORs initiate the hypoxic ventilatory responses and maintain the oxygen homeostasis of breathing in the carotid body when oxygen levels decline. Ectopic ORs induce glucose homeostasis in diabetes. Ectopic ORs regulate systemic blood pressure by increasing renin secretion and vasodilation. Ectopic ORs participate in the process of tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, and invasiveness. Ectopic ORs accelerate the occurrence of obesity, angiogenesis and wound-healing processes. Ectopic ORs affect fetal hemoglobin levels in sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. Finally, we also elaborate some ligands targeting for ORs. Obviously, the diversified function and related signal pathway of ectopic ORs may play a potential therapeutic target in non-olfactory tissues. Thus, this review focuses on the latest research results about the diversified function and therapeutic potential of ectopic ORs in non-olfactory tissues. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Utility of multiparametric MRI in Caesarean section scar characterization and preoperative prediction of scar dehiscence: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ishan; Verma, Ashish; Matah, Manjari; Satpathy, Gayatri

    2017-07-01

    Background Post-Caesarean uterine scar rupture during vaginal birth after Caesarean section (VBAC) is a potentially life-threatening complication. Prediction of scar dehiscence and scar rupture is vital in treatment planning and selecting candidates of trial of labor after a Caesarean section (CS). Purpose To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluation of post-Caesarean uterine scar and to predict scar dehiscence during repeat CS. Material and Methods Thirty patients with a history of at least one previous CS underwent pelvic MRI for assessment of uterine scar during a subsequent gestation, all of whom underwent lower segment Caesarean section (LSCS) subsequently due to one of the established indications of CSs. Thickness, T1, T2 signal intensity ratio (SER), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of scar site were charted. The lower uterine segment was assessed and graded intraoperatively and findings were correlated with MRI findings. Results A total of 30 participants were included in this study, of which nine were classified as having an abnormal scar (of various grades) based on surgical observations. T2 SER with a cutoff value of 0.935 showed the highest sensitivity of 100% and scar thickness value of 3.45 mm showed highest specificity of 91% in prediction of abnormal scar. On drawing a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, T2 signal intensity ratio showed the highest area under the curve (AUC) closely followed by scar thickness values. Conclusion MRI derived parameters may be utilized for differentiation of an abnormal post-Caesarean uterine scar from a normal one. Both scar thickness and T2 SER measured on MRI can be used to predict scar dehiscence. However, T2 SER can serve as a more standardized and objective criterion.

  6. Functional Neuroanatomy of "Drosophila" Olfactory Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying "Drosophila" learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive…

  7. Spotlight on olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Violante M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mayela Rodríguez-Violante,1,2 Natalia Ospina-García,1,2 Christian Pérez-Lohman,1,2 Amin Cervantes-Arriaga1,2 1Movement Disorders Clinic, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Clinical Neurodegenerative Research Unit, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract: Olfactory dysfunction is frequent in Parkinson’s disease (PD. A correlation between olfactory dysfunction and the pathophysiological process of the disease has been confirmed. On the other hand, olfaction disturbances are also prevalent in other neurodegenerative diseases, and may be related to other factors such as gender, age, smoking, and trauma. Clinically, hyposmia is commonly assessed by smell identification testing. Good diagnostic accuracy has been widely reported, but differences in sensitivity and specificity due to sociocultural factors have also been reported. Since hyposmia may be present before the onset of motor symptoms, it has the potential to serve as a biomarker for the identification of subjects at risk of developing PD. Several studies have been conducted to assess the utility of smell testing as an isolated or combined biomarker for this end. Finally, severe olfactory dysfunction has been associated with faster disease progression and higher risk of cognitive decline in patients with PD. Olfactory dysfunction assessment in PD will continue to be relevant in research and clinical practice. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, olfaction, smell identification test, biomarker 

  8. Neural crest origin of olfactory ensheating glia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barraud, P; Seferiadis, A.A.; Tyson, L.D.; Zwart, M.F.; Szabo-Rogers, H.L.; Ruhrberg, C; Liu, K.J.; Baker, C.V.

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a unique class of glial cells with exceptional translational potential because of their ability to support axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Although OECs are similar in many ways to immature and nonmyelinating Schwann cells, and can myelinate

  9. Olfactory Environment Design for Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, C. S.; Holland, F. J.

    2002-01-01

    Smell is usually deemed the least important of the five senses. To contradict this assertion, however, there is no shortage of scientific literature which concludes that olfaction is of very great significance to humans. Odours have been shown to have a variety of effects on humans, and are capable of changing both behaviour and cognitive processing in ways that we are frequently completely unconscious of. Examples of this include alertness, alteration of mood, capacity for ideation and intellectual performance. To date, the design of human spacecraft has concentrated on making their olfactory environments, where possible, `odour neutral' - that is ensuring that all unpleasant and/or offensive odours are removed. Here it suggested that spacecraft (and other extraterrestrial facilities for human inhabitation) might benefit from having their olfactory environments designed to be `odour positive', that is to use odours and olfaction for the positive benefit of their residents. This paper presents a summary of current olfactory research and considers both its positive and negative implications for humans in space. It then discusses `odour positive' design of spacecraft olfactory environments and the possible benefits accruing from this approach before examining its implications for the architecture of spacecraft environmental control systems.

  10. Laparoscopic Resection of Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ades, Alex; Parghi, Sneha

    To demonstrate a technique for the laparoscopic surgical management of cesarean section scar ectopic pregnancy. Step-by-step presentation of the procedure using video (Canadian Task Force classification III). Cesarean section scar ectopic pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy with an incidence ranging from 1:1800 to 1:2216. Over the last decade, the incidence seems to be on the rise with increasing rates of cesarean deliveries and early use of Doppler ultrasound. These pregnancies can lead to life-threatening hemorrhage, uterine rupture, and hysterectomy if not managed promptly. Local or systemic methotrexate therapy has been used successfully but can result in prolonged hospitalization, requires long-term follow-up, and in some cases treatment can fail. In the hands of a trained operator, laparoscopic resection can be performed to manage this type of pregnancy. Consent was obtained from the patient, and exemption was granted from the local Internal Review Board (The Womens' Hospital, Parkville). In this video we describe our technique for laparoscopic management of a cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy. We present the case of a 34-year-old G4P2T1 with the finding of a live 8-week pregnancy embedded in the cesarean section scar. The patient had undergone 2 previous uncomplicated cesarean sections at term. On presentation her β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) level was 52 405 IU/L. She was initially managed with an intragestational sac injection of potassium chloride and methotrexate, followed by 4 doses of intramuscular methotrexate. Despite these conservative measures, the level of β-hCG did not adequately fall and an ultrasound showed a persistent 4-cm mass. A decision was made to proceed with surgical treatment in the form of a laparoscopic resection of the ectopic pregnancy. The surgery was uneventful, and the patient was discharged home within 24 hours of her procedure. Her serial β-hCG levels were followed until complete resolution

  11. Update on scar management: guidelines for treating Asian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sukwha; Choi, Tae Hyun; Liu, Wei; Ogawa, Rei; Suh, Jeong Seok; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2013-12-01

    Following injury, Asian skin has a tendency towards hyper-pigmentation and scar formation, and therefore the prevention of scarring is particularly important in Asian patients. Since publication of an International Clinical Recommendation on Scar Management in 2002, there have been numerous publications in the field of scar management. Advances in understanding scar formation have also led to the introduction of new treatments as well as a better understanding of established therapeutic options. A literature search for abstracts, clinical trials and meta-analyses evaluating scar prevention and treatment was performed using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Based on this data a panel of experts formulated treatment recommendations for Asian patients. Following surgery, scar prevention should be initiated in all Asian patients due to the high risk of poor scars. There is strong evidence for the efficacy of silicone based products, and due to their ease of use, they can be considered first-line therapy. Silicone gel (versus silicone gel sheets) products have demonstrated efficacy. For patients who fail to respond to first-line therapy, intralesional steroid injections, radiation therapy, and intralesional 5-flourouracil injections have achieved widespread acceptance. Laser treatments have been increasingly used, although the evidence remains largely anecdotal without a clear consensus on optimal wavelength, or amount of energy. Surgical approaches have increased in sophistication with recognition of the impact that tension has on scar formation. Updated scar management recommendations will benefit practitioners making decisions regarding optimal, evidence-based treatment strategies for their patients.

  12. Olfactory cues are subordinate to visual stimuli in a neotropical generalist weevil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Otálora-Luna

    Full Text Available The tropical root weevil Diaprepes abbreviatus is a major pest of multiple crops in the Caribbean Islands and has become a serious constraint to citrus production in the United States. Recent work has identified host and conspecific volatiles that mediate host- and mate-finding by D. abbreviatus. The interaction of light, color, and odors has not been studied in this species. The responses of male and female D. abbreviatus to narrow bandwidths of visible light emitted by LEDs offered alone and in combination with olfactory stimuli were studied in a specially-designed multiple choice arena combined with a locomotion compensator. Weevils were more attracted to wavelengths close to green and yellow compared with blue or ultraviolet, but preferred red and darkness over green. Additionally, dim green light was preferred over brighter green. Adult weevils were also attracted to the odor of its citrus host + conspecifics. However, the attractiveness of citrus + conspecific odors disappeared in the presence of a green light. Photic stimulation induced males but not females to increase their speed. In the presence of light emitted by LEDs, turning speed decreased and path straightness increased, indicating that weevils tended to walk less tortuously. Diaprepes abbreviatus showed a hierarchy between chemo- and photo-taxis in the series of experiments presented herein, where the presence of the green light abolished upwind anemotaxis elicited by the pheromone + host plant odor. Insight into the strong responses to visual stimuli of chemically stimulated insects may be provided when the amount of information supplied by vision and olfaction is compared, as the information transmission capacity of compound eyes is estimated to be several orders of magnitude higher compared with the olfactory system. Subordination of olfactory responses by photic stimuli should be considered in the design of strategies aimed at management of such insects.

  13. Olfactory Cues Are Subordinate to Visual Stimuli in a Neotropical Generalist Weevil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otálora-Luna, Fernando; Lapointe, Stephen L.; Dickens, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    The tropical root weevil Diaprepes abbreviatus is a major pest of multiple crops in the Caribbean Islands and has become a serious constraint to citrus production in the United States. Recent work has identified host and conspecific volatiles that mediate host- and mate-finding by D. abbreviatus. The interaction of light, color, and odors has not been studied in this species. The responses of male and female D. abbreviatus to narrow bandwidths of visible light emitted by LEDs offered alone and in combination with olfactory stimuli were studied in a specially-designed multiple choice arena combined with a locomotion compensator. Weevils were more attracted to wavelengths close to green and yellow compared with blue or ultraviolet, but preferred red and darkness over green. Additionally, dim green light was preferred over brighter green. Adult weevils were also attracted to the odor of its citrus host + conspecifics. However, the attractiveness of citrus + conspecific odors disappeared in the presence of a green light. Photic stimulation induced males but not females to increase their speed. In the presence of light emitted by LEDs, turning speed decreased and path straightness increased, indicating that weevils tended to walk less tortuously. Diaprepes abbreviatus showed a hierarchy between chemo- and photo-taxis in the series of experiments presented herein, where the presence of the green light abolished upwind anemotaxis elicited by the pheromone + host plant odor. Insight into the strong responses to visual stimuli of chemically stimulated insects may be provided when the amount of information supplied by vision and olfaction is compared, as the information transmission capacity of compound eyes is estimated to be several orders of magnitude higher compared with the olfactory system. Subordination of olfactory responses by photic stimuli should be considered in the design of strategies aimed at management of such insects. PMID:23341926

  14. Laser therapy for prevention and treatment of pathologic excessive scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rui; Huang, Xiaolu; Li, Hua; Yuan, Yuwen; Li, Bin; Cheng, Chen; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-12-01

    The management of hypertrophic scars and keloids remains a therapeutic challenge. Treatment regimens are currently based on clinical experience rather than substantiated evidence. Laser therapy is an emerging minimally invasive treatment that has recently gained attention. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various laser therapies. The pooled response rate, pooled standardized mean difference of Vancouver Scar Scale scores, scar height, erythema, and pliability were reported. Twenty-eight well-designed clinical trials with 919 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The overall response rate for laser therapy was 71 percent for scar prevention, 68 percent for hypertrophic scar treatment, and 72 percent for keloid treatment. The 585/595-nm pulsed-dye laser and 532-nm laser subgroups yielded the best responses among all laser systems. The pooled estimates of hypertrophic scar studies also showed that laser therapy reduced total Vancouver Scar Scale scores, scar height, and scar erythema of hypertrophic scars. Regression analyses of pulsed-dye laser therapy suggested that the optimal treatment interval is 5 to 6 weeks. In addition, the therapeutic effect of pulsed-dye laser therapy is better on patients with lower Fitzpatrick skin type scores. This study presents the first meta-analysis to confirm the efficacy and safety of laser therapy in hypertrophic scar management. The level of evidence for laser therapy as a keloid treatment is low. Further research is required to determine the mechanism of action for different laser systems and to examine the efficacy in quantifiable parameters, such as scar erythema, scar texture, degrees of symptom relief, recurrence rates, and adverse effects.

  15. Olfactory perception, cognition, and dysfunction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    The main functions of olfaction relate to finding food, avoiding predators and disease, and social communication. Its role in detecting food has resulted in a unique dual mode sensory system. Environmental odorants are 'smelled' via the external nostrils, while volatile chemicals in food-detected by the same receptors-arrive via the nasopharynx, contributing to flavor. This arrangement allows the brain to link the consequences of eating with a food's odor, and then later to use this information in the search for food. Recognizing an odorant-a food, mate, or predator-requires the detection of complex chemical blends against a noisy chemical background. The brain solves this problem in two ways. First, by rapid adaptation to background odorants so that new odorants stand out. Second, by pattern matching the neural representation of an odorant to prior olfactory experiences. This account is consistent with olfactory sensory physiology, anatomy, and psychology. Odor perception, and its products, may be subject to further processing-olfactory cognition. While olfactory cognition has features in common with visual or auditory cognition, several aspects are unique, and even those that are common may be instantiated in different ways. These differences can be productively used to evaluate the generality of models of cognition and consciousness. Finally, the olfactory system can breakdown, and this may be predictive of the onset of neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's, as well as having prognostic value in other disorders such as schizophrenia. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:273-284. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1224 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Properties of an optogenetic model for olfactory stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thews, Marion; Möhrlen, Frank; Frings, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Key points In olfactory research it is difficult to deliver stimuli with defined intensity and duration to olfactory sensory neurons.Expression of channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) in olfactory sensory neurons provides a means to activate these neurons with light flashes. Appropriate mouse models are available.The present study explores the suitability of an established olfactory marker protein (OMP)/ChR2–yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) mouse model for ex vivo experimentation.Expression of ChR2 in sensory neurons of the main olfactory epithelium, the septal organ and vomeronasal organ is characterized. Expression pattern of ChR2 in olfactory receptor neurons and the properties of light responses indicate that light stimulation does not impact on signal transduction in the chemosensory cilia.Light‐induced electro‐olfactograms are characterized with light flashes of different intensities, durations and frequencies.The impact of light‐induced afferent stimulation on the olfactory bulb is examined with respect to response amplitude, polarity and low‐pass filtering. Abstract For the examination of sensory processing, it is helpful to deliver stimuli in precisely defined temporal and spatial patterns with accurate control of stimulus intensity. This is challenging in experiments with the mammalian olfactory system because airborne odorants have to be transported into the intricate sensory structures of the nose and must dissolve in mucus to be detected by sensory neurons. Defined and reproducible activity can be generated in olfactory sensory neurons that express the light‐gated ion channel channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2). The neurons can be stimulated by light flashes in a controlled fashion by this optogenetic approach. Here we examined the application of an olfactory marker protein (OMP)/ChR2–yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) model for ex vivo exploration of the olfactory epithelium and the olfactory bulb of the mouse. We studied the expression patterns of ChR2 in the

  17. Ocean acidification impairs olfactory discrimination and homing ability of a marine fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Philip L; Dixson, Danielle L; Donelson, Jennifer M; Jones, Geoffrey P; Pratchett, Morgan S; Devitsina, Galina V; Døving, Kjell B

    2009-02-10

    The persistence of most coastal marine species depends on larvae finding suitable adult habitat at the end of an offshore dispersive stage that can last weeks or months. We tested the effects that ocean acidification from elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) could have on the ability of larvae to detect olfactory cues from adult habitats. Larval clownfish reared in control seawater (pH 8.15) discriminated between a range of cues that could help them locate reef habitat and suitable settlement sites. This discriminatory ability was disrupted when larvae were reared in conditions simulating CO(2)-induced ocean acidification. Larvae became strongly attracted to olfactory stimuli they normally avoided when reared at levels of ocean pH that could occur ca. 2100 (pH 7.8) and they no longer responded to any olfactory cues when reared at pH levels (pH 7.6) that might be attained later next century on a business-as-usual carbon-dioxide emissions trajectory. If acidification continues unabated, the impairment of sensory ability will reduce population sustainability of many marine species, with potentially profound consequences for marine diversity.

  18. Basic principles and molecular mechanisms of olfactory axon pathfinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Y; Mori, K

    1997-11-01

    The present review describes several lines of recent evidence providing new insights into the basic principles and mechanisms of axon projection from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb. Olfactory sensory neurons are classified into approximately 1000 subtypes according to the expression of specific odorant receptors. Olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given odorant receptor are distributed within one zone out of the four circumscribed zones of the olfactory epithelium and send their axons to the corresponding zone of the olfactory bulb: the principle of zone-to-zone projection. We discuss possible functions of a novel cell adhesion molecule, viz., OCAM, in the formation and maintenance of zone-to-zone projection of both olfactory and vomeronasal axons. Furthermore, olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given odorant receptor converge their axons onto only two topographically fixed glomeruli among the 1500-3000 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb: the principle of glomerular convergence. These axonal connection patterns give rise to the response specificity of the second-order neurons, viz., the mitral/tufted cells, to a particular range of odor molecules. In the process of glomerular convergence, combinatorial functions of axon-associated cell adhesion molecules and odorant receptor proteins may be required for the establishment of the precise targeting of olfactory axons to the appropriate glomeruli.

  19. Anatomical specializations for enhanced olfactory sensitivity in kiwi, Apteryx mantelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Eisthen, Heather L; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Parsons, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The ability to function in a nocturnal and ground-dwelling niche requires a unique set of sensory specializations. The New Zealand kiwi has shifted away from vision, instead relying on auditory and tactile stimuli to function in its environment and locate prey. Behavioral evidence suggests that kiwi also rely on their sense of smell, using olfactory cues in foraging and possibly also in communication and social interactions. Anatomical studies appear to support these observations: the olfactory bulbs and tubercles have been suggested to be large in the kiwi relative to other birds, although the extent of this enlargement is poorly understood. In this study, we examine the size of the olfactory bulbs in kiwi and compare them with 55 other bird species, including emus, ostriches, rheas, tinamous, and 2 extinct species of moa (Dinornithiformes). We also examine the cytoarchitecture of the olfactory bulbs and olfactory epithelium to determine if any neural specializations beyond size are present that would increase olfactory acuity. Kiwi were a clear outlier in our analysis, with olfactory bulbs that are proportionately larger than those of any other bird in this study. Emus, close relatives of the kiwi, also had a relative enlargement of the olfactory bulbs, possibly supporting a phylogenetic link to well-developed olfaction. The olfactory bulbs in kiwi are almost in direct contact with the olfactory epithelium, which is indeed well developed and complex, with olfactory receptor cells occupying a large percentage of the epithelium. The anatomy of the kiwi olfactory system supports an enhancement for olfactory sensitivities, which is undoubtedly associated with their unique nocturnal niche. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management; Overview of current therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Al-Shaqsi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management.

  1. [Mechanism of scar formation and strategy of treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shu-liang

    2013-04-01

    So far, studies on the mechanism of scar formation have mainly focused on cells, cytokines and extracellular matrix. Some studies have shown that fibroblast is one of the most important element in the process of scar formation, while epidermal and endothelial cells exert synergistic effects as well. Genetic factor can not be ignored in scar formation, either. Recently, studies have shown decisively the loss or damage of the three-dimensional structure of dermal tissue is the initiator of scar formation. Thus, the defect of epidermis template is proposed as a theory in order to explain the mechanism of scar formation. There are various techniques for scar treatment. The commonly accepted methods are physical therapy, pressure therapy, pharmaceutical therapy, radiotherapy, etc.

  2. Prosthodontist contribution in treating post-burn hypertrophic facial scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmanabhan T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of hypertrophic scars is common following healing of the burn wound, particularly in children. The face is one of the areas of the body most frequently affected by burns. Scar formation as a result of burn wounds leads to contraction of the formed granulation tissue, which causes both aesthetic and functional impairment for the patient. Scarring has major psychological and physical repercussions. Scarring on the face and visible regions of the body can be very distressing for the patient. Prevention of scars involves early and continuous use of a compressive orthesis. However, their efficacy is often limited to the facial region because of the contours of this area of body. This paper describes a clinical case of post-burn hypertrophic scars treated with silicone gel sheeting applied with pressure under custom made auto-polymerizing resin stent.

  3. Olfactory bulb volume and olfactory function after radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyseller, Bayram; Ozucer, Berke; Degirmenci, Nazan; Gurbuz, Defne; Tambas, Makbule; Altun, Musa; Aksoy, Fadullah; Ozturan, Orhan

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary method of treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) and many side effects were reported in patients receiving radiation to this area. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term effects of radiotherapy following NPC on olfactory bulb (OB) volume and olfactory function. Twenty-four patients with NPC who received radiotherapy at least 12 months ago were recruited. Fourteen healthy subjects with similar demographical characteristics were recruited as the healthy control group. All volunteers were subjected to a nasoendoscopical examination, and abnormalities that could potentially cause olfactory dysfunction were the exclusion criteria from the study. An experienced radiologist segmented the MRI coronal, axial and sagittal slices manually for three-dimensional OB volume measurement in a blinded manner. Olfactory function was assessed using the Connecticut Chemosensory Clinical Research Center (CCCRC) test, and average score (0: worst, 7: best) was calculated as the total CCCRC olfactory score. The mean CCCRC score was 5.5 ± 1.1 for the nasopharyngeal cancer patients, whereas the mean score of healthy control group was 6.4 ± 0.4. There was a significant difference in the olfactory scores (p=0.003). The mean OB volume in the NPC group was 46.7 ± 12.1mm(3). Among the patients with NPC, the cisplatin receiving group had a mean OB volume of 47.2mm(3), whereas the cisplatin+docetaxel receiving group had a mean OB volume of 46.5mm(3), and they were similar. The MRI measurement of the healthy control group was 58.6 ± 13.8mm(3). The OB volumes of the healthy control group were significantly higher (polfactory function. Chemosensory olfactory dysfunction might be a contributing factor to lack of appetite, cancer cachexia and consequent lowered quality of life in NPC patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy. Laparoscopic resection and total scar dehiscence repair. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Sara; Gabriele, Victor; Faller, Emilie; Langer, Bruno; Wattiez, Arnaud; Lecointre, Lise; Akladios, Cherif

    2017-02-04

    Illustrate laparoscopic technique for resection of cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy, associated with isthmocele repair. Case report SETTING: Tertiary referral centre in Strasbourg, France. The study was approved by the local IRB. Cesarean scar pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy. The major risk of this type of pregnancy is the early uterine rupture with massive bleeding and maternal life-threatening. It is therefore crucial to manage actively these pregnancies as soon as they are diagnosed. Therapeutic options can be medical, surgical, or a combination of both. Many case reports or case series are found in the literature, but only few clinical studies, too difficult to carry out because of cases rarity and inconclusiveness. "Systematic review: What is the best first-line approach for cesarean section ectopic pregnancy?" is a meta-analysis that was published in 2016, and includes 194 studies between 1978 and 2014 (126 case reports, 45 cases series and 23 clinical studies). According to this systematic review, hysteroscopy or laparoscopic hysterotomy seems to be the best first-line approach to treat cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy. Uterine artery embolization seems to be reserved for significant bleeding and/or a high suspicion index for arteriovenous malformation. There is however no consensus on treatment of reference. The case concerns a 38-year-old primiparous women with cesarean section in 2010, who was diagnosed by US scan at 7 WG as cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy, confirmed by pelvic MRI. The patient has initially received medical treatment with two intramuscular injections of Methotrexate and one local intra-gestational injection of KCl. Initial rate of HCG was 82000 IU/L. Through a rigorous weekly biological and US scan monitoring, it has been observed an involution of the ectopic pregnancy at ultrasonography associated to HCG decreasing. No bleeding or infectious complications occurred during this period. After 10 weeks of monitoring, because of a

  5. A novel instrument aimed at measuring hypertrophic scar formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramella-Roman, J C; Nguyen, T A; Lemaillet, P [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of America (United States); Pavlovich, A R; Jordan, M H; Shupp, J W, E-mail: ramella@cua.edu [Burn Center, Department of Surgery, Washington Hospital Center-MedStar Health Research Institute, Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic scaring is a condition that can occur after thermal trauma and can lead to loss of function and psyco-social complications. Assessment of the development of a hypertrophic scar currently relies on visual inspection and grading. In this paper we propose a system based on polarized illumination and collection capable of capturing images of scars and quantify their roughness. Models of rough surface roughness are ultimately used to quantify the level of roughness of scarred skin compared to normal skin.

  6. Numerical study of scars in a chaotic billiard

    CERN Document Server

    Li, B

    1997-01-01

    We study numerically the scaling properties of scars in stadium billiard. Using the semiclassical criterion, we have searched systematically the scars of the same type through a very wide range, from ground state to as high as the 1 millionth state. We have analyzed the integrated probability density along the periodic orbit. The numerical results confirm that the average intensity of certain types of scars is independent of $\\hbar$ rather than scales with (1989).

  7. Post herpes-zoster scar sarcoidosis with pulmonary involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous sarcoidosis presents with a wide range of clinical presentations. An uncommon cutaneous manifestation is infiltration of old cutaneous scars with non-caseating granulomas known as scar sarcoidosis. Most of the patients with this clinical entity have other systemic manifestations, particularly pulmonary changes. We report a case of a 50 years old man, presenting with cutaneous sarcoidosis overlying scars of healed herpes zoster.

  8. Olfactory Cues, Visual Cues, and Semiochemical Diversity Interact During Host Location by Invasive Forest Beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jessica L; Kelly, Dave; Bader, Martin K-F; Brockerhoff, Eckehard G

    2017-01-01

    Plant-feeding insects use visual and olfactory cues (shape, color, plant volatiles) for host location, but the relative importance of different cues and interactions with non-host-plant volatiles in ecosystems of varying plant biodiversity is unclear for most species. We studied invasive bark beetles and wood borers associated with pine trees to characterize interactions among color, host and non-host volatiles, by employing traps that mimic tree trunks. Cross-vane flight intercept traps (black, green, red, white, yellow, clear) and black funnel traps were used with and without attractants (α-pinene + ethanol), repellents (non-host green leaf volatiles, 'GLV'), and attractant/repellent combinations in four pine forests in New Zealand. We trapped 274,594 Hylurgus ligniperda, 7842 Hylastes ater, and 16,301 Arhopalus ferus. Trap color, attractant, and color × attractant effects were highly significant. Overall, black and red traps had the highest catches, irrespective of the presence of attractants. Alpha-pinene plus ethanol increased trap catch of H. ligniperda 200-fold but only 6-fold for H. ater and 2-fold for A. ferus. Green leaf volatiles had a substantial repellent effect on trap catch of H. ligniperda but less on H. ater and A. ferus. Attack by H. ligniperda was halved when logs were treated with GLV, and a similar effect was observed when logs were placed among broadleaved understory shrubs emitting GLV. Overall, H. ligniperda was most strongly affected by the olfactory cues used, whereas H. ater and A. ferus were more strongly affected by visual cues. Collectively, the results support the semiochemical diversity hypothesis, indicating that non-host plant volatiles from diverse plant communities or artificial dispensers can contribute to resistance against herbivores by partly disrupting host location.

  9. Interactive visualization for scar transmurality in cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiml, Sabrina; Toth, Daniel; Panayiotou, Maria; Fahn, Bernhard; Karim, Rashed; Behar, Jonathan M.; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Brost, Alexander; Mountney, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Heart failure is a serious disease affecting about 23 million people worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is used to treat patients suffering from symptomatic heart failure. However, 30% to 50% of patients have limited clinical benefit. One of the main causes is suboptimal placement of the left ventricular lead. Pacing in areas of myocardial scar correlates with poor clinical outcomes. Therefore precise knowledge of the individual patient's scar characteristics is critical for delivering tailored treatments capable of improving response rates. Current research methods for scar assessment either map information to an alternative non-anatomical coordinate system or they use the image coordinate system but lose critical information about scar extent and scar distribution. This paper proposes two interactive methods for visualizing relevant scar information. A 2-D slice based approach with a scar mask overlaid on a 16 segment heart model and a 3-D layered mesh visualization which allows physicians to scroll through layers of scar from endocardium to epicardium. These complementary methods enable physicians to evaluate scar location and transmurality during planning and guidance. Six physicians evaluated the proposed system by identifying target regions for lead placement. With the proposed method more target regions could be identified.

  10. Management of Keloid and Hypertrophic Scar/span>s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edriss, A.S.; Mesták, J.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Scar management for the prevention of excessive scar formation has always been important but never so important as it is today. Optimal management continues to be an enigma for surgeons, and the best modality of treatment has been debated for many years. However, most studies have unfortunately been either retrospective or case report descriptions. Advances in scar management have been hampered by confusing or ambiguous terminology. There is no consensus on what amount of post-traumatic skin scar formation is "normal" and what should be considered "hypertrophic". In the World Health Organization's ICD-9, there is no diagnostic code for hypertrophic scar - only keloid is listed. Yet the medical and scientific literature distinguishes them as different conditions. This confusion results in inappropriate management of scar formation, and occasionally contributes to decision making related to elective or cosmetic surgery. Our experience suggests that there is no single treatment for scars that is adequate and that clinical judgement is very important when considering treatment and balancing the potential benefits of the various treatments available. The goal of treating scars is to restore functionality, provide relief of symptoms, enhance cosmetics, and prevent recurrence. This article is based on our scientific and clinical experiences and focuses on over-the-counter options to manage keloid and hypertrophic scar/span>s. PMID:21991008

  11. Quantitative analysis of a scar's pliability, perfusion and metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Mariacarla; Sevilla, Nicole; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2017-02-01

    The primary effect of scarring is the loss of function in the affected area. Scarring also leads to physical and psychological problems that could be devastating to the patient's life. Currently, scar assessment is highly subjective and physician dependent. The examination relies on the expertise of the physician to determine the characteristics of the scar by touch and visual examination using the Vancouver scar scale (VSS), which categorizes scars depending on pigmentation, pliability, height and vascularity. In order to establish diagnostic guidelines for scar formation, a quantitative, accurate assessment method needs to be developed. An instrument capable of measuring all categories was developed; three of the aforementioned parameters will be explored. In order to look at pliability, a durometer which measures the amount of resistance a surface exerts to prevent the permanent indentation of the surface is used due to its simplicity and quantitative output. To look at height and vascularity, a profilometry system that collects the location of the scar in three-dimensions and laser speckle imaging (LSI), which shows the dynamic changes in perfusion, respectively, are used. Gelatin phantoms were utilized to measure pliability. Finally, dynamic changes in skin perfusion of volunteers' forearms undergoing pressure cuff occlusion were measured, along with incisional scars.

  12. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Chadwick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options.

  13. Ipsilateral Rotational Autokeratoplasty for the Management of Traumatic Corneal Scar

    OpenAIRE

    Alime Günes; Tahir Kansu Bozkurt; Cihan Unlu; Betül Ilkay Sezgin Akcay; Hüseyin Bayramlar

    2012-01-01

    A 40-years-old male patient with a corneal scar secondary to perforating eye injury had undergone ipsilateral rotational autokeratoplasty in our clinics. The corneal scar involved the pupillary area. The patient had a preoperative visual acuity of counting fingers. The patient's cornea was trephined with a 0.5 mm temporal decentration. The 8.0 mm autograft was rotated approximately 180° to relocate the scar to the temporal aspect of the cornea. The final position of the corneal scar was tempo...

  14. Koinophilia and Human Facial Attractiveness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 4. Koinophilia and Human Facial Attractiveness. Aishwawriya Iyengar Rutvij Kulkarni T N C Vidya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 4 April 2015 pp 311-319 ... Keywords. Koinophilia; attractiveness; averaged faces; recognition; mate choice.

  15. AIM: Attracting Women into Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Icial S.

    1995-01-01

    Addresses how to attract more college women into the sciences. Attracting Women into Sciences (AIM) is a comprehensive approach that begins with advising, advertising, and ambiguity. The advising process includes dispelling stereotypes and reviewing the options open to a female basic science major. Interaction, involvement and instruction, finding…

  16. The Measurement of Interpersonal Attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCroskey, James C.; McCain, Thomas A.

    This paper reports a factor analytic investigation of the interpersonal attraction construct. Two hundred-fifteen subjects completed 30 Likert-type, 7-step scales concerning an acquaintance. Factor analysis indicated three dimensions of the interpersonal attraction construct which were labeled "task,""social," and "physical." Obtained internal…

  17. Treating Scars on the Oral Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Erik William

    2017-02-01

    Mucosal wounds tend to heal more rapidly than skin wounds and with minimal to no scar formation and hence have a minimal impact on function or aesthetics. This is likely due to differences in the magnitude and timing of the various factors that contribute to wound healing. Some examples of these differences are fibroblast proliferation, transforming growth factor-β, macrophages, neutrophils, and T cells. Other factors, such as the moist environment, contribute to the favorable wound-healing characteristics of mucosa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Preliminary Study on the Pattern, the Physiological Bases and the Molecular Mechanism of the Adductor Muscle Scar Pigmentation in Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Yu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The melanin pigmentation of the adductor muscle scar and the outer surface of the shell are among attractive features and their pigmentation patterns and mechanism still remains unknown in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. To study these pigmentation patterns, the colors of the adductor muscle scar vs. the outer surface of the shell on the same side were compared. No relevance was found between the colors of the adductor muscle scars and the corresponding outer surface of the shells, suggesting that their pigmentation processes were independent. Interestingly, a relationship between the color of the adductor muscle scars and the dried soft-body weight of Pacific oysters was found, which could be explained by the high hydroxyl free radical scavenging capacity of the muscle attached to the black adductor muscle scar. After the transcriptomes of pigmented and unpigmented adductor muscles and mantles were studied by RNAseq and compared, it was found that the retinol metabolism pathway were likely to be involved in melanin deposition on the adductor muscle scar and the outer surface of the shell, and that the different members of the tyrosinase or Cytochrome P450 gene families could play a role in the independent pigmentation of different organs.

  19. Morphology and physiology of the olfactory system of blood-feeding insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidobaldi, F; May-Concha, I J; Guerenstein, P G

    2014-01-01

    Several blood-feeding (hematophagous) insects are vectors of a number of diseases including dengue, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis which persistently affect public health throughout Latin America. The vectors of those diseases include mosquitoes, triatomine bugs and sandflies. As vector control is an efficient way to prevent these illnesses it is important to understand the sensory biology of those harmful insects. We study the physiology of the olfactory system of those insects and apply that knowledge on the development of methods to manipulate their behavior. Here we review some of the latest information on insect olfaction with emphasis on hematophagous insects. The insect olfactory sensory neurons are housed inside hair-like organs called sensilla which are mainly distributed on the antenna and mouthparts. The identity of many of the odor compounds that those neurons detect are already known in hematophagous insects. They include several constituents of host (vertebrate) odor, sex, aggregation and alarm pheromones, and compounds related to egg-deposition behavior. Recent work has contributed significant knowledge on how odor information is processed in the insect first odor-processing center in the brain, the antennal lobe. The quality, quantity, and temporal features of the odor stimuli are encoded by the neural networks of the antennal lobe. Information regarding odor mixtures is also encoded. While natural mixtures evoke strong responses, synthetic mixtures that deviate from their natural counterparts in terms of key constituents or proportions of those constituents evoke weaker responses. The processing of olfactory information is largely unexplored in hematophagous insects. However, many aspects of their olfactory behavior are known. As in other insects, responses to relevant single odor compounds are weak while natural mixtures evoke strong responses. Future challenges include studying how information about odor mixtures is processed in their brain

  20. The banana code – Natural blend processing in the olfactory circuitry of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eSchubert

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Odor information is predominantly perceived as complex odor blends. For Drosophila melanogaster one of the most attractive blends is emitted by an over-ripe banana. To analyze how the fly’s olfactory system processes natural blends we combined the experimental advantages of gas chromatography and functional imaging (GC-I. In this way, natural banana compounds were presented successively to the fly antenna in close to natural occurring concentrations. This technique allowed us to identify the active odor components, use these compounds as stimuli and measure odor-induced Ca2+ signals in input and output neurons of the Drosophila antennal lobe (AL, the first olfactory neuropil. We demonstrate that mixture interactions of a natural blend are very rare and occur only at the AL output level resulting in a surprisingly linear blend representation. However, the information regarding single components is strongly modulated by the olfactory circuitry within the AL leading to a higher similarity between the representation of individual components and the banana blend. This observed modulation might tune the olfactory system in a way to distinctively categorize odor components and improve the detection of suitable food sources. Functional GC-I thus enables analysis of virtually any unknown natural odorant blend and its components in their relative occurring concentrations and allows characterization of neuronal responses of complete neural assemblies. This technique can be seen as a valuable complementary method to classical GC/electrophysiology techniques, and will be a highly useful tool in future investigations of insect-insect and insect-plant chemical interactions.

  1. Valproic acid ameliorates olfactory dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease: Ameliorations from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Gang; Jing, Hai-Yan; Wang, Dong-Mei; Lv, Bei-Bei; Li, Jia-Mei; Liu, Feng-Feng; Fan, Hui; Sun, Xi-Chao; Qin, Ye-Jun; Zhao, Miao-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is a common and early symptom of many neurodegenerative diseases, particularly of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment, pointing to the progression to dementia. Recent studies have revealed that valproic acid (VPA) has neuroprotective effects in rodent models of AD. In this study, we investigated the effects of VPA on olfactory dysfunction of APP/PS1 double transgenic mouse models of AD. After continuous treatment with a 100mg/kg daily dose of VPA for 3 months, APP/PS1 mice showed improved olfactory performances. In agreement with the behavioral findings, VPA treatment reduced amyloid β (Aβ) burden in the olfactory epithelium (OE) of transgenic mice. And, VPA increased epithelial thickness of the olfactory mucosa through decreased cell apoptosis and increased cell proliferation. In the olfactory bulb (OB), VPA administration also reduced senile plaques and levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ42 peptides. Besides, VPA promoted the increase of mitral cells and decrease of neurofilament immunostaining. In hence, VPA treatment completely improved the olfactory performances and prevented degenerative changes of the OE and OB. Our study raises the possibility of AD diagnosis by OE biopsy. Moreover, VPA may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of olfactory dysfunction in AD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tunicamycin impairs olfactory learning and synaptic plasticity in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jia; Okutani, Fumino; Murata, Yoshihiro; Taniguchi, Mutsuo; Namba, Toshiharu; Wang, Yu-Jie; Kaba, Hideto

    2017-03-06

    Tunicamycin (TM) induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inhibits N-glycosylation in cells. ER stress is associated with neuronal death in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, and most patients complain of the impairment of olfactory recognition. Here we examined the effects of TM on aversive olfactory learning and the underlying synaptic plasticity in the main olfactory bulb (MOB). Behavioral experiments demonstrated that the intrabulbar infusion of TM disabled aversive olfactory learning without affecting short-term memory. Histological analyses revealed that TM infusion upregulated C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), a marker of ER stress, in the mitral and granule cell layers of MOB. Electrophysiological data indicated that TM inhibited tetanus-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) at the dendrodendritic excitatory synapse from mitral to granule cells. A low dose of TM (250nM) abolished the late phase of LTP, and a high dose (1μM) inhibited the early and late phases of LTP. Further, high-dose, but not low-dose, TM reduced the paired-pulse facilitation ratio, suggesting that the inhibitory effects of TM on LTP are partially mediated through the presynaptic machinery. Thus, our results support the hypothesis that TM-induced ER stress impairs olfactory learning by inhibiting synaptic plasticity via presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms in MOB. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human hypertrophic and keloid scar models: principles, limitations and future challenges from a tissue engineering perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, L.J.; Limandjaja, G.C.; Niessen, F.B.; Gibbs, S.

    2014-01-01

    Most cutaneous wounds heal with scar formation. Ideally, an inconspicuous normotrophic scar is formed, but an abnormal scar (hypertrophic scar or keloid) can also develop. A major challenge to scientists and physicians is to prevent adverse scar formation after severe trauma (e.g. burn injury) and

  4. Psychometric properties of the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile in adults with burn scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyack, Zephanie; Kimble, Roy; McPhail, Steven; Plaza, Anita; Simons, Megan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the longitudinal validity, reproducibility, responsiveness and interpretability of the adult version of the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile, a patient-report measure of health-related quality of life. A prospective longitudinal cohort study of patients with or at risk of burn scarring was conducted at three assessment points (at baseline around the time of wound healing, one to two weeks post-baseline and 1-month post-baseline). Participants attending a major metropolitan adult burn centre at baseline were recruited. Participants completed the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey and Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs), smallest detectable change, percentage of those who improved, stayed the same or worsened and Area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC) were used to test the aim. Data were included for 118 participants at baseline, 68 participants at one to two weeks and 57 participants at 1-month post-baseline. All groups of items had acceptable reproducibility, except for the overall impact of burn scars (ICC = 0.69), the impact of sensations which was not expected to be stable (ICC = 0.63), mobility and daily activities (ICC = 0.63, 0.67 respectively). The responsiveness of six out of seven groups of items able to be tested against external criterion was supported (AUC = 0.72-0.75). Hypothesised correlations of changes in the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile items with changes in criterion measures generally supported longitudinal validity (e.g., nine out of thirteen hypotheses using the SF-36 as an external criterion were supported). Internal consistency estimates, item-total and inter-item correlations indicated there was likely redundancy of some groups of items, particularly in the relationships and social interaction, appearance and emotional reactions items (Chronbach's alpha range = 0.94-0.95). Support was found

  5. Psychometric properties of the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile in adults with burn scars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zephanie Tyack

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the longitudinal validity, reproducibility, responsiveness and interpretability of the adult version of the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile, a patient-report measure of health-related quality of life.A prospective longitudinal cohort study of patients with or at risk of burn scarring was conducted at three assessment points (at baseline around the time of wound healing, one to two weeks post-baseline and 1-month post-baseline. Participants attending a major metropolitan adult burn centre at baseline were recruited. Participants completed the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey and Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs, smallest detectable change, percentage of those who improved, stayed the same or worsened and Area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC were used to test the aim.Data were included for 118 participants at baseline, 68 participants at one to two weeks and 57 participants at 1-month post-baseline. All groups of items had acceptable reproducibility, except for the overall impact of burn scars (ICC = 0.69, the impact of sensations which was not expected to be stable (ICC = 0.63, mobility and daily activities (ICC = 0.63, 0.67 respectively. The responsiveness of six out of seven groups of items able to be tested against external criterion was supported (AUC = 0.72-0.75. Hypothesised correlations of changes in the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile items with changes in criterion measures generally supported longitudinal validity (e.g., nine out of thirteen hypotheses using the SF-36 as an external criterion were supported. Internal consistency estimates, item-total and inter-item correlations indicated there was likely redundancy of some groups of items, particularly in the relationships and social interaction, appearance and emotional reactions items (Chronbach's alpha range = 0.94-0.95.Support

  6. Neural sensitivity to odorants in deprived and normal olfactory bulbs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco B Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Early olfactory deprivation in rodents is accompanied by an homeostatic regulation of the synaptic connectivity in the olfactory bulb (OB. However, its consequences in the neural sensitivity and discrimination have not been elucidated. We compared the odorant sensitivity and discrimination in early sensory deprived and normal OBs in anesthetized rats. We show that the deprived OB exhibits an increased sensitivity to different odorants when compared to the normal OB. Our results indicate that early olfactory stimulation enhances discriminability of the olfactory stimuli. We found that deprived olfactory bulbs adjusts the overall excitatory and inhibitory mitral cells (MCs responses to odorants but the receptive fields become wider than in the normal olfactory bulbs. Taken together, these results suggest that an early natural sensory stimulation sharpens the receptor fields resulting in a larger discrimination capability. These results are consistent with previous evidence that a varied experience with odorants modulates the OB's synaptic connections and increases MCs selectivity.

  7. File list: Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium mm9 Unclassified Others Olfactory epithelium ...SRX112960 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Oth.50.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.50.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium mm9 Unclassified Others Olfactory epithelium ...SRX112960 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.50.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium mm9 Unclassified Others Olfactory epithelium ...SRX112960 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium mm9 Unclassified Others Olfactory epithelium ...SRX112960 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium.bed ...

  11. Semi-field evaluation of several novel alkenol analogs of 1-octen-3-ol as attractants to adult Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The compound 1-octen-3-ol is a known attractant of some mosquito species which has led to the hypothesis that olfactory stimulation by this alkenol may be associated with the following structural elements: a terminal site of unsaturation or high electron density, a structural capability for hydroge...

  12. OLAF: standardization of international olfactory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, C; Zucco, G M; Iannilli, E; Maboshe, W; Landis, B N; Hummel, T

    2012-03-01

    Developed in the 1990 s, the "Sniffin 'Sticks" test for the assessment of olfactory threshold, odor identification and discrimination has become a widely used tool both in clinical and research settings. Originally pencil-and-paper documented, it may now be applied using a computer program. The "Filemaker" based software "OLAF" guides the examiner through any user-defined arrangement of the test battery, stores all data in a database, and offers results sheets to be printed out for convenience. The royalty-free program may be downloaded from http://www.tu-dresden.de/medkhno/riechen_schmecken/olaf.zip as a runtime solution application. It is currently available in four languages (English, French, German, and Italian) which can be toggled by a single mouse click, and is suitable for Windows as well as Apple platforms. In conclusion, the currently described software is expected to further facilitate and standardize olfactory testing with the "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery.

  13. A natural odor attraction between lactic acid bacteria and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Im; Yoon, Kyoung-Hye; Subbammal Kalichamy, Saraswathi; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Il Lee, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Animal predators can track prey using their keen sense of smell. The bacteriovorous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans employs sensitive olfactory sensory neurons that express vertebrate-like odor receptors to locate bacteria. C. elegans displays odor-related behaviors such as attraction, aversion and adaptation, but the ecological significance of these behaviors is not known. Using a combination of food microbiology and genetics, we elucidate a possible predator-prey relationship between C. elegans and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in rotting citrus fruit. LAB produces the volatile odor diacetyl as an oxidized by-product of fermentation in the presence of citrate. We show that C. elegans is attracted to LAB when grown on citrate media or Citrus medica L, commonly known as yuzu, a citrus fruit native to East Asia, and this attraction is mediated by the diacetyl odor receptor, ODR-10. We isolated a wild LAB strain and a wild C. elegans-related nematode from rotten yuzu, and demonstrate that the wild nematode was attracted to the diacetyl produced by LAB. These results not only identify an ecological function for a C. elegans olfactory behavior, but contribute to the growing understanding of ecological relationships between the microbial and metazoan worlds.

  14. Profound Olfactory Dysfunction in Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E.; Bayona, Edgardo A.; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Osman, Allen; Doty, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease strongly identified with deficient acetylcholine receptor transmission at the post-synaptic neuromuscular junction, is accompanied by a profound loss of olfactory function. Twenty-seven MG patients, 27 matched healthy controls, and 11 patients with polymiositis, a disease with peripheral neuromuscular symptoms analogous to myasthenia gravis with no known central nervous system involvement, were tested. All were administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Picture Identification Test (PIT), a test analogous in content and form to the UPSIT designed to control for non-olfactory cognitive confounds. The UPSIT scores of the myasthenia gravis patients were markedly lower than those of the age- and sex-matched normal controls [respective means (SDs) = 20.15 (6.40) & 35.67 (4.95); p<0.0001], as well as those of the polymiositis patients who scored slightly below the normal range [33.30 (1.42); p<0.0001]. The latter finding, along with direct monitoring of the inhalation of the patients during testing, implies that the MG-related olfactory deficit is unlikely due to difficulties sniffing, per se. All PIT scores were within or near the normal range, although subtle deficits were apparent in both the MG and PM patients, conceivably reflecting influences of mild cognitive impairment. No relationships between performance on the UPSIT and thymectomy, time since diagnosis, type of treatment regimen, or the presence or absence of serum anti-nicotinic or muscarinic antibodies were apparent. Our findings suggest that MG influences olfactory function to the same degree as observed in a number of neurodegenerative diseases in which central nervous system cholinergic dysfunction has been documented. PMID:23082113

  15. Semiclassical quantization of highly excited scar states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergini, Eduardo G.

    2017-04-01

    The semiclassical quantization of Hamiltonian systems with classically chaotic dynamics is restricted to low excited states, close to the ground state, because the number of required periodic orbits grows exponentially with energy. Nevertheless, here we demonstrate that it is possible to find eigenenergies of highly excited states scarred by a short periodic orbit. Specifically, by using 18146 homoclinic orbits (HO)s of the shortest periodic orbit of the hyperbola billiard, we find eigenenergies of the strongest scars over a range which includes 630 even eigenfunctions. The analysis of data reveals that the used semiclassical formula presents two regimes. First, when all HOs with excursion time smaller than the Heisenberg time t H are included, the error is around 3.3% of the mean level spacing. Second, in the energy region defined by \\tilde{t}/ tH > 0.13 , where \\tilde{t} is the maximum excursion time included in the calculation, the error is around 15% of the mean level spacing.

  16. Reliable scar scoring system to assess photographs of burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecott, Gabriel A; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M; Branski, Ludwik K; Hegde, Sachin; Kraft, Robert; Williams, Felicia N; Maldonado, Susana A; Rivero, Haidy G; Rodriguez-Escobar, Noe; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-12-01

    Several scar-scoring scales exist to clinically monitor burn scar development and maturation. Although scoring scars through direct clinical examination is ideal, scars must sometimes be scored from photographs. No scar scale currently exists for the latter purpose. We modified a previously described scar scale (Yeong et al., J Burn Care Rehabil 1997) and tested the reliability of this new scale in assessing burn scars from photographs. The new scale consisted of three parameters as follows: scar height, surface appearance, and color mismatch. Each parameter was assigned a score of 1 (best) to 4 (worst), generating a total score of 3-12. Five physicians with burns training scored 120 representative photographs using the original and modified scales. Reliability was analyzed using coefficient of agreement, Cronbach alpha, intraclass correlation coefficient, variance, and coefficient of variance. Analysis of variance was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Color mismatch and scar height scores were validated by analyzing actual height and color differences. The intraclass correlation coefficient, the coefficient of agreement, and Cronbach alpha were higher for the modified scale than those of the original scale. The original scale produced more variance than that in the modified scale. Subanalysis demonstrated that, for all categories, the modified scale had greater correlation and reliability than the original scale. The correlation between color mismatch scores and actual color differences was 0.84 and between scar height scores and actual height was 0.81. The modified scar scale is a simple, reliable, and useful scale for evaluating photographs of burn patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Circadian regulation of insect olfactory learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Susan; McConnaughey, Shannon; Page, Terry L

    2007-10-02

    Olfactory learning in insects has been used extensively for studies on the neurobiology, genetics, and molecular biology of learning and memory. We show here that the ability of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae to acquire olfactory memories is regulated by the circadian system. We investigated the effect of training and testing at different circadian phases on performance in an odor-discrimination test administered 30 min after training (short-term memory) or 48 h after training (long-term memory). When odor preference was tested by allowing animals to choose between two odors (peppermint and vanilla), untrained cockroaches showed a clear preference for vanilla at all circadian phases, indicating that there was no circadian modulation of initial odor preference or ability to discriminate between odors. After differential conditioning, in which peppermint odor was associated with a positive unconditioned stimulus of sucrose solution and vanilla odor was associated with a negative unconditioned stimulus of saline solution, cockroaches conditioned in the early subjective night showed a strong preference for peppermint and retained the memory for at least 2 days. Animals trained and tested at other circadian phases showed significant deficits in performance for both short- and long-term memory. Performance depended on the circadian time (CT) of training, not the CT of testing, and results indicate that memory acquisition rather than retention or recall is modulated by the circadian system. The data suggest that the circadian system can have profound effects on olfactory learning in insects.

  18. Functional neuroanatomy of Drosophila olfactory memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L

    2014-10-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying Drosophila learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive and aversive reinforcers: (1) Which neurons within the olfactory nervous system mediate the acquisition of memory? (2) What is the complete neural circuitry extending from the site(s) of acquisition to the site(s) controlling memory expression? (3) How is information processed across this circuit to consolidate early-forming, disruptable memories to stable, late memories? Much progress has been made and a few strong conclusions have emerged: (1) Acquisition occurs at multiple sites within the olfactory nervous system but is mediated predominantly by the γ mushroom body neurons. (2) The expression of long-term memory is completely dependent on the synaptic output of α/β mushroom body neurons. (3) Consolidation occurs, in part, through circuit interactions between mushroom body and dorsal paired medial neurons. Despite this progress, a complete and unified model that details the pathway from acquisition to memory expression remains elusive. © 2014 Guven-Ozkan and Davis; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Effects of student physical attractiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjajić Stevan B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Implicit personality theories suggest that people draw conclusions about other persons by using a relatively small number of visible features. The formation of "the first impression" is influenced by the factors, such as sex, age, appearances, race or nationality. Frequently, conclusions based on those factors lead to developing social stereotypes. Attractiveness is a good example of "the first impression" effect, because physical attractiveness entails the creation of impression about another person along a relatively great number of dimensions. Experimental paradigm, introduced in the sphere of interpersonal perception around the mid-20th century, led to a relatively great number of studies on stereotype based on physical attractiveness. One of the most often quoted conclusions of studies on physical attractiveness is summarized by the idiom "what is beautiful is good". For example, socially desirable personality traits (responsibility kindness, energy quality, modesty, more successful private and professional life, are all attributed to physically attractive persons. In addition physical attractiveness is coupled with positive expectations, peer acceptance, academic achievement etc. On the basis of studies on the "what is beautiful is good" stereotype, we have situated our analysis within the domain of roles regulating social interaction between teachers and students i.e. effects of physical attractiveness on teacher expectations, peer acceptance and academic achievement.

  20. Higher Body Mass Index Is Associated with Subjective Olfactory Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Morbidly obese patients demonstrate altered olfactory acuity. There has been no study directly assessing Body Mass Index (BMI in patients with olfactory dysfunction. Our purpose was to compare BMI in a group of patients with subjective olfactory dysfunction to those without subjective olfactory complaints. Methods. Retrospective matched case-control study. Sixty patients who presented to a tertiary care otolaryngology center with subjective smell dysfunction over one year were identified. Neoplastic and obstructive etiologies were excluded. Demographics, BMI, and smoking status were reviewed. Sixty age, gender, and race matched control patients were selected for comparison. Chi-square testing was used. Results. 48 out of 60 patients (80% in the olfactory dysfunction group fell into the overweight or obese categories, compared to 36 out of 60 patients (60% in the control group. There was a statistically significant difference between the olfactory dysfunction and control groups for this stratified BMI (p= 0.0168.  Conclusion. This study suggests high BMI is associated with olfactory dysfunction. Prospective clinical research should examine this further to determine if increasing BMI may be a risk factor in olfactory loss and to elucidate what role olfactory loss may play in diet and feeding habits of obese patients.

  1. Anatomy, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur William Barrios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labelling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg’s ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg’s ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs are also labelled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb. These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line.

  2. The sorting behaviour of olfactory and vomeronasal axons during regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehrehasa, Fatemeh; St John, James; Key, Brian

    2005-09-01

    In order to begin to understand how primary olfactory and vomeronasal organ (VNO) axons target specific regions of the olfactory bulb, we examined the sorting behaviour of these axons following neonatal unilateral olfactory bulbectomy. Bulbectomy induced widespread ipsilateral death of the primary olfactory and VNO neurons. After 4 weeks, many new sensory axons had re-grown into the cranial cavity and established a prominent plexus with evidence of dense tufts that were similar in gross appearance to glomeruli. Axons expressing the cell adhesion molecule OCAM, which normally innervate the ventrolateral and rostral halves of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively, sorted out and segregated from those axons not expressing this molecule within the plexus. In addition, VNO axons formed large discrete bundles that segregated from main olfactory axons within the plexus. Thus, VNO and primary olfactory axons as well as discrete subpopulations of both are able to sort out and remain segregated in the absence of the olfactory bulb. Sorting and convergence of axons therefore occur independently of the olfactory bulb and are probably attributable either to inherent properties of the axons themselves or to interactions between the axons and accompanying glial ensheathing cells.

  3. Retro- and orthonasal olfactory function in relation to olfactory bulb volume in patients with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Murat; Kurt, Onuralp; Ay, Seyid Ahmet; Baskoy, Kamil; Altundag, Aytug; Saglam, Muzaffer; Deniz, Ferhat; Tekeli, Hakan; Yonem, Arif; Hummel, Thomas

    2017-08-24

    Idiopathic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (IHH) with an olfactory deficit is defined as Kallmann syndrome (KS) and is distinct from normosmic IHH. Because olfactory perception not only consists of orthonasally gained impressions but also involves retronasal olfactory function, in this study we decided to comprehensively evaluate both retronasal and orthonasal olfaction in patients with IHH. This case-control study included 31 controls and 45 IHH patients. All participants whose olfactory and taste functions were evaluated with orthonasal olfaction (discrimination, identification and threshold), retronasal olfaction, taste function and olfactory bulb volume (OBV) measurement. The patients were separated into three groups according to orthonasal olfaction: anosmic IHH (aIHH), hyposmic IHH (hIHH) and normosmic IHH (nIHH). Discrimination, identification and threshold scores of patients with KS were significantly lower than controls. Threshold scores of patients with nIHH were significantly lower than those of controls, but discrimination and identification scores were not significantly different. Retronasal olfaction was reduced only in the aIHH group compared to controls. Identification of bitter, sweet, sour, and salty tastes was not significantly different when compared between the anosmic, hyposmic, and normosmic IHH groups and controls. OBV was lower bilaterally in all patient groups when compared with controls. The OBV of both sides was found to be significantly correlated with TDI scores in IHH patients. 1) There were no significant differences in gustatory function between controls and IHH patients; 2) retronasal olfaction was reduced only in anosmic patients but not in orthonasally hyposmic participants, possibly indicating presence of effective compensatory mechanisms; 3) olfactory bulb volumes were highly correlated with olfaction scores in the HH group. The current results indicate a continuum from anosmia to normosmia in IHH patients. Copyright © 2017

  4. Mechanisms of regulation of olfactory transduction and adaptation in the olfactory cilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Gabriela; Sebastião, Ana Maria; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory adaptation is a fundamental process for the functioning of the olfactory system, but the underlying mechanisms regulating its occurrence in intact olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are not fully understood. In this work, we have combined stochastic computational modeling and a systematic pharmacological study of different signaling pathways to investigate their impact during short-term adaptation (STA). We used odorant stimulation and electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings of the olfactory epithelium treated with pharmacological blockers to study the molecular mechanisms regulating the occurrence of adaptation in OSNs. EOG responses to paired-pulses of odorants showed that inhibition of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and phosphatases enhanced the levels of STA in the olfactory epithelium, and this effect was mimicked by blocking vesicle exocytosis and reduced by blocking cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and vesicle endocytosis. These results suggest that G-coupled receptors (GPCRs) cycling is involved with the occurrence of STA. To gain insights on the dynamical aspects of this process, we developed a stochastic computational model. The model consists of the olfactory transduction currents mediated by the cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channels and calcium ion (Ca(2+))-activated chloride (CAC) channels, and the dynamics of their respective ligands, cAMP and Ca(2+), and it simulates the EOG results obtained under different experimental conditions through changes in the amplitude and duration of cAMP and Ca(2+) response, two second messengers implicated with STA occurrence. The model reproduced the experimental data for each pharmacological treatment and provided a mechanistic explanation for the action of GPCR cycling in the levels of second messengers modulating the levels of STA. All together, these experimental and theoretical results indicate the existence of a mechanism of regulation of STA by signaling pathways that control

  5. Paying attention to smell: cholinergic signaling in the olfactory bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Souza, Rinaldo D.; Vijayaraghavan, Sukumar

    2014-01-01

    The tractable, layered architecture of the olfactory bulb (OB), and its function as a relay between odor input and higher cortical processing, makes it an attractive model to study how sensory information is processed at a synaptic and circuit level. The OB is also the recipient of strong neuromodulatory inputs, chief among them being the central cholinergic system. Cholinergic axons from the basal forebrain modulate the activity of various cells and synapses within the OB, particularly the numerous dendrodendritic synapses, resulting in highly variable responses of OB neurons to odor input that is dependent upon the behavioral state of the animal. Behavioral, electrophysiological, anatomical, and computational studies examining the function of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors expressed in the OB have provided valuable insights into the role of acetylcholine (ACh) in regulating its function. We here review various studies examining the modulation of OB function by cholinergic fibers and their target receptors, and provide putative models describing the role that cholinergic receptor activation might play in the encoding of odor information. PMID:25309421

  6. Database of predicted SCAR markers in five fruit and three ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Database of predicted. SCAR markers in five fruit and three vegetable crops. Balakrishnan. V asanthakumari. Premkrishnan and. V adivel. Arunachalam. J. Genet. 95. ,. 171–175. Figure. 1 . Multiplex. PCR with. SCAR primer designed based on. OPJ-04 along with. 16S. rRNA- specific primers with genomic. DNA of banana.

  7. Managing Caesarean Scar Pregnancy in low Resource Settings: 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Mots-clés: grossesse de la cicatrice césarienne, approche chirurgicale guidée de l'échographie transrectale. Introduction. Caesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) occurs when an embryo implants in a previous caesarean section scar. It has a reported incidence of 1 in 18001 and was first reported by Larson and Solomon in ...

  8. External charring and fire scarring in three western conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. K. Sutherland; Josh Farella; David K Wright; Ian Hyp; K. T. Smith; Donald A. Falk; Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel

    2013-01-01

    Fires that injure but do not kill trees cause scars used as proxies for the reconstruction of wildfire history. Understanding about these wildfires - and their relationship to vegetation dynamics and climate - has profoundly affected wildfire and land management policy globally. To better understand scarring in the context of wildfire behavior, landscape and biological...

  9. NEDD4-1 and PTEN expression in keloid scarring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sang, P F; Wang, H; Wang, M; Hu, C; Zhang, J S; Li, X J; Zhu, F

    2015-01-01

    Keloid scarring remains a major problem in plastic surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of the PTEN tumor suppressor and NEDD4-1 genes in keloid tissue and explore their effect on the formation of such scarring...

  10. Potential cellular and molecular causes of hypertrophic scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, van der W.M.; Bloemen, M.C.; Ulrich, M.; Molema, G.; Zuijlen, van P.P.; Middelkoop, E.; Niessen, F.B.

    2009-01-01

    A scar is an expected result of wound healing. However, in some individuals, and particularly in burn victims, the wound healing processes may lead to a fibrotic hypertrophic scar, which is raised, red, inflexible and responsible for serious functional and cosmetic problems. It seems that a wide

  11. Potential cellular and molecular causes of hypertrophic scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Willem M.; Bloemen, Monica C. T.; Ulrich, Magda M. W.; Molema, Grietje; van Zuijlen, Paul P.; Middelkoop, Esther; Niessen, Frank B.

    A scar is an expected result of wound healing. However, in some individuals, and particularly in burn victims, the wound healing processes may lead to a fibrotic hypertrophic scar, which is raised, red, inflexible and responsible serious functional and cosmetic problems. It seems that a wide array

  12. Laser treatment of hypertrophic scar/span>s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrjakova, Olga B.; Gulev, Valerii S.

    2001-10-01

    For prophylaxis and treatment, the pulsed solid state neodymium yttrium-aluminum garnet laser was used. It has been shown that this kind of radiation inhibits the proliferative process and prevents the scar hyperfibrotization. In this paper author's reports about the development of the method for improving the scar quality using Nd:YAG laser are presented.

  13. Topical modalities for treatment and prevention of postsurgical hypertrophic scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Chong Wee; Tristani-Firouzi, Payam

    2011-08-01

    There is no universally accepted treatment regimen and no evidence-based literature to guide management of hypertrophic scars. This article summarizes the existing literature regarding topical treatments such as silicone gel sheeting and ointment, onion extract, vitamin E, pressure garment therapy, massage therapy, and topical imiquimod 5% cream in the management of hypertrophic scars. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Scar-modulating treatments for central nervous system injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dingding; Wang, Xiaodong; Gu, Xiaosong

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic injury to the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) leads to complex cellular responses. Among them, the scar tissue formed is generally recognized as a major obstacle to CNS repair, both by the production of inhibitory molecules and by the physical impedance of axon regrowth. Therefore, scar-modulating treatments have become a leading therapeutic intervention for CNS injury. To date, a variety of biological and pharmaceutical treatments, targeting scar modulation, have been tested in animal models of CNS injury, and a few are likely to enter clinical trials. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the scar-modulating treatments according to their specific aims: (1) inhibition of glial and fibrotic scar formation, and (2) blockade of the production of scar-associated inhibitory molecules. The removal of existing scar tissue is also discussed as a treatment of choice. It is believed that only a combinatorial strategy is likely to help eliminate the detrimental effects of scar tissue on CNS repair.

  15. The Role of Elastic Fibers in Scar Formation and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Brandon E; Geronemus, Roy G; McDaniel, David H; Brauer, Jeremy A

    2017-01-01

    Laser therapy is a continuously evolving treatment option for scars, and the underlying therapeutic mechanisms continue to be elucidated. To comprehensively review the literature to summarize the role of elastin in the formation scars, as well as treatment via therapeutic lasers. Review of the PubMED/MEDLINE database for available studies pertaining to the role of elastic fibers in scar formation and after laser-based therapy. The loss and disorganization of elastic fiber components plays a role in the development of atrophic, hypertrophic, and keloid scars. While the majority of histologic studies focus on the underlying changes in collagen, neoelastogenesis and reorganization of elastic fibers have also been demonstrated in studies using ablative, nonablative, and fractional laser devices for the treatment of scars. Production of novel elastin and normalization of elastic fiber organization occur after a variety of resurfacing procedures to treat scarring. As the treatment modalities to manage scars continue to evolve, further characterization of the role of elastin in the skin and in scar formation is merited.

  16. Pulmonary scar carcinoma in South Africa | Jenkins | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The association between lung scarring and the subsequent development of cancer remains controversial. South Africa has one of the highest incidences of tuberculosis in the world, and resultant scarring may predispose to malignancy. The country also carries a very high burden of smoking and ...

  17. Fractional CO2 laser resurfacing for atrophic acne scars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, Lene; Haak, Christina Skovbølling; Togsverd-Bo, Katrine

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of acne scars with fractional CO(2) lasers is gaining increasing impact, but has so far not been compared side-by-side to untreated control skin.......The treatment of acne scars with fractional CO(2) lasers is gaining increasing impact, but has so far not been compared side-by-side to untreated control skin....

  18. Macroanatomy of compartmentalization in fire scars of three western conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Elaine Sutherland; Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Donald. Falk

    2013-01-01

    Fire scars are visible evidence of compartmentalization and closure processes that contribute to tree survival after fire injury. Preliminary observations of dissected fire scars from trees injured within the last decade showed centripetal development of wound-initiated discoloration (WID) through 2-3 decades of former sapwood in Larix occidentalis and Pseudotsuga...

  19. Intralesional Cryotherapy for Treatment of Keloid Scars: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.C.E.; van der Wal, M.B.A.; Bulstra, A.E.J.; Galindo Garre, F.; Molier, J.; van Zuijlen, P.P.M.; van Leeuwen, P.A.M.; Niessen, F.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intralesional cryotherapy is a novel treatment for keloid scars in which the scar is frozen from inside. Published results are promising, but the treatment has only been tested in a Caucasian patient population. Therefore, the authors evaluated intralesional cryotherapy in a patient

  20. Patient reported facial scar assessment : directions for the professional

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, Cornelis J; van Baar, Margriet E; Middelkoop, Esther; Van Loey, N.E.E.

    BACKGROUND: The face is central to our identity and provides our most expressive means of communication. Currently, the role of facial scarring in relation to self-esteem is unclear and the value of self-reported scar assessment is insufficiently understood. The aim of this study was twofold: (1) to

  1. Trachomatous Scar Ranking: A Novel Outcome for Trachoma Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Angela; Ryner, Alexander M; Tadesse, Zerihun; Shiferaw, Ayalew; Callahan, Kelly; Fry, Dionna M; Zhou, Zhaoxia; Lietman, Thomas M; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2017-06-01

    AbstractWe evaluated a new trachoma scarring ranking system with potential use in clinical research. The upper right tarsal conjunctivas of 427 individuals from Ethiopian villages with hyperendemic trachoma were photographed. An expert grader first assigned a scar grade to each photograph using the 1981 World Health Organization (WHO) grading system. Then, all photographs were ranked from least (rank = 1) to most scarring (rank = 427). Photographic grading found 79 (18.5%) conjunctivae without scarring (C0), 191 (44.7%) with minimal scarring (C1), 105 (24.6%) with moderate scarring (C2), and 52 (12.2%) with severe scarring (C3). The ranking method demonstrated good internal validity, exhibiting a monotonic increase in the median rank across the levels of the 1981 WHO grading system. Intrarater repeatability was better for the ranking method (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.74-0.94). Exhibiting better internal and external validity, this ranking method may be useful for evaluating the difference in scarring between groups of individuals.

  2. Minimising Corneal Scarring from the use of Harmful Traditional Eye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corneal scarring is the fourth largest cause of blindness globally, and a much more prominent factor in developing countries. Blindness from corneal scarring is largely a preventable phenomenon, and is capable of causing significant morbidity that can last for a lifetime. A significant proportion of these cases are caused by ...

  3. Regenerative healing, scar-free healing and scar formation across the species: current concepts and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ud-Din, Sara; Volk, Susan W; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-09-01

    All species have evolved mechanisms of repair to restore tissue function following injury. Skin scarring is an inevitable and permanent endpoint for many postnatal organisms except for non-amniote vertebrates such as amphibians, which are capable of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, mammalian foetuses through mid-gestation are capable of rapid wound repair in the absence of scar formation. Notably, excessive cutaneous scar formation, such as hypertrophic and keloid scars, is a species limited clinical entity as it occurs only in humans, although wounds on the distal limbs of horses are also prone to heal with fibroproliferative pathology known as equine exuberant granulation tissue. Currently, there are no reliable treatment options to eradicate or prevent scarring in humans and vertebrates. The limited number of vertebrate models for either hypertrophic or keloid scarring has been an impediment to mechanistic studies of these diseases and the development of therapies. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts of regenerative, scar-free and scar-forming healing compared across a number of species and speculate on areas for future research. Furthermore, in-depth investigative research into the mechanisms of scarless repair may allow for the development of improved animal models and novel targets for scar prevention. As the ability to heal in both a scarless manner and propensity for healing with excessive scar formation is highly species dependent, understanding similarities and differences in healing across species as it relates to the regenerative process may hold the key to improve scarring and guide translational wound-healing studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Use of Autologous Fat Grafting for Treatment of Scar Tissue and Scar-Related Conditions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negenborn, Vera L; Groen, Jan-Willem; Smit, Jan Maerten; Niessen, Frank B; Mullender, Margriet G

    2016-01-01

    Scar tissue can cause cosmetic impairments, functional limitations, pain, and itch. It may also cause emotional, social, and behavioral problems, especially when it is located in exposed areas. To date, no gold standard exists for the treatment of scar tissue. Autologous fat grafting has been introduced as a promising treatment option for scar tissue-related symptoms. However, the scientific evidence for its effectiveness remains unclear. This systematic review aims to evaluate the available evidence regarding the effectiveness of autologous fat grafting for the treatment of scar tissue and scar-related conditions. A systematic literature review was performed using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science. No language restrictions were imposed. Twenty-six clinical articles were included, reporting on 905 patients in total. Meta-analysis was not performed because of the heterogeneous methodology demonstrated among the articles. Main outcome measures were scar appearance and skin characteristics, restoration of volume and/or (three-dimensional) contour, itch, and pain. All publications report a beneficial effect of autologous fat grafting on scar tissue. There is statistical significant improvement of the scar appearance, skin characteristics, and pain. Itch and restoration of volume and three-dimensional contour also improved. Autologous fat grafting is used to improve a variety of symptoms related to scar tissue. This systematic review suggests that autologous fat grafting provides beneficial effects with limited side effects. However, the level of evidence and methodological quality are quite low. Future randomized controlled trials with a methodologically strong design are necessary to confirm the effects of autologous fat grafting on scar tissue and scar-related conditions.

  5. Photoperiod mediated changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Walton

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD and short day lengths (SD for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus.

  6. Effects of student physical attractiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Krnjajić Stevan B.

    2005-01-01

    Implicit personality theories suggest that people draw conclusions about other persons by using a relatively small number of visible features. The formation of "the first impression" is influenced by the factors, such as sex, age, appearances, race or nationality. Frequently, conclusions based on those factors lead to developing social stereotypes. Attractiveness is a good example of "the first impression" effect, because physical attractiveness entails the creation of impression about anothe...

  7. Creating kampong as tourist attractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, N.; Utama, R.; Hidayat, A. R. T.; Zamrony, A. B.

    2017-06-01

    Tourism attractions become one of the main components and they drive the tourism activity in a region. The quality of tourism attractions would affect tourists’ visits. Tourism power can basically be built on any conditions which can attract people to visit. Towns is full of activities which include their economic, social, cultural and physical features, if they are presented properly, they can be a tourist attraction. Kampung City, as a form of urban settlement, has the potential to be developed as a tourism attraction. Kampung is not only a physical area of housing but it has also productive activities. Even the city’s economic activities are also influenced by the productive activities of its Kampung. The shape of Kampung which varies in physical, social, economic and cultural raises special characteristics of each Kampung. When it is linked with the city’s tourism activities, these special characteristics of course could be one of the attractions to attract tourists. This paper studies about one of Kampung in the Malang City. Administratively located in the Penanggungan Village Lowokwaru District, but the potential will just be focused on RW 4. Main productive activities of this village are pottery. In contrast to ceramics, pottery is made from clay and its uniqueness in color and shape. Based on the history of pottery in the Malang, it is concentrated in Penanggungan Village. But along with its development, pottery is decreasingly in demand and number of craftsmen is dwindling. Based on these circumstances, a concept is prepared to raise the image of the region as the Kampung of pottery and to repack it as a tourism attraction of the city.

  8. Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation after a Complete Spinal Cord Transection Mediates Neuroprotective and Immunomodulatory Mechanisms to Facilitate Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankan, Rana R; Griffis, Khris G; Haggerty-Skeans, James R; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Phelps, Patricia E

    2016-06-08

    Multiple neural and peripheral cell types rapidly respond to tissue damage after spinal cord injury to form a structurally and chemically inhibitory scar that limits axon regeneration. Astrocytes form an astroglial scar and produce chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), activate microglia, and recruit blood-derived immune cells to the lesion for debris removal. One beneficial therapy, olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation, results in functional improvements and promotes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. The lack of an OEC-specific marker, however, has limited the investigation of mechanisms underlying their proregenerative effects. We compared the effects of enhanced green fluorescent protein-labeled fibroblast (FB) and OEC transplants acutely after a complete low-thoracic spinal cord transection in adult rats. We assessed the preservation of neurons and serotonergic axons, the levels of inhibitory CSPGs and myelin debris, and the extent of immune cell activation between 1 and 8 weeks postinjury. Our findings indicate that OECs survive longer than FBs post-transplantation, preserve axons and neurons, and reduce inhibitory molecules in the lesion core. Additionally, we show that OECs limit immune-cell activation and infiltration, whereas FBs alter astroglial scar formation and increase immune-cell infiltration and concomitant secondary tissue damage. Administration of cyclosporine-A to enhance graft survival demonstrated that immune suppression can augment OEC contact-mediated protection of axons and neurons during the first 2 weeks postinjury. Collectively, these data suggest that OECs have neuroprotective and immunomodulatory mechanisms that create a supportive environment for neuronal survival and axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury creates physical and chemical barriers to axon regeneration. We used a complete spinal cord transection model and olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) or fibroblast (FB; control

  9. A Rare Case Report of Caesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepika; Gupta, Taru; Wahi, Sonika

    2017-08-01

    Caesarean scar ectopic is one of the rarest of all ectopic pregnancies. It is defined as when a blastocyst implants on a previous Caesarean scar. The incidence of Caesarean scar ectopic has increased due to increase in number of Caesarean deliveries. Early diagnosis of this can be done by using sonography. It is very important because a delay can lead to increased maternal morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis leads to prompt management and improves the outcome by allowing preservation of future fertility. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has important role when sonography is equivocal or inconclusive before therapy or intervention. We are reporting a rare case of G3P2l2 with previous two Caesarean deliveries, diagnosed as Caesarean scar ectopic pregnancy with the help of sonography and MRI. Patient underwent laparotomy and on histopathological examination Caesarean scar pregnancy was confirmed.

  10. Treatment of acne scars with hyaluronic acid: an improved approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halachmi, Shlomit; Ben Amitai, Dan; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2013-07-01

    Acne scarring is a prevalent and challenging cosmetic issue, which is often addressed by multiple modalities. A low-viscosity non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA) dermal filler, injected in microdoses into the mid-to-superficial dermis, may provide a useful new approach to improving the appearance of depressed acne scars Twelve consecutive patients with moderate to severe acne scarring, who had completed a series of fractional laser resurfacing, underwent microinjections of 20 mg/mL hyaluronic acid (HA) gel into discrete depressed acne scars on the face Immediate visual improvement was observed in all lesions. The procedure was well tolerated. Adverse events were limited to transient pinpoint bleeding at the injection site Microinjection of low viscosity HA offers a valuable technique for the treatment of discrete depressed acne scars

  11. Interneurons and beta-amyloid in the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory tubercle in APPxPS1 transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; De La Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2013-09-01

    Impaired olfaction has been described as an early symptom in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neuroanatomical changes underlying this deficit in the olfactory system are largely unknown. Given that interneuron populations are crucial in olfactory information processing, we have quantitatively analyzed somatostatin- (SOM), parvalbumin- (PV), and calretinin-expressing (CR) cells in the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and olfactory tubercle in PS1 x APP double transgenic mice model of AD. The experiments were performed in wild type and double transgenic homozygous animal groups of 2, 4, 6, and 8 months of age to analyze early stages of the pathology. In addition, beta-amyloid (Aβ) expression and its correlation with SOM cells have been quantified under confocal microscopy. The results indicate increasing expressions of Aβ with aging as well as an early fall of SOM and CR expression, whereas PV was decreased later in the disease progression. These observations evidence an early, preferential vulnerability of SOM and CR cells in rostral olfactory structures during AD that may be useful to unravel neural basis of olfactory deficits associated to this neurodegenerative disorder. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Breast Cancer from the Excisional Scar of a Benign Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Ji Young; Youk, Ji Hyun; Park, Byeong Woo; Kim, Hae Ryoung; Oh, Ki Keun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Burns and chronic inflammation are well-known circumstances in which malignant transformation may occur during wound healing. There are many reports of malignancies developing from a burn scar; however, there are only a few reports of malignancy arising from chronic inflammation or from the skin of a surgical scar following excision of a benign mass, in any part of the body. There are only twelve reported cases of breast cancer developing from a surgical scar, moreover, there have been no reports in the last 30 years. This case is a recent example of breast cancer developing in a surgical scar that showed subtle changes on sequential sonograms. The imaging findings of this case were subtle but the mass that had been shrinking developed an angular margin in one region. These findings, along with the penetrating vascularity revealed on Doppler, prompted us to proceed to a biopsy of the lesion. It was of critical importance to compare the size and the shape of the lesion with previous ultrasounds in order to exclude malignancy in any iatrogenically altered lesion. Based on this case, we conclude that whenever a subtle change is detected, at a surgical site, a biopsy should be performed. Breast cancer developing from a surgical scar is rare; this type of malignancy has been reported in only 12 cases to date. Herein, we report on a 52-year-old female who developed infiltrating ductal carcinoma in a surgical scar following excision of a benign mass. Two years previously, the patient underwent surgery and radiotherapy for invasive ductal carcinoma of the contralateral breast. The initial appearance of the scar was similar to fat necrosis; it was observed to be progressively shrinking on follow-up sonography. On the two year follow-up ultrasound, the appearance changed, an angular margin and vascularity at the periphery of the scar were noted. A biopsy and subsequent excision of the scar were performed; the diagnosis of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the scar was

  13. Recent Developments in the Theory of Scarring

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1998-01-01

    We review recent progress in attaining a quantitative understanding of the scarring phenomenon, the non-random behavior of quantum wavefunctions near unstable periodic orbits of a classically chaotic system. The wavepacket dynamics framework leads to predictions about statistical long-time and stationary properties of quantum systems with chaotic classical analogues. Many long-time quantum properties can be quantitatively understood using only short-time classical dynamics information; these include wavefunction intensity distributions, intensity correlations in phase space and correlations between wavefunctions, and distributions of decay rates and conductance peaks in weakly open systems. Strong deviations from random matrix theory are predicted and observed in the presence of short unstable periodic orbits.

  14. Exposure to young preferentially activates adult-born neurons in the main olfactory bulb of sheep mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, R; Meurisse, M; Cornilleau, F; Moussu, C; Keller, M; Lévy, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    New neurons are continuously added to the main olfactory bulb (MOB) of the mammalian brain. While their function has been demonstrated in olfactory learning, it is less known in an ethological context such as mothering. We addressed this question by investigating whether in sheep mothers the adult-generated olfactory neurons contribute to the processing of odors involved in attraction to lambs and in memorization of its individual signature. Parturient ewes, after having 2 days of contact with their lamb and being separated from them for 3 h, were exposed for 2 h either to their own lamb, an unfamiliar lamb or a familiar adult sheep and then sacrificed. A control group was composed of mothers not exposed to any lambs for 5 h before sacrifice. Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, was injected 3 months before parturition and revealed through immunocytochemistry in combination with markers of activation or neuronal maturation. The percentage of adult-born cells activated in the granular layer of the MOB was compared between the four groups. Results show that the whole population of olfactory neuroblasts and in particular the 3-month-old neuroblasts, are preferentially activated by lamb exposure and that the preferential activation is specific to olfactory neurogenesis since no activation was observed in newborn neurons of the dentate gyrus. However, neither neuroblasts nor mature neurons of the MOB differentiate between familiar and unfamiliar lamb exposure. Therefore, our data shows that adult-born neurons contribute to the processing of infantile odors which are determinant for maternal behavior.

  15. Visualizing olfactory learning functional imaging of experience-induced olfactory bulb changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Max L; Bendahmane, Mounir

    2014-01-01

    The anatomical organization of sensory neuron input allows odor information to be transformed into odorant-specific spatial maps of mitral/tufted cell glomerular activity. In other sensory systems, neuronal representations of sensory stimuli can be reorganized or enhanced following learning or experience. Similarly, several studies have demonstrated both structural and physiological experience-induced changes throughout the olfactory system. As experience-induced changes within this circuit likely serve as an initial site for odor memory formation, the olfactory bulb is an ideal site for optical imaging studies of olfactory learning, as they allow for the visualization of experience-induced changes in the glomerular circuit following learning and how these changes impact of odor representations with the bulb. Presently, optical imaging techniques have been used to visualize experience-induced changes in glomerular odor representations in a variety of paradigms in short-term habituation, chronic odor exposure, and olfactory associative conditioning. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Olfactory aversive conditioning alters olfactory bulb mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max L Fletcher

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical organization of receptor neuron input into the olfactory bulb (OB allows odor information to be transformed into an odorant-specific spatial map of mitral/tufted cell glomerular activity at the upper level of the olfactory bulb. In other sensory systems, neuronal representations of stimuli can be reorganized or enhanced following learning. While the mammalian OB has been shown to undergo experience-dependent plasticity at the glomerular level, it is still unclear if similar representational change occurs within mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor representations following learning. To address this, odorant-evoked glomerular activity patterns were imaged in mice expressing a GFP-based calcium indicator (GCaMP2 in OB mitral/tufted cells. Glomerular odor responses were imaged before and after olfactory associative conditioning to aversive foot shock. Following conditioning, we found no overall reorganization of the glomerular representation. Training, however, did significantly alter the amplitudes of individual glomeruli within the representation in mice in which the odor was presented together with foot shock. Further, the specific pairing of foot shock with odor presentations lead to increased responses primarily in initially weakly activated glomeruli. Overall, these results suggest that associative conditioning can enhance the initial representation of odors within the olfactory bulb by enhancing responses to the learned odor in some glomeruli.

  17. Loss of olfactory cell adhesion molecule reduces the synchrony of mitral cell activity in olfactory glomeruli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisovska, Maria; McGinley, Matthew J; Bensen, AeSoon; Westbrook, Gary L

    2011-04-15

    Odours generate activity in olfactory receptor neurons, whose axons contact the dendritic tufts of mitral cells within olfactory bulb glomeruli. These axodendritic synapses are anatomically separated from dendrodendritic synapses within each glomerulus. Mitral cells within a glomerulus show highly synchronized activity as assessed with whole-cell recording from pairs of mitral cells. We examined glomerular activity in mice lacking the olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM). Glomeruli in mice lacking OCAM show a redistribution of synaptic subcompartments, but the total area occupied by axonal inputs was similar to wild-type mice. Stimulation of olfactory nerve bundles showed that excitatory synaptic input to mitral cells as well as dendrodendritic inhibition was unaffected in the knockout. However, correlated spiking in mitral cells was significantly reduced, as was electrical coupling between apical dendrites. To analyse slow network dynamics we induced slow oscillations with a glutamate uptake blocker. Evoked and spontaneous slow oscillations in mitral cells and external tufted cells were broader and had multiple peaks in OCAM knockout mice, indicating that synchrony of slow glomerular activity was also reduced. To assess the degree of shared activity between mitral cells under physiological conditions, we analysed spontaneous sub-threshold voltage oscillations using coherence analysis. Coherent activity was markedly reduced in cells from OCAM knockout mice across a broad range of frequencies consistent with a decrease in tightly time-locked activity. We suggest that synchronous activity within each glomerulus is dependent on segregation of synaptic subcompartments.

  18. Anatomic olfactory structural abnormalities in congenital smell loss: magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of olfactory bulb, groove, sulcal, and hippocampal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Lucien M; Degnan, Andrew J; Sethi, Ila; Henkin, Robert I

    2013-01-01

    There are 2 groups of patients with congenital smell loss: group 1 (12% of the total), in which patients exhibit a familial smell loss in conjunction with severe anatomical, somatic, neurological, and metabolic abnormalities such as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism; and a larger group, group 2 (88% of the total), in which patients possess a similar degree of smell loss but without somatic, neurological, or anatomical abnormalities or hypogonadism. Both groups are characterized by similar olfactory dysfunction, and both have been reported to have absent or decreased olfactory bulbs and grooves, which indicates some overlap in olfactory pathophysiology and anatomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients with congenital smell loss, primarily among group 2 patients, comparing brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results in patients with types of hyposmia. Forty group 2 patients were studied by measurements of taste (gustometry) and smell (olfactometry) function and by use of MRI in which measurements of olfactory bulbs, olfactory sulcus depth, olfactory grooves, and hippocampal anatomy were performed. Anatomical results were compared with similar studies in group 1 patients and in 22 control subjects with normal sensory function. Olfactometry was abnormal in all patients with no patient reporting ever having normal olfaction. No patient had a familial history of smell loss. On MRI, all exhibited at least 1 abnormality in olfactory system anatomy, including absence or decreased size of at least 1 olfactory bulb, decreased depth of an olfactory sulcus, and abnormalities involving hippocampal anatomy with hippocampal malrotations. One patient had bilateral bulb duplication. Normal subjects with normal smell and taste function exhibited some but very few or significant neuroanatomical changes on MRI. Although both groups have similar abnormalities of smell function, group 2 patients demonstrate anatomical anomalies in olfactory structures that are neither as

  19. The Venus flytrap attracts insects by the release of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Scheerer, Ursel; Kruse, Jörg; Burzlaff, Tim; Honsel, Anne; Alfarraj, Saleh; Georgiev, Plamen; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Ghirardo, Andrea; Kreuzer, Ines; Hedrich, Rainer; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2014-02-01

    Does Dionaea muscipula, the Venus flytrap, use a particular mechanism to attract animal prey? This question was raised by Charles Darwin 140 years ago, but it remains unanswered. This study tested the hypothesis that Dionaea releases volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to allure prey insects. For this purpose, olfactory choice bioassays were performed to elucidate if Dionaea attracts Drosophila melanogaster. The VOCs emitted by the plant were further analysed by GC-MS and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The bioassays documented that Drosophila was strongly attracted by the carnivorous plant. Over 60 VOCs, including terpenes, benzenoids, and aliphatics, were emitted by Dionaea, predominantly in the light. This work further tested whether attraction of animal prey is affected by the nutritional status of the plant. For this purpose, Dionaea plants were fed with insect biomass to improve plant N status. However, although such feeding altered the VOC emission pattern by reducing terpene release, the attraction of Drosophila was not affected. From these results it is concluded that Dionaea attracts insects on the basis of food smell mimicry because the scent released has strong similarity to the bouquet of fruits and plant flowers. Such a volatile blend is emitted to attract insects searching for food to visit the deadly capture organ of the Venus flytrap.

  20. Hubungan antara Pembentukan Scar Vaksin BCG dan Kejadian Infeksi Tuberkulosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajriah Rosandali

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakTuberkulosis adalah penyakit menular yang disebabkan oleh kuman Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Orang dewasa yang menderita tuberkulosis sangat mudah menularkan kuman TB kepada orang disekitarnya terutama pada anak-anak. Salah satu cara pencegahan penyakit tuberkulosis adalah pemberian imunisasi BCG pada saat bayi baru lahir. Scar vaksin BCG dapat terbentuk setelah penyuntikan, kadang Scar tidak terbentuk setelah penyuntikan. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menentukan hubungan antara pembentukan Scar vaksin BCG dan kejadian infeksi tuberkulosis. Penelitian ini menggunakan desain cross sectional dengan jumlah subjek sebanyak 80 orang. Pengambilan data berupa melakukan pengamatan terhadap Scar pada lengan atas serta wawancara kepada responden dengan menggunakan pedoman wawancara. Kemudian data ditabulasi dalam bentuk persentase dan dianalisis dengan uji chi-square . Hasil penelitian menunjukan bahwa responden yang terbanyak adalah perempuan dan usia yang terbanyak 35-44 tahun. Terdapat hubungan yang bermakna antara pembentukan Scar  vaksin BCG dengan kejadian infeksi tuberkulosis (p < 0,05. Disimpulkan bahwa terdapat pengaruh antara pembentukan Scar vaksin BCG terhadap kejadian infeksi tuberkulosis.Kata kunci: tuberkulosis, vaksin BCG, Scar. AbstractTuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis with the number of sufferers tend to increase every years. Adults who suffer  tuberculosis is very easy to spread it to around, especially to children. One of the way to prevent tuberculosis is immunization of BCG vaccine which given since infant. The Scar of BCG vaccine can formed after injection or not. The objective of this study was to determine the relation of BCG vaccine Scar formation on  the incidence of tuberculosis infection.This research used a cross sectional design with 80 total subjects. The data was collected by observations of the scar on the upper arm while interviewed  respondents using interview guide

  1. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  2. Construction of odor representations by olfactory bulb microcircuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Like other sensory systems, the olfactory system transduces specific features of the external environment and must construct an organized sensory representation from these highly fragmented inputs. As with these other systems, this representation is not accurate per se, but is constructed for utility, and emphasizes certain, presumably useful, features over others. I here describe the cellular and circuit mechanisms of the peripheral olfactory system that underlie this process of sensory construction, emphasizing the distinct architectures and properties of the two prominent computational layers in the olfactory bulb. Notably, while the olfactory system solves essentially similar conceptual problems to other sensory systems, such as contrast enhancement, activity normalization, and extending dynamic range, its peculiarities often require qualitatively different computational algorithms than are deployed in other sensory modalities. In particular, the olfactory modality is intrinsically high dimensional, and lacks a simple, externally defined basis analogous to wavelength or pitch on which elemental odor stimuli can be quantitatively compared. Accordingly, the quantitative similarities of the receptive fields of different odorant receptors (ORs) vary according to the statistics of the odor environment. To resolve these unusual challenges, the olfactory bulb appears to utilize unique nontopographical computations and intrinsic learning mechanisms to perform the necessary high-dimensional, similarity-dependent computations. In sum, the early olfactory system implements a coordinated set of early sensory transformations directly analogous to those in other sensory systems, but accomplishes these with unique circuit architectures adapted to the properties of the olfactory modality. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison between Olfactory Function of Pregnant Women and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-15

    Nov 15, 2016 ... Background: Pregnant women require normal olfactory function in order to develop good appetite for healthy living and normal fetal development. This study was carried out to investigate and compare olfactory function of pregnant women with non-pregnant women. Methods: This was a case control study ...

  4. Neural correlates of olfactory processing in congenital blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, R; Beaulieu-Lefebvre, M; Schneider, F C

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive neuroplastic changes have been well documented in congenitally blind individuals for the processing of tactile and auditory information. By contrast, very few studies have investigated olfactory processing in the absence of vision. There is ample evidence that the olfactory system is hig...

  5. Olfactory G proteins: simple and complex signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, F A; Chess, A

    1998-06-04

    In both vertebrates and invertebrates, olfactory perception is mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors. Recent work, in both mouse and Caenorhabditis elegans, sheds light on the role of specific G proteins in olfactory signal transduction, neuronal morphology and axon guidance.

  6. The role of main olfactory and vomeronasal systems in animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The great diversity of signals used in chemical communication indicates that this communication is not mediated exclusively by pheromones. A number of pheromonal responses are not dependent on the vomeronasal system, but on the main olfactory system. The dual olfactory systems also have overlappng functons.

  7. Comparison between Olfactory Function of Pregnant Women and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... study was carried out to investigate and compare olfactory function of pregnant women with non-pregnant ... Pregnant women have olfactory dysfunction more than the non-pregnant women of reproductive age group. Also, they ..... Olfaction is linked to important cognitive and emotional domains such as the ...

  8. A second look at the structure of human olfactory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Theresa L

    2009-07-01

    How do we remember olfactory information? Is the architecture of human olfactory memory unique compared with that of memory for other types of stimuli? Ten years ago, a review article evaluated these questions, as well as the distinction between long- and short-term olfactory memory, with three lines of evidence: capacity differences, coding differences, and neuropsychological evidence, though serial position effects were also considered. From the data available at the time, the article preliminarily suggested that olfactory memory was a two-component system that was not qualitatively different from memory systems for other types of stimuli. The decade that has elapsed since then has ushered in considerable changes in theories of memory structure and provided huge advances in neuroscience capabilities. Not only have many studies exploring various aspects of olfactory memory been published, but a model of olfactory perception that includes an integral unitary memory system also has been presented. Consequently, the structure of olfactory memory is reevaluated in the light of further information currently available with the same theoretical lines of evidence previously considered. This evaluation finds that the preponderance of evidence suggests that, as in memory for other types of sensory stimuli, the short-term-long-term distinction remains a valuable dissociation for conceptualizing olfactory memory, though perhaps not as architecturally separate systems.

  9. Voltage-Dependent Intrinsic Bursting in Olfactory Bulb Golgi Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, R. Todd; Rozman, Peter A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), local synaptic circuits modulate the evolving pattern of activity in mitral and tufted cells following olfactory sensory stimulation. GABAergic granule cells, the most numerous interneuron subtype in this brain region, have been extensively studied. However, classic studies using Golgi staining methods…

  10. Semaphorins and their receptors in olfactory axon guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Verhaagen, J

    The mammalian olfactory system is capable of discriminating among a large variety of odor molecules and is therefore essential for the identification of food, enemies and mating partners. The assembly and maintenance of olfactory connectivity have been shown to depend on the combinatorial actions of

  11. Comparison between olfactory function of pregnant women and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pregnant women require normal olfactory function in order to develop good appetite for healthy living and normal fetal development. This study was carried out to investigate and compare olfactory function of pregnant women with non-pregnant women. Methods: This was a case control study of women in ...

  12. Heritability of attractiveness to mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Grandon, G Mandela; Gezan, Salvador A; Armour, John A L; Pickett, John A; Logan, James G

    2015-01-01

    Female mosquitoes display preferences for certain individuals over others, which is determined by differences in volatile chemicals produced by the human body and detected by mosquitoes. Body odour can be controlled genetically but the existence of a genetic basis for differential attraction to insects has never been formally demonstrated. This study investigated heritability of attractiveness to mosquitoes by evaluating the response of Aedes aegypti (=Stegomyia aegypti) mosquitoes to odours from the hands of identical and non-identical twins in a dual-choice assay. Volatiles from individuals in an identical twin pair showed a high correlation in attractiveness to mosquitoes, while non-identical twin pairs showed a significantly lower correlation. Overall, there was a strong narrow-sense heritability of 0.62 (SE 0.124) for relative attraction and 0.67 (0.354) for flight activity based on the average of ten measurements. The results demonstrate an underlying genetic component detectable by mosquitoes through olfaction. Understanding the genetic basis for attractiveness could create a more informed approach to repellent development.

  13. Heritability of attractiveness to mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mandela Fernández-Grandon

    Full Text Available Female mosquitoes display preferences for certain individuals over others, which is determined by differences in volatile chemicals produced by the human body and detected by mosquitoes. Body odour can be controlled genetically but the existence of a genetic basis for differential attraction to insects has never been formally demonstrated. This study investigated heritability of attractiveness to mosquitoes by evaluating the response of Aedes aegypti (=Stegomyia aegypti mosquitoes to odours from the hands of identical and non-identical twins in a dual-choice assay. Volatiles from individuals in an identical twin pair showed a high correlation in attractiveness to mosquitoes, while non-identical twin pairs showed a significantly lower correlation. Overall, there was a strong narrow-sense heritability of 0.62 (SE 0.124 for relative attraction and 0.67 (0.354 for flight activity based on the average of ten measurements. The results demonstrate an underlying genetic component detectable by mosquitoes through olfaction. Understanding the genetic basis for attractiveness could create a more informed approach to repellent development.

  14. Fatal attraction phenomenon in humans: cat odour attractiveness increased for toxoplasma-infected men while decreased for infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegr, Jaroslav; Lenochová, Pavlína; Hodný, Zdeněk; Vondrová, Marta

    2011-11-01

    Latent toxoplasmosis, a lifelong infection with the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, has cumulative effects on the behaviour of hosts, including humans. The most impressive effect of toxoplasmosis is the "fatal attraction phenomenon," the conversion of innate fear of cat odour into attraction to cat odour in infected rodents. While most behavioural effects of toxoplasmosis were confirmed also in humans, neither the fatal attraction phenomenon nor any toxoplasmosis-associated changes in olfactory functions have been searched for in them. Thirty-four Toxoplasma-infected and 134 noninfected students rated the odour of urine samples from cat, horse, tiger, brown hyena and dog for intensity and pleasantness. The raters were blind to their infection status and identity of the samples. No signs of changed sensitivity of olfaction were observed. However, we found a strong, gender dependent effect of toxoplasmosis on the pleasantness attributed to cat urine odour (p = 0.0025). Infected men rated this odour as more pleasant than did the noninfected men, while infected women rated the same odour as less pleasant than did noninfected women. Toxoplasmosis did not affect how subjects rated the pleasantness of any other animal species' urine odour; however, a non-significant trend in the same directions was observed for hyena urine. The absence of the effects of toxoplasmosis on the odour pleasantness score attributed to large cats would suggest that the amino acid felinine could be responsible for the fatal attraction phenomenon. Our results also raise the possibility that the odour-specific threshold deficits observed in schizophrenia patients could be caused by increased prevalence of Toxoplasma-infected subjects in this population rather than by schizophrenia itself. The trend observed with the hyena urine sample suggests that this carnivore, and other representatives of the Feliformia suborder, should be studied for their possible role as definitive hosts in the life cycle

  15. Fatal Attraction Phenomenon in Humans – Cat Odour Attractiveness Increased for Toxoplasma-Infected Men While Decreased for Infected Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegr, Jaroslav; Lenochová, Pavlína; Hodný, Zdeněk; Vondrová, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Background Latent toxoplasmosis, a lifelong infection with the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, has cumulative effects on the behaviour of hosts, including humans. The most impressive effect of toxoplasmosis is the “fatal attraction phenomenon,” the conversion of innate fear of cat odour into attraction to cat odour in infected rodents. While most behavioural effects of toxoplasmosis were confirmed also in humans, neither the fatal attraction phenomenon nor any toxoplasmosis-associated changes in olfactory functions have been searched for in them. Principal Findings Thirty-four Toxoplasma-infected and 134 noninfected students rated the odour of urine samples from cat, horse, tiger, brown hyena and dog for intensity and pleasantness. The raters were blind to their infection status and identity of the samples. No signs of changed sensitivity of olfaction were observed. However, we found a strong, gender dependent effect of toxoplasmosis on the pleasantness attributed to cat urine odour (p = 0.0025). Infected men rated this odour as more pleasant than did the noninfected men, while infected women rated the same odour as less pleasant than did noninfected women. Toxoplasmosis did not affect how subjects rated the pleasantness of any other animal species' urine odour; however, a non-significant trend in the same directions was observed for hyena urine. Conclusions The absence of the effects of toxoplasmosis on the odour pleasantness score attributed to large cats would suggest that the amino acid felinine could be responsible for the fatal attraction phenomenon. Our results also raise the possibility that the odour-specific threshold deficits observed in schizophrenia patients could be caused by increased prevalence of Toxoplasma-infected subjects in this population rather than by schizophrenia itself. The trend observed with the hyena urine sample suggests that this carnivore, and other representatives of the Feliformia suborder, should be studied for their

  16. Fatal attraction phenomenon in humans: cat odour attractiveness increased for toxoplasma-infected men while decreased for infected women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Flegr

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Latent toxoplasmosis, a lifelong infection with the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, has cumulative effects on the behaviour of hosts, including humans. The most impressive effect of toxoplasmosis is the "fatal attraction phenomenon," the conversion of innate fear of cat odour into attraction to cat odour in infected rodents. While most behavioural effects of toxoplasmosis were confirmed also in humans, neither the fatal attraction phenomenon nor any toxoplasmosis-associated changes in olfactory functions have been searched for in them.Thirty-four Toxoplasma-infected and 134 noninfected students rated the odour of urine samples from cat, horse, tiger, brown hyena and dog for intensity and pleasantness. The raters were blind to their infection status and identity of the samples. No signs of changed sensitivity of olfaction were observed. However, we found a strong, gender dependent effect of toxoplasmosis on the pleasantness attributed to cat urine odour (p = 0.0025. Infected men rated this odour as more pleasant than did the noninfected men, while infected women rated the same odour as less pleasant than did noninfected women. Toxoplasmosis did not affect how subjects rated the pleasantness of any other animal species' urine odour; however, a non-significant trend in the same directions was observed for hyena urine.The absence of the effects of toxoplasmosis on the odour pleasantness score attributed to large cats would suggest that the amino acid felinine could be responsible for the fatal attraction phenomenon. Our results also raise the possibility that the odour-specific threshold deficits observed in schizophrenia patients could be caused by increased prevalence of Toxoplasma-infected subjects in this population rather than by schizophrenia itself. The trend observed with the hyena urine sample suggests that this carnivore, and other representatives of the Feliformia suborder, should be studied for their possible role as definitive hosts in

  17. The age of olfactory bulb neurons in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Olaf; Liebl, Jakob; Bernard, Samuel; Alkass, Kanar; Yeung, Maggie S Y; Steier, Peter; Kutschera, Walter; Johnson, Lars; Landén, Mikael; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L; Frisén, Jonas

    2012-05-24

    Continuous turnover of neurons in the olfactory bulb is implicated in several key aspects of olfaction. There is a dramatic decline postnatally in the number of migratory neuroblasts en route to the olfactory bulb in humans, and it has been unclear to what extent the small number of neuroblasts at later stages contributes new neurons to the olfactory bulb. We have assessed the age of olfactory bulb neurons in humans by measuring the levels of nuclear bomb test-derived (14)C in genomic DNA. We report that (14)C concentrations correspond to the atmospheric levels at the time of birth of the individuals, establishing that there is very limited, if any, postnatal neurogenesis in the human olfactory bulb. This identifies a fundamental difference in the plasticity of the human brain compared to other mammals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neural circuits mediating olfactory-driven behavior in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermen, Florence; Franco, Luis M.; Wyatt, Cameron; Yaksi, Emre

    2013-01-01

    The fish olfactory system processes odor signals and mediates behaviors that are crucial for survival such as foraging, courtship, and alarm response. Although the upstream olfactory brain areas (olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb) are well-studied, less is known about their target brain areas and the role they play in generating odor-driven behaviors. Here we review a broad range of literature on the anatomy, physiology, and behavioral output of the olfactory system and its target areas in a wide range of teleost fish. Additionally, we discuss how applying recent technological advancements to the zebrafish (Danio rerio) could help in understanding the function of these target areas. We hope to provide a framework for elucidating the neural circuit computations underlying the odor-driven behaviors in this small, transparent, and genetically amenable vertebrate. PMID:23596397

  19. Neural correlates of taste perception in congenital olfactory impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, Léa; Vestergaard, Martin; Madsen, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    Olfaction and gustation contribute both to the appreciation of food flavours. Although acquired loss of smell has profound consequences on the pleasure of eating, food habits and body weight, less is known about the impact of congenital olfactory impairment on gustatory processing. Here we examined...... taste identification accuracy and its neural correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 12 congenitally olfactory impaired individuals and 8 normosmic controls. Results showed that taste identification was worse in congenitally olfactory impaired compared to control subjects. The f......MRI results demonstrated that olfactory impaired individuals had reduced activation in medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) relative to normosmic subjects while tasting. In addition, olfactory performance as measured with the Sniffin׳ Sticks correlated positively with taste-induced BOLD signal increases...

  20. Understanding smell--the olfactory stimulus problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffarth, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The main problem with sensory processing is the difficulty in relating sensory input to physiological responses and perception. This is especially problematic at higher levels of processing, where complex cues elicit highly specific responses. In olfaction, this relationship is particularly obfuscated by the difficulty of characterizing stimulus statistics and perception. The core questions in olfaction are hence the so-called stimulus problem, which refers to the understanding of the stimulus, and the structure-activity and structure-odor relationships, which refer to the molecular basis of smell. It is widely accepted that the recognition of odorants by receptors is governed by the detection of physico-chemical properties and that the physical space is highly complex. Not surprisingly, ideas differ about how odor stimuli should be classified and about the very nature of information that the brain extracts from odors. Even though there are many measures for smell, there is none that accurately describes all aspects of it. Here, we summarize recent developments in the understanding of olfaction. We argue that an approach to olfactory function where information processing is emphasized could contribute to a high degree to our understanding of smell as a perceptual phenomenon emerging from neural computations. Further, we argue that combined analysis of the stimulus, biology, physiology, and behavior and perception can provide new insights into olfactory function. We hope that the reader can use this review as a competent guide and overview of research activities in olfactory physiology, psychophysics, computation, and psychology. We propose avenues for research, particularly in the systematic characterization of receptive fields and of perception. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of scar contractures after burn: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterwijk, Anouk M; Mouton, Leonora J; Schouten, Hennie; Disseldorp, Laurien M; van der Schans, Cees P; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    2017-02-01

    Burn scar contractures are the pathological outcome of excessive scarring and ongoing scar contraction. Impairment of joint range of motion is a threat to performing activities in daily living. To direct treatment strategies to prevent and/or correct such contractures, insight into the prevalence, course, and determinants is essential. A literature search was conducted including Pubmed, Cochrane library, CINAHL, and PEDro. Articles were included if they provided burn scar contracture data to calculate the point prevalence. The quality of the articles was scored. Data were extracted regarding study, subject and burn characteristics, method of scar contracture assessment, point prevalence, and possible determinants. Nine articles and one abstract could be included for data extraction. The prevalence at discharge was 38-54%, but with a longer time after burn, the prevalence was lower. Contractures were more likely to occur in more severe burns, flame burns, children, female, the cervical spine, and the upper extremity. The prevalence of burn scar contractures varies considerably between studies. When prevalence is unclear, it is also difficult to investigate potential determinants and evaluate changes in interventions. There is a need for extensive, well-designed longitudinal (inter)national studies that investigate prevalence of scar contractures, their evolvement over time, and risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Early chemabrasion for acne scars after treatment with oral isotretinoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picosse, Fabíola Rosa; Yarak, Samira; Cabral, Nádia Canale; Bagatin, Ediléia

    2012-09-01

    Acne is an inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous follicles. Oral isotretinoin is the treatment of choice for severe acne. Exaggerated cicatrization related to oral isotretinoin was reported in the 1980s and 1990s. Currently, dermabrasion for acne scar revision is only recommended 6 to 12 months after the completion of oral isotretinoin treatment. To evaluate the evolution of healing from manual chemabrasion of depressed scars resulting from acne conducted within 1 to 3 months after oral isotretinoin treatment. This was an interventional, prospective study involving 10 patients with depressed facial scars. A medium-depth chemical peel was applied to the entire face. Manual sandpaper dermabrasion was performed to areas of scarring until the appearance of bloody dew. A 6-month reepithelization follow-up was conducted. All of the patients presented with normal cicatrization, and neither hypertrophic scars nor keloids were observed. Depressed acne scar revision was satisfactory. Our observations may contribute to the discussion of the negative influence of oral isotretinoin on wound healing. Other studies are necessary to reevaluate the current recommendation of a 6- to 12-month waiting period after oral isotretinoin treatment before performing dermabrasion or fractional ablative laser for acne scar revision. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Attractive ellipsoids in robust control

    CERN Document Server

    Poznyak, Alexander; Azhmyakov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    This monograph introduces a newly developed robust-control design technique for a wide class of continuous-time dynamical systems called the “attractive ellipsoid method.” Along with a coherent introduction to the proposed control design and related topics, the monograph studies nonlinear affine control systems in the presence of uncertainty and presents a constructive and easily implementable control strategy that guarantees certain stability properties. The authors discuss linear-style feedback control synthesis in the context of the above-mentioned systems. The development and physical implementation of high-performance robust-feedback controllers that work in the absence of complete information is addressed, with numerous examples to illustrate how to apply the attractive ellipsoid method to mechanical and electromechanical systems. While theorems are proved systematically, the emphasis is on understanding and applying the theory to real-world situations. Attractive Ellipsoids in Robust Control will a...

  4. The physics of pollinator attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyroud, Edwige; Glover, Beverley J

    2017-10-01

    Contents 350 I. 350 II. 350 III. 352 IV. 353 V. 353 353 References 354 SUMMARY: This Tansley Insight focuses on recent advances in our understanding of how flowers manipulate physical forces to attract animal pollinators and ensure reproductive success. Research has traditionally explored the role of chemical pigments and volatile organic compounds as cues for pollinators, but recent reports have demonstrated the importance of physical and structural means of pollinator attraction. Here we explore the role of petal microstructure in influencing floral light capture and optics, analysing colour, gloss and polarization effects. We discuss the interaction between flower, pollinator and gravity, and how petal surface structure can influence that interaction. Finally, we consider the role of electrostatic forces in pollen transfer and pollinator attraction. We conclude that this new interdisciplinary field is evolving rapidly. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. An olfactory demography of a diverse metropolitan population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human perception of the odour environment is highly variable. People vary both in their general olfactory acuity as well as in if and how they perceive specific odours. In recent years, it has been shown that genetic differences contribute to variability in both general olfactory acuity and the perception of specific odours. Odour perception also depends on other factors such as age and gender. Here we investigate the influence of these factors on both general olfactory acuity and on the perception of 66 structurally and perceptually different odours in a diverse subject population. Results We carried out a large human olfactory psychophysics study of 391 adult subjects in metropolitan New York City, an ethnically and culturally diverse North American metropolis. 210 of the subjects were women and the median age was 34.6 years (range 19–75. We recorded ~2,300 data points per subject to obtain a comprehensive perceptual phenotype, comprising multiple perceptual measures of 66 diverse odours. We show that general olfactory acuity correlates with gender, age, race, smoking habits, and body type. Young, female, non-smoking subjects had the highest average olfactory acuity. Deviations from normal body type in either direction were associated with decreased olfactory acuity. Beyond these factors we also show that, surprisingly, there are many odour-specific influences of race, age, and gender on olfactory perception. We show over 100 instances in which the intensity or pleasantness perception of an odour is significantly different between two demographic groups. Conclusions These data provide a comprehensive snapshot of the olfactory sense of a diverse population. Olfactory acuity in the population is most strongly influenced by age, followed by gender. We also show a large number of diverse correlations between demographic factors and the perception of individual odours that may reflect genetic differences as well as different

  6. Measurement and Analysis of Olfactory Responses with the Aim of Establishing an Objective Diagnostic Method for Central Olfactory Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Tominori; Wang, Li-Qun; Miwakeichi, Fumikazu; Tonoike, Mitsuo; Kaneda, Teruo

    In order to establish a new diagnostic method for central olfactory disorders and to identify objective indicators, we measured and analyzed brain activities in the parahippocampal gyrus and uncus, region of responsibility for central olfactory disorders. The relationship between olfactory stimulation and brain response at region of responsibility can be examined in terms of fitted responses (FR). FR in these regions may be individual indicators of changes in brain olfactory responses. In the present study, in order to non-invasively and objectively measure olfactory responses, an odor oddball task was conducted on four healthy volunteers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a odorant stimulator with blast-method. The results showed favorable FR and activation in the parahippocampal gyrus or uncus in all subjects. In some subjects, both the parahippocampal gyrus and uncus were activated. Furthermore, activation was also confirmed in the cingulate gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus, superior temporal gyrus and insula. The hippocampus and uncus are known to be involved in the olfactory disorders associated with early-stage Alzheimer's disease and other olfactory disorders. In the future, it will be necessary to further develop the present measurement and analysis method to clarify the relationship between central olfactory disorders and brain activities and establish objective indicators that are useful for diagnosis.

  7. Olfactory ensheathing glia are required for embryonic olfactory axon targeting and the migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrine Barraud

    2013-06-01

    Kallmann's syndrome is caused by the failure of olfactory axons and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons to enter the embryonic forebrain, resulting in anosmia and sterility. Sox10 mutations have been associated with Kallmann's syndrome phenotypes, but their effect on olfactory system development is unknown. We recently showed that Sox10 is expressed by neural crest-derived olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs. Here, we demonstrate that in homozygous Sox10lacZ/lacZ mouse embryos, OEC differentiation is disrupted; olfactory axons accumulate in the ventromedial olfactory nerve layer and fewer olfactory receptor neurons express the maturation marker OMP (most likely owing to the failure of axonal targeting. Furthermore, GnRH neurons clump together in the periphery and a smaller proportion enters the forebrain. Our data suggest that human Sox10 mutations cause Kallmann's syndrome by disrupting the differentiation of OECs, which promote embryonic olfactory axon targeting and hence olfactory receptor neuron maturation, and GnRH neuron migration to the forebrain.

  8. Laparoscopic Excision of a Scar Pregnancy and Isthmocele Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyak, Huseyin; Wetherilt, Lale Susan; Seckin, Kerem Doga; Polat, Ibrahim; Kadirogullari, Pınar; Karacan, Tolga

    2017-10-13

    Laparoscopic excision of a scar pregnancy and isthmocele repair with a barbed suture. A step-by-step explanation of the laparoscopic excision technique of a scar pregnancy and isthmocele repair. Cesarean scar pregnancy occurs as a result of attachment of the products of conception to the uterine scar [1-3]. In the present case, a 34-year-old, gravida 4, para 1 patient with a history of 1 miscarriage and 1 ectopic pregnancy was diagnosed with type 2 cesarean scar pregnancy at 7 weeks of gestation. Dilation and curretage was performed at the 8th week of gestation to terminate the pregnancy. On ultrasonography performed 1 month later, placental material underlying the isthmocele was observed. Her beta human chorionic gonadotropin level was 13 836 mIU/mL. She was followed up for 1.5 months until the beta human chorionic gonadotropin levels were negative. However, the mass underneath the scar had grown larger, measuring up to 5 × 6 cm. Laparoscopy was performed because the patient reported vaginal spotting and pelvic pain. The incision was sutured with a synthetic absorbable unidirectional barbed suture (Stratafix Knotless Tissue Control Device; Ethicon Inc., Somerville, NJ). No residual scar defect was visible on follow-up ultrasonography 1 week and 1 month after surgery. Barbed sutures ease the repair of uterine scar defects and can provide ideal reapproximation of thick myometrial tissue. Laparoscopic treatment of a scar pregnancy and isthmocele repair are effective and safe modes of treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Microneedling therapy in atrophic facial scars: An objective assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Imran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrophic facial scars are always a challenge to treat, especially the ones that are deep-seated and/or involve much of the face. Microneedling or dermaroller therapy is a new addition to the treatment armamentarium for such scars that offers a simple and reportedly effective management of these scars. Aims: The aim of the present study was to perform an objective evaluation of the efficacy of dermaroller treatment in atrophic facial scars of varying etiology. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven patients of atrophic facial scarring were offered multiple sittings of microneedling (dermaroller treatment and their scars were evaluated and graded clinically and by serial photography at the start as well as at two months after the conclusion of the treatment protocol. Any change in the grading of scars after the end of treatment and follow-up period was noted down. The patients were also asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment received on a 1-10 point scale. The efficacy of dermaroller treatment was thus assessed both subjectively by the patients as well as objectively by a single observer. Results: Overall 36 out of the total of 37 patients completed the treatment schedule and were evaluated for its efficacy. Out of these 36 patients, 34 achieved a reduction in the severity of their scarring by one or two grades. More than 80% of patients assessed their treatment as ′excellent′ on a 10-point scale. No significant adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Microneedling therapy seems to be a simple and effective treatment option for the management of atrophic facial scars.

  10. Compression therapy affects collagen type balance in hypertrophic scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejiram, Shawn; Zhang, Jenny; Travis, Taryn E; Carney, Bonnie C; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Moffatt, Lauren T; Johnson, Laura S; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2016-04-01

    The effects of pressure on hypertrophic scar are poorly understood. Decreased extracellular matrix deposition is hypothesized to contribute to changes observed after pressure therapy. To examine this further, collagen composition was analyzed in a model of pressure therapy in hypertrophic scar. Hypertrophic scars created on red Duroc swine (n = 8) received pressure treatment (pressure device mounting and delivery at 30 mm Hg), sham treatment (device mounting and no delivery), or no treatment for 2 wk. Scars were assessed weekly and biopsied for histology, hydroxyproline quantification, and gene expression analysis. Transcription levels of collagen precursors COL1A2 and COL3A1 were quantified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Masson trichrome was used for general collagen quantification, whereas immunofluorescence was used for collagen types I and III specific quantification. Total collagen quantification using hydroxyproline assay showed a 51.9% decrease after pressure initiation. Masson trichrome staining showed less collagen after 1 (P < 0.03) and 2 wk (P < 0.002) of pressure application compared with sham and untreated scars. Collagen 1A2 and 3A1 transcript decreased by 41.9- and 42.3-fold, respectively, compared with uninjured skin after pressure treatment, whereas a 2.3- and 1.3-fold increase was seen in untreated scars. This decrease was seen in immunofluorescence staining for collagen types I (P < 0.001) and III (P < 0.04) compared with pretreated levels. Pressure-treated scars also had lower levels of collagen I and III after pressure treatment (P < 0.05) compared with sham and untreated scars. These results demonstrate the modulation of collagen after pressure therapy and further characterize its role in scar formation and therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence and Correlates of Myocardial Scar in a US Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Evrim B; Nacif, Marcelo S; Guo, Mengye; McClelland, Robyn L; Teixeira, Patricia B R P; Bild, Diane E; Barr, R Graham; Shea, Steven; Post, Wendy; Burke, Gregory; Budoff, Matthew J; Folsom, Aaron R; Liu, Chia-Ying; Lima, João A; Bluemke, David A

    2015-11-10

    Myocardial scarring leads to cardiac dysfunction and poor prognosis. The prevalence of and factors associated with unrecognized myocardial infarction and scar have not been previously defined using contemporary methods in a multiethnic US population. To determine prevalence of and factors associated with myocardial scar in middle- and older-aged individuals in the United States. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) study is a population-based cohort in the United States. Participants were aged 45 through 84 years and free of clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline in 2000-2002. In the 10th year examination (2010-2012), 1840 participants underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging with gadolinium to detect myocardial scar. Cardiovascular disease risk factors and coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores were measured at baseline and year 10. Logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for myocardial scar. Cardiovascular risk factors, CAC scores, left ventricle size and function, and carotid intima-media thickness. Myocardial scar detected by CMR imaging. Of 1840 participants (mean [SD] age, 68 [9] years, 52% men), 146 (7.9%) had myocardial scars, of which 114 (78%) were undetected by electrocardiogram or by clinical adjudication. In adjusted models, age, male sex, body mass index, hypertension, and current smoking at baseline were associated with myocardial scar at year 10. The OR per 8.9-year increment was 1.61 (95% CI, 1.36-1.91; P scar at year 10. Compared with a CAC score of 0, the OR for scores from 1 through 99 was 2.4 (95% CI, 1.5-3.9); from 100 through 399, 3.0 (95% CI, 1.7-5.1), and 400 or higher, 3.3 (95% CI, 1.7-6.1) (P ≤ .001). The CAC score significantly added to the association of myocardial scar with age, sex, race/ethnicity, and traditional CVD risk factors (C statistic, 0.81 with CAC vs 0.79 without CAC, P = .01). The prevalence of myocardial scars in a US community-based multiethnic cohort

  12. Practical Evaluation and Management of Atrophic Acne Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Atrophic acne scarring is an unfortunate, permanent complication of acne vulgaris, which may be associated with significant psychological distress. General dermatologists are frequently presented with the challenge of evaluating and providing treatment recommendations to patients with acne scars. This article reviews a practical, step-by-step approach to evaluating the patient with atrophic acne scars. An algorithm for providing treatment options is presented, along with pitfalls to avoid. A few select procedures that may be incorporated into a general dermatology practice are reviewed in greater detail, including filler injections, skin needling, and the punch excision. PMID:21909457

  13. Morbid attraction to leopard urine in Toxoplasma-infected chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirotte, Clémence; Kappeler, Peter M; Ngoubangoye, Barthelemy; Bourgeois, Stéphanie; Moussodji, Maick; Charpentier, Marie J E

    2016-02-08

    Parasites are sometimes capable of inducing phenotypic changes in their hosts to improve transmission [1]. Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan that infects a broad range of warm-blooded species, is one example that supports the so-called 'parasite manipulation hypothesis': it induces modifications in rodents' olfactory preferences, converting an innate aversion for cat odor into attraction and probably favoring trophic transmission to feline species, its only definitive hosts [2]. In humans, T. gondii induces behavioral modifications such as personality changes, prolonged reaction times and decreased long-term concentration [3]. However, modern humans are not suitable intermediate hosts because they are no longer preyed upon by felines. Consequently, behavioral modifications in infected people are generally assumed to be side effects of toxoplasmosis or residual manipulation traits that evolved in appropriate intermediate hosts. An alternative hypothesis, however, states that these changes result from parasite manipulative abilities that evolved when human ancestors were still under significant feline predation [3,4]. As such, T. gondii also alters olfactory preferences in humans; infected men rate cat urine, but not tiger urine, as pleasant while non-infected men do not [5]. To unravel the origin of Toxoplasma-induced modifications in humans, we performed olfactory tests on a living primate still predated by a feline species. We found in our closest relative, the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes), that Toxoplasma-infected (TI) animals lost their innate aversion towards the urine of leopards (Panthera pardus), their only natural predator. By contrast, we observed no clear difference in the response of TI and Toxoplasma-non-infected (TN) animals towards urine collected from other definitive feline hosts that chimpanzees do not encounter in nature. Although the adaptive value of parasitically induced behavior should be assessed carefully, we suggest that the

  14. [Cesarean scar pregnancy analysis of 42 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ling; Tao, Xia; Zhu, Yu-chun; Yu, Xiao-lan; Zou, Ying-hua; Yang, Hui-xia

    2009-08-01

    To discuss the diagnosis and treatment strategy of cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP). Forty-two cases of CSP admitted to Peking University First Hospital from Jan. 2003 to Dec. 2008 were analyzed retrospectively, and the clinical characteristics, pelvic Doppler ultrasonography report, management including methotrexate (MTX) therapy, bilateral uterine artery embolism (UAE), curettage and hysterectomy of these 42 women were reviewed. The percentage of human chorionic gonadochopin (hCG) reduction, menstrual period after the treatment of her CSP and recurrent pregnant outcome were also followed. Among the 42 CSP women, 24 (57%) presented with vaginal bleeding, 3 (7%) with lower abdominal pain. The interval between CSP and the last cesarean scar (CS) was 0.5 - 18.0 years and the average duration of gestation was (60 +/- 18) days. Fourteen cases (33%) were finally diagnosed as CSP in our hospital followed by failure of abortion due to misdiagnosed as early uterine pregnancy in other hospitals; one (2%) was finally diagnosed after hysterectomy due to excessive bleeding during curettage because of suspected hydatidiform mole under color sonography; one was diagnosed by MRI after color sonography; the rest 25 women (60%) were all confirmed by color sonography before management. Treatment of these cases included curettage after UAE (17 cases), curettage after UAE and MTX (13 cases), curettage after MTX only (4 cases), MTX only (4 cases) and others (4 cases). No significant difference was found in the average duration of pregnancy, average reduction of serum level of hCG and the operation time for curettage between the first two management group (P > 0.05). All of the 42 cases fully recovered before discharge and the recovery time of menses was averagely (32 +/- 10) days (10 - 60 days) after curettage and 5 reported reduced menstrual blood volume. Three out of the 42 women were pregnant again during follow-up and 1 delivered by CS at 39 weeks of gestation one year after without

  15. The attractiveness of car use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, A.N.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind car use is necessary for the development of effective transport policies. The high door-to-door speed of the car in comparison with other travel modes forms its main attractiveness. And speed is the main engine for mobility growth, which is not easy to curb.

  16. Multiple reversal olfactory learning in honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Mota

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In multiple reversal learning, animals trained to discriminate a reinforced from a non-reinforced stimulus are subjected to various, successive reversals of stimulus contingencies (e.g. A+ vs. B-, A- vs. B+, A+ vs. B-. This protocol is useful to determine whether or not animals learn to learn and solve successive discriminations faster (or with fewer errors with increasing reversal experience. Here we used the olfactory conditioning of proboscis extension reflex to study how honeybees Apis mellifera perform in a multiple reversal task. Our experiment contemplated four consecutive differential conditioning phases involving the same odors (A+ vs. B- to A- vs. B+ to A+ vs. B- to A- vs. B+. We show that bees in which the weight of reinforced or non-reinforced stimuli was similar mastered the multiple olfactory reversals. Bees which failed the task exhibited asymmetric responses to reinforced and non-reinforced stimuli, thus being unable to rapidly reverse stimulus contingencies. Efficient reversers did not improve their successive discriminations but rather tended to generalize their choice to both odors at the end of conditioning. As a consequence, both discrimination and reversal efficiency decreasedalong experimental phases. This result invalidates a learning-to-learn effect and indicates that bees do not only respond to the actual stimulus contingencies but rather combine these with an average of past experiences with the same stimuli.  

  17. Olfactory sex recognition investigated in Antarctic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bonadonna

    Full Text Available Chemical signals can yield information about an animal such as its identity, social status or sex. Such signals have rarely been considered in birds, but recent results have shown that chemical signals are actually used by different bird species to find food and to recognize their home and nest. This is particularly true in petrels whose olfactory anatomy is among the most developed in birds. Recently, we have demonstrated that Antarctic prions, Pachyptila desolata, are also able to recognize and follow the odour of their partner in a Y-maze.However, the experimental protocol left unclear whether this choice reflected an olfactory recognition of a particular individual (i.e. partner or a more general sex recognition mechanism. To test this second hypothesis, male and female birds' odours were presented simultaneously to 54 Antarctic prions in a Y-maze. Results showed random behaviour by the tested bird, independent of its sex or reproductive status. Present results do not support the possibility that Antarctic prions can distinguish the sex of a conspecific through its odour but indirectly support the hypothesis that they can distinguish individual odours.

  18. Intraspecific combinations of flower and leaf volatiles act together in attracting hawkmoth pollinators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Kárpáti

    Full Text Available Insects pinpoint mates, food and oviposition sites by olfactory cues. Recognizing and localizing a suitable target by olfaction is demanding. Odor sources emit characteristic blends of compounds that have to be identified against an environmentally derived olfactory background. This background, however, does not necessarily disturb the localization of a source. Rather, the contrary. Sex pheromones become more attractive to male moths when being presented against a relevant plant background. Here we asked whether such olfactory coaction also characterizes foraging cues. The tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta feeds on nectar from wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata and sacred datura Datura wrightii flowers. We tested how leaf-derived volatile blends as a background affect the moths' approach to flower blends. We found coaction when a flower blend was presented against a conspecific leaf volatile background but not when the blend was presented against volatiles emitted by the other host plant or by a non-host plant. Hence, our results reveal a species-specific coaction between flower blend and leaf volatile background. The ability to integrate information from different odor sources on one plant might provide the moth with a fine-grained analysis of food site quality.

  19. Fractional CO2 laser treatment of caesarean section scars-A randomized controlled split-scar trial with long term follow-up assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmisholt, Katrine E; Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Wulff, Camilla B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Caesarean section (c-section) scars can be pose functional and cosmetic challenges and ablative fractional laser (AFXL) treatment may offer benefit to patients. We evaluated textural and color changes over time in AFXL-treated versus untreated control scars. MATERIALS......-treated scars. At 6 months follow-up, a majority of patients (64%) favored subsequent AFXL-treatment of their untreated control scar tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Scar remodeling is initiated 1 month after AFXL treatment, but overall scar improvement is concealed until laser-induced color changes resolve. At 6 months...

  20. Miscalibrations in judgements of attractiveness with cosmetics

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, A L; Kramer, R.S.S.; Ward, R

    2014-01-01

    Women use cosmetics to enhance their attractiveness. How successful they are in doing so remains unknown - how do men and women respond to cosmetics use in terms of attractiveness? There are a variety of miscalibrations where attractiveness is concerned - often, what one sex thinks the opposite sex finds attractive is incorrect. Here, we investigated observer perceptions about attractiveness and cosmetics, as well as their understanding of what others would find attractive. We used computer g...

  1. Perioperative conditions affect long-term hypertrophic scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, W.M.; Ferreira, J.A.; de Jong, E.H.; Molema, G.; Niessen, F.B.

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used as treatment for excessive scarring by intralesional injection with variable success rates. It is conceivable that systemically administered corticosteroids affect a wider range of inflammatory processes that influence wound healing and may be more successful in

  2. Perioperative Conditions Affect Long-term Hypertrophic Scar Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Willem M.; Ferreira, Jose A.; de Jong, Etty H.; Molema, Grietje; Niessen, Frank B.

    Corticosteroids are widely used as treatment for excessive scarring by intralesional injection with variable success rates. It is conceivable that systemically administered corticosteroids affect a wider range of inflammatory processes that influence wound healing and may be more successful in

  3. NEW MOLECULAR MEDICINE-BASED SCAR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arno, Anna I; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Barret, Juan P; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scar/span>s are prevalent disabling conditions with still suboptimal treatments. Basic science and molecular-based medicine research has contributed to unravel new bench-to-bedside scar therapies, and to dissect the complex signaling pathways involved. Peptides such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, with SMADs, Ski, SnoN, Fussels, endoglin, DS-Sily, Cav-1p, AZX100, thymosin-β4 and other related molecules may emerge as targets to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scar/span>s. The aim of this review is to describe the basic complexity of these new molecular scar management strategies, and point out new fibrosis research lines. PMID:24438742

  4. Hypertrophic scarring: the greatest unmet challenge following burn injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Branski, Ludwik K; Barret, Juan P.; Dziewulski, Peter; Herndon, David N

    2017-01-01

    Summary Improvements in acute burn care have enabled patients to survive massive burns which would have once been fatal. Now up to 70% of patients develop hypertrophic scars following burns. The functional and psychosocial sequelae remain a major rehabilitative challenge, decreasing quality of life and delaying reintegration into society. The current approach is to optimise the healing potential of the burn wound using targeted wound care and surgery in order to minimise the development of hypertrophic scarring. This approach often fails, and modulation of established scar is continued although the optimal indication, timing, and combination of therapies have yet to be established. The need for novel treatments is paramount, and future efforts to improve outcomes and quality of life should include optimisation of wound healing to attenuate or prevent hypertrophic scarring, well-designed trials to confirm treatment efficacy, and further elucidation of molecular mechanisms to allow development of new preventative and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27707499

  5. Anti-inflammatory polymer electrodes for glial scar treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maria eAsplund; Christian eBoehler; Thomas eStieglitz

    2014-01-01

    .... A micron thick coating, deposited on the surface of a regular metallic electrode, can elute anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of glial scarring as well as growth factors for the support of surrounding neurons...

  6. Break dancing: a new risk factor for scarring hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monselise, Assaf; Chan, Lisa J Y; Shapiro, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    We report on a first case of lichen planopilaris (LPP) mimicking androgenetic alopecia (AGA) in an individual who has been break-dancing on his head for many years. LPP is an autoimmune inflammatory scalp condition that when left untreated can result in scarring and irreversible hair loss. The etiology of LPP is unknown. Different treatment modalities are used for LPP and AGA. To increase the awareness of physicians to the possibility of scarring hair loss (LPP) presenting like AGA. Scalp examination showed scarring patches of hair loss. A scalp biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of LPP. Chronic scalp trauma due to break dancing may be a trigger for LPP. A meticulous scalp examination should be performed before making a diagnosis of nonscarring conditions of hair loss such as AGA. Early recognition of LPP and appropriate treatment are important before scarring and irreversible hair loss ensue.

  7. [Umbilical hernia. New repair technique with a minimal scar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannistrà, C; Marmuse, J P; Madelenat, P

    2003-05-01

    Describe a surgical technique concerning the treatment of umbilical hernias that have a diameter less than 5 cm, with a reduction of scars. After analysing the different techniques of umbilical hernias repair, the authors suggest a new personal technique. The surgical treatment consists in removing the hernia sack after double M incision of the umbilical skin, repairing the abdominal wall by Quenu technique, folding the abdominal muscles and reconstructing the umbilicus. The results, which are achieved on nine patients, with check up two years after, confirm the validity of the technique. The scars after umbilical hernia surgical treatment are very important and visible because of their being located on the middle line of the abdominal wall. For the female patient in particular, this scar represents a great psychological annoyance. The double M technique leaves only an invisible scar with a good functional result.

  8. The evaluation of olfactory function in individuals with chronic halitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundag, Aytug; Cayonu, Melih; Kayabasoglu, Gurkan; Salihoglu, Murat; Tekeli, Hakan; Cayonu, Sibel; Akpinar, Meltem Esen; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Halitosis and olfactory dysfunction may disrupt an individual's quality of life remarkably. One may ask whether halitosis has effects on olfactory functions or not? Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the olfactory abilities of subjects with chronic halitosis evaluated using the measurements of volatile sulfur compounds. This study was carried out in 77 subjects, with a mean age of 40.1±13.3 years, ranging from 18 to 65 years. Forty-three participants were diagnosed as halitosis according to the gas chromatography results and constituted the halitosis group. Also, a control group was created from individuals without a complaint of halitosis and also who had normal values for volatile sulfur compounds. Each subject's orthonasal olfactory and retronasal olfactory functions were assessed using "Sniffin' Sticks" and retronasal olfactory testing. The results showed that odor threshold scores were lower in participants with halitosis compared with controls. Also, hyposmia was seen more common in the halitosis group than in controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation was found between odor threshold scores and volatile sulfur compounds levels, particularly with hydrogen sulfide and dimethyl sulfide levels. The results suggest that the chronic presence of volatile sulfur compounds may have a negative effect on olfactory function. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Expressing exogenous functional odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons

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    Fomina Alla F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory discrimination depends on the large numbers of odorant receptor genes and differential ligand-receptor signaling among neurons expressing different receptors. In this study, we describe an in vitro system that enables the expression of exogenous odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons. Olfactory sensory neurons in the culture express characteristic signaling molecules and, therefore, provide a system to study receptor function within its intrinsic cellular environment. Results We demonstrate that cultured olfactory sensory neurons express endogenous odorant receptors. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer enables successful ectopic expression of odorant receptors. We show that the ectopically expressed mouse I7 is functional in the cultured olfactory sensory neurons. When two different odorant receptors are ectopically expressed simultaneously, both receptor proteins co-localized in the same olfactory sensory neurons up to 10 days in vitro. Conclusion This culture technique provided an efficient method to culture olfactory sensory neurons whose morphology, molecular characteristics and maturation progression resembled those observed in vivo. Using this system, regulation of odorant receptor expression and its ligand specificity can be studied in its intrinsic cellular environment.

  10. Olfactory Pathology in Central Nervous System Demyelinating Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Gabriele C; Joseph, Albert; George, Jithin; Yates, Richard L; Hamard, Marie; Hofer, Monika; Esiri, Margaret M

    2015-09-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Olfactory bulb and tract pathology in MS and other demyelinating diseases remain unexplored. A human autopsy cohort of pathologically confirmed cases encompassing the spectrum of demyelinating disease (MS; n = 17), neuromyelitis optica [(NMO); n = 3] and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis [(ADEM); n = 7] was compared to neuroinflammatory [herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE); n = 3], neurodegenerative [Alzheimer's disease (AD); n = 4] and non-neurologic (n = 8) controls. For each case, olfactory bulbs and/or tracts were stained for myelin, axons and inflammation. Inferior frontal cortex and hippocampus were stained for myelin in a subset of MS and ADEM cases. Olfactory bulb/tract demyelination was frequent in all demyelinating diseases [MS 12/17 (70.6%); ADEM 3/7 (42.9%); NMO 2/3 (66.7%)] but was absent in HSE, AD and non-neurologic controls. Inflammation was greater in the demyelinating diseases compared to non-neurologic controls. Olfactory bulb/tract axonal loss was most severe in MS where it correlated significantly with the extent of demyelination (r = 0.610, P = 0.009) and parenchymal inflammation (r = 0.681, P = 0.003). The extent of olfactory bulb/tract demyelination correlated with that found in the adjacent inferior frontal cortex but not hippocampus. We provide unequivocal evidence that olfactory bulb/tract demyelination is frequent, can occur early and is highly inflammatory, and is specific to demyelinating disease. © 2014 International Society of Neuropathology.

  11. Scarring, stem cells, scaffolds and skin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markeson, Daniel; Pleat, Jonathon M; Sharpe, Justin R; Harris, Adrian L; Seifalian, Alexander M; Watt, Suzanne M

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin loss, which can be extensive in the case of large burns, continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. This is due to an on-going inability to produce a suitable tissue engineered substrate that can satisfactorily replicate the epidermal and dermal in vivo niches to fulfil both aesthetic and functional demands. The current gold standard treatment of autologous skin grafting is inadequate because of poor textural durability, scarring and associated contracture, and because of a paucity of donor sites in larger burns. Tissue engineering has seen exponential growth in recent years with a number of 'off-the-shelf' dermal and epidermal substitutes now available. Each has its own limitations. In this review, we examine normal wound repair in relation to stem/progenitor cells that are intimately involved in this process within the dermal niche. Endothelial precursors, in particular, are examined closely and their phenotype, morphology and enrichment from multiple sources are described in an attempt to provide some clarity regarding the controversy surrounding their classification and role in vasculogenesis. We also review the role of the next generation of cellularized scaffolds and smart biomaterials that attempt to improve the revascularisation of artificial grafts, the rate of wound healing and the final cosmetic and functional outcome. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Cellular Architecture and Functional Aspects of the Olfactory Rosette of Wallago attu (Bleeker)

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Saroj Kumar; Chakrabarti, Padmanabha

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium of Wallago attu has been studied with conventional histological techniques. The elongated olfactory rosette consists of 62 to 64 primary lamellae in each left and right rosette. The olfactory lamellae are arranged in two rows on either side of the long raphe. Each olfactory lamella consists of two layers of epithelium separated by central core. The olfactory epithelium in one side consists of mixed sensory and non-sensory epithelium while the other side is consists of...

  13. Distinct amyloid precursor protein processing machineries of the olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Yeon; Rasheed, Ameer; Yoo, Seung-Jun; Kim, So Yeun; Cho, Bongki; Son, Gowoon; Yu, Seong-Woon; Chang, Keun-A; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Moon, Cheil

    2018-01-01

    Processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) occurs through sequential cleavages first by β-secretase and then by the γ-secretase complex. However, abnormal processing of APP leads to excessive production of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the central nervous system (CNS), an event which is regarded as a primary cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In particular, gene mutations of the γ-secretase complex-which contains presenilin 1 or 2 as the catalytic core-could trigger marked Aβ accumulation. Olfactory dysfunction usually occurs before the onset of typical AD-related symptoms (eg, memory loss or muscle retardation), suggesting that the olfactory system may be one of the most vulnerable regions to AD. To date however, little is known about why the olfactory system is affected so early by AD prior to other regions. Thus, we examined the distribution of secretases and levels of APP processing in the olfactory system under either healthy or pathological conditions. Here, we show that the olfactory system has distinct APP processing machineries. In particular, we identified higher expressions levels and activity of γ-secretase in the olfactory epithelium (OE) than other regions of the brain. Moreover, APP c-terminal fragments (CTF) are markedly detected. During AD progression, we note increased expression of presenilin2 of γ-secretases in the OE, not in the OB, and show that neurotoxic Aβ*56 accumulates more quickly in the OE. Taken together, these results suggest that the olfactory system has distinct APP processing machineries under healthy and pathological conditions. This finding may provide a crucial understanding of the unique APP-processing mechanisms in the olfactory system, and further highlights the correlation between olfactory deficits and AD symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurobiology of mammalian olfactory learning that occurs during sensitive periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideto KABA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This review examines the organizational principles underlying olfactory learning in three specialized contexts that occur during sensitive periods of enhanced neural plasticity and emphasizes some of their common features. All three forms of olfactory learning are associated with neural changes in the olfactory bulb (OB at the first stage of sensory processing. These changes require the association of the olfactory and somatosensory signals in the OB. They all depend on somatosensory stimulation-induced release of noradrenaline that induces structural and functional changes at mitral-granule cell reciprocal synapses in the OB, resulting in increases in inhibitory transmission. In the accessory olfactory bulb, this represents the enhanced self-inhibition of mitral cells, which selectively disrupts the transmission of the mating male’s pregnancy-blocking signal at this level. In contrast, an extensive network of secondary dendrites of mitral cells in the main olfactory bulb probably results in a sharpening of the odor-induced pattern of activity, due to increases in lateral inhibition, leading to offspring recognition in sheep and neonatal learning in rats and rabbits. These findings show that inhibitory interneurons play a critical role in olfactory learning. Further work on how these neurons shape olfactory circuit function could provide important clues to understand memory functions of interneurons in other systems. Moreover, recent research has suggested that three forms of olfactory learning are controlled by synergistic, redundant, and distributed neural mechanisms. This has general implications regarding the mechanisms that may contribute to the robustness of memories [Current Zoology 56 (6: 819–833, 2010].

  15. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: Pathophysiology, Classification, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Brian; Maderal, Andrea; Raphael, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Keloid and hypertrophic scars represent an aberrant response to the wound healing process. These scars are characterized by dysregulated growth with excessive collagen formation, and can be cosmetically and functionally disruptive to patients. Objectives are to describe the pathophysiology of keloid and hypertrophic scar, and to compare differences with the normal wound healing process. The classification of keloids and hypertrophic scars are then discussed. Finally, various treatment options including prevention, conventional therapies, surgical therapies, and adjuvant therapies are described in detail. Literature review was performed identifying relevant publications pertaining to the pathophysiology, classification, and treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars. Though the pathophysiology of keloid and hypertrophic scars is not completely known, various cytokines have been implicated, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10, as well as various growth factors including transforming growth factor-beta and platelet-derived growth factor. Numerous treatments have been studied for keloid and hypertrophic scars,which include conventional therapies such as occlusive dressings, compression therapy, and steroids; surgical therapies such as excision and cryosurgery; and adjuvant and emerging therapies including radiation therapy, interferon, 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, tacrolimus, sirolimus, bleomycin, doxorubicin, transforming growth factor-beta, epidermal growth factor, verapamil, retinoic acid, tamoxifen, botulinum toxin A, onion extract, silicone-based camouflage, hydrogel scaffold, and skin tension offloading device. Keloid and hypertrophic scars remain a challenging condition, with potential cosmetic and functional consequences to patients. Several therapies exist which function through different mechanisms. Better understanding into the pathogenesis will allow for development of newer and more targeted therapies in the future.

  16. Evaluation of Acne Scars: How to Assess Them and What to Tell the Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence and emotional impact of acne scarring are underestimated by the medical community. Dermatology providers should be able to evaluate the acne scar patient and discuss treatment options. Important aspects of the patient history include current treatments, prior acne scar procedures, and the patient's goals for treatment. During the physical examination, the scars are assessed and classified by scar morphology and overall severity of scarring. Finally, a treatment plan is developed in which the most appropriate procedures are matched with the scars that will work the best. Helping the patient understand likely expectations for improvement will increase overall satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nicotine increases lifespan and rescues olfactory and motor deficits in a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Raegan P; Call, Gerald B; Meyer, David; Smith, Justin; Techau, Jared A; Pearman, Krista; Buhlman, Lori M

    2013-09-15

    Drosophila melanogaster is an attractive model of familial Parkinson's disease, as flies with loss-of-function mutations of the parkin gene exhibit many pathologies observed in PD patients. Progressive motor deficits found in homozygous parkin mutants seem to result from mitochondrial pathology that causes indirect flight muscle and dopaminergic neuronal degeneration [1,2]. We have found that heterozygous parkin mutants have decreased lifespan, generally progressive motor dysfunction and olfactory deficits compared to control flies, suggesting that mutation of this gene produces a dominant phenotype. Tobacco smokers are dose-dependently less likely to develop PD [3,4]; subsequent in vitro and in vivo studies show that nicotine is protective in models of sporadic PD [6]. Literature addressing the potential protection by nicotine in Parkin loss-of-function models spans limited concentrations and selected time points in the organism's lifespan. We have found that parkin heterozygotes have late-onset climbing and flying deficits as well as decreased viability and olfactory deficits that precede motor defects. While chronic nicotine exposure decreases lifespan and climbing and flying abilities in control flies, it can improve viability and flying capability as well as rescue climbing and olfactory deficits in parkin heterozygotes. Dopaminergic neurons are spared in the parkin heterozygote, perhaps because this phenotype is less severe than in the homozygous parkin mutants. Nicotine pretreatment may be protective in sporadic PD patients and models; however, timely diagnosis remains to be an obstacle. Our results suggest that nicotine also may be protective in familial PD patients, who can be easily identified before motor symptoms occur. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A paired comparison analysis of third-party rater thyroidectomy scar preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakumar, C; Doyle, P C; Brandt, M G; Moore, C C; Nichols, A; Franklin, J H; Yoo, J; Fung, K

    2017-01-01

    To determine the length and position of a thyroidectomy scar that is cosmetically most appealing to naïve raters. Images of thyroidectomy scars were reproduced on male and female necks using digital imaging software. Surgical variables studied were scar position and length. Fifteen raters were presented with 56 scar pairings and asked to identify which was preferred cosmetically. Twenty duplicate pairings were included to assess rater reliability. Analysis of variance was used to determine preference. Raters preferred low, short scars, followed by high, short scars, with long scars in either position being less desirable (p scars over the alternatives. High, short scars were the next most favourably rated. If other factors influencing incision choice are considered equal, surgeons should consider these preferences in scar position and length when planning their thyroidectomy approach.

  19. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: Update and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyu Huang, MD, PhD

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The development of cutaneous pathological scars, namely, hypertrophic scars (HSs and keloids, involves complex pathways, and the exact mechanisms by which they are initiated, evolved, and regulated remain to be fully elucidated. The generally held concepts that keloids and HSs represent “aberrant wound healing” or that they are “characterized by hyalinized collagen bundles” have done little to promote their accurate clinicopathological classification or to stimulate research into the specific causes of these scars and effective preventative therapies. To overcome this barrier, we review here the most recent findings regarding the pathology and pathogenesis of keloids and HSs. The aberrations of HSs and keloids in terms of the inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling phases of the wound healing process are described. In particular, the significant roles that the extracellular matrix and the epidermal and dermal layers of skin play in scar pathogenesis are examined. Finally, the current hypotheses of pathological scar etiology that should be tested by basic and clinical investigators are detailed. Therapies that have been found to be effective are described, including several that evolved directly from the aforementioned etiology hypotheses. A better understanding of pathological scar etiology and manifestations will improve the clinical and histopathological classification and treatment of these important lesions.

  20. Successful treatment of atypical cesarean scar defect using endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hirotaka; Uchida, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Sato, Kenji; Sato, Suguru; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2015-12-22

    Cesarean scar syndrome results from a postoperative defect of the uterine isthmus, also known as an isthmocele. Patients present with gynecological symptoms, such as abnormal genital bleeding or infertility, after cesarean delivery. Although the cesarean rate is increasing worldwide, this syndrome is not widely known. A 43-year-old G2P1 Japanese woman with atypical cesarean scar syndrome had a 3-year history of secondary infertility and postmenstrual brown discharge. Laparoscopic and hysteroscopic exploration revealed a cesarean scar defect connected to a small cavity in the myometrium: this was not an endometrial cavity or a uterine diverticulum. After endoscopic excision of the cavity, the brown discharge resolved, and the patient achieved ongoing pregnancy on her third attempt at intrauterine insemination. Consensus is still lacking regarding the diagnosis and treatment of cesarean scar defect. However, the gynecologists should be aware that cesarean scar syndrome can have scar defects forming cavities of unusual shapes and features. Surgical correction of these defects will often improve postmenstrual bleeding and subfertility in these cases.

  1. Risk factors of renal scars in children with acute pyelonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Ehsanipour

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the association between previously documented risk factors such as recurrent pyelonephritis with the incidence of renal scarring after acute pyelonephritis in children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Children with acute pyelonephritis who were admitted to the Department of Pediatrics of a teaching hospital during 2007-2009 were enrolled in this study. DMSA scans were obtained 4-6 months after the last episode of pyelonephritis in all patients. RESULTS: A total of 80 children with acute pyelonephritis were enrolled in this study. Most of them were girls (77.5%, with a median age of 12 months. Nearly half of the children (n = 44; 55% had one or more renal scars. The distribution of gender, CRP level and leukocytosis did not differ significantly regardingthe absence or presence of renal scars (p > 0.05. Most of the scars occurred in children who had presented with bilateral pyelonephritis (69.4% vs. 18.2%, p = 0.001. Most of the patients with renal scars had a positive history of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR (75% vs.13.6%, p = 0.001. The significant roles of recurrent pyelonephritis and presence of VUR were further confirmed by multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: According to our findings, presence of VUR and recurrent pyelonephritis are independently associated with a higher incidence of renal scarring.

  2. Cascade pathway of filopodia formation downstream of SCAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyasheva, Assel; Svitkina, Tatyana; Kunda, Patricia; Baum, Buzz; Borisy, Gary

    2004-02-29

    The protrusion of two distinct actin-containing organelles, lamellipodia and filopodia, is thought to be regulated by two parallel pathways: from Rac1 through Scar/WAVEs to lamellipodia, and from Cdc42 through N-WASP to filopodia. We tested this hypothesis in Drosophila, which contains a single gene for each WASP subfamilies, SCAR and WASp. We performed targeted depletion of SCAR or WASp by dsRNA-mediated interference in two Drosophila cultured cell lines expressing lamellipodial and filopodial protrusion. Knockdown was verified by laser capture microdissection and RT-PCR, as well as western blotting. Morphometrical, kinetic and electron microscopy analyses of the SCAR-depleted phenotype in both cell types revealed strong inhibition of lamellipodial formation and cell spreading, as expected. More importantly, filopodia formation was also strongly inhibited, which is not consistent with the parallel pathway hypothesis. By contrast, depletion of WASp did not produce any significant phenotype, except for a slight inhibition of spreading, showing that both lamellipodia and filopodia in Drosophila cells are regulated predominantly by SCAR. We propose a new, cascade pathway model of filopodia regulation in which SCAR signals to lamellipodia and then filopodia arise from lamellipodia in response to additional signal(s).

  3. Management of keloids and hypertrophic scars: current and emerging options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauglitz GG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gerd G GauglitzDepartment of Dermatology and Allergy, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, GermanyAbstract: In the context of growing aesthetic awareness, a rising number of patients feel disappointed with their scars and are frequently seeking help for functional and aesthetic improvement. However, excessive scarring following surgery or trauma remains difficult to improve despite a plethora of advocated treatment strategies as frequently observed in daily clinical routine. It is thus still preferable to prevent scarring by minimizing risk factors as much as possible. Hence, it remains crucial for the physician to be aware of basic knowledge of healing mechanisms and skin anatomy, as well as an appreciation of suture material and wound closure techniques to minimize the risk of postoperative scarring. Next to existing, well known prophylactic and therapeutic strategies for the improvement of excessive scarring, this article discusses emerging techniques such as intralesional cryotherapy, intralesional 5-fluorouracil, interferon, and bleomycin. Some of them have been successfully tested in well-designed trials and already have extended or may extend the current spectrum of excessive scar treatment in the near future. Innovative options such as imiquimod 5% cream, photodynamic therapy, or botulinum toxin A may also be of certain importance; however, the data currently available is too contradictory for definite recommendations.Keywords: intralesional cryotherapy, lasers, triamcinolone acetonide, TGF-β

  4. Treatment of acne scars by fractional bipolar radiofrequency energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Michael H; Biron, Julie A

    2012-08-01

    A variety of modalities are available for the treatment of acne scars. This prospective, IRB-approved study evaluates the efficacy and tolerance of fractional bipolar RF energy in the treatment of facial acne scars. Healthy subjects (n = 15, 13 females, aged 35.7 ± 5.6 years [mean ± SD], skin types I-V) with mild to moderate acne scars received three monthly treatments with a fractional bipolar RF device. Improvement and tolerance were evaluated at each visit, including a 1-month and 3-month follow-up visit. Ten subjects completed the study. Physician-assessed acne scar severity was significantly reduced at 1 month and 3 months. Adverse effects were limited to transient erythema. Dryness, bruising and crusting erosion were limited. Subject-assessed stinging/burning, stinging (alone), tingling, itching and burning were also limited and consistent with each treatment. Subject-assessed fine lines and wrinkles, brightness, tightness, acne scar texture, pigmentation were all improved significantly. Satisfaction was high in 67-92% of subjects. Fractional bipolar RF energy is a safe and effective modality for the treatment of acne scars.

  5. Renal scar formation after urinary tract infection in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Seo Park

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is a common bacterial illness in children. Acute pyelonephritis in children may lead to renal scarring with the risk of later hypertension, preeclampsia during pregnancy, proteinuria, and renal insufficiency. Until now, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR has been considered the most important risk factor for post-UTI renal scar formation in children. VUR predisposes children with UTI to pyelonephritis, and both are associated with renal scarring. However, reflux nephropathy is not always acquired; rather, it reflects refluxassociated congenital dysplastic kidneys. The viewpoint that chronic kidney disease results from renal maldevelopment-associated VUR has led to questioning the utility of any regimen directed at identifying or treating VUR. Despite the recognition that underlying renal anomalies may be the cause of renal scarring that was previously attributed to infection, the prevention of renal scarring remains the goal of all therapies for childhood UTI. Therefore, children at high risk of renal scar formation after UTI should be treated and investigated until a large clinical study and basic research give us more information.

  6. Face detection for interactive tabletop viewscreen system using olfactory display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Kanazawa, Fumihiro

    2009-10-01

    An olfactory display is a device that delivers smells to the nose. It provides us with special effects, for example to emit smell as if you were there or to give a trigger for reminding us of memories. The authors have developed a tabletop display system connected with the olfactory display. For delivering a flavor to user's nose, the system needs to recognition and measure positions of user's face and nose. In this paper, the authors describe an olfactory display which enables to detect the nose position for an effective delivery.

  7. Odorant receptor proteins in the mouse main olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Victoria F; Mombaerts, Peter

    2017-03-06

    In the mouse, odorant receptor proteins (ORs) are G-protein-coupled receptors expressed in mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) of the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). ORs mediate odorant reception at the level of the OSN cilia. Most of the ∼1100 OR genes in the mouse genome are expressed, at the RNA level, in mature OSNs. The literature on antibodies against ORs is limited, and most reports are with antibodies that are not commercially available. Here we have screened 40 commercial antibodies against human and mouse ORs by immunofluorescence staining of coronal cryosections of the MOE of 21-day-old C57BL/6J mice. Various methods of antigen retrieval were tested. Of the 19 antibodies raised against human ORs, three yielded a consistent immunoreactive signal in the mouse MOE; of these three, two appeared to cross react against one or more, unknown, mouse ORs. Of the 21 antibodies raised against mouse ORs, six yielded a consistent immunoreactive signal in the mouse MOE; of these six, two also stained specific glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Antibody specificity could be validated with gene-targeted mouse strains in the case of three ORs. The number of OSNs immunoreactive for the MOR28/Olfr1507 antibody is greater in C57BL/6J than in 129S6/SvEvTac wild-type mice. Taken together, our results are encouraging: 20-30% of these commercially available antibodies are informative in immunohistochemical analyses of the mouse MOE. The commercial availability of these antibodies should facilitate the study of OR proteins in the MOE and the olfactory bulb, and the replicability of results in the literature. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Intranasal administration of rotenone in mice attenuated olfactory functions through the lesion of dopaminergic neurons in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, Hitoshi; Miyazono, Sadaharu; Noguchi, Tomohiro; Kashiwayanagi, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Many environmental chemicals are thought to affect brain function. It was reported that chemicals in the nasal cavity directly reach the brain through the connection between olfactory neurons and the olfactory bulb (OB). In this 'olfactory transport,' xenobiotics absorbed at the nasal mucosa reach the brain by bypassing some physical barriers and defenses, and thus olfactory transport is suspected to be a vulnerable mechanism of the brain against invasion threats of environmental chemicals. In this study, we focused on the neuronal toxicity of rotenone administered intranasally to mice. The results showed that the mice that were administered rotenone had attenuated olfactory functions. We also found that intranasally administered rotenone induced acute mitochondrial stress at the OB. The repeated administration of rotenone resulted in a decrease in the number of dopaminergic neurons, which are inhibitory interneurons in the OB. Taken together, our findings suggest that the inhalation of environmental toxins induces the neurodegeneration of cranial neurons through olfactory transport, and that olfactory dysfunction may be induced as an earliest symptom of neurodegeneration caused by inhaled neurotoxins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Value of MRI olfactory bulb evaluation in the assessment of olfactory dysfunction in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, J J; Noblet, V; Kremer, S; Molière, S; Dollfus, H; Marion, V; Goetz, N; Muller, J; Riehm, S

    2016-07-01

    Olfactory bulb (OB) volume evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been demonstrated to be related to olfactory dysfunction in many different diseases. Olfactory dysfunction is often overlooked in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) patients and is rarely objectively evaluated by MRI. We present a series of 20 BBS patients with olfactory dysfunction. The OB was evaluated separately and blindly by two radiologists (SR and SM) with 3 Tesla MRI imaging comparatively to 12 normal control subjects by global visual evaluation and by quantitative measurement of OB volume. In the 12 control cases OB visual evaluation was considered as normal in all cases for radiologist (SR) and in 10 cases for radiologist (SM). In the 20 BBS patients, OB visual evaluation was considered as abnormal in 18 cases for SR and in all cases for SM. OB volumetric evaluation for SR and SM in BBS patients was able to provide significant correlation between BBS and olfactory dysfunction. This study indicates that OB volume evaluation by MRI imaging like structural MRI scan for gray matter modifications demonstrates that olfactory dysfunction in BBS patients is a constant and cardinal symptom integrated in a genetical syndrome with peripheral and central olfactory structure alterations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Expression of polysialyltransferases (STX and PST) in adult rat olfactory bulb after an olfactory associative discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mione, J; Manrique, C; Duhoo, Y; Roman, F S; Guiraudie-Capraz, G

    2016-04-01

    Neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis occur in the adult hippocampus and in other brain structures such as the olfactory bulb and often involve the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM. During an olfactory associative discrimination learning task, NCAM polysialylation triggers neuronal plasticity in the adult hippocampus. The PST enzyme likely modulates this polysialylation, but not STX, a second sialyltransferase. How the two polysialyltransferases are involved in the adult olfactory bulb remains unknown. We addressed this question by investigating the effect of olfactory associative learning on plasticity and neurogenesis. After a hippocampo-dependent olfactory associative task learning, we measured the expression of both PST and STX polysialyltransferases in the olfactory bulbs of adult rats using quantitative PCR. In parallel, immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate both NCAM polysialylation level and newly-born cells, with or without learning. After learning, no changes were observed neither in the expression level of PST and NCAM polysialylation, nor in STX gene expression level and newly-born cells number in the olfactory bulb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Facial attractiveness: evolutionary based research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Anthony C.; Jones, Benedict C.; DeBruine, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Face preferences affect a diverse range of critical social outcomes, from mate choices and decisions about platonic relationships to hiring decisions and decisions about social exchange. Firstly, we review the facial characteristics that influence attractiveness judgements of faces (e.g. symmetry, sexually dimorphic shape cues, averageness, skin colour/texture and cues to personality) and then review several important sources of individual differences in face preferences (e.g. hormone levels and fertility, own attractiveness and personality, visual experience, familiarity and imprinting, social learning). The research relating to these issues highlights flexible, sophisticated systems that support and promote adaptive responses to faces that appear to function to maximize the benefits of both our mate choices and more general decisions about other types of social partners. PMID:21536551

  12. Collective motion from local attraction

    OpenAIRE

    Strömbom, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Many animal groups, for example schools of fish or flocks of birds, exhibit complex dynamic patterns while moving cohesively in the same direction. These flocking patterns have been studied using self-propelled particle models, most of which assume that collective motion arises from individuals aligning with their neighbours. Here, we propose a self-propelled particle model in which the only social force between individuals is attraction. We show that this model generates ...

  13. Ubiquitous water-soluble molecules in aquatic plant exudates determine specific insect attraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Sérandour

    Full Text Available Plants produce semio-chemicals that directly influence insect attraction and/or repulsion. Generally, this attraction is closely associated with herbivory and has been studied mainly under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand, the relationship between aquatic plants and insects has been little studied. To determine whether the roots of aquatic macrophytes release attractive chemical mixtures into the water, we studied the behaviour of mosquito larvae using olfactory experiments with root exudates. After testing the attraction on Culex and Aedes mosquito larvae, we chose to work with Coquillettidia species, which have a complex behaviour in nature and need to be attached to plant roots in order to obtain oxygen. This relationship is non-destructive and can be described as commensal behaviour. Commonly found compounds seemed to be involved in insect attraction since root exudates from different plants were all attractive. Moreover, chemical analysis allowed us to identify a certain number of commonly found, highly water-soluble, low-molecular-weight compounds, several of which (glycerol, uracil, thymine, uridine, thymidine were able to induce attraction when tested individually but at concentrations substantially higher than those found in nature. However, our principal findings demonstrated that these compounds appeared to act synergistically, since a mixture of these five compounds attracted larvae at natural concentrations (0.7 nM glycerol, <0.5 nM uracil, 0.6 nM thymine, 2.8 nM uridine, 86 nM thymidine, much lower than those found for each compound tested individually. These results provide strong evidence that a mixture of polyols (glycerol, pyrimidines (uracil, thymine, and nucleosides (uridine, thymidine functions as an efficient attractive signal in nature for Coquillettidia larvae. We therefore show for the first time, that such commonly found compounds may play an important role in plant-insect relationships in aquatic eco-systems.

  14. New diagnostic criteria and operative strategy for cesarean scar syndrome: Endoscopic repair for secondary infertility caused by cesarean scar defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Satoshi; Funamoto, Hiroshi; Hosono, Takashi; Shitano, Yasushi; Nakashima, Masao; Ametani, Yuka; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of endoscopic repair for secondary infertility caused by post-cesarean scar defect (PCSD). Our investigation focused on the validity of new diagnostic criteria and selection methods. The subjects were 22 women with secondary infertility due to PCSD with retention of bloody fluid in the uterine cavity. Women with a residual myometrial thickness of ≥ 2.5 mm and an anteflexed or straight uterus underwent hysteroscopic surgery, while all others underwent laparoscopic repair. Hysteroscopic surgery involved resection and coagulation of scarred areas, whereas laparoscopic surgery involved removal of scarred areas combined with hysteroscopy, followed by resuturing. Fourteen of the 22 women (63.6%) who were followed up for ≥ 1 year after surgery achieved pregnancy. Pregnancies occurred in all four women (100%) who underwent hysteroscopic surgery and in 10 of the 18 women (55.6%) who underwent laparoscopic surgery. Three out of four women who underwent hysteroscopic surgery had term deliveries. Among the women who underwent laparoscopic surgery, five had term deliveries. No cases of uterine rupture were experienced, and the delivery method was cesarean section in all cases. We propose that infertility associated with PCSD, cesarean scar syndrome, is caused by the retention of bloody fluid in the uterine cavity and scarring. Endoscopic treatment, such as hysteroscopy or laparoscopy, was effective for cesarean scar syndrome. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Cesarean Scar Pregnancy Managed with Conservative Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barıs Boza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP is a rare, but life-threatening type of ectopic pregnancy. An exact and early diagnosis of CSP is very important for prognosis. The aim of the present study was to describe 4 women with CSP and discuss their clinical presentations, diagnoses, and various management options along with the published literature. Four women with a suspicion of CSP or cervical pregnancy were referred to our hospital between August 2013 and January 2014. All the patients were counseled about medical management options. After the treatment, serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-hCG levels were followed weekly until they reached <5 mIU/mL. All the patients were diagnosed at the first trimester, with the average gestational age of 6.4±0.9 weeks. Treatment was systemic methotrexate (MTX treatment in 3 of the 4 women, requiring no further intervention. The remaining 1 woman was treated with an intragestational administration of MTX. The mean time passed until ß-hCG reached <5 mIU/mL was 10.2±2.9 (range, 8–14 weeks, and the mean time passed until the gestational sac resolved was 21.5±3.5 (range, 18–25 weeks. Based on this limited number of case-series experience, it seems that CSP should be treated conservatively even if there are visible fetal cardiac activity, fetal poles, large gestational sacs, and high initial ß-hCG levels. Although the complete remission of the lesion takes a relatively long time, medical management via a noninvasive approach and follow-up should be tried as the first choice of therapy.

  16. Parallel olfactory processing in the honey bee brain: odor learning and generalization under selective lesion of a projection neuron tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eCarcaud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The function of parallel neural processing is a fundamental problem in Neuroscience, as it is found across sensory modalities and evolutionary lineages, from insects to humans. Recently, parallel processing has attracted increased attention in the olfactory domain, with the demonstration in both insects and mammals that different populations of second-order neurons encode and/or process odorant information differently. Among insects, Hymenoptera present a striking olfactory system with a clear neural dichotomy from the periphery to higher-order centers, based on two main tracts of second-order (projection neurons: the medial and lateral antennal lobe tracts (m-ALT and l-ALT. To unravel the functional role of these two pathways, we combined specific lesions of the m-ALT tract with behavioral experiments, using the classical conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER conditioning. Lesioned and intact bees had to learn to associate an odorant (1-nonanol with sucrose. Then the bees were subjected to a generalization procedure with a range of odorants differing in terms of their carbon chain length or functional group. We show that m-ALT lesion strongly affects acquisition of an odor-sucrose association. However, lesioned bees that still learned the association showed a normal gradient of decreasing generalization responses to increasingly dissimilar odorants. Generalization responses could be predicted to some extent by in vivo calcium imaging recordings of l-ALT neurons. The m-ALT pathway therefore seems necessary for normal classical olfactory conditioning performance.

  17. Branner-Hubbard Motions and attracting dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a new notion of attracting dynamics, which is related to polynomial-like mappings. Also we review the Branner-Hubbard Motion and study its action on attracting dynamics.......We introduce a new notion of attracting dynamics, which is related to polynomial-like mappings. Also we review the Branner-Hubbard Motion and study its action on attracting dynamics....

  18. A specialized odor memory buffer in primary olfactory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelano, Christina; Montag, Jessica; Khan, Rehan; Sobel, Noam

    2009-01-01

    The neural substrates of olfactory working memory are unknown. We addressed the questions of whether olfactory working memory involves a verbal representation of the odor, or a sensory image of the odor, or both, and the location of the neural substrates of these processes. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure activity in the brains of subjects who were remembering either nameable or unnameable odorants. We found a double dissociation whereby remembering nameable odorants was reflected in sustained activity in prefrontal language areas, and remembering unnameable odorants was reflected in sustained activity in primary olfactory cortex. These findings suggest a novel dedicated mechanism in primary olfactory cortex, where odor information is maintained in temporary storage to subserve ongoing tasks.

  19. Olfactory and gustatory functions in bipolar disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazour, Francois; Richa, Sami; Desmidt, Thomas; Lemaire, Mathieu; Atanasova, Boriana; El Hage, Wissam

    2017-05-12

    Olfactory and gustatory dysfunctions have been described in different psychiatric disorders. Several studies have found gustatory and olfactory function change in bipolar disorders with various results. The aim of this study is to have a systematic review of studies evaluating gustatory and olfactory function in bipolar disorders. After a systematic search, 15 studies on olfaction and 5 studies on taste were included in this review. The UPSIT (University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test) and Sniffin' Sticks were the most widely used tests to evaluate smell. Some studies on olfaction described dysfunctions in smell identification as potential markers for bipolar disorders. Moreover, olfactory acuity was associated with psychosocial and cognitive performances. For taste, only few studies used standardized tests to evaluate gustation. These studies showed that patients with Bipolar disorders had more gustatory dysfunction compared to controls, and to non-bipolar depressed patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. AASERT: Hydrodynamic Interaction Between Olfactory Antennae and Odor Plumes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koehl, M

    2002-01-01

    We trained graduate and undergraduate students by involving them in research elucidating ways in which the structure and the motions of olfactory antennae affect how they encounter the concentration...

  1. Calcium Signaling in Mitral Cell Dendrites of Olfactory Bulbs of Neonatal Rats and Mice during Olfactory Nerve Stimulation and Beta-Adrenoceptor Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qi; Mutoh, Hiroki; Debarbieux, Franck; Knopfel, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Synapses formed by the olfactory nerve (ON) provide the source of excitatory synaptic input onto mitral cells (MC) in the olfactory bulb. These synapses, which relay odor-specific inputs, are confined to the distally tufted single primary dendrites of MCs, the first stage of central olfactory processing. Beta-adrenergic modulation of electrical…

  2. On the surgical treatment of hypertrophic scars: a comprehensive guideline for the surgical treatment of hypertrophic scars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stekelenburg, C.M.; van der Wal, M.B.A.; Middelkoop, E.; Niessen, F.B.; van Zuijlen, P.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Treating the hypertrophic scar remains a challenging problem. It often leaves the clinician with the questions whether, when and how to treat a hypertrophic scar. Methods: This review will focus on the surgical treatment of hypertrophic scars considering the latest research in this

  3. Postmastectomy radiotherapy with integrated scar boost using helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Riverview Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Riverview Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Fahner, Tasha [University of Wisconsin Riverview Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Paliwal, Bhudatt [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate helical tomotherapy dosimetry in postmastectomy patients undergoing treatment for chest wall and positive nodal regions with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in the scar region using strip bolus. Six postmastectomy patients were scanned with a 5-mm-thick strip bolus covering the scar planning target volume (PTV) plus 2-cm margin. For all 6 cases, the chest wall received a total cumulative dose of 49.3-50.4 Gy with daily fraction size of 1.7-2.0 Gy. Total dose to the scar PTV was prescribed to 58.0-60.2 Gy at 2.0-2.5 Gy per fraction. The supraclavicular PTV and mammary nodal PTV received 1.7-1.9 dose per fraction. Two plans (with and without bolus) were generated for all 6 cases. To generate no-bolus plans, strip bolus was contoured and overrode to air density before planning. The setup reproducibility and delivered dose accuracy were evaluated for all 6 cases. Dose-volume histograms were used to evaluate dose-volume coverage of targets and critical structures. We observed reduced air cavities with the strip bolus setup compared with what we normally see with the full bolus. The thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in vivo dosimetry confirmed accurate dose delivery beneath the bolus. The verification plans performed on the first day megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image verified that the daily setup and overall dose delivery was within 2% accuracy compared with the planned dose. The hotspot of the scar PTV in no-bolus plans was 111.4% of the prescribed dose averaged over 6 cases compared with 106.6% with strip bolus. With a strip bolus only covering the postmastectomy scar region, we observed increased dose uniformity to the scar PTV, higher setup reproducibility, and accurate dose delivered beneath the bolus. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a strip bolus over the scar using tomotherapy for SIB dosimetry in postmastectomy treatments.

  4. Treatment of acne scarring with fractional CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui; Lu, Zhong; Ding, Huilin; Yan, Shuxian; Xiang, Leihong; Gold, Michael H

    2012-08-01

    Fractional ablative CO(2) laser therapy is based on the theory of fractional photothermolysis. It can be effective in treating acne scars in a less invasive fashion than conventional ablative CO(2) laser therapy. In this clinical study, the safety and efficacy of a novel CO(2) fractional ablative laser was investigated for the treatment of facial atrophic acne scarring in Chinese individuals. A total of 31 patients (11 females, 20 males, Fitzpatrick skin phototypes III-IV) with facial acne scarring received three sequential fractional treatments over a 6-month period. Outcome measurements included blinded evaluations of before and after photographs by two physicians at 3 and 12 months after the final treatment. Global improvement was noted as well as any untoward events. At the 12 months follow-up time period, 12.9% of the patients showed excellent improvement in their acne scars, while 38.71% noted good to fair results. The clinical response at the 12-month follow-up visit tended to be better than at the 3-month follow-up visit, but was not statistically significant. Four patients experienced post-treatment and transient PIH but three patients were noted to have prolonged erythema. There was no evidence hypopigmentation or worsening of the scarring in any of the study patients. This high-energy pulsed and cool-scanned fractional ablative CO(2) laser system is safe and effective for facial atrophic acne scarring. Improvement in scarring was noted in the majority of patients with minimal discomfort and minimal downtime. Continued improvement over time is also an important clinical finding.

  5. Attraction of two lacewing species to volatiles produced by host plants and aphid prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Obrycki, J. J.; Ochieng, Samuel A.; Baker, Thomas C.; Pickett, J. A.; Smiley, D.

    2005-06-01

    It is well documented that host-related odors enable many species of parasitoids and predatory insects to locate their prey and prey habitats. This study reports the first characterization of prey and prey host odor reception in two species of lacewings, Chrysoperla carnea (Say) and Chrysopa oculata L. 2-Phenylethanol, one of the volatiles emitted from their prey’s host plants (alfalfa and corn) evoked a significant EAG response from antennae of C. carnea. Traps baited with this compound attracted high numbers of adult C. carnea, which were predominantly females. One of the sex pheromone components (1R,4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactol of an aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) attracted only C. oculata adults. Single sensillum recordings showed that the olfactory neurons of C. carnea responded to both 2-phenylethanol and aphid sex pheromone components, but those of C. oculata only responded to the latter.

  6. Integrating temperature with odor processing in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kludt, Eugen; Okom, Camille; Brinkmann, Alexander; Schild, Detlev

    2015-05-20

    Temperature perception has long been classified as a somesthetic function solely. However, in recent years several studies brought evidence that temperature perception also takes place in the olfactory system of rodents. Temperature has been described as an effective stimulus for sensory neurons of the Grueneberg ganglion located at the entrance of the nose. Here, we investigate whether a neuronal trace of temperature stimulation can be observed in the glomeruli and mitral cells of the olfactory bulb, using calcium imaging and fast line-scanning microscopy. We show in the Xenopus tadpole system that the γ-glomerulus, which receives input from olfactory neurons, is highly sensitive to temperature drops at the olfactory epithelium. We observed that thermo-induced activity in the γ-glomerulus is conveyed to the mitral cells innervating this specific neuropil. Surprisingly, a substantial number of thermosensitive mitral cells were also chemosensitive. Moreover, we report another unique feature of the γ-glomerulus: it receives ipsilateral and contralateral afferents. The latter fibers pass through the contralateral bulb, cross the anterior commissure, and then run to the ipsilateral olfactory bulb, where they target the γ-glomerulus. Temperature drops at the contralateral olfactory epithelium also induced responses in the γ-glomerulus and in mitral cells. Temperature thus appears to be a relevant physiological input to the Xenopus olfactory system. Each olfactory bulb integrates and codes temperature signals originating from receptor neurons of the ipsilateral and contralateral nasal cavities. Finally, temperature and chemical information is processed in shared cellular networks. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357892-11$15.00/0.

  7. Parasite and predator risk assessment: nuanced use of olfactory cues

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, John G.; Garnick, Sarah; Mark A Elgar; Coulson, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Foraging herbivores face twin threats of predation and parasite infection, but the risk of predation has received much more attention. We evaluated, experimentally, the role of olfactory cues in predator and parasite risk assessment on the foraging behaviour of a population of marked, free-ranging, red-necked wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus). The wallabies adjusted their behaviour according to these olfactory cues. They foraged less, were more vigilant and spent less time at feeders placed in...

  8. Spotlight on olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Violante,Mayela; Ospina-García,Natalia; Pérez-Lohman,Christian; Cervantes-Arriaga,Amin

    2017-01-01

    Mayela Rodríguez-Violante,1,2 Natalia Ospina-García,1,2 Christian Pérez-Lohman,1,2 Amin Cervantes-Arriaga1,2 1Movement Disorders Clinic, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Clinical Neurodegenerative Research Unit, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract: Olfactory dysfunction is frequent in Parkinson’s disease (PD). A correlation between olfactory dysfunction and the pathophy...

  9. Modeling of Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in Biological Olfactory Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-21

    34 Neuron, 2001. 1371 B. Quenet, D. Horn, G. Dreyfus , and R. Dubois, "Temporal coding in an olfactory oscillatory model," Neurocomputing, vol. 38-40, pp...in Engineering (ANNIE 2004) Conference, St. Louis , Missouri, November 7-10, 2004, pp.791-799 Progress Report Zurada JM, Lozowskl AG, Modeling of...Engineering (ANNIE 2004) Conference, St. Louis , Missouri, November 7-10, 2004, pp.791- 799 SIMULATION OF PULSE DISTRIBUTION OBSERVED IN OLFACTORY BULB

  10. State and trait olfactory markers of major depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Naudin

    Full Text Available Nowadays, depression is a major issue in public health. Because of the partial overlap between the brain structures involved in depression, olfaction and emotion, the study of olfactory function could be a relevant way to find specific cognitive markers of depression. This study aims at determining whether the olfactory impairments are state or trait markers of major depressive episode (MDE through the study of the olfactory parameters involving the central olfactory pathway. In a pilot study, we evaluated prospectively 18 depressed patients during acute episodes of depression and 6 weeks after antidepressant treatment (escitalopram against 54 healthy volunteers, matched by age, gender and smoking status. We investigated the participants' abilities to identify odors (single odors and in binary mixture, to evaluate and discriminate the odors' intensity, and determine the hedonic valence of odors. The results revealed an "olfactory anhedonia" expressed by decrease of hedonic score for high emotional odorant as potential state marker of MDE. Moreover, these patients experienced an "olfactory negative alliesthesia", during the odor intensity evaluation, and failed to identify correctly two odorants with opposite valences in a binary iso-mixture, which constitute potential trait markers of the disease. This study provides preliminary evidence for olfactory impairments associated with MDE (state marker that are persistent after the clinical improvement of depressive symptoms (trait marker. These results could be explained by the chronicity of depression and/or by the impact of therapeutic means used (antidepressant treatment. They need to be confirmed particularly the ones obtained in complex olfactory environment which corresponds a more objective daily life situation.

  11. Reference values of olfactory function for Mexico City inhabitants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarneros, Marco; Hudson, Robyn; López-Palacios, Martha; Drucker-Colín, René

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory testing is useful in the differential diagnosis of age-related pathologies. To provide baseline reference values for clinical use in Mexico City we investigated the relation between olfactory capabilities and the principal population parameters of age, sex, and smoking habits in a large sample of healthy inhabitants. We applied the internationally recognized and commercially available Sniffin' Sticks test battery to 916 men and women from across the adult life span. The Sniffin' Sticks test evaluates three key aspects of olfactory function: 1) ability to detect an odor, 2) to discriminate between odors, and 3) to identify odors. We found a significant decline in olfactory function from the 5th decade of age, and that detection threshold was the most sensitive measure of this. We did not find a significant difference between men and women or between smokers and non-smokers. In confirmation of our previous studies of the negative effect of air pollution on olfactory function, Mexico City inhabitants had poorer overall performance than corresponding subjects previously tested in the neighboring but less polluted Mexican state of Tlaxcala. Although we basically confirm findings on general demographic patterns of olfactory performance from other countries, we also demonstrate the need to take into account local cultural, environmental and demographic factors in the clinical evaluation of olfactory performance of Mexico City inhabitants. The Sniffin' Sticks test battery, with some adjustment of stimuli to correspond to Mexican culture, provides an easily administered means of assessing olfactory health. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. State and trait olfactory markers of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Marine; El-Hage, Wissam; Gomes, Marlène; Gaillard, Philippe; Belzung, Catherine; Atanasova, Boriana

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, depression is a major issue in public health. Because of the partial overlap between the brain structures involved in depression, olfaction and emotion, the study of olfactory function could be a relevant way to find specific cognitive markers of depression. This study aims at determining whether the olfactory impairments are state or trait markers of major depressive episode (MDE) through the study of the olfactory parameters involving the central olfactory pathway. In a pilot study, we evaluated prospectively 18 depressed patients during acute episodes of depression and 6 weeks after antidepressant treatment (escitalopram) against 54 healthy volunteers, matched by age, gender and smoking status. We investigated the participants' abilities to identify odors (single odors and in binary mixture), to evaluate and discriminate the odors' intensity, and determine the hedonic valence of odors. The results revealed an "olfactory anhedonia" expressed by decrease of hedonic score for high emotional odorant as potential state marker of MDE. Moreover, these patients experienced an "olfactory negative alliesthesia", during the odor intensity evaluation, and failed to identify correctly two odorants with opposite valences in a binary iso-mixture, which constitute potential trait markers of the disease. This study provides preliminary evidence for olfactory impairments associated with MDE (state marker) that are persistent after the clinical improvement of depressive symptoms (trait marker). These results could be explained by the chronicity of depression and/or by the impact of therapeutic means used (antidepressant treatment). They need to be confirmed particularly the ones obtained in complex olfactory environment which corresponds a more objective daily life situation.

  13. The fate of the inner nose: odor imagery in patients with olfactory loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, E L R; Arshamian, A; Wieser, M J; Hummel, C; Larsson, M; Mühlberger, A; Hummel, T

    2014-05-30

    Cerebral activations during olfactory mental imagery are fairly well investigated in healthy participants but little attention has been given to olfactory imagery in patients with olfactory loss. To explore whether olfactory loss leads to deficits in olfactory imagery, neural responses using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and self-report measures were investigated in 16 participants with acquired olfactory loss and 19 control participants. Participants imagined both pleasant and unpleasant odors and their visual representations. Patients reported less vivid olfactory but not visual images than controls. Results from neuroimaging revealed that activation patterns differed between patients and controls. While the control group showed stronger activation in olfactory brain regions for unpleasant compared to pleasant odors, the patient group did not. Also, activation in critical areas for olfactory imagery was correlated with the duration of olfactory dysfunction, indicating that the longer the duration of dysfunction, the more the attentional resources were employed. This indicates that participants with olfactory loss have difficulties to perform olfactory imagery in the conventional way. Regular exposure to olfactory information may be necessary to maintain an olfactory imagery capacity. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The sea lamprey has a primordial accessory olfactory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A dual olfactory system, represented by two anatomically distinct but spatially proximate chemosensory epithelia that project to separate areas of the forebrain, is known in several classes of tetrapods. Lungfish are the earliest evolving vertebrates known to have this dual system, comprising a main olfactory and a vomeronasal system (VNO). Lampreys, a group of jawless vertebrates, have a single nasal capsule containing two anatomically distinct epithelia, the main (MOE) and the accessory olfactory epithelia (AOE). We speculated that lamprey AOE projects to specific telencephalic regions as a precursor to the tetrapod vomeronasal system. Results To test this hypothesis, we characterized the neural circuits and molecular profiles of the accessory olfactory epithelium in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). Neural tract-tracing revealed direct and reciprocal connections with the dorsomedial telencephalic neuropil (DTN) which in turn projects directly to the dorsal pallium and the rostral hypothalamus. High-throughput sequencing demonstrated that the main and the accessory olfactory epithelia have virtually identical profiles of expressed genes. Real time quantitative PCR confirmed expression of representatives of all 3 chemoreceptor gene families identified in the sea lamprey genome. Conclusion Anatomical and molecular evidence shows that the sea lamprey has a primordial accessory olfactory system that may serve a chemosensory function. PMID:23957559

  15. Recency and suffix effects with immediate recall of olfactory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, C; Jenkins, R

    2000-05-01

    In contrast to our understanding of the immediate recall of auditory and visual material, little is known about the corresponding characteristics of short-term olfactory memory. The current study investigated the pattern of immediate serial recall and the associated suffix effect using olfactory stimuli. Subjects were trained initially to identify and name correctly nine different odours. Experiment 1 established an immediate correct recall span of approximately six items. In Experiment 2 participants recalled serially span equivalent lists which were followed by a visual, auditory, or olfactory suffix. Primacy was evident in the recall curves for all three suffix conditions. Recency, in contrast, was evident in the auditory and visual suffix conditions only; there was a strong suffix effect in the olfactory suffix condition. Experiment 3 replicated this pattern of effects using seven-item lists, and demonstrated that the magnitude of the recency and suffix effects obtained in the olfactory modality can equate to that obtained in the auditory modality. It is concluded that the pattern of recency and suffix effects in the olfactory modality is reliable, and poses difficulties for those theories that rely on the presence of a primary linguistic code, sound, or changing state as determinants of these effects in serial recall.

  16. Gustatory and olfactory responses to stimulation of the human insula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Laure; Royet, Jean-Pierre; Catenoix, Hélène; Montavont, Alexandra; Isnard, Jean; Mauguière, François

    2017-09-01

    Despite numerous studies suggesting the role of insular cortex in the processing of gustatory and olfactory inputs, the exact location of olfactogustatory representation in the insula remains controversial. Here we provide a functional mapping of olfactory-gustatory responses to stimulation of the human insular cortex. We reviewed 651 electrical stimulations of the insula that were performed in 221 patients, using stereotactically implanted depth electrodes, during the presurgical evaluation of drug-refractory epilepsy. Gustatory sensations were evoked in 15 (2.7%) of the 550 stimulations that elicited a clinical response. They were exclusively obtained after stimulation of a relatively delimited zone of insula, located in its mid-dorsal part (posterior short gyrus). Six olfactory sensations (1.1%) could be obtained during stimulations of an insular region that partially overlapped with the gustatory representation. Our study provides a functional mapping of gustatory representation in the insular posterior short gyrus and the first detailed description of olfactory sensations obtained by direct stimulation of mid-dorsal insula. Our data also show a spatial overlap between gustatory, olfactory, and oral somatosensory representation in the mid-dorsal insula, and suggest that this part of the insula may be an integrated oral sensory region that plays a key role in flavor perception. It also indicates that dysfunction in this region should be considered during the evaluation of gustatory and olfactory epileptic seizures. Ann Neurol 2017;82:360-370. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  17. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Uterine Scar Niche before and after Laparoscopic Surgical Repair: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Drouin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Context - Uterine scar defects or scar niche are relatively common after cesarean delivery. An association has been observed between the severity of scar defect, also known as isthmocele, some gynecologic symptoms, and the risk of uterine scar dehiscence at the next delivery. It has been suggested that surgical repair of scar defect could improve the gynecological symptoms, but it remains unclear whether such surgery mends the uterine scar itself. Case Report - We report the case of a woman with uterine scar defect in whom laparoscopic repair significantly improved the gynecological symptoms without affecting the uterine scar, evaluated by hysterosonography. Conclusion - This case highlights the significant dearth of knowledge surrounding the diagnosis, consequences, and benefits of surgical repair of uterine scar defect after cesarean.

  18. A Study Of 7 Cases Of Depressed Facial Scars Corrected By Subcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malakar Subrata

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven (7 cases of depressed facial scars which included depressed distensile acne scars, depressed bound down scars of acne excluding deep ice pick scars, and scars of varicella constituted the study group. The scars were treated with a new method named subcuticular undermining. A tri-bevelled hypodermic needle was inserted through a puncture in the skin surface and its sharp edges were manouevered under the scar. The depression was lifted by the releasing action of the needle maneuevere and from connective tissue that forms in course of normal wound healing. Approximately 50% to 80% improvement of all the scars were noticed. Patient’s compliance was highly satisfactory. Subcision is an appropriate, option in depressed scars of black skin (Type IV-Type VI where dermabrasion and medium-depth and deep chemical peeling are contraindicated.

  19. Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging of chronic myocardial infarct scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horáček, B Milan; Wang, Linwei; Dawoud, Fady; Xu, Jingjia; Sapp, John L

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) scar constitutes a substrate for ventricular tachycardia (VT), and an accurate delineation of infarct scar may help to identify reentrant circuits and thus facilitate catheter ablation. One of the recent advancements in characterization of a VT substrate is its volumetric delineation within the ventricular wall by noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging. This paper compares, in four specific cases, epicardial and volumetric inverse solutions, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with late gadolinium enhancement as a gold standard. For patients with chronic MI, who presented at Glasgow Western Infirmary, delayed-enhancement MRI and 120-lead body surface potential mapping (BSPM) data were acquired and 4 selected cases were later made available to a wider community as part of the 2007 PhysioNet/Computers in Cardiology Challenge. These data were used to perform patient-specific inverse solutions for epicardial electrograms and morphology-based criteria were applied to delineate infarct scar on the epicardial surface. Later, the Rochester group analyzed the same data by means of a novel inverse solution for reconstructing intramural transmembrane potentials, to delineate infarct scar in three dimensions. Comparison of the performance of three specific inverse-solution algorithms is presented here, using scores based on the 17-segment ventricular division scheme recommended by the American Heart Association. The noninvasive methods delineating infarct scar as three-dimensional (3D) intramural distribution of transmembrane action potentials outperform estimates providing scar delineation on the epicardial surface in all scores used for comparison. In particular, the extent of infarct scar (its percentage mass relative to the total ventricular mass) is rendered more accurately by the 3D estimate. Moreover, the volumetric rendition of scar border provides better clues to potential targets for catheter ablation. Electrocardiographic inverse

  20. Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging of chronic myocardial infarct scar§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horáček, B. Milan; Wang, Linwei; Dawoud, Fady; Xu, Jingjia; Sapp, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) scar constitutes a substrate for ventricular tachycardia (VT), and an accurate delineation of infarct scar may help to identify reentrant circuits and thus facilitate catheter ablation. One of the recent advancements in characterization of a VT substrate is its volumetric delineation within the ventricular wall by noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging. This paper compares, in four specific cases, epicardial and volumetric inverse solutions, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with late gadolinium enhancement as a gold standard. Methods For patients with chronic MI, who presented at Glasgow Western Infirmary, delayed-enhancement MRI and 120-lead body surface potential mapping (BSPM) data were acquired and 4 selected cases were later made available to a wider community as part of the 2007 PhysioNet/Computers in Cardiology Challenge. These data were used to perform patient-specific inverse solutions for epicardial electrograms and morphology-based criteria were applied to delineate infarct scar on the epicardial surface. Later, the Rochester group analyzed the same data by means of a novel inverse solution for reconstructing intramural transmembrane potentials, to delineate infarct scar in three dimensions. Comparison of the performance of three specific inverse-solution algorithms is presented here, using scores based on the 17-segment ventricular division scheme recommended by the American Heart Association. Results The noninvasive methods delineating infarct scar as three-dimensional (3D) intramural distribution of transmembrane action potentials outperform estimates providing scar delineation on the epicardial surface in all scores used for comparison. In particular, the extent of infarct scar (its percentage mass relative to the total ventricular mass) is rendered more accurately by the 3D estimate. Moreover, the volumetric rendition of scar border provides better clues to potential targets for catheter ablation

  1. Identification and Optimization of Microbial Attractants for Philornis downsi, an Invasive Fly Parasitic on Galapagos Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Dong H; Mieles, Alejandro E; Lahuatte, Paola F; Cahuana, Andrea; Lincango, Marie Piedad; Causton, Charlotte E; Tebbich, Sabine; Cimadom, Arno; Teale, Stephen A

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the role of olfactory cues from actively fermenting yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in attraction of adult Philornis downsi and identified two synergistically attractive yeast volatiles. Larvae of this invasive fly parasitize the hatchlings of passerines and threaten the Galapagos avifauna. Gas chromatography coupled with electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD), coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and field trapping experiments were used to identify volatile compounds from a yeast-sugar solution. EAD responses were consistently elicited by 14 yeast volatiles. In a series of field trapping experiments, a mixture of the 14 EAD-active compounds was similarly attractive to P. downsi when compared to the yeast-sugar solution, and we found that acetic acid and ethanol were essential for attraction. A mixture of 0.03 % acetic acid and 3 % ethanol was as attractive as the 14-component blend, but was not as attractive as the yeast-sugar solution. Philornis downsi showed positive and negative dose-responses to acetic acid in the ranges of 0.01 ~ 0.3 % and 0.3 ~ 9 %, respectively. Further optimization showed that the mixture of 1 % acetic acid and 3 % ethanol was as attractive as the yeast-sugar solution. Both mixtures of acetic acid and ethanol were more selective than the yeast-sugar solution in terms of non-target moths and Polistes versicolor wasps captured. These results indicate that acetic acid and ethanol produced by yeasts are crucial for P. downsi attraction to fermented materials on which they feed as adults and can be used to manage this invasive fly in Galapagos.

  2. Inducible activation of ERK5 MAP kinase enhances adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and improves olfactory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbin; Lu, Song; Li, Tan; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Abel, Glen M; Xu, Lihong; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-05-20

    Recent discoveries have suggested that adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and olfactory bulb (OB) may be required for at least some forms of olfactory behavior in mice. However, it is unclear whether conditional and selective enhancement of adult neurogenesis by genetic approaches is sufficient to improve olfactory function under physiological conditions or after injury. Furthermore, specific signaling mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB are not fully defined. We previously reported that ERK5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain, plays a critical role in adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB. Using a site-specific knock-in mouse model, we report here that inducible and targeted activation of the endogenous ERK5 in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances adult neurogenesis in the OB by increasing cell survival and neuronal differentiation. This conditional ERK5 activation also improves short-term olfactory memory and odor-cued associative olfactory learning under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these mice show enhanced recovery of olfactory function and have more adult-born neurons after a zinc sulfate-induced lesion of the main olfactory epithelium. We conclude that ERK5 MAP kinase is an important endogenous signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and that conditional activation of endogenous ERK5 is sufficient to enhance adult neurogenesis in the OB thereby improving olfactory function both under normal conditions and after injury. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357833-17$15.00/0.

  3. Olfactory hallucinations elicited by electrical stimulation via subdural electrodes: effects of direct stimulation of olfactory bulb and tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gogi; Juhász, Csaba; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2012-06-01

    In 1954, Penfield and Jasper briefly described that percepts of unpleasant odor were elicited by intraoperative electrical stimulation of the olfactory bulb in patients with epilepsy. Since then, few peer-reviewed studies have reported such phenomena elicited by stimulation mapping via subdural electrodes implanted on the ventral surface of the frontal lobe. Here, we determined what types of olfactory hallucinations could be reproduced by such stimulation in children with focal epilepsy. This study included 16 children (age range: 5 to 17 years) who underwent implantation of subdural electrodes to localize the presumed epileptogenic zone and eloquent areas. Pairs of electrodes were electrically stimulated, and clinical responses were observed. In case a patient reported a perception, she/he was asked to describe its nature. We also described the stimulus parameters to elicit a given symptom. Eleven patients reported a perception of smell in response to electrical stimulation while the remaining five did not. Nine patients perceived an unpleasant smell (like bitterness, smoke, or garbage) while two perceived a pleasant smell (like strawberry or good food). Such olfactory hallucinations were induced by stimulation proximal to the olfactory bulb or tract on either hemisphere but not by that of orbitofrontal gyri lateral to the medial orbital sulci. The range of stimulus parameters employed to elicit olfactory hallucinations was comparable to those for other sensorimotor symptoms. Our systematic study of children with epilepsy replicated stimulation-induced olfactory hallucinations. We failed to provide evidence that a positive olfactory perception could be elicited by conventional stimulation of secondary olfactory cortex alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding the NG2 glial scar after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber R Hackett

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available NG2 cells, also known as oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, are located throughout the central nervous system and serve as a pool of progenitors to differentiate into oligodendrocytes. In response to spinal cord injury, NG2 cells increase their proliferation and differentiation into remyelinating oligodendrocytes. While astrocytes are typically associated with being the major cell type in the glial scar, many NG2 cells also accumulate within the glial scar but their function remains poorly understood. Similar to astrocytes, these cells hypertrophy, upregulate expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, inhibit axon regeneration, contribute to the glial-fibrotic scar border, and some even differentiate into astrocytes. Whether NG2 cells also have a role in other astrocyte functions, such as preventing the spread of infiltrating leukocytes and expression of inflammatory cytokines, is not yet known. Thus, NG2 cells are not only important for remyelination after spinal cord injury, but are also a major component of the glial scar with functions that overlap with astrocytes in this region. In this review, we describe the signaling pathways important for the proliferation and differentiation of NG2 cells, as well as the role of NG2 cells in scar formation and tissue repair.

  5. Investigating the role of P311 in the hypertrophic scar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianglin Tan

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of hypertrophic scar formation are not fully understood. We previously screened the differentially expressed genes of human hypertrophic scar tissue and identified P311 gene as upregulated. As the activities of P311 in human fibroblast function are unknown, we examined the distribution of it and the effects of forced expression or silencing of expression of P311. P311 expression was detected in fibroblast-like cells from the hypertrophic scar of burn injury patients but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, epidermal cells or normal skin dermal cells. Transfection of fibroblasts with P311 gene stimulated the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA, TGF-beta1 and alpha1(I collagen (COL1A1, and enhanced the contraction of fibroblast populated collagen lattices (FPCL. In contrast, interference of fibroblast P311 gene expression decreased the TGF-beta1 mRNA expression and reduced the contraction of fibroblasts in FPCL. These results suggest that P311 may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar via induction of a myofibroblastic phenotype and of functions such as TGF-beta1 expression. P311 could be a novel target for the control of hypertrophic scar development.

  6. Ipsilateral rotational autokeratoplasty for the management of traumatic corneal scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günes, Alime; Kansu Bozkurt, Tahir; Unlu, Cihan; Sezgin Akcay, Betül Ilkay; Bayramlar, Hüseyin

    2012-01-01

    A 40-years-old male patient with a corneal scar secondary to perforating eye injury had undergone ipsilateral rotational autokeratoplasty in our clinics. The corneal scar involved the pupillary area. The patient had a preoperative visual acuity of counting fingers. The patient's cornea was trephined with a 0.5 mm temporal decentration. The 8.0 mm autograft was rotated approximately 180° to relocate the scar to the temporal aspect of the cornea. The final position of the corneal scar was temporal of the visual axis and central area was clear. The visual acuity at 1-, 3-, and 6-months followups was better than the first visual acuity in the patient. Ipsilateral rotational autokeratoplasty has many advantages over conventional keratoplasty. There is no risk of immunological rejection of the graft, postoperative corticosteroids are not needed as frequently, and donor cornea is not required. A rotational autograft can be a powerful alternative to conventional keratoplasty for some patients with traumatic corneal scars.

  7. Ipsilateral Rotational Autokeratoplasty for the Management of Traumatic Corneal Scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alime Günes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-years-old male patient with a corneal scar secondary to perforating eye injury had undergone ipsilateral rotational autokeratoplasty in our clinics. The corneal scar involved the pupillary area. The patient had a preoperative visual acuity of counting fingers. The patient’s cornea was trephined with a 0.5 mm temporal decentration. The 8.0 mm autograft was rotated approximately 180° to relocate the scar to the temporal aspect of the cornea. The final position of the corneal scar was temporal of the visual axis and central area was clear. The visual acuity at 1-, 3-, and 6-months followups was better than the first visual acuity in the patient. Ipsilateral rotational autokeratoplasty has many advantages over conventional keratoplasty. There is no risk of immunological rejection of the graft, postoperative corticosteroids are not needed as frequently, and donor cornea is not required. A rotational autograft can be a powerful alternative to conventional keratoplasty for some patients with traumatic corneal scars.

  8. Videocapillaroscopy in postburn scars: in vivo analysis of the microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangemi, Ezio Nicola; Carnino, Riccardo; Stella, Maurizio

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation in vivo of the differences between the microcirculatory characteristics of the postburn scar and the healthy skin. Twelve patients with postburn scars were included in the study, evaluating fifteen scar areas and twelve healthy skin areas by means of contact optical probe videocapillaroscopy. The examined areas for each patient were the right and the left upper limb. Capillary density, length and diameter, together with capillary distribution pattern (punctiform, reticular, directional) and the presence of microhaemorrhages and neoangiogenesis were studied. The results were obtained by two different researchers using the capillaroscope's software. Capillary loop diameter and length, capillary distribution pattern and presence of neoangiogenesis were found to be significantly increased in postburn scars compared with controls. There were also significant differences between hypertrophic tissue in the active phase and the one in the remission phase for capillary diameter and presence of neoangiogenesis. Videocapillaroscopy showed "in vivo" a change in local microcirculation architecture using a microscope. Patients with hypertrophic burn scars showed a variety of microcirculatory changes, often clustered in a characteristic pattern of abnormally oriented, dilated capillaries and neoangiogenetic phenomena. This methodology is highly likely to be of value in the assessment and prognostication of burn outcome. 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. Sarcoidosis presenting as non-scarring non-scalp alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Luke; Relic, John

    2016-08-01

    In this article we describe a 39-year-old man who presented with non-scarring non-scalp alopecia of his limbs as the initial presentation of sarcoidosis. Alopecia is a rare cutaneous manifestation of sarcoidosis. A literature review has found only one other example of sarcoidosis presenting as non-scarring non-scalp alopecia in an area other than the scalp in a patient who was otherwise asymptomatic. Several reported cases have described scarring alopecia of the scalp, which is the area of skin most commonly affected by sarcoidosis. There has been one documented case of sarcoidosis manifesting as total body non-scarring alopecia in a patient who had systemic symptoms of sarcoidosis. Other cases have presented rare cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis but in all these cases several other organ systems have been involved, and the patient has had systemic symptoms on presentation or the cutaneous presentation did not include non-scalp non-scarring alopecia. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  10. Mechanisms of pathological scarring: role of myofibroblasts and current developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazy, Vincent; Billet, Fabrice; Micallef, Ludovic; Coulomb, Bernard; Desmoulière, Alexis

    2011-09-01

    Myofibroblasts play a key role in the wound-healing process, promoting wound closure and matrix deposition. These cells normally disappear from granulation tissue by apoptosis after wound closure, but under some circumstances, they persist and may contribute to pathological scar formation. Myofibroblast differentiation and apoptosis are both modulated by cytokines, mechanical stress, and, more generally, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Tissue repair allows tissues and organs to recover, at least partially, functional properties that have been lost through trauma or disease. Embryonic skin wounds are repaired without scarring or fibrosis, whereas skin wound repair in adults always leads to scar formation, which may have functional or esthetic consequences, as in the case of hypertrophic scars, for example. Skin wound repair involves a precise remodeling process, particularly in the dermal compartment, during which fibroblasts/myofibroblasts play a central role. This article reviews the origins of myofibroblasts and their role in normal and pathological skin wound healing. This article focuses on traumatic skin wound healing, but largely, the same mechanisms apply in other physiological and pathological settings. Tissue healing in other organs is examined by comparison, as well as the stromal reaction associated with cancer. New approaches to wound/scar therapy are discussed. © 2011 by the Wound Healing Society.

  11. The Living Scar – Cardiac Fibroblasts and the Injured Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Norris, Russell A; Kohl, Peter; Markwald, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac scars, often perceived as “dead” tissue, are very much alive, with heterocellular activity ensuring the maintenance of structural and mechanical integrity following heart injury. To form a scar, non-myocytes such as fibroblasts, proliferate and are recruited from intra- and extra-cardiac sources. Fibroblasts perform important autocrine and paracrine signalling functions. They also establish mechanical and, as is increasingly evident, electrical junctions with other cells. While fibroblasts were previously thought to act simply as electrical insulators, they may be electrically connected among themselves and, under certain circumstances, to other cells, including cardiomyocytes. A better understanding of these interactions will help target scar structure and function and facilitate the development of novel therapies aimed at modifying scar properties for patient benefit. This review explores available insight and recent concepts on fibroblast integration in the heart, and highlights potential avenues for harnessing their roles to optimise scar function following heart injury such as infarction, and therapeutic interventions such as ablation. PMID:26776094

  12. Inverse expression of olfactory cell adhesion molecule in a subset of olfactory axons and a subset of mitral/tufted cells in the developing rat main olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treloar, Helen B; Gabeau, Darlene; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Mori, Kensaku; Greer, Charles A

    2003-04-14

    The projection of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) axons from the olfactory epithelium (OE) to the olfactory bulb (OB) is highly organized but topographically complex. Evidence suggests that odorant receptor expression zones in the OE map to the OB about orthogonal axes. One candidate molecule for the formation of zone-specific targeting of OSN axon synapses onto the OB is the olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM). OCAM(+) OSNs are restricted to three of the four zones in the OE and project their axons to the ventral OB where they form synapses with mitral/tufted (M/T) cells. To determine when this zonal connection is established, we have examined OCAM expression in rat olfactory system, during seminal periods of glomerular formation. OCAM(+) axons sort out in the ventral olfactory nerve layer of the OB before glomerular formation. Surprisingly, OCAM was also expressed transiently by subsets of M/T cell dendrites located in the dorsal OB. The expression of OCAM by OSN axons and M/T dendrites was asymmetrical; in the dorsal OB, OCAM(-) OSN axons synapsed on OCAM(+) M/T dendrites, whereas in the ventral OB, OCAM(+) OSN axons synapsed on OCAM(-) M/T dendrites. The restricted spatial map of OCAM(+) M/T cells appeared earlier in development than the zonal segregation of OCAM(+) OSN axons. Thus, OCAM on M/T cell dendrites may act in a spatiotemporal window to specify regions of the developing rat OB, thereby establishing a foundation for mapping of the OE zonal organization onto the OB. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Scar resurfacing with high-energy, short-pulsed and flashscanning carbon dioxide lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, L J; Kauvar, A N; Grossman, M C; Geronemus, R G

    1998-01-01

    Scars have a significant effect on a person's physical and social being. Many treatment modalities for scar improvement such as surgical scar revision, electrosurgical planing, chemical peeling, filler substance implantation, and dermabrasion have been developed. Recently, the resurfacing carbon dioxide (CO2) laser systems have proven to be a useful and safe treatment in the treatment of facial rhytides and acne scarring. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the resurfacing CO2 lasers in the treatment of various surgical, traumatic, acne, and varicella scars. Thirty subjects, aging between 14 and 84 years, with surgical, traumatic, acne, or varicella scars were evaluated. Two types of resurfacing laser systems were utilized in this study, a high-energy, short-pulsed CO2 laser and a continuous wave CO2 laser with an optico-mechanical computer flash-scanner. Post-surgical scars were treated with laser resurfacing between 4 and 6 weeks after scar formation. Traumatic, acne, and varicella scars were treated after scar maturation (range, 1-10 years). Scar improvement was evaluated by photographic analysis of before and after images by four independent health care workers using a quartile scale of improvement ( 75%) as well as optical profilometry using silicone surface impressions in 12 scars. Twenty of 24 surgical scars had greater than 75% improvement, and 24 of 24 had greater than 50% improvement by photographic analysis. All six traumatic, acne and varicella scars had greater than 50% improvement. Optical profilometry and surface topography maps reveal a significant flattening of related and depressed scars. The high-energy, short-pulsed CO2 laser and the continuous wave CO2 laser with flash-scanning attachment are safe and effective as a treatment modality for scar revision. In general, elevated scars improve more dramatically than depressed scars.

  14. Disrupted compartmental organization of axons and dendrites within olfactory glomeruli of mice deficient in the olfactory cell adhesion molecule, OCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Andreas; Mombaerts, Peter; Greer, Charles A; Treloar, Helen B

    2006-01-01

    There is an overall topographic connectivity in the axonal projections of olfactory sensory neurons from the olfactory epithelium (OE) to the olfactory bulb (OB). The molecular determinants of this overall topographic OE-OB connectivity are not known. For 20 years, the intriguing expression pattern of the olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) has made it the leading candidate as determinant of overall topographic OE-OB connectivity. Here, we have generated a strain of OCAM knockout mice by gene targeting. There were no obvious alterations in the distribution of olfactory sensory neurons within the OE or in the coalescence of axons into specific glomeruli. However, the compartmental organization of dendrites and axons within the glomeruli was disrupted. Surprisingly, the mutant mice exhibited an increase in olfactory acuity; they appeared to have a better sense of smell. Thus, despite its striking expression pattern, OCAM is not essential for overall topographic OE-OB connectivity. Instead, OCAM is required for establishing or maintaining the compartmental organization and the segregation of axodendritic and dendrodendritic synapses within glomeruli.

  15. Interactions of Carbon Dioxide and Food Odours in Drosophila: Olfactory Hedonics and Sensory Neuron Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Cécile P.; Hilker, Monika; de Bruyne, Marien

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural responses of animals to volatiles in their environment are generally dependent on context. Most natural odours are mixtures of components that can each induce different behaviours when presented on their own. We have investigated how a complex of two olfactory stimuli is evaluated by Drosophila flies in a free-flying two-trap choice assay and how these stimuli are encoded in olfactory receptor neurons. We first observed that volatiles from apple cider vinegar attracted flies while carbon dioxide (CO2) was avoided, confirming their inherent positive and negative values. In contradiction with previous results obtained from walking flies in a four-field olfactometer, in the present assay the addition of CO2 to vinegar increased rather than decreased the attractiveness of vinegar. This effect was female-specific even though males and females responded similarly to CO2 and vinegar on their own. To test whether the female-specific behavioural response to the mixture correlated with a sexual dimorphism at the peripheral level we recorded from olfactory receptor neurons stimulated with vinegar, CO2 and their combination. Responses to vinegar were obtained from three neuron classes, two of them housed with the CO2-responsive neuron in ab1 sensilla. Sensitivity of these neurons to both CO2 and vinegar per se did not differ between males and females and responses from female neurons did not change when CO2 and vinegar were presented simultaneously. We also found that CO2-sensitive neurons are particularly well adapted to respond rapidly to small concentration changes irrespective of background CO2 levels. The ability to encode temporal properties of stimulations differs considerably between CO2- and vinegar-sensitive neurons. These properties may have important implications for in-flight navigation when rapid responses to fragmented odour plumes are crucial to locate odour sources. However, the flies’ sex-specific response to the CO2-vinegar combination and the

  16. Interactions of carbon dioxide and food odours in Drosophila: olfactory hedonics and sensory neuron properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile P Faucher

    Full Text Available Behavioural responses of animals to volatiles in their environment are generally dependent on context. Most natural odours are mixtures of components that can each induce different behaviours when presented on their own. We have investigated how a complex of two olfactory stimuli is evaluated by Drosophila flies in a free-flying two-trap choice assay and how these stimuli are encoded in olfactory receptor neurons. We first observed that volatiles from apple cider vinegar attracted flies while carbon dioxide (CO2 was avoided, confirming their inherent positive and negative values. In contradiction with previous results obtained from walking flies in a four-field olfactometer, in the present assay the addition of CO2 to vinegar increased rather than decreased the attractiveness of vinegar. This effect was female-specific even though males and females responded similarly to CO2 and vinegar on their own. To test whether the female-specific behavioural response to the mixture correlated with a sexual dimorphism at the peripheral level we recorded from olfactory receptor neurons stimulated with vinegar, CO2 and their combination. Responses to vinegar were obtained from three neuron classes, two of them housed with the CO2-responsive neuron in ab1 sensilla. Sensitivity of these neurons to both CO2 and vinegar per se did not differ between males and females and responses from female neurons did not change when CO2 and vinegar were presented simultaneously. We also found that CO2-sensitive neurons are particularly well adapted to respond rapidly to small concentration changes irrespective of background CO2 levels. The ability to encode temporal properties of stimulations differs considerably between CO2- and vinegar-sensitive neurons. These properties may have important implications for in-flight navigation when rapid responses to fragmented odour plumes are crucial to locate odour sources. However, the flies' sex-specific response to the CO2-vinegar

  17. Interactions of carbon dioxide and food odours in Drosophila: olfactory hedonics and sensory neuron properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Cécile P; Hilker, Monika; de Bruyne, Marien

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural responses of animals to volatiles in their environment are generally dependent on context. Most natural odours are mixtures of components that can each induce different behaviours when presented on their own. We have investigated how a complex of two olfactory stimuli is evaluated by Drosophila flies in a free-flying two-trap choice assay and how these stimuli are encoded in olfactory receptor neurons. We first observed that volatiles from apple cider vinegar attracted flies while carbon dioxide (CO2) was avoided, confirming their inherent positive and negative values. In contradiction with previous results obtained from walking flies in a four-field olfactometer, in the present assay the addition of CO2 to vinegar increased rather than decreased the attractiveness of vinegar. This effect was female-specific even though males and females responded similarly to CO2 and vinegar on their own. To test whether the female-specific behavioural response to the mixture correlated with a sexual dimorphism at the peripheral level we recorded from olfactory receptor neurons stimulated with vinegar, CO2 and their combination. Responses to vinegar were obtained from three neuron classes, two of them housed with the CO2-responsive neuron in ab1 sensilla. Sensitivity of these neurons to both CO2 and vinegar per se did not differ between males and females and responses from female neurons did not change when CO2 and vinegar were presented simultaneously. We also found that CO2-sensitive neurons are particularly well adapted to respond rapidly to small concentration changes irrespective of background CO2 levels. The ability to encode temporal properties of stimulations differs considerably between CO2- and vinegar-sensitive neurons. These properties may have important implications for in-flight navigation when rapid responses to fragmented odour plumes are crucial to locate odour sources. However, the flies' sex-specific response to the CO2-vinegar combination and the

  18. The effect of moisturizers or creams on scars: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Tanja; Munn, Zachary; Aromataris, Edoardo; Greenwood, John

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the review are to identify the effect of any moisturizers or creams (medicated or unmedicated) on immature scars (linear, keloid or hypertrophic) on any persons of any age. Effects will be assessed by changes in scar activity, changes in the final appearance/cosmesis of the scar, improvements in patient reported features of scars (e.g. itch, tightness, range of movement) and/or by altering measurable features of the scar such as vascularity, color, height, length, pliability and/or transepidermal water loss.Specifically the review question is: are moisturizers or creams effective in modifying immature scars?

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to scars: a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanier, Emiliano; Bordoni, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to carry out a narrative review regarding the approach to scars through complementary and alternative medicine focusing on osteopathy, naturopathy, and other minor methods and traditional rehabilitative medicines, such as physiotherapy and manual therapies. We analyzed the existing literature regarding the possible influences of techniques relaxing the diaphragm – both manual and psychophysical relaxing techniques – and the consequent local response to events leading to scar tissue healing. The objective of the study is to become a useful instrument of knowledge for those manual therapists and professionals who deal with patients affected by discontinuity of the skin surface due to trauma or surgery. This article also intends to stimulate research in order to find and propose new methods of scar treatment, taking into consideration the information gained so far from other complementary and alternative disciplines. PMID:26316774

  20. A TAP1 null mutation leads to an enlarged olfactory bulb and supernumerary, ectopic olfactory glomeruli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, Ernesto; Cruz, Nicole M.; Ly, Xuan; Welander, Beth A.; Hanson, Kyle; Kronberg, Eugene; Restrepo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility class I (MHCI) molecules are well known for their immunological role in mediating tissue graft rejection. Recently, these molecules were discovered to be expressed in distinct neuronal subclasses, dispelling the long-held tenet that the uninjured brain is immune-privileged. Here, we show that MHCI molecules are expressed in the main olfactory bulb (MOB) of adult animals. Furthermore, we find that mice with diminished levels of MHCI expression have enlarged MOBs containing an increased number of small, morphologically abnormal and ectopically located P2 glomeruli. These findings suggest that MHCI molecules may play an important role in the proper formation of glomeruli in the bulb. PMID:23697805

  1. Induction of Associative Olfactory Memory by Targeted Activation of Single Olfactory Neurons in Drosophila Larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Takato Honda; Chi-Yu Lee; Maki Yoshida-Kasikawa; Ken Honjo; Katsuo Furukubo-Tokunaga

    2014-01-01

    It has been postulated that associative memory is formed by at least two sets of external stimuli, CS and US, that are transmitted to the memory centers by distinctive conversing pathways. However, whether associative memory can be induced by the activation of only the olfactory CS and a biogenic amine-mediated US pathways remains to be elucidated. In this study, we substituted the reward signals with dTrpA1-mediated thermogenetic activation of octopaminergic neurons and the odor signals by C...

  2. System identification of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Anmo J; Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2011-02-01

    The lack of a deeper understanding of how olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) encode odors has hindered the progress in understanding the olfactory signal processing in higher brain centers. Here we employ methods of system identification to investigate the encoding of time-varying odor stimuli and their representation for further processing in the spike domain by Drosophila OSNs. In order to apply system identification techniques, we built a novel low-turbulence odor delivery system that allowed us to deliver airborne stimuli in a precise and reproducible fashion. The system provides a 1% tolerance in stimulus reproducibility and an exact control of odor concentration and concentration gradient on a millisecond time scale. Using this novel setup, we recorded and analyzed the in-vivo response of OSNs to a wide range of time-varying odor waveforms. We report for the first time that across trials the response of OR59b OSNs is very precise and reproducible. Further, we empirically show that the response of an OSN depends not only on the concentration, but also on the rate of change of the odor concentration. Moreover, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional (2D) Encoding Manifold in a concentration-concentration gradient space provides a quantitative description of the neuron's response. We then use the white noise system identification methodology to construct one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson (LNP) cascade models of the sensory neuron for a fixed mean odor concentration and fixed contrast. We show that in terms of predicting the intensity rate of the spike train, the 2D LNP model performs on par with the 1D LNP model, with a root mean-square error (RMSE) increase of about 5 to 10%. Surprisingly, we find that for a fixed contrast of the white noise odor waveforms, the nonlinear block of each of the two models changes with the mean input concentration. The shape of the nonlinearities of both the 1D and the 2D LNP model appears to be

  3. Centrifugal telencephalic afferent connections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; de Moya-Pinilla, Miguel; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2012-01-01

    Parallel to the olfactory system, most mammals possess an accessory olfactory or vomeronasal system. The olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, which in turn project to adjacent areas of the telencephalon, respectively. New data indicate that projections arising from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs partially converge in the rostral telencephalon and are non-overlapping at caudal telencephalic levels. Therefore, the basal telencephalon should be reclassified in olfactory, vomeronasal, and mixed areas. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that virtually all olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures send reciprocal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Further, non-chemosensory recipient structures also projects centrifugally to the olfactory bulbs. These feed-back projections appear to be essential modulating processing of chemosensory information. The present work aims at characterizing centrifugal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs arising from olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic areas. This issue has been addressed by using tracer injections in the rat and mouse brain. Tracer injections were delivered into the main and accessory olfactory bulbs as well as in olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic structures. The results confirm that olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Interestingly, olfactory (e.g., piriform cortex), vomeronasal (e.g., posteromedial cortical amygdala), mixed (e.g., the anterior medial amygdaloid nucleus), and non-chemosensory-recipient (e.g., the nucleus of the diagonal band) structures project to the main and to the accessory olfactory bulbs thus providing the possibility of simultaneous modulation and interaction of both systems at different stages of chemosensory processing

  4. Organization and distribution of glomeruli in the bowhead whale olfactory bulb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takushi Kishida

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although modern baleen whales (Mysticeti retain a functional olfactory system that includes olfactory bulbs, cranial nerve I and olfactory receptor genes, their olfactory capabilities have been reduced to a great degree. This reduction likely occurred as a selective response to their fully aquatic lifestyle. The glomeruli that occur in the olfactory bulb can be divided into two non-overlapping domains, a dorsal domain and a ventral domain. Recent molecular studies revealed that all modern whales have lost olfactory receptor genes and marker genes that are specific to the dorsal domain. Here we show that olfactory bulbs of bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus lack glomeruli on the dorsal side, consistent with the molecular data. In addition, we estimate that there are more than 4,000 glomeruli elsewhere in the bowhead whale olfactory bulb, which is surprising given that bowhead whales possess only 80 intact olfactory receptor genes. Olfactory sensory neurons that express the same olfactory receptors in rodents generally project to two specific glomeruli in an olfactory bulb, implying an approximate 1:2 ratio of the number of olfactory receptors to the number of glomeruli. Here we show that this ratio does not apply to bowhead whales, reiterating the conceptual limits of using rodents as model organisms for understanding the initial coding of odor information among mammals.

  5. A group's physical attractiveness is greater than the average attractiveness of its members : The group attractiveness effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Y.M.J.; Blanken, Irene; Meijs, Maartje H. J.; van Wolferen, Job

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether the perceived physical attractiveness of a group is greater than the average attractiveness of its members. In nine studies, we find evidence for the so-called group attractiveness effect (GA-effect), using female, male, and mixed-gender groups, indicating that group impressions of

  6. Current Therapeutic Approach to Hypertrophic Scar/span>s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokos, Zrinka Bukvić; Jović, Anamaria; Grgurević, Lovorka; Dumić-Čule, Ivo; Kostović, Krešimir; Čeović, Romana; Marinović, Branka

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal scarring and its accompanying esthetic, functional, and psychological sequelae still pose significant challe nges. To date, there is no satisfactory prevention or treatment option for hypertrophic scar/span>s (HSs), which is mostly due to not completely comprehending the mechanisms underlying their formation. That is why the apprehension of regular and controlled physiological processes of scar formation is of utmost importance when facing hypertrophic scarring, its pathophysiology, prevention, and therapeutic approach. When treating HSs and choosing the best treatment and prevention modality, physicians can choose from a plethora of therapeutic options and many commercially available products, among which currently there is no efficient option that can successfully overcome impaired skin healing. This article reviews current therapeutic approach and emerging therapeutic strategies for the management of HSs, which should be individualized, based on an evaluation of the scar itself, patients’ expectations, and practical, evidence-based guidelines. Clinicians are encouraged to combine various prevention and treatment modalities where combination therapy that includes steroid injections, 5-fluorouracil, and pulsed-dye laser seems to be the most effective. On the other hand, the current therapeutic options are usually empirical and their results are unreliable and unpredictable. Therefore, there is an unmet need for an effective, targeted therapy and prevention, which would be based on an action or a modulation of a particular factor with clarified mechanism of action that has a beneficial effect on wound healing. As the extracellular matrix has a crucial role in cellular and extracellular events that lead to pathological scarring, targeting its components mostly by regulating bone morphogenetic proteins may throw up new therapeutic approach for reduction or prevention of HSs with functionally and cosmetically acceptable outcome. PMID:28676850

  7. Molecular attraction of condensed bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derjaguin, B. V.; Abrikosova, I. I.; Lifshitz, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    From the Editorial Board. As a contribution to commemorating the 100th anniversary of the birth of Evgenii Mikhailovich Lifshitz, it was found appropriate by the Editorial Board of Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (UFN) [Physics-Uspekhi] journal that the materials of the jubilee-associated Scientific Session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences published in this issue (pp. 877-905) be augmented by the review paper "Molecular attraction of condensed bodies" reproduced from a 1958 UFN issue. Included in this review, in addition to an account by Evgenii Mikhailovich Lifshitz of his theory of molecular attractive forces between condensed bodies (first published in Zhurnal Eksperimental'noi i Teoreticheskoi Fiziki (ZhETF) in 1955 and in its English translation Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics (JETP) in 1956), is a summary of a series of experimental studies beginning in 1949 by Irina Igorevna Abrikosova at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR in a laboratory led by Boris Vladimirovich Derjaguin (1902-1994), a Corresponding Member of the USSR Academy of Sciences. In 1958, however, UFN was not yet available in English translation, so the material of the review is insufficiently accessible to the present-day English-speaking reader. This is the reason why the UFN Editorial Board decided to contribute to celebrating the 100th anniversary of E M Lifshitz's birthday by reproducing on the journal's pages a 1958 review paper which contains both E M Lifshitz's theory itself and the experimental data that underpinned it (for an account of how Evgenii Mikhailovich Lifshitz was enlisted to explain the experimental results of I I Abrikosova and B V Derjaguin, see the letter to the editors N P Danilova on page 925 of this jubilee collection of publications).

  8. Using insect electroantennogram sensors on autonomous robots for olfactory searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Dominique; Arhidi, Lotfi; Demondion, Elodie; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Lucas, Philippe

    2014-08-04

    Robots designed to track chemical leaks in hazardous industrial facilities or explosive traces in landmine fields face the same problem as insects foraging for food or searching for mates: the olfactory search is constrained by the physics of turbulent transport. The concentration landscape of wind borne odors is discontinuous and consists of sporadically located patches. A pre-requisite to olfactory search is that intermittent odor patches are detected. Because of its high speed and sensitivity, the olfactory organ of insects provides a unique opportunity for detection. Insect antennae have been used in the past to detect not only sex pheromones but also chemicals that are relevant to humans, e.g., volatile compounds emanating from cancer cells or toxic and illicit substances. We describe here a protocol for using insect antennae on autonomous robots and present a proof of concept for tracking odor plumes to their source. The global response of olfactory neurons is recorded in situ in the form of electroantennograms (EAGs). Our experimental design, based on a whole insect preparation, allows stable recordings within a working day. In comparison, EAGs on excised antennae have a lifetime of 2 hr. A custom hardware/software interface was developed between the EAG electrodes and a robot. The measurement system resolves individual odor patches up to 10 Hz, which exceeds the time scale of artificial chemical sensors. The efficiency of EAG sensors for olfactory searches is further demonstrated in driving the robot toward a source of pheromone. By using identical olfactory stimuli and sensors as in real animals, our robotic platform provides a direct means for testing biological hypotheses about olfactory coding and search strategies. It may also prove beneficial for detecting other odorants of interests by combining EAGs from different insect species in a bioelectronic nose configuration or using nanostructured gas sensors that mimic insect antennae.

  9. Early olfactory environment influences social behaviour in adult Octodon degus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Márquez

    Full Text Available We evaluated the extent to which manipulation of early olfactory environment can influence social behaviours in the South American Hystricognath rodent Octodon degus. The early olfactory environment of newborn degus was manipulated by scenting all litter members with eucalyptol during the first month of life. The social behaviour of sexually mature animals (5-7 months old towards conspecifics was then assessed using a y-maze to compare the response of control (naïve and treated animals to two different olfactory configurations (experiment 1: (i a non-familiarized conspecific impregnated with eucalyptol (eucalyptol arm presented against (ii a non-familiarized unscented conspecific (control arm. In addition, in dyadic encounters, we assessed the behaviour of control and eucalyptol treated animals towards a non-familiarized conspecific scented with eucalyptol (experiment 2. We found that control subjects explored and spent significantly less time in the eucalyptol arm, indicating neophobic behaviours towards the artificially scented conspecific. Treated subjects explored and spent similar time in both arms of the maze, showing the same interest for both olfactory stimuli presented. During dyadic encounters in experiment 2, an interaction effect between early experience and sex was observed. Control males escaped and avoided their scented partner more frequently than eucalyptol treated male subjects and than females. Both groups did not differ in the exploration of their scented partners, suggesting that avoidance within agonistic context does not relate to neophobic behaviours. Our results suggest that the exposure to eucalyptol during early ontogeny decreases evasive behaviours within an agonistic context as a result of olfactory learning. Altogether, these results indicate that olfactory cues learned in early ontogeny can influence olfactory-guided behaviours in adult degus.

  10. Expression of olfactory signaling genes in the eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Pronin

    Full Text Available To advance our understanding how the outer eye interacts with its environment, we asked which cellular receptors are expressed in the cornea, focusing on G protein-coupled receptors.Total RNA from the mouse cornea was subjected to next-generation sequencing using the Illumina platform. The data was analyzed with TopHat and CuffLinks software packages. Expression of a representative group of genes detected by RNA-seq was further analyzed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization using RNAscope technology and fluorescent microscopy.We generated more than 46 million pair-end reads from mouse corneal RNA. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the mouse corneal transcriptome reconstructed from these reads represents over 10,000 gene transcripts. We identified 194 GPCR transcripts, of which 96 were putative olfactory receptors. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the presence of several olfactory receptors and related genes, including olfactory marker protein and the G protein associated with olfaction, Gαolf. In situ hybridization showed that mRNA for olfactory marker protein, Gαolf and possibly some olfactory receptors were found in the corneal epithelial cells. In addition to the corneal epithelium, Gαolf was present in the ganglionic and inner nuclear layers of the retina. One of the olfactory receptors, Olfr558, was present primarily in vessels of the eye co-stained with antibodies against alpha-smooth muscle actin, indicating expression in arterioles.Several species of mRNA encoding putative olfactory receptors and related genes are expressed in the mouse cornea and other parts of the eye indicating they may play a role in sensing chemicals in the ocular environment.

  11. Ethmoidectomy combined with superior meatus enlargement increases olfactory airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kenji; Nomura, Tsutomu; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The relationship between a particular surgical technique in endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) and airflow changes in the post‐operative olfactory region has not been assessed. The present study aimed to compare olfactory airflow after ESS between conventional ethmoidectomy and ethmoidectomy with superior meatus enlargement, using virtual ESS and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Study Design Prospective computational study. Materials and Methods Nasal computed tomography images of four adult subjects were used to generate models of the nasal airway. The original preoperative model was digitally edited as virtual ESS by performing uncinectomy, ethmoidectomy, antrostomy, and frontal sinusotomy. The following two post‐operative models were prepared: conventional ethmoidectomy with normal superior meatus (ESS model) and ethmoidectomy with superior meatus enlargement (ESS‐SM model). The calculated three‐dimensional nasal geometries were confirmed using virtual endoscopy to ensure that they corresponded to the post‐operative anatomy observed in the clinical setting. Steady‐state, laminar, inspiratory airflow was simulated, and the velocity, streamline, and mass flow rate in the olfactory region were compared among the preoperative and two postoperative models. Results The mean velocity in the olfactory region, number of streamlines bound to the olfactory region, and mass flow rate were higher in the ESS‐SM model than in the other models. Conclusion We successfully used an innovative approach involving virtual ESS, virtual endoscopy, and CFD to assess postoperative outcomes after ESS. It is hypothesized that the increased airflow to the olfactory fossa achieved with ESS‐SM may lead to improved olfactory function; however, further studies are required. Level of Evidence NA. PMID:28894833

  12. Digital imaging analysis of scar aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Jonathan H; Jay, Gregory D; Schmidt, Scott T; Oh, Albert K; Reinert, Steven E; Zabbo, Christopher P

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic outcome is an important end point of wound care. The purpose of this study was to compare a wound aesthetic scoring system by emergency physicians, patients, and digital imaging by blinded plastic surgeons. The goal was to see if digital photography could accurately analyze the aesthetics of closed lacerations for future research. This was a subanalysis of a prospective, randomized trial conducted in an urban, academic emergency department. Patients aged 18 to 100 years were included if they had simple, uncomplicated lacerations 8 hours old or less located on the trunk, head or neck (not scalp), or extremities that required repair by sutures. Exclusion criteria included immunocompromised state of health, a complicated laceration, specialty consultant intervention in management of the wound, or current use of or need for antibiotics for wound prophylaxis. Complicated lacerations were defined in the article. Infection outcomes, demographics, and aesthetic outcomes were assessed. Scar appearance was assessed at 3 to 4 months after closure using a previously validated 0-to 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) score and 6-point wound evaluation score (WES) done by 2 trained emergency physicians (MD1 and MD2). Patients also performed self-VAS (VAS(Pt)), whereas VAS was done using digital imaging by 2 trained plastic surgeons (VAS(Plast1) and VAS(Plast2)). Data were evaluated when both plastic surgeons independently believed that the digital images were able to be adequately scored. Pearson correlation coefficients were performed using mean values. Three- to 4-month VAS(MD) and WES(MD) follow-up was obtained in 66 of 175 (37.7%), 3- to 4-month VAS(Pt) follow-up was obtained in 70 of 175 (40.0%), and 3- to 4-month digital imaging assessment was obtained in 66 of 175 (37.7%). Digital images were evaluated for VAS(Plast) in 34 of 66 (51.5%). Mean scores for VAS(MD1) and VAS(MD2) were 84.2 (SD, 12.4) mm and 87.8 (SD, 10.5) mm. Mean scores for WES(MD1) and WES(MD2) were

  13. Disfiguring scarring following mesotherapy-associated Mycobacterium cosmeticum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Kenneth; Waibel, Jill

    2009-04-01

    Mesotherapy is a popular procedure that poses risks that include scarring, contour changes and bacterial infections. The benefits of the procedure remain to be objectively delineated in a placebo-controlled, blinded study. Despite the lack of evidence to support its use, it is marketed as a "nonsurgical and safe" way to remove fat. The authors report a case of mycobacterial infection resulting from mesotherapy. This infection should be considered when a patient presents with a mesotherapy complication and should be discussed with the patient prior to the procedure. Options for treatment of the scarring are considered.

  14. Scars of Invariant Manifolds in Interacting Few-Body Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Papenbrock, T; Weidenmüller, H A

    1997-01-01

    We present a novel extension of the concept of scars for the wave functions of classically chaotic few--body systems of identical particles with rotation and permutation symmetry. Generically there exist manifolds in classical phase space which are invariant under the action of a common subgroup of these two symmetries. Such manifolds are associated with highly symmetric configurations and, if sufficiently stable, support quantum resonances. Although not directly associated to individual periodic orbits, the resonances nevertheless cause scars which signify collective motion on the quantum level and which should be experimentally observable.

  15. Recontouring, resurfacing, and scar revision in skin cancer reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Michael J; Perro, Christopher A

    2009-08-01

    Residual disfigurement is a common problem for patients who have undergone skin cancer reconstruction. Restoring form and function in these patients is an artistic and technical endeavor. The efficacy of surgical scar revision, dermabrasion, chemical peels, and laser resurfacing is predicated upon the skin's innate ability to regenerate over time in response to mechanical, chemical, and thermal or ablative stresses. The patient and surgeon should be accepting of a process that is often gradual and may proceed in stages. Achieving proficiency with the secondary procedures for improving scars and local flaps may allow the motivated surgeon to mold an initially passable surgical result into an excellent one.

  16. Eccrine syringofibroadenoma in a patient with a burn scar ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, E; Fujisawa, Y; Tateishi, Y; Imakado, S; Otsuka, F

    2000-09-01

    A 72-year-old woman with a burn scar on the calves of both legs developed an ulcer on her right heel, surrounded by multiple verrucous nodules and plaques. She had experienced similar verrucous lesions on both legs in the burn scar areas. Although the clinical diagnosis was Marjolin's ulcer, histologically the ulcer region showed thick fibrous tissue without any atypical epithelial cells. The verrucous lesions were consistent with the diagnosis of eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA). Moreover, an ESFA-like growth pattern was seen in the elevated margin of the ulcer. Our findings suggest that these lesions developed as a result of reactive eccrine duct hyperplasia followed by skin tissue remodelling.

  17. Disentangling visual and olfactory signals in mushroom-mimicking Dracula orchids using realistic three-dimensional printed flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policha, Tobias; Davis, Aleah; Barnadas, Melinda; Dentinger, Bryn T M; Raguso, Robert A; Roy, Bitty A

    2016-05-01

    Flowers use olfactory and visual signals to communicate with pollinators. Disentangling the relative contributions and potential synergies between signals remains a challenge. Understanding the perceptual biases exploited by floral mimicry illuminates the evolution of these signals. Here, we disentangle the olfactory and visual components of Dracula lafleurii, which mimics mushrooms in size, shape, color and scent, and is pollinated by mushroom-associated flies. To decouple signals, we used three-dimensional printing to produce realistic artificial flower molds that were color matched and cast using scent-free surgical silicone, to which we could add scent. We used GC-MS to measure scents in co-occurring mushrooms, and related orchids, and used these scents in field experiments. By combining silicone flower parts with real floral organs, we created chimeras that identified the mushroom-like labellum as a source of volatile attraction. In addition, we showed remarkable overlap in the volatile chemistry between D. lafleurii and co-occurring mushrooms. The characters defining the genus Dracula - a mushroom-like, 'gilled' labellum and a showy, patterned calyx - enhance pollinator attraction by exploiting the visual and chemosensory perceptual biases of drosophilid flies. Our techniques for the manipulation of complex traits in a nonmodel system not conducive to gene silencing or selective breeding are useful for other systems. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Scar-free cutaneous wound healing in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Hanna M; Gilbert, Emily A B; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal with two possible outcomes: scarification or near-perfect integumentary restoration. Whereas scar formation has been intensively investigated, less is known about the tissue-level events characterising wounds that spontaneously heal scar-free, particularly in non-foetal amniotes. Here, a spatiotemporal investigation of scar-free cutaneous wound healing following full-thickness excisional biopsies to the tail and body of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) is provided. All injuries healed without scarring. Cutaneous repair involves the development of a cell-rich aggregate within the wound bed, similar to scarring wounds. Unlike scar formation, scar-free healing involves a more rapid closure of the wound epithelium, and a delay in blood vessel development and collagen deposition within the wound bed. It was found that, while granulation tissue of scarring wounds is hypervascular, scar-free wound healing conspicuously does not involve a period of exuberant blood vessel formation. In addition, during scar-free wound healing the newly formed blood vessels are typically perivascular cell-supported. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread expression of both the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor A and the anti-angiogenic factor thrombospondin-1 within the healing wound. It was found that scar-free wound healing is an intrinsic property of leopard gecko integument, and involves a modulation of the cutaneous scar repair program. This proportional revascularisation is an important factor in scar-free wound healing. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Acne Scarring Among Patients Consulting Dermatologists in the Unites States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jerry; Kang, Sewon; Leyden, James

    2017-02-01

    Although there have been few formal studies, scarring is a known bothersome companion of acne vulgaris. We performed a prospective study of subjects consulting a dermatologist for active acne to assess the frequency of acne scarring. Investigators performed a short questionnaire on all acne patients seen at their office for one consecutive 5-day work week to assess scar frequency. Additionally, the first four subjects with acne scars identified were enrolled for a second phase (scar cohort) of the study during which the investigator collected further medical history and performed a clinical evaluation and the patient completed a self-administered questionnaire about scar perceptions and impact on quality of life. A total of 1,972 subjects were evaluated by 120 investigators. Among these, 43 percent (n=843) had acne scarring. Subjects with acne scars were significantly more likely to have severe or very severe acne (P less than .01); however, 69% of the subjects with acne scars had mild or moderate acne at the time of the study visit. Risk factors correlated with increased likelihood of scarring were acne severity, time between acne onset and first effective treatment, relapsing acne, and male gender. Treatments that can completely resolve acne scars are not yet available - prevention and early treatment remain a primary strategy against scars. It is vital for clinicians who manage individuals with acne to institute effective therapy as early as possible, since treatment delay is a key modifiable risk factor for scarring. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(2):97-102..

  20. Outcome of dermal grafting in the management of atrophic facial scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanathur Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scars over the face are cosmetically and psychologically disturbing. Various techniques have been described and are being practiced in the management of these scars. Aims and Objectives: This study was undertaken to study the safety, effectiveness of using dermal grafts as fillers in the management of facial scars due to acne, chickenpox, trauma or any others. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with atrophic facial scars of varied aetiology and willing for surgery were considered for dermal graft technique. After pre-operative workup, subcision was done 2 weeks before planned surgery. Depending on the type of scar, grafts were inserted using pocket or road railing techniques. Scar improvement was assessed based on patient satisfaction. Results: Linear scars showed excellent improvement. Acne, varicella and traumatic scars also showed good improvement. However, two patients did not appreciate improvement due to marked surface irregularities as the scars were elevated. They were further subjected to LASER and chemical peel resurfacing. Conclusion: Dermal grafting can be used in the management of any round to oval facial scar which is soft, prominent and at least 4-5 mm across; linear scars at least 2-3 mm across and 3-4 cm in length. However, scars with prominent surface irregularities need further resurfacing techniques along with dermal grafting. Limitations: Limitations of the study include small sample size, and only subjective assessment of the scar has been taken into consideration to assess the outcome.