WorldWideScience

Sample records for scanning tunneling imaging

  1. Electric field effects in scanning tunneling microscope imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Quaade, Ulrich; Grey, Francois

    1998-01-01

    We present a high-voltage extension of the Tersoff-Hamann theory of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images, which includes the effect of the electric field between the tip and the sample. The theoretical model is based on first-principles electronic structure calculations and has no adjustable...

  2. New approach towards imaging λ-DNA using scanning tunneling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. A new methodology to anchor λ-DNA to silanized n-Si(111) surface using Langmuir Blodget trough was developed. The n-Si (111) was silanized by treating it with low molecular weight octyltrichlorosi- lane in toluene. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) image of λ-DNA on octyltrichlorosilane deposited Si.

  3. New approach towards imaging λ-DNA using scanning tunneling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new methodology to anchor -DNA to silanized -Si(111) surface using Langmuir Blodget trough was developed. The -Si (111) was silanized by treating it with low molecular weight octyltrichlorosilane in toluene. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) image of -DNA on octyltrichlorosilane deposited Si substrate ...

  4. Imaging of surface plasmon polariton interference using phase-sensitive scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2011-01-01

    We report the surface plasmon polariton interference, generated via a ‘buried’ gold grating, and imaged using a phase-sensitive Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope (PSTM). The phase-resolved PSTM measurement unravels the complex surface plasmon polariton interference fields at the gold-air

  5. Covalently Immobilised Cytochrome C Imaged by In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Olesen, Klaus G.; Danilov, Alexey I.

    1997-01-01

    In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging of cytochrome c (cyt c) on polycrystalline Pt surfaces and on Au(lll) was achieved first by covalent immobilisation of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTS) brought to react with oxide present on the Pt surfaces. Covalently bound 3-APTS forms a...

  6. Restoration of images from the scanning-tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaram, A. C.; Persad, N.; Lasenby, J.; Fitzgerald, W. J.; McKinnon, A.; Welland, M.

    1995-08-01

    During the acquisition of an image from any probe microscope instrument, various noise sources cause distortion in the observed image. It is often the case that impulsive disturbances cause bright groups of pixels to replace the actual image data in these locations. Furthermore, the images from a probe microscope show some amount of blurring caused both by the instrument function and the material properties. In almost all image-processing applications it is important to remove any impulsive distortion that may be present before deblurring can be attempted. We give a technique for detecting these impulses and reconstructing the image. This technique is superior to the standard global application of median filters for the case considered. The reconstruction is limited only to the affected regions and therefore results in a much sharper and more meaningful image. With the assumption of Gaussian blur it is then possible to propose several different deblurring methodologies. We present a novel Wiener-filter deblurring implementation and compare it to both maximum-entropy and Richardson-Lucy deblurring.

  7. Imaging by Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Deconvolution Resolving More Details of Surfaces Nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    to crystallographic-surface structures. Within the wide range of new technologies, those images surface features, the electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) provides means of atomic resolution where the tip participates actively in the process of imaging. Two metallic surfaces influence ions trapped.......g., nanoelectronics and single-molecule probing. In principle, the ESTM is capable of sub-atomic resolution but many details at this level of magnification need further treatment of recorded data before real information is obtained. Deconvolution of the data according to the instrument response may explain some...

  8. Doppler-scanning tunneling microscopy current imaging in superconductor-ferromagnet hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, S. A.; Plummer, G.; Fedor, J.; Pearson, J. E.; Novosad, V.; Karapetrov, G.; Iavarone, M.

    2016-01-25

    Mapping the distribution of currents inside a superconductor is usually performed indirectly through imaging of the stray magnetic fields above the surface. Here, we show that by direct imaging of the Doppler shift contribution to the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the superconductor using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, we obtain directly the distribution of supercurrents inside the superconductor. We demonstrate the technique at the example of superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structure that produces intricate current pattern consisting of combination Meissner shielding currents and Abrikosov vortex currents.

  9. Introduction to scanning tunneling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C Julian

    2008-01-01

    The scanning tunneling and the atomic force microscope, both capable of imaging individual atoms, were crowned with the Physics Nobel Prize in 1986, and are the cornerstones of nanotechnology today. This is a thoroughly updated version of this 'bible' in the field.

  10. Molecular images and vibrational spectroscopy of sorbic acid with the scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas P. E.; Kirk, Michael D.; Quate, Calvin F.

    1987-06-01

    Images of sorbic acid molecules absorbed onto graphite have been taken with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in liquid helium. Molecular clusters were clearly observed, as was the atomic structure of the graphite substrate. The molecules were seen to diffuse across the substrate at a rate of about 1 Å/min. When dI/dV vs V was measured with the STM probe directly over a sorbic acid molecule, a well-defined spectrum of peaks was obtained whose energies corresponded to the vibrational resonances of the molecule. Large changes in the spectra occurred if the tip was moved a lateral distance of 5 Å.

  11. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Manson-Smith, S K

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provi...

  12. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  13. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    based on a slab model for the metal surface. The ordered monolayer offers a platform for submolecular scale electronic mapping that is an issue of fundamental interest but remains a challenge in STM imaging science and surface chemistry. Single Cys molecules were mapped as three electronic subunits......We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry...... contributed mainly from three chemical moieties: thiol (-SH), carboxylic (-COOH), and amine (-NH2) groups. The contrasts of the three subunits depend on the environment (e.g., pH), which affects the electronic structure of adsorbed species. From the DFT computations focused on single molecules, rational...

  14. Imaging by in situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy and its Nanotechnological Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2002-01-01

    in the interpretation of the imaging procedure. Other methods of in situ Scanning Probe Microscopy (in situ SPM), such as in situ Scanning Force Microscopy (in situ AFM) are considered for the sake of comparison and they are applied to imaging of non-conducting systems. Major results include demonstration of atomic...

  15. Low Temperature Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Michael Dominic

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was designed and built to operate at liquid helium temperature and was used to measure highly localized electron tunneling spectroscopy. Several instruments were built, all capable of operating in many different environments: air, vacuum, liquid helium and in a transfer gas. An adaptation of one particular design was made into an atomic force microscope capable of operating at low temperatures. Using a low temperature STM, three adsorbed molecular species (liquid crystals, sorbic acid, and carbon monoxide), deposited on a graphite substrate, have been imaged at 4.2K. The inelastic tunneling spectra of these adsorbates show strong peaks in dI/dV vs V curves at energies that correspond to known vibrational modes. The increase in conductance at the onset of inelastic tunneling was measured to be as high as 100 times. The spatial variation of the spectra was measured and was seen to change dramatically on the scale of angstroms, suggesting that individual molecular bonds could be measured. A theoretical model is presented to explain the contrast seen in the STM images of adsorbed molecules, thereby explaining why adsorbed molecules appear to be more conductive than the background. The microscope proved very useful for measuring the energy gap of high temperature superconductors. These materials often have submicron grain sizes. For LaSrCuO, YBaCuO, and BiCaSrCuO, the conductance curves showed a large energy gap suggesting a strongly coupled superconductor. The conductance curves also indicated that intergrain tunneling may occur and that the background conductance varied linearly with the applied voltage. The crystalline structure of rm Bi_2 Sr_2 CaCu_2 O_ {8 + delta} was imaged by an STM operating in air and in ultra-high vacuum. From the STM images the bulk crystal structure model for this material was refined. Finally, the STM was used to make holes reproducibly on a graphite surface with diameters less than 40A. Because the

  16. A high-stability scanning tunneling microscope achieved by an isolated tiny scanner with low voltage imaging capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Junting; Lu, Qingyou, E-mail: qxl@ustc.edu.cn [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hou, Yubin [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2013-11-15

    We present a novel homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with high quality atomic resolution. It is equipped with a small but powerful GeckoDrive piezoelectric motor which drives a miniature and detachable scanning part to implement coarse approach. The scanning part is a tiny piezoelectric tube scanner (industry type: PZT-8, whose d{sub 31} coefficient is one of the lowest) housed in a slightly bigger polished sapphire tube, which is riding on and spring clamped against the knife edges of a tungsten slot. The STM so constructed shows low back-lashing and drifting and high repeatability and immunity to external vibrations. These are confirmed by its low imaging voltages, low distortions in the spiral scanned images, and high atomic resolution quality even when the STM is placed on the ground of the fifth floor without any external or internal vibration isolation devices.

  17. A high-stability scanning tunneling microscope achieved by an isolated tiny scanner with low voltage imaging capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Hou, Yubin; Wang, Junting; Lu, Qingyou

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with high quality atomic resolution. It is equipped with a small but powerful GeckoDrive piezoelectric motor which drives a miniature and detachable scanning part to implement coarse approach. The scanning part is a tiny piezoelectric tube scanner (industry type: PZT-8, whose d31 coefficient is one of the lowest) housed in a slightly bigger polished sapphire tube, which is riding on and spring clamped against the knife edges of a tungsten slot. The STM so constructed shows low back-lashing and drifting and high repeatability and immunity to external vibrations. These are confirmed by its low imaging voltages, low distortions in the spiral scanned images, and high atomic resolution quality even when the STM is placed on the ground of the fifth floor without any external or internal vibration isolation devices.

  18. Perspectives for in situ Scanning Tunnel Microscopic Imaging of Proteins at HOPG surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Møller, Per

    1996-01-01

    potentials on in situ potentiostatic control and releases nm size HOPG scrap bits. These are clearly different in shape from the ex situ imaged molecular-size structures. Laccase could not, however, be imaged by in situ STM, most likely due to structural incompatibility between hydrophobic HOPG surface......We have investigated the behaviour of the four-copper fungal metalloenzyme laccase (MW~68kDa) at highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by ex situ and in situ STM. The four copper atoms ar suited to stimulate long-range inelastic tunnel modes through the protein. The proteins forms...... crystalline or amorphous structures of micro-meter lateral extension during evaporation of aqueous laccase solution at low ionic strength. Individual molecular-size structures distinct from the HOPG background, and possibly arising from tip dislodging can also be imaged. The HOPG surface cracks at certain...

  19. In situ scanning tunneling microscope tip treatment device for spin polarization imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-Ping [Oak Ridge, TN; Jianxing, Ma [Oak Ridge, TN; Shen, Jian [Knoxville, TN

    2008-04-22

    A tip treatment device for use in an ultrahigh vacuum in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The device provides spin polarization functionality to new or existing variable temperature STM systems. The tip treatment device readily converts a conventional STM to a spin-polarized tip, and thereby converts a standard STM system into a spin-polarized STM system. The tip treatment device also has functions of tip cleaning and tip flashing a STM tip to high temperature (>2000.degree. C.) in an extremely localized fashion. Tip coating functions can also be carried out, providing the tip sharp end with monolayers of coating materials including magnetic films. The device is also fully compatible with ultrahigh vacuum sample transfer setups.

  20. Analysis and Calibration of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy Images with atomic Resolution Influenced by Surface Drift Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    The influence of surface drift velocities on in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) experiments with atomic resolution is analysed experimentally and mathematically. Constant drift velocities much smaller than the speed of scanning can in many in situ STM experiments with atomic resolution...... result in an apparent surface reconstruction. It is shown that a surface atomic structure can be distorted and observed as another atomic structure entirely owing to a constant drift velocity in the plane of the surface. The image can be resolved mathematically and the components of the drift velocity...... as well as the vectors of the non-distorted surface lattice can be determined. The calibration of distances can thus be carried out also when the image is influenced by drift. Results with gold surfaces and graphite surfaces are analysed and discussed....

  1. High-Resolution Imaging of Polyethylene Glycol Coated Dendrimers via Combined Atomic Force and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Riechers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers have shown great promise as drug delivery vehicles in recent years because they can be synthesized with designed size and functionalities for optimal transportation, targeting, and biocompatibility. One of the most well-known termini used for biocompatibility is polyethylene glycol (PEG, whose performance is affected by its actual conformation. However, the conformation of individual PEG bound to soft materials such as dendrimers has not been directly observed. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, this work characterizes the structure adopted by PEGylated dendrimers with the highest resolution reported to date. AFM imaging enables visualization of the individual dendrimers, as well as the differentiation and characterization of the dendrimer core and PEG shell. STM provides direct imaging of the PEG extensions with high-resolution. Collectively, this investigation provides important insight into the structure of coated dendrimers, which is crucial for the design and development of better drug delivery vehicles.

  2. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bode, M

    2003-01-01

    The recent experimental progress in spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy (SP-STM) - a magnetically sensitive imaging technique with ultra-high resolution - is reviewed. The basics of spin-polarized electron tunnelling are introduced as they have been investigated in planar tunnel junctions for different electrode materials, i.e. superconductors, optically excited GaAs, and ferromagnets. It is shown that ferromagnets and antiferromagnets are suitable tip materials for the realization of SP-STM. Possible tip designs and modes of operations are discussed for both classes of materials. The results of recent spatially resolved measurements as performed with different magnetic probe tips and using different modes of operation are reviewed and discussed in terms of applicability to surfaces, thin films, and nanoparticles. The limits of spatial resolution, and the impact of an external magnetic field on the imaging process.

  3. Conductivity map from scanning tunneling potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Xianqi; Chen, Yunmei; Durand, Corentin; Li, An-Ping; Zhang, X-G

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel method for extracting two-dimensional (2D) conductivity profiles from large electrochemical potential datasets acquired by scanning tunneling potentiometry of a 2D conductor. The method consists of a data preprocessing procedure to reduce/eliminate noise and a numerical conductivity reconstruction. The preprocessing procedure employs an inverse consistent image registration method to align the forward and backward scans of the same line for each image line followed by a total variation (TV) based image restoration method to obtain a (nearly) noise-free potential from the aligned scans. The preprocessed potential is then used for numerical conductivity reconstruction, based on a TV model solved by accelerated alternating direction method of multiplier. The method is demonstrated on a measurement of the grain boundary of a monolayer graphene, yielding a nearly 10:1 ratio for the grain boundary resistivity over bulk resistivity.

  4. Conductivity map from scanning tunneling potentiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Xianqi; Chen, Yunmei; Durand, Corentin; Li, An-Ping; Zhang, X.-G.

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel method for extracting two-dimensional (2D) conductivity profiles from large electrochemical potential datasets acquired by scanning tunneling potentiometry of a 2D conductor. The method consists of a data preprocessing procedure to reduce/eliminate noise and a numerical conductivity reconstruction. The preprocessing procedure employs an inverse consistent image registration method to align the forward and backward scans of the same line for each image line followed by a total variation (TV) based image restoration method to obtain a (nearly) noise-free potential from the aligned scans. The preprocessed potential is then used for numerical conductivity reconstruction, based on a TV model solved by accelerated alternating direction method of multiplier. The method is demonstrated on a measurement of the grain boundary of a monolayer graphene, yielding a nearly 10:1 ratio for the grain boundary resistivity over bulk resistivity.

  5. Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch...

  6. Tip-Dependent Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Imaging of Ultrathin FeO Films on Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merte, Lindsay Richard; Grabow, Lars C.; Peng, Guowen

    2011-01-01

    -vacancy dislocation loops in the FeO moiré structure. The experimental STM results are compared with the results of electronic structure calculations within the DFT+U scheme for a realistic (sqrt(91)xsqrt(91)R5.2 moiré unit cell supported on Pt(111) as well as with the results from previous studies. We find that one...... type of STM imaging mode, showing both Fe and O atoms, agrees well with simulated STM images, indicating that the simple Tersoff-Hamann theory is partially valid for this imaging mode. In addition, we identify other distinct, element-specific imaging modes which reveal a strong dependence...

  7. Low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was designed and built to operate at liquid helium temperature and was used to measure highly localized electron tunneling spectroscopy. Several instruments were built, all capable of operating in many different environments: air, vacuum, liquid helium and in a transfer gas. An adaptation of one particular design was made into an atomic force microscope capable of operating at low temperatures. Using a low temperature STM, three adsorbed molecular species (liquid crystals, sorbic acid, and carbon monoxide), deposited on a graphite substrate, have been imaged at 4.2K. The inelastic tunneling spectra of these adsorbates show strong peaks in dI/dV vs V curves at energies that correspond to known vibrational modes. The increase in conductance at the onset of inelastic tunneling was measured to be as high as 100 times. The spatial variation of the spectra was measured and was seen to change dramatically on the scale of angstroms, suggesting that individual molecular bonds could be measured. A theoretical model is presented to explain the contrast seen in the STM images of adsorbed molecules, thereby explaining why adsorbed molecules appear to be more conductive than the background. The microscope proved very useful for measuring the energy gap of high temperature superconductors. These materials often have submicron grain sizes. For LaSrCuO, YBaCuO, and BiCaSrCuO, the conductance curves showed a large energy gap suggesting a strongly coupled superconductor. The conductance curves also indicated that intergrain tunneling may occur and that the background conductance varied linearly with the applied voltage. The crystalline structure of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} was imaged by an STM operating in air and in ultra-high vacuum.

  8. New Applications of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas Philip Edward

    This dissertation describes the application of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) technique to four new fields of study: thin organic films, phonon spectroscopy of bulk surfaces, the vibrational spectroscopy of molecules, and the tribological forces which occur between STM tip and sample. Images with atomic resolution were obtained with speeds approaching video rates. Two types of microscopes were used: one operated at room temperature in air, another at 4.2K in liquid helium. At room temperature, the STM was able to image molecules of cadmium arachidate deposited onto graphite by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. The packing of molecules in the lipid bilayer was found to be partially ordered, with density of 1 molecule per 19.4 square angstroms. At liquid-helium temperature, inelastic electron processes were detected, and it was possible to determine within an area of a few square angstroms where the vibrational excitations occurred. On a bare graphite substrate, phonons of the sample and tip caused step increases in the tunneling conductivity at the phonon energies. Molecules of sorbic acid could be resolved when deposited onto graphite, and these molecules caused spatially localized peaks in conductivity at the energies of the bond vibrations. Although the STM is usually considered a non-contact instrument, under certain circumstances the tip and sample exerted strong forces on each other. With a tungsten tip and a graphite sample, friction and mechanical deformations on the atomic scale were observed.

  9. A versatile high resolution scanning tunneling potentiometry implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druga, T; Wenderoth, M; Homoth, J; Schneider, M A; Ulbrich, R G

    2010-08-01

    We have developed a new scanning tunneling potentiometry technique which can-with only minor changes of the electronic setup-be easily added to any standard scanning tunneling microscope (STM). This extension can be combined with common STM techniques such as constant current imaging or scanning tunneling spectroscopy. It is capable of performing measurements of the electrochemical potential with microvolt resolution. Two examples demonstrate the versatile application. First of all, we have determined local variations of the electrochemical potential due to charge transport of biased samples down to angstrom length scales. Second, with tip and sample at different temperatures we investigated the locally varying thermovoltage occurring at the tunneling junction. Aside from its use in determining the chemical identity of substances at the sample surface our method provides a controlled way to eliminate the influence of laterally varying thermovoltages on low-bias constant current topographies.

  10. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  11. Towards high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabak, Femke Chantal

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, two routes towards high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are described. The first possibility for high-speed scanning that is discussed is the use of MEMS (Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems) devices as high-speed add-ons in STM microscopes. The functionality of these devices

  12. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of Graphene on Graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guohong; Luican, Adina; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2008-01-01

    We report low temperature high magnetic field scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of graphene flakes on graphite that exhibit the structural and electronic properties of graphene decoupled from the substrate. Pronounced peaks in the tunneling spectra develop with field revealing a Landau level sequence that provides a direct way to identify graphene and to determine the degree of its coupling to the substrate. The Fermi velocity and quasiparticle lifetime, obtained from the positio...

  13. Simultaneous observation of surface- and edge-states of a 2D topological insulator through scanning tunneling spectroscopy and differential conductance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Hrishikesh; Bar, Abhijit; Bera, Abhijit; Pal, Amlan J

    2017-04-12

    A 2D form of Bi2Se3 which acts as a topological insulator was grown through colloidal synthesis method. The surface-states and edge-states of the nanoplates were simultaneously probed through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). At the interior, density of states (DOS) revealed the location of conduction and valence band edges. The DOS at the edges, on the other hand, brought out gapless conducting states along with a Dirac point at a non-zero value below the Fermi energy representing the Dirac cone of a 2D topological insulator. In differential tunnel conductance (dI/dV), images are recorded at different voltages and the two sections of the topological insulator can be viewed selectively or simultaneously with a clear contrast in illumination. Upon increasing the 2D-nanoplates thickness, the material turned into a 3D topological insulator with gapless surface states.

  14. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  15. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of graphene on graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohong; Luican, Adina; Andrei, Eva Y

    2009-05-01

    We report low temperature high magnetic field scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of graphene flakes on graphite that exhibit the structural and electronic properties of graphene decoupled from the substrate. Pronounced peaks in the tunneling spectra develop with increasing field revealing a Landau level sequence that provides a direct way to identify graphene and to determine the degree of its coupling to the substrate. The Fermi velocity and quasiparticle lifetime, obtained from the positions and width of the peaks, provide access to the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions.

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in STM I, these studies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described in chapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Together, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspects of STM. They provide essential reading and reference material for all students and researchers involved in this field. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  17. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in Vol. I, these sudies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described inchapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Togehter, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspcets of STM. They provide essentialreading and reference material for all students and researchers involvedin this field.

  18. Postprocessing Algorithm for Driving Conventional Scanning Tunneling Microscope at Fast Scan Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an image postprocessing framework for Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM to reduce the strong spurious oscillations and scan line noise at fast scan rates and preserve the features, allowing an order of magnitude increase in the scan rate without upgrading the hardware. The proposed method consists of two steps for large scale images and four steps for atomic scale images. For large scale images, we first apply for each line an image registration method to align the forward and backward scans of the same line. In the second step we apply a “rubber band” model which is solved by a novel Constrained Adaptive and Iterative Filtering Algorithm (CIAFA. The numerical results on measurement from copper(111 surface indicate the processed images are comparable in accuracy to data obtained with a slow scan rate, but are free of the scan drift error commonly seen in slow scan data. For atomic scale images, an additional first step to remove line-by-line strong background fluctuations and a fourth step of replacing the postprocessed image by its ranking map as the final atomic resolution image are required. The resulting image restores the lattice image that is nearly undetectable in the original fast scan data.

  19. Extension of Seismic Scanning Tunneling Macroscope to Elastic Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Tarhini, Ahmad

    2017-11-06

    The theory for the seismic scanning tunneling macroscope is extended from acoustic body waves to elastic body-wave propagation. We show that, similar to the acoustic case, near-field superresolution imaging from elastic body waves results from the O(1/R) term, where R is the distance between the source and near-field scatterer. The higher-order contributions R−n for n>1 are cancelled in the near-field region for a point source with normal stress.

  20. Extension of Seismic Scanning Tunneling Macroscope to Elastic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhini, Ahmad; Guo, Bowen; Dutta, Gaurav; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-11-01

    The theory for the seismic scanning tunneling macroscope is extended from acoustic body waves to elastic body-wave propagation. We show that, similar to the acoustic case, near-field superresolution imaging from elastic body waves results from the O(1/R) term, where R is the distance between the source and near-field scatterer. The higher-order contributions R^{-n} for n>1 are cancelled in the near-field region for a point source with normal stress.

  1. Probing the surface chemistry of polycrystalline ZnO with scanning tunneling microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, G.S.; Bonnell, D.A. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States))

    This paper describes the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spatially resolved tunneling spectroscopy to examine polycrystalline ZnO surface in ultrahigh vacuum after bake-out, after a low temperature anneal that cleaned the surface, after a high temperature anneal, which segregated bismuth to the surface, after being dosed with O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, and after exposure to air. The tunneling spectra depend both on the proximity to structural features, such as grain boundaries, and on the chemical composition of the surface. For example, the segregation of bismuth to the surface causes the tunneling spectra to have a p-type rectification. Our results also indicate that the rectification of tunneling spectra acquired in air is caused by surface hydration and that images of surfaces that have not been heated in vacuum have inferior resolution due to a reduction in the height of the apparent tunnel barrier. Spatially resolved tunneling spectroscopy has been used to demonstrate that surface hydration has a greater effect on the crystallite surfaces than on the grain boundary surfaces.

  2. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate...... in a direct manner and has most often been inferred from the apparent quality of recorded optical images. Complicated near-field optical imaging characteristics, together with the possibility of topographically induced artefacts, however, has increased demands for a more reliable probe characterization...... technique. Here we present experimental results obtained for optical characterization of two different probes by imaging of a well-specified near-field intensity distribution at various spatial frequencies. In particular, we observe that a sharply pointed dielectric probe can be highly suitable for imaging...

  3. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of Pb thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Michael

    2010-12-13

    The present thesis deals with the electronic structure, work function and single-atom contact conductance of Pb thin films, investigated with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. The electronic structure of Pb(111) thin films on Ag(111) surfaces is investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Quantum size effects, in particular, quantum well states (QWSs), play a crucial role in the electronic and physical properties of these films. Quantitative analysis of the spectra yields the QWS energies as a function of film thickness, the Pb bulk-band dispersion in {gamma}-L direction, scattering phase shifts at the Pb/Ag interface and vacuum barrier as well as the lifetime broadening at anti {gamma}. The work function {phi} is an important property of surfaces, which influences catalytic reactivity and charge injection at interfaces. It controls the availability of charge carriers in front of a surface. Modifying {phi} has been achieved by deposition of metals and molecules. For investigating {phi} at the atomic scale, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has become a widely used technique. STM measures an apparent barrier height {phi}{sub a}, which is commonly related to the sample work function {phi}{sub s} by: {phi}{sub a}=({phi}{sub s}+{phi}{sub t}- vertical stroke eV vertical stroke)/2, with {phi}{sub t} the work function of the tunneling tip, V the applied tunneling bias voltage, and -e the electron charge. Hence, the effect of the finite voltage in STM on {phi}{sub a} is assumed to be linear and the comparison of {phi}{sub a} measured at different surface sites is assumed to yield quantitative information about work function differences. Here, the dependence of {phi}{sub a} on the Pb film thickness and applied bias voltage V is investigated. {phi}{sub a} is found to vary significantly with V. This bias dependence leads to drastic changes and even inversion of contrast in spatial maps of {phi}{sub a}, which are related to the QWSs in the Pb

  4. Scanning tunneling microscope spectroscopy of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zypman, Fredy R

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents theoretical results on the relationship between density of states (DOS) and scanning tunneling microscope current-voltage curves in polymers. We considered samples of linear hydrocarbons electrically grounded at one of their extremes. The other extreme is electrically connected to the microscope tip via electron tunneling through vacuum. When a voltage, V, is applied to the tip, electric current, I, flows in the tip-sample circuit. This current varies as the voltage varies and depends on the DOS to the extent that no current would flow if no electron states exist at a certain energy (or voltage). The detailed relationship between DOS and the current-voltage (I-V) curve is not known a priori. We solve the corresponding quantum problem in the context of tight binding and find that I-V reproduces accurately the resonant energy peaks of the DOS. We apply the results to 100 atom-long alkane and alkene chains and found that there is a significant voltage shift in the corresponding curves as to discriminate one structure from the other.

  5. Theory and feasibility tests for a seismic scanning tunnelling macroscope

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunnelling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect subwavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the scatterer is in the near-field region. This means that, as the scatterer approaches the source, imaging of the scatterer with super-resolution can be achieved. Acoustic and elastic simulations support this concept, and a seismic experiment in an Arizona tunnel shows a TRM profile with super-resolution adjacent to the fault location. The SSTM is analogous to the optical scanning tunnelling microscopes having subwavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by the imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  6. Spatially Resolved Imaging on Photocarrier Generations and Band Alignments at Perovskite/PbI2 Heterointerfaces of Perovskite Solar Cells by Light-Modulated Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Min-Chuan; Li, Shao-Sian; Hsieh, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Ying-Chiao; Yang, Hung-Duen; Chiu, Ya-Ping; Chang, Chia-Seng; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2017-02-08

    The presence of the PbI2 passivation layers at perovskite crystal grains has been found to considerably affect the charge carrier transport behaviors and device performance of perovskite solar cells. This work demonstrates the application of a novel light-modulated scanning tunneling microscopy (LM-STM) technique to reveal the interfacial electronic structures at the heterointerfaces between CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite crystals and PbI2 passivation layers of individual perovskite grains under light illumination. Most importantly, this technique enabled the first observation of spatially resolved mapping images of photoinduced interfacial band bending of valence bands and conduction bands and the photogenerated electron and hole carriers at the heterointerfaces of perovskite crystal grains. By systematically exploring the interfacial electronic structures of individual perovskite grains, enhanced charge separation and reduced back recombination were observed when an optimal design of interfacial PbI2 passivation layers consisting of a thickness less than 20 nm at perovskite crystal grains was applied.

  7. A High Rigidity and Precision Scanning Tunneling Microscope with Decoupled XY and Z Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new scan-head structure for the scanning tunneling microscope (STM is proposed, featuring high scan precision and rigidity. The core structure consists of a piezoelectric tube scanner of quadrant type (for XY scans coaxially housed in a piezoelectric tube with single inner and outer electrodes (for Z scan. They are fixed at one end (called common end. A hollow tantalum shaft is coaxially housed in the XY-scan tube and they are mutually fixed at both ends. When the XY scanner scans, its free end will bring the shaft to scan and the tip which is coaxially inserted in the shaft at the common end will scan a smaller area if the tip protrudes short enough from the common end. The decoupled XY and Z scans are desired for less image distortion and the mechanically reduced scan range has the superiority of reducing the impact of the background electronic noise on the scanner and enhancing the tip positioning precision. High quality atomic resolution images are also shown.

  8. A High Rigidity and Precision Scanning Tunneling Microscope with Decoupled XY and Z Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Guo, Tengfei; Hou, Yubin; Zhang, Jing; Meng, Wenjie; Lu, Qingyou

    2017-01-01

    A new scan-head structure for the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is proposed, featuring high scan precision and rigidity. The core structure consists of a piezoelectric tube scanner of quadrant type (for XY scans) coaxially housed in a piezoelectric tube with single inner and outer electrodes (for Z scan). They are fixed at one end (called common end). A hollow tantalum shaft is coaxially housed in the XY-scan tube and they are mutually fixed at both ends. When the XY scanner scans, its free end will bring the shaft to scan and the tip which is coaxially inserted in the shaft at the common end will scan a smaller area if the tip protrudes short enough from the common end. The decoupled XY and Z scans are desired for less image distortion and the mechanically reduced scan range has the superiority of reducing the impact of the background electronic noise on the scanner and enhancing the tip positioning precision. High quality atomic resolution images are also shown.

  9. Manipulation of magnetic skyrmions with a scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, R.; Shindou, R.; Xie, X. C.

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of a single magnetic skyrmion in an atomic spin system under the influence of a scanning tunneling microscope is investigated by computer simulations solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. Two possible scenarios are described: manipulation with aid of a spin-polarized tunneling current and by an electric field created by the scanning tunneling microscope. The dynamics during the creation and annihilation process is studied and the possibility to move single skyrmions is showed.

  10. Tomographic scanning imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Harald

    2009-07-06

    In tomographic scanning (TOSCA) imaging, light from a scene is focused onto a reticle mask using conical scan optics, and collected on a single element detector. Alternatively, one or several detectors replace the reticle. Tomographic processing techniques are then applied to the one-dimensional signal to reproduce a two-dimensional image. The TOSCA technique is presented in detail, including its mathematical foundations and some of its limitations. It is shown how TOSCA imaging can be used in a multispectral configuration, and compares well with more conventional alternatives both in simplicity and performance. Examples of image reconstruction using TOSCA techniques are shown.

  11. SPATIAL REPARTITION OF CURRENT FLUCTUATIONS IN A SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Lagoute

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM is a technique where the surface topography of a conducting sample is probed by a scanning metallic tip. The tip-to-surface distance is controlled by monitoring the electronic tunneling current between the two metals. The aim of this work is to extend the temporal range of this instrument by characterising the time fluctuations of this current on different surfaces. The current noise power spectral density is dominated by a characteristic 1/f component, the physical origin of which is not yet clearly identified, despite a number of investigations. A new I-V preamplifier was developed in order to characterise these fluctuations of the tunnelling current and to obtain images of their spatial repartition. It is observed that their intensity is correlated with some topographical features. This information can be used to get insights on the physical phenomena involved that are not accessible by the usual STM set-up, which is limited to low frequencies.

  12. Surface Analysis by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coury, Louis A., Jr.; Johnson, Mario; Murphy, Tammy J.

    1995-12-01

    In both student projects a Burleigh Instruments ARIS-2200E STM was employed to image polycrystalline gold electrodes before and after deposition of a second metal onto the surface. Students prepared their own tungsten STM tips using an A.C.-etching procedure in 5% NaNO2. The electrodes used were available commercailly (AAI-AbTech, Yardley, PA) and consisted of 1000 of Au over a 100 adhesion layer of Ti on electronics-grade borosilicate glass. Electrodes were affixed to the STM sample holder using conductive carbon tape (SPI, West Chester, PA) and imaged in air. Modified electrodes were prepared by sonochemical deposition of 300 nm-Cu particles onto the Au surface in a procedure described elsewhere (2) or by the electrolytic deposition of various metals used in dental amalgams from acidic media using a Cypress Systems CS-1087 potentiostat. ResultsIn a typical image obtained for an unmodified Au surface (see image below), small crystallites (~500 to 1000 in diameter) of Au formed during the sputtering process during electrode fabrication are clearly visible. Images of modified electrodes (not shown) always show a markedly different morphology, with visible characteristic surface features ranging in size from hundreds of nanometers to several microns. The concepts students learn in these studies include electron tunneling, electroplating, nucleation phenomena, and amalgam chemistry. Although primarily touted as a method for atomic resolution imaging, STM clearly has utility for examining surfaces with features in the 100-nm to 1-micrometer size regime. Because of the recent availability of inexpensive instruments with user-friendly software, we encourage others to consider incorporating STM into the undergraduate curriculum. AcknowledgmentThis project was supported partially by a grant, DUE-9351426, from the National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement Program. Literature Cited Lederman, L. Science 1991

  13. Time Dependent Tunneling in Laser Irradiated Scanning Tunneling Microscope Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sookyung Hur

    A principal motivation for the studies reported in this thesis was to obtain a theoretical explanation for the experimental results obtained by Nguyen et al. (1989) to determine the traversal time of an electron tunneling through a quantum mechanical barrier in a laser irradiated STM junction. The work therefore focused on the calculation of tunneling in a time-dependent oscillating barrier, and more specifically on the inelastic contributions to the tunneling current. To do so the kinetic formalism for tunneling was modified and extended to calculate inelastic processes in an irradiated tunneling junction. Furthermore, there is significant absorption of power from the laser beam in the junction electrodes resulting in thermal effects which can influence the tunneling. Extensive analysis of the spatial and temporal temperature distributions was first done for a realistic model of the diode emitter and anode using the Green function method. Specifically we considered (i) thermal effects due to surface heating of the absorbed laser radiation, (ii) the thermoelectric emf produced in the junction due to differential heating, and (iii) resistive and Thomson heat produced in the junction by laser induced currents. Using first-order time-dependent perturbation theory we also (iv) calculated the inelastic tunneling current due to a time dependent oscillating barrier produced by the antenna geometry of the STM junction. Lastly, we (v) formulated photo-assisted tunneling due to the electron -photon interaction in the junction using the second-quantization formalism. Although quite significant results were obtained for the tunneling current density as a function of frequency, gap distance and other junction parameters which gave insights into important features of the Nguyen et al. experiment (and tunneling characteristics of an irradiated STM in general), no single expression was derived or calculated results obtained which explains or fits all their observed data, or

  14. Ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM) can probe single atoms on a silicon surface with simultaneous sub-nanometer and sub-picosecond spatio-temporal resolution. THz-STM is established as a new technique for exploring high-field non-equilibrium tunneling...

  15. A high stability and repeatability electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Zhigang; Wang, Jihao; Lu, Qingyou, E-mail: qxl@ustc.edu.cn [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hou, Yubin [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-12-15

    We present a home built electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ECSTM) with very high stability and repeatability. Its coarse approach is driven by a closely stacked piezo motor of GeckoDrive type with four rigid clamping points, which enhances the rigidity, compactness, and stability greatly. It can give high clarity atomic resolution images without sound and vibration isolations. Its drifting rates in XY and Z directions in solution are as low as 84 pm/min and 59 pm/min, respectively. In addition, repeatable coarse approaches in solution within 2 mm travel distance show a lateral deviation less than 50 nm. The gas environment can be well controlled to lower the evaporation rate of the cell, thus reducing the contamination and elongating the measurement time. Atomically resolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} image on Au (111) work electrode is demonstrated to show the performance of the ECSTM.

  16. Measuring voltage transients with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    We use an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope to resolve propagating voltage transients in space and time. We demonstrate that the previously observed dependence of the transient signal amplitude on the tunneling resistance was only caused by the electrical sampling circuit. With a modified......-gating photoconductive switch with a rigidly attached fiber, the probe is scanned without changing the probe characteristics. (C) 1997 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Spectroscopic Imaging Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Electronic Structure in the Superconducting and Pseudogap Phases of Cuprate High-Tc Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kazuhiro; Schmidt, Andrew R.; Kim, Eun-Ah; Lawler, Michael J.; Lee, Dung Hai; Davis, J. C.; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    One of the key motivations for the development of atomically resolved spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (SI-STM) has been to probe the electronic structure of cuprate high temperature superconductors. In both the d-wave superconducting (dSC) and the pseudogap (PG) phases of underdoped cuprates, two distinct classes of electronic states are observed using SI-STM. The first class consists of the dispersive Bogoliubov quasiparticles of a homogeneous d-wave superconductor. These are detected below a lower energy scale |E|=Δ0 and only upon a momentum space (k-space) arc which terminates near the lines connecting k=±(π/a0,0) to k=±(0,π/a0). Below optimal doping, this ``nodal'' arc shrinks continuously with decreasing hole density. In both the dSC and PG phases, the only broken symmetries detected in the |E|≤Δ0 states are those of a d-wave superconductor. The second class of states occurs at energies near the pseudogap energy scale |E|˜ Δ1 which is associated conventionally with the ``antinodal'' states near k=±(π/a0,0) and k=±(0,π/a0). We find that these states break the expected 90°-rotational (C4) symmetry of electronic structure within CuO2 unit cells, at least down to 180°-rotational (C2) symmetry (nematic) but in a spatially disordered fashion. This intra-unit-cell C4 symmetry breaking coexists at |E|˜Δ1 with incommensurate conductance modulations locally breaking both rotational and translational symmetries (smectic). The characteristic wavevector Q of the latter is determined, empirically, by the k-space points where Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference terminates, and therefore evolves continuously with doping. The properties of these two classes of |E|˜Δ1 states are indistinguishable in the dSC and PG phases. To explain this segregation of k-space into the two regimes distinguished by the symmetries of their electronic states and their energy scales |E|˜Δ1 and |E|≤Δ0, and to understand how this impacts the electronic

  18. Scanning tunneling microscope with continuous flow cryostat sample cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, S.; Rose, M.K.; Dunphy, J.C.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chapelier, C. [Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA/Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    1997-06-01

    We have constructed an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM) for operation in the temperature range 20{endash}300 K. The design consists of a vibration isolated sample holder mounted on a continuous flow cryostat. By rotation and linear motion of the cryostat, the sample can be positioned in front of various surface preparation and analysis instruments contained in a single vacuum chamber. A lightweight beetle-type STM head is lowered from the top onto the sample by a linear manipulator. To minimize helium convection in the cryostat, the entire vacuum system, including a liquid helium storage Dewar, can be tilted by a few degrees perpendicular to the cryostat axis, which improves the operation. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of the Pd(111) surface and adsorbed CO molecules. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopy I general principles and applications to clean and adsorbate-covered surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy I provides a unique introduction to a novel and fascinating technique that produces beautiful images of nature on an atomic scale. It is the first of three volumes that together offer a comprehensive treatment of scanning tunneling microscopy, its diverse applications, and its theoretical treatment. In this volume the reader will find a detailed description of the technique itself and of its applications to metals, semiconductors, layered materials, adsorbed molecules and superconductors. In addition to the many representative results reviewed, extensive references to original work will help to make accessible the vast body of knowledge already accumulated in this field.

  1. The study of electrical conductivity of DNA molecules by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharipov, T. I.; Bakhtizin, R. Z.

    2017-10-01

    An interest to the processes of charge transport in DNA molecules is very high, due to perspective of their using in nanoelectronics. The original sample preparation for studying electrical conductivity of DNA molecules by scanning tunneling spectroscopy has been proposed and tested. The DNA molecules immobilized on gold surface have been imaged clearly and their current-voltage curves have been measured.

  2. Polarization contrast in photon scanning tunnelling microscopy combined with atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Propstra, K.; Propstra, K.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Photon scanning tunnelling microscopy combined with atomic force microscopy allows simultaneous acquisition and direct comparison of optical and topographical images, both with a lateral resolution of about 30 nm, far beyond the optical diffraction limit. The probe consists of a modified

  3. Photon scanning tunneling microscope in combination with a force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Tack, R.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous operation of a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an atomic force microscope is presented. The use of standard atomic force silicon nitride cantilevers as near-field optical probes offers the possibility to combine the two methods. Vertical forces and torsion are detected

  4. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of suspended single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeRoy, B.J.; Lemay, S.G.; Kong, J.; Dekker, C.

    2004-01-01

    We have performed low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy measurements on single-wall carbon nanotubes that are freely suspended over a trench. The nanotubes were grown by chemical vapor deposition on a Pt substrate with predefined trenches etched into it. Atomic resolution was obtained on the

  5. Apparent Barrier Height in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, L.; Brandbyge, Mads; Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt

    1996-01-01

    The apparent barrier height phi(ap), that is, the rate of change of the logarithm of the conductance with tip-sample separation in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), has been measured for Ni, Pt, and Au single crystal surfaces. The results show that phi(ap) is constant until point contact is ...

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1996-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy III provides a unique introduction to the theoretical foundations of scanning tunneling microscopy and related scanning probe methods. The different theoretical concepts developed in the past are outlined, and the implications of the theoretical results for the interpretation of experimental data are discussed in detail. Therefore, this book serves as a most useful guide for experimentalists as well as for theoreticians working in the filed of local probe methods. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  7. Nanofabrication with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shedd, G.M.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Precision Engineering Center has recently begun a research program into applications of STM to Nanotechnology. Few tools permit humans to control events and processes at the manometer level, and of those, the STM is the most well-suited to the task. A versatile new ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) STM is being built to study the use of STM for the manipulation of nanometer-scale particles. Part of the STM`s usefulness will be due to its being positioned directly beneath the focused ion beam (FIB). The interface of the STM with the FIB will allow the STM to take advantage of the FIB for long-range imaging and as a particle source; the FIB can in turn use the STM for in situ, high-resolution imaging of micromachined features.

  8. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Elastic simulations and Arizona mine test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic seismic simulations and field data tests are used to validate the theory of a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM). For nearfield elastic simulation, the SSTM results show superresolution to be better than λ/8 if the only scattered data are used as input data. If the direct P and S waves are muted then the resolution of the scatterer locations are within about λ/5. Seismic data collected in an Arizona tunnel showed a superresolution limit of at least λ/19. These test results are consistent with the theory of the SSTM and suggest that the SSTM can be a tool used by geophysicists as a probe for near-field scatterers.

  9. Sub-Kelvin scanning tunneling microscopy on magnetic molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic molecules have attracted lots interest. In this work, an ultra-stable and low noise scanning tunneling microscopy operating at 400 mK using He-3 (930 mK using He-4) has been developed. The magnetic behavior of different magnetic molecules on substrates, especially the exchange interaction between the magnetic ions, the magnetic anisotropy on the surface, the magnetic excitations as well as the Kondo effect, were studied by using STM.

  10. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of Proximity Superconductivity in Epitaxial Multilayer Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Natterer, Fabian D.; Ha, Jeonghoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Zhang, Duming; Cullen, William; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.; Kuk, Young; Stroscio, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on spatial measurements of the superconducting proximity effect in epitaxial graphene induced by a graphene-superconductor interface. Superconducting aluminum films were grown on epitaxial multilayer graphene on SiC. The aluminum films were discontinuous with networks of trenches in the film morphology reaching down to exposed graphene terraces. Scanning tunneling spectra measured on the graphene terraces show a clear decay of the superconducting energy gap with increasing separatio...

  11. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1993-01-01

    While the first two volumes on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and its related scanning probe (SXM) methods have mainly concentrated on intro­ ducing the experimental techniques, as well as their various applications in different research fields, this third volume is exclusively devoted to the theory of STM and related SXM methods. As the experimental techniques including the reproducibility of the experimental results have advanced, more and more theorists have become attracted to focus on issues related to STM and SXM. The increasing effort in the development of theoretical concepts for STM/SXM has led to considerable improvements in understanding the contrast mechanism as well as the experimental conditions necessary to obtain reliable data. Therefore, this third volume on STM/SXM is not written by theorists for theorists, but rather for every scientist who is not satisfied by just obtaining real­ space images of surface structures by STM/SXM. After a brief introduction (Chap. 1), N. D. Lang first co...

  12. Dopant migration in silicon during implantation/annealing measured by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessel, H.E.; Memmert, U.; Behm, R.J. (Univ. Muenchen (West Germany)); Cerva, H. (Siemens Research Lab., Muenchen (West Germany))

    In this paper spatial correlation between the lateral distribution of the doping type and the former implantation mask edge was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements. The position of the former mask edge was determined from surface steps resolved by STM topography measurements. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) data recorded simultaneously allowed to detect the transition from a high doping level with an ohmic I-V curve to a lower doping level displaying a Schottky barrier behavior. The influence of different annealing treatments on the position of this transition was investigated.

  13. Detectors for scanning video imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert H.; Hughes, George W.

    1993-11-01

    In scanning video imagers, a single detector sees each pixel for only 100 ns, so the bandwidth of the detector needs to be about 10 MHz. How this fact influences the choice of detectors for scanning systems is described here. Some important parametric quantities obtained from manufacturer specifications are related and it is shown how to compare detectors when specified quantities differ.

  14. Exhibition of tunnel coupling of negatively charged dangling bonds on Si Surface Using Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, M. Baseer; Livadaru, L.; Pitters, J.; Wolkow, R.

    2011-03-01

    We have performed Scanning tunneling microscopy study of hydrogen terminated Si (100). We will show that single Si atoms in a solid state environment can be served as quantum dots. These negatively charged quantum dots can be tunnel coupled to the nearby Si quantum dots. We will demonstrate that this tunnel coupling can be controlled by adjusting the separation between the two Si atomic quantum dots. Moreover electron occupation in the tunnel coupled Si quantum dots can be controlled. We have used this tunnel coupling effect of Si atomic quantum dots to fabricate Quantum Cellular Automata Cells. Quantum Cellular Automata are used to transmit binary information through electrostatic interaction between adjacent cells without the transfer of charge from one cell to the next. Devices based on Quantum Cellular Automata will consume much less power compared to the conventional transistor based devices. Moreover, since there is no transfer of charge so power dissipation during its operation is minimal compared to conventional semiconductor devices. This Si based Quantum Cellular Automat Cell works at room temperature.

  15. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  16. EDITORIAL: Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    Three decades ago, with a tiny tip of platinum, the scientific world saw the real space imaging of single atoms with unprecedented spatial resolution. This signalled the birth of one of the most versatile surface probes, based on the physics of quantum mechanical tunnelling: the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Invented in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer of IBM, Zurich, it led to their award of the 1986 Nobel Prize. Atoms, once speculated to be abstract entities used by theoreticians for mere calculations, can be seen to exist for real with the nano-eye of an STM tip that also gives real-space images of molecules and adsorbed complexes on surfaces. From a very fundamental perspective, the STM changed the course of surface science and engineering. STM also emerged as a powerful tool to study various fundamental phenomena relevant to the properties of surfaces in technological applications such as tribology, medical implants, catalysis, sensors and biology—besides elucidating the importance of local bonding geometries and defects, non-periodic structures and the co-existence of nano-scale phases. Atom-level probing, once considered a dream, has seen the light with the evolution of STM. An important off-shoot of STM was the atomic force microscope (AFM) for surface mapping of insulating samples. Then followed the development of a flurry of techniques under the general name of scanning probe microscopy (SPM). These techniques (STM, AFM, MFM, PFM etc) designed for atomic-scale-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, have led to brand new developments in surface analysis. All of these novel methods enabled researchers in recent years to image and analyse complex surfaces on microscopic and nanoscopic scales. All of them utilize a small probe for sensing the surface. The invention of AFM by Gerd Binnig, Calvin Quate and Christopher Gerber opened up new opportunities for characterization of a variety of materials, and various industrial applications could be

  17. Tip preparation for usage in an ultra-low temperature UHV scanning tunneling microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ernst, S. Wirth, M. Rams, V. Dolocan and F. Steglich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the preparation and characterization of tungsten tips for the use in UHV low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS, respectively. These specific environments require in situ facilities for tip conditioning, for further sharpening of the tips, as well as for reliable tip characterization. The implemented conditioning methods include direct resistive annealing, annealing by electron bombardment, and self-sputtering with noble gas ions. Moreover, results from in situ tip characterization by field emission and STM experiments were compared to ex situ scanning electron microscopy. Using the so-prepared tips, high resolution STM images and tunneling spectra were obtained in a temperature range from ambient down to 350 mK, partially with applied magnetic field, on a variety of materials.

  18. In situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of inorganic transition metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Christensen, Jørn B; Guckian, Adrian; Bjørnholm, Thomas; Vos, Johannes G; Ulstrup, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Redox molecules with equilibrium potentials suitable for electrochemical control offer perspectives in nanoscale and single-molecule electronics. This applies to molecular but also towards higher sophistication such as transistor or diode function. Most recent nanoscale or single-molecule functional systems are, however, fraught with operational limitations such as cryogenic temperatures and ultra-high vacuum, or lack of electrochemical potential control. We report here cyclic voltammetry (CV) using single-crystal Au(111)- and Pt(111)-electrodes and electrochemical in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of a class of Os(II)/(III)- and Co(II)/(III)-complexes, the former novel molecular electronics. The complexes are robust, with ligand groups suitable for linking the complexes to the Au(111)- and Pt(111)-surfaces via N- and S-donor atoms. The data reflect monolayer behaviour. Interfacial ET of the Os-complexes is fast, kET(0) > or = 10(6) s(-1), while the Co-complex reacts much more slowly, kET(0) approximately (1-3) x 10(3) s(-1). In STM of the Os-complexes shows a maximum in the tunnelling current/overpotential relation at constant bias voltage with up to 50-fold current rise. The peak position systematically the bias voltage and equilibrium potential, in keeping with theoretical frames for two-step electron transfer (ET) of in situ STM of redox molecules. The molecular conductivity behaves broadly similarly. The Co-complex also shows a tunnelling spectroscopic feature but much weaker than the Os-complexes. This can be ascribed much smaller interfacial ET rate constant, again caused by large intramolecular nuclear reorganization and weak electronic coupling to the substrate electrode. Overall the has mapped the properties of target molecules needed for stable electronic switching, possible importance in molecular electronics towards the single-molecule level, in room temperature condensed matter environment.

  19. Sequencing of adenine in DNA by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2017-08-01

    The development of DNA sequencing technology utilizing the detection of a tunnel current is important for next-generation sequencer technologies based on single-molecule analysis technology. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, we previously reported that dI/dV measurements and dI/dV mapping revealed that the guanine base (purine base) of DNA adsorbed onto the Cu(111) surface has a characteristic peak at V s = -1.6 V. If, in addition to guanine, the other purine base of DNA, namely, adenine, can be distinguished, then by reading all the purine bases of each single strand of a DNA double helix, the entire base sequence of the original double helix can be determined due to the complementarity of the DNA base pair. Therefore, the ability to read adenine is important from the viewpoint of sequencing. Here, we report on the identification of adenine by STM topographic and spectroscopic measurements using a synthetic DNA oligomer and viral DNA.

  20. Fault detection by surface seismic scanning tunneling macroscope: Field test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-08-05

    The seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) is proposed for detecting the presence of near-surface impedance anomalies and faults. Results with synthetic data are consistent with theory in that scatterers closer to the surface provide brighter SSTM profiles than those that are deeper. The SSTM profiles show superresolution detection if the scatterers are in the near-field region of the recording line. The field data tests near Gulf of Aqaba, Haql, KSA clearly show the presence of the observable fault scarp, and identify the subsurface presence of the hidden faults indicated in the tomograms. Superresolution detection of the fault is achieved, even when the 35 Hz data are lowpass filtered to the 5-10 Hz band.

  1. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of Proximity Superconductivity in Epitaxial Multilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natterer, Fabian D; Ha, Jeonghoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Zhang, Duming; Cullen, William; Zhitenev, Nikolai B; Kuk, Young; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2016-01-15

    We report on spatial measurements of the superconducting proximity effect in epitaxial graphene induced by a graphene-superconductor interface. Superconducting aluminum films were grown on epitaxial multilayer graphene on SiC. The aluminum films were discontinuous with networks of trenches in the film morphology reaching down to exposed graphene terraces. Scanning tunneling spectra measured on the graphene terraces show a clear decay of the superconducting energy gap with increasing separation from the graphene-aluminum edges. The spectra were well described by Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory. The decay length for the superconducting energy gap in graphene was determined to be greater than 400 nm. Deviations in the exponentially decaying energy gap were also observed on a much smaller length scale of tens of nanometers.

  2. A first principles scanning tunneling potentiometry study of an opaque graphene grain boundary in the ballistic transport regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Kirk H

    2014-10-17

    We report on a theoretical interpretation of scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP), formulated within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function description of quantum transport. By treating the probe tip as an electron point source/sink, it is shown that this approach provides an intuitive bridge between existing theoretical interpretations of scanning tunneling microscopy and STP. We illustrate this through ballistic transport simulations of the potential drop across an opaque graphene grain boundary, where atomistic features are predicted that might be imaged through high resolution STP measurements. The relationship between the electrochemical potential profile measured and the electrostatic potential drop across such a nanoscale defect is also explored in this model system.

  3. Reversible Hydrogenation and Bandgap Opening of Graphene and Graphite Surfaces Probed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Wojtaszek, Magdalena; Arramel, [No Value; Tombros, Nikolaos; van Wees, Bart J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of hydrogenation on the topography and electronic properties of graphene and graphite surfaces are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The surfaces are chemically modified using an Ar/H2 plasma. By analyzing thousands of scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements

  4. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of CdSe nanocrystals covalently bound to GaAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walzer, K.; Marx, E.; Greenham, N.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements of CdSe nanocrystals covalently attached to doped GaAs substrates using monolayers of 1,6-hexanedithiol. STM measurements showed the formation of stable, densely packed, homogeneous monolayers...

  5. Scanning strategies for imaging arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Attila

    2008-07-01

    Large-format (sub)millimeter wavelength imaging arrays are best operated in scanning observing modes rather than traditional position-switched (chopped) modes. The choice of observing mode is critical for isolating source signals from various types of noise interference, especially for ground-based instrumentation operating under a bright atmosphere. Ideal observing strategies can combat 1/f noise, resist instrumental defects, sensitively recover emission on large scales, and provide an even field coverage - all under feasible requirements of telescope movement. This work aims to guide the design of observing patterns that maximize scientific returns. It also compares some of the popular choices of observing modes for (sub)millimeter imaging, such as random, Lissajous, billiard, spiral, On-The-Fly (OTF), DREAM, chopped and stare patterns. Many of the conclusions are also applicable other imaging applications and imaging in one dimension (e.g. spectroscopic observations).

  6. Submonolayer growth of Pd on Cu(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, E.; Ruban, Andrei; Stensgaard, I.

    1998-01-01

    The growth mode of sub-monolayer amounts of Pd on Cu(111) in the temperature range - 80-300 degrees C has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Below approximate to 100 degrees C, the Pd induced...... is dug out from the surface in extended, monolayer deep pits, and concurrently, the brims and islands increase in height by one layer. High-resolution STM images of brims and islands in this phase are interpreted as evidence for Cu capping. For Pd evaporation at temperatures of 220-300 degrees C...

  7. Structure and Reactions of Carbon and Hydrogen on Ru(0001): A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-09-09

    The interaction between carbon and hydrogen atoms on a Ru(0001) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Density Functional Theory (DFT) and STM image calculations. Formation of CH species by reaction between adsorbed H and C was observed to occur readily at 100 K. When the coverage of H increased new complexes of the form CH+nH (n = 1, 2 and 3) were observed. These complexes, never observed before, might be precursors for further hydrogenation reactions. DFT analysis reveals that a considerable energy barrier exists for the CH+H {yields} CH{sub 2} reaction.

  8. Investigating Single Molecule Physics with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Calvin Jay

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has given the scientific community a method to view, characterize, and manipulate the world at the atomic scale. Thirty years after the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for its invention, the remarkable instrument is still being used to deepen our understanding of physical and chemical processes. Tantamount to this has been the development of new techniques to expand its capabilities allowing STMs to answer increasingly more difficult scientific questions. This dissertation describes three technological thrusts in expanding the STMs capabilities in studying physics at the single molecule level. First, I have helped developed a new technique called the RF-STM which has the potential to snapshot femtosecond and picosecond processes by locking into the high frequency tunneling component generated from the 80MHz laser pulse train. This technique solves the problem of low frequency thermal oscillations when choppers are used in the beam line and if only tunneling signal is monitored, sub-angstrom spatial resolution should be simultaneously possible. Second, I have helped develop the itProbe technique by increasing its ability to map out the interaction potential energy surface (iPES) between a tip-CO molecule and a surface adsorbed molecule. I present a study conducted on the bridge-like 1,4 phenylene diisocyanide molecule where the iPES is probed at different heights and different energies. The result is an ability to 3-dimensionally map out the iPES and provide reliable insight into developing itProbe simulations. Third, I have developed a new technique called Energy Resolved Laser Action STM (ERLA-STM) where we can observe the change in molecular dynamics as a function of the illumination wavelength. In our pyrrolidine study, we demonstrated the kinetic changes that occur when an overtone of the CH stretch mode is excited by a near-IR laser pulse. By sweeping the excitation energy, we can characterize and control single molecule

  9. Local potentiometry using a multiprobe scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannani, A; Bobisch, C A; Möller, R

    2008-08-01

    Scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP) is a powerful tool to analyze the conductance through thin conducting layers with lateral resolution in the nanometer range. In this work, we show how a commercial ultrahigh vacuum multiprobe system, equipped with four independent tips, can be used to perform STP experiments. Two tips are gently pushed into the surface applying a lateral current through the layer of interest. Simultaneously, the topography and the potential distribution across the metal film are measured with a third tip. The signal-to-noise ratio of the potentiometry signal may be enhanced by using a fourth tip, providing a reference potential in close vicinity of the studied area. Two different examples are presented. For epitaxial (111) oriented Bi films, grown on a Si(100)-(2 x 1) surface, an almost constant gradient of the potential as well as potential drops at individual Bi-domain boundaries were observed. On the surface of the Si(111)(3 x 3)-Ag superstructure the potential variation at individual monoatomic steps could be precisely resolved.

  10. Active current-noise cancellation for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabbi, Lavish; Shoop, Conner; Banerjee, Riju; Dusch, Bill; Hudson, E. W.

    The high sensitivity of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) poses a barrier to its use in a noisy environment. Vibrational noise, whether structural or acoustic in source, manifests as relative motion between the probe tip and the sample, then appearing in the Z feedback that tries to cancel it. Here we describe an active noise cancellation process that nullifies this motion by adding a drive signal into the existing Z feedback loop. The drive is digitally calculated by actively monitoring vibrations measured by an accelerometer placed in-situ close to the STM head. By transferring the vibration cancellation effort to this drive signal, vibration-created noise in the Z-feedback (during topography) or current (during spectroscopy) is significantly reduced. This inexpensive and easy solution, requiring no major instrumental modifications, is ideal for those looking to place their STM in a noisier environment, for example in the presence of active refrigeration systems (e.g. pulse tube cryocoolers) or coupled to high-vibration instrumentation. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1229138.

  11. Atomic species identification at the (101) anatase surface by simultaneous scanning tunnelling and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Todorović, Milica; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Moreno, César; Ryan, James William; León, Carmen Pérez; Sagisaka, Keisuke; Palomares, Emilio; Matolín, Vladimír; Fujita, Daisuke; Perez, Ruben; Custance, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Anatase is a pivotal material in devices for energy-harvesting applications and catalysis. Methods for the accurate characterization of this reducible oxide at the atomic scale are critical in the exploration of outstanding properties for technological developments. Here we combine atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), supported by first-principles calculations, for the simultaneous imaging and unambiguous identification of atomic species at the (101) anatase surface. We demonstrate that dynamic AFM-STM operation allows atomic resolution imaging within the material's band gap. Based on key distinguishing features extracted from calculations and experiments, we identify candidates for the most common surface defects. Our results pave the way for the understanding of surface processes, like adsorption of metal dopants and photoactive molecules, that are fundamental for the catalytic and photovoltaic applications of anatase, and demonstrate the potential of dynamic AFM-STM for the characterization of wide band gap materials. PMID:26118408

  12. A 3-d laser scanning system and scan data processing method for the monitoring of tunnel deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelina, Klaus; Jansa, Josef; Hesina, Gerd; Traxler, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    The paper presents the mobile multi-sensor system Orthos Plus for the monitoring and mapping of tunnel walls, a scan data processing method for the evaluation of 3-d tunnel wall displacements from subsequent wall scans and, finally, a virtual reality tool supporting the interpretation of data. The measuring system consists of a 3-d laser scanner, a motorised total station and a digital camera that are integrated on a light metal frame that is installed on a mobile platform. It has been designed to perform tunnel measurements most efficiently and to meet the special requirements of tunnels under construction. The evaluation of 3-d displacements is based on a 3-d matching algorithm that takes advantage of the particular conditions of tunnel (shotcrete) surfaces. The virtual reality tool allows viewing of data in a 3-d virtual reality tunnel model and their animation in time and space in order supports understanding in an optimal way. The measuring system Orthos Plus has been developed in the course of a national research project, the 3-d matching method in the frame of the Austrian Christian Doppler Laboratory Spatial Data from Laser Scanning and Remote Sensing and the VR tool in the Austrian COMET K1 Competence Center VRVis Center (www.vrvis.at).

  13. Scanning tunnelling spectroscopy and manipulation of double-decker phthalocyanine molecules on a semiconductor surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Kanisawa, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Naoto; Fölsch, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    A scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) operated at 5 K was used to study dysprosium biphthalocyanine (DyPc2) molecules adsorbed on the inert III-V semiconductor surface InAs(1 1 1)A. Orbital imaging and scanning tunnelling spectroscopy measurements reveal that the molecular electronic structure remains largely unperturbed, indicating a weak molecule-surface binding. The molecule adsorbs at the In vacancy site of the (2  ×  2)-reconstructed surface and is highly sensitive to current-induced excitations leading to random rotational fluctuations. Owing to the weak surface binding, individual molecules can be precisely repositioned and arranged by the STM tip via attractive tip-molecule interaction. In this way, DyPc2 dimers of well-defined internal structure can be assembled which exist in two conformations of equivalent appearance. A binary switching between these two conformers can be induced by injecting electrons into one of the two molecules. The conformational change of the dimer proceeds via a concerted molecular rotation and minor lateral displacement. The synchronised switching observed here is attributed to steric interactions between the two molecules constituting the dimer.

  14. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of AdsorbateStructure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions: Novel Design of anUltra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling MicroscopeSystem for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David Chi-Wai [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-16

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope’s (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 °C).

  15. First-principles theory of inelastic currents in a scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Thirstrup, C.

    1998-01-01

    A first-principles theory of inelastic tunneling between a model probe tip and an atom adsorbed on a surface is presented, extending the elastic tunneling theory of Tersoff and Hamann. The inelastic current is proportional to the change in the local density of states at the center of the tip due...... to the addition of the adsorbate. We use the theory to investigate the vibrational heating of an adsorbate below a scanning tunneling microscopy tip. We calculate the desorption rate of PI from Si(100)-H(2 X 1) as a function of the sample bias and tunnel current, and find excellent a,agreement with recent...

  16. Electronic “Edge” State on Molybdenite Basal Plane Observed by Ultrahigh-Vacuum Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Masaharu; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Yoda, Eisuke

    2007-09-01

    An electronic state heretofore unreported has been found on a cleaved basal plane of a natural molybdenite (MoS2) single crystal by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM), and examined in detail both by STM and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The new electronic state resides on the edge of the upper terrace of MoS2(0001), manifesting itself in the form of bright ridges with a width of ca. 4 nm along the step edges in negatively sample-biased STM images. This ridge structure is nonexistent in STM images taken with positive sample biases. STS showed that the local density of states (LDOS) on such ridge structures is much higher than that on the terraces in the range of 0.2-1.2 eV below the Fermi edge. The nature and origin of this high LDOS at the step edges are discussed.

  17. Preparation of scanning tunneling microscopy tips using pulsed alternating current etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, Victor A.; Thaker, Avesh A.; Derouin, Jonathan; Valencia, Damian N.; Farber, Rachael G.; Gebel, Dana A.; Killelea, Daniel R., E-mail: dkillelea@luc.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Loyola University Chicago, 1068 W. Sheridan Rd., Chicago, Illinois 60660 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    An electrochemical method using pulsed alternating current etching (PACE) to produce atomically sharp scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips is presented. An Arduino Uno microcontroller was used to control the number and duration of the alternating current (AC) pulses, allowing for ready optimization of the procedures for both Pt:Ir and W tips using a single apparatus. W tips prepared using constant and pulsed AC power were compared. Tips fashioned using PACE were sharper than those etched with continuous AC power alone. Pt:Ir tips were prepared with an initial coarse etching stage using continuous AC power followed by fine etching using PACE. The number and potential of the finishing AC pulses was varied and scanning electron microscope imaging was used to compare the results. Finally, tip quality using the optimized procedures was verified by UHV-STM imaging. With PACE, at least 70% of the W tips and 80% of the Pt:Ir tips were of sufficiently high quality to obtain atomically resolved images of HOPG or Ni(111)

  18. In silico simulations of tunneling barrier measurements for molecular orbital-mediated junctions: A molecular orbital theory approach to scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terryn, Raymond J.; Sriraman, Krishnan; Olson, Joel A., E-mail: jolson@fit.edu; Baum, J. Clayton, E-mail: cbaum@fit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, Florida 32901 (United States); Novak, Mark J. [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biological Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. Saint Joseph Street, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A new simulator for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented based on the linear combination of atomic orbitals molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) approximation for the effective tunneling Hamiltonian, which leads to the convolution integral when applied to the tip interaction with the sample. This approach intrinsically includes the structure of the STM tip. Through this mechanical emulation and the tip-inclusive convolution model, dI/dz images for molecular orbitals (which are closely associated with apparent barrier height, ϕ{sub ap}) are reported for the first time. For molecular adsorbates whose experimental topographic images correspond well to isolated-molecule quantum chemistry calculations, the simulator makes accurate predictions, as illustrated by various cases. Distortions in these images due to the tip are shown to be in accord with those observed experimentally and predicted by other ab initio considerations of tip structure. Simulations of the tunneling current dI/dz images are in strong agreement with experiment. The theoretical framework provides a solid foundation which may be applied to LCAO cluster models of adsorbate–substrate systems, and is extendable to emulate several aspects of functional STM operation.

  19. Atomic resolution on the (111 )B surface of mercury cadmium telluride by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Fang-Xing; Hong, Feng; Pan, Bi-Cai; Wang, Yin; Shao, Jun; Shen, Xue-Chu

    2018-01-01

    The real-space atomic surface structure of mercury cadmium telluride was successfully achieved on the (111 )B surface of H g0.78C d0.22Te by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The work casts light on the reconstructions of the (111 )B surface unraveling a (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction induced by adatom adsorption of Cd. The other (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction is clarified to be induced by the single Te vacancy, which is more stable than the reconstruction of multivacancies in contrast to the prevailing view. The simulated STM images are in good agreement with the experiments. We also observed an in situ morphology transition from the (1 ×1 ) structure to those (2 ×2 ) reconstructions, implying the stability of the reconstructions.

  20. Transient measurements with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    the transmission line while the change in delay time between pump beam (on the sample) and probe beam (on the probe) provides the temporal information. The investigated photoconductor sample is a low-temperature-grown GaAs layer placed on a sapphire substrate with a thin, semitransparent gold layer. In tunneling...

  1. Scan image compression-encryption hardware system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbakis, Nikolaos G.; Brause, R.; Alexopoulos, C.

    1995-04-01

    This paper deals with the hardware design of an image compression/encryption scheme called SCAN. The scheme is based on the principles and ideas reflected by the specification of the SCAN language. SCAN is a fractal based context-free language which accesses sequentially the data of a 2D array, by describing and generating a wide range (near (nxn)) of space filling curves (or SCAN patterns) from a short set of simple ones. The SCAN method uses the algorithmic description of each 2D image as SCAN patterns combinations for the compression and encryption of the image data. Note that each SCAN letter or word accesses the image data with a different order (or sequence), thus the application of a variety of SCAN words associated with the compression scheme will produce various compressed versions of the same image. The compressed versions are compared in memory size and the best of them with the smallest size in bits could be used for the image compression/encryption. Note that the encryption of the image data is a result of the great number of possible space filling curves which could be generated by SCAN. Since the software implementation of the SCAN compression/encryption scheme requires some time, the hardware design and implementation of the SCAN scheme is necessary in order to reduce the image compression/encryption time to the real-time one. The development of such an image compression encryption system will have a significant impact on the transmission and storage of images. It will be applicable in multimedia and transmission of images through communication lines.

  2. Development of a Millikelvin dual-tip Josephson scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychowdhury, Anita

    In this thesis, I first describe the design and construction of a dual-tip millikelvin STM system. The STM is mounted on a dilution refrigerator and the setup includes vibration isolation, rf-filtered wiring, an ultra high vacuum (UHV) sample preparation chamber and sample transfer mechanism. Next I describe a novel superconducting tip fabrication technique. My technique involves dry-etching sections of 250 mum diameter Nb wire with an SF6 plasma in a reactive ion etcher. I present data taken with these tips on various samples at temperatures ranging from 30 mK to 9 K. My results demonstrate that the tips are superconducting, achieve good spectroscopic energy resolution, are mechanically robust over long time periods, and are atomically sharp. I also show data characterizing the performance of our system. This data is in the form of atomic resolution images, spectroscopy, noise spectra and simultaneous scans taken with both tips of the STM. I used these to examine the tip-sample stability, cross talk between the two tips, and to extract the effective noise temperature (˜185 mK) of the sample by fitting the spectroscopy data to a voltage noise model. Finally, I present spectroscopy data taken with a Nb tip on a Nb(100) sample at 30 mK. The enhanced spectroscopic resolution at this temperature allowed me to resolve peaks in the fluctuation-dominated supercurrent at sub-gap voltages. My analysis indicates that these peaks are due to the incoherent tunneling of Cooper pairs at resonant frequencies of the STM's electromagnetic environment. By measuring the response of the STM junction to microwaves, I identified the charge carriers in this regime as Cooper pairs with charge 2e. The amplitude of the response current scales as the square of the Bessel functions, indicating that the pair tunneling originates from photon assisted tunneling in the incoherent regime, rather than the more conventionally observed Shapiro steps in the coherent regime.

  3. Multicolor Scanning Laser Imaging in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad S Z; Carrim, Zia Iqbal

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common cause of blindness in individuals younger than 60 years. Screening for retinopathy is undertaken using conventional color fundus photography and relies on the identification of hemorrhages, vascular abnormalities, exudates, and cotton-wool spots. These can sometimes be difficult to identify. Multicolor scanning laser imaging, a new imaging modality, may have a role in improving screening outcomes, as well as facilitating treatment decisions. Observational case series comprising two patients with known diabetes who were referred for further examination after color fundus photography revealed abnormal findings. Multicolor scanning laser imaging was undertaken. Features of retinal disease from each modality were compared. Multicolor scanning laser imaging provides superior visualization of retinal anatomy and pathology, thereby facilitating risk stratification and treatment decisions. Multicolor scanning laser imaging is a novel imaging technique offering the potential for improving the reliability of screening for diabetic retinopathy. Validation studies are warranted.

  4. Transient measurements with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope on semiconductor surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate: the use of an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope on a semiconductor surface. Laser-induced transient signals with 1.8 ps rise time are detected, The investigated sample is a low-temperature grown GaAs layer plated on a sapphire substrate with a thin gold layer that serves as st...... by the nonuniform carrier density created by the absorption of the light (photo Dember effect). The transient depends in sign and in shape on the direction of optical excitation. This signal is the dominating transient in tunneling mode. The signals are explained by a capacitive coupling across the tunneling gap...

  5. Construction of a Dual-Tip Scanning Tunneling Microscope: a Prototype Nanotechnology Workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Mark Alan

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation describes the construction and performance of a dual-tip scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The microscope was built as a prototype nanotechnology workstation, a general purpose instrument designed to give a researcher the ability to investigate and manipulate nanometer scale structures. Chapter One describes the genesis and development of the concept of nanotechnology, from the atomic hypothesis of Democritus to modern developments in synthetic chemistry. Nanometer scale electronics (molecular electronics) is introduced and the state of the art in this field is described. The dual-tip scanning probe microscope is proposed as a way to address individual molecular electronic devices, a key goal in realizing nanometer scale electronic technology. Investigation of microtubules, a proposed nanometer scale intracellular biological information processing system, is also discussed. Chapter Two reviews the history and fundamental physics of STM, along with the related techniques of Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Ballistic Electon Emission Microscopy (BEEM). BEEM is used to introduce the physics of the dual -tip STM. Other dual-probe systems are also described. Chapter Three covers the design and construction of the dual-tip STM. Both hardware and software are described in detail. Chapter Four presents the results obtained with the dual-tip STM, including dual-tip images and noise measurements for the electronic circuitry. The last chapter, Chapter Five, contains suggested design changes for improving the performance of the dual -tip microscope and descriptions of experiments that can be performed with an improved instrument. Design and use of a nanotechnology workstation in the fields of semiconductor electronics, molecular electronics and cellular biology is discussed. Investigation of neurons grown on a silicon chip with a dual-tip STM system is proposed. Four Appendices present a noise model of the STM tunneling gap and preamplifier, describe

  6. Interfacial scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of chalcogenide/metal hybrid nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Mahmoud M.; Abdallah, Tamer [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt); Easawi, Khalid; Negm, Sohair [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering (Shoubra), Benha University (Egypt); Talaat, Hassan, E-mail: hassantalaat@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Comparing band gaps values obtained optically with STS. • Comparing direct imaging with calculated dimensions. • STS determination of the interfacial band bending of metal/chalcogenide. - Abstract: The electronic structure at the interface of chalcogenide/metal hybrid nanostructure (CdSe–Au tipped) had been studied by UHV scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) technique at room temperature. This nanostructure was synthesized by a phase transfer chemical method. The optical absorption of this hybrid nanostructure was recorded, and the application of the effective mass approximation (EMA) model gave dimensions that were confirmed by the direct measurements using the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as the high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The energy band gap obtained by STS agrees with the values obtained from the optical absorption. Moreover, the STS at the interface of CdSe–Au tipped hybrid nanostructure between CdSe of size about 4.1 ± 0.19 nm and Au tip of size about 3.5 ± 0.29 nm shows a band bending about 0.18 ± 0.03 eV in CdSe down in the direction of the interface. Such a result gives a direct observation of the electron accumulation at the interface of CdSe–Au tipped hybrid nanostructure, consistent with its energy band diagram. The presence of the electron accumulation at the interface of chalcogenides with metals has an important implication for hybrid nanoelectronic devices and the newly developed plasmon/chalcogenide photovoltaic solar energy conversion.

  7. Development of a 3D modeling algorithm for tunnel deformation monitoring based on terrestrial laser scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongyao Xie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Deformation monitoring is vital for tunnel engineering. Traditional monitoring techniques measure only a few data points, which is insufficient to understand the deformation of the entire tunnel. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS is a newly developed technique that can collect thousands of data points in a few minutes, with promising applications to tunnel deformation monitoring. The raw point cloud collected from TLS cannot display tunnel deformation; therefore, a new 3D modeling algorithm was developed for this purpose. The 3D modeling algorithm includes modules for preprocessing the point cloud, extracting the tunnel axis, performing coordinate transformations, performing noise reduction and generating the 3D model. Measurement results from TLS were compared to the results of total station and numerical simulation, confirming the reliability of TLS for tunnel deformation monitoring. Finally, a case study of the Shanghai West Changjiang Road tunnel is introduced, where TLS was applied to measure shield tunnel deformation over multiple sections. Settlement, segment dislocation and cross section convergence were measured and visualized using the proposed 3D modeling algorithm.

  8. Visualizing the interface state of PTCDA on Au(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoara, N.; Méndez, J.; Gómez-Rodríguez, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) the electronic structure of PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) molecular monolayers grown on Au(111). Thanks to our STM/STS measurements, performed under ultra-high vacuum conditions and low temperature, an interface state directly derived from the Shockley-type surface state of pristine Au(111) has been detected. Low bias voltage STM images show the formation of standing wave patterns both on Au(111) and on Au(111) covered by a PTCDA monolayer. These patterns result from the scattering of quasi-free 2D electron surface states with surface defects. By Fourier transforming STM images, the corresponding wavevectors have been extracted. In particular, the simultaneous imaging of both pristine and PTCDA covered Au(111) areas has allowed to measure the Fermi contours and the Fermi wavevectors of both systems. These measurements show that one monolayer PTCDA on Au(111) presents an interface state with an isotropic circular Fermi contour and smaller Fermi wavector ({k}{{F}}=0.15+/- 0.01\\phantom{\\rule{thinmathspace}{0ex}}\\mathring{{{A}}}{}-1) than the corresponding Fermi wavector of pristine Au(111) ({k}{{F}}=0.17+/- 0.01\\phantom{\\rule{thinmathspace}{0ex}}\\mathring{{{A}}}{}-1). This picture is consistent with an upward shift of the Shockley-type surface state due to the presence of the molecular monolayer.

  9. Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Geometry Documentation and Construction Management of Highway Tunnels during Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Gikas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered.

  10. Three-dimensional laser scanning for geometry documentation and construction management of highway tunnels during excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered.

  11. Isometric Tunnel Placement in Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction with Single CT Scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Kholinne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Isometric tunnel placement for anterior bundle of the medial collateral ligament (MCL reconstruction is mandatory for successful surgery. Purpose. This study aimed to demonstrate a useful method for identifying isometric tunnel placement using a single computed tomography (CT scan. Study Design. Descriptive Laboratory Study. Methods. Five normal elbows were scanned at 4 different flexion angles at 45° increment. Three-dimensional models were analyzed using 2 different approaches: single and multiple CT scans methods. Ligament footprints in the humerus and the ulna were registered. Ligament length and isometric points were defined. The locations of the isometric points were imported into both methods to be compared. Results. There was no significant difference between 2 methods in calculating the length in every zone. There was also no significant difference in determining isometric ligament’s origin point, which is located approximately 18.2±4.0 mm and 18.4±2.9 mm for single and multiple CT, respectively, measured inferolaterally from medial epicondyle. Conclusions. A solid preoperative plan is critical when predicting tunnel locations due to the difficulty in finding isometric points and the individuality of optimal bone tunnel locations. Using single CT scan, optimal locations can be predicted with the same accuracy as a multiple CT scans with less radiation exposure.

  12. Oxygen-free in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2007-01-01

    containing organic molecule cysteamine and the biomolecule homocysteine. The third example is the iron-sulfur protein ferredoxin (Pyrococcus furiosus). Monolayers of these molecules on Au(111) are imaged to molecular resolution and the images compared in the presence and absence of oxygen. In all the cases...

  13. A 30 mK, 13.5 T scanning tunneling microscope with two independent tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychowdhury, Anita; Gubrud, M. A.; Dana, R.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.; Dreyer, M.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of an ultra-low temperature, high-field scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with two independent tips. The STM is mounted on a dilution refrigerator and operates at a base temperature of 30 mK with magnetic fields of up to 13.5 T. We focus on the design of the two-tip STM head, as well as the sample transfer mechanism, which allows in situ transfer from an ultra high vacuum preparation chamber while the STM is at 1.5 K. Other design details such as the vibration isolation and rf-filtered wiring are also described. Their effectiveness is demonstrated via spectral current noise characteristics and the root mean square roughness of atomic resolution images. The high-field capability is shown by the magnetic field dependence of the superconducting gap of CuxBi2Se3. Finally, we present images and spectroscopy taken with superconducting Nb tips with the refrigerator at 35 mK that indicate that the effective temperature of our tips/sample is approximately 184 mK, corresponding to an energy resolution of 16 μeV.

  14. Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Thomas; Simon, Georg H; Heinke, Lars; Lichtenstein, Leonid; Heyde, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Surfaces of thin oxide films were investigated by means of a dual mode NC-AFM/STM. Apart from imaging the surface termination by NC-AFM with atomic resolution, point defects in magnesium oxide on Ag(001) and line defects in aluminum oxide on NiAl(110), respectively, were thoroughly studied. The contact potential was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and the electronic structure by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). On magnesium oxide, different color centers, i.e., F(0), F(+), F(2+) and divacancies, have different effects on the contact potential. These differences enabled classification and unambiguous differentiation by KPFM. True atomic resolution shows the topography at line defects in aluminum oxide. At these domain boundaries, STS and KPFM verify F(2+)-like centers, which have been predicted by density functional theory calculations. Thus, by determining the contact potential and the electronic structure with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range, NC-AFM and STM can be successfully applied on thin oxide films beyond imaging the topography of the surface atoms.

  15. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Crystalline Hydrogenation of Graphene Grown on Cu(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjung, Steven J.; Gambrel, Grady A.; Hollen, Shawna M.; Gupta, Jay A.

    Because of the sensitivity of 2D material surfaces, chemical functionalization can be exploited to tune the electronic structure of these materials. For example, hydrogen bonding to carbon atoms in graphene tunes the material from a semi-metal to a wide-gap insulator. We developed a method for a reproducible epitaxial growth of graphene on Cu(111) in the ultra-high vacuum chamber of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). We find that hydrogen atoms can be bonded to the graphene in a nanoscale region using a novel field-emission process, whereby physisorbed H2 is cracked in situ using the STM tip. This method produced crystalline surfaces of hydrogen-terminated graphene with 4.2Å lattice, which has proven difficult to produce using conventional atomic beam methods which typically produced disordered hydrogenation. Additionally, this hydrogenation process is reversible and we are able to recover the pristine graphene by H desorption during STM imaging at a high bias. STM images after the dehydrogenation process showed the same atomic lattice and Moiré pattern as the pristine graphene, with the exception of additional point defects. STM spectra show the suppression of the Cu surface state on the hydrogenated graphene, but the opening of a wide-gap was not observed. Funded by the Center for Emergent Materials at the Ohio State University, an NSF MRSEC (Grant No. DMR-1420451 and DMR-0820414).

  16. Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas König

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfaces of thin oxide films were investigated by means of a dual mode NC-AFM/STM. Apart from imaging the surface termination by NC-AFM with atomic resolution, point defects in magnesium oxide on Ag(001 and line defects in aluminum oxide on NiAl(110, respectively, were thoroughly studied. The contact potential was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM and the electronic structure by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS. On magnesium oxide, different color centers, i.e., F0, F+, F2+ and divacancies, have different effects on the contact potential. These differences enabled classification and unambiguous differentiation by KPFM. True atomic resolution shows the topography at line defects in aluminum oxide. At these domain boundaries, STS and KPFM verify F2+-like centers, which have been predicted by density functional theory calculations. Thus, by determining the contact potential and the electronic structure with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range, NC-AFM and STM can be successfully applied on thin oxide films beyond imaging the topography of the surface atoms.

  17. Preparation of Chemically Etched Tips for Ambient Instructional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccardi, Margot J.; Winkelmann, Kurt; Olson, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    A first-year laboratory experiment that utilizes concepts of electrochemical tip etching for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is described. This experiment can be used in conjunction with any STM experiment. Students electrochemically etch gold STM tips using a time-efficient method, which can then be used in an instructional grade STM that…

  18. Simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast in scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Volker; Preissner, Curt A; Hla, Saw-Wai; Wang, Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A method and system for performing simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast analysis in a scanning, tunneling microscope. The method and system also includes nanofabricated coaxial multilayer tips with a nanoscale conducting apex and a programmable in-situ nanomanipulator to fabricate these tips and also to rotate tips controllably.

  19. Real-time scanning tunneling microscopy studies of thin film deposition and ion erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis I present my research on the physics of some important processes in the production of thin films. I studied physical vapour deposition (PVD) and thin film modification through ion bombardment using a newly developed, high-speed scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The instrument has

  20. Local electronic structure of Fe(001) surfaces studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, M.M.J.; Yamada, T.K.; Fang, C.M.; Groot, R.A. de; Kempen, H. van

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy is used to study the local electronic structure of Fe(001) whiskers. The influence of a voltage dependent background on the apparent peak energies in the dI/dV curves is discussed. A relation between this background and the apparent barrier height is established. The

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy in TTF-TCNQ: Phase and amplitude modulated charge density waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Z.Z.; Gorard, J.C.; Pasquier, C.

    2003-01-01

    Charge density waves (CDWs) have been studied at the surface of a cleaved tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) single crystal using a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions, between 300 and 33 K with molecular resolution. All CDW...

  2. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Topological Insulators Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Qikun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We summarize our recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM study of topological insulator thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE, which includes the observation of electron standing waves on topological insulator surface and the Landau quantization of topological surface states. The work has provided valuable information to the understanding of intriguing properties of topological insulators, as predicted by theory.

  3. Measurements with an ultrafast scanning tunnelling microscope on photoexcited semiconductor layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    Summary form only given. We demonstrate the use of a ultrafast scanning tunnelling microscopes (USTM) for detecting laser-induced field transients on semiconductor layers. In principle, the instrument can detect transient field changes thus far observed as far-field THz radiation in the near-fiel...

  4. Adsorption of Cu phthalocyanine on Pt modified Ge(001): A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, A.; Berkelaar, Robin P.; Kumar, Avijit; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption configurations of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on platinum-modified Ge(001) have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. After deposition at room temperature and cooling down to 77 K the CuPc molecules are still dynamic. However, after annealing at 550±50 K, the

  5. Quasi interference of perpendicularly polarized guided modes observed with a photon scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balistreri, M.L.M.; Driessen, A.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2000-01-01

    The simultaneous detection of TE- as well as TM-polarized light with a photon scanning tunneling microscope leads to a quasi- interference pattern of these mutually perpendicular polarized fields. This interference pattern has been observed in the optical field distribution as a function of both

  6. Chain-like structure elements in Ni40Ta60 metallic glasses observed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Rémy; Marot, Laurent; Sadeghi, Ali; Kawai, Shigeki; Glatzel, Thilo; Reimann, Peter; Goedecker, Stefan; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-08-13

    The structure of metallic glasses is a long-standing question because the lack of long-range order makes diffraction based techniques difficult to be applied. Here, we used scanning tunneling microscopy with large tunneling resistance of 6 GΩ at low temperature in order to minimize forces between probe and sample and reduce thermal fluctuations of metastable structures. Under these extremely gentle conditions, atomic structures of Ni40Ta60 metallic glasses are revealed with unprecedented lateral resolution. In agreement with previous models and experiments, icosahedral-like clusters are observed. The clusters show a high degree of mobility, which explains the need of low temperatures for stable imaging. In addition to icosahedrons, chain-like structures are resolved and comparative density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirm that these structures are meta-stable. The co-existence of icosahedral and chain-like structures might be an key ingredient for the understanding of the mechanical properties of metallic glasses.

  7. Method to characterize the vibrational response of a beetle type scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, S.; Rose, M.K.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We describe a method for analyzing the external vibrations and intrinsic mechanical resonances affecting scanning probe microscopes by using the microscope as an accelerometer. We show that clear correlations can be established between the frequencies of mechanical vibrational modes and the frequencies of peaks in the tunnel current noise power spectrum. When this method is applied to our {open_quotes}beetle{close_quotes} type scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we find unexpected low frequency {open_quotes}rattling resonances{close_quotes} in the 500{endash}1700 Hz range that depend on the exact lateral position of the STM, in addition to the expected mechanical resonances of the STM above 4 kHz which are in good agreement with theoretical estimates. We believe that these rattling resonances may be a general problem for scanning probe microscopes that use some type of kinetic motion for coarse positioning. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    This thesis is concerned with fundamental research into electronic and magnetic interaction on the nanoscale. From small metallic and magnetic islands and layers to single atoms. The research revolves around magnetic interaction probed through the spectroscopic capabilities of the scanning....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...... coverage the silver preferably nucleates on top of the bilayer high cobalt islands compared to directly on the Cu(111) substrate. Furthermore, the silver forms a combination of a reconstruction and a Moire pattern which is investigated with low-energy electron diraction and spectroscopic STM mapping at 6...

  9. Field-Induced Deformation as a Mechanism for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Based Nanofabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole; Ravnkilde, Jan Tue; Quaade, Ulrich

    1998-01-01

    The voltage between tip and sample in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) results in a large electric field localized near the tip apex. The mechanical stress due to this field can cause appreciable deformation of both tip and sample on the scale of the tunnel gap. We derive an approximate...... analytical expression for this deformation and confirm the validity of the result by comparison with a finite element analysis. We derive the condition for a field-induced jump to contact of tip and sample and show that this agrees well with experimental results for material transfer between tip and sample...... by voltage pulsing in ultrahigh vacuum....

  10. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Related Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-26

    imaged the spiral structure, based on n-reverse turns, of the elastomeric wheat gluten proteins (D401). Masai et al. observed the sheet-type paracrystal 23...88, 68-71. (D402) Masai , J.; Shibata, T.; Kondo, S.; Isbiwata, S. J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 1ŕ, 9, 1177-9. (D403) Heckl, W.M.; Smith, D.P.E.; Binnig, G

  11. Copper intercalation at the interface of graphene and Ir(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicot, M.; Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Kierren, B.; Vasseur, G.; Malterre, D.

    2014-11-01

    We report on the intercalation of a submonolayer of copper at 775 K underneath graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111) studied by means of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77 K. Nucleation and growth dynamics of Cu below graphene have been investigated, and, most importantly, the intercalation mechanism has been identified. First, LEED patterns reveal the pseudomorphic growth of Cu on Ir under the topmost graphene layer resulting in a large Cu in-plane lattice parameter expansion of about 6% compared to Cu(111). Second, large-scale STM topographs as a function of Cu coverage show that Cu diffusion on Ir below graphene exhibits a low energy barrier resulting in Cu accumulation at Ir step edges. As a result, the graphene sheet undergoes a strong edges reshaping. Finally, atomically-resolved STM images reveal a damaged graphene sheet at the atomic scale after metal intercalation. Point defects in graphene were shown to be carbon vacancies. According to these results, a Cu penetration path beneath graphene is proposed to occur via metal aided defect formation with no or poor self healing of the graphene sheet. This work illustrates the fact that Cu intercalation is harmful for graphene grown on Ir(111) at the atomic scale.

  12. Improved design for a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with an in situ tip treatment stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-J.; Joo, S. H.; Lee, K. S.; Yoo, J. H.; Park, M. S.; Kwak, J. S.; Lee, Jinho

    2017-04-01

    The Low Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscope (LT-STM) is an extremely valuable tool not only in surface science but also in condensed matter physics. For years, numerous new ideas have been adopted to perfect LT-STM performances—Ultra-Low Vibration (ULV) laboratory and the rigid STM head design are among them. Here, we present three improvements for the design of the ULV laboratory and the LT-STM: tip treatment stage, sample cleaving stage, and vibration isolation system. The improved tip treatment stage enables us to perform field emission for the purpose of tip treatment in situ without exchanging samples, while our enhanced sample cleaving stage allows us to cleave samples at low temperature in a vacuum without optical access by a simple pressing motion. Our newly designed vibration isolation system provides efficient space usage while maintaining vibration isolation capability. These improvements enhance the quality of spectroscopic imaging experiments that can last for many days and provide increased data yield, which we expect can be indispensable elements in future LT-STM designs.

  13. The study of transition metal surfaces and thin films with inverse photoemission and scanning tunnelling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, L K

    1997-01-01

    clean Cr(001) and the thick films. This suggests that hybridisation between the substrate bands and the film bands and interface induced states are significant. The spectra taken from sub-monolayer coverages of Fe show marked intensity increase at the Fermi energy, this is a feature of LDOS calculations on Fe atoms at the Fe/Cr interface. Fe growth on surfaces of Cu(100) precovered with c(2x2)N has been studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy. The images show that the Fe does not grow on areas covered with nitrogen. Two different c(2x2)N templates have been used and the shape and size of the Fe islands is seen to be altered. The unoccupied electronic states at the surface of Cr(001) have been observed using k-resolved inverse photoemission. Normal incidence IPE spectra have been taken over a range of incident electron energies (14-24 eV). The spectra show only small variation with incident energy, this is attributed to densities of states effects due to the absence of symmetry allowed initial states at th...

  14. Dynamics of tetraphenylporphyrins on a copper (111) surface: A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaessel, Stefanie; Buchner, Florian; Zillner, Elisabeth; Roeckert, Michael; Steinrueck, Hans-Peter; Marbach, Hubertus [Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II and Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials (ICMM), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The understanding of the properties of large organic molecules at surfaces is a requirement to utilize their functional properties either in single-molecule devices or in organized supramolecular architectures. Here we concentrate on the investigation of the dynamics and self-assembly of tetraphenylporphyrins (TPP) on Cu(111) using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). STM images of ordered molecular arrays and individual molecules with submolecular resolution enable to determine the supramolecular and intramolecular conformation of the porphyrins. Interestingly, 2HTPP molecules exhibit a mainly one dimensional diffusion along the main crystallographic axes of Cu(111) at room temperature, whereas CoTPP molecules form ordered arrays. Based on STM movies acquired at varying sample temperatures fundamental parameters of the molecular motion of 2HTPP on Cu(111), like the activation energy for diffusion and rotation could be estimated. These results allow a deeper understanding of the corresponding molecule-molecule and molecule-substrate interactions and thus the assembly of the observed porphyrins.

  15. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  16. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy study of the proximity effect in a disordered two-dimensional metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrier-Garcia, L; Cuevas, J C; Cren, T; Brun, C; Cherkez, V; Debontridder, F; Fokin, D; Bergeret, F S; Roditchev, D

    2013-04-12

    The proximity effect between a superconductor and a highly diffusive two-dimensional metal is revealed in a scanning tunneling spectroscopy experiment. The in situ elaborated samples consist of superconducting single crystalline Pb islands interconnected by a nonsuperconducting atomically thin disordered Pb wetting layer. In the vicinity of each superconducting island the wetting layer acquires specific tunneling characteristics which reflect the interplay between the proximity-induced superconductivity and the inherent electron correlations of this ultimate diffusive two-dimensional metal. The observed spatial evolution of the tunneling spectra is accounted for theoretically by combining the Usadel equations with the theory of dynamical Coulomb blockade; the relevant length and energy scales are extracted and found in agreement with available experimental data.

  17. Simultaneous scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron X-ray measurements in a gas environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mom, Rik V; Onderwaater, Willem G; Rost, Marcel J; Jankowski, Maciej; Wenzel, Sabine; Jacobse, Leon; Alkemade, Paul F A; Vandalon, Vincent; van Spronsen, Matthijs A; van Weeren, Matthijs; Crama, Bert; van der Tuijn, Peter; Felici, Roberto; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Carlà, Francesco; Frenken, Joost W M; Groot, Irene M N

    2017-11-01

    A combined X-ray and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) instrument is presented that enables the local detection of X-ray absorption on surfaces in a gas environment. To suppress the collection of ion currents generated in the gas phase, coaxially shielded STM tips were used. The conductive outer shield of the coaxial tips can be biased to deflect ions away from the tip core. When tunneling, the X-ray-induced current is separated from the regular, 'topographic' tunneling current using a novel high-speed separation scheme. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by measuring the local X-ray-induced current on Au(1 1 1) in 800 mbar Ar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Spin scan tomographic array-based imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Harald

    2014-12-29

    This work presents a novel imaging device based on tomographic reconstruction. Similar in certain aspects to the earlier presented tomographic scanning (TOSCA) principle, it provides several important enhancements. The device described generates a stream of one-dimensional projections from a linear array of thin stripe detectors onto which the (circular) image of the scene is rotated. A two-dimensional image is then reproduced from the one-dimensional signals using tomographic processing techniques. A demonstrator is presented. Various aspects of the design and construction are discussed, and resulting images and movies are presented.

  19. A NEW APPROACH FOR SUBWAY TUNNEL DEFORMATION MONITORING: HIGH-RESOLUTION TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available With the improvement of the accuracy and efficiency of laser scanning technology, high-resolution terrestrial laser scanning (TLS technology can obtain high precise points-cloud and density distribution and can be applied to high-precision deformation monitoring of subway tunnels and high-speed railway bridges and other fields. In this paper, a new approach using a points-cloud segmentation method based on vectors of neighbor points and surface fitting method based on moving least squares was proposed and applied to subway tunnel deformation monitoring in Tianjin combined with a new high-resolution terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl VZ-400. There were three main procedures. Firstly, a points-cloud consisted of several scanning was registered by linearized iterative least squares approach to improve the accuracy of registration, and several control points were acquired by total stations (TS and then adjusted. Secondly, the registered points-cloud was resampled and segmented based on vectors of neighbor points to select suitable points. Thirdly, the selected points were used to fit the subway tunnel surface with moving least squares algorithm. Then a series of parallel sections obtained from temporal series of fitting tunnel surfaces were compared to analysis the deformation. Finally, the results of the approach in z direction were compared with the fiber optical displacement sensor approach and the results in x, y directions were compared with TS respectively, and comparison results showed the accuracy errors of x, y, z directions were respectively about 1.5 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm. Therefore the new approach using high-resolution TLS can meet the demand of subway tunnel deformation monitoring.

  20. Plasmons and Electrons as Nanosecond-Fast Sensors for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    The ability to measure the fast dynamical evolution of atomic-scale systems often holds the key to their understanding. We combine fast pump-probe spectroscopy tools with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to study atomically assembled arrays of magnetic atoms. The dynamical information quantifies spin lifetimes, magnetic stability and even allows identifying the cross-over between quantum spins and classical magnetism. The spin relaxation times of transition metal atoms can be measured by all-electronic pump probe spectroscopy in which nanosecond-fast voltage pulses excite the spins and probe the average time-dependent response by variations in the spin-polarized tunnel current. In addition, the fast evolution of the local electrostatic potential can be mapped by detecting plasmonic light emission from the STM tunnel junction with time correlating single photon counting. The combination of electrical stimulus and optical detection provides precise control of the excitation process of individual atoms enabling new experiments to probe charge and spin dynamics in the scanning tunneling microscope.

  1. Scanning tunneling potentiometry implemented into a multi-tip setup by software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüpke, F; Korte, S; Cherepanov, V; Voigtländer, B

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-tip scanning tunneling potentiometry technique that can be implemented into existing multi-tip scanning tunneling microscopes without installation of additional hardware. The resulting setup allows flexible in situ contacting of samples under UHV conditions and subsequent measurement of the sample topography and local electric potential with resolution down to Å and μV, respectively. The performance of the potentiometry feedback is demonstrated by thermovoltage measurements on the Ag/Si(111)-(√3×√3)R30° surface by resolving a standing wave pattern. Subsequently, the ability to map the local transport field as a result of a lateral current through the sample surface is shown on Ag/Si(111)-(√3×√3)R30° and Si(111) - (7 × 7) surfaces.

  2. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of different porphynoids on a Ni-prestructured Cu(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeckert, Michael; Buchner, Florian; Zillner, Elisabeth; Glaessel, Stefanie; Steinrueck, Hans-Peter; Marbach, Hubertus [Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II and Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials (ICMM), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The assembly of organic molecules on single-crystal surfaces is an approach towards the creation of novel materials with outstanding properties. Porphyrins appear to be ideal candidates to generate functional molecular devices, due to their self-assembly properties and their versatile functionality. In the present work we study the possibility to locally anchor or functionalize porphyrins on a prestructured surface, namely a composite Ni/Cu(111) surface, by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Based on scanning tunneling micrographs and movies the dynamics, assembly and intramolecular conformation of the corresponding porphyrins (2HTPP,CoTPP,OEP) as well as the role of molecule-molecule and molecule-substrate interactions are discussed. The obtained findings indeed indicate the possibility to locally anchor and/or functionalize (e.g. metalate) the porphyrins on a Cu(111) surface prestructured either with atomically flat Ni- or oxygen-islands.

  3. Parallel line scanning ophthalmoscope for retinal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vienola, K.V.; Damodaran, M.; Braaf, B.; Vermeer, K.A.; de Boer, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    A parallel line scanning ophthalmoscope (PLSO) is presented using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for parallel confocal line imaging of the retina. The posterior part of the eye is illuminated using up to seven parallel lines, which were projected at 100 Hz. The DMD offers a high degree of

  4. Cross-Sectional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of InAsSb/InAsP Superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allerman, A.A.; Biefeld, R.M.; Yu, E.T.; Zuo, S.L.

    1999-02-10

    Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to characterize compositional structure in InAs{sub 0.87}Sb{sub 0.13}/InAs{sub 0.73}P{sub 0.27} and InAs{sub 0.83}Sb{sub 0.17}/InAs{sub 0.60}P{sub 0.40} strained-layer superlattice structures grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. High-resolution STM images of the (110) cross section reveal compositional features within both the InAs{sub x}Sb{sub 1{minus}x} and InAs{sub y}P{sub 1{minus}y} alloy layers oriented along the [{bar 1}12] and [1{bar 1}2] directions--the same as those in which features would be observed for CuPt-B type ordered alloys. Typically one variant dominates in a given area, although occasionally the coexistence of both variants is observed. Furthermore, such features in the alloy layers appear to be correlated across heterojunction interfaces in a manner that provides support for III-V alloy ordering models which suggest that compositional order can arise from strain-induced order near the surface of an epitaxially growing crystal. Finally, atomically resolved (1{bar 1}0) images obtained from the InAs{sub 0.87}Sb{sub 0.13}/InAs{sub 0.73}P{sub 0.27} sample reveal compositional features in the [112] and [{bar 1}{bar 1}2] directions, i.e., those in which features would be observed for CuPt-A type ordering.

  5. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on heavy-fermion systems; Rastertunnelspektroskopie an Schwere-Fermionen-Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Stefan

    2011-06-24

    in the framework of this thesis different heavy-fermion systems were studied by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. In the experiment two main topics existed. On the one hand the heavy-fermion superconductivity in the compounds CeCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, CeCoIn{sub 5}, and on the other hand the Kondo effect in the Kondo-lattice system YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}.

  6. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...... a quasipoint source with a spatial extension similar to the size of a dangling bond. [S0031-9007(98)08376-8]....

  7. The tip-sample water bridge and light emission from scanning tunnelling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Michael G; Mitra, J; Dawson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Light emission spectrum from a scanning tunnelling microscope (LESTM) is investigated as a function of relative humidity and shown to be a novel and sensitive means for probing the growth and properties of a water meniscus in the nm-scale. An empirical model of the light emission process is formulated and applied successfully to replicate the decay in light intensity and spectral changes observed with increasing relative humidity. The modelling indicates a progressive water filling of the tip...

  8. Pulse Plating on Gold Surfaces Studied by In Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    Deposition of bulk copper on thin film gold surfaces is carried out by computer-aided pulse plating. It is demonstrated that the morphology of the copper deposit can be studied by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy both in potentiostatic experiments and in galvanostatic experiments. Optimized...... procedures for obtaining smooth deposits by pulse plating are explained in terms of a levelling effect. Possible non-faradaic processes observed in measurements with high frequency pulse plating are discussed....

  9. Fermi-level alignment at metal-carbon nanotube interfaces: application to scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Yongqiang; Datta, Supriyo

    1999-01-01

    At any metal-carbon nanotube interface there is charge transfer and the induced interfacial field determines the position of the carbon nanotube band structure relative to the metal Fermi-level. In the case of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) supported on a gold substrate, we show that the charge transfers induce a local electrostatic potential perturbation which gives rise to the observed Fermi-level shift in scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements. We also discuss the relevan...

  10. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of Charge Density Wave Structure in Tantalum Disulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Ruth Ellen

    I have used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to image simultaneously the atomic lattice and the charge density wave (CDW) superstructure in tantalum disulfide (1T-TaS_2) over the temperature range of 370-77K. In the lowest temperature (commensurate) phase, present below 180K, the CDW is at an angle of 13.9 ^circ relative to the lattice and is uniformly commensurate. In the incommensurate phase, present above 353K, the CDW is aligned with the lattice. 1T-TaS_2 exhibits two other phases; the triclinic (T) phase which is present between 223K and 283K upon warming the sample, and the nearly-commensurate (NC) phase which is present between 353K and 180K upon cooling the sample and between 283K and 353K upon warming the sample. In both of these phases, discommensurate models where the CDW is arranged in small commensurate domains have been proposed. In the NC phase the CDW is rotated between 10^circ and 12.5 ^circ relative to the atomic lattice. Such a rotated CDW would create an interference pattern with the underlying atomic lattice regardless of the existence of a true domain superstructure. Previous work on 1T-TaS _2 has not adequately accounted for the possibility of the moire pattern. However, around each fundamental CDW peak in the Fourier transform of the real space STM images, several satellite spots are visible, which conclusively prove the existence of domains in the NC phase. In the T phase, STM images clearly show discommensurations and domains of the CDW which are verified by the satellite spots in the Fourier transform. However, the shape and size of these domains do not agree with those of the stretched honeycomb model proposed by Nakanishi and Shiba, but do agree with the striped model developed by my co-worker B. Burk from his new x-ray diffraction results. In addition, I report on our STM studies of two other CDW materials, blue bronze and o-TaS_3. With blue bronze we obtain STM images of the atomic structure but do not observe the CDW. With o

  11. Real-space imaging of molecular structure and chemical bonding by single-molecule inelastic tunneling probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chi-lun; Xu, Chen; Han, Zhumin; Ho, W

    2014-05-23

    The arrangement of atoms and bonds in a molecule influences its physical and chemical properties. The scanning tunneling microscope can provide electronic and vibrational signatures of single molecules. However, these signatures do not relate simply to the molecular structure and bonding. We constructed an inelastic tunneling probe based on the scanning tunneling microscope to sense the local potential energy landscape of an adsorbed molecule with a carbon monoxide (CO)-terminated tip. The skeletal structure and bonding of the molecule are revealed from imaging the spatial variations of a CO vibration as the CO-terminated tip probes the core of the interactions between adjacent atoms. An application of the inelastic tunneling probe reveals the sharing of hydrogen atoms among multiple centers in intramolecular and extramolecular bonding. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. A study of surface diffusion with the scanning tunneling microscope from fluctuations of the tunneling current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuel, Lozano [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-01-12

    The transport of atoms or molecules over surfaces has been an important area of study for several decades now, with its progress generally limited by the available experimental techniques to characterize the phenomena. A number of methods have been developed over the years to measure surface diffusion yet only very few systems have been characterized to this day mainly due to the physical limitations inherent in these available methods. Even the STM with its astonishing atomically-resolved images of the surface has been limited in terms of its capability to determine mass transport properties. This is because the STM is inherently a ``slow`` instrument, i.e., a finite time is needed for signal averaging in order to produce the image. A need exists for additional surface diffusion measurement techniques, ideally ones which are able to study varied systems and measure a wide range of diffusion rates. The STM (especially because of its highly local nature) presents itself as a promising tool to conduct dynamical studies if its poor time resolution during ``normal operation`` can somehow be overcome. The purpose of this dissertation is to introduce a new technique of using the STM to measure adatom mobility on surfaces -- one with a capacity to achieve excellent time resolution.

  13. In situ high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy study of bilayer graphene growth on 6H-SiC(0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Yuya [Dept. Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Petrova, V.; Petrov, I. [Frederick-Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kodambaka, S., E-mail: kodambaka@ucla.edu [Dept. Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Using in situ high-temperature (1395 K), ultra-high vacuum, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we investigated the growth of bilayer graphene on 6H-SiC(0001). From the STM images, we measured areal coverages of SiC and graphene as a function of annealing time and found that graphene grows at the expense of SiC. Graphene domains were observed to grow, at comparable rates, at (I) graphene-free SiC step edges, (II) graphene-SiC interfaces, and (III) the existing graphene domain edges. Based upon our results, we suggest that the rate-limiting step controlling bilayer graphene growth is the desorption of Si from the substrate. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of scanning tunneling microscopy at temperatures as high as 1395 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct observation of graphene formation on SiC surfaces at the growth temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of atomic-scale pathways for bilayer graphene growth.

  14. Facile synthesis and electron transport properties of NiO nanostructures investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Mallick

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique chemical, thermal, electronic and photonic properties, low -dimensional transition metal oxides, especially NiO, have attracted great deal of attention for potential applications in a wide range of technologies, such as, sensors, electrochromic coatings and self-healing materials. However, their synthesis involves multi-step complex procedures that in addition to being expensive, further introduce impurities. Here we present a low cost facile approach to synthesize uniform size NiO nanoparticles (NPs from hydrothermally grown Ni(OH2. Detailed transmission electron microscopic analysis reveal the average size of NiO NPs to be around 29 nm. The dimension of NiO NP is also corroborated by the small area scanning tunneling microscope (STM measurements. Further, we investigate electron transport characteristics of newly synthesized Ni(OH2 and NiO nanoparticles on p-type Si substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy. The conductivity of Ni(OH2 and NiO are determined to be 1.46x10-3 S/cm and 2.37x10-5 S/cm, respectively. The NiO NPs exhibit a lower voltage window (∼0.7 V electron tunneling than the parent Ni(OH2.

  15. Facile synthesis and electron transport properties of NiO nanostructures investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Govind; Labh, Jyotsna; Giri, Lily; Pandey, Avinash C.; Karna, Shashi P.

    2017-08-01

    Due to their unique chemical, thermal, electronic and photonic properties, low -dimensional transition metal oxides, especially NiO, have attracted great deal of attention for potential applications in a wide range of technologies, such as, sensors, electrochromic coatings and self-healing materials. However, their synthesis involves multi-step complex procedures that in addition to being expensive, further introduce impurities. Here we present a low cost facile approach to synthesize uniform size NiO nanoparticles (NPs) from hydrothermally grown Ni(OH)2. Detailed transmission electron microscopic analysis reveal the average size of NiO NPs to be around 29 nm. The dimension of NiO NP is also corroborated by the small area scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measurements. Further, we investigate electron transport characteristics of newly synthesized Ni(OH)2 and NiO nanoparticles on p-type Si substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy. The conductivity of Ni(OH)2 and NiO are determined to be 1.46x10-3 S/cm and 2.37x10-5 S/cm, respectively. The NiO NPs exhibit a lower voltage window (˜0.7 V) electron tunneling than the parent Ni(OH)2.

  16. Imaging a vertical shaft from a tunnel using muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Dorsey, D. J.; Schwellenbach, D.; Green, A.; Smalley, D.

    2015-12-01

    We use muon technology to image a vertical shaft from a tunnel. The density of the materials through which cosmic ray muons pass influences the flux of muons because muons are more attenuated by higher density material. Additionally, muons can travel several kilometers allowing measurements through deep rock. Density maps are generated from muon flux measurements to locate subsurface features like tunnel structures and ore bodies. Additionally, muon data can be jointly inverted with other data such as gravity and seismic to produce higher quality earth models than produced from a single method. We collected several weeks of data in a tunnel to image a vertical shaft. The minimum length of rock between the vertical shaft and the detector is 120 meters and the diameter of the vertical shaft is 4.6 meters. The rock the muons traveled through consists of Tertiary age volcanic tuff and steeply dipping, small-displacement faults. Results will be presented for muon flux in the tunnel and Monte-Carlo simulations of this experiment. Simulations from both GEANT4 (Geometry And Tracking version 4) and MCNP6 (Monte-Carlo N-Particle version 6) models will be compared. The tunnel overburden from muon measurements is also estimated and compared with actual the overburden. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Atomic scale images of acceptors in III-V semiconductors. Band bending, tunneling paths and wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loth, S.

    2007-10-26

    This thesis reports measurements of single dopant atoms in III-V semiconductors with low temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS). It investigates the anisotropic spatial distribution of acceptor induced tunneling processes at the {l_brace}110{r_brace} cleavage planes. Two different tunneling processes are identified: conventional imaging of the squared acceptor wave function and resonant tunneling at the charged acceptor. A thorough analysis of the tip induced space charge layers identifies characteristic bias windows for each tunnel process. The symmetry of the host crystal's band structure determines the spatial distribution of the tunneling paths for both processes. Symmetry reducing effects at the surface are responsible for a pronounced asymmetry of the acceptor contrasts along the principal [001] axis. Uniaxial strain fields due to surface relaxation and spin orbit interaction of the tip induced electric field are discussed on the basis of band structure calculations. High-resolution STS studies of acceptor atoms in an operating p-i-n diode confirm that an electric field indeed changes the acceptor contrasts. In conclusion, the anisotropic contrasts of acceptors are created by the host crystal's band structure and concomitant symmetry reduction effects at the surface. (orig.)

  18. Cytochrome C Dynamics at Gold and Glassy Carbon Surfaces Monitored by in Situ Scanning Tunnel Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per; Pedersen, Marianne Vind

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the absorption of cytochrome c on gold and glassy carbon substrates by in situ scanning tunnel microscopy under potentiostatic control of both substrate and tip. Low ionic strength and potential ranges where no Faradaic current flows were used. Cyt c aggregates into flat...... composite structures of about 50 nm lateral extension at gold surfaces. The aggregates evolve in time, and structures resembling individual cyt c molecules can be distinguished in the space between the 50 nm structures. Cyt c aggregates also form at glassy carbon but have a different, unbroken character...

  19. Atomic-scale structure of dislocations revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jesper; Morgenstern, K.; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    The intersection between dislocations and a Ag(111) surface has been studied using an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular dynamics. Whereas the STM provides atomically resolved information about the surface structure and Burgers vectors of the dislocations......, the simulations can be used to determine dislocation structure and orientation in the near-surface region. In a similar way, the subsurface structure of other extended defects can be studied. The simulations show dislocations to reorient the partials in the surface region leading to an increased splitting width...

  20. Creating Nanoscale Pits on Solid Surfaces in Aqueous Environment with Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong; Friis, Esben P.

    2000-01-01

    A novel method has been developed to fabricate nanoscale pits on Au(111) in aqueous environments by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), based on critical interactions between tip and substrate. The most striking advantages of the present method are that the dimension and position...... of the pits can be controlled well in aqueous environments, and the operations are simple. Parameters affecting the pit formation and size have been systematically characterized to show that pit formation is dominated by bias voltage. A mechanism is proposed based on local surface reconstruction induced...

  1. Identification of nitrogen dopants in single-walled carbon nanotubes by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tison, Yann; Lin, Hong; Lagoute, Jérôme; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Henrard, Luc; Zheng, Bing; Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ducastelle, François; Loiseau, Annick

    2013-08-27

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we investigated the atomic and electronic structure of nitrogen-doped single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The insertion of nitrogen in the carbon lattice induces several types of point defects involving different atomic configurations. Spectroscopic measurements on semiconducting nanotubes reveal that these local structures can induce either extended shallow levels or more localized deep levels. In a metallic tube, a single doping site associated with a donor state was observed in the gap at an energy close to that of the first van Hove singularity. Density functional theory calculations reveal that this feature corresponds to a substitutional nitrogen atom in the carbon network.

  2. Electronic properties of (Zn,CoO systems probed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Moldovan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to gain insight into theelectronic properties of (Zn,CoO system - a widebandgap Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors (DMSshowing room temperature (RT ferromagnetism undern-type doping conditions. On the experimental side, ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunnelling microscopy andspectroscopy (STM and STS at variable temperature (Tare used to probe the local electronic structure of thesystem. It is presented the map of the local density ofstates (LDOS of polar ZnO surfaces. Then, it is possibleto decorate (incorporate Co atoms onto (into thesemiconductor.

  3. A scanning tunneling microscope break junction method with continuous bias modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Edward; Yin, Xing; Waldeck, David H; Wierzbinski, Emil

    2015-09-28

    Single molecule conductance measurements on 1,8-octanedithiol were performed using the scanning tunneling microscope break junction method with an externally controlled modulation of the bias voltage. Application of an AC voltage is shown to improve the signal to noise ratio of low current (low conductance) measurements as compared to the DC bias method. The experimental results show that the current response of the molecule(s) trapped in the junction and the solvent media to the bias modulation can be qualitatively different. A model RC circuit which accommodates both the molecule and the solvent is proposed to analyze the data and extract a conductance for the molecule.

  4. First-principles modelling of scanning tunneling microscopy using non-equilibrium Green's functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, H.P.; Rauba, J.M.C.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of electron transport processes in nano-scale architectures plays a crucial role in the development of surface chemistry and nano-technology. Experimentally, an important driving force within this research area has been the concurrent refinements of scanning tunneling microscopy...... into account. As an illustrating example we apply the NEGF-STM method to the Si(001)(2x1):H surface with sub-surface P doping and discuss the results in comparison to the Bardeen and Tersoff-Hamann methods....

  5. High-resolution photon-scanning tunneling microscope measurements of the whispering gallery modes in a cylindrical microresonator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, D.J.W.; Balistreri, M.L.M.; Blom, F.C.; Driessen, A.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed analysis of spatio-spectral photon scanning tunneling microscope scans of the light intensity inside a cylindrical microresonator has been carried out. By comparing the experimental results with theory, it is shown that the inclusion of spectral mode-beat phenomena is crucial for an

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of iron suicide epitaxially grown on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raunau, Werner; Niehus, Horst; Schilling, Thomas; Comsa, George

    1993-05-01

    Epitaxial iron suicide films have been grown on Si(111) by solid phase epitaxy (SPE) in UHV. Structural and electronic properties have been investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). For initial Fe deposition up to 3 Å and annealing at 850 K, metallic γ-FeSi 2 is formed. These films exhibit a perfect (2 × 2) superstructure, which is attributed to γ-FeSi 2(111) with Si termination. SPE at higher initial iron deposition (15 Å) and annealing at 800 K results in ɛ-FeSi showing a (√3 × √3) R30° superstructure. Subsequent annealing above 900 K leads to β-FeSi 2 formation. As by STS, β-FeSi 2 films are semiconducting with Eg = 0.85 eV. STM topographs show that SPE produces rough silicide surfaces wit β-FeSi 2(101) [and not β-FeSi 2(110)] epitaxy. The atomic structure on β-FeSi 2 terraces is complex, consisting domain boundaries and defects.

  7. Bulk crystalline copper electrodeposition on polycrystalline gold surfaces observed by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    Bulk copper electrodeposition onto technical gold surfaces in electrolytes of 0.05 M H2SO4 and 1 mM CuSO4 was investigated by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy at fixed overpotentials. At potentials between -60 and -30 mV the growth of bulk copper proceeds in cycles of nucleation, agglomerat......Bulk copper electrodeposition onto technical gold surfaces in electrolytes of 0.05 M H2SO4 and 1 mM CuSO4 was investigated by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy at fixed overpotentials. At potentials between -60 and -30 mV the growth of bulk copper proceeds in cycles of nucleation......, agglomeration and crystallization. Crystalline copper is seen as involving an intermediate stage in the progress of growth. The final stage in the growth involves an equilibrium of copper electrochemically dissolving and precipitating. The drift velocity was measured for a gold surface subjected to flame...... annealing and subsequently installed in the cell compartment. It was found that the drift velocity decays with time in an exponential-like manner, and a 70 min waiting time before experiments with atomic resolution is recommended. Atomic resolution on Au(111) has been obtained, and an apparent surface...

  8. Thermal Motion of Steps and Vacancies in SILICON(001) by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Nobuyoshi

    Thermal motion of steps and vacancies plays important roles in surface kinetic processes. Using a scanning tunneling microscope with the new capability to image heated samples, we have conducted direct observations of the motion of monatomic-height steps and vacancies on Si(001) at the atomic level in the temperature range of 490 to 530K. We clarify behaviors of steps and vacancies specific to the Si(001) surface. The tip-to-sample drift caused by the sample heating has been reduced to about 0.01 A/sec by applying linear voltage ramps with a precisely adjusted rate to the piezo tube scanner. The low drift rate allows detailed analyses of individual structural changes at steps and vacancies within the same region for ~ 1 hour. We find that motion of vacancies is predominantly along the dimer rows, and that creation and annihilation events occur in the terraces rather than at steps. In particular, diffusion of the single-dimer vacancy has been analyzed in detail, and an activation energy of 1.7 +/- 0.4 eV has been measured for its diffusion. Structural changes at steps are observed at the ends of dimer rows as either additions or deletions of a pair of dimers. We observe that changes mainly occur nearby kinks and those of the same sign are clustered together. It is shown that these changes involve nucleation or dissociation of dimers and long range transport of monomers, and that they are inconsistent with random nucleation and dissociation of dimers. All the observations are quantitatively reproduced by a Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation with a Hamiltonian containing only kink and corner energies. By classifying the elementary reactions at steps based on the same Hamiltonian, we find that hopping of a unit kink along the step is the predominant type of reactions. This finding leads to a simple explanation for all the observations. At our temperatures, changes at steps are governed by energy differences among local configurations, which are only on the order of 0

  9. Investigating Atomic Scale Disordered Stripes in the Cuprate Superconductors with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Elizabeth

    The high-Tc cuprate superconductors have been studied for 25 years in the search for the mechanism underlying their superconductivity. In the process, experiments learned that the correlated electrons in these materials organize themselves in a variety of patterns. One such pattern is a type of short-range charge modulations that exist both in and outside of the superconducting phase, which has been linked to the cuprate pseudogap phase. In optimal and slightly underdoped Bi2Sr 2CuO6+delta this charge order (labeled Q*) has wavelength ˜ 5a0. A second and, I argue, related order (Q**) has wavelength of ˜1.25a0. These modulations are highly disordered and for this reason their nature is not fully understood. In this thesis I use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to study the disorder of these charge modulations, as an avenue to understanding the nature of the charge order itself. Locally, the charge modulations have a preferred orientation, with a wavevector pointing along one crystal axis or the other. But globally, there is no preferred direction. Our most striking finding is that the local orientation is the same for the Q* and Q** orders, strong new evidence that these two types of charge modulations have the same physical cause. Next, we find that Q* and Q** are subject to two kinds of disorder. Disorder in the optimal local wavelength competes with defect pinning of crests and troughs to produce the disordered modulations that we see. To get our final result, I view the local orientation of the charge modulations as an Ising spin, and compare the resulting Ising maps to theoretical predictions for different classes of disorder. I find the disorder to be consistent with 3D Random Field disorder. New analytical tools were necessary to carry out these measurements. I describe a new algorithm to map the local wavevector of a modulation. Then I present a second new algorithm to correct an STM image for the effects of a slightly anisotropic tip, This thesis also

  10. An easy-to-implement filter for separating photo-excited signals from topography in scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel; Holt, Martin; Winarski, Robert; Hla, Saw-Wai [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rose, Volker [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    In order to achieve elemental and chemical sensitivity in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), synchrotron x-rays have been applied to excite core-level electrons during tunneling. The x-ray photo-excitations result in tip currents that are superimposed onto conventional tunneling currents. While carrying important physical information, the varying x-ray induced currents can destabilize the feedback loop causing it to be unable to maintain a constant tunneling current, sometimes even causing the tip to retract fully or crash. In this paper, we report on an easy-to-implement filter circuit that can separate the x-ray induced currents from conventional tunneling currents, thereby allowing simultaneous measurements of topography and chemical contrasts. The filter and the schematic presented here can also be applied to other variants of light-assisted STM such as laser STM.

  11. A scanning tunneling microscopy study of self-assembled nickel(II) octaethylporphyrin deposited from solutions on HOPG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunrinde, Ayowale; Hipps, K W; Scudiero, L

    2006-06-20

    The adsorption of nickel(II) octaethylporphyrin (NiOEP) from benzene and chloroform solutions on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was investigated with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operated in ambient conditions. STM images show that NiOEP self-assembles on the graphite surface and that the molecules lie flat and form 2D lattices with spacings of 1.58 +/- 0.03 nm by 1.46 +/- 0.06 nm with a lattice angle of 69 degrees +/- 4 degrees averaged over both solvents. We were unable to eliminate the possibility that one unit cell distance is twice the above-reported distance. The corresponding molecular packing density, 4.5 +/- 0.3 x 10(13) molecules/cm(2), was essentially the same for benzene and chloroform solution deposition. These results differ somewhat from the structure revealed by high-resolution STM images of NiOEP on Au (111). The lack of apparent height (image intensity) in the constant current STM image of the alkane region of alkane-substituted metal porphyrins is attributed to a combination of changes in alkane configuration relative to the ring and associated changes in electronic coupling with HOMO and LUMO.

  12. Dynamical image-charge effect in molecular tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    When an electron tunnels between two metal contacts it temporarily induces an image charge (IC) in the electrodes which acts back on the tunneling electron. It is usually assumed that the IC forms instantaneously such that a static model for the image potential applies. Here we investigate how...... the finite IC formation time affects charge transport through a molecule suspended between two electrodes. For a single-level model, an analytical treatment shows that the conductance is suppressed by a factor Z(2), where Z is the quasiparticle renormalization factor, compared to the static IC approximation...... that the dynamical corrections can reduce the conductance by more than a factor of two when compared to static GW or density functional theory where the molecular energy levels have been shifted to match the exact quasiparticle levels....

  13. A scanning tunneling microscopy based potentiometry technique and its application to the local sensing of the spin Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Ting Xie; Michael Dreyer; David Bowen; Dan Hinkel; R. E. Butera; Charles Krafft; Isaak Mayergoyz

    2017-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscopy based potentiometry technique for the measurements of the local surface electric potential is presented. A voltage compensation circuit based on this potentiometry technique is developed and employed to maintain a desired tunneling voltage independent of the bias current flow through the film. The application of this potentiometry technique to the local sensing of the spin Hall effect is outlined and some experimental results are reported.

  14. A scanning tunneling microscopy based potentiometry technique and its application to the local sensing of the spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ting; Dreyer, Michael; Bowen, David; Hinkel, Dan; Butera, R. E.; Krafft, Charles; Mayergoyz, Isaak

    2017-12-01

    A scanning tunneling microscopy based potentiometry technique for the measurements of the local surface electric potential is presented. A voltage compensation circuit based on this potentiometry technique is developed and employed to maintain a desired tunneling voltage independent of the bias current flow through the film. The application of this potentiometry technique to the local sensing of the spin Hall effect is outlined and some experimental results are reported.

  15. Fundamental studies of superconductors using scanning magnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtley, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    In this review I discuss the application of scanning magnetic imaging to fundamental studies of superconductors, concentrating on three scanning magnetic microscopies—scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM), scanning Hall bar microscopy (SHM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). I briefly discuss the history, sensitivity, spatial resolution, invasiveness and potential future developments of each technique. I then discuss a selection of applications of these microscopies. I start with static imaging of magnetic flux: an SSM study provides deeper understanding of vortex trapping in narrow strips, which are used to reduce noise in superconducting circuitry. Studies of vortex trapping in wire lattices, clusters and arrays of rings and nanoholes show fascinating ordering effects. The cuprate high-Tc superconductors are shown to have predominantly d-wave pairing symmetry by magnetic imaging of the half-integer flux quantum effect. Arrays of superconducting rings act as a physical analog for the Ising spin model, with the half-integer flux quantum effect helping to eliminate one source of disorder in antiferromagnetic arrangements of the ring moments. Tests of the interlayer tunneling model show that the condensation energy available from this mechanism cannot account for the high critical temperatures observed in the cuprates. The strong divergence in the magnetic fields of Pearl vortices allows them to be imaged using SSM, even for penetration depths of a millimeter. Unusual vortex arrangements occur in samples comparable in size to the coherence length. Spontaneous magnetization is not observed in Sr2RuO4, which is believed to have px ± ipy pairing symmetry, although effects hundreds of times bigger than the sensitivity limits had been predicted. However, unusual flux trapping is observed in this superconductor. Finally, unusual flux arrangements are also observed in magnetic superconductors. I then turn to vortex dynamics: imaging of vortices in rings of highly underdoped

  16. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stępniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  17. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of organic monolayers adsorbed on the rhodium(111) crystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernota, Paul Davis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy studies were carried out on ordered overlayers on the (111) surface of rhodium. These adsorbates include carbon monoxide (CO), cyclohexane, cyclohexene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, para-xylene, and meta-xylene. Coadsorbate systems included: CO with ethylidyne, CO with para- and meta-xylene, and para-xylene with meta-xylene. In the case of CO, the structure of the low coverage (2x2) overlayer has been observed. The symmetry of the unit cell in this layer suggests that the CO is adsorbed in the 3-fold hollow sites. There were also two higher coverage surface structures with (√7x√7) unit cells. One of these is composed of trimers of CO and has three CO molecules in each unit cell. The other structure has an additional CO molecule, making a total of four. This extra CO sits on a top site.

  18. Hydrogen adsorption on Ru(001) studied by Scanning TunnelingMicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatarkhanov, Mous; Rose, Franck; Fomin, Evgeny; Ogletree, D.Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-01-18

    The adsorption of hydrogen on Ru(001) was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy at temperatures around 50 K. Hydrogen was found to adsorb dissociatively forming different ordered structures as a function of coverage. In order of increasing coverage {theta} in monolayers (ML) these were ({radical}3 x {radical}3)r30{sup o} at {theta} = 0.3 ML; (2 x 1) at {theta} = 0.50 ML, (2 x 2)-3H at {theta} = 0.75, and (1 x 1) at {theta} = 1.00. Some of these structures were observed to coexist at intermediate coverage values. Close to saturation of 1 ML, H-vacancies (unoccupied three fold fcc hollow Ru sites) were observed either as single entities or forming transient aggregations. These vacancies diffuse and aggregate to form active sites for the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen.

  19. Interfacial self-assembly of amino acids and peptides: Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Liu, Yibiao; Zhang, Xueji

    2011-12-01

    Proteins play important roles in human daily life. To take advantage of the lessons learned from nature, it is essential to investigate the self-assembly of subunits of proteins, i.e., amino acids and polypeptides. Due to its high resolution and versatility of working environment, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has become a powerful tool for studying interfacial molecular assembly structures. This review is intended to reflect the progress in studying interfacial self-assembly of amino acids and peptides by STM. In particular, we focus on environment-induced polymorphism, chiral recognition, and coadsorption behavior with molecular templates. These studies would be highly beneficial to research endeavors exploring the mechanism and nanoscale-controlling molecular assemblies of amino acids and polypeptides on surfaces, understanding the origin of life, unravelling the essence of disease at the molecular level and deeming what is necessary for the ``bottom-up'' nanofabrication of molecular devices and biosensors being constructed with useful properties and desired performance.

  20. Ultra-High Vacuum Compatible Optical Chopper System for Synchrotron X-ray Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hao; Cummings, Marvin L.; Shirato, Nozomi; Stripe, Benjamin D.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Preissner, Curt A.; Freeland, John W.; Kersell, Heath R.; Hla, Saw Wai; Rose, Volker

    2015-01-01

    High-speed beam choppers are a crucial part of time-resolved x-ray studies as well as a necessary component to enable elemental contrast in synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM). However, many chopper systems are not capable of operation in vacuum, which restricts their application to x-ray studies with high photon energies, where air absorption does not present a significant problem. To overcome this limitation, we present a fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible chopper system capable of operating at variable chopping frequencies up to 4 kHz. The lightweight aluminum chopper disk is coated with Ti and Au films to provide the required beam attenuation for soft and hard x-rays with photon energies up to about 12 keV. The chopper is used for lock-in detection of x-ray enhanced signals in SX-STM.

  1. Ultra-high vacuum compatible optical chopper system for synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hao, E-mail: hc000211@ohio.edu [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Physics & Astronomy Department, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Cummings, Marvin; Shirato, Nozomi; Stripe, Benjamin; Preissner, Curt; Freeland, John W. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rosenmann, Daniel [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kersell, Heath; Hla, Saw-Wai [Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Physics & Astronomy Department, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rose, Volker, E-mail: vrose@anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    High-speed beam choppers are a crucial part of time-resolved x-ray studies as well as a necessary component to enable elemental contrast in synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM). However, many chopper systems are not capable of operation in vacuum, which restricts their application to x-ray studies with high photon energies, where air absorption does not present a significant problem. To overcome this limitation, we present a fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible chopper system capable of operating at variable chopping frequencies up to 4 kHz. The lightweight aluminum chopper disk is coated with Ti and Au films to provide the required beam attenuation for soft and hard x-rays with photon energies up to about 12 keV. The chopper is used for lock-in detection of x-ray enhanced signals in SX-STM.

  2. Local transport measurements at mesoscopic length scales using scanning tunneling potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weigang; Munakata, Ko; Rozler, Michael; Beasley, Malcolm R

    2013-06-07

    Under mesoscopic conditions, the transport potential on a thin film carrying a current is theoretically expected to bear spatial variation due to quantum interference. Scanning tunneling potentiometry is the ideal tool to investigate such variation, by virtue of its high spatial resolution. We report in this Letter the first detailed measurement of transport potential under mesoscopic conditions. Epitaxial graphene at a temperature of 17 K was chosen as the initial system for study because the characteristic transport length scales in this material are relatively large. Tip jumping artifacts are a major possible contribution to systematic errors; and we mitigate such problems by using custom-made slender and sharp tips manufactured by focused ion beam. In our data, we observe residual resistivity dipoles associated with topographical defects, and local peaks and dips in the potential that are not associated with topographical defects.

  3. Scanning-tunneling-spectroscopy-directed design of tailored deep-blue emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanning, Jan; Ewen, Pascal R; Stegemann, Linda; Schmidt, Judith; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Koch, Tobias; Doltsinis, Nikos L; Wegner, Daniel; Strassert, Cristian A

    2015-01-12

    Frontier molecular orbitals can be visualized and selectively set to achieve blue phosphorescent metal complexes. For this purpose, the HOMOs and LUMOs of tridentate Pt(II) complexes were measured using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The introduction of electron-accepting or -donating moieties enables independent tuning of the frontier orbital energies, and the measured HOMO-LUMO gaps are reproduced by DFT calculations. The energy gaps correlate with the measured and the calculated energies of the emissive triplet states and the experimental luminescence wavelengths. This synergetic interplay between synthesis, microscopy, and spectroscopy enabled the design and realization of a deep-blue triplet emitter. Finding and tuning the electronic "set screws" at molecular level constitutes a useful experimental method towards an in-depth understanding and rational design of optoelectronic materials with tailored excited state energies and defined frontier-orbital properties. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of van der Waals graphene/semiconductor interfaces: absence of Fermi level pinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quang, T.; Cherkez, V.; Nogajewski, K.; Potemski, M.; Dau, M. T.; Jamet, M.; Mallet, P.; Veuillen, J.-Y.

    2017-09-01

    We have investigated the electronic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), namely trilayer WSe2 and monolayer MoSe2, deposited on epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide, by using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) in ultra-high vacuum. Depending on the number of graphene layers below the TMD flakes, we identified variations in the electronic dI/dV(V) spectra measured by the STM tip: the most salient feature is a rigid shift of the TMD spectra (i.e. of the different band onset positions) towards occupied states by about 120 mV when passing from bilayer to monolayer underlying graphene. Since both graphene phases are metallic and present a work function difference in the same energy range, our measurements point towards the absence of Fermi-level pinning for such van der Waals 2D TMD/Metal heterojunctions, following the prediction of the Schottky-Mott model.

  5. High-Resolution Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Molecular Nanostructures on Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xin

    . First, to study the role of hydrogen bonding in self-assembly, we investigate the monomolecular self-assembled system of pyrene-4,5,9,10-tetrone and phenanthrene- 9,10-dione molecules on Au(111) and HOPG surface respectively and the binary molecular self-assembled system of stearic acid and guanine...... molecules co-adsorbed on HOPG surface. Hydrogen bonding plays a key role in these self-assembled nanostructures and the substrate could also give an effect in the self-assembly. Second, to study the self-assembly across the terrace steps as a defect on surface, the chiral self-assembled supramolecular...... of nanostructures requires deeper insight into the adsorption sites, adsorption configurations, diffusion behaviour and driving forces for self-assembly of different molecules or atoms on different substrates. To study these fundamental issues, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has proven to be an ideal choice...

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy on the formation of lipoamide-cyclodextrin monolayer on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Shigekawa, Hidemi; Suzuki, Iwao; Nakamura, Tohru; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Komiyama, Makoto

    2000-01-01

    β-cyclodextrin molecules modified with lipoamide residue (LP-β-CyD) were self-assembled on an Au(111) surface in ethanol solution, and the growth process was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy. At the initial stage, adsorption sites were not only random, but also partially linear ordering, which suggests the existence of some influence by the herringbone structure of the Au(111) surface. According to the macroscopic analysis, the subsequent growth process was explained by the Elovich model, which is based on the repulsive interaction between adsorbed molecules. However, when the immersion time increased, island structures began forming. This result suggests the interaction between LP-β-CyD molecules as attractive, which in fact is more probable in consideration of the possibility of the hydrophobic and the hydrogen bonding interactions between CyD molecules. Finally, formation of a single LP-β-CyD layer was clearly confirmed.

  7. Ex situ elaborated proximity mesoscopic structures for ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolyarov, V. S. [UMR 7588, Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universités, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7588, Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, F-75005 Paris (France); Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Kazan Federal University, 420008 Kazan (Russian Federation); Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Cren, T., E-mail: tristan.cren@upmc.fr; Debontridder, F.; Brun, C. [UMR 7588, Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universités, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7588, Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, F-75005 Paris (France); Veshchunov, I. S. [Université de Bordeaux, LP2N, 351 cours de la Libération, F-33405 Talence (France); Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Skryabina, O. V. [Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Rusanov, A. Yu. [LLC “Applied radiophysics” 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Roditchev, D. [UMR 7588, Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universités, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7588, Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, F-75005 Paris (France); LPEM-UMR 8213, CNRS, ESPCI-ParisTech, UPMC, 10 rue Vauquelin, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2014-04-28

    We apply ultrahigh vacuum Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS) at ultra-low temperature to study proximity phenomena in metallic Cu in contact with superconducting Nb. In order to solve the problem of Cu-surface contamination, Cu(50 nm)/Nb(100 nm) structures are grown by respecting the inverted order of layers on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. Once transferred into vacuum, the samples are cleaved at the structure-substrate interface. As a result, a contamination-free Cu-surface is exposed in vacuum. It enables high-resolution STS of superconducting correlations induced by proximity from the underlying superconducting Nb layer. By applying magnetic field, we generate unusual proximity-induced superconducting vortices and map them with a high spatial and energy resolution. The suggested method opens a way to access local electronic properties of complex electronic mesoscopic devices by performing ex situ STS under ultrahigh vacuum.

  8. Theoretical analysis of a dual-probe scanning tunneling microscope setup on graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen R.; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    Experimental advances allow for the inclusion of multiple probes to measure the transport properties of a sample surface. We develop a theory of dual-probe scanning tunneling microscopy using a Green's function formalism, and apply it to graphene. Sampling the local conduction properties at finite...... length scales yields real space conductance maps which show anisotropy for pristine graphene systems and quantum interference effects in the presence of isolated impurities. Spectral signatures in the Fourier transforms of real space conductance maps include characteristics that can be related...... to different scattering processes. We compute the conductance maps of graphene systems with different edge geometries or height fluctuations to determine the effects of nonideal graphene samples on dual-probe measurements. © 2014 American Physical Society....

  9. Bimetallic Catalysts and Platinum Surfaces Studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenning, Magnus

    2000-07-01

    Bimetallic catalyst systems used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (Co-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and in the naphtha reforming process (Pt-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been studied in situ using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). Additionally, the adsorption of ethene on platinum single crystal surfaces has been investigated using scanning tunnelling microscopy. In situ EXAFS at the cobalt K absorption edge have been carried out at 450{sup o}C on the hydrogen reduction of a rhenium-promoted Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Reductions carried out using 100% hydrogen and 5% hydrogen in helium gave different results. Whereas the reduction using dilute hydrogen leads to bulk-like metallic cobalt particles (hcp or fcc), reaction with pure hydrogen yields a more dispersed system with smaller cobalt metal particles (< 40 A). The results are rationalised in terms of different degrees of reoxidation of cobalt by the higher and lower concentrations of water generated during the reduction of cobalt oxide by 100% and 5% hydrogen, respectively. Additionally, in both reduction protocols a small fraction (3 -4 wt%) of the cobalt content is randomly dispersed over the tetrahedral vacancies of the alumina support. This dispersion occurs during reduction and not calcination. The cobalt in these sites cannot be reduced at 450 {sup o}C. The local environments about the rhenium atoms in Co-Re/{gamma}-A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst after different reduction periods have been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A bimetallic catalyst containing 4.6 wt% cobalt and 2 wt% rhenium has been compared with a corresponding monometallic sample with 2 wt% rhenium on the same support. The rhenium L{sub III} EXAFS analysis shows that bimetallic particles are formed after reduction at 450{sup o}C with the average particle size being 10-15 A. Rhenium is shown to be reduced at a later stage than cobalt. The fraction of cobalt atoms entering the support obstructs the access to the support for the

  10. Parallel line scanning ophthalmoscope for retinal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vienola, Kari V.; Damodaran, Mathi; Braaf, Boy; Vermeer, Koenraad A.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To visualize retinal structures using a newly developed parallel line scanning ophthalmoscope (PLSO). Methods: A PLSO was built using a digital micromirror device (DMD) instead of traditional scanning mirrors to scan lines over the field of view (FOV). The DMD consists of 912 × 1140

  11. Demonstration of synchronised scanning Lidar measurements of 2D velocity fields in a boundary-layer wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dooren, M F; Kühn, M.; Petrovic, V.

    2016-01-01

    compared to hot wire probe measurements commonly used in wind tunnels. This yielded goodness of fit coefficients of 0.969 and 0.902 for the 1 Hz averaged u- and v-components of the wind speed, respectively, validating the 2D measurement capability of the Lidar scanners. Subsequently, the measurement......This paper combines the currently relevant research methodologies of scaled wind turbine model experiments in wind tunnels with remote-sensing short-range WindScanner Lidar measurement technology. The wind tunnel of the Politecnico di Milano was equipped with three wind turbine models and two short......-range WindScanner Lidars to demonstrate the benefits of synchronised scanning Lidars in such experimental surroundings for the first time. The dualLidar system can provide fully synchronised trajectory scans with sampling time scales ranging from seconds to minutes. First, staring mode measurements were...

  12. Atomic structure of screw dislocations intersecting the Au(111) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Schiøtz, Jakob; Dahl-Madsen, Bjarke

    2006-01-01

    The atomic-scale structure of naturally occurring screw dislocations intersecting a Au(111) surface has been investigated both experimentally by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and theoretically using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The step profiles of 166 dislocations were measured using...

  13. INTER-LAYER INTERACTION IN DOUBLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES EVIDENCED BY SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY AND SPECTROSCOPY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giusca, Cristina E; Tison, Yann; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy have been used in an attempt to elucidate the electronic structure of nanotube systems containing two constituent shells. Evidence for modified electronic structure due to the inter-layer interaction in double-walled carbon nanotubes is provided by t...

  14. Adsorption of human insulin on single-crystal gold surfaces investigated by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy and electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, Anna Christina; Zhang, Jingdong; Steensgaard, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    We have explored the adsorption of zinc-free human insulin on the three low-index single-crystalline Au(111)-, Au(100)- and Au(110)-surfaces in aqueous buffer (KH2PO4, pH 5) by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunnelling microscopy (in situ STM) at single-molecule resolution and linear s...

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy I general principles and applications to clean and absorbate-covered surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-01-01

    Since the first edition of "Scanning 'funneling Microscopy I" has been pub­ lished, considerable progress has been made in the application of STM to the various classes of materials treated in this volume, most notably in the field of adsorbates and molecular systems. An update of the most recent develop­ ments will be given in an additional Chapter 9. The editors would like to thank all the contributors who have supplied up­ dating material, and those who have provided us with suggestions for further improvements. We also thank Springer-Verlag for the decision to publish this second edition in paperback, thereby making this book affordable for an even wider circle of readers. Hamburg, July 1994 R. Wiesendanger Preface to the First Edition Since its invention in 1981 by G. Binnig, H. Rohrer and coworkers at the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has devel­ oped into an invaluable surface analytical technique allowing the investigation of real-space surface structures at th...

  16. ANALYSIS OF TARSAL TUNNEL SYNDROME USING IMAGE CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarjot Singh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS, also known as posterior tibial neuralgia is a painful disorder of the foot. It is a medical condition arising due to the compression of the tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel, resulting in numbness, parenthesis and muscle weakness in foot. A number of imaging methodologies such as ultrasound as well as MRI imaging has been used in the past in order to analyze the strain pattern of gastrocnemius tendon and aponeurosis from the surface of the skin without analyzing the internal tendons. The DIC code developed, computes the in-plane strain with a correlation function using pictures taken before and after stretching, using a CCD camera. The shift between the initial picture and subsequent one is evaluated by cross-correlation using FFT. This paper gives in detail description of the preprocessing steps necessary to extract Zone of Interest from the two images. The effects of stretching on the superficial components of the tibial nerve, the posterior tibial artery and vein, and the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus tendons in the calf and foot are studied.

  17. Tibial tunnel and pretibial cysts following ACL graft reconstruction: MR imaging diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazikhanian, Varand [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Beltran, Javier [Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Nikac, Violeta [Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Bencardino, Jenny T. [NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States); Feldman, Marina

    2012-11-15

    Tunnel cyst formation is a rare complication after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, usually occurring 1-5 years post-operatively, which may occasionally be symptomatic. There are multiple proposed theories regarding the etiology of tunnel cysts. Theories include necrosis, foreign-body reaction, lack of complete graft osteo-integration, and intravasation of articular fluid. It is important to know if the tunnel cysts are communicating or not communicating with the joint, as surgical management may be different. Imaging characteristics on magnetic resonance images (MRI) include tibial tunnel widening, multilocular or unilocular cyst formation in the graft or tibial tunnel, with possible extension into the pretibial space, intercondylar notch, and/or popliteal fossa. The MR imaging differential diagnosis of tibial tunnel cysts includes infection, foreign-body granuloma, or tibial screw extrusion. Importantly, to the best of our knowledge, graft failure or instability has not been reported in association with tibial tunnel cysts. (orig.)

  18. Electronic structure of carbon nanotube systems measured with scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbaker, Daniel Jay

    Carbon fullerenes are unusually structured molecules with robust mechanical and electronic properties. Their versatility is astounding; envisioned applications range from field emission displays to impregnated metal composites, battery storage media, and nanoelectronic devices. The combination of simple constituency, diverse behavior, and ease of fabrication makes these materials a cornerstone topic in current research. This thesis details scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments investigating how carbon nanotube fullerenes interact with and couple to their local environment. Scanning tunneling microscopy continues to be a key method for characterizing fullerenes, particularly in regards to their electronic properties. The atomic scale nature of this technique makes it uniquely suited for observing individual molecules and determining correlations between locally measured electronic properties and the particular environment of the molecule. The primary subject of this study is single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which were observed under various perturbative influences resulting in measurable changes in the electronic structure. Additionally, fullerene heterostructures formed by the encapsulation of C60 molecules within the hollow interiors of SWNTs were characterized for the first time with STM. These novel macromolecules (dubbed "peapods") demonstrate the potential for custom engineering the properties of fullerene materials. Measurements indicate that the properties of individual nanotubes depend sensitively on local interactions. In particular, pronounced changes in electronic behavior are observed in nanotubes exhibiting mechanical distortion, interacting with extrinsic materials (including other nanotubes), and possessing intrinsic defects in the atomic lattice. In fullerene peapods, while no discernable change in the atomic ordering of the encapsulating nanotubes was evident, the presence of interior C60 molecules has a dramatic effect on the

  19. Controlling molecular condensation/diffusion of copper phthalocyanine by local electric field induced with scanning tunneling microscope tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Katsumi; Yaginuma, Shin; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2018-02-01

    We have discovered the condensation/diffusion phenomena of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules controlled with a pulsed electric field induced by the scanning tunneling microscope tip. This behavior is not explained by the conventional induced dipole model. In order to understand the mechanism, we have measured the electronic structure of the molecule by tunneling spectroscopy and also performed theoretical calculations on molecular orbitals. These data clearly indicate that the molecule is positively charged owing to charge transfer to the substrate, and that hydrogen bonding exists between CuPc molecules, which makes the molecular island stable.

  20. Modeling a Shallow Rock Tunnel Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Discrete Fracture Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciari, Pedro Pazzoto; Futai, Marcos Massao

    2017-05-01

    Discontinuity mapping and analysis are extremely important for modeling shallow tunnels constructed in fractured rock masses. However, the limited exposure and variability of rock face orientation in tunnels must be taken into account. In this paper, an automatic method is proposed to generate discrete fracture networks (DFNs) using terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) geological mapping and to continuously calculate the volumetric intensities ( P 32) along a tunnel. The number of fractures intersecting rectangular sampling planes with different orientations, fitted in tunnel sections of finite lengths, is used as the program termination criteria to create multiple DFNs and to calculate the mean P 32. All traces and orientations from three discontinuity sets of the Monte Seco tunnel (Vitória Minas Railway) were mapped and the present method applied to obtain the continuous variation in P 32 along the tunnel. A practical approach to creating single and continuous DFNs (for each discontinuity set), considering the P 32 variations, is also presented, and the results are validated by comparing the trace intensities ( P 21) from the TLS mapping and DFNs generated. Three examples of 3DEC block models generated from different sections of the tunnel are shown, including the ground surface and the bedrock topographies. The results indicate that the proposed method is a practical and powerful tool for modeling fractured rock masses of uncovered tunnels. It is also promising for application during tunnel construction when TLS mapping is a daily task (for as-built tunnel controls), and the complete geological mapping (traces and orientations) is available.

  1. Development of in situ two-coil mutual inductance technique in a multifunctional scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ming-Chao; Liu, Zhi-Long; Ge, Jian-Feng; Tang, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Guan-Yong; Wang, Zi-Xin; Guan, Dandan; Li, Yao-Yi; Qian, Dong; Liu, Canhua; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2017-07-01

    Superconducting thin films have been a focal point for intensive research efforts since their reduced dimension allows for a wide variety of quantum phenomena. Many of these films, fabricated in UHV chambers, are highly vulnerable to air exposure, making it difficult to measure intrinsic superconducting properties such as zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism with ex situ experimental techniques. Previously, we developed a multifunctional scanning tunneling microscope (MSTM) containing in situ four-point probe (4PP) electrical transport measurement capability in addition to the usual STM capabilities [Ge et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 053903 (2015)]. Here we improve this MSTM via development of both transmission and reflection two-coil mutual inductance techniques for in situ measurement of the diamagnetic response of a superconductor. This addition does not alter the original STM and 4PP functions of the MSTM. We demonstrate the performance of the two-coil mutual inductance setup on a 10-nm-thick NbN thin film grown on a Nb-doped SrTiO3(111) substrate.

  2. Unveiling Stability Criteria of DNA-Carbon Nanotubes Constructs by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Computational Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Kilina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a combined approach that relies on computational simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM measurements to reveal morphological properties and stability criteria of carbon nanotube-DNA (CNT-DNA constructs. Application of STM allows direct observation of very stable CNT-DNA hybrid structures with the well-defined DNA wrapping angle of 63.4° and a coiling period of 3.3 nm. Using force field simulations, we determine how the DNA-CNT binding energy depends on the sequence and binding geometry of a single strand DNA. This dependence allows us to quantitatively characterize the stability of a hybrid structure with an optimal π-stacking between DNA nucleotides and the tube surface and better interpret STM data. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the existence of a very stable DNA binding geometry for (6,5 CNT as evidenced by the presence of a well-defined minimum in the binding energy as a function of an angle between DNA strand and the nanotube chiral vector. This novel approach demonstrates the feasibility of CNT-DNA geometry studies with subnanometer resolution and paves the way towards complete characterization of the structural and electronic properties of drug-delivering systems based on DNA-CNT hybrids as a function of DNA sequence and a nanotube chirality.

  3. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of finite-size twisted bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Xiao; Jiang, Hua; Zhang, Yu; Li, Si-Yu; Liu, Haiwen; Li, Xinqi; Wu, Xiaosong; He, Lin

    2017-09-01

    Finite-size twisted bilayer graphene (TBG, where here the TBG is of nanoscale size) is quite unstable and will change its structure to a Bernal (or A B -stacking) bilayer with a much lower energy. Therefore, the lack of finite-size TBG makes its electronic properties difficult to access in experiments. In this paper, a special confined TBG is obtained in the overlaid area of two continuous misoriented graphene sheets. The width of the confined region of the TBG changes gradually from about 22 to 0 nm. By using scanning tunneling microscopy, we study carefully the structure and the electronic properties of finite-size TBG. Our results indicate that the low-energy electronic properties, including twist-induced Van Hove singularities (VHSs) and spatial modulation of the local density of states, are strongly affected by the translational symmetry breaking of the finite-size TBG. However, the electronic properties above the energy of the VHSs are almost not influenced by quantum confinement even when the width of the TBG is reduced to only a single moiré spot.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Active nanocharacterization of nanofunctional materials by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Fujita and Keisuke Sagisaka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in the application of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM to nanofabrication and nanocharacterization are reviewed. The main focus of this paper is to outline techniques for depositing and manipulating nanometer-scale structures using STM tips. Firstly, the transfer of STM tip material through the application of voltage pulses is introduced. The highly reproducible fabrication of metallic silver nanodots and nanowires is discussed. The mechanism is thought to be spontaneous point-contact formation caused by field-enhanced diffusion to the apex of the tip. Transfer through the application of z-direction pulses is also introduced. Sub-nanometer displacement pulses along the z-direction form point contacts that can be used for reproducible nanodot deposition. Next, the discovery of the STM structural manipulation of surface phases is discussed. It has been demonstrated that superstructures on Si(001 surfaces can be reverse-manipulated by controlling the injected carriers. Finally, the fabrication of an atomic-scale one-dimensional quantum confinement system by single-atom deposition using a controlled point contact is presented. Because of its combined nanofabrication and nanocharacterization capabilities, STM is a powerful tool for exploring the nanotechnology and nanoscience fields.

  5. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study of a Vicinal Anatase TiO2 Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Chun; Dulub, Olga; Diebold, Ulrike

    2009-03-01

    Titanium dioxide finds versatile applications in various technical fields including gas sensing, coatings, pigments, heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, and solar cells. TiO2 is found in three main crystallographic phases: rutile, anatase and brookite. Rutile is the thermodynamically most stable form and is considered a model system for basic research. However, anatase TiO2 is often considered to be catalytically more active than rutile for reasons not yet completely understood. In this work, using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED), the structure of the anatase TiO2(5 14) surface, ˜10 vicinal to the -- lowest energy -- (101) plane, has been studied. The surface was found to facet into a structure composed of ridges with a uniform width of 5 lattice units. Based on atomically-resolved STM and electron counting rules, it is proposed that the sides of the ridges are parallel to (1 10) and (112) planes. These sides might be reconstructed to stabilize the microfaceted structure. Vapor-deposited gold shows pronounced clustering between the ridges, indicating a one-dimensional template effect of the vicinal surface, which supports denser and more uniformly sized Au clusters, as compared to the flat (101) surface.

  6. Poor electronic screening in lightly doped Mott insulators observed with scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, I.; Fedoseev, V.; Bastiaans, K. M.; de la Torre, A.; Perry, R. S.; Baumberger, F.; Allan, M. P.

    2017-06-01

    The effective Mott gap measured by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the lightly doped Mott insulator (Sr1-xLax) 2IrO4 differs greatly from values reported by photoemission and optical experiments. Here we show that this is a consequence of the poor electronic screening of the tip-induced electric field in this material. Such effects are well known from STM experiments on semiconductors and go under the name of tip-induced band bending (TIBB). We show that this phenomenon also exists in the lightly doped Mott insulator (Sr1-xLax) 2IrO4 and that, at doping concentrations of x ≤4 % , it causes the measured energy gap in the sample density of states to be bigger than the one measured with other techniques. We develop a model able to retrieve the intrinsic energy gap leading to a value which is in rough agreement with other experiments, bridging the apparent contradiction. At doping x ≈5 % we further observe circular features in the conductance layers that point to the emergence of a significant density of free carriers in this doping range and to the presence of a small concentration of donor atoms. We illustrate the importance of considering the presence of TIBB when doing STM experiments on correlated-electron systems and discuss the similarities and differences between STM measurements on semiconductors and lightly doped Mott insulators.

  7. Proximity Effect between Two Superconductors Spatially Resolved by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cherkez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the proximity effect in an atomic-scale controlled junction between two different superconductors. Elaborated on a Si(111 surface, the junction comprises a Pb nanocrystal with an energy gap Δ_{1}=1.2  meV, connected to a crystalline atomic monolayer of lead with Δ_{2}=0.23  meV. Using in situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we probe the local density of states of this hybrid system both in space and in energy, at temperatures below and above the critical temperature of the superconducting monolayer. Direct and inverse proximity effects are revealed with high resolution. Our observations are precisely explained with the help of a self-consistent solution of the Usadel equations. In particular, our results demonstrate that in the vicinity of the Pb islands, the Pb monolayer locally develops a finite proximity-induced superconducting order parameter, well above its own bulk critical temperature. This leads to a giant proximity effect where the superconducting correlations penetrate inside the monolayer a distance much larger than in a nonsuperconducting metal.

  8. Demonstration of synchronised scanning Lidar measurements of 2D velocity fields in a boundary-layer wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooren, M. F.; Kühn, M.; PetroviĆ, V.; Bottasso, C. L.; Campagnolo, F.; Sjöholm, M.; Angelou, N.; Mikkelsen, T.; Croce, A.; Zasso, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper combines the currently relevant research methodologies of scaled wind turbine model experiments in wind tunnels with remote-sensing short-range WindScanner Lidar measurement technology. The wind tunnel of the Politecnico di Milano was equipped with three wind turbine models and two short-range WindScanner Lidars to demonstrate the benefits of synchronised scanning Lidars in such experimental surroundings for the first time. The dual- Lidar system can provide fully synchronised trajectory scans with sampling time scales ranging from seconds to minutes. First, staring mode measurements were compared to hot wire probe measurements commonly used in wind tunnels. This yielded goodness of fit coefficients of 0.969 and 0.902 for the 1 Hz averaged u- and v-components of the wind speed, respectively, validating the 2D measurement capability of the Lidar scanners. Subsequently, the measurement of wake profiles on a line as well as wake area scans were executed to illustrate the applicability of Lidar scanning to measuring small scale wind flow effects. The downsides of Lidar with respect to the hot wire probes are the larger measurement probe volume and the loss of some measurements due to moving blades. In contrast, the benefits are the high flexibility in conducting both point measurements and area scanning, and the fact that remote sensing techniques do not disturb the flow while measuring. The research campaign revealed a high potential for using short-range WindScanner Lidar for accurately measuring small scale flow structures in a wind tunnel.

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopy of sulfur and benzenethiol chemisorbed on Ru(0001) in 0.1 M HClO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang-Yueh Ou; Yau, Shueh-lin; Itaya, Kingo

    2004-05-25

    In situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) combined with linear sweep voltammetry was used to examine spatial structures of sulfur adatoms (SA) and benzenethiol (BT) molecules adsorbed on an ordered Ru(0001) electrode in 0.1 M HClO4. The Ru(0001) surface, prepared by mechanical polishing and electrochemical reduction at -1.5 V (vs RHE) in 0.1 M HClO4, contained atomically flat terraces with an average width of 20 nm. Cyclic voltammograms obtained with an as-prepared Ru(0001) electrode in 0.1 M HClO4 showed characteristics nearly identical to those of Ru(0001) treated in high vacuum. High-quality STM images were obtained for SA and BT to determine their spatial structures as a function of potential. The structure of the SA adlayer changed from (2 x mean square root of 3)rect to domain walls to (mean square root of 7 x mean square root of 7)R19.1 degrees and then to disordered as the potential was scanned from 0.3 to 0.6 V. In contrast, molecules of BT were arranged in (2 x mean square root of 3)rect between 0.1 and 0.4 V, while they were disordered at all other potentials. Adsorption of BT molecules was predominantly through the sulfur headgroup. Sulfur adatoms and adsorbed BT molecules were stable against anodic polarization up to 1.0 V (vs RHE). These two species were adsorbed so strongly that their desorption did not occur even at the onset potential for the reduction of water in 0.1 M KOH.

  10. Nonparametric illumination correction for scanned document images via convex hulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Gaofeng; Xiang, Shiming; Zheng, Nanning; Pan, Chunhong

    2013-07-01

    A scanned image of an opened book page often suffers from various scanning artifacts known as scanning shading and dark borders noises. These artifacts will degrade the qualities of the scanned images and cause many problems to the subsequent process of document image analysis. In this paper, we propose an effective method to rectify these scanning artifacts. Our method comes from two observations: that the shading surface of most scanned book pages is quasi-concave and that the document contents are usually printed on a sheet of plain and bright paper. Based on these observations, a shading image can be accurately extracted via convex hulls-based image reconstruction. The proposed method proves to be surprisingly effective for image shading correction and dark borders removal. It can restore a desired shading-free image and meanwhile yield an illumination surface of high quality. More importantly, the proposed method is nonparametric and thus does not involve any user interactions or parameter fine-tuning. This would make it very appealing to nonexpert users in applications. Extensive experiments based on synthetic and real-scanned document images demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  12. Update on MEMS-based scanned beam imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Richard; Gibson, Greg; Metting, Frank; Davis, Wyatt; Drabe, Christian

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, Microvision presented "Scanned Beam Medical Imager" as an introduction to our MEMS-based, full color scanned beam imaging system. This presentation will provide an update of the technological advancements since this initial work from 2004. This recent work includes the development of functional prototypes that are much smaller than previous prototypes using a design architecture that is easily scalable. Performance has been significantly improved by increasing the optical field of views and video refresh rate. Real-time image processing capabilities have been developed to enhance the image quality and functionality over a wide range of operating conditions. Actual images of various objects will be presented.

  13. A scanning tunneling microscopy based potentiometry technique and its application to the local sensing of the spin Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Ting; Dreyer, Michael; Bowen, David; Hinkel, Dan; Butera, R. E.; Krafft, Charles; Mayergoyz, Isaak

    2017-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscopy based potentiometry technique for the measurements of the local surface electric potential is presented and illustrated by experiments performed on current-carrying thin tungsten films. The obtained results demonstrate a sub-millivolt resolution in the measured surface potential. The application of this potentiometry technique to the local sensing of the spin Hall effect is outlined and some experimental results are reported.

  14. Scanning tunneling potentiometry, charge transport, and Landauer's resistivity dipole from the quantum to the classical transport regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morr, Dirk K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the nonequilibrium Keldysh formalism, we investigate the spatial relation between the electrochemical potential measured in scanning tunneling potentiometry, and local current patterns over the entire range from the quantum to the classical transport regime. These quantities show similar spatial patterns near the quantum limit but are related by Ohm's law only in the classical regime. We demonstrate that defects induce a Landauer residual resistivity dipole in the electrochemical potential with the concomitant spatial current pattern representing the field lines of the dipole.

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy study of pinning-induced vortex lattice distortion in ion-irradiated NbSe[sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, S. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Bernasconi, M. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Jess, P. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Hofer, R. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Guentherodt, H.J. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Wirth, G. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)); Wiesner, J. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany))

    1994-04-01

    We observe vortex pinning in 2.2 GeV Au-ion irradiated NbSe[sub 2] by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 3 K. The ion irradiation generates columnar defects which act as pinning sites. At various external magnetic fields the vortex arrangement is clearly resolved but shows strong distortion. The location of individual defects is extracted from STM data and compared to the vortex arrangement. (orig.)

  16. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results.

  17. Spatial Angular Compounding Technique for H-Scan Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairalseed, Mawia; Xiong, Fangyuan; Kim, Jung-Whan; Mattrey, Robert F; Parker, Kevin J; Hoyt, Kenneth

    2017-10-11

    H-Scan is a new ultrasound imaging technique that relies on matching a model of pulse-echo formation to the mathematics of a class of Gaussian-weighted Hermite polynomials. This technique may be beneficial in the measurement of relative scatterer sizes and in cancer therapy, particularly for early response to drug treatment. Because current H-scan techniques use focused ultrasound data acquisitions, spatial resolution degrades away from the focal region and inherently affects relative scatterer size estimation. Although the resolution of ultrasound plane wave imaging can be inferior to that of traditional focused ultrasound approaches, the former exhibits a homogeneous spatial resolution throughout the image plane. The purpose of this study was to implement H-scan using plane wave imaging and investigate the impact of spatial angular compounding on H-scan image quality. Parallel convolution filters using two different Gaussian-weighted Hermite polynomials that describe ultrasound scattering events are applied to the radiofrequency data. The H-scan processing is done on each radiofrequency image plane before averaging to get the angular compounded image. The relative strength from each convolution is color-coded to represent relative scatterer size. Given results from a series of phantom materials, H-scan imaging with spatial angular compounding more accurately reflects the true scatterer size caused by reductions in the system point spread function and improved signal-to-noise ratio. Preliminary in vivo H-scan imaging of tumor-bearing animals suggests this modality may be useful for monitoring early response to chemotherapeutic treatment. Overall, H-scan imaging using ultrasound plane waves and spatial angular compounding is a promising approach for visualizing the relative size and distribution of acoustic scattering sources. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, K. S., E-mail: kssim@mmu.edu.my; Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  19. Scanning gate imaging in confined geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Steinacher, R.; Kozikov, A. A.; Rössler, C.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Ensslin, K.; Ihn, T.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on tunable electron backscattering investigated with the biased tip of a scanning force microscope. Using a channel defined by a pair of Schottky gates, the branched electron flow of ballistic electrons injected from a quantum point contact is guided by potentials of a tunable height well below the Fermi energy. The transition from injection into an open two-dimensional electron gas to a strongly confined channel exhibits three experimentally distinct regimes: one in whic...

  20. Origin of magnetic contrast in spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Experiments on ultra-thin Mn films

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, T K; Heijnen, G M M; Kempen, H V; Mizoguchi, T

    2003-01-01

    Normalized differential tunneling conductivities obtained with Fe-coated W tips show a spin-polarized peak around +0.8 V on ultrathin bct Mn films grown on Fe(001)-whiskers. This spin-polarized peak results in a clear magnetic contrast in spectroscopic images. Our normalization removes the influence of the tunneling probability and makes the spectroscopic curves most reliable for a derivation of the spin-resolved sample density of states (DOS) at positive voltages. From this analysis we conclude that the magnetic contrast in our spectroscopic maps is caused by a highly polarized DOS. Furthermore, a tip polarization of about 15% is found. (author)

  1. Scanning, standoff TDLAS leak imaging and quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainner, Richard T.; Aubut, Nicholas F.; Laderer, Matthew C.; Frish, Michael B.

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports a novel quantitative gas plume imaging tool, based on active near-infrared Backscatter Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (b-TDLAS) technology, designed for upstream natural gas leak applications. The new tool integrates low-cost laser sensors with video cameras to create a highly sensitive gas plume imager that also quantifies emission rate, all in a lightweight handheld ergonomic package. It is intended to serve as a lower-cost, higherperformance, enhanced functionality replacement for traditional passive non-quantitative mid-infrared Optical Gas Imagers (OGI) which are utilized by industry to comply with natural gas infrastructure Leak Detection and Repair (LDAR) requirements. It addresses the need for reliable, robust, low-cost sensors to detect and image methane leaks, and to quantify leak emission rates, focusing on inspections of upstream oil and gas operations, such as well pads, compressors, and gas plants. It provides: 1) Colorized quantified images of path-integrated methane concentration. The images depict methane plumes (otherwise invisible to the eye) actively interrogated by the laser beam overlaid on a visible camera image of the background. The detection sensitivity exceeds passive OGI, thus simplifying the manual task of leak detection and location; and 2) Data and algorithms for using the quantitative information gathered by the active detection technique to deduce plume flux (i.e. methane emission rate). This key capability will enable operators to prioritize leak repairs and thereby minimize the value of lost product, as well as to quantify and minimize greenhouse gas emissions, using a tool that meets EPA LDAR imaging equipment requirements.

  2. Digital image watermarking for printed and scanned documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongkor, Kharittha; Amornraksa, Thumrongrat

    2017-07-01

    We present a spatial domain image watermarking for printed and scanned documents. In the watermark embedding process, a watermark image is embedded into the blue color component of a white color image. The result is overlaid with information, and printed out on a piece of paper. In the watermark extraction process, a printed document is first scanned back to obtain an electronic copy. Geometric distortions from the printing and scanning processes are then reduced by an image registration technique based on affine transformation. All watermarked components are used to determine a threshold for watermark bits extraction. The performance of the proposed watermarking method was investigated based on different scanning resolutions, printing quality modes, and printable materials. Watermark extraction from ripped, crumpled, and wet documents was also investigated. The promising results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Construction and demonstration of a multispectral tomographic scanning imager (TOSCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Harald

    2013-02-25

    This work presents the first experimental demonstrator of an imager based on a tomographic scanning (TOSCA) principle. The device described generates a stream of multispectral images of a scene or target using simple conical scan optics and a simple patterned reticle, followed by collecting optics and one or several single pixel detectors. Tomographic processing techniques are then applied to the one-dimensional signals to reproduce two-dimensional images. Various aspects of the design and construction are described, and resulting images and movies are shown.

  4. A mapping approach for distortion correction in sinusoidally scanned images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, J.; Woods, C. L.; Haji-saeed, Bahareh; Pyburn, Dana; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Kierstead, J.

    2006-04-01

    We have developed a mapping algorithm for correcting sinusoidally scanned images from their distortions. Our algorithm is based on an approximate relationship between linear and sinusoidal scanning. Straightforward implementation of this algorithm showed that the mapped image has either missing lines or redundant lines. The missing lines were filled by fusing the mapped image with its median filtered version. The implementation of this algorithm shows that it is possible to retrieve up to 96.43% of the original image, as measured by the recovered energy.

  5. [Digital scanning converter for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongxu; Zhou, Peifan; Wen, Shijie; Yu, Daoyin

    2009-02-01

    This paper mainly introduces the design of digital scanning converter (DSC) for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging. Fast modified vector totational CORDIC (FMVR-CORDIC) arithmetic complete coordinate conversion is used to increase the speed of ultrasonic scanning imaging. FPGA is used as the kernel module to control data transferring, related circuits and relevant chips' working, and to accomplish data preprocessing. With the advantages of simple structure, nice flexibility and convenience, it satisfies the demand for real-time displaying in this system. Finally, the original polar coordinate image is transformed to rectangular coordinate grey image through coordinate transformation. The system performances have been validated by the experimental result.

  6. Method for Surface Scanning in Medical Imaging and Related Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for surface scanning in medical imaging is provided. The surface scanning apparatus comprises an image source, a first optical fiber bundle comprising first optical fibers having proximal ends and distal ends, and a first optical coupler for coupling an image from the image...... source into the proximal ends of the first optical fibers, wherein the first optical coupler comprises a plurality of lens elements including a first lens element and a second lens element, each of the plurality of lens elements comprising a primary surface facing a distal end of the first optical...... coupler, and a secondary surface facing a proximal end of the first optical coupler....

  7. A New Multichannel Spectral Imaging Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhai Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multichannel spectral imaging laser scanning confocal microscope for effective detection of multiple fluorescent labeling in the research of biological tissues. In this paper, the design and key technologies of the system are introduced. Representative results on confocal imaging, 3-dimensional sectioning imaging, and spectral imaging are demonstrated. The results indicated that the system is applicable to multiple fluorescent labeling in biological experiments.

  8. Infrared scanning images: an archeological application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, G G; Gumerman, G J

    1969-05-09

    Aerial infrared scanner images of an area near the Little Colorado River in north-central Arizona disclosed the existence of scattered clusters of parallel linear features in the ashfall area of Sunset Crater. The features are not obvious in conventional aerial photographs, and only one cluster could be recognized on the ground. Soil and pollen analyses reveal that they are prehistoric agricultural plots.

  9. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  10. Co on Pt(111) studied by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, F.K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis the electronic properties of the bare Pt(111) surface, the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of monolayer and double-layer high Co nanostructures as well as the spin-averaged electronic structure of single Co atoms on Pt(111) were studied by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS). The experiments on the bare Pt(111) surface and on single Co atoms have been performed in an STM facility operating at temperatures of down to 0.3 K and at magnetic fields of up to 14 T under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The facility has been taken into operation within the time period of this thesis and its specifications were tested by STS measurements. These characterization measurements show a very high stability of the tunneling junction and an energy resolution of about 100 {mu}eV, which is close to the thermal limit. The investigation of the electronic structure of the bare Pt(111) surface reveals the existence of an unoccupied surface state. By a comparison of the measured dispersion to first-principles electronic structure calculations the state is assigned to an sp-derived surface band at the lower boundary of the projected bulk band gap. The surface state exhibits a strong spin-orbit coupling induced spin splitting. The close vicinity to the bulk bands leads to a strong linear contribution to the dispersion and thus to a deviant appearance in the density of states in comparison to the surface states of the (111) surfaces of noble metals. A detailed study of Co monolayer and double-layer nanostructures on the Pt(111) surface shows that both kinds of nanostructures exhibit a highly inhomogeneous electronic structure which changes at the scale of only a few Aa due to a strong stacking dependence with respect to the Pt(111) substrate. With the help of first principles calculations the different spectroscopic appearance for Co atoms within the Co monolayer is assigned to a stacking dependent hybridization of Co states

  11. Atomic-scale scanning tunneling microscopy study of plasma-oxidized ultrahigh-modulus carbon fiber surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, J I; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2003-02-15

    In the present work, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was employed to study the surface modification of ultrahigh modulus carbon fibers at the atomic level by oxygen plasma. As detected by STM, the distinctive feature of the fresh, untreated surface was the general presence of atomic-scale arrangements in different degrees of order (from atomic-sized spots without a clearly ordered disposition to triangular patterns identical to those typical of perfect graphite). Following fiber exposure to the plasma, the STM images showed evidence of the abstraction of carbon atoms from random locations on the fiber surface, giving rise to the development of defects (i.e., structural disorder), which in turn were the places where oxygen could be introduced during and after the plasma etching. It was observed that the most effective treatments in terms of extent of surface structural modification (disordering) and uniform introduction of oxygen were those carried out for just a few ( approximately 3) minutes. Considerably shorter exposures failed to provide a homogeneous modification and many locations on the fiber surface remained unaltered, retaining their original atomic-scale order, whereas longer treatments did not bring about further structural changes to the surface and only led to fiber consumption. These results are consistent with previous X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements on these fibers and provide an atomic-level understanding of the saturation effect observed in the surface oxygen concentration of this and other types of carbon fibers with plasma oxidation. Such understanding may also prove helpful for the accurate control and optimization of fiber-matrix interaction in composite materials.

  12. A Scanning Tunneling Microscope at the Milli-Kelvin, High Magnetic Field Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Brian B.

    The ability to access lower temperatures and higher magnetic fields has precipitated breakthroughs in our understanding of physical matter, revealing novel effects such as superconductivity, the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, and single spin magnetism. Extending the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to the extremity of the B-T phase space provides unique insight on these phenomena both at the atomic level and with spectroscopic power. In this thesis, I describe the design and operation of a full-featured, dilution refrigerator-based STM capable of sample preparation in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and spectroscopic mapping with an electronic temperature of 240 mK in fields up to 14 T. I detail technical solutions to overcome the stringent requirements on vibration isolation, electronic noise, and mechanical design necessary to successfully integrate the triad of the STM, UHV, and dilution refrigeration. Measurements of the heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn5 ( Tc = 2.3 K) directly leverage the resulting combination of ultra-low temperature and atomic resolution to identify its Cooper pairing to be of dx2-y2 symmetry. Spectroscopic and quasiparticle interference measurements isolate a Kondo-hybridized, heavy effective mass band near the Fermi level, from which nodal superconductivity emerges in CeCoIn5 in coexistence with an independent pseudogap. Secondly, the versatility of this instrument is demonstrated through measurements of the three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 up to the maximum magnetic field. Through high resolution Landau level spectroscopy, the dispersion of the conduction band is shown to be Dirac-like over an unexpectedly extended regime, and its two-fold degeneracy to be lifted in field through a combination of orbital and Zeeman effects. Indeed, these two experiments on CeCoIn5 and Cd3 As2 glimpse the new era of nano-scale materials research, spanning superconductivity, topological properties, and single spin phenomena, made

  13. Non-linear image scanning microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Ingo; Ros, Robert; Enderlein, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, multiphoton microscopy can be considered as a routine method for the observation of living cells, organs, up to whole organisms. Second-harmonics generation (SHG) imaging has evolved to a powerful qualitative and label-free method for studying fibrillar structures, like collagen networks. However, examples of super-resolution non-linear microscopy are rare. So far, such approaches require complex setups and advanced synchronization of scanning elements limiting the image acquisition rates. We describe theory and realization of a super-resolution image scanning microscope [1, 2] using two-photon excited fluorescence as well as second-harmonic generation. It requires only minor modifications compared to a classical two-photon laser-scanning microscope and allows image acquisition at the high frame rates of a resonant galvo-scanner. We achieve excellent sensitivity and high frame-rate in combination with two-times improved lateral resolution. We applied this method to fixed cells, collagen hydrogels, as well as living fly embryos. Further, we proofed the excellent image quality of our setup for deep tissue imaging. 1. Müller C.B. and Enderlein J. (2010) Image scanning microscopy. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104(19), 198101. 2. Sheppard C.J.R. (1988) Super-resolution in confocal imaging. Optik (Stuttg) 80 53-54.

  14. A New High Channel-Count, High Scan-Rate, Data Acquisition System for the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.; Sekula, Martin K.; Piatak, David J.; Simmons, Scott A.; Babel, Walter C.; Collins, Jesse G.; Ramey, James M.; Heald, Dean M.

    2016-01-01

    A data acquisition system upgrade project, known as AB-DAS, is underway at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. AB-DAS will soon serve as the primary data system and will substantially increase the scan-rate capabilities and analog channel count while maintaining other unique aeroelastic and dynamic test capabilities required of the facility. AB-DAS is configurable, adaptable, and enables buffet and aeroacoustic tests by synchronously scanning all analog channels and recording the high scan-rate time history values for each data quantity. AB-DAS is currently available for use as a stand-alone data system with limited capabilities while development continues. This paper describes AB-DAS, the design methodology, and the current features and capabilities. It also outlines the future work and projected capabilities following completion of the data system upgrade project.

  15. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel: Digital image processing, part 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A survey of digital image processing techniques and processing systems for aerodynamic images has been conducted. These images covered many types of flows and were generated by many types of flow diagnostics. These include laser vapor screens, infrared cameras, laser holographic interferometry, Schlieren, and luminescent paints. Some general digital image processing systems, imaging networks, optical sensors, and image computing chips were briefly reviewed. Possible digital imaging network systems for the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel were explored.

  16. Data compression of scanned halftone images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Jensen, Kim S.

    1994-01-01

    with the halftone grid, and converted to a gray level representation. A new digital description of (halftone) grids has been developed for this purpose. The gray level values are coded according to a scheme based on states derived from a segmentation of gray values. To enable real-time processing of high resolution...... scanner output, the coding has been parallelized and implemented on a transputer system. For comparison, the test image was coded using existing (lossless) methods giving compression rates of 2-7. The best of these, a combination of predictive and binary arithmetic coding was modified and optimized...

  17. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and High PressureX-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of Adsorbate Structure,Composition and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions on A Model SingleCrystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montano, Max O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Our research focuses on taking advantage of the ability of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to operate at high-temperatures and high-pressures while still providing real-time atomic resolution images. We also utilize high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HPXPS) to monitor systems under identical conditions thus giving us chemical information to compare and contrast with the structural and dynamic data provided by STM.

  18. Elimination of periodic damped artifacts in scanning probe microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhang; Huang, Wenhao

    2010-04-01

    When scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is operated at high scan rates, stripe-like artifacts will appear frequently in the SPM images. The removal of the image artifacts is highly demanded because they will distort the results in precise measurements. In this work, a method based on Prony analysis has been introduced to erase such periodic damped artifacts. Results demonstrate that this method prevails against the conventional fast Fourier transformation (FFT) method. Clean eliminations of the image artifacts are obtained, with almost no sacrifice of the detailed surface information. Even for arbitrary rough surfaces, the image artifacts can also be reduced by more than one order of magnitude. However, small amounts of stripes may still remain in the images. In these cases, the Prony analysis combined with locally weighted smoothing will provide better image quality. The artifacts reduction can have a meaning in the SPM-based visualization of dynamic phenomena with a nanoscale resolution.

  19. Line-scanning confocal microendoscope for nuclear morphometry imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yubo; Carns, Jennifer; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.

    2017-11-01

    Fiber-optic endomicroscopy is a minimally invasive method to image cellular morphology in vivo. Using a coherent fiber bundle as an image relay, it allows additional imaging optics to be placed at the distal end of the fiber outside the body. In this research, we use this approach to demonstrate a compact, low-cost line-scanning confocal fluorescence microendoscope that can be constructed for pathological conditions.

  20. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Image mosaicing for automated pipe scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summan, Rahul; Dobie, Gordon; Guarato, Francesco; MacLeod, Charles; Marshall, Stephen; Forrester, Cailean; Pierce, Gareth; Bolton, Gary

    2015-03-01

    Remote visual inspection (RVI) is critical for the inspection of the interior condition of pipelines particularly in the nuclear and oil and gas industries. Conventional RVI equipment produces a video which is analysed online by a trained inspector employing expert knowledge. Due to the potentially disorientating nature of the footage, this is a time intensive and difficult activity. In this paper a new probe for such visual inspections is presented. The device employs a catadioptric lens coupled with feature based structure from motion to create a 3D model of the interior surface of a pipeline. Reliance upon the availability of image features is mitigated through orientation and distance estimates from an inertial measurement unit and encoder respectively. Such a model affords a global view of the data thus permitting a greater appreciation of the nature and extent of defects. Furthermore, the technique estimates the 3D position and orientation of the probe thus providing information to direct remedial action. Results are presented for both synthetic and real pipe sections. The former enables the accuracy of the generated model to be assessed while the latter demonstrates the efficacy of the technique in a practice.

  2. Discretization of electronic states in large InAsP/InP multilevel quantum dots probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, B; Robert-Philip, I; Beveratos, A; David, C; Wang, Z Z; Sagnes, I; Girard, J C

    2012-03-23

    The topography and the electronic structure of InAsP/InP quantum dots are probed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The study of the local density of states in such large quantum dots confirms the discrete nature of the electronic levels whose wave functions are measured by differential conductivity mapping. Because of their large dimensions, the energy separation between the discrete electronic levels is low, allowing for quantization in both the lateral and growth directions as well as the observation of the harmonicity of the dot lateral potential.

  3. Scanning Tunneling Microscopic Observation of Adatom-Mediated Motifs on Gold-Thiol Self-assembled Monolayers at High Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yun; Chi, Qijin; Hush, Noel S.

    2009-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed by chemisorption of a branched-chain alkanethiol, 2-methyl-1-propanethiol, on Au(111) surfaces were studied by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under electrochemical potential control and analyzed using extensive density functional theory (DFT...... the structural motifs observed on surfaces at low coverage and on gold nanoparticles to the observed spectroscopic properties of high-coverage SAMs formed by methanethiol. However, the significant role attributed to intermolecular steric packing effects suggests a lack of generality for the adatom-mediated motif...

  4. Quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukojevic, Vladana; Heidkamp, Marcus; Ming, Yu; Johansson, Björn; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf

    2008-11-25

    A new approach to quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is presented. It relies on fluorescence intensity distribution to analyze the molecular occurrence statistics captured by digital imaging and enables direct determination of the number of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion rates without resorting to temporal or spatial autocorrelation analyses. Digital images of fluorescent molecules were recorded by using fast scanning and avalanche photodiode detectors. In this way the signal-to-background ratio was significantly improved, enabling direct quantitative imaging by CLSM. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using standard solutions of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules, quantum dots, and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein in solution and in live cells. The method was verified by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The relevance for biological applications, in particular, for live cell imaging, is discussed.

  5. Modular Scanning Confocal Microscope with Digital Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xianjun; McCluskey, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    In conventional confocal microscopy, a physical pinhole is placed at the image plane prior to the detector to limit the observation volume. In this work, we present a modular design of a scanning confocal microscope which uses a CCD camera to replace the physical pinhole for materials science applications. Experimental scans were performed on a microscope resolution target, a semiconductor chip carrier, and a piece of etched silicon wafer. The data collected by the CCD were processed to yield images of the specimen. By selecting effective pixels in the recorded CCD images, a virtual pinhole is created. By analyzing the image moments of the imaging data, a lateral resolution enhancement is achieved by using a 20 × / NA = 0.4 microscope objective at 532 nm laser wavelength.

  6. The role of dimer formation in the self-assemblies of DNA base molecules on Cu(111) surfaces: A scanning tunneling microscope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Masashi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Tomoji

    2001-08-01

    For the purpose of understanding the self-assembly formation mechanism of DNA base molecules, guanine, adenine, cytosine, and thymine molecules were deposited on Cu(111) surfaces, and were observed using a low-temperature (≈80 K) scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Single-molecular-scale STM images revealed that guanine, adenine, and cytosine molecules can form ordered one- and/or two-dimensional unique structures, but thymine molecules, however, randomly aggregate into small clusters. Semiempirical molecular orbital (MO) calculation indicates that there exists predominantly stable dimer structures for the former three molecules, while such phenomena cannot be observed among the possible thymine dimer and even trimer structures. Based on experimental and theoretical results, we have concluded that specific hydrogen-bonded nucleus formation is a decisive process in the two-dimensional self-assembly formation of DNA base molecules on Cu(111) surfaces.

  7. Adsorbate structures and catalytic reactions studied in the torrpressure range by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Kevin Shao-Lin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (HPHTSTM) was used to study adsorbate structures and reactions on single crystal model catalytic systems. Studies of the automobile catalytic converter reaction [CO + NO → 1/2 N2 + CO2] on Rh(111) and ethylene hydrogenation [C2H4 + H2 → C2H6] on Rh(111) and Pt(111) elucidated information on adsorbate structures in equilibrium with high-pressure gas and the relationship of atomic and molecular mobility to chemistry. STM studies of NO on Rh(111) showed that adsorbed NO forms two high-pressure structures, with the phase transformation from the (2 x 2) structure to the (3 x 3) structure occurring at 0.03 Torr. The (3 x 3) structure only exists when the surface is in equilibrium with the gas phase. The heat of adsorption of this new structure was determined by measuring the pressures and temperatures at which both (2 x 2) and (3 x 3) structures coexisted. The energy barrier between the two structures was calculated by observing the time necessary for the phase transformation to take place. High-pressure STM studies of the coadsorption of CO and NO on Rh(111) showed that CO and NO form a mixed (2 x 2) structure at low NO partial pressures. By comparing surface and gas compositions, the adsorption energy difference between topsite CO and NO was calculated. Occasionally there is exchange between top-site CO and NO, for which we have described a mechanism for. At high NO partial pressures, NO segregates into islands, where the phase transformation to the (3 x 3) structure occurs. The reaction of CO and NO on Rh(111) was monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) and HPHTSTM. From MS studies the apparent activation energy of the catalytic converter reaction was calculated and compared to theory. STM showed that under high-temperature reaction conditions, surface metal atoms become mobile. Ethylene hydrogenation and its poisoning by CO was

  8. Surface damage through grazing incidence ions investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redinger, Alex

    2009-07-10

    Surface damage, caused by grazing incidence ions, is investigated with variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The experiments are carried out on a Pt(111) crystal. The kinetic energy of noble gas ions is varied between 1-15 keV and the angle of incidence can be adjusted between {theta} = 78.5 and {theta} = 90 measured with respect to the surface normal. The damage patterns of single ion impacts, on flat terraces and at step edges of monoatomic height, are investigated at low surface temperatures. Ions hitting a flat terrace are usually specular reflected. The energy transfer from the ion to the crystal atoms is small and only little damage is produced. In contrast, at ascending step edges, which are illuminated by the ion beam, large angle scattering events occur. Sputtering, adatom and vacancy production is induced. However, a significant fraction of the ions, which hit step edges, enter the crystal and are guided in between two atomic layers parallel to the surface via small angle binary collisions. This steering process is denoted as subsurface channeling. The energy loss per length scale of the channeled particles is low, which results in long ion trajectories (up to 1000A). During the steering process, the ions produce surface damage. Depending on the ion species and the ion energy, adatom and vacancies or surface vacancy trenches of monoatomic width are observed. The surface damage can be used to track the path of the ion. This makes the whole trajectory of single ions with keV energy visible. The number of sputtered atoms per incident ion at ascending step edges, i.e. the step edge sputtering yield, is measured experimentally for different irradiation conditions. For {theta} = 86 , the sputtering yield is determined from the fluence dependent retraction of pre-existing illuminated step edges. An alternative method for the step edge sputtering yield determination, is the analysis of the concentration of ascending steps and of the removed amount

  9. Hybrid detection of lung nodules on CT scan images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lin; Tan, Yongqiang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng, E-mail: bz2166@columbia.edu [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The diversity of lung nodules poses difficulty for the current computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) schemes for lung nodule detection on computed tomography (CT) scan images, especially in large-scale CT screening studies. We proposed a novel CAD scheme based on a hybrid method to address the challenges of detection in diverse lung nodules. Methods: The hybrid method proposed in this paper integrates several existing and widely used algorithms in the field of nodule detection, including morphological operation, dot-enhancement based on Hessian matrix, fuzzy connectedness segmentation, local density maximum algorithm, geodesic distance map, and regression tree classification. All of the adopted algorithms were organized into tree structures with multi-nodes. Each node in the tree structure aimed to deal with one type of lung nodule. Results: The method has been evaluated on 294 CT scans from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset. The CT scans were randomly divided into two independent subsets: a training set (196 scans) and a test set (98 scans). In total, the 294 CT scans contained 631 lung nodules, which were annotated by at least two radiologists participating in the LIDC project. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the training set were 87% and 2.61%. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the testing set were 85.2% and 3.13%. Conclusions: The proposed hybrid method yielded high performance on the evaluation dataset and exhibits advantages over existing CAD schemes. We believe that the present method would be useful for a wide variety of CT imaging protocols used in both routine diagnosis and screening studies.

  10. Correcting scanning instabilities from images of periodic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braidy, Nadi, E-mail: nadi.braidy@usherbrooke.ca [Departement de genie chimique et de genie biotechnologique, Universite de Sherbrooke. 2500 Boul. de l' Universite, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1H 2R1 (Canada); Le Bouar, Yann [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures, CNRS/Onera, 29, avenue de la division Leclerc, 92322 Chatillon (France); Lazar, Sorin [FEI Electron Optics, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ricolleau, Christian [Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, CNRS-UMR 7162, Universite Paris Diderot, Paris 7, Case Courrier 7021, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2012-07-15

    A method for measuring and correcting the row displacement errors in lattice images acquired using scanning based methods is presented. This type of distortion is apparent in lattice-resolved images acquired using scanning-based techniques such as scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and translates to vertical streaks convolving every feature in Fourier space. This paper presents a method to measure and correct the distortion based on the phase analysis of the streaks in Fourier space. The validity and the precision of the method is demonstrated using a model image and two experimental STEM images of Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 110 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket thin film and a 5 nm CoPt disordered nanocrystal. The algorithm is implemented in a freely available Digital Micrograph Trade-Mark-Sign script. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method to remove scanning instabilities in micrographs exhibiting periodic features. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique highly precise and accurate as demonstrated using test image. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental micrographs of Si thin film and CoPt nanocrystal successfully restored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method is artefact-free and improves the overall quality of the micrograph.

  11. Investigations in optoelectronic image processing in scanning laser microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaliha, Hiranya Kumar

    A considerable amount of work has been done on scann-ing laser microscopy since its applications were first pointed out by Roberts and Young[1], Minsky [2] and Davidovits et al [3]. The advent of laser has made it possible to focus an intense beam of laser light in a scanning optical microscope (SOM) [4, 5] and hence explore regions of microscopy[6] uncovered by conven-tional microscopy. In the simple SOM [7, 8, 9], the upper spatial frequency in amplitude transmittance or reflectance of an object for which transfer function is nonzero is same as that in a conventional optical microscope. However, in Type II SOM [7] or confocal SOM that employs a coherent or a point detector, the spatial frequency bandwidth is twice that obtained in a conventional microscope. Besides this confocal set-up is found to be very useful in optical sectioning and consequently in 3-D image processing[10, 11, 12] specially of biological specimens. Such systems are also suitable for studies of semiconductor materials [13], super-resolution [14] and various imaginative ways of image processing[15, 16, 17] including phase imaging[18]. A brief survey of related advances in scanning optical microscopy has been covered in the chapter 1 of the thesis. The performance of SOM may be investigated by concent-rating also on signal derived by one dimensional scan of the object specimen. This simplified mode may also be adapted to give wealth of information for biological and semiconductor specimens. Hence we have investigated the design of a scanning laser system suited specifically for studies of line scan image signals of microscopic specimens when probed through a focused laser spot. An electro-mechanical method of scanning of the object specimen has been designed with this aim in mind. Chapter 2, Part A of the thesis deals with the design consider-ations of such a system. For analysis of scan signals at a later instant of time so as to facilitate further processing, an arrangement of microprocessor

  12. Surface polymerization of (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) probed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy on Au(111) in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shahzada; Carstens, Timo; Berger, Rüdiger; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Endres, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The electropolymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) to poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was investigated in the air and water-stable ionic liquids 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate [HMIm]FAP and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) amide [EMIm]TFSA. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) results show that the electropolymerization of EDOT in the ionic liquid can be probed on the nanoscale. In contrast to present understanding, it was observed that the EDOT can be oxidised in ionic liquids well below its oxidation potential and the under potential growth of polymer was visualized by in situ STM. These results serve as the first study to confirm the under potential growth of conducting polymers in ionic liquids. Furthermore, ex situ microscopy measurements were performed. Quite a high current of 670 nA was observed on the nanoscale by conductive scanning force microscopy (CSFM).

  13. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Jason, E-mail: jason.holm@nist.gov; Keller, Robert R.

    2016-08-15

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. - Highlights: • A modular aperture system for STEM-in-SEM imaging is described. • A flexible cantilever sample holder that can maximize camera length is described. • The aperture system and sample holder enable complete acceptance angle control. • Most STEM imaging modes can be implemented without multi-segment detectors.

  14. Design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, S.; Zhou, B. B.; Drozdov, I. K.; Seo, J.; Urban, L.; Gyenis, A.; Kingsley, S. C. J.; Jones, H.; Yazdani, A.

    2013-10-01

    We describe the construction and performance of a scanning tunneling microscope capable of taking maps of the tunneling density of states with sub-atomic spatial resolution at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high (14 T) magnetic fields. The fully ultra-high vacuum system features visual access to a two-sample microscope stage at the end of a bottom-loading dilution refrigerator, which facilitates the transfer of in situ prepared tips and samples. The two-sample stage enables location of the best area of the sample under study and extends the experiment lifetime. The successful thermal anchoring of the microscope, described in detail, is confirmed through a base temperature reading of 20 mK, along with a measured electron temperature of 250 mK. Atomically resolved images, along with complementary vibration measurements, are presented to confirm the effectiveness of the vibration isolation scheme in this instrument. Finally, we demonstrate that the microscope is capable of the same level of performance as typical machines with more modest refrigeration by measuring spectroscopic maps at base temperature both at zero field and in an applied magnetic field.

  15. Scanning Reduction Strategy in MEG/EEG Beamformer Source Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hee Hong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MEG/EEG beamformer source imaging is a promising approach which can easily address spatiotemporal multi-dipole problems without a priori information on the number of sources and is robust to noise. Despite such promise, beamformer generally has weakness which is degrading localization performance for correlated sources and is requiring of dense scanning for covering all possible interesting (entire source areas. Wide source space scanning yields all interesting area images, and it results in lengthy computation time. Therefore, an efficient source space scanning strategy would be beneficial in achieving accelerated beamformer source imaging. We propose a new strategy in computing beamformer to reduce scanning points and still maintain effective accuracy (good spatial resolution. This new strategy uses the distribution of correlation values between measurements and lead-field vectors. Scanning source points are chosen yielding higher RMS correlations than the predetermined correlation thresholds. We discuss how correlation thresholds depend on SNR and verify the feasibility and efficacy of our proposed strategy to improve the beamformer through numerical and empirical experiments. Our proposed strategy could in time accelerate the conventional beamformer up to over 40% without sacrificing spatial accuracy.

  16. Novel fringe scanning/Fourier transform method of synthetic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, T.M.; Albano, R.K.

    1993-08-01

    We have developed a one-dimensional theory and a computer model for synthetically imaging scenes using a novel fringe scanning/Fourier transform technique. Our method probes a scene using two interfering beams of slightly different frequency. These beams form a moving fringe pattern which scans the scene and resonates with any spatial frequency components having the same spatial frequency as the scanning fringe pattern. A simple, non-imaging detector above the scene observes any scattered radiation from the scene falling onto it. If a resonance occurs between the scanning fringe pattern and the scene, then the scattered radiation will be modulated at the difference frequency between the two probing beams. By changing the spatial period of the fringe pattern and then measuring the amplitude and phase of the modulated radiation that is scattered from the scene, the Fourier amplitudes and phases of the different spatial frequency components making up the scene can be measured. A synthetic image of the scene being probed can be generated from this Fourier amplitude and phase data by taking the inverse Fourier transform of this information. This technique could be used to image objects using light, ultrasonic, or other electromagnetic or acoustic waves.

  17. Scan-plane truncation in diffraction tomography-based imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Three approaches for truncating the scan plane in diffraction tomography-based imaging are suggested and compared. The first and second approaches involve multiplication of a window to the scattered field before evaluating the spatial Fourier transform. The third method relies on an asymptotic end...

  18. Toward quantitative STM: Scanning tunneling microscopy study of structure and dynamics of adsorbates on transition metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunphy, James Christopher [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    STM was applied to chemisorbed S layers on Re(000l) and Mo(100) surfaces. As function of coverage on both these surfaces, S orders into several different overlayer structures, which have been studied by dynamic LEED. STM images of all these structures were obtained. Approximate location of S atoms in the structures was determined by inspecting the images, especially the regions containing defects. Results are in agreement with LEED except for the p(2xl) overlayer of sulfur on Mo(100). The STM images were compared to calculations made with Electron Scattering Quantum Chemistry (ESQC) theory. Variation of contrast in experimental images is explained as a result of changes in STM tip termination structure. STM image contrast is a result of changes in the interference between different paths for the tunneling electrons. The simplest structure on the Mo(100) surface was used as a model for developing and testing a method of quantitative structure determination with the STM. Experimental STM images acquired under a range of tunneling conditions were compared to theoretical calculations of the images as a function of surface structure to determine the structure which best fit. Results matched within approximately 0.1 Angstroms a LEED structural determination. At lower S coverage, diffusion of S atoms over the Re(0001) surface and the lateral interaction between these atoms were investigated by application of a new image analysis technique. The interaction between the S and a coadsorbed CO layer was also studied, and CO was found to induce compression of the S overlayer. A similar result was found for Au deposited on the sulfur covered Mo(100) surface. The interaction between steps on the Mo surface was found to be influenced by S adsorption and this observation was interpreted with the theory of equilibrium crystal shape. Design of an STM instrument which operates at cryogenic and variable sample temperatures, and its future applications, are described.

  19. High-throughput microfluidic line scan imaging for cytological characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Powless, Amy J.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Claycomb, Adair; Fritsch, Ingrid; Balachandran, Kartik; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Imaging cells in a microfluidic chamber with an area scan camera is difficult due to motion blur and data loss during frame readout causing discontinuity of data acquisition as cells move at relatively high speeds through the chamber. We have developed a method to continuously acquire high-resolution images of cells in motion through a microfluidics chamber using a high-speed line scan camera. The sensor acquires images in a line-by-line fashion in order to continuously image moving objects without motion blur. The optical setup comprises an epi-illuminated microscope with a 40X oil immersion, 1.4 NA objective and a 150 mm tube lens focused on a microfluidic channel. Samples containing suspended cells fluorescently stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine in saline are introduced into the microfluidics chamber via a syringe pump; illumination is provided by a blue LED (455 nm). Images were taken of samples at the focal plane using an ELiiXA+ 8k/4k monochrome line-scan camera at a line rate of up to 40 kHz. The system's line rate and fluid velocity are tightly controlled to reduce image distortion and are validated using fluorescent microspheres. Image acquisition was controlled via MATLAB's Image Acquisition toolbox. Data sets comprise discrete images of every detectable cell which may be subsequently mined for morphological statistics and definable features by a custom texture analysis algorithm. This high-throughput screening method, comparable to cell counting by flow cytometry, provided efficient examination including counting, classification, and differentiation of saliva, blood, and cultured human cancer cells.

  20. High resolution imaging of tunnels by magnetic resonance neurography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhawong, Ty K.; Thawait, Shrey K.; Machado, Antonio J.; Carrino, John A.; Chhabra, Avneesh [Johns Hopkins Hospital, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Kenneth C. [Baltimore VA Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Williams, Eric H. [Dellon Institute for Peripheral Nerve Surgery, Towson, MD (United States); Hashemi, Shahreyar Shar [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Peripheral nerves often traverse confined fibro-osseous and fibro-muscular tunnels in the extremities, where they are particularly vulnerable to entrapment and compressive neuropathy. This gives rise to various tunnel syndromes, characterized by distinct patterns of muscular weakness and sensory deficits. This article focuses on several upper and lower extremity tunnels, in which direct visualization of the normal and abnormal nerve in question is possible with high resolution 3T MR neurography (MRN). MRN can also serve as a useful adjunct to clinical and electrophysiologic exams by discriminating adhesive lesions (perineural scar) from compressive lesions (such as tumor, ganglion, hypertrophic callous, or anomalous muscles) responsible for symptoms, thereby guiding appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  1. Simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope images on desktop computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: christian.dwyer@mcem.monash.edu.au [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Two independent strategies are presented for reducing the computation time of multislice simulations of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images: (1) optimal probe sampling, and (2) the use of desktop graphics processing units. The first strategy is applicable to STEM images generated by elastic and/or inelastic scattering, and requires minimal effort for its implementation. Used together, these two strategies can reduce typical computation times from days to hours, allowing practical simulation of STEM images of general atomic structures on a desktop computer.

  2. Development and set-up of a new low temperature scanning tunneling microscope Applications on microscopy and spectroscopy of lanthanid metals

    CERN Document Server

    Mühlig, A

    2000-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are suitable methods to study the physical properties of thin magnetic metal films with a thickness of a few monolayers. These systems are of current interest because they give insight into solids states physics of metals. This thesis deals with following subjects: Introduction to scanning tunneling microscopy. Set-up of a low temperatur scanning tunneling microscope. Growth of thin Co and lanthanid metal films on W(110). Interplay of morphologie and magnetism on the example of Co/W(110). Making of Gd wires which are only a few nanometers thin. Diskussion of the studied exchange splitting of a d-like surface state in a local moment magnet. Measurement of the lifetime of hot holes and hot electrons near the fermi edge.

  3. Local analysis of semiconductor nanoobjects by scanning tunneling atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Lashkova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of the current–voltage (I–V measurements in local regions of semiconductor nanostructures by conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM are discussed. The standard procedure of I–V measurements in conductive AFM leads not infrequently to the thermomechanical stresses in the sample and, as a consequence, nonreproducibility and unreliability of measurements. The technique of obtaining reproducible current–voltage characteristics is proposed. According to the technique, a series of measurements of the selected scanning area in the mode of conducting AFM should be taken, each at the certain value of the potential. According to a series of scans I–V curve at a particular point (for any point of the scan was plotted. The program is realized in the LabVIEW software. The proposed method extends the capabilities of scanning probe microscopy in the diagnosis of nanostructured semiconductor materials.

  4. Line-scanning Raman imaging spectroscopy for detection of fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sunan; Liu, Le; Liu, Zhiyi; Shen, Zhiyuan; Li, Guohua; He, Yonghong

    2012-06-10

    Fingerprints are the best form of personal identification for criminal investigation purposes. We present a line-scanning Raman imaging system and use it to detect fingerprints composed of β-carotene and fish oil on different substrates. Although the line-scanning Raman system has been used to map the distribution of materials such as polystyrene spheres and minerals within geological samples, this is the first time to our knowledge that the method is used in imaging fingerprints. Two Raman peaks of β-carotene (501.2, 510.3 nm) are detected and the results demonstrate that both peaks can generate excellent images with little difference between them. The system operates at a spectra resolution of about 0.4 nm and can detect β-carotene signals in petroleum ether solution with the limit of detection of 3.4×10(-9) mol/L. The results show that the line-scanning Raman imaging spectroscopy we have built has a high accuracy and can be used in the detection of latent fingerprints in the future.

  5. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yue, E-mail: shenyue@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhou, Yuan, E-mail: zhouy@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The humidity dramatically affects the contrast of scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) imaging on mica surface. • This influence roots in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the humidity change. • A strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM is proposed. - Abstract: Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  6. Space Radar Image of West Texas - SAR scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This radar image of the Midland/Odessa region of West Texas, demonstrates an experimental technique, called ScanSAR, that allows scientists to rapidly image large areas of the Earth's surface. The large image covers an area 245 kilometers by 225 kilometers (152 miles by 139 miles). It was obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 5, 1994. The smaller inset image is a standard SIR-C image showing a portion of the same area, 100 kilometers by 57 kilometers (62 miles by 35 miles) and was taken during the first flight of SIR-C on April 14, 1994. The bright spots on the right side of the image are the cities of Odessa (left) and Midland (right), Texas. The Pecos River runs from the top center to the bottom center of the image. Along the left side of the image are, from top to bottom, parts of the Guadalupe, Davis and Santiago Mountains. North is toward the upper right. Unlike conventional radar imaging, in which a radar continuously illuminates a single ground swath as the space shuttle passes over the terrain, a Scansar radar illuminates several adjacent ground swaths almost simultaneously, by 'scanning' the radar beam across a large area in a rapid sequence. The adjacent swaths, typically about 50 km (31 miles) wide, are then merged during ground processing to produce a single large scene. Illumination for this L-band scene is from the top of the image. The beams were scanned from the top of the scene to the bottom, as the shuttle flew from left to right. This scene was acquired in about 30 seconds. A normal SIR-C image is acquired in about 13 seconds. The ScanSAR mode will likely be used on future radar sensors to construct regional and possibly global radar images and topographic maps. The ScanSAR processor is being designed for 1996 implementation at NASA's Alaska SAR Facility, located at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and will produce digital images from the

  7. CT Scanning Imaging Method Based on a Spherical Trajectory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chen

    Full Text Available In industrial computed tomography (CT, the mismatch between the X-ray energy and the effective thickness makes it difficult to ensure the integrity of projection data using the traditional scanning model, because of the limitations of the object's complex structure. So, we have developed a CT imaging method that is based on a spherical trajectory. Considering an unrestrained trajectory for iterative reconstruction, an iterative algorithm can be used to realise the CT reconstruction of a spherical trajectory for complete projection data only. Also, an inclined circle trajectory is used as an example of a spherical trajectory to illustrate the accuracy and feasibility of this new scanning method. The simulation results indicate that the new method produces superior results for a larger cone-beam angle, a limited angle and tabular objects compared with traditional circle trajectory scanning.

  8. A 10 mK scanning tunneling microscope operating in ultra high vacuum and high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assig, Maximilian; Etzkorn, Markus; Enders, Axel; Stiepany, Wolfgang; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    We present design and performance of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that operates at temperatures down to 10 mK providing ultimate energy resolution on the atomic scale. The STM is attached to a dilution refrigerator with direct access to an ultra high vacuum chamber allowing in situ sample preparation. High magnetic fields of up to 14 T perpendicular and up to 0.5 T parallel to the sample surface can be applied. Temperature sensors mounted directly at the tip and sample position verified the base temperature within a small error margin. Using a superconducting Al tip and a metallic Cu(111) sample, we determined an effective temperature of 38 ± 1 mK from the thermal broadening observed in the tunneling spectra. This results in an upper limit for the energy resolution of ΔE = 3.5 kBT = 11.4 ± 0.3 μeV. The stability between tip and sample is 4 pm at a temperature of 15 mK as demonstrated by topography measurements on a Cu(111) surface.

  9. A 10Â mK scanning tunneling microscope operating in ultra high vacuum and high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assig, Maximilian; Etzkorn, Markus; Enders, Axel; Stiepany, Wolfgang; Ast, Christian R.; Kern, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    We present design and performance of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that operates at temperatures down to 10 mK providing ultimate energy resolution on the atomic scale. The STM is attached to a dilution refrigerator with direct access to an ultra high vacuum chamber allowing in situ sample preparation. High magnetic fields of up to 14 T perpendicular and up to 0.5 T parallel to the sample surface can be applied. Temperature sensors mounted directly at the tip and sample position verified the base temperature within a small error margin. Using a superconducting Al tip and a metallic Cu(111) sample, we determined an effective temperature of 38 ± 1 mK from the thermal broadening observed in the tunneling spectra. This results in an upper limit for the energy resolution of ΔE = 3.5kBT = 11.4 ± 0.3 μeV. The stability between tip and sample is 4 pm at a temperature of 15 mK as demonstrated by topography measurements on a Cu(111) surface.

  10. Detecting element specific electrons from a single cobalt nanocluster with synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersell, Heath; Shirato, Nozomi; Cummings, Marvin; Chang, Hao; Miller, Dean; Rosenmann, Daniel; Hla, Saw-Wai; Rose, Volker

    2017-09-04

    We use a nanofabricated scanning tunneling microscope tip as a detector to investigate local X-ray induced tunneling and electron emission from a single cobalt nanocluster on a Au(111) surface. The tip-detector is positioned a few angstroms above the nanocluster, and ramping the incident X-ray energy across the Co photoabsorption K-edge enables the detection of element specific electrons. Atomic-scale spatial dependent changes in the X-ray absorption cross section are directly measured by taking the X-ray induced current as a function of X-ray energy. From the measured sample and tip currents, element specific X-ray induced current components can be separated and thereby the corresponding yields for the X-ray induced processes of the single cobalt nanocluster can be determined. The detection of element specific synchrotron X-ray induced electrons of a single nanocluster opens a new avenue for materials characterization on a one particle at-a-time basis.

  11. Attractive interaction between Mn atoms on the GaAs(110) surface observed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Yoshida, Shoji; Kanazawa, Ken; Hayaki, Eiko; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2016-06-16

    Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) was carried out to investigate the structures of Mn atoms deposited on a GaAs(110) surface at room temperature to directly observe the characteristics of interactions between Mn atoms in GaAs. Mn atoms were paired with a probability higher than the random distribution, indicating an attractive interaction between them. In fact, re-pairing of unpaired Mn atoms was observed during STS measurement. The pair initially had a new structure, which was transformed during STS measurement into one of those formed by atom manipulation at 4 K. Mn atoms in pairs and trimers were aligned in the direction, which is theoretically predicted to produce a high Curie temperature.

  12. Low conductive support for thermal insulation of a sample holder of a variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzelka, Pavel; Vonka, Jakub; Musilova, Vera

    2013-08-01

    We have designed a supporting system to fix a sample holder of a scanning tunneling microscope in an UHV chamber at room temperature. The microscope will operate down to a temperature of 20 K. Low thermal conductance, high mechanical stiffness, and small dimensions are the main features of the supporting system. Three sets of four glass balls placed in vertices of a tetrahedron are used for thermal insulation based on small contact areas between the glass balls. We have analyzed the thermal conductivity of the contacts between the balls mutually and between a ball and a metallic plate while the results have been applied to the entire support. The calculation based on a simple model of the setup has been verified with some experimental measurements. In comparison with other feasible supporting structures, the designed support has the lowest thermal conductance.

  13. Strongly compressed Bi (111) bilayer films on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, K. F.; Yang, Fang; Song, Y. R. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Gao, C. L.; Jia, Jin-Feng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-09-21

    Ultra-thin Bi films show exotic electronic structure and novel quantum effects, especially the widely studied Bi (111) film. Using reflection high-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we studied the structure and morphology evolution of Bi (111) thin films grown on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. A strongly compressed, but quickly released in-plane lattice of Bi (111) is found in the first three bilayers. The first bilayer of Bi shows a fractal growth mode with flat surface, while the second and third bilayer show a periodic buckling due to the strong compression of the in-plane lattice. The lattice slowly changes to its bulk value with further deposition of Bi.

  14. Mn doped InSb studied at the atomic scale by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, S. J. C.; Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M.; Feeser, C. E.; Parashar, N. D.; Wessels, B. W.

    2015-11-01

    We present an atomically resolved study of metal-organic vapor epitaxy grown Mn doped InSb. Both topographic and spectroscopic measurements have been performed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The measurements on the Mn doped InSb samples show a perfect crystal structure without any precipitates and reveal that Mn acts as a shallow acceptor. The Mn concentration of the order of ˜1020 cm-3 obtained from the cross-sectional STM data compare well with the intended doping concentration. While the pair correlation function of the Mn atoms showed that their local distribution is uncorrelated beyond the STM resolution for observing individual dopants, disorder in the Mn ion location giving rise to percolation pathways is clearly noted. The amount of clustering that we see is thus as expected for a fully randomly disordered distribution of the Mn atoms and no enhanced clustering or second phase material was observed.

  15. Electronic Structure on (001) Surface of Co-doped BaFe2As2 Studied with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A.; Jayasundara, D. R.; Xuan, Y.; O'Neal, J. P.; Chen, Y.; Kim, W.; Ting, C. S.; Pan, S. H.; Jin, R.; Plummer, E. W.; Jin, R.; Sefat, A. S.; McGuire, M. A.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D.

    2009-03-01

    Co-doping makes the pnictide compound BaFe2As2 superconducting. We cleave the single crystals of this compound in UHV and study their surfaces with a low temperature STM. In this talk, we present the scanning tunneling spectrums obtained on the (001) surface of the optimally doped BaFe2As2 single crystals (Tc = 23K) and compare these spectrums with the ones obtained on the surface of the parent compound. We have found that the major feature of the spectrums on the superconducting compounds is the opening of a superconducting gap of about 6 meV for the optimally doped one. We have also observed other detailed spectrum features. We will discuss the relation between spectrum features and the local environment and also present some theoretical fit to the superconducting energy gap spectrum.

  16. GaSb/GaAs quantum dot formation and demolition studied with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smakman, E. P.; Garleff, J. K.; Rambabu, P.; Koenraad, P. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven 5612 AZ (Netherlands); Young, R. J.; Hayne, M. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-02

    We present a cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy study of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Various nanostructures are observed as a function of the growth parameters. During growth, relaxation of the high local strain fields of the nanostructures plays an important role in their formation. Pyramidal dots with a high Sb content are often accompanied by threading dislocations above them. GaSb ring formation is favored by the use of a thin GaAs first cap layer and a high growth temperature of the second cap layer. At these capping conditions, strain-driven Sb diffusion combined with As/Sb exchange and Sb segregation remove the center of a nanostructure, creating a ring. Clusters of GaSb without a well defined morphology also appear regularly, often with a highly inhomogeneous structure which is sometimes divided up in fragments.

  17. Hydrophilicity and Microsolvation of an Organic Molecule Resolved on the Sub-molecular Level by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucht, Karsten; Loose, Dirk; Ruschmeier, Maximilian; Strotkötter, Valerie; Dyker, Gerald; Morgenstern, Karina

    2018-01-26

    Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy was used to follow the formation of a solvation shell around an adsorbed functionalized azo dye from the attachment of the first water molecule to a fully solvated molecule. Specific functional groups bind initially one water molecule each, which act as anchor points for additional water molecules. Further water attachment occurs in areas close to these functional groups even when the functional groups themselves are already saturated. In contrast, water molecules surround the hydrophobic parts of the molecule only when the two-dimensional solvation shell closes around them. This study thus traces hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of an organic molecule down to a sub-molecular length scale. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  19. Simulation of channeling contrast in scanning ion microscope images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Kaoru

    2018-01-01

    The scanning ion microscope (SIM) provides a distinct channeling contrast in backscattered ion (BSI) and secondary electron (SE) images owing to its wide critical angle for ion channeling. In this report, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a crystalline sample's channeling contrast that has been scanned by ion beams of 30 keV He, Ne, and Ga in the SIM. A middle portion of the sample surface inclined at different angles against neighboring sides oriented toward the ions' channeling direction. Line profiles of the BSI and SE yields along the surface reproduced crystalline-oriented changes that are expected for a transparency model. Nevertheless, a trajectory simulation of the ions in the sample according to the MD technique suggests some contrast differences from that of the model for the BSI and SE images and for different ion species.

  20. Post-processing strategies in image scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, J E; Mitchell, C A; Hartell, N A

    2015-10-15

    Image scanning microscopy (ISM) coupled with pixel reassignment offers a resolution improvement of √2 over standard widefield imaging. By scanning point-wise across the specimen and capturing an image of the fluorescent signal generated at each scan position, additional information about specimen structure is recorded and the highest accessible spatial frequency is doubled. Pixel reassignment can be achieved optically in real time or computationally a posteriori and is frequently combined with the use of a physical or digital pinhole to reject out of focus light. Here, we simulate an ISM dataset using a test image and apply standard and non-standard processing methods to address problems typically encountered in computational pixel reassignment and pinholing. We demonstrate that the predicted improvement in resolution is achieved by applying standard pixel reassignment to a simulated dataset and explore the effect of realistic displacements between the reference and true excitation positions. By identifying the position of the detected fluorescence maximum using localisation software and centring the digital pinhole on this co-ordinate before scaling around translated excitation positions, we can recover signal that would otherwise be degraded by the use of a pinhole aligned to an inaccurate excitation reference. This strategy is demonstrated using experimental data from a multiphoton ISM instrument. Finally we investigate the effect that imaging through tissue has on the positions of excitation foci at depth and observe a global scaling with respect to the applied reference grid. Using simulated and experimental data we explore the impact of a globally scaled reference on the ISM image and, by pinholing around the detected maxima, recover the signal across the whole field of view. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Spin-polarized scanning-tunneling probe for helical Luttinger liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sourin; Rao, Sumathi

    2011-06-10

    We propose a three-terminal spin-polarized STM setup for probing the helical nature of the Luttinger liquid edge state that appears in the quantum spin Hall system. We show that the three-terminal tunneling conductance depends on the angle (θ) between the magnetization direction of the tip and the local orientation of the electron spin on the edge while the two terminal conductance is independent of this angle. We demonstrate that chiral injection of an electron into the helical Luttinger liquid (when θ is zero or π) is associated with fractionalization of the spin of the injected electron in addition to the fractionalization of its charge. We also point out a spin current amplification effect induced by the spin fractionalization.

  2. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-01-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. MEMS ultrasonic probe rotary scanning imaging system for medical endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Wen, Shijie; Yu, Daoyin

    2006-11-01

    Medical ultrasonic endoscope is the combination of electronic endoscope and ultrasonic sensor technology. Ultrasonic endoscope sends the ultrasonic probe into coelom through the biopsy channel of an electronic endoscope and rotates it by a micro motor, acquiring fault histology features of digestive organs. Compared with external ultrasonic detection, the system reduces the distance between the transducer and the organ, diminishing the effects on imaging of fats and body cavity gas. On the basis of ultrasonic imaging system, this paper implements a pulse echo imaging system. We describe the ultrasonic probe, emission circuit, receiving circuit and protective circuit in detail. With the demodulation circuit, we get the amplitude of echo which indicates the objects. And to achieve the rotary scan, we design a synchronous control circuit and a data transfer circuit basing on the USB2.0 interface. Finally we get a grey image with 256 grey levels after coordinate conversion.

  4. Images of a poe(rotic body scanned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carolina Hipólito de Assis

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to determine how the poetic eroticized body is evident in the visual images of some works of the poet, translator and literary critic Brazilian Décio Pignatari, as well as put on the reintegration of this debate in the media desiring body from the critical explained by the Mexican poet and essayist Octávio Paz is work Conjunções e Disjunções (1979. To address this body lov(erotic as cut corpus study of the work: Poesia Pois é Poesia, of Décio Pignatari (2004. Poetry expressing the brand and put in concrete dialogue resulting images of translating a digital body that extends (McLuhan while communication apparatus, media convergence in the conception of art as scanned image, such as sensory, tactile, eroticized body. Attendance plastic, tangible reflecting a face that survives own image: a concrete icon.

  5. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merino D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available David Merino, Pablo Loza-Alvarez The Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Castelldefels, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Adaptive optics (AO retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. Keywords: high-resolution, in vivo retinal imaging, AOSLO

  6. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Boppart

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT, utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR. In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR.

  7. Detection of High Local Groundwater Inflow to Rock Tunnels using ASTER Satellite Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sharafi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available High local groundwater flow into rock tunnels may lead to a potential hazard and is an important factor influencing construction time and costs. Geological features such as fault zones and open fractures can be the source of very high local groundwater inflows. Having a reliable estimation of location groundwater inflows is essential before excavation of tunnels. To reduce the costs and time of field works, remote sensing investigations can be a good solution. The main aim of the present study is to propose a methodology for detecting the geomorphic markers of cuesta in the high local groundwater inflow to Nosoud tunnel using the satellite imagery data. For this purpose, a reflectance image from the ASTER satellite sensor was used. Our Experiments show that cuesta springs, caused by hydraulic fracturing, can be detected using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI map, computed on the ASTER image, and analyzing the topographic and morphometric features of the area. Moreover, observations in tunnel excavation stage showed that crossing through open fractures in hard and thick layers is the major cause of water inflow into the tunnel, which corresponds to the surface hydrogeological evidences obtained from the ASTER image.

  8. Continuous section extraction and over-underbreak detection of tunnel based on 3D laser technology and image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Wang, Zhiwei; Han, Ya; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    In order to ensure safety, long term stability and quality control in modern tunneling operations, the acquisition of geotechnical information about encountered rock conditions and detailed installed support information is required. The limited space and time in an operational tunnel environment make the acquiring data challenging. The laser scanning in a tunneling environment, however, shows a great potential. The surveying and mapping of tunnels are crucial for the optimal use after construction and in routine inspections. Most of these applications focus on the geometric information of the tunnels extracted from the laser scanning data. There are two kinds of applications widely discussed: deformation measurement and feature extraction. The traditional deformation measurement in an underground environment is performed with a series of permanent control points installed around the profile of an excavation, which is unsuitable for a global consideration of the investigated area. Using laser scanning for deformation analysis provides many benefits as compared to traditional monitoring techniques. The change in profile is able to be fully characterized and the areas of the anomalous movement can easily be separated from overall trends due to the high density of the point cloud data. Furthermore, monitoring with a laser scanner does not require the permanent installation of control points, therefore the monitoring can be completed more quickly after excavation, and the scanning is non-contact, hence, no damage is done during the installation of temporary control points. The main drawback of using the laser scanning for deformation monitoring is that the point accuracy of the original data is generally the same magnitude as the smallest level of deformations that are to be measured. To overcome this, statistical techniques and three dimensional image processing techniques for the point clouds must be developed. For safely, effectively and easily control the problem of

  9. Analysis of Scanned Probe Images for Magnetic Focusing in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sagar; Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Philip; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2017-07-01

    We have used cooled scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to study electron motion in nanoscale devices. The charged tip of the microscope was raster-scanned at constant height above the surface as the conductance of the device was measured. The image charge scatters electrons away, changing the path of electrons through the sample. Using this technique, we imaged cyclotron orbits that flow between two narrow contacts in the magnetic focusing regime for ballistic hBN-graphene-hBN devices. We present herein an analysis of our magnetic focusing imaging results based on the effects of the tip-created charge density dip on the motion of ballistic electrons. The density dip locally reduces the Fermi energy, creating a force that pushes electrons away from the tip. When the tip is above the cyclotron orbit, electrons are deflected away from the receiving contact, creating an image by reducing the transmission between contacts. The data and our analysis suggest that the graphene edge is rather rough, and electrons scattering off the edge bounce in random directions. However, when the tip is close to the edge, it can enhance transmission by bouncing electrons away from the edge, toward the receiving contact. Our results demonstrate that cooled SPM is a promising tool to investigate the motion of electrons in ballistic graphene devices.

  10. Observation of layered antiferromagnetism in self-assembled parallel NiSi nanowire arrays on Si(110) by spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ie-Hong; Hsu, Hsin-Zan

    2018-03-01

    The layered antiferromagnetism of parallel nanowire (NW) arrays self-assembled on Si(110) have been observed at room temperature by direct imaging of both the topographies and magnetic domains using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (SP-STM/STS). The topographic STM images reveal that the self-assembled unidirectional and parallel NiSi NWs grow into the Si(110) substrate along the [\\bar{1}10] direction (i.e. the endotaxial growth) and exhibit multiple-layer growth. The spatially-resolved SP-STS maps show that these parallel NiSi NWs of different heights produce two opposite magnetic domains, depending on the heights of either even or odd layers in the layer stack of the NiSi NWs. This layer-wise antiferromagnetic structure can be attributed to an antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling between the adjacent layers in the multiple-layer NiSi NW with a B2 (CsCl-type) crystal structure. Such an endotaxial heterostructure of parallel magnetic NiSi NW arrays with a layered antiferromagnetic ordering in Si(110) provides a new and important perspective for the development of novel Si-based spintronic nanodevices.

  11. Atomistic study of comblike structure on the MoO2/Mo(110) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Arifumi; Hara, Shinsuke; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    2017-09-01

    The origin of comblike step formation, which was previously observed in the initial oxidation stage of the Mo(110) surface, was investigated by comparing between scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations and ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The comblike steps were obtained by the formation and evaporation of cluster arrays during oxidation and thermal treatment. On the terraces surrounding the comblike steps formed by the evaporation of clusters, a characteristic “overstripe” pattern was found. On the basis of this pattern, it is assumed that a reliable unit cell with MoO2(010) placed on Mo(110) with in-plane rotation can be constructed and ab initio structural relaxations can be performed. The calculations included “small” model calculations for investigating stable interfacial oxygen sites and “large” model calculations for simulating STM images, and calculation results were compared with experimental results. The simulated STM images show good agreement with the experimental observations, indicating the relevance of the large model. From these analyses, it is pointed out that the local stresses on molybdenum in the oxide layer were important for the comblike step formation.

  12. A novel cryogenic scanning laser microscope tested on Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper; Mygind, Jesper

    1995-01-01

    A novel cryogenic scanning laser microscope with a spatial resolution of less than 5 µm has been designed for on-chip in situ investigations of the working properties of normal and superconducting circuits and devices. The instrument relies on the detection of the electrical response of the circuit...... to a very localized heating induced by irradiation with 675 nm wavelength light from a semiconductor laser. The hot spot is moved by a specially designed piezoelectric scanner sweeping the tip of a single-mode optical fiber a few µm above the circuit. Depending on the scanner design the scanning area can...... be as large as 50×500 µm2 at 4.2 K. The microscope can be operated in the temperature range 2–300 K using a standard temperature controller. The central microscope body is mounted inside the vacuum can of a dip-stick-type cryoprobe. A damped spring system is used to reduce interference from extraneous...

  13. Design and calibration of a scanning tunneling microscope for large machined surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    During the last year the large sample STM has been designed, built and used for the observation of several different samples. Calibration of the scanner for prope dimensional interpretation of surface features has been a chief concern, as well as corrections for non-linear effects such as hysteresis during scans. Several procedures used in calibration and correction of piezoelectric scanners used in the laboratorys STMs are described.

  14. Electrochemistry and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of pure and redox-marked DNA- and UNA-based oligonucleotides on Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Salvatore, Princia; Karlsen, K.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied adsorption and electrochemical electron transfer of several 13- and 15-base DNA and UNA (unlocked nucleic acids) oligonucleotides (ONs) linked to Au(111)-electrode surfaces via a 50-C6-SH group using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning tunnelling microscopy in aqueous buffer unde...

  15. Lagrange time delay estimation for scanning electron microscope image magnification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K-S; Thong, L W; Ting, H Y; Tso, C P

    2010-02-01

    Interpolation techniques that are used for image magnification to obtain more useful details of the surface such as morphology and mechanical contrast usually rely on the signal information distributed around edges and areas of sharp changes and these signal information can also be used to predict missing details from the sample image. However, many of these interpolation methods tend to smooth or blur out image details around the edges. In the present study, a Lagrange time delay estimation interpolator method is proposed and this method only requires a small filter order and has no noticeable estimation bias. Comparing results with the original scanning electron microscope magnification and results of various other interpolation methods, the Lagrange time delay estimation interpolator is found to be more efficient, more robust and easier to execute.

  16. VISUALIZATION OF MACULAR PUCKER BY MULTICOLOR SCANNING LASER IMAGING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic Muftuoglu, Ilkay; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Barteselli, Giulio; Gaber, Raouf; Nezgoda, Joseph; Freeman, William R

    2018-02-01

    To compare the visualization of the epiretinal membrane (ERM) using multicolor imaging (MCI) (Heidelberg Engineering, Carlsbad, CA) and conventional white light flood color fundus photography (FP) (Topcon). The paired images of patients with ERM who underwent same-day MCI and FP examinations were reviewed. Visibility of the ERM was graded using a scale (0: not visible, 1: barely visible, and 2: clearly visible) by masked readers, and surface folds were counted to quantify the membrane visibility for each method. Images from individual color channels in MCI (green, blue, and infrared) were also graded using the same method to further investigate MCI images. Forty-eight eyes of 42 patients were included. The average ERM visibility score was 1.8 ± 0.37 for MCI and 1.01 ± 0.63 for FP (P provided better detection of surface folds (5.54 ± 2.12) compared to blue reflectance (4.2 ± 2.34) and infrared reflectance (1.2 ± 0.9). Multicolor scanning laser imaging provides superior ERM detection and delineation of surface folds than conventional FP, primarily due to the green channel present in the combination-pseudocolor image in MCI.

  17. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indebetouw, Guy; Tada, Yoshitaka; Leacock, John

    2006-11-28

    This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example), while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  18. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assesment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Yoshitaka

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example, while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  19. Note: Automated electrochemical etching and polishing of silver scanning tunneling microscope tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Stephen S; Perdue, Shawn M; Rodriguez Perez, Alejandro; Tallarida, Nicholas; Majors, Julia H; Apkarian, V Ara; Lee, Joonhee

    2013-09-01

    Fabrication of sharp and smooth Ag tips is crucial in optical scanning probe microscope experiments. To ensure reproducible tip profiles, the polishing process is fully automated using a closed-loop laminar flow system to deliver the electrolytic solution to moving electrodes mounted on a motorized translational stage. The repetitive translational motion is controlled precisely on the μm scale with a stepper motor and screw-thread mechanism. The automated setup allows reproducible control over the tip profile and improves smoothness and sharpness of tips (radius 27 ± 18 nm), as measured by ultrafast field emission.

  20. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (COSMIR) GCPEx dataset used the Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer...

  1. Neural Network for Nanoscience Scanning Electron Microscope Image Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, Mohammad Hadi; Aversa, Rossella; Cozzini, Stefano; Ciancio, Regina; Leto, Angelo; Brandino, Giuseppe Piero

    2017-10-16

    In this paper we applied transfer learning techniques for image recognition, automatic categorization, and labeling of nanoscience images obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Roughly 20,000 SEM images were manually classified into 10 categories to form a labeled training set, which can be used as a reference set for future applications of deep learning enhanced algorithms in the nanoscience domain. The categories chosen spanned the range of 0-Dimensional (0D) objects such as particles, 1D nanowires and fibres, 2D films and coated surfaces, and 3D patterned surfaces such as pillars. The training set was used to retrain on the SEM dataset and to compare many convolutional neural network models (Inception-v3, Inception-v4, ResNet). We obtained compatible results by performing a feature extraction of the different models on the same dataset. We performed additional analysis of the classifier on a second test set to further investigate the results both on particular cases and from a statistical point of view. Our algorithm was able to successfully classify around 90% of a test dataset consisting of SEM images, while reduced accuracy was found in the case of images at the boundary between two categories or containing elements of multiple categories. In these cases, the image classification did not identify a predominant category with a high score. We used the statistical outcomes from testing to deploy a semi-automatic workflow able to classify and label images generated by the SEM. Finally, a separate training was performed to determine the volume fraction of coherently aligned nanowires in SEM images. The results were compared with what was obtained using the Local Gradient Orientation method. This example demonstrates the versatility and the potential of transfer learning to address specific tasks of interest in nanoscience applications.

  2. Electrical imaging for localizing historical tunnels at an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osella, Ana; Martinelli, Patricia; Grunhut, Vivian; de la Vega, Matías; Bonomo, Néstor; Weissel, Marcelo

    2015-08-01

    We performed a geophysical study at a historical site in Buenos Aires, Argentina, corresponding to the location of a Jesuit Mission established during the 17th century, remaining there until the 18th century. The site consisted of a church, cloisters, a school, orchards and a procurator’s office; also several tunnels were built, connecting the mission with different public buildings in the town. In the 19th century the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires was built in a sector of the site originally occupied by an orchard, functioning until its demolition in 1973. At present, this area is a cobbled square. With the aim of preserving and restoring the buried structures, work was carried out in this square looking for tunnels and remains of the basement of the old building. Considering the conductive features of the subsoil, mainly formed by clays and silt, the complex characteristics of the buried structures, and the urban localization of the study area with its consequent high level of environmental electromagnetic noise, we performed pre-feasibility studies to determine the usefulness of different geophysical methods. The best results were achieved from the geoelectrical method. Dipole-dipole profiles with electrode spacings of 1.5 and 3 m provided enough lateral and vertical resolution and the required penetration depth. Reliable data were obtained as long as the electrodes were buried at least 15 cm among the cobble stones. Nine 2D electrical resistivity tomographies were obtained by using a robust inversion procedure to reduce the effect of possible data outliers in the resulting models. The effect on these models of different error estimations was also analyzed. Then, we built up a pseudo-3D model by laterally interpolating the 2D inversion results. Finally, by correlating the resulting model with the original plans, the remains of the expected main structures embedded in the site were characterized. In addition, an anomaly was

  3. CATE 2016 Indonesia: Image Calibration, Intensity Calibration, and Drift Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, H. S.; Kovac, S. A.; Jensen, L.; McKay, M. A.; Bosh, R.; Watson, Z.; Mitchell, A. M.; Penn, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    The citizen Continental America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) experiment aims to provide equipment for 60 sites across the path of totality for the United States August 21st, 2017 total solar eclipse. The opportunity to gather ninety minutes of continuous images of the solar corona is unmatched by any other previous eclipse event. In March of 2016, 5 teams were sent to Indonesia to test CATE equipment and procedures on the March 9th, 2016 total solar eclipse. Also, a goal of the trip was practice and gathering data to use in testing data reduction methods. Of the five teams, four collected data. While in Indonesia, each group participated in community outreach in the location of their site. The 2016 eclipse allowed CATE to test the calibration techniques for the 2017 eclipse. Calibration dark current and flat field images were collected to remove variation across the cameras. Drift scan observations provided information to rotationally align the images from each site. These image's intensity values allowed for intensity calibration for each of the sites. A GPS at each site corrected for major computer errors in time measurement of images. Further refinement of these processes is required before the 2017 eclipse. This work was made possible through the NSO Training for the 2017 Citizen CATE Experiment funded by NASA (NASA NNX16AB92A).

  4. Request to Release CEV Orion TSP Images Acquired at AEDC Tunnel 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Joe; Austin, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This document reviews the images that are requested for release from the Temperature Sensitive Paint tests of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Orion that were conducted at the Arnold Engineering Development Center wind tunnel. Included is a description of the data, sample images, and graphs showing (1) Thermocouple T history under the paint layer at the location where the I/Iref is provided, and the Surface I/Iref history over the thermocouple.

  5. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of the heavy-electron superconductor TlNi2Se2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfert, Stefan; Schmitt, Martin; Schmidt, Henrik; Mauerer, Tobias; Sessi, Paolo; Wang, Hangdong; Mao, Qianhui; Fang, Minghu; Bode, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    We report on the structural and superconducting electronic properties of the heavy-electron superconductor TlNi2Se2 . By using a variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (VT-STM) the coexistence of (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ and (2 ×1 ) surface reconstructions is observed. Similar to earlier observations on the "122" family of Fe-based superconductors, we find that their respective surface fraction strongly depends on the temperature during cleavage, the measurement temperature, and the sample's history. Cleaving at low temperature predominantly results in the (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ -reconstructed surface. A detailed analysis of the (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ -reconstructed domains identifies (2 ×1 ) -ordered dimers, tertramers, and higher order even multimers as domain walls. Higher cleaving temperatures and the warming of low-temperature-cleaved samples increases the relative weight of the (2 ×1 ) surface reconstruction. By slowly increasing the sample temperature Ts inside the VT-STM we find that the (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ surface reconstructions transforms into the (2 ×1 ) structure at Ts=123 K. We identify the polar nature of the TlNi2Se2 (001) surface as the most probable driving mechanism of the two reconstructions, as both lead to a charge density ρ =0.5 e- , thereby avoiding divergent electrostatic potentials and the resulting "polar catastrophe." Low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) performed with normal metal and superconducting probe tips shows a superconducting gap which is best fit with an isotropic s wave. We could not detect any correlation between the local surface reconstruction, suggesting that the superconductivity is predominantly governed by TlNi2Se2 bulk properties. Correspondingly, temperature- and field-dependent data reveal that both the critical temperature and critical magnetic field are in good agreement with bulk values obtained earlier from transport measurements. In the superconducting state

  6. Scanning tomographic particle image velocimetry applied to a turbulent jet

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, T. A.

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a modified tomographic PIV technique using four high-speed video cameras and a scanning pulsed laser-volume. By rapidly illuminating adjacent subvolumes onto separate video frames, we can resolve a larger total volume of velocity vectors, while retaining good spatial resolution. We demonstrate this technique by performing time-resolved measurements of the turbulent structure of a round jet, using up to 9 adjacent volume slices. In essence this technique resolves more velocity planes in the depth direction by maintaining optimal particle image density and limiting the number of ghost particles. The total measurement volumes contain between 1 ×106 and 3 ×106 velocity vectors calculated from up to 1500 reconstructed depthwise image planes, showing time-resolved evolution of the large-scale vortical structures for a turbulent jet of Re up to 10 000.

  7. Dimension and lacunarity measurement of IR images using Hilbert scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Baback; Hintz, Kenneth J.; Stewart, Clayton V.

    1991-07-01

    This paper illustrates the use of fractal geometry and fractal metrics for analysis and characterization of natural textures and clutter in IR images in the wavelength band of 2-5 micrometers . In addition to the local fractal dimension, the lacunarity of textures is also briefly investigated. The addition of lacunarity significantly improves the pattern classification performance and is an important part of a complete fractal description of natural textures. A new measurement technique, based on the statistics of a space-filling curve, is presented. Specifically, a space-filling scan of an image texture is used to estimate the fractal dimension of the corresponding intensity surface. This unique one-dimensional representation is also used for measuring local texture features such as granularity and lacunarity.

  8. [Scanning electron microscopic investigations of cutting edge quality in lamellar keratotomy using the Wavelight femtosecond laser (FS-200) : What influence do spot distance and an additional tunnel have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, T; Höche, T; Heichel, J

    2018-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers (fs-lasers) are established cutting instruments for the creation of LASIK flaps. Previous studies often showed even rougher surfaces after application of fs-laser systems compared to lamellar keratotomy with mechanical microkeratomes. When cutting the cornea with fs-lasers, an intrastromal gas development occurs, which has a potentially negative influence on the cutting quality if the gas cannot be dissipated; therefore, manufacturers have chosen the way of gas assimilation in so-called pockets. The investigated system creates a tunnel which opens under the conjunctiva. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a tunnel as well as the influence of different spot distances on the quality of cut surfaces and edges. In this experimental study on freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 15), the following cuts were carried out with the FS-200 (Wavelight, Erlangen, Germany): 1. standard setting (spot and line separation 8 µm), 2. with tunnel for gas drainage, 3. without gas-conducting tunnel, 4. with increased spot spacing (spot and line separation 9 μm instead of 8 μm) and 5. with reduced spot spacing (spot and line separation 7 μm instead of 8 μm). Subsequently, scanning electron microscopy (FEI Quanta 650, Hillsboro, OR) of the cut edges and surfaces as well as the gas drain tunnel were performed. The evaluation was based on an established score. The current fs-laser system (200 Hz) is able to create smooth cutting surfaces and sharp edges. The changed density of laser pulses compared to the standard settings with a reduced or increased distance between the pulses, did not achieve any further improvement in the surface quality. The gas-conducting tunnel could be detected by scanning electron microscope. In the case of cutting without a tunnel, roughened surfaces and irregularities on the cutting edges were found. When the FS-200 fs-laser is used, LASIK cuts with very smooth cut surfaces and sharp cutting

  9. Thirty per cent contrast in secondary-electron imaging by scanning field-emission microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, D A; De Pietro, L G; Peter, Q; Kostanyan, A; Cabrera, H; Vindigni, A; Bähler, Th; Pescia, D; Ramsperger, U

    2016-11-01

    We perform scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) in a regime where primary electrons are field-emitted from the tip and excite secondary electrons out of the target-the scanning field-emission microscopy regime (SFM). In the SFM mode, a secondary-electron contrast as high as 30% is observed when imaging a monoatomic step between a clean W(110)- and an Fe-covered W(110)-terrace. This is a figure of contrast comparable to STM. The apparent width of the monoatomic step attains the 1 nm mark, i.e. it is only marginally worse than the corresponding width observed in STM. The origin of the unexpected strong contrast in SFM is the material dependence of the secondary-electron yield and not the dependence of the transported current on the tip-target distance, typical of STM: accordingly, we expect that a technology combining STM and SFM will highlight complementary aspects of a surface while simultaneously making electrons, selected with nanometre spatial precision, available to a macroscopic environment for further processing.

  10. Airborne Laser Scanning and Image Processing Techniques for Archaeological Prospection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltýnová, M.; Nový, P.

    2014-06-01

    Aerial photography was, for decades, an invaluable tool for archaeological prospection, in spite of the limitation of this method to deforested areas. The airborne laser scanning (ALS) method can be nowadays used to map complex areas and suitable complement earlier findings. This article describes visualization and image processing methods that can be applied on digital terrain models (DTMs) to highlight objects hidden in the landscape. Thanks to the analysis of visualized DTM it is possible to understand the landscape evolution including the differentiation between natural processes and human interventions. Different visualization methods were applied on a case study area. A system of parallel tracks hidden in a forest and its surroundings - part of old route called "Devil's Furrow" near the town of Sázava was chosen. The whole area around well known part of Devil's Furrow has not been prospected systematically yet. The data from the airborne laser scanning acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre was used. The average density of the point cloud was approximately 1 point/m2 The goal of the project was to visualize the utmost smallest terrain discontinuities, e.g. tracks and erosion furrows, which some were not wholly preserved. Generally we were interested in objects that are clearly not visible in DTMs displayed in the form of shaded relief. Some of the typical visualization methods were tested (shaded relief, aspect and slope image). To get better results we applied image-processing methods that were successfully used on aerial photographs or hyperspectral images in the past. The usage of different visualization techniques on one site allowed us to verify the natural character of the southern part of Devil's Furrow and find formations up to now hidden in the forests.

  11. Scanning array radar system for bridge subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chieh-Ping; Ren, Yu-Jiun; Yu, Tzu Yang

    2012-04-01

    Early damage detection of bridge has been an important issue for modern civil engineering technique. Existing bridge inspection techniques used by State Department of Transportation (DOT) and County DOT include visual inspection, mechanical sounding, rebound hammer, cover meter, electrical potential measurements, and ultrasonics; other NDE techniques include ground penetrating radar (GPR), radiography, and some experimental types of sensors. Radar technology like GPR has been widely used for the bridge structure detection with a good penetration depth using microwave energy. The system to be presented in this paper is a different type of microwave sensing technology. It is focus on the subsurface detection and trying to find out detail information at subsurface (10 cm) with high resolution radar imaging from a flexible standoff distance. Our radar operating frequency is from 8-12 GHz, which is different from most of the current GPR systems. Scanning array antenna system is designed for adjustable beamwidth, preferable scanning area, and low sidelobe level. From the theoretical analysis and experimental results, it is found that the proposed technique can successfully capture the presence of the near-surface anomaly. This system is part of our Multi- Modal Remote Sensing System (MRSS) and provides good imaging correlations with other MRSS sensors.

  12. Experiments on terahertz 3D scanning microscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Li, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Compared with the visible light and infrared, terahertz (THz) radiation can penetrate nonpolar and nonmetallic materials. There are many studies on the THz coaxial transmission confocal microscopy currently. But few researches on the THz dual-axis reflective confocal microscopy were reported. In this paper, we utilized a dual-axis reflective confocal scanning microscope working at 2.52 THz. In contrast with the THz coaxial transmission confocal microscope, the microscope adopted in this paper can attain higher axial resolution at the expense of reduced lateral resolution, revealing more satisfying 3D imaging capability. Objects such as Chinese characters "Zhong-Hua" written in paper with a pencil and a combined sheet metal which has three layers were scanned. The experimental results indicate that the system can extract two Chinese characters "Zhong," "Hua" or three layers of the combined sheet metal. It can be predicted that the microscope can be applied to biology, medicine and other fields in the future due to its favorable 3D imaging capability.

  13. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue; Zhou, Yuan; Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  14. Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunnelling microscopy investigation of free radical adsorption to the Si(111)-7 x 7 surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guisinger, Nathan P; Elder, Shaun P; Yoder, Nathan L; Hersam, Mark C [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States)

    2007-01-31

    Room-temperature ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) has been employed to investigate free radical chemistry on the Si(111)-7 x 7 surface with atomic-scale spatial resolution. In particular, due to its single-site binding mechanism and extensive previous study on the Si(100)-2 x 1 surface, the nitroxyl free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) was explored. UHV STM imaging of isolated molecules revealed that TEMPO covalently reacts with adatom dangling bonds with high affinity. By monitoring TEMPO adsorption as a function of surface coverage, TEMPO was also found to preferentially bind to centre adatom sites at the initial stages of adsorption. On the other hand, as the surface coverage increased, TEMPO molecules adsorbed to centre adatoms and corner adatoms approached a ratio of 1:1. At all surface coverage levels, TEMPO showed minimal preference for binding to either the faulted or unfaulted half of the unit cell. Consequently, upon saturation, the TEMPO adlayer exhibited long-range ordering and preserved the underlying 7 x 7 surface reconstruction. This study provides fundamental insight into free radical surface chemistry and suggests a direct pathway for forming nearly perfectly ordered organic adlayers on the Si(111)-7 x 7 surface.

  15. Cobalt Chemical Vapor Deposition Process on Molybdenite Basal Plane Observed by Ultrahigh-Vacuum Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Masaharu; Kiyohara, Kohei; Yoda, Eisuke; Kubota, Takeshi; Okamoto, Yasuaki

    2005-07-01

    The processes of high-temperature (473 K) resulfidation and cobalt carbonyl adsorption by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a cleaved basal plane of a natural molybdenite (MoS2) single crystal were examined by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM) on the nanometer scale. The resulfided cleaved molybdenite basal plane showed a displacement of upper terraces, and a sinusoidal structure at step edges, both of which may be caused by the electronic effect at the surface. Cobalt carbonyl appeared to be adsorbed at both the S- and Mo-terminated edges, resulting in an agglomeration at the step edges on lower terraces with a width of a few tens of nanometers. When this surface with adsorbed carbonyl was sulfided at 513 K for 1 h, most of the adsorbed carbonyl clusters appeared to be desorbed while a small part were dispersed on the terraces in small clusters of 10-20 nm in size. The obtained results are discussed in terms of the preparation of Co-Mo hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts.

  16. Defect-like structures of graphene on copper foils for strain relief investigated by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Teng; Gao, Yabo; Xie, Shubao; Ji, Qingqing; Yan, Kai; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2011-05-24

    Understanding of the continuity and the microscopic structure of as-grown graphene on Cu foils through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method is of fundamental significance for optimizing the growth parameters toward high-quality graphene. Because of the corrugated nature of the Cu foil surface, few experimental efforts on this issue have been made so far. We present here a high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of CVD graphene directly on Cu foils. Our work indicates that graphene can be grown with a perfect continuity extending over both crystalline and noncrystalline regions, highly suggestive of weak graphene-substrate interactions. Due to thermal expansion mismatch, defect-like wrinkles and ripples tend to evolve either along the boundaries of crystalline terraces or on noncrystalline areas for strain relief. Furthermore, the strain effect arising from the conforming of perfect two-dimensional graphene to the highly corrugated surface of Cu foils is found to induce local bonding configuration change of carbon from sp(2) to sp(3), evidenced by the formation of "three-for-six" lattices.

  17. Tip-enhanced near-field Raman spectroscopy with a scanning tunneling microscope and side-illumination optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, K J; He, X N; Zhou, Y S; Xiong, W; Lu, Y F

    2008-07-01

    Conventional Raman spectroscopy (RS) suffers from low spatial resolution and low detection sensitivity due to the optical diffraction limit and small interaction cross sections. It has been reported that a highly localized and significantly enhanced electromagnetic field could be generated in the proximity of a metallic tip illuminated by a laser beam. In this study, a tip-enhanced RS system was developed to both improve the resolution and enhance the detection sensitivity using the tip-enhanced near-field effects. This instrument, by combining RS with a scanning tunneling microscope and side-illumination optics, demonstrated significant enhancement on both optical sensitivity and spatial resolution using either silver (Ag)-coated tungsten (W) tips or gold (Au) tips. The sensitivity improvement was verified by observing the enhancement effects on silicon (Si) substrates. Lateral resolution was verified to be below 100 nm by mapping Ag nanostructures. By deploying the depolarization technique, an apparent enhancement of 175% on Si substrates was achieved. Furthermore, the developed instrument features fast and reliable optical alignment, versatile sample adaptability, and effective suppression of far-field signals.

  18. Atomic mechanism for the growth of wafer-scale single-crystal graphene: theoretical perspective and scanning tunneling microscopy investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Tianchao; Zhang, Jialin; Chen, Wei

    2017-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most promising approach for producing low-cost, high-quality, and large area graphene. Revealing the graphene growth mechanism at the atomic-scale is of great importance for realizing single crystal graphene (SCG) over wafer scale. Density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations are playing an increasingly important role in revealing the structure of the most stable carbon species, understanding the evolution processes, and disclosing the active sites. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is a powerful surface characterization tool to illustrate the real space distribution and atomic structures of growth intermediates during the CVD process. Combining them together can provide valuable information to improve the atomically controlled growth of SCG. Starting from a basic concept of the substrate effect on realizing SCG, this review covers the progress made in theoretical investigations on various carbon species during graphene growth on different transition metal substrates, in the STM study of the structural intermediates on transition metal surfaces, and in synthesizing graphene nanoribbons with atomic-precise width and edge structure, ending with a perspective on the future development of 2D materials beyond graphene.

  19. High resolution in situ magneto-optic Kerr effect and scanning tunneling microscopy setup with all optical components in UHV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, A; Buluschek, P; Weiss, N; Giesecke, J; Treier, M; Rusponi, S; Brune, H

    2009-02-01

    A surface magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) setup fully integrated in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber is presented. The system has been designed to combine in situ MOKE and scanning tunneling microscopy. Magnetic fields up to 0.3 T can be applied at any angle in the transverse plane allowing the study of in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization. The setup performance is demonstrated for a continuous film of 0.9 monolayers (ML) Co/Rh(111) with in-plane easy axis and for a superlattice of nanometric double layer Co islands on Au(11,12,12) with out-of-plane easy axis. For Co/Au(11,12,12) we demonstrate that the magnetic anisotropy energies deduced from thermally induced magnetization reversal and from applying a torque onto the magnetization by turning the field are the same. For the presented setup we establish a coverage detection limit of 0.5 ML for transverse and 0.1 ML for polar MOKE. For island superlattices with the density of Co/Au(11,12,12), the latter limit corresponds to islands composed of about 50 atoms. The detection limit can be further reduced when optimizing the MOKE setup for either one of the two Kerr configurations.

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopy of epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7 - x films prepared by thermal plasma flash evaporation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaki, Kei; Takamura, Yuzuru; Yamaguchi, Norio; Terashima, Kazuo; Yoshida, Toyonobu

    1997-02-01

    The surface morphology of epitaxial YBa2Cuoverflow="scroll">3O7-x films prepared by thermal plasma flash evaporation was extensively investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. Under epitaxial film growth conditions with the deposition rate up to 0.42 μm/min, two-dimensional nucleus growth and spiral growth were observed. The main deposition species in this process was found to be the cluster ranging from 0.3 to 9 nm and the size of the cluster influenced the growth mode strongly. Theoretical analysis based on the two-dimensional critical radius revealed that smaller clusters became weakly bonded nuclei resulting in spiral growth and larger clusters became stable nuclei resulting in two-dimensional nucleus growth, which we named two-dimensional cluster nucleus growth. The clusters generated in the plasma boundary layer undoubtedly involve sufficient energy necessary for crystallization and show quite different characteristics from those of the clusters generated in vacuum by adiabatic expansion process. Hence, this process must be named "hot cluster epitaxy.''

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of the patchwork structure in Pt doped IrTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, Y., E-mail: 1215702@ed.tus.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Machida, T. [RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Igarashi, K.; Kaneko, A. [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Mochiku, T.; Ooi, S.; Tachiki, M.; Komori, K.; Hirata, K. [Superconducting Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Sakata, H. [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We performed STS measurements on patchwork structure in Ir{sub 0.93}Pt{sub 0.07}Te{sub 2}. • Patchwork structure has similar electronic features to those of IrTe{sub 2}. • Patchwork structure is caused by strain due to the dopant Pt. - Abstract: We report on the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) study on a newly discovered superconductor, Ir{sub 1−x}Pt{sub x}Te{sub 2}. We previously found that the sample which shows superconductivity forms so called “patchwork structure (PS)”. To obtain the spatial evolution of electronic structure on the PS, we performed STM/STS measurements on the PS. STS measurements revealed that an averaged spectrum shows the same energy asymmetry as that in the low temperature phase in the parent material, IrTe{sub 2}. Furthermore, the spectrum at the trough on the PS is more asymmetric than that at the crest. This tendency is similar to that observed on the supermodulation in the low temperature phase in IrTe{sub 2}.

  2. Single vacancy defect spectroscopy on HfO2 using random telegraph noise signals from scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamankar, R.; Raghavan, N.; Molina, J.; Puglisi, F. M.; O'Shea, S. J.; Shubhakar, K.; Larcher, L.; Pavan, P.; Padovani, A.; Pey, K. L.

    2016-02-01

    Random telegraph noise (RTN) measurements are typically carried out at the device level using standard probe station based electrical characterization setup, where the measured current represents a cumulative effect of the simultaneous response of electron capture/emission events at multiple oxygen vacancy defect (trap) sites. To better characterize the individual defects in the high-κ dielectric thin film, we propose and demonstrate here the measurement and analysis of RTN at the nanoscale using a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope setup, with an effective area of interaction of the probe tip that is as small as 10 nm in diameter. Two-level and multi-level RTN signals due to single and multiple defect locations (possibly dispersed in space and energy) are observed on 4 nm HfO2 thin films deposited on n-Si (100) substrate. The RTN signals are statistically analyzed using the Factorial Hidden Markov Model technique to decode the noise contribution of more than one defect (if any) and estimate the statistical parameters of each RTN signal (i.e., amplitude of fluctuation, capture and emission time constants). Observation of RTN at the nanoscale presents a new opportunity for studies on defect chemistry, single-defect kinetics and their stochastics in thin film dielectric materials. This method allows us to characterize the fast traps with time constants ranging in the millisecond to tens of seconds range.

  3. Surface structures of L10-MnGa (001) by scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, J. P.; Guerrero-Sanchez, J.; Richard, A. L.; Ingram, D. C.; Takeuchi, N.; Smith, A. R.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the surface reconstructions of L10-ordered MnGa (001) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a 50 nm Mn3N2 (001) layer freshly grown on a magnesium oxide (001) substrate. Scanning tunneling microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and reflection high energy electron diffraction are combined with first-principles density functional theory calculations to determine the reconstructions of the L10-ordered MnGa (001) surface. We find two lowest energy reconstructions of the MnGa (001) face: a 1 × 1 Ga-terminated structure and a 1 × 2 structure with a Mn replacing a Ga in the 1 × 1 Ga-terminated surface. The 1 × 2 reconstruction forms a row structure along [100]. The manganese:gallium stoichiometry within the surface based on theoretical modeling is in good agreement with experiment. Magnetic moment calculations for the two lowest energy structures reveal important surface and bulk effects leading to oscillatory total magnetization for ultra-thin MnGa (001) films.

  4. Lattice-Assisted Spectroscopy: A Generalized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Ultracold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, A; Schollwöck, U; Giamarchi, T

    2015-10-16

    We propose a scheme to measure the frequency-resolved local particle and hole spectra of any optical lattice-confined system of correlated ultracold atoms that offers single-site addressing and imaging, which is now an experimental reality. Combining perturbation theory and time-dependent density matrix renormalization group simulations, we quantitatively test and validate this approach of lattice-assisted spectroscopy on several one-dimensional example systems, such as the superfluid and Mott insulator, with and without a parabolic trap, and finally on edge states of the bosonic Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. We highlight extensions of our basic scheme to obtain an even wider variety of interesting and important frequency resolved spectra.

  5. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (marsh elevation response away from the measurement site. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) offers potential for high definition monitoring of marsh surface evolution. However, several challenges must be overcome in the application of the technology for geodetic imaging of marsh surfaces. These challenges include surface occlusion by dense vegetation, error propagation due to scan co-registration and referencing across time, impacts of scan angle, and filtering of non-ground points. Researchers at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi conducted a field-survey of a marsh within the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve using TLS and RTK GPS for comparison. Grand Bay in Mississippi USA is one of the most biologically productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to extract the bare-earth surface below the dense vegetation. This presentation will present results of the study including the developed

  6. Image processing based detection of lung cancer on CT scan images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdillah, Bariqi; Bustamam, Alhadi; Sarwinda, Devvi

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we implement and analyze the image processing method for detection of lung cancer. Image processing techniques are widely used in several medical problems for picture enhancement in the detection phase to support the early medical treatment. In this research we proposed a detection method of lung cancer based on image segmentation. Image segmentation is one of intermediate level in image processing. Marker control watershed and region growing approach are used to segment of CT scan image. Detection phases are followed by image enhancement using Gabor filter, image segmentation, and features extraction. From the experimental results, we found the effectiveness of our approach. The results show that the best approach for main features detection is watershed with masking method which has high accuracy and robust.

  7. Reproducible strain measurement in electronic devices by applying integer multiple to scanning grating in scanning moiré fringe imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhyun Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Scanning moiré fringe (SMF imaging by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the strain field in the channel of a transistor with a CoSi2 source and drain. Nanometer-scale SMFs were formed with a scanning grating size of ds at integer multiples of the Si crystal lattice spacing dl (ds ∼ ndl, n = 2, 3, 4, 5. The moiré fringe formula was modified to establish a method for quantifying strain measurement. We showed that strain fields in a transistor measured by SMF images were reproducible with an accuracy of 0.02%.

  8. The dissolution of Ag(111) electrodes investigated by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T K

    1998-01-01

    voltammetric methods. This remained evident for varying extents of silver dissolution. Ag(111) electrodes were oxidised in 0.1 M KCIO sub 4 solutions by a single swept ORC of 0.77x10 sup - sup 3 C cm sup - sup 2. The final rest potential of the Ag(111) working electrode was over the potential range of -36 mV to 114 mV versus the SCE where the silver islands of the reformed surface are believed to be unstable. Results show that a majority of silver islands of all sizes are stable with time, whereas the silver islands with irregular shapes tended to evolve to exhibit higher degrees of spherical geometry. Additionally, the position of the silver islands did not remain constant during the acquisition of STM images. Results from in situ STM demonstrated that the underlying step-terrace morphology of the Ag(111) electrodes did not remain constant with time. Both macroscale and nanoscale changes to the Ag(111) electrode surface were observed. It is concluded that this is due to the transport of material along and fr...

  9. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  10. Oxidation of arsenopyrite and deposition of gold on the oxidized surfaces: A scanning probe microscopy, tunneling spectroscopy and XPS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhlin, Yuri L.; Romanchenko, Alexander S.; Asanov, Igor P.

    2006-10-01

    We have used ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study the surfaces of natural arsenopyrite samples that were electrochemically polarized in 1 M HCl, or leached in acidic solutions containing ferric iron salts, and then reacted with aqueous gold (III) chloride at ambient temperatures. For arsenopyrite oxidized on a positive-going potential sweep, progressively increasing amounts of surface Fe(III)-O and As-O species, and of S/Fe and S/As ratios in a non-stoichiometric sulfidic layer were found. The products formed in the sweep to a potential of 0.6 V (Ag/AgCl) of the passivity region are shaped in about 100 nm protrusions of two sorts, which are arranged in micrometer-size separate areas, while they are largely mixed at higher, "transpassive" potentials. The quantities of surface alteration substances notably decrease after leaching in ferric chloride and ferric sulfate acidic solutions. Passivation of arsenopyrite was suggested to associate with the disordered, metal-deficient surface layer having moderate excess of sulfur rather than with the products of arsenopyrite oxidation. Exposure of arsenopyrite to 10 -5-10 -3 M AuCl4- (pH 2) solutions results in the deposition of 8-50 nm gold particles; only a small fraction of the gold is present as Au(I)-S species. The electrochemical oxidation at 0.6 V or ageing of arsenopyrite in air promotes the subsequent gold deposition; in contrast, the amount of Au deposited on arsenopyrite that was treated by leaching in ferric chloride and sulfate solutions was about 10 times smaller than with polished arsenopyrite samples. It has been concluded that reducing agents formed as intermediates of arsenopyrite decomposition facilitate the Au 0 cementation although other factors related to the surface state of the arsenopyrite play a role as well. A decrease in the tunneling current magnitudes with decreasing the Au 0 particle

  11. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and X-Ray Diffraction of Charge Density Wave Materials and the Rubidium Isotope Effect in Superconducting RUBIDIUM(3)CARBON(60)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Brian D.

    We image the surfaces of K_ {0.3}MoO_3 and Rb_{0.3}MoO_3 with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) above and below the charge density wave (CDW) transition temperature (T_ p). Surprisingly, below T_ p real space and Fourier transformed images show no evidence of CDW modulation, suggesting a relatively small CDW amplitude at the sample surface. Furthermore, the lattice images that we obtained below T_ p are unaffected by the sliding of the CDW. With STM and x-ray diffraction we investigate the CDW domain structure of 1T-TaS_2 in the nearly commensurate (NC), triclinic (T), and incommensurate (I) phases. Fourier transformed STM images of the NC phase show fine satellite structure surrounding CDW peaks. The satellite structure confirms that the apparent domain-like modulation seen in real space images results from a true domain structure rather than from a moire pattern. STM images of the T phase indicate a surface striped domain pattern that is contrary to the previously reported stretched -honeycomb domain structure for the crystal bulk. In the T phase our x-ray diffraction measurements of CDW wave vectors and examination of fine satellite structure surrounding CDW peaks conclusively demonstrate that the bulk domain pattern is striped. We find that the bulk and surface domain structures are identical. X-ray diffraction of the I phase reveals weak satellites near CDW peaks. The satellite structure indicates a short wavelength, periodic amplitude and phase modulation of the CDW in a case where the CDW is far from commensurability. We measure the resistive superconducting transition temperature in C_{60} single crystals intercalated with isotopically pure ^{87}Rb and ^{85 }Rb and with natural abundance rubidium. We obtain a rubidium isotope effect exponent of alpha_{Rb} = -0.028 +/- 0.036, a result which implies that the Rb-C_ {60} optic phonons play at most a minor role in the pairing mechanism of Rb_3C _{60}..

  12. Computer vision distortion correction of scanning probe microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaponenko, Iaroslav; Tückmantel, Philippe; Ziegler, Benedikt; Rapin, Guillaume; Chhikara, Manisha; Paruch, Patrycja

    2017-04-06

    Since its inception, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has established itself as the tool of choice for probing surfaces and functionalities at the nanoscale. Although recent developments in the instrumentation have greatly improved the metrological aspects of SPM, it is still plagued by the drifts and nonlinearities of the piezoelectric actuators underlying the precise nanoscale motion. In this work, we present an innovative computer-vision-based distortion correction algorithm for offline processing of functional SPM measurements, allowing two images to be directly overlaid with minimal error - thus correlating position with time evolution and local functionality. To demonstrate its versatility, the algorithm is applied to two very different systems. First, we show the tracking of polarisation switching in an epitaxial Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 thin film during high-speed continuous scanning under applied tip bias. Thanks to the precise time-location-polarisation correlation we can extract the regions of domain nucleation and track the motion of domain walls until the merging of the latter in avalanche-like events. Secondly, the morphology of surface folds and wrinkles in graphene deposited on a PET substrate is probed as a function of applied strain, allowing the relaxation of individual wrinkles to be tracked.

  13. Formation and structure of p-nitrobenzoic acid adlayer on Au(111) surface in HClO4 investigated by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Chen, Ting; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2011-06-01

    The adsorption and adlayer structure of p-nitrobenzoic acid (pNBA) on a Au(111) surface in 0.1 M HCIO4 are investigated by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and cyclic voltammetry. The pNBA adlayer is prepared by dipping Au(111) into a saturated pNBA aqueous solution. The cyclic voltammogram (CV) of the so-prepared Au(111) electrode shows an irreversible cathodic peak at 0.24 V, which corresponds to the electro-reduction reaction from pNBA to hydroxylamine, and a pair of reversible peaks at ca. 0.7 V, corresponding to redox reaction of hydroxylamine to nitrosobenzoic acid. STM is employed to investigate the pNBA adlayer structure. The molecules form ordered adlayers in (16 x 2 square root of 3), (7 x 4 square root of 3) and (9 x 6 square root of 3) structures at the double layer potential region. High resolution STM image reveals the details of the molecular arrangement in the adlayers. On the basis of the STM image and the chemical structure of pNBA, structural models for three adlayers are proposed. In all three structures, pNBA molecules adsorb perpendicularly with the carboxylic groups contacting with the Au(111) substrate. The effect of dipping time on the adlayer formation is investigated. Upon shifting the electrode potentials in negative direction to induce the electroreduction reaction, the bright dots corresponding to the molecular aggregations start emerging on the surface and selectively locate at the elbow position along Au(111) reconstruction lines. The results provide direct evidence for the adsorption and electrochemical behavior of nitro-benzene derivatives.

  14. Can we use thermal imaging to evaluate the effects of carpal tunnel syndrome surgical decompression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baic, Agnieszka; Kasprzyk, Teresa; Rżany, Michał; Stanek, Agata; Sieroń, Karolina; Suszyński, Krzysztof; Marcol, Wiesław; Cholewka, Armand

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Research is intended to verify if thermal imaging can be used in diagnosing and monitoring the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This disease is not easy to diagnose using traditional methods. Also, the difficulties in monitoring carpal tunnel surgery effects necessitate new, noninvasive method, which gives more information. The research group consists of 15 patients with CTS and control group of healthy people. All patients who were examined before surgery were also tested 4 weeks after surgery, to check the effects of treatment. In addition a lot of our patients had or will have open carpel tunnel release surgery. Diagnosis of CTS was performed by thermal imaging in both hands from phalanges to the area of the wrist on the external and palmar side of the palm. Using infrared (IR) camera one can observe high temperature gradient on hand-tested areas and these differences prove the diagnosis. Moreover patients after surgery have better temperature distribution and it was closer to control group. Results prove that surgery is the best, and currently, the only method to treat CTS. Thermal imaging may be helpful in diagnosing CTS. PMID:28953619

  15. Pre- and post-operative diffusion tensor imaging of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltunen, Jaana [Aalto University School of Science, Brain Research Unit, Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto (Finland); Aalto University School of Science, Advanced Magnetic Imaging Centre, Aalto (Finland); Kirveskari, Erika [Aalto University School of Science, Brain Research Unit, Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto (Finland); Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Helsinki (Finland); Numminen, Jussi [Aalto University School of Science, Brain Research Unit, Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto (Finland); University of Helsinki, Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Lindfors, Nina; Goeransson, Harry [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Hand Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Hari, Riitta [Aalto University School of Science, Brain Research Unit, Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto (Finland); Aalto University School of Science, Advanced Magnetic Imaging Centre, Aalto (Finland); Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    To use pre- and post-operative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to monitor median nerve integrity in patients suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Diffusivity and anisotropy images along the median nerve were compared among 12 patients, 12 age-matched and 12 young control subjects and correlated with electrophysiological neurography results. Slice-wise DTI parameter values were calculated to focus on local changes. Results of pre-operative patients and age-matched control subjects differed only in the distal nerve. Moreover, pre-operative patients differed significantly from young controls and post-operative patients. The main abnormalities were increased diffusivity and decreased anisotropy in the carpal tunnel and distal median nerve. Post-operative clinical improvement was reflected in diffusivity, but not in anisotropy. Slice-wise analysis showed high pre-operative diffusivity at the distal nerve. All groups had relatively large inter-subject variation in both diffusivity and anisotropy. DTI can provide information complementary to clinical examination, electrophysiological recordings and anatomical MRI of diseases and injuries of peripheral nerves. However, similar age-related changes in diffusivity and anisotropy may weaken DTI specificity. Slice-wise analysis is necessary for detection of local changes in nerve integrity. circle Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging provides information complementary to conventional diagnostic methods. circle Age caused similar changes to diffusivity and anisotropy as carpal tunnel syndrome. circle Post-operative clinical improvement was reflected in diffusivity, but not in anisotropy. circle Inter-subject variation in diffusivity and anisotropy was considerable. (orig.)

  16. Construction of a four tip scanning tunneling microscope/scanning electron microscope combination and conductivity measurements of silicide nanowires; Aufbau einer Vierspitzen-Rastertunnelmikroskop/Rasterelektronenmikroskop-Kombination und Leitfaehigkeitsmessungen an Silizid Nanodraehten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubkov, Evgeniy

    2013-09-01

    In this work the combination of a four-tip scanning tunneling microscope with a scanning electron microscope is presented. By means of this apparatus it is possible to perform the conductivity measurements on the in-situ prepared nanostructures in ultra-high vacuum. With the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), it becomes possible to position the tunneling tips of the four-tip scanning tunneling microscope (STM), so that an arrangement for a four-point probe measurement on nanostructures can be obtained. The STM head was built according to the novel coaxial Beetle concept. This concept allows on the one hand, a very compact arrangement of the components of the STM and on the other hand, the new-built STM head has a good mechanical stability, in order to achieve atomic resolution with all four STM units. The atomic resolution of the STM units was confirmed by scanning a Si(111)-7 x 7 surface. The thermal drift during the STM operation, as well as the resonant frequencies of the mechanical structure of the STM head, were determined. The scanning electron microscope allows the precise and safe navigation of the tunneling tips on the sample surface. Multi tip spectroscopy with up to four STM units can be performed synchronously. To demonstrate the capabilities of the new-built apparatus the conductivity measurements were carried out on metallic yttrium silicide nanowires. The nanowires were prepared by the in-situ deposition of yttrium on a heated Si(110) sample surface. Current-voltage curves were recorded on the nanowires and on the wetting layer in-between. The curves indicate an existence of the Schottky barrier between the yttrium silicide nanowires and the silicon bulk. By means of the two-tip measurements with a gate, the insulating property of the Schottky barrier has been confirmed. Using this Schottky barrier, it is possible to limit the current to the nanowire and to prevent it from flowing through the silicon bulk. A four-tip resistance measurement

  17. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-17

    the study of surfact strain. A variety of studies were conducted on Au(in air) CdTe (in air), Hg1-xMnxTe (under glycerin), and Hg 1-xCdx Te (in air...HgCdTe and CdMnTe. (7) Scribing of adjacent parallel lines on the HgCdTe and CdMnTe surfaces. (8) Identification of a new c(4x6) reconstruction on some...tihodoluminescence spectroscopy, coupled with pulsed laser annealing-to reveal systematics between interface chemical and electronic structure. The

  18. Evidence for Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking of the Superconducting State near Twin-Boundary Interfaces in FeSe Revealed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Watashige

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Junctions and interfaces consisting of unconventional superconductors provide an excellent experimental playground to study exotic phenomena related to the phase of the order parameter. Not only does the complex structure of unconventional order parameters have an impact on the Josephson effects, but it also may profoundly alter the quasiparticle excitation spectrum near a junction. Here, by using spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy, we visualize the spatial evolution of the LDOS near twin boundaries (TBs of the nodal superconductor FeSe. The π/2 rotation of the crystallographic orientation across the TB twists the structure of the unconventional order parameter, which may, in principle, bring about a zero-energy LDOS peak at the TB. The LDOS at the TB observed in our study, in contrast, does not exhibit any signature of a zero-energy peak, and an apparent gap amplitude remains finite all the way across the TB. The low-energy quasiparticle excitations associated with the gap nodes are affected by the TB over a distance more than an order of magnitude larger than the coherence length ξ_{ab}. The modification of the low-energy states is even more prominent in the region between two neighboring TBs separated by a distance ≈7ξ_{ab}. In this region, the spectral weight near the Fermi level (≈±0.2  meV due to the nodal quasiparticle spectrum is almost completely removed. These behaviors suggest that the TB induces a fully gapped state, invoking a possible twist of the order parameter structure, which breaks time-reversal symmetry.

  19. Probing defect states in polycrystalline GaN grown on Si(111) by sub-bandgap laser-excited scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, F.-M.; Schnedler, M.; Portz, V.; Huang, Y.-C.; Huang, B.-C.; Shih, M.-C.; Chang, C.-W.; Tu, L.-W.; Eisele, H.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.; Chiu, Y.-P.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the potential of sub-bandgap laser-excited cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate the presence of defect states in semiconductors. The characterization method is illustrated on GaN layers grown on Si(111) substrates without intentional buffer layers. According to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, the GaN layers consist of nanoscale wurtzite and zincblende crystallites with varying crystal orientations and hence contain high defect state densities. In order to discriminate between band-to-band excitation and defect state excitations, we use sub-bandgap laser excitation. We probe a clear increase in the tunnel current at positive sample voltages during sub-bandgap laser illumination for the GaN layer with high defect density, but no effect is found for high quality GaN epitaxial layers. This demonstrates the excitation of free charge carriers at defect states. Thus, sub-bandgap laser-excited scanning tunneling spectroscopy is a powerful complimentary characterization tool for defect states.

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, C.; Hancart, C.; Thuc, V.Le; Cotten, A. [Service de Radiologie Osteoarticulaire, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU de Lille (France); Chantelot, C. [Clinique d' Orthopedie, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU de Lille (France); Chechin, D. [Philips Medical Systems, Suresnes (France)

    2008-10-15

    The purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography of the human median nerve with a 1.5-T MR scanner and to assess potential differences in diffusion between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. The median nerve was examined in 13 patients and 13 healthy volunteers with MR DTI and tractography using a 1.5-T MRI scanner with a dedicated wrist coil. T1-weighted images were performed for anatomical correlation. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were quantified in the median nerve on tractography images. In all subjects, the nerve orientation and course could be detected with tractography. Mean FA values were significantly lower in patients (p=0.03). However, no statistically significant differences were found for mean ADC values. In vivo assessment of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel using DTI with tractography on a 1.5-T MRI scanner is possible. Microstructural parameters can be easily obtained from tractography images. A significant decrease of mean FA values was found in patients suffering from chronic compression of the median nerve. Further investigations are necessary to determine if mean FA values may be correlated with the severity of nerve entrapment. (orig.)

  1. Anatomical placement of double femoral tunnels in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: anteromedial tunnel first or posterolateral tunnel first?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketomi, Shuji; Nakagawa, Takumi; Takeda, Hideki; Nakajima, Kohei; Nakayama, Shuichi; Fukai, Atsushi; Hirota, Jinso; Kachi, Yoshinori; Kawano, Hirotaka; Miura, Toshiki; Fukui, Naoshi; Nakamura, Kozo

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to know which tunnel--the anteromedial (AM) bundle or the posterolateral (PL) bundle--should be prepared first to create the 2 femoral tunnels accurately in anatomic double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Thirty-four patients were divided into 2 groups of 17 depending on the sequence of preparation of the 2 femoral tunnels. In group A, the AM tunnel was prepared first, whereas the PL tunnel was prepared first in group P. ACL reconstruction was performed using a three-dimensional (3-D) fluoroscopy-based navigation system to place the double femoral tunnels through an accessory medial portal. The double femoral socket positioning was evaluated by 3-D computed tomography (CT) scan image. The non-anatomical placement of the femoral sockets occurred in 5 patients (29%) in group A, whereas the 2 sockets were placed anatomically in all patients in group P (P tunnels through accessory medial portal affected the resultant location of the sockets and the rate of the complications. When femoral tunnels are prepared with a transportal technique, PL tunnel first technique seems to be superior to AM first technique regarding anatomic placement. However, PL tunnel first technique accompanies the risk of socket communication.

  2. Multidimensional ultrasound imaging of the wrist: Changes of shape and displacement of the median nerve and tendons in carpal tunnel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Filius (Anika); M. Scheltens-De Boer (Marjan); H.G. Bosch (Hans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); H.J. Stam (Henk); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); P.C. Amadio (Peter ); R.W. Selles (Ruud)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel may alter in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to fibrotic changes and increased carpal tunnel pressure. Ultrasound can visualize these potential changes, making ultrasound potentially an accurate diagnostic tool. To study this, we imaged

  3. 3-D Reconstruction of Neurons from Multichannel Confocal Laser Scanning Image Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterlood, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on GaN and InGaN surfaces; Rastertunnelmikroskopie und -spektroskopie an GaN- und InGaN-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, David

    2009-12-02

    Optelectronic devices based on gallium nitride (GaN) and indium gallium nitride (InGaN) are in the focus of research since more than 20 years and still have great potential for optical applications. In the first part of this work non-polar surfaces of GaN are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In SEM and AFM, the (1 anti 100)- and especially the (anti 2110)-plane are quite corrugated. For the first time, the (anti 2110)-plane of GaN is atomically resolved in STM. In the second part InGaN quantum dot layers are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and STM. The STMmeasurements show the dependency of surface morphology on growth conditions in the metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Nucleation, a new MOVPE-strategy, is based on phase separations on surfaces. It is shown that locally varying density of states and bandgaps can be detected by STS, that means bandgap histograms and 2D-bandgap-mapping. (orig.)

  5. Scanning gate imaging of quantum dots in 1D ultra-thin InAs/InP nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Erin E; Westervelt, Robert M [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Storm, Kristian; Samuelson, Lars, E-mail: westervelt@seas.harvard.edu [Solid State Physics/the Nanometer Structure Consortium, Lund University, Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-05-06

    We use a scanning gate microscope (SGM) to characterize one-dimensional ultra-thin (diameter{approx}30 nm) InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires containing a nominally 300 nm long InAs quantum dot defined by two InP tunnel barriers. Measurements of Coulomb blockade conductance versus backgate voltage with no tip present are difficult to decipher. Using the SGM tip as a charged movable gate, we are able to identify three quantum dots along the nanowire: the grown-in quantum dot and an additional quantum dot near each metal lead. The SGM conductance images are used to disentangle information about individual quantum dots and then to characterize each quantum dot using spatially resolved energy-level spectroscopy.

  6. Scanning gate imaging of quantum dots in 1D ultra-thin InAs/InP nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Erin E.; Storm, Kristian; Samuelson, Lars; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2011-05-01

    We use a scanning gate microscope (SGM) to characterize one-dimensional ultra-thin (diameter≈30 nm) InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires containing a nominally 300 nm long InAs quantum dot defined by two InP tunnel barriers. Measurements of Coulomb blockade conductance versus backgate voltage with no tip present are difficult to decipher. Using the SGM tip as a charged movable gate, we are able to identify three quantum dots along the nanowire: the grown-in quantum dot and an additional quantum dot near each metal lead. The SGM conductance images are used to disentangle information about individual quantum dots and then to characterize each quantum dot using spatially resolved energy-level spectroscopy.

  7. Scanning gate imaging of quantum dots in 1D ultra-thin InAs/InP nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Erin E; Storm, Kristian; Samuelson, Lars; Westervelt, Robert M

    2011-05-06

    We use a scanning gate microscope (SGM) to characterize one-dimensional ultra-thin (diameter ≈ 30 nm) InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires containing a nominally 300 nm long InAs quantum dot defined by two InP tunnel barriers. Measurements of Coulomb blockade conductance versus backgate voltage with no tip present are difficult to decipher. Using the SGM tip as a charged movable gate, we are able to identify three quantum dots along the nanowire: the grown-in quantum dot and an additional quantum dot near each metal lead. The SGM conductance images are used to disentangle information about individual quantum dots and then to characterize each quantum dot using spatially resolved energy-level spectroscopy.

  8. Simulation and analysis of natural rain in a wind tunnel via digital image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, K. M.; Hernan, M.; Parikh, P.; Sarohia, V.; Gharib, M.

    1986-01-01

    It is desired to simulate natural rain in a wind tunnel in order to investigate its influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft. Rain simulation nozzles have been developed and tested at JPL. Pulsed laser sheet illumination is used to photograph the droplets in the moving airstream. Digital image processing techniques are applied to these photographs for calculation of rain statistics to evaluate the performance of the nozzles. It is found that fixed hypodermic type nozzles inject too much water to simulate natural rain conditions. A modification uses two aerodynamic spinners to flex a tube in a pseudo-random fashion to distribute the water over a larger area.

  9. Imaging of the umbrella motion and tunneling in the ammonia molecule by strong-field ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Förster, Johann; Magana, Alvaro; Saenz, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The geometry-dependent ionization behavior of the ammonia molecule is investigated. Different theoretical approaches for obtaining the ionization yield are compared, all of them showing a strong dependence of the ionization yield on the inversion coordinate at long wavelengths ($\\geq$ 800 nm). It is shown how this effect can be exploited to create and probe nuclear wave packets in neutral ammonia using Lochfra{\\ss}. Furthermore, imaging of a wave packet tunneling through the barrier of a double-well potential in real time is discussed.

  10. Modification by H-termination in growth process of titanium silicide on Si(0 0 1)-2 x 1 observed with scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, T., E-mail: d08gd201@ynu.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Shudo, K.; Sato, K.; Ohno, S.; Nishioka, H.; Iida, T.; Toramaru, M.; Tanaka, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Formation processes of titanium silicide on hydrogen-terminated H/Si(0 0 1)-2 x 1 surface are studied at the atomic scale with a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Square-shaped nanoislands were observed on the Ti/H/Si(0 0 1) surface after annealed at 873-1073 K. These are the epitaxial nanoislands moderately grown due to the local orientation relationship between C49-TiSi{sub 2} and Si(0 0 1), because passivation by surface hydrogen on Si(0 0 1) suppresses active and complex bond formation of Ti-Si.

  11. A perfect wetting of Mg monolayer on Ag(111) under atomic scale investigation: First principles calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migaou, Amani; Sarpi, Brice; Guiltat, Mathilde; Payen, Kevin; Daineche, Rachid; Landa, Georges; Vizzini, Sébastien; Hémeryck, Anne

    2016-05-01

    First principles calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy experiments of the adsorption of Mg on Ag(111) substrate are conducted. This detailed study reveals that an atomic scale controlled deposition of a metallic Mg monolayer perfectly wets the silver substrate without any alloy formation at the interface at room temperature. A liquid-like behavior of the Mg species on the Ag substrate is highlighted as no dot formation is observed when coverage increases. Finally a layer-by-layer growth mode of Mg on Ag(111) can be predicted, thanks to density functional theory calculations as observed experimentally.

  12. Structure determination of the indium induced Si(001)-(4X3) reconstruction by surface x-ray diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunk, O.; Falkenberg, G.; Seehofer, L.

    1998-01-01

    The indium-induced Si(001)-(4 X 3) reconstruction has been investigated by surface X-ray diffraction (SXRD) measurements with synchrotron radiation and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The Patterson function analysis enables us to exclude In dimers as a structural element in this reconstruction....... We present a new structural model which includes 6 In atoms threefold coordinated to Si atoms and 5 displaced Si atoms per unit cell. Relaxations down to the sixth layer were determined. 'Trimers' made up of In-Si-In atoms are a key structural element. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V....

  13. Imaging systems in the Delft Multi-Beam Scanning Electron Microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this Ph.D. research is to develop imaging systems for the multiple beam scanning electron microscope (MBSEM) built in Delft University of Technology. This thesis includes two imaging systems, transmission electron (TE) imaging system, and secondary electron (SE) imaging system. The major

  14. The quality of three-dimensional images reconstructed with volume-scan CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimbashi, Takeshi; Sakurai, Nobuaki; Watanabe, Norimitsu (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Takagi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Yutaka

    1993-05-01

    Volume-scan CT is based on slip-ring technology which leads to continuous scanning. It permits remarkable reduction in scanning time, which is especially meaningful where children and elderly patients are concerned. One scan takes one second, with a maximum continuous time of 50 seconds. Slice widths of 2, 3, 5 and 100 mm can be selected and table changed from 1.5 to 20 mm/second. The reconstruction index is 1 to 10 mm, and reconstruction time about 10 seconds. As both the patient and table are moved simultaneously, it is possible to scan a wide area in a short time. Volume-scan CT is suitable for three-dimensional (3-D) images because of the good continuity of slices. The authors reconstructed 3-D phantom images using both ordinary CT and volume-scan CT, and then compared the quality of these images. Under the condition of 3 mm slice width and 3 mm/sec table speed, the 3-D images reconstructed with volume-scan CT were clearly better than those reconstructed using ordinary CT. The quality of both has improved after interpolation. In particular, the periorbital and zygomatic areas of 3-D images reconstructed with volume-scan CT are quite natural. When a phantom was scanned under the condition of 10 mm slice width and 10 mm/sec table speed, the quality of 3-D image reconstructed with ordinary CT was not sufficient to be distinct. Even under interpolation, the quality of image was not natural. Useful images could not be obtained when the phantom was moving. It was found that volume-scan CT is suitable for reconstruction of 3-D images. (author).

  15. Investigation of Supramolecular Coordination Self-Assembly and Polymerization Confined on Metal Surfaces Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao

    Organic molecules are envisioned as the building blocks for design and fabrication of functional devices in future, owing to their versatility, low cost and flexibility. Although some devices such as organic light-emitting diode (OLED) have been already applied in our daily lives, the field is still in its infancy and numerous challenges still remain. In particular, fundamental understanding of the process of organic material fabrication at a molecular level is highly desirable. This thesis focuses on the design and fabrication of supramolecular and macromolecular nanostructures on a Au(111) surface through self-assembly, polymerization and a combination of two. We used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as an experimental tool and Monte Carlo (MC) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations as theoretical tools to characterize the structures of these systems and to investigate the mechanisms of the self-assembly and polymerization processes at a single-molecular level. The results of this thesis consist of four parts as below: Part I addresses the mechanisms of two-dimensional multicomponent supramolecular self-assembly via pyridyl-Fe-terpyridyl coordination. Firstly, we studied four types of self-assembled metal-organic systems exhibiting different dimensionalities using specifically-designed molecular building blocks. We found that the two-dimensional system is under thermodynamic controls while the systems of lower dimension are under kinetic controls. Secondly, we studied the self-assembly of a series of cyclic supramolecular polygons. Our results indicate that the yield of on-surface cyclic polygon structures is very low independent of temperature and concentration and this phenomenon can be attributed to a subtle competition between kinetic and thermodynamic controls. These results shed light on thermodynamic and kinetic controls in on-surface coordination self-assembly. Part II addresses the two-dimensional supramolecular self-assembly of porphyrin

  16. Theory for Spin Selective Andreev Re ection in Vortex Core of Topological Superconductor: Majorana Zero Modes on Spherical Surface and Application to Spin Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscope Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fu-Chun; Hu, Lun-Hui; Li, Chuang; Xu, Dong-Hui; Zhou, Yi

    Majorana zero modes (MZMs) have been predicted to exist in the topological insulator (TI)/superconductor (SC) heterostructure. Recent spin polarized scanning tunneling microscope(STM) experiment has observed spin-polarization dependence of the zero bias differential tunneling conductance at the center of vortex core. Here we consider a helical electron system described by a Rashba spin orbit coupling Hamiltonian on a spherical surface with a s-wave superconducting pairing due to proximity effect. We examine in-gap excitations of a pair of vortices with one at the north pole and the other at the south pole. While the MZM is not a spin eigenstate, the spin wavefunction of the MZM at the center of the vortex core, r = 0, is parallel to the magnetic field, and the local Andreev reflection of the MZM is spin selective, namely occurs only when the STM tip has the spin polarization parallel to the magnetic field, similar to the case in 1-dimensional nanowire. The total local differential tunneling conductance consists of the normal term proportional to the local density of states and an additional term arising from the Andreev reflection. We apply our theory to examine the recently reported spin-polarized STM experiments and show good agreement with the experiments

  17. Multiple Ligament Reconstruction Femoral Tunnels: Intertunnel Relationships and Guidelines to Avoid Convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moatshe, Gilbert; Brady, Alex W; Slette, Erik L; Chahla, Jorge; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Engebretsen, Lars; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-03-01

    Knee dislocations often require multiple concurrent ligament reconstructions, which involve creating several tunnels in the distal femur. Therefore, the risk of tunnel convergence is increased because of the limited bone volume within the distal aspect of the femur. To assess the risk of tunnel convergence and determine the optimal reconstruction tunnel orientations for multiple ligament reconstructions in the femur. Descriptive laboratory study. Three-dimensional knee models were developed from computed tomography scans of 21 patients. Medical image processing software was used to create tunnels for each of the primary ligamentous structures, replicating a surgical approach that would be used in multiple ligament reconstructions. Thereafter, the tunnel orientation was varied in surgically relevant directions to determine orientations that minimized the risk of tunnel convergence. The orientation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tunnels was held constant throughout the study, while the orientation of the fibular collateral ligament (FCL), popliteus tendon (PLT), superficial medial collateral ligament (sMCL), and posterior oblique ligament (POL) tunnels was varied to avoid convergence. A high risk of tunnel convergence was observed between the FCL and ACL tunnels when the FCL tunnel was aimed at 0° in the axial and coronal planes. Aiming the FCL tunnel 35° anteriorly minimized convergence with the ACL tunnel. No tunnel convergence was observed for the PLT tunnel aimed 35° anteriorly and parallel to the FCL tunnel. To avoid convergence between the sMCL and PCL tunnels, the sMCL tunnels should be aimed 40° proximally in the coronal plane and 20° to 40° anteriorly. During concomitant POL reconstruction, the sMCL should be aimed 40° proximally and anteriorly and the POL 20° proximally and anteriorly. The PLT and POL tunnels aimed at 0° in both the coronal and axial planes had an increased risk of violating the

  18. Optimization and applications of an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Sam A.; Klomkaew, Phiwat; Leavesley, Silas J.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2017-02-01

    Currently, the majority of microscopic and endoscopic technologies utilize white light illumination. For a number of applications, hyper-spectral imaging can be shown to have significant improvements over standard white-light imaging techniques. This is true for both microscopy and in vivo imaging. However, hyperspectral imaging methods have suffered from slow application times. Often, minutes are required to gather a full imaging stack. Here we will describe the system and evaluate optimizations and applications of a novel excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system. We have developed and are optimizing a novel approach called excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging that provides an order of magnitude increased signal strength. Optimization of the light path, optical components and illumination sources have allowed us to achieve high speed image acquisition. This high speed allows for potential live video acquisition. This excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging technology has potential to impact a range of applications. The current system allows triggering of up to 16 wavelengths at less than 1 millisecond per image using digital strobing. Analog intensity control is also provided for a fully customizable excitation profile. A significant advantage of excitation scanning hyperspectral imaging is can identify multiple targets simultaneously in real time. We are optimizing the system to compare sensitivity and specificity of excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging with pathology techniques. Finally, we are exploring utilizing this technology to measure cAMP distribution in three dimensions within a cell.

  19. Volumetric display system based on three-dimensional scanning of inclined optical image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Shiba, Kensuke; Sotsuka, Koji; Matsushita, Kenji

    2006-12-25

    A volumetric display system based on three-dimensional (3D) scanning of an inclined image is reported. An optical image of a two-dimensional (2D) display, which is a vector-scan display monitor placed obliquely in an optical imaging system, is moved laterally by a galvanometric mirror scanner. Inclined cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed on the 2D display in accordance with the position of the image plane to form a 3D image. Three-dimensional images formed by this display system satisfy all the criteria for stereoscopic vision because they are real images formed in a 3D space. Experimental results of volumetric imaging from computed-tomography images and 3D animated images are presented.

  20. Seismic prediction and imaging of geological structures ahead of a tunnel using surface waves

    OpenAIRE

    Jetschny, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    To improve the performance and safety of tunnel constructions, we introduce a new seismic prediction method utilizing tunnel surface waves to detect relevant geological structures ahead of the tunnel face. On the basis of both synthetic and field data, we investigate the propagation characteristics of such surface waves propagating along the tunnel wall. We further introduce a simple but robust automatic prediction scheme that can estimate the distance to a reflector ahead of the tunnel.

  1. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-04-07

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions.

  2. An ultra-low temperature scanning Hall probe microscope for magnetic imaging below 40 mK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcı, Özgür; Piatek, Julian O.; Jorba, Pau; Dede, Münir; Rønnow, Henrik M.; Oral, Ahmet

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a low temperature scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) for a dilution refrigerator system. A detachable SHPM head with 25.4 mm OD and 200 mm length is integrated at the end of the mixing chamber base plate of the dilution refrigerator insert (Oxford Instruments, Kelvinox MX-400) by means of a dedicated docking station. It is also possible to use this detachable SHPM head with a variable temperature insert (VTI) for 2 K-300 K operations. A microfabricated 1μm size Hall sensor (GaAs/AlGaAs) with integrated scanning tunneling microscopy tip was used for magnetic imaging. The field sensitivity of the Hall sensor was better than 1 mG/√Hz at 1 kHz bandwidth at 4 K. Both the domain structure and topography of LiHoF4, which is a transverse-field Ising model ferromagnet which orders below TC = 1.53 K, were imaged simultaneously below 40 mK.

  3. Spatial compounding in ultrasonic imaging using an articulated scan arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, A; Basset, O; Chirossel, P; Gimenez, G

    1996-01-01

    A spatial compounding system has been designed to improve the quality of B-mode echographic images. It consists of constructing an improved image from the combination of several different images of the same cross-sectional plane. The "final" image is constructed by the registration and the superposition of the "original" images. For this, the relative position in the space of the original images has to be known. The use of a localization articulated arm, on which the ultrasonic probe is fixed, makes this possible. The main advantages of the technique are, on one hand, the elimination of the acoustic shadows following a strong reflector structure and, on the other hand, the reduction of the speckle generated in echographic images. The method of reconstruction has been validated on agar gel phantoms and provides good accuracy. In vivo experiments on human beings have also been performed. Acoustic shadows caused by bones in cross-sectional images of the thigh and the arm are eliminated. All the contours of the femur and humerus can be observed in the final images. The reduction of speckle is shown in kidney images and the signal-to-noise ratio improvement is quantified as a function of the number of images involved in the reconstruction.

  4. Investigation of the structural anisotropy in a self-assembling glycinate layer on Cu(100) by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmin, Mikhail [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Sánchez-de-Armas, Rocío [Materials Theory Division, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, S75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Hirsimäki, Mika, E-mail: mikahirsi@gmail.com [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Valden, Mika [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Deprotonation reaction of glycine and self-assembly of glycinate is observed on Cu. • Bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy indicates two glycinate geometries. • Density functional theory calculations confirm the two non-identical configurations. • Non-identical adsorption explains the anisotropy in adlayer’s electronic structure. - Abstract: Self-assembling organic molecule-metal interfaces exhibiting free-electron like (FEL) states offers an attractive bottom-up approach to fabricating materials for molecular electronics. Accomplishing this, however, requires detailed understanding of the fundamental driving mechanisms behind the self-assembly process. For instance, it is still unresolved as to why the adsorption of glycine ([NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2})COOH]) on isotropic Cu(100) single crystal surface leads, via deprotonation and self-assembly, to a glycinate ([NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2})COO–]) layer that exhibits anisotropic FEL behavior. Here, we report on bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for glycine adsorption on Cu(100) single crystal surface. We find that after physical vapor deposition (PVD) of glycine on Cu(100), glycinate self-assembles into an overlayer exhibiting c(2 × 4) and p(2 × 4) symmetries with non-identical adsorption sites. Our findings underscore the intricacy of electrical conductivity in nanomolecular organic overlayers and the critical role the structural anisotropy at molecule-metal interface plays in the fabrication of materials for molecular electronics.

  5. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion–extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  6. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  7. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Tzung Kuo

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS. Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for

  8. Sequential {sup 123}I-iododexetimide scans in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison with neuroimaging scans (MR imaging and {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Armin [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Comprehensive Epilepsy Service, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Eberl, Stefan; Henderson, David; Beveridge, Scott; Constable, Chris [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Fulham, Michael J. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Kassiou, Michael [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Department of Pharmacology, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Zaman, Aysha [University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lo, Sing Kai [University of Sydney, Institute of International Health, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2005-02-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play an important role in the generation of seizures. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 123}I-iododexetimide (IDEX) depicts tracer uptake by mAChRs. Our aims were to: (a) determine the optimum time for interictal IDEX SPECT imaging; (b) determine the accuracy of IDEX scans in the localisation of seizure foci when compared with video EEG and MR imaging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE); (c) characterise the distribution of IDEX binding in the temporal lobes and (d) compare IDEX SPECT and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in identifying seizure foci. We performed sequential scans using IDEX SPECT imaging at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h in 12 consecutive patients with refractory TLE undergoing assessment for epilepsy surgery. Visual and region of interest analyses of the mesial, lateral and polar regions of the temporal lobes were used to compare IDEX SPECT, FDG PET and MR imaging in seizure onset localisation. The 6-h IDEX scan (92%; {kappa}=0.83, p=0.003) was superior to the 0-h (36%; {kappa}=0.01, p>0.05), 3-h (55%; {kappa}=0.13, p>0.05) and 24-h IDEX scans in identifying the temporal lobe of seizure origin. The 6-h IDEX scan correctly predicted the temporal lobe of seizure origin in two patients who required intracranial EEG recordings to define the seizure onset. Reduced ligand binding was most marked at the temporal pole and mesial temporal structures. IDEX SPECT was superior to interictal FDG PET (75%; {kappa}=0.66, p=0.023) in seizure onset localisation. MR imaging was non-localising in two patients in whom it was normal and in another patient in whom there was bilateral symmetrical hippocampal atrophy. The 6-h IDEX SPECT scan is a viable alternative to FDG PET imaging in seizure onset localisation in TLE. (orig.)

  9. Benefits and unexpected artifacts of biplanar digital slot-scanning imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumer, Steven L. [Nemours/A.I duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Medical Imaging, Wilmington, DE (United States); Dinan, David [Nemours Children' s Hospital, Orlando, FL (United States); Grissom, Leslie E. [Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Biplanar digital slot-scanning allows for relatively low-dose orthopedic imaging, an advantage in imaging children given the growing concerns regarding radiosensitivity. We have used this system for approximately 1 year for orthopedic imaging of the spine and lower extremities. We have noted advantages of using the digital slot-scanning system when compared with computed radiographic and standard digital radiographic imaging systems, but we also found unexpected but common imaging artifacts that are the direct result of the imaging method and that have not been reported. This pictorial essay serves to familiarize radiologists with the advantages of the digital slot-scanning system as well as imaging artifacts common with this new technology. (orig.)

  10. Real-time scanning charged-particle microscope image composition with correction of drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmar, Petr; Vladár, András E; Postek, Michael T

    2011-04-01

    In this article, a new scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image composition technique is described, which can significantly reduce drift related image corruptions. Drift distortion commonly causes blur and distortions in the SEM images. Such corruption ordinarily appears when conventional image-acquisition methods, i.e., "slow scan" and "fast scan," are applied. The damage is often very significant; it may render images unusable for metrology applications, especially where subnanometer accuracy is required. The described correction technique works with a large number of quickly taken frames, which are properly aligned and then composed into a single image. Such image contains much less noise than the individual frames, while the blur and deformation is minimized. This technique also provides useful information about changes of the sample position in time, which may be applied to investigate the drift properties of the instrument without a need of additional equipment.

  11. 3D - RECURSIVELY SCANS IMAGING SYSTEM WITH COMPUTER MATHEMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lazurchak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the algorithm for constructing the N-dimensional recursive Peano scans. Driven by their two-dimensional and three-dimensional realization of a system of computer mathematics Mathematica 7.0. We are discussing the issue of reduction of the multidimensional space to one-dimensional in the calculation of multiple integrals.

  12. Scanning Emitter Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Spontaneous Emission Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimmer, Martin; Chen, Yuntian; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2011-01-01

    We report an experimental technique to map and exploit the local density of optical states of arbitrary planar nanophotonic structures. The method relies on positioning a spontaneous emitter attached to a scanning probe deterministically and reversibly with respect to its photonic environment while...

  13. Optimal imaging techniques in the scanning transmission electron microscope: applications to biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, M; Crewe, A V

    1980-01-01

    We show applications of the optimal imaging method to stained biological macromolecules. This optimal imaging method involves the following basic procedures: (i) for any given resolution, which is represented by the electron probe size in the scanning transmission electron microscope, a preferred magnification is used; (ii) the micrographs taken at the condition described above are then spatially filtered by using a low-pass filter (nu < 1/2d, in which d is the space between scan lines) to optically reconstruct the final optimal image. It is found that the micrographs obtained by using the optimal imaging method clearly show an improvement in contrast. Images PMID:6933454

  14. Phantom verification for a ring-scanning and prone diffuse optical imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jhao-Ming; Pan, Min-Chun; Chen, Liang-Yu; Pan, Min-Cheng; Hsu, Ya-Fen

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we proposed and implemented a ring-scanning mechanism in the prone position for application in breast tumour detection. The current scanning module using two zones with three light sources in each zone enables the acquisition of 36 source and 30 detection data (36S × 30D) items during the optical information collection phase. This study employed only three photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), instead of 30 PMTs used in a fixed model. In particular, the circular scanning of source-and-detection module actually behaves as more channels and can acquire more optoelectrical data as the scanning module operates in a fractional motion of a single channel-to-channel span. In this study, the optoelectrical measurement system was first calibrated; then, the feasibility of optical-coefficient image reconstruction was verified using several heterogeneous cylindrical phantoms. The reconstructed μa and μs ‧ images through multilayer scanning presented good outcomes, implying that the developed system is promising for 3D scanning of breasts. In a quantitative analysis, the contrast-to-noise ratios of the μa and μs ‧ images (6.00 and 4.97, respectively) for the flexible scanning scheme were superior to those derived for the fixed scheme (5.05 and 4.31, respectively). This indicates that the higher amount of detection information obtained through the proposed scanning module can enhance the spatial resolution of the reconstructed images while retaining an acceptable scanning time.

  15. Carpal tunnel biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tunnel Images Carpal tunnel syndrome Surface anatomy - normal palm Surface anatomy - normal wrist Carpal biopsy References Calandruccio ... CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. ...

  16. CLOSE RANGE HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING INTEGRATED WITH TERRESTRIAL LIDAR SCANNING APPLIED TO ROCK CHARACTERISATION AT CENTIMETRE SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Kurz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Compact and lightweight hyperspectral imagers allow the application of close range hyperspectral imaging with a ground based scanning setup for geological fieldwork. Using such a scanning setup, steep cliff sections and quarry walls can be scanned with a more appropriate viewing direction and a higher image resolution than from airborne and spaceborne platforms. Integration of the hyperspectral imagery with terrestrial lidar scanning provides the hyperspectral information in a georeferenced framework and enables measurement at centimetre scale. In this paper, three geological case studies are used to demonstrate the potential of this method for rock characterisation. Two case studies are applied to carbonate quarries where mapping of different limestone and dolomite types was required, as well as measurements of faults and layer thicknesses from inaccessible parts of the quarries. The third case study demonstrates the method using artificial lighting, applied in a subsurface scanning scenario where solar radiation cannot be utilised.

  17. Range image segmentation for tree detection in forest scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bienert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To make a tree-wise analysis inside a forest stand, the trees have to be identified. An interactive segmentation is often labourintensive and time-consuming. Therefore, an automatic detection process will aspired using a range image. This paper presents a method for the segmentation of range images extracted from terrestrial laser scanner point clouds of forest stands. After range image generation the segmentation is carried out with a connectivity analysis using the differences of the range values as homogeneity criterion. Subsequently, the tree detection is performed interactively by analysing one horizontal image line. When passing objects with a specific width, the object indicates a potential tree. By using the edge points of a segmented pixel group the tree position and diameter is calculated. Results from one test site are presented to show the performance of the method.

  18. Electronic Structure on (001) Surface of BaFe2As2 Parent Compound Studied with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasundara, D. R.; Li, A.; Xuan, Y.; O'Neal, J. P.; Pan, S. H.; Jin, R.; Plummer, E. W.; Jin, R.; Sefat, A. S.; McGuire, M. A.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D.

    2009-03-01

    Doping can drive some metallic pnictide compounds to superconducting phase. The microscopic mechanism of this phase transition has still not been understood. Starting with the parent compound, we have used a UHV Low Temperature STM to study the density of states on the (001) surface of single crystal BaFe2As2. The tunneling spectrum varies depending on the local environment. All the spectrums have the same background with density of states depression near the Fermi energy, but some of them show different anomalies. We attribute some of these anomalies to surface states. These results may provide useful information to those surface techniques other than STM.

  19. Contribution of Metal Layer Thickness for Quantitative Backscattered Electron Imaging of Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Hyonchol; Takei, Hiroyuki; Negishi, Tsutomu; Kudo, Masato; Terazono, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    ...) imaging in field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were studied to evaluate the potential of using these particles as simultaneously distinguishable labels of target molecules in FE-SEM studies...

  20. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) dataset for the GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) plays the role as an airborne...

  1. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) dataset for the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) plays the role as an...

  2. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) IPHEx V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) IPHEx dataset includes data gathered during the Integrated Precipitation and...

  3. Rank-1 accelerated illumination recovery in scanning diffractive imaging by transparency estimation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hau-Tieng

    2014-08-07

    Illumination retrieval in scanning diffractive imaging a.k.a. ptychography is challenging when the specimen is weakly scattering or surrounded by empty space. We describe a rank-1 acceleration method for weakly scattering or piecewise smooth specimens.

  4. A Video Rate Confocal Laser Beam Scanning Light Microscope Using An Image Dissector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Seth R.; Hubin, Thomas; Rosenthal, Scott; Washburn, Clayton

    1989-12-01

    A video rate confocal reflected light microscope with no moving parts has been developed. Return light from an acousto-optically raster scanned laser beam is imaged from the microscope stage onto the photocathode of an Image Dissector Tube (IDT). Confocal operation is achieved by appropriately raster scanning with the IDT x and y deflection coils so as to continuously "sample" that portion of the photocathode that is being instantaneously illuminated by the return image of the scanning laser spot. Optimum IDT scan parameters and geometric distortion correction parameters are determined under computer control within seconds and are then continuously applied to insure system alignment. The system is operational and reflected light images from a variety of objects have been obtained. The operating principle can be extended to fluorescence and transmission microscopy.

  5. GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) OLYMPEX dataset consists of brightness temperatures from 9 channels as...

  6. MR neurography of ulnar nerve entrapment at the cubital tunnel: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, Julia B.; Berzaczy, Dominik; Nemec, Stefan F.; Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Kranz, Gottfried; Sycha, Thomas [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Hold, Alina [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-07-15

    MR neurography, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography at 3 Tesla were evaluated for the assessment of patients with ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE). Axial T2-weighted and single-shot DTI sequences (16 gradient encoding directions) were acquired, covering the cubital tunnel of 46 patients with clinically and electrodiagnostically confirmed UNE and 20 healthy controls. Cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured at the retrocondylar sulcus and FA and ADC values on each section along the ulnar nerve. Three-dimensional nerve tractography and T2-weighted neurography results were independently assessed by two raters. Patients showed a significant reduction of ulnar nerve FA values at the retrocondylar sulcus (p = 0.002) and the deep flexor fascia (p = 0.005). At tractography, a complete or partial discontinuity of the ulnar nerve was found in 26/40 (65 %) of patients. Assessment of T2 neurography was most sensitive in detecting UNE (sensitivity, 91 %; specificity, 79 %), followed by tractography (88 %/69 %). CSA and FA measurements were less effective in detecting UNE. T2-weighted neurography remains the most sensitive MR technique in the imaging evaluation of clinically manifest UNE. DTI-based neurography at 3 Tesla supports the MR imaging assessment of UNE patients by adding quantitative and 3D imaging data. (orig.)

  7. Spatial-temporal features of thermal images for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estupinan Roldan, Kevin; Ortega Piedrahita, Marco A.; Benitez, Hernan D.

    2014-02-01

    Disorders associated with repeated trauma account for about 60% of all occupational illnesses, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) being the most consulted today. Infrared Thermography (IT) has come to play an important role in the field of medicine. IT is non-invasive and detects diseases based on measuring temperature variations. IT represents a possible alternative to prevalent methods for diagnosis of CTS (i.e. nerve conduction studies and electromiography). This work presents a set of spatial-temporal features extracted from thermal images taken in healthy and ill patients. Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers test this feature space with Leave One Out (LOO) validation error. The results of the proposed approach show linear separability and lower validation errors when compared to features used in previous works that do not account for temperature spatial variability.

  8. Automatic Construction of Hypotheses for Linear Objects in Digital and Laser Scanning Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintino Dalmolin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an automatic road hypotheses approach using digital image and laser scanning image combining various Digital Image Processing techniques. The semantic objects, in this work, are linear features, such as, roads and streets. The aim of this paper is extract automatically road hypotheses on image space and object space for use the information in automatic absolute orientation process. The results show that methodology is efficiency and the roads hypotheses are generate and validate.

  9. Unsynchronized scanning with a low-cost laser range finder for real-time range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Isa; Nakhmani, Arie

    2017-06-01

    Range imaging plays an essential role in many fields: 3D modeling, robotics, heritage, agriculture, forestry, reverse engineering. One of the most popular range-measuring technologies is laser scanner due to its several advantages: long range, high precision, real-time measurement capabilities, and no dependence on lighting conditions. However, laser scanners are very costly. Their high cost prevents widespread use in applications. Due to the latest developments in technology, now, low-cost, reliable, faster, and light-weight 1D laser range finders (LRFs) are available. A low-cost 1D LRF with a scanning mechanism, providing the ability of laser beam steering for additional dimensions, enables to capture a depth map. In this work, we present an unsynchronized scanning with a low-cost LRF to decrease scanning period and reduce vibrations caused by stop-scan in synchronized scanning. Moreover, we developed an algorithm for alignment of unsynchronized raw data and proposed range image post-processing framework. The proposed technique enables to have a range imaging system for a fraction of the price of its counterparts. The results prove that the proposed method can fulfill the need for a low-cost laser scanning for range imaging for static environments because the most significant limitation of the method is the scanning period which is about 2 minutes for 55,000 range points (resolution of 250x220 image). In contrast, scanning the same image takes around 4 minutes in synchronized scanning. Once faster, longer range, and narrow beam LRFs are available, the methods proposed in this work can produce better results.

  10. Scanning laser topography and scanning laser polarimetry: comparing both imaging methods at same distances from the optic nerve head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremmer, Stephan; Keienburg, Marcus; Anastassiou, Gerasimos; Schallenberg, Maurice; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Selbach, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of scanning laser topography (SLT) and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) on the rim of the optic nerve head and its surrounding area and thereby to evaluate whether these imaging technologies are influenced by other factors beyond the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). A total of 154 eyes from 5 different groups were examined: young healthy subjects (YNorm), old healthy subjects (ONorm), patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG), patients with open-angle glaucoma and early glaucomatous damage (OAGE) and patients with open-angle glaucoma and advanced glaucomatous damage (OAGA). SLT and SLP measurements were taken. Four concentric circles were superimposed on each of the images: the first one measuring at the rim of the optic nerve head (1.0 ONHD), the next measuring at 1.25 optic nerve head diameters (ONHD), at 1.5 ONHD and at 1.75 ONHD. The aligned images were analyzed using GDx/NFA software. Both methods showed peaks of RNFL thickness in the superior and inferior segments of the ONH. The maximum thickness, registered by the SLT device was at the ONH rim where the SLP device tended to measure the lowest values. SLT measurements at the ONH were influenced by other tissues besides the RNFL like blood vessels and glial tissues. SLT and SLP were most strongly correlated at distances of 1.25 and 1.5 ONHD. While both imaging technologies are valuable tools in detecting glaucoma, measurements at the ONH rim should be interpreted critically since both methods might provide misleading results. For the assessment of the retinal nerve fiber layer we would like to recommend for both imaging technologies, SLT and SLP, measurements in 1.25 and 1.5 ONHD distance of the rim of the optic nerve head.

  11. Improved T2* imaging without increase in scan time: SWI processing of 2D gradient echo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, S; Holdsworth, S J; Barnes, P D; Rosenberg, J; Andre, J B; Bammer, R; Yeom, K W

    2013-01-01

    2D gradient-echo imaging is sensitive to T2* lesions (hemorrhages, mineralization, and vascular lesions), and susceptibility-weighted imaging is even more sensitive, but at the cost of additional scan time (SWI: 5-10 minutes; 2D gradient-echo: 2 minutes). The long acquisition time of SWI may pose challenges in motion-prone patients. We hypothesized that 2D SWI/phase unwrapped images processed from 2D gradient-echo imaging could improve T2* lesion detection. 2D gradient-echo brain images of 50 consecutive pediatric patients (mean age, 8 years) acquired at 3T were retrospectively processed to generate 2D SWI/phase unwrapped images. The 2D gradient-echo and 2D SWI/phase unwrapped images were compared for various imaging parameters and were scored in a blinded fashion. Of 50 patients, 2D gradient-echo imaging detected T2* lesions in 29 patients and had normal findings in 21 patients. 2D SWI was more sensitive than standard 2D gradient-echo imaging in detecting T2* lesions (P echo images were more sensitive in detecting T2* lesions and delineating normal venous structures and nonpathologic mineralization, and they also helped distinguish calcification at no additional scan time. SWI processing of 2D gradient-echo images may be a useful adjunct in cases in which longer scan times of 3D SWI are difficult to implement.

  12. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga+ -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga+ density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Technical Considerations on Scanning and Image Analysis for Amyloid PET in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Go; Ohnishi, Akihito; Aita, Kazuki; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Yasuji; Senda, Michio

    2017-01-01

    Brain imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET), can provide essential and objective information for the early and differential diagnosis of dementia. Amyloid PET is especially useful to evaluate the amyloid-β pathological process as a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease. This article reviews critical points about technical considerations on the scanning and image analysis methods for amyloid PET. Each amyloid PET agent has its own proper administration instructions and recommended uptake time, scan duration, and the method of image display and interpretation. In addition, we have introduced general scanning information, including subject positioning, reconstruction parameters, and quantitative and statistical image analysis. We believe that this article could make amyloid PET a more reliable tool in clinical study and practice.

  14. Mechanical scanning in intravascular ultrasound imaging: Artifacts and driving mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. ten Hoff (H.); E.J. Gussenhoven (Elma); C.M. Korbijn (Carin); F. Mastik (Frits); C.T. Lancée (Charles); N. Bom (Klaas)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Currently, intravascular ultrasound (US) imaging catheters are developed and produced to provide a complementary diagnostic method in the treatment of blood vessel obstructive disease. Typical catheter dimensions are a diameter of 1–2.5 mm and a length of 1–1.5 m. A real-time

  15. Examination of body image issues and willingness to be body scanned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domina, Tanya; Heuberger, Roschelle; MacGillivray, Maureen

    2007-01-01

    This project examined body image issues using 3D body scanning technology. Twenty years of research on body image indicates that though thinness is culturally desirable, possessing an ideal body does not guarantee that women will be satisfied with their bodies. Furthermore, the disconnect continues to widen between the reality of a heavier American woman and the thinner western feminine ideal necessitating the continued need for body image research. This study included 240 female college students enrolled in a mid-sized university. Phase I included a questionnaire of several different measures of body image satisfaction/dissatisfaction, a description of the body scanner including a 3D image, as well as standard demographic questions and estimates of height and weight. Of the initial 240 participants, 85 women agreed to participate in the body scanning portion (Phase II) of the research project. A majority of the women chose an ideal figure thinner than their current figure. Self-esteem scores were significantly correlated with Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) scores. Neither level of body dissatisfaction nor self-esteem scores were significantly associated with willingness to be body scanned, despite the fact that body scanning involves significant body exposure and that the resulting 3D image is highly realistic. Due to the novelty of body scanning technology and its application to body image research, these findings represent an innovative contribution to the field.

  16. Adaptive and robust statistical methods for processing near-field scanning microwave microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, K J; Imtiaz, A; Wallis, T M; Weber, J C; Berweger, S; Kabos, P

    2015-03-01

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy offers great potential to facilitate characterization, development and modeling of materials. By acquiring microwave images at multiple frequencies and amplitudes (along with the other modalities) one can study material and device physics at different lateral and depth scales. Images are typically noisy and contaminated by artifacts that can vary from scan line to scan line and planar-like trends due to sample tilt errors. Here, we level images based on an estimate of a smooth 2-d trend determined with a robust implementation of a local regression method. In this robust approach, features and outliers which are not due to the trend are automatically downweighted. We denoise images with the Adaptive Weights Smoothing method. This method smooths out additive noise while preserving edge-like features in images. We demonstrate the feasibility of our methods on topography images and microwave |S11| images. For one challenging test case, we demonstrate that our method outperforms alternative methods from the scanning probe microscopy data analysis software package Gwyddion. Our methods should be useful for massive image data sets where manual selection of landmarks or image subsets by a user is impractical. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Chemical imaging of latent fingerprints by mass spectrometry based on laser activated electron tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-03

    Identification of endogenous and exogenous chemicals contained in latent fingerprints is important for forensic science in order to acquire evidence of criminal identities and contacts with specific chemicals. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for such applications without any derivatization or fluorescent tags. Among these techniques, MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) provides small beam size but has interferences with MALDI matrix materials, which cause ion suppressions as well as limited spatial resolution resulting from uneven distribution of MALDI matrix crystals with different sizes. LAET (Laser Activated Electron Tunneling) described in this work offers capabilities for chemical imaging through electron-directed soft ionization. A special film of semiconductors has been designed for collection of fingerprints. Nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were compressed on a conductive metal substrate (Al or Cu sticky tape) under 10 MPa pressure. Resultant uniform thin films provide tight and shining surfaces on which fingers are impressed. Irradiation of ultraviolet laser pulses (355 nm) on the thin film instantly generates photoelectrons that can be captured by adsorbed organic molecules and subsequently cause electron-directed ionization and fragmentation. Imaging of latent fingerprints is achieved by visualization of the spatial distribution of these molecular ions and structural information-rich fragment ions. Atomic electron emission together with finely tuned laser beam size improve spatial resolution. With the LAET technique, imaging analysis not only can identify physical shapes but also reveal endogenous metabolites present in females and males, detect contacts with prohibited substances, and resolve overlapped latent fingerprints.

  18. Structure, Mobility, and Composition of Transition Metal Catalyst Surfaces. High-Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zhongwei [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-12-06

    Surface structure, mobility, and composition of transition metal catalysts were studied by high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) at high gas pressures. HP-STM makes it possible to determine the atomic or molecular rearrangement at catalyst surfaces, particularly at the low-coordinated active surface sites. AP-XPS monitors changes in elemental composition and chemical states of catalysts in response to variations in gas environments. Stepped Pt and Cu single crystals, the hexagonally reconstructed Pt(100) single crystal, and Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size, shape and composition, were employed as the model catalysts for experiments in this thesis.

  19. Characterizing low-coordinated atoms at the periphery of MgO-supported Au islands using scanning tunneling microscopy and electronic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao; Nilius, Niklas; Sterrer, Martin; Koskinen, Pekka; Häkkinen, Hannu; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2010-04-01

    The perimeter of oxide-supported metal particles is suggested to be of pivotal importance for various catalytic processes. To elucidate the underlying effects, the electronic properties of edge and corner atoms of planar Au clusters on MgO/Ag(001) thin films have been analyzed with scanning tunneling microscopy and electronic structure calculations. The low-coordinated perimeter atoms are characterized by a high density of s -derived states at the Fermi level. Those states accommodate transfer electrons from the MgO/Ag substrate, which render the perimeter atoms negatively charged. In contrast, the inner atoms of the island are not affected by the charge transfer and remain neutral. This combination of charge accumulation and high state-density explains the specific relevance of the cluster perimeter in adsorption and reaction processes.

  20. DESORPTION OF Te CAPPING LAYER FROM ZnTe (100: AUGER SPECTROSCOPY, LOW-ENERGY ELECTRON DIFFRACTION AND SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Sossoe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the annealing temperature to desorb a protective Te capping layer of the zinc telluride (ZnTe (100 surface was investigated. The surface reconstruction of the ZnTe (100 upon the removal of a Te capping layer grown by the molecular beam epitaxy was characterized by different methods. Auger spectroscopy brought out the chemical composition of the surface before and after annealing; the Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED gave information about the crystallographic structure. The surface crystallographic configurations of tellurium Te (c (2x2 and Te (c (2x1 are confirmed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM. Such a study reveals a phase transition from a rich-Te to a poor-Te surface as the annealing temperature increases. 

  1. Investigation of atomic species in Pt-induced nanowires on Ge(001) surface by combined atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Shinozaki, Takuya; Gurlu, Oguzhan; Yurtsever, Ayhan

    2017-10-01

    We have studied identification of atomic species in Pt-induced nanowires self-assembled on the Ge(001) surface by combining scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A small number of Sn atoms substituted in the top atomic chains were utilized as references to identify the target atomic species. Force spectroscopy data taken above single atoms on the Sn-substituted nanowires showed that the ratio between the maximum attractive forces above the Sn and the pristine chain atoms exhibited a constant value of 0.86. The obtained ratio was identical to that between Sn and Ge atoms, strongly suggestive that the top ridge of the Pt-induced nanowire was composed of Ge dimers. Our findings also demonstrate that AFM chemical identification method can be used to identify the unknown atomic species on surfaces, regardless of the homogeneity in the atomic composition, which has not been addressed so far.

  2. Recovery and local-variation of Dirac cones in oxygen-intercalated graphene on Ru(0001) studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won-Jun; Kim, Howon; Jeon, Jeong Heum; Yoon, Jong Keon; Kahng, Se-Jong

    2013-10-14

    Methods to decouple epitaxial graphene from metal substrates have been extensively studied, with anticipation of observing unperturbed Dirac cone properties, but its local electronic structures were rarely studied. Here, we investigated the local variations of Dirac cones recovered using oxygen intercalation applied to epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001) using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS). New V-shaped features, which appear in the STS data at the oxygen-intercalated graphene regions, are attributed to the signatures of recovered Dirac cones. The Dirac point energy was observed at 0.48 eV below the Fermi level, different from previous photoemission results because of different oxygen coverages. The observed spatial variations of Dirac point energy were explained by the weakly protruding network structures caused by a small net strain in graphene. Our study shows that oxygen-intercalated graphene provides an excellent platform for further graphene research at the nano-meter scale with unperturbed Dirac cones.

  3. Voltammetry and single-molecule in situ scanning tunneling microscopy of laccases and bilirubin oxidase in electrocatalytic dioxygen reduction on Au(111) single-crystal electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climent, Victor; Zhang, Jingdong; Friis, Esben Peter

    2012-01-01

    to elucidate the catalytic mechanism, where laccase (sub)monolayer voltammetry has been a core approach. In this report, we address voltammetry and electrocatalysis of O2 reduction of (sub)monolayers of several laccases in new ways. These are based on the use of single-crystal, atomically planar bare Au(111......)-electrode surfaces or surfaces modified by thiol-based self-assembled molecular monolayers. These well-defined surfaces enable introducing electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy directly in aqueous biological media in which the enzymes are operative (in situ STM), to the level of resolution...... of the single enzyme molecule in electrocatalytic action. Enzyme-electrode electronic contact and intramolecular electron transfer triggered by the electrode potential or by O2-substrate binding to the enzyme, followed at the single-molecule level, are the most important observations of this study. © 2011...

  4. Observation of Supermodulation in LaO0.5F0.5BiSe2 by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Satoshi; Ishida, Naoki; Fujisawa, Yuita; Sakata, Hideaki

    2017-11-01

    We observed the surface and electronic structure of single-crystal LaO0.5F0.5BiSe2 by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy at 4.2 K. A square lattice composed of Bi atoms was observed at a positive sample bias voltage for the surface prepared by cleavage. At a negative sample bias voltage, a stripe structure along the Bi-Bi directions was observed as in a previous report on NdO0.7F0.3BiS2. Furthermore, we observed a supermodulation along the diagonal directions with a period of about five times the lattice constant. This seems to be indicative of the structural instability of this system rather than the electronic instability attributed to a nesting picture.

  5. Light-modulated scanning tunneling microscopy studied on photoinduced carrier generations at PbI2/perovskite interface of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ya-Ping; Shih, Min-Chuan; Li, Shao-Sian; Hsieh, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Ying-Chiao; Yang, Hung-Duen; Chang, Chia-Seng; Chen, Chun-Wei

    Perovskite solar devices based on CH3NH3PbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) have recently shown tremendous efficiency enhancements up to 20% in photovoltaic applications. The presence of PbI2 in perovskite films has been found to affect the charge carrier transport behaviors and device performance of perovskite solar cells. In this work, we employed the unique ability of light-modulated scanning tunneling microscopy (LM-STM) technique to dircetly reveal the correlation of the nanoscaled compositional distributions and photo-induced interfacial electronic structures at the PbI2/perovskite interface of perovskite grains under light illumination. The result reveals the important role of the optimum PbI2 passivation layers (a thickness less than 20 nm) on the charge separation and recombination at perovskite crystal grains. The unique LM-STM technique demonstartes great potential for application in the future exploring photovoltaic systems.

  6. Iron on GaN(0001) pseudo-1 × 1 (1+1/(12) ) investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Smith, Arthur R., E-mail: smitha2@ohio.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Takeuchi, Noboru [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Apartado Postal 14, Ensenada Baja California, Codigo Postal 22800 (Mexico); Al-Brithen, Hamad A. H. [Physics and Astronomy Department, King Abdulah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and National Center for Nano Technology, KACST, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-04-28

    We have investigated sub-monolayer iron deposition on atomically smooth GaN(0001) pseudo-1 × 1 (1+1/(12) ). The iron is deposited at a substrate temperature of 360 °C, upon which reflection high energy electron diffraction shows a transformation to a √(3)×√(3)-R30° pattern. After cooling to room temperature, the pattern transforms to a 6 × 6, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals 6 × 6 reconstructed regions decorating the GaN step edges. First-principles theoretical calculations have been carried out for a range of possible structural models, one of the best being a Ga dimer model consisting of 2/9 monolayer of Fe incorporated into 7/3 monolayer of Ga in a relaxed but distorted structure.

  7. Adsorption characteristics of Er3N@C80on W(110 and Au(111 studied via scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schimmel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We performed a study on the fundamental adsorption characteristics of Er3N@C80 deposited on W(110 and Au(111 via room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. Adsorbed on W(110, a comparatively strong bond to the endohedral fullerenes inhibited the formation of ordered monolayer islands. In contrast, the Au(111-surface provides a sufficiently high mobility for the molecules to arrange in monolayer islands after annealing. Interestingly, the fullerenes modify the herringbone reconstruction indicating that the molecule–substrate interaction is of considerable extent. Investigations concerning the electronic structure of Er3N@C80/Au(111 reveals spatial variations dependent on the termination of the Au(111 at the interface.

  8. A novel two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound imaging. It consists of a miniaturized single-element ultrasound transducer driven by a unique 2-axis liquid-immersible electromagnetic microactuator. With a mechanical scanning frequency of 19.532 Hz and an ultrasound pulse repetition rate of 5 kHz, the scanning transducer was scanned along 60 concentric paths with 256 detection points on each to simulate a physical 2D ultrasound transducer array of 60 × 256 elements. Using the scanning transducer, 3D pulse-echo ultrasound imaging of two silicon discs immersed in water as the imaging target was successfully conducted. The lateral resolution of the 3D ultrasound image was further improved with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer doesn't require complex and expensive multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics. Therefore, it could provide a new approach to achieve compact and low-cost 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging systems, especially for handheld operations.

  9. Image quality improvement in adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy assisted capillary visualization using B-spline-based elastic image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Arichika, Shigeta; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of B-spline-based elastic image registration on adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO)-assisted capillary visualization. AO-SLO videos were acquired from parafoveal areas in the eyes of healthy subjects and patients with various diseases. After nonlinear image registration, the image quality of capillary images constructed from AO-SLO videos using motion contrast enhancement was compared before and after B-spline-based elastic (nonlinear) image registration performed using ImageJ. For objective comparison of image quality, contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRS) for vessel images were calculated. For subjective comparison, experienced ophthalmologists ranked images on a 5-point scale. All AO-SLO videos were successfully stabilized by elastic image registration. CNR was significantly higher in capillary images stabilized by elastic image registration than in those stabilized without registration. The average ratio of CNR in images with elastic image registration to CNR in images without elastic image registration was 2.10 ± 1.73, with no significant difference in the ratio between patients and healthy subjects. Improvement of image quality was also supported by expert comparison. Use of B-spline-based elastic image registration in AO-SLO-assisted capillary visualization was effective for enhancing image quality both objectively and subjectively.

  10. Imaging inflammation in mouse colon using a rapid stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldua, Meagan A; Olsovsky, Cory A; Callaway, Evelyn S; Chapkin, Robert S; Maitland, Kristen C

    2012-01-01

    Large area confocal microscopy may provide fast, high-resolution image acquisition for evaluation of tissue in pre-clinical studies with reduced tissue processing in comparison to histology. We present a rapid beam and stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope to image cellular and tissue features along the length of the entire excised mouse colon. The beam is scanned at 8,333 lines/sec by a polygon scanning mirror while the specimen is scanned in the orthogonal axis by a motorized translation stage with a maximum speed of 7 mm/sec. A single 1 × 60 mm(2) field of view image spanning the length of the mouse colon is acquired in 10 s. Z-projection images generated from axial image stacks allow high resolution imaging of the surface of non-flat specimens. In contrast to the uniform size, shape, and distribution of colon crypts in confocal images of normal colon, confocal images of chronic bowel inflammation exhibit heterogeneous tissue structure with localized severe crypt distortion.

  11. Fast Image Scanning with Deep Max-Pooling Convolutional Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Giusti, Alessandro; Cireşan, Dan C.; Masci, Jonathan; Gambardella, Luca M.; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Deep Neural Networks now excel at image classification, detection and segmentation. When used to scan images by means of a sliding window, however, their high computational complexity can bring even the most powerful hardware to its knees. We show how dynamic programming can speedup the process by orders of magnitude, even when max-pooling layers are present.

  12. High-speed, image-based eye tracking with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheehy, C.K.; Yang, Q.; Arathorn, D.W.; Teeruveedhula, P.; de Boer, J.F.; Roorda, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-speed, image-based tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) that can provide high fidelity structural images, real-time eye tracking and targeted stimulus delivery. The system was designed for diffraction-limited performance over an 8° field of view (FOV) and operates with

  13. TOD Predicts Target Acquisition Performance for Staring and Scanning Thermal Imagers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.; Valeton, J.M.; Jong, A.N. de

    2000-01-01

    Identification and recognition performance for four staring and two scanning thermal imagers, were measured in an observer experiment using images that were collected during a NATO field trial in Nettuno, Italy, in 1998. The dataset allows validation of the MRTD and alternative sensor performance

  14. Line-Scan Hyperspectral Imaging Techniques for Food Safety and Quality Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Qin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging technologies in the food and agricultural area have been evolving rapidly over the past 15 years owing to tremendous interest from both academic and industrial fields. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging is a major method that has been intensively researched and developed using different physical principles (e.g., reflectance, transmittance, fluorescence, Raman, and spatially resolved spectroscopy and wavelength regions (e.g., visible (VIS, near infrared (NIR, and short-wavelength infrared (SWIR. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging systems are mainly developed and used for surface inspection of food and agricultural products using area or line light sources. Some of these systems can also be configured to conduct spatially resolved spectroscopy measurements for internal or subsurface food inspection using point light sources. This paper reviews line-scan hyperspectral imaging techniques, with introduction, demonstration, and summarization of existing and emerging techniques for food and agricultural applications. The main topics include related spectroscopy techniques, line-scan measurement methods, hardware components and systems, system calibration methods, and spectral and image analysis techniques. Applications in food safety and quality are also presented to reveal current practices and future trends of line-scan hyperspectral imaging techniques.

  15. Submolecular resolution in scanning probe images of Sn-phthalocyanines on Cu(1 0 0) using metal tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, Kristof; Hauptmann, Nadine; Foster, Adam S.; Berndt, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Single Sn-phthalocyanine (SnPc) molecules adsorb on Cu(1 0 0) with the Sn ion above (Sn-up) or below (Sn-down) the molecular plane. Here we use a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and first principles calculations to understand the adsorption configuration and origin of observed contrast of molecules in the Sn-down state. AFM with metallic tips images the pyrrole nitrogen atoms in these molecules as attractive features while STM reveals a chirality of the electronic structure of the molecules close to the Fermi level E_F, which is not observed in AFM. Using density functional theory calculations, the origin of the submolecular contrast is analysed and, while the electrostatic forces turn out to be negligible, the van der Waals interaction between the phenyl rings of SnPc and the substrate deform the molecule, push the pyrrole nitrogen atoms away from the substrate and thus induce the observed submolecular contrast. Simulated STM images reproduce the chirality of the electronic structure near E_F.

  16. Improving image quality by accounting for changes in water temperature during a photoacoustic tomography scan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Van de Sompel

    Full Text Available The emerging field of photoacoustic tomography is rapidly evolving with many new system designs and reconstruction algorithms being published. Many systems use water as a coupling medium between the scanned object and the ultrasound transducers. Prior to a scan, the water is heated to body temperature to enable small animal imaging. During the scan, the water heating system of some systems is switched off to minimize the risk of bubble formation, which leads to a gradual decrease in water temperature and hence the speed of sound. In this work, we use a commercially available scanner that follows this procedure, and show that a failure to model intra-scan temperature decreases as small as 1.5°C leads to image artifacts that may be difficult to distinguish from true structures, particularly in complex scenes. We then improve image quality by continuously monitoring the water temperature during the scan and applying variable speed of sound corrections in the image reconstruction algorithm. While upgrading to an air bubble-free heating pump and keeping it running during the scan could also solve the changing temperature problem, we show that a software correction for the temperature changes provides a cost-effective alternative to a hardware upgrade. The efficacy of the software corrections was shown to be consistent across objects of widely varying appearances, namely physical phantoms, ex vivo tissue, and in vivo mouse imaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the efficacy of modeling temporal variations in the speed of sound during photoacoustic scans, as opposed to spatial variations as focused on by previous studies. Since air bubbles pose a common problem in ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging systems, our results will be useful to future small animal imaging studies that use scanners with similarly limited heating units.

  17. Comparison of PA imaging by narrow beam scanning and one-shot broad beam excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; Huang, Lingyun; Pelivanov, I. M.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Current systems designed for deep photoacoustic (PA) imaging typically use a low repetition rate, high power pulsed laser to provide a ns-scale pulse illuminating a large tissue volume. Acoustic signals recorded on each laser firing can be used to reconstruct a complete 2-D (3-D) image of sources of heat release within that region. Using broad-beam excitation, the maximum frame rate of the imaging system is restricted by the pulse repetition rate of the laser. An alternate illumination approach is proposed based on fast scanning by a low energy (~ 1 mJ) high repetition rate (up to a few kHz) narrow laser beam (~1 mm) along the tissue surface over a region of interest. A final PA image is produced from the summation of individual PA images reconstructed at each laser beam position. This concept can take advantage of high repetition rate fiber lasers to create PA images with much higher frame rates than current systems, enabling true real-time integration of photoacoustics with ultrasound imaging. As an initial proof of concept, we compare conventional broad beam illumination to a scanned beam approach in a simple model system. Two transparent teflon tubes with diameters of 1.6 mm and 0.8 mm were filled with ink having an absorption coefficient of 5 cm-1. These tubes were buried inside chicken breast tissue acting as an optical scattering medium. They were separated by 3 mm or 10 mm to test spatial and contrast resolution for the two scan formats. The excitation wavelength was 700 nm. The excitation source is a traditional OPO pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with doubler. Photoacoustic images were reconstructed using signals from a small, scanned PVDF transducer acting as an acoustic array. Two different illumination schemes were compared: one was 15 mm x 10 mm in cross section and acted as the broad beam; the other was 5 mm x 2 mm in cross section (15 times smaller than the broad beam case) and was scanned over an area equivalent to broad beam illumination

  18. Geometric super-resolved imaging based upon axial scanning and phase retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Amikam; Marom, Emanuel; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-06-20

    In this paper, we propose a new geometric super-resolving approach that overcomes the geometric resolution reduction caused by the spatially large pixels of the detector array. The improvement process is obtained by applying an axial scanning procedure. In the scanning process, several images are captured corresponding to focus applied at several axial planes. By applying an iterative Gerchberg-Saxton-based algorithm, we managed to retrieve the phase and to reconstruct the original high-resolution image from the captured set of low-resolution images. In addition, the paper also presents a numerically efficient algorithm to compute the free space Fresnel integral.

  19. Second-harmonic interference imaging of ferroelectric domains through a scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyang; Wei, Dunzhao; Wang, Yongmei; Zhu, Yunzhi; Zhang, Yong; Hu, X. P.; Zhu, S. N.; Xiao, Min

    2017-12-01

    We report a second-harmonic (SH) interference imaging technique to observe the ferroelectric domains of a periodically poled LiTaO3 crystal through a scanning microscope. By interfering with the reference SH field, which is produced in an un-poled LiTaO3 crystal, the SH imaging of the positive and negative domains can be easily distinguished. The image quality can be tuned by rotating the reference crystal or moving the focal plane. Our SH interference configuration is compatible with commercial scanning microscopy and has potential applications in fast examination of the ferroelectric structures in waveguide, film, and integrated devices.

  20. Modern technologies for retinal scanning and imaging: an introduction for the biomedical engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatikov, Boris I

    2014-04-29

    This review article is meant to help biomedical engineers and nonphysical scientists better understand the principles of, and the main trends in modern scanning and imaging modalities used in ophthalmology. It is intended to ease the communication between physicists, medical doctors and engineers, and hopefully encourage "classical" biomedical engineers to generate new ideas and to initiate projects in an area which has traditionally been dominated by optical physics. Most of the methods involved are applicable to other areas of biomedical optics and optoelectronics, such as microscopic imaging, spectroscopy, spectral imaging, opto-acoustic tomography, fluorescence imaging etc., all of which are with potential biomedical application. Although all described methods are novel and important, the emphasis of this review has been placed on three technologies introduced in the 1990's and still undergoing vigorous development: Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy, Optical Coherence Tomography, and polarization-sensitive retinal scanning.

  1. Laser range scanning for image-guided neurosurgery: investigation of image-to-physical space registrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Aize; Thompson, R C; Dumpuri, P; Dawant, B M; Galloway, R L; Ding, S; Miga, M I

    2008-04-01

    In this article a comprehensive set of registration methods is utilized to provide image-to-physical space registration for image-guided neurosurgery in a clinical study. Central to all methods is the use of textured point clouds as provided by laser range scanning technology. The objective is to perform a systematic comparison of registration methods that include both extracranial (skin marker point-based registration (PBR), and face-based surface registration) and intracranial methods (feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, a combined geometry/intensity surface registration method, and a constrained form of that method to improve robustness). The platform facilitates the selection of discrete soft-tissue landmarks that appear on the patient's intraoperative cortical surface and the preoperative gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) image volume, i.e., true corresponding novel targets. In an 11 patient study, data were taken to allow statistical comparison among registration methods within the context of registration error. The results indicate that intraoperative face-based surface registration is statistically equivalent to traditional skin marker registration. The four intracranial registration methods were investigated and the results demonstrated a target registration error of 1.6 +/- 0.5 mm, 1.7 +/- 0.5 mm, 3.9 +/- 3.4 mm, and 2.0 +/- 0.9 mm, for feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, unconstrained geometric/intensity registration, and constrained geometric/intensity registration, respectively. When analyzing the results on a per case basis, the constrained geometric/intensity registration performed best, followed by feature PBR, and finally cortical vessel-contour registration. Interestingly, the best target registration errors are similar to targeting errors reported using bone-implanted markers within the context of rigid targets. The experience in this study as with others is that brain shift can compromise extracranial

  2. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Pinkard

    Full Text Available Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM, the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems.

  3. Evaluation of Yogurt Microstructure Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of protein networks in yogurts defines important physical properties of the yogurt and hereby partly its quality. Imaging this protein network using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) has shown good results, and CSLM has become a standard measuring technique for fermented...... to image texture description. Here, CSLM images from a yogurt fermentation study are investigated, where production factors including fat content, protein content, heat treatment, and incubation temperature are varied. The descriptors are evaluated through nearest neighbor classification, variance analysis...

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  5. Improved detection of differentially expressed genes in microarray experiments through multiple scanning and image integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romualdi, Chiara; Trevisan, Silvia; Celegato, Barbara; Costa, Germano; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

    2003-01-01

    The variability of results in microarray technology is in part due to the fact that independent scans of a single hybridised microarray give spot images that are not quite the same. To solve this problem and turn it to our advantage, we introduced the approach of multiple scanning and of image integration of microarrays. To this end, we have developed specific software that creates a virtual image that statistically summarises a series of consecutive scans of a microarray. We provide evidence that the use of multiple imaging (i) enhances the detection of differentially expressed genes; (ii) increases the image homogeneity; and (iii) reveals false-positive results such as differentially expressed genes that are detected by a single scan but not confirmed by successive scanning replicates. The increase in the final number of differentially expressed genes detected in a microarray experiment with this approach is remarkable; 50% more for microarrays hybridised with targets labelled by reverse transcriptase, and 200% more for microarrays developed with the tyramide signal amplification (TSA) technique. The results have been confirmed by semi-quantitative RT–PCR tests. PMID:14627839

  6. A quantitative damage imaging technique based on enhanced CCRTM for composite plates using 2D scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-10-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) non-contact areal scan system was developed to image and quantify impact damage in a composite plate using an enhanced zero-lag cross-correlation reverse-time migration (E-CCRTM) technique. The system comprises a single piezoelectric wafer mounted on the composite plate and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) for scanning a region in the vicinity of the PZT to capture the scattered wavefield. The proposed damage imaging technique takes into account the amplitude, phase, geometric spreading, and all of the frequency content of the Lamb waves propagating in the plate; thus, a reflectivity coefficients of the delamination is calculated and potentially related to damage severity. Comparisons are made in terms of damage imaging quality between 2D areal scans and 1D line scans as well as between the proposed and existing imaging conditions. The experimental results show that the 2D E-CCRTM performs robustly when imaging and quantifying impact damage in large-scale composites using a single PZT actuator with a nearby areal scan using LDV.

  7. Flexible polygon-mirror based laser scanning microscope platform for multiphoton in-vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y X; Gautam, V; Brüstle, A; Cockburn, I A; Daria, V R; Gillespie, C; Gaus, K; Alt, C; Lee, W M

    2017-11-01

    Commercial microscopy systems make use of tandem scanning i.e. either slow or fast scanning. We constructed, for the first time, an advanced control system capable of delivering a dynamic line scanning speed ranging from 2.7 kHz to 27 kHz and achieve variable frame rates from 5 Hz to 50 Hz (512 × 512). The dynamic scanning ability is digitally controlled by a new customized open-source software named PScan1.0. This permits manipulation of scanning rates either to gain higher fluorescence signal at slow frame rate without increasing laser power or increase frame rates to capture high speed events. By adjusting imaging speed from 40 Hz to 160 Hz, we capture a range of calcium waves and transient peaks from soma and dendrite of single fluorescence neuron (CAL-520AM). Motion artifacts arising from respiratory and cardiac motion in small animal imaging reduce quality of real-time images of single cells in-vivo. An image registration algorithm, integrated with PScan1.0, was shown to perform both real time and post-processed motion correction. The improvement is verified by quantification of blood flow rates. This work describes all the steps necessary to develop a high performance and flexible polygon-mirror based multiphoton microscope system for in-vivo biological imaging. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of tunnel diameters prior to revision ACL reconstruction: a comparison to computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, Bjoern Holger; Gulkin, Daniel; Guelke, Joachim; Gebhard, Florian [University of Ulm, Center of Surgery, Department for Orthopedic Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Ulm (Germany); Merz, Cornelia; Huth, Jochen; Mauch, Frieder [Sportklinik Stuttgart GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Revision ACL reconstruction is becoming more frequent because of a 10% rate of re-ruptures and insufficiencies. Currently, computed tomography (CT) represents the gold standard in detecting and measuring the tunnels of the initial ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare measurement results of CT and thin-sliced MRI sequences, which were modified to a high soft tissue-bone contrast. Prior to an ACL revision surgery, 16 consecutive patients had an MRI in addition to the standard CT scan. A dedicated 0.25-T Esaote G-Scan (Esaote Biomedica, Cologne, Germany) with a Turbo 3D T1 sequence was used for MRI. Tunnel diameters were measured at 11 defined points of interest. For the statistical evaluation, the Mann-Whitney U test for connected samples was used. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was additionally calculated. All measured diameters showed significant to highly significant correlations between both diagnostic tools (r = 0.7-0.98). In addition, there was no significant difference (p > 0.5) between the two techniques. Almost all diameters showed nearly perfect intraobserver reliability (ICC 0.8-0.97). Interobserver reliability showed an ICC of 0.91/0.92 for only one diameter in MRI and CT. Prior to ACL revision surgery, bone tunnel measurements can be done using a 3D T1-MRI sequence in low-field MRI. MRI measurements show the same accuracy as CT scans. Preoperative radiation exposure in mainly young patients could be reduced. Also the costs of an additional CT scan could be saved. (orig.)

  9. Imaging studies of excretory urography and computed tomography scan for patients suffering from renal colic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Hirofumi [Yashio Chuo General Hospital, Saitama (Japan); Hariu, Kyouichi; Tohyama, Yuichi; Kamiyama, Yutaka; Iiyama, Tetsuro; Tomomasa, Hiroshi; Yazaki, Tsunetada; Umeda, Takashi

    1998-02-01

    Renal colic mainly due to urolithiasis is one of the most common morbid conditions in urology and commonly seen in the urology emergency clinic. Imaging studies were performed to evaluate the upper urinary tract of 29 patients suffering from renal colic in the 2 years between November, 1994 and October, 1996. After intramuscular injection of the analgesic (pentazocine, 15 mg), all 29 patients were examined by excretory urography (IVP) at the time of the first visit. In some patients abdominal plain computed tomography (CT) scan was performed consecutively even when extravasation of the contrast medium was not seen. Spontaneous peripelvic extravasation was seen in 14 patients (11 males and 3 females) with urolithiasis; 7 of them were diagnosed by IVP, 5 by IVP plus CT scan and 2 with CT scan only. IVP imaging study followed by plain abdominal CT scan is useful even when the contrast medium is not extravasated on IVP in patients suffering from renal colic. (author)

  10. Angular scan optical coherence tomography imaging and metrology of spherical gradient refractive index preforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianing; Meemon, Panomsak; Ponting, Michael; Rolland, Jannick P

    2015-03-09

    The fabrication of high-performance spherical gradient refractive index (S-GRIN) optics requires nondestructive metrology techniques to inspect the samples. We have developed an angular-scan, swept-source-based, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system centered at 1318 nm with 5 mm imaging depth capable of 180° polar scan and 360° azimuthal scan to investigate polymeric S-GRIN preforms. We demonstrate a method that enables simultaneous mapping of the group optical thickness, physical thickness, the radially-averaged group refractive index, and the transmitted wavefront of the S-GRIN preforms. The angular scan OCT imaging and metrology enables direct visualization, molding uniformity characterization, and optical property evaluations of the preforms. The results on two generations of S-GRIN preforms are discussed that showcase the evolution of the manufacturing process in response to the OCT metrology feedback.

  11. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis by a self-normalization process and ultrasound compound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yin-Yin; Wu, Chin-Chou; Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2012-12-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the common entrapment neuropathy that occurs due to compression of the median nerve at the wrist. Ultrasound images have been used to highlight anatomical variants of the median nerve, and CTS is thought to be associated to enlargement of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve. However, there remains controversy regarding the most appropriate cutoff values of the computer measurements including the CSA, flattening ratio, and palmar bowing of median nerve, especially given that they can be influenced by image artifacts and factors that differ between individual patients. This study proposed a modified ultrasound compound imaging technique by moving fingers to reduce image artifacts, and the estimates of the normalized CSA [i.e., CSA at the wrist (CSAw) to CSA at the midforearm] with the aim of reducing discrepancies in CSA estimates and improving the ability of CTS discrimination. The subjects were examined with their arms supine and while they were making repetitive movements of their fingers (from an open palm into a clenched fist) within 3 s. By a commercial ultrasound scanner with a 10-MHz linear array transducer, a total of 70 images were acquired in each subject. The frame rate of ultrasound system was 25 fps. Nine frames in the acquisition sequence that had produced partial speckle decorrelation were incoherently added to form a compound image, and the inplane motion of them was corrected using the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm. The manual contours outlined by ten experimenters and three physicians were used to test the performance in determining the boundary of the median nerve. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the usefulness of the estimates in distinguishing healthy volunteers from CTS patients. The manual contours of the median nerve in the compound images had an average area overlap exceeding 90% and relatively small area errors. The areas under the ROC curve

  13. 2D size, position and shape definition of defects by B-scan image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Scafidi; Donatella Cerniglia; Tommaso Ingrassia

    2015-01-01

    The non-destructive evaluation of defects by automatic procedures is of great importance for structural components. Thanks to the developments of the non-contact ultrasonic techniques, the automation of the inspections is gaining a progressively important role. In this work, an automatic inspection technique for the evaluation of defects by the analysis of B-scan images obtained by a laser ultrasonic system is presented. The data are extracted directly from a B-scan map obtained f...

  14. Exact ray-tracing computation of narcissus-equivalent temperature difference in scanning thermal imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayces, Juan L.; Lebich, Lan

    1992-12-01

    The formula for evaluation of narcissus equivalent temperature difference as a function of the scan angle in thermal imaging systems is made more meaningful by grouping the parameters in two factors: one depending on wavelength and temperature and the other, a function of the scan angle, depending on the geometry of the instrument. Exact ray tracing equations are used to evaluate the ratio of radiant energy reaching the detector from warm and cold areas of the instrument.

  15. Image reconstruction and scan configurations enabled by optimization-based algorithms in multispectral CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Buxin; Zhang, Zheng; Sidky, Emil Y.; Xia, Dan; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2017-11-01

    Optimization-based algorithms for image reconstruction in multispectral (or photon-counting) computed tomography (MCT) remains a topic of active research. The challenge of optimization-based image reconstruction in MCT stems from the inherently non-linear data model that can lead to a non-convex optimization program for which no mathematically exact solver seems to exist for achieving globally optimal solutions. In this work, based upon a non-linear data model, we design a non-convex optimization program, derive its first-order-optimality conditions, and propose an algorithm to solve the program for image reconstruction in MCT. In addition to consideration of image reconstruction for the standard scan configuration, the emphasis is on investigating the algorithm’s potential for enabling non-standard scan configurations with no or minimum hardware modification to existing CT systems, which has potential practical implications for lowered hardware cost, enhanced scanning flexibility, and reduced imaging dose/time in MCT. Numerical studies are carried out for verification of the algorithm and its implementation, and for a preliminary demonstration and characterization of the algorithm in reconstructing images and in enabling non-standard configurations with varying scanning angular range and/or x-ray illumination coverage in MCT.

  16. Multimodal backside imaging of a microcontroller using confocal laser scanning and optical-beam-induced current imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkeldey, Markus; Göring, Lena; Schellenberg, Falk; Brenner, Carsten; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Microscopy imaging with a single technology is usually restricted to a single contrast mechanism. Multimodal imaging is a promising technique to improve the structural information that could be obtained about a device under test (DUT). Due to the different contrast mechanisms of laser scanning microscopy (LSM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and optical beam induced current microscopy (OBICM), a combination could improve the detection of structures in integrated circuits (ICs) and helps to reveal their layout. While OBIC imaging is sensitive to the changes between differently doped areas and to semiconductor-metal transitions, CLSM imaging is mostly sensitive to changes in absorption and reflection. In this work we present the implementation of OBIC imaging into a CLSM. We show first results using industry standard Atmel microcontrollers (MCUs) with a feature size of about 250nm as DUTs. Analyzing these types of microcontrollers helps to improve in the field of side-channel attacks to find hardware Trojans, possible spots for laser fault attacks and for reverse engineering. For the experimental results the DUT is placed on a custom circuit board that allows us to measure the current while imaging it in our in-house built stage scanning microscope using a near infrared (NIR) laser diode as light source. The DUT is thinned and polished, allowing backside imaging through the Si-substrate. We demonstrate the possibilities using this optical setup by evaluating OBIC, LSM and CLSM images above and below the threshold of the laser source.

  17. Novel low-dose imaging technique for characterizing atomic structures through scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Ping; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chen, Chien-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To investigate dislocations or heterostructures across interfaces is now of great interest to condensed matter and materials scientists. With the advances in aberration-corrected electron optics, the scanning transmission electron microscope has demonstrated its excellent capability of characterizing atomic structures within nanomaterials, and well-resolved atomic-resolution images can be obtained through long-exposure data acquisition. However, the sample drifting, carbon contamination, and radiation damage hinder further analysis, such as deriving three-dimensional (3D) structures from a series of images. In this study, a method for obtaining atomic-resolution images with significantly reduced exposure time was developed, using which an original high-resolution image with approximately one tenth the electron dose can be obtained by combining a fast-scan high-magnification image and a slow-scan low-magnification image. The feasibility of obtaining 3D atomic structures using the proposed approach was demonstrated through multislice simulation. Finally, the feasibility and accuracy of image restoration were experimentally verified. This general method cannot only apply to electron microscopy but also benefit to image radiation-sensitive materials using various light sources.

  18. Tri-Scan: A Three Stage Color Enhancement Tool for Endoscopic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Mohammad S; Mohammed, Shahed K; Deeba, Farah; Wahid, Khan A

    2017-06-01

    Modern endoscopes play a significant role in diagnosing various gastrointestinal (GI) tract related diseases where the visual quality of endoscopic images helps improving the diagnosis. This article presents an image enhancement method for color endoscopic images that consists of three stages, and hence termed as "Tri-scan" enhancement: (1) tissue and surface enhancement: a modified linear unsharp masking is used to sharpen the surface and edges of tissue and vascular characteristics; (2) mucosa layer enhancement: an adaptive sigmoid function is employed on the R plane of the image to highlight micro-vessels of the superficial layers of the mucosa and submucosa; and (3) color tone enhancement: the pixels are uniformly distributed to create an enhanced color effect to highlight the subtle micro-vessels, mucosa and tissue characteristics. The proposed method is used on a large data set of low contrast color white light images (WLI). The results are compared with three existing enhancement techniques: Narrow Band Imaging (NBI), Fuji Intelligent Color Enhancement (FICE) and i-scan Technology. The focus value and color enhancement factor show that the enhancement level achieved in the processed images is higher compared to NBI, FICE and i-scan images.

  19. Real-Time Imaging with Frequency Scanning Array Antenna for Industrial Inspection Applications at W band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larumbe, Belen; Laviada, Jaime; Ibáñez-Loinaz, Asier; Teniente, Jorge

    2017-09-01

    A real-time imaging system based on a frequency scanning antenna for conveyor belt setups is presented in this paper. The frequency scanning antenna together with an inexpensive parabolic reflector operates at the W band enabling the detection of details with dimensions in the order of 2 mm. In addition, a low level of sidelobes is achieved by optimizing unequal dividers to window the power distribution for sidelobe reduction. Furthermore, the quality of the images is enhanced by the radiation pattern properties. The performance of the system is validated by showing simulation as well as experimental results obtained in real time, proving the feasibility of these kinds of frequency scanning antennas for cost-effective imaging applications.

  20. Real-Time Imaging with Frequency Scanning Array Antenna for Industrial Inspection Applications at W band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larumbe, Belen; Laviada, Jaime; Ibáñez-Loinaz, Asier; Teniente, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    A real-time imaging system based on a frequency scanning antenna for conveyor belt setups is presented in this paper. The frequency scanning antenna together with an inexpensive parabolic reflector operates at the W band enabling the detection of details with dimensions in the order of 2 mm. In addition, a low level of sidelobes is achieved by optimizing unequal dividers to window the power distribution for sidelobe reduction. Furthermore, the quality of the images is enhanced by the radiation pattern properties. The performance of the system is validated by showing simulation as well as experimental results obtained in real time, proving the feasibility of these kinds of frequency scanning antennas for cost-effective imaging applications.

  1. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  2. Open source deformable image registration system for treatment planning and recurrence CT scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Brink, Carsten; Hansen, Christian Rønn

    2016-01-01

    CT) images of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients was evaluated. PATIENTS AND MATERIALS: Twenty patients treated with definitive IMRT for HNSCC in 2010-2012 were included. For each patient, a pCT and an rCT scan were used. Median interval between the scans was 8.5 months. One observer...... on pCT. DSC for DIR varied between 0.58 and 0.79 for soft tissues and was 0.79 or higher for bony structures, and correlated with the volumes of ROIs (r = 0.5, p CT scans is feasible...

  3. A unifying model for non-adiabatic coupling at metallic surfaces beyond the local harmonic approximation: from vibrational relaxation to scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2013-06-28

    A model for treating excitation and relaxation of adsorbates at metallic surfaces induced by non-adiabatic coupling is developed. The derivation is based on the concept of resonant electron transfer, where the adsorbate serves as a molecular bridge for the inelastic transition between an electron source and a sink. In this picture, energy relaxation and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at metallic surfaces are treated on an equal footing as a quasi-thermal process. The model goes beyond the local harmonic approximation and allows for an unbiased description of floppy systems with multiple potential wells. Further, the limitation of the product ansatz for the vibronic wave function to include the position-dependence of the non-adiabatic couplings is avoided by explicitly enforcing detailed balance. The theory is applied to the excitation of hydrogen on palladium, which has multiple local potential minima connected by low energy barriers. The main aspects investigated are the lifetimes of adsorbate vibrations in different adsorption sites, as well as the dependence of the excitation, response, and transfer rates on an applied potential bias. The excitation and relaxation simulations reveal intricate population dynamics that depart significantly from the simplistic tunneling model in a truncated harmonic potential. In particular, the population decay from an initially occupied local minimum induced by the contact with an STM tip is found to be better described by a double exponential. The two rates are interpreted as a response to the system perturbation and a transfer rate following the perturbation. The transfer rate is found to obey a power law, as was the case in previous experimental and theoretical work.

  4. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  5. Usefulness of 3D-image of ossicles with helical scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makihata, Hiroshi; Kimura, Hideaki; Hanaguri, Katsurou; Fukushima, Noriyuki; Oda, Yukari [Chugoku Rousai Hospital, Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    It is important to understand the abnormalities of ossicles (continuity, destruction and malformation) in clinical practice of middle ear diseases. Multidirection exposures were needed to visualize ossicles with the conventional CT scanning, because they are visualized in 2D images. It was difficult to make patients hold the posture and to settle the problems such as an increase in X-ray dose. We created 3D images of ossicles with a helical scanning, and examined the visualization of the normal and abnormal ear (otitis media cholesteatoma) especially in terms of continuity in each of 20 patients. We would here like to report the favorable results together with some literature review. (author).

  6. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system for microscopic and endoscopic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Sam A.; Leavesley, Silas J.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2016-04-01

    Current microscopic and endoscopic technologies for cancer screening utilize white-light illumination sources. Hyper-spectral imaging has been shown to improve sensitivity while retaining specificity when compared to white-light imaging in both microscopy and in vivo imaging. However, hyperspectral imaging methods have historically suffered from slow acquisition times due to the narrow bandwidth of spectral filters. Often minutes are required to gather a full image stack. We have developed a novel approach called excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging that provides 2-3 orders of magnitude increased signal strength. This reduces acquisition times significantly, allowing for live video acquisition. Here, we describe a preliminary prototype excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system that can be coupled with endoscopes or microscopes for hyperspectral imaging of tissues and cells. Our system is comprised of three subsystems: illumination, transmission, and imaging. The illumination subsystem employs light-emitting diode arrays to illuminate at different wavelengths. The transmission subsystem utilizes a unique geometry of optics and a liquid light guide. Software controls allow us to interface with and control the subsystems and components. Digital and analog signals are used to coordinate wavelength intensity, cycling and camera triggering. Testing of the system shows it can cycle 16 wavelengths at as fast as 1 ms per cycle. Additionally, more than 18% of the light transmits through the system. Our setup should allow for hyperspectral imaging of tissue and cells in real time.

  7. Lateral spatial resolution of thermal lens microscopy during continuous scanning for nonstaining biofilm imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossteuscher, T. T. J.; Hibara, A.; Mawatari, K.; Kitamori, T.

    2009-05-01

    The possible application of continuous scanning thermal lens microscopy (TLM) as alternative online biofilm observation method is studied. As biofilm is a heterogeneous sample, the influence of spatially limited thermal flow at the sample heterogeneities and the biofilm-environment border has to be considered. The influence of the edges on the lateral resolution with respect to scanning velocity during continuous scanning TLM was therefore evaluated. Lateral scanning experiments on 100 nm thin gold stripes showed that the maximum scan speed can be predicted from a time constant of a lock-in amplifier and the beamwidth. Since three-dimensional mapping is needed to fully characterize the biofilm structure, depth scanning experiments with stained 4 μm thick polystyrene samples with the coaxial TLM setup were evaluated for signal width at full width at half maximum. Thus, a minimum step width for depth scanning of 10 μm for observation has been acquired. A three-dimensional image of unstained biofilm grown in a flow chamber was acquired using continuous scanning TLM.

  8. The Role of Wrist Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Differential Diagnosis of the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onen, Mehmet Resid; Kayalar, Ali Erhan; Ilbas, Elif Nurbegum; Gokcan, Recai; Gulec, Ilker; Naderi, Sait

    2015-01-01

    The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the commonest compressive neuropathy. Electromyography (EMG) is accepted as gold standard in diagnosis of CTS. However, pathologies and variations that are associated with a various findings may lead to failure. Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) was applied to 69 wrists of 55 patients, who received a diagnosis of CTS by means of clinical and electrodiagnostic testing (EDT) during the years 2011 and 2013. We detected a total of 71 additional pathologies in MRI analyses: 29 degenerative bone cysts, 28 ganglion cysts, 8 tenosynovitis, and 6 avascular necroses. While the MRI detected 44 (59.5%) additional radiological pathologies in 39 wrists diagnosed with mid-level CTS by means of EMG, the number of detected additional pathologies was 27 (36.5%) in 30 wrists diagnosed with advanced-level CTS. Wrist MRI is an effective means to reveal associated pathologies in patients diagnosed with CTS by means of clinical testing and EDT. Additional pathologies may not only change the applicable type of surgery, but also decrease the number of postoperative failures. Wrist MRI is recommended, especially for young cases with unilateral CTS history accompanied by dubious clinical symptoms and lacking any pronounced predisposing factors.

  9. Superresolution upgrade for confocal spinning disk systems using image scanning microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbaner, Sebastian; Hähnel, Dirk; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Confocal Spinning Disk Systems are widely used for 3D cell imaging because they offer the advantage of optical sectioning at high framerates and are easy to use. However, as in confocal microscopy, the imaging resolution is diffraction limited, which can be theoretically improved by a factor of 2 using the principle of Image Scanning Microscopy (ISM) [1]. ISM with a Confocal Spinning Disk setup (CSDISM) has been shown to improve contrast as well as lateral resolution (FWHM) from 201 +/- 20 nm to 130 +/- 10 nm at 488 nm excitation. A minimum total acquisition time of one second per ISM image makes this method highly suitable for 3D live cell imaging [2]. Here, we present a multicolor implementation of CSDISM for the popular Micro-Manager Open Source Microscopy platform. Since changes in the optical path are not necessary, this will allow any researcher to easily upgrade their standard Confocal Spinning Disk system at remarkable low cost ( 5000 USD) with an ISM superresolution option. [1]. Müller, C.B. and Enderlein, J. Image Scanning Microscopy. Physical Review Letters 104, (2010). [2]. Schulz, O. et al. Resolution doubling in fluorescence microscopy with confocal spinning-disk image scanning microscopy. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110, 21000-5 (2013).

  10. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A., E-mail: priscillainglid@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  11. Cine viability magnetic resonance imaging of the heart without increased scan time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Azza S; Khalifa, Ayman M; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides information about myocardial morphology, function, and viability from cine, tagged, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images, respectively. While the cine and tagged images are acquired in a time-resolved fashion, the LGE images are acquired at a single timeframe. The purpose of this work is to develop a method for generating cine LGE images without additional scan time. The motion field is extracted from the tagged images, and is then used to guide the deformation of the infarcted region from the acquired LGE image at the acquired timeframe to any other timeframe. Major techniques for motion estimation, including harmonic phase (HARP) and optical flow analysis, are tested in this work for motion estimation. The proposed method is tested on numerical phantom and images from four human subjects. The generated cine LGE images showed both viability and wall motion information in the same set of images without additional scan time or image misregistration problems. The band-pass optical flow analysis resulted in the most accurate motion estimation compared to other methods, especially HARP, which fails to track points at the myocardial boundary. Infarct transmurality from the generated images showed good agreement with myocardial strain, and wall thickening showed good agreement with that measured from conventional cine images. In conclusion, the developed technique allows for generating cine LGE images that enable simultaneous display of wall motion and viability information. The generated images could be useful for estimating myocardial contractility reserve and for treatment prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  13. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E.; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  14. Monte Carlo modeling of cavity imaging in pure iron using back-scatter electron scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Garner, F. A.; Shao, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Backscattered electrons (BSE) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) can produce images of subsurface cavity distributions as a nondestructive characterization technique. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the mechanism of void imaging and to identify key parameters in optimizing void resolution. The modeling explores an iron target of different thicknesses, electron beams of different energies, beam sizes, and scan pitch, evaluated for voids of different sizes and depths below the surface. The results show that the void image contrast is primarily caused by discontinuity of energy spectra of backscattered electrons, due to increased outward path lengths for those electrons which penetrate voids and are backscattered at deeper depths. Size resolution of voids at specific depths, and maximum detection depth of specific voids sizes are derived as a function of electron beam energy. The results are important for image optimization and data extraction.

  15. [The comparison between mental image manipulation and distinctive feature scan on recognition memory of faces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, K; Yoshikawa, S

    2001-08-01

    The authors proposed "mental image manipulation of expression" as processing strategy for faces, and investigated whether this strategy facilitates memory for faces or not. In the Experiment, four groups of subjects were assigned to a combination of a task (mental image manipulation of expression or distinctive feature scan) and a retention interval (short-term latency or long-term latency). Each task was followed by an unexpected yes-no recognition test in which identical pictures of the target faces or the same person's expression-changed faces were randomly presented with distractor faces. The mental image manipulation group was better than distinctive feature scan group in long-term storage. This result is considered as a long-term effect of imagery encoding and a configurational encoding by mental image manipulation.

  16. Imaging and identifying defects in nitride semiconductor thin films using a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Ruterana, P. [CIMAP UMR 6252 CNRS-ENSICAEN-CEA-UCBN, 6, Caen (France); Gamarra, P.; Lacam, C.; Tordjman, M.; Di Forte-Poisson, M.A. [Thales Research and Technology, III-V Lab, Marcoussis (France); Parbrook, P.J. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Claremont House, High St, Lydney (United Kingdom); England, G. [K. E. Developments Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    We describe the use of electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) - in a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) - to reveal and identify defects in nitride semiconductor thin films. In ECCI changes in crystallographic orientation, or changes in lattice constant due to local strain, are revealed by changes in grey scale in an image constructed by monitoring the intensity of backscattered electrons (BSEs) as an electron beam is scanned over a suitably oriented sample. Extremely small orientation changes are detectable, enabling small angle tilt and rotation boundaries and dislocations to be imaged. Images with a resolution of tens of nanometres are obtainable with ECCI. In this paper, we describe the use of ECCI with TEM to determine threading dislocation densities and types in InAlN/GaN heterostructures grown on SiC and sapphire substrates. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Confocal line scanning of a Bessel beam for fast 3D imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P; Phipps, M E; Goodwin, P M; Werner, J H

    2014-06-15

    We have developed a light-sheet illumination microscope that can perform fast 3D imaging of transparent biological samples with inexpensive visible lasers and a single galvo mirror (GM). The light-sheet is created by raster scanning a Bessel beam with a GM, with this same GM also being used to rescan the fluorescence across a chip of a camera to construct an image in real time. A slit is used to reject out-of-focus fluorescence such that the image formed in real time has minimal contribution from the sidelobes of the Bessel beam. Compared with two-photon Bessel beam excitation or other confocal line-scanning approaches, our method is of lower cost, is simpler, and does not require calibration and synchronization of multiple GMs. We demonstrated the optical sectioning and out-of-focus background rejection capabilities of this microscope by imaging fluorescently labeled actin filaments in fixed 3T3 cells.

  18. A dark-field scanning spectroscopy platform for localized scatter and fluorescence imaging of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Laughney, Ashley M.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-03-01

    Tissue ultra-structure and molecular composition provide native contrast mechanisms for discriminating across pathologically distinct tissue-types. Multi-modality optical probe designs combined with spatially confined sampling techniques have been shown to be sensitive to this type of contrast but their extension to imaging has only been realized recently. A modular scanning spectroscopy platform has been developed to allow imaging localized morphology and molecular contrast measures in breast cancer surgical specimens. A custom designed dark-field telecentric scanning spectroscopy system forms the core of this imaging platform. The system allows imaging localized elastic scatter and fluorescence measures over fields of up to 15 mm x 15 mm at 100 microns resolution in tissue. Results from intralipid and blood phantom measurements demonstrate the ability of the system to quantify localized scatter parameters despite significant changes in local absorption. A co-registered fluorescence spectroscopy mode is also demonstrated in a protophorphyrin-IX phantom.

  19. Lumbar spine joint synovial cysts of intraspinal development. CT scan imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, C.; Chevrot, A.; Benhamouda, M. and others

    CT scan imaging findings are described in 22 patients with lumbar spine joint synovial cysts, of intraspinal development, provoking sciatica or lumbosciatica from nerve compression in spinal canal. Diagnosis was suggested by a mass at the posterior joint level, of variable density, sometimes with peripheral calcification, presenting a vacuum appearance on occasions, and with enhanced image with contrast. Differential diagnosis is from excluded hernia and postoperative fibrosis. Posterior intra-articular arthrography can confirm diagnosis and allow treatment with prolonged action corticoid infiltrations.

  20. Fundus autofluorescence in patients with macular holes imaged with a laser scanning ophthalmoscope

    OpenAIRE

    von Ruckmann, A.; Fitzke, F.; Gregor, Z.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To demonstrate the usefulness of a recently developed technique of imaging fundus autofluorescence and to compare it with the results of fluorescein angiography in the diagnosis and staging of macular holes.
METHODS—The intensity and distribution of fundus autofluorescence was studied in 51 patients with idiopathic macular holes and pseudoholes using a confocal laser scanning ophthalmoscope (cLSO) and the images were compared with those obtained by fundus fluorescein angiography.
RESULTS—...

  1. Implementation of 3D prostrate ring-scanning mechanism for NIR diffuse optical imaging phantom validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jhao-Ming; Chen, Liang-Yu; Pan, Min-Cheng; Hsu, Ya-Fen; Pan, Min-Chun

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse optical imaging (DOI) providing functional information of tissues has drawn great attention for the last two decades. Near infrared (NIR) DOI systems composed of scanning bench, opt-electrical measurement module, system control, and data processing and image reconstruction schemes are developed for the screening and diagnosis of breast tumors. Mostly, the scanning bench belonging to fixed source-and-detector configuration limits computed image resolution to an extent. To cope with the issue, we propose, design and implement a 3D prostrate ring-scanning equipment for NIR DOI with flexible combinations of illumination and detection, and with the function of radial, circular and vertical movement without hard compression of breast tissue like the imaging system using or incorporating with X-ray mammographic bench. Especially, a rotation-sliding-and-moving mechanism was designed for the guidance of source- and detection-channel movement. Following the previous justification for synthesized image reconstruction, in the paper the validation using varied phantoms is further conducted and 3D image reconstruction for their absorption and scattering coefficients is illustrated through the computation of our in-house coded schemes. The source and detection NIR data are acquired to reconstruct the 3D images through the operation of scanning bench in the movement of vertical, radial and circular directions. Rather than the fixed configuration, the addressed screening/diagnosing equipment has the flexibility for optical-channel expansion with a compromise among construction cost, operation time, and spatial resolution of reconstructed μa and μs' images.

  2. Optimization of dose and image quality in adult and pediatric computed tomography scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kwo-Ping; Hsu, Tzu-Kun; Lin, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Wen-Lin

    2017-11-01

    Exploration to maximize CT image and reduce radiation dose was conducted while controlling for multiple factors. The kVp, mAs, and iteration reconstruction (IR), affect the CT image quality and radiation dose absorbed. The optimal protocols (kVp, mAs, IR) are derived by figure of merit (FOM) based on CT image quality (CNR) and CT dose index (CTDIvol). CT image quality metrics such as CT number accuracy, SNR, low contrast materials' CNR and line pair resolution were also analyzed as auxiliary assessments. CT protocols were carried out with an ACR accreditation phantom and a five-year-old pediatric head phantom. The threshold values of the adult CT scan parameters, 100 kVp and 150 mAs, were determined from the CT number test and line pairs in ACR phantom module 1and module 4 respectively. The findings of this study suggest that the optimal scanning parameters for adults be set at 100 kVp and 150-250 mAs. However, for improved low- contrast resolution, 120 kVp and 150-250 mAs are optimal. Optimal settings for pediatric head CT scan were 80 kVp/50 mAs, for maxillary sinus and brain stem, while 80 kVp /300 mAs for temporal bone. SNR is not reliable as the independent image parameter nor the metric for determining optimal CT scan parameters. The iteration reconstruction (IR) approach is strongly recommended for both adult and pediatric CT scanning as it markedly improves image quality without affecting radiation dose.

  3. Imaging optical fields below metal films and metal-dielectric waveguides by a scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liangfu; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Ruxue; Qiu, Dong; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Rosenfeld, Mary; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2017-09-01

    Laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy (LSCM) is now an important method for tissue and cell imaging when the samples are located on the surfaces of glass slides. In the past decade, there has been extensive development of nano-optical structures that display unique effects on incident and transmitted light, which will be used with novel configurations for medical and consumer products. For these applications, it is necessary to characterize the light distribution within short distances from the structures for efficient detection and elimination of bulky optical components. These devices will minimize or possibly eliminate the need for free-space light propagation outside of the device itself. We describe the use of the scanning function of a LSCM to obtain 3D images of the light intensities below the surface of nano-optical structures. More specifically, we image the spatial distributions inside the substrate of fluorescence emission coupled to waveguide modes after it leaks through thin metal films or dielectric-coated metal films. The observed spatial distribution were in general agreement with far-field calculations, but the scanning images also revealed light intensities at angles not observed with classical back focal plane imaging. Knowledge of the subsurface optical intensities will be crucial in the combination of nano-optical structures with rapidly evolving imaging detectors.

  4. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging as a means to discriminate various tissues types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Joshua; Favreau, Peter F.; Lopez, Carmen; Lall, Malvika; Weber, David S.; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2017-02-01

    Little is currently known about the fluorescence excitation spectra of disparate tissues and how these spectra change with pathological state. Current imaging diagnostic techniques have limited capacity to investigate fluorescence excitation spectral characteristics. This study utilized excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging to perform a comprehensive assessment of fluorescence spectral signatures of various tissues. Immediately following tissue harvest, a custom inverted microscope (TE-2000, Nikon Instruments) with Xe arc lamp and thin film tunable filter array (VersaChrome, Semrock, Inc.) were used to acquire hyperspectral image data from each sample. Scans utilized excitation wavelengths from 340 nm to 550 nm in 5 nm increments. Hyperspectral images were analyzed with custom Matlab scripts including linear spectral unmixing (LSU), principal component analysis (PCA), and Gaussian mixture modeling (GMM). Spectra were examined for potential characteristic features such as consistent intensity peaks at specific wavelengths or intensity ratios among significant wavelengths. The resultant spectral features were conserved among tissues of similar molecular composition. Additionally, excitation spectra appear to be a mixture of pure endmembers with commonalities across tissues of varied molecular composition, potentially identifiable through GMM. These results suggest the presence of common autofluorescent molecules in most tissues and that excitationscanning hyperspectral imaging may serve as an approach for characterizing tissue composition as well as pathologic state. Future work will test the feasibility of excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging as a contrast mode for discriminating normal and pathological tissues.

  5. Speckle noise reduction in ultrasound biomedical B-scan images using discrete topological derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Nedumaran; Ramamurthy, Sivakumar; Velusamy, Sekar; Manickam, Gayathri Kanakaraj

    2012-02-01

    Over three decades, several despeckling techniques have been developed by researchers to reduce the speckle noise inherently present in ultrasound B-scan images without losing the diagnostic information. The topological derivative (TD) is the recently adopted technique in the area of biomedical image processing. In this work, we computed the topological derivative for an appropriate function associated to the ultrasound B-scan image gradient by assigning a diffusion factor k, which indicates the cost endowed to that particular image. In this article, a novel image denoising approach, called discrete topological derivative (DTD) has been implemented. The algorithm has been developed in MATLAB7.1 and tested over 200 ultrasound B-scan images of several organs such as the liver, kidney, gall bladder and pancreas. Further, the performance of the DTD algorithm has been estimated by calculating important performance metrics. A comparative study was carried out between the DTD and the traditional despeckling techniques. The calculated peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) (the ratio between the maximum possible power of a signal and the power of corrupting noise that affects the fidelity of its representation) value of the DTD despeckled liver image is found to be 28 which is comparable with the outperformed speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) filter. SRAD filter is an edge-sensitive diffusion method for speckled images of ultrasonic and radar imaging applications. Canny edge detection and visual inspection of DTD filtered images by the trained radiologist found that the DTD algorithm preserves the hypoechoic and hyperechoic regions resulting in improved diagnosis as well as tissue characterization. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose of coronary computed tomographic angiography between conventional helical scanning and a strategy incorporating sequential scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J; Wolff, Steven D; Manheimer, Eric D; Thompson, James; Terry, Sylvia; Uretsky, Seth; Pilip, Adalbert; Peters, M Robert

    2009-11-15

    Radiation dose from coronary computed tomographic angiography may be decreased using a sequential scanning protocol rather than a conventional helical scanning protocol. We compared radiation dose and image quality from coronary computed tomographic angiography in a single center between an initial period during which helical scanning with electrocardiographically controlled tube current modulation was used for all patients (n = 138) and after adoption of a strategy incorporating sequential scanning whenever appropriate (n = 261). Using the sequential-if-appropriate strategy, sequential scanning was employed in 86.2% of patients. Compared to the helical-only strategy, this strategy was associated with a 65.1% dose decrease (mean dose-length product [DLP] 305.2 vs 875.1 and mean effective dose 14.9 vs 5.2 mSv, respectively), with no significant change in overall image quality, step artifacts, motion artifacts, or perceived image noise. For the 225 patients undergoing sequential scanning, the DLP was 201.9 +/- 90.0 mGy x cm; for patients undergoing helical scanning under either strategy, the DLP was 890.9 +/- 293.3 mGy x cm (p strategy. In conclusion, a sequential-if-appropriate diagnostic strategy decreases dose markedly compared to a helical-only strategy, with no significant difference in image quality.

  7. Data Based Parameter Estimation Method for Circular-scanning SAR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Gong-bo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The circular-scanning Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR is a novel working mode and its image quality is closely related to the accuracy of the imaging parameters, especially considering the inaccuracy of the real speed of the motion. According to the characteristics of the circular-scanning mode, a new data based method for estimating the velocities of the radar platform and the scanning-angle of the radar antenna is proposed in this paper. By referring to the basic conception of the Doppler navigation technique, the mathematic model and formulations for the parameter estimation are firstly improved. The optimal parameter approximation based on the least square criterion is then realized in solving those equations derived from the data processing. The simulation results verified the validity of the proposed scheme.

  8. Texture feature extraction for the lung lesion density classification on computed tomography scan image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasnely

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The radiology examination by computed tomography (CT scan is an early detection of lung cancer to minimize the mortality rate. However, the assessment and diagnosis by an expert are subjective depending on the competence and experience of a radiologist. Hence, a digital image processing of CT scan is necessary as a tool to diagnose the lung cancer. This research proposes a morphological characteristics method for detecting lung cancer lesion density by using the histogram and GLCM (Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrices. The most well-known artificial neural network (ANN architecture that is the multilayers perceptron (MLP, is used in classifying lung cancer lesion density of heterogeneous and homogeneous. Fifty CT scan images of lungs obtained from the Department of Radiology of RSUP Dr. Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta are used as the database. The results show that the proposed method achieved the accuracy of 98%, sensitivity of 96%, and specificity of 96%.

  9. Atomic structure of the indium-induced Ge(001)(¤n¤x4) surface reconstruction determined by scanning tunneling microscopy and ¤ab initio¤ calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, G.; Bunk, O.; Johnson, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    . Sci. 123/124, 104 (1998) for In on Si(001). For the (4x4) subunit, we propose a model that includes the main features of the (3x4) subunit together with additional mixed Ge-In dimers. The atomic positions were optimized using ab initio total-energy calculations. The calculated local densities......Using scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) and first-principles total-energy calculations, we have determined the atomic geometry of the superstructures formed by the adsorption of up to 0.5 monolayer of indium on Ge(001) and annealing at temperatures above 200 degreesC. A strong interaction between...... indium adatoms and the germanium substrate atoms leads to the formation of two different In-Ge subunits on the Ge(001) surface. In the subsaturation regime separate (nx4) subunits are observed where n can be either 3 or 4 and the STM images resemble those of the Si(001)-(3x4)-In and -Al reconstructions...

  10. Transmission electron imaging in the Delft multibeam scanning electron microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.; Kruit, P.

    2016-01-01

    Our group is developing a multibeam scanning electron microscope (SEM) with 196 beams in order to increase the throughput of SEM. Three imaging systems using, respectively, transmission electron detection, secondary electron detection, and backscatter electron detection are designed in order to

  11. Batch fabrication of scanning microscopy probes for thermal and magnetic imaging using standard micromachining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarajlic, Edin; Vermeer, Rolf; Delalande, M.Y.; Siekman, Martin Herman; Huijink, R.; Fujita, H.; Abelmann, Leon

    2010-01-01

    We present a process for batch fabrication of a novel scanning microscopy probe for thermal and magnetic imaging using standard micromachining and conventional optical contact lithography. The probe features an AFM-type cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip composed of four freestanding silicon

  12. RGB color coded images in scanning electron microscopy of biological surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 349-352 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biological surfaces * Color images * Scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  13. Automatic Registration of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Point Clouds using Panoramic Reflectance Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, Z.; Li, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, Q.; Zlatanova, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds using panoramic reflectance images. The approach follows a two-step procedure that includes both pair-wise registration and global registration. The pair-wise registration consists of

  14. Real-time non-linear image processing using an active optical scanning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, B. D.; Poon, T.-C.; Pieper, R. J.

    1991-02-01

    Real-time non-linear image processing has been achieved using an active optical scanning technique. This paper reports experimental results in edge extraction for both binary and grey-scale transmissive objects. Binary edge extractionis achieved using morphological transformations, while grey-scale edge extraction is achieved using a threshold decomposition technique. Advantages and limitation of both techniques are identified.

  15. ONLINE MULTITASKING LINE-SCAN IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR SIMULTANEOUS SAFETY AND QUALITY EVALUATION OF APPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lab developed a push-broom, line-scan imaging system capable of simultaneous measurements of reflectance and fluorescence. The system allows multitasking inspections for quality and safety attributes of apples due to its dynamic capabilities in simultaneously capturing fluorescence and reflectan...

  16. CT scan range estimation using multiple body parts detection: let PACS learn the CT image content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunliang; Lundström, Claes

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient CT scan range estimation method that is based on the analysis of image data itself instead of metadata analysis. This makes it possible to quantitatively compare the scan range of two studies. In our study, 3D stacks are first projected to 2D coronal images via a ray casting-like process. Trained 2D body part classifiers are then used to recognize different body parts in the projected image. The detected candidate regions go into a structure grouping process to eliminate false-positive detections. Finally, the scale and position of the patient relative to the projected figure are estimated based on the detected body parts via a structural voting. The start and end lines of the CT scan are projected to a standard human figure. The position readout is normalized so that the bottom of the feet represents 0.0, and the top of the head is 1.0. Classifiers for 18 body parts were trained using 184 CT scans. The final application was tested on 136 randomly selected heterogeneous CT scans. Ground truth was generated by asking two human observers to mark the start and end positions of each scan on the standard human figure. When compared with the human observers, the mean absolute error of the proposed method is 1.2% (max: 3.5%) and 1.6% (max: 5.4%) for the start and end positions, respectively. We proposed a scan range estimation method using multiple body parts detection and relative structure position analysis. In our preliminary tests, the proposed method delivered promising results.

  17. Study of CT head scans using different voltages: image quality evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco de Freitas C, I.; Prata M, A. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Alonso, T. C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Santana, P., E-mail: iarapfcorrea@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem, Av. Prof. Alfredo Balena 190, 30130-100 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was introduced to medical practice in 1972. It generates images recognized by high diagnostic potential. CT allows investigation of structures in the human body inaccessible by conventional image methods, replacing invasive methods in many cases. Noise is a kind of variation of brightness observed on CT images, and it is inherent to this method. The magnitude of the noise is determined by the standard deviation of CT numbers of a region of interest in a homogeneous material. The aim of this study is to analyze the noise in head CT images generated by different acquisition protocols using four voltage values. Five different scans were performed using a female Alderson phantom and their images were analyzed with the RadiAnt software. With the average HU values and standard deviation of each scan, the values of noise were calculated in some region of interest. The obtained noise values were compared and it was observed that the 140 kV voltage promotes the in the lower noise in the image, resulting in better image quality. The results also show that the parameters, such as voltage and current, can be adjusted so that the noise can be decreased. Thus, acquisition protocols may be adapted to produce images with diagnostic quality and lower doses in patient. (Author)

  18. Mn Doping Effects on the Electronic Band Structure of PbS Quantum Dot Thin Films: A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Andrew J.; Rimal, Gaurab; Tang, Jinke; Chien, Teyu

    A thorough understanding of the phenomena associated with doping of transition metals in semiconductors is important for the development of semiconducting electronic technologies such as semiconducting quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSC). Manganese doping is of particular interest in a PbS QD as it is potentially capable of increasing overall QDSSC performance. Here we present scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies about the effects of Manganese doping on the energy band structures of PbS semiconducting QD thin films, grown using pulsed laser deposition. As a result of Manganese doping in the PbS QD thin films, a widening of the electronic band gap was observed, which is responsible for the observed increase in resistivity. Furthermore, a loss of long range periodicity observed by XRD, upon incorporation of Manganese, indicates that the Manganese dopants also induce a large amount of grain boundaries. This work was supported by the following: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, DEFG02-10ER46728 and the National Science Foundation Grant #0948027.

  19. A Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy Study on an Alloyed Topological Insulator, Bi1.5Sb0.5Te1.7Se1.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wonhee; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Hyo Won; Kwon, Hyeokshin; Oh, Youngtek; Kahng, Se-Jong; Park, Joonbum; Kim, Jun Sung; Hwang, Sung Woo; Suh, Hwansoo

    2015-03-01

    Efficient doping of topological insulators while protecting its topological nature is key ingredient to realize topological devices. Engineering the chemical potential in the alloyed compound Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey has been achieved by tuning its chemical composition. However, the effect of alloying in microscopic scale has not yet been fully investigated with local probes. Here we report on the atomic and electronic structures of Bi1.5Sb0.5Te1.7Se1.3 studied using scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). Although there is significant surface disorder due to the alloying of constituent atoms, cleaved surfaces of the crystals present a well-ordered hexagonal lattice in STM topographs with 1 nm high quintuple layer steps. STS results reflect the band structure and indicate that the surface state and Fermi energy are both located inside the energy gap. The surface states do not show any electron back-scattering; due to their topological nature they are extremely robust. Landau levels generated by perpendicular magnetic field follow the massless Dirac fermions. This finding demonstrates that alloying is a promising route for efficient doping of topological insulators whilst keeping the topological surface state intact.

  20. Laser-Combined Scanning Tunneling Microscopy on the Carrier Dynamics in Low-Temperature-Grown GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Terada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated carrier recombination dynamics in a low-temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure by laser-combined scanning tunneling microscopy, shaken-pulse-pair-excited STM (SPPX-STM. With the AlGaAs interlayer as a barrier against the flow of photocarriers, recombination lifetimes in LT-GaAs of 4.0 ps and GaAs of 4.8 ns were successfully observed separately. We directly demonstrated the high temporal resolution of SPPX-STM by showing the recombination lifetime of carriers in LT-GaAs (4.0 ps in the range of subpicosecond temporal resolution. In the carrier-lifetime-mapping measurement, a blurring of recombination lifetime up to 50 nm was observed at the LT-GaAs/AlGaAs boundary, which was discussed in consideration of the screening length of the electric field from the STM probe. The effect of the built-in potential on the signal, caused by the existence of LT-GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs boundaries, was discussed in detail.

  1. ALL-IN-ONE LASER SCANNING METHODS FOR SURVEYING, REPRESENTING AND SHARING INFORMATION ON ARCHAEOLOGY. VIA FLAMINIA AND THE FURLO TUNNEL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Clini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe the results of the laser scanner survey of an archaeological complex, aimed at knowledge, documentation and diagnostic operations to make premises secure. Archaeology has always been the most complex subject where the discipline of surveying is continually being put to the test and experimented with. The development in laser scanner technologies has led to an extremely important turning point in this field. Complex geometrical shapes or irregular surfaces, such as those in archaeology, are defined through surfaces that can be directly extrapolated from the point cloud with extremely high precision, allowing even the finest details to be mapped. The precision of this surveying technique together with the wide range of data that can be acquired and represented provide several opportunities for communication and investigation. This experimental work has concentrated on the Furlo tunnel complex, located along one of the most important infrastructural arteries from Roman antiquity, the Via Flaminia. The need in this case was to be able to acquire the entire rocky complex, extending the scan area as far as possible so as to assess the whole system in its entirety. The results of our metric and morphological survey provide an excellent basis for record the situation as it is today, so as to establish the initial temporal step to be used in future monitoring programmes. The accuracy of the survey allows static assessments and effective planning for future safety-oriented projects.

  2. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory investigations on molecular self-assembly of graphene on Ru(0 0 0 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Junjie; Zhang, Han-jie; Zhang, Yuxi; Cai, Yiliang; Bao, Shining; He, Pimo

    2016-03-01

    Investigations on the bottom-up fabrication of graphene with 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene as precursor on Ru(0 0 0 1) was carried out using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Upon annealing 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene overlayer on Ru(0 0 0 1) at 550 °C, the precursors dehydrogenated and coalesced into graphitized flakes, and subsequent annealing up to 600 °C results in complete graphene conversion. The migration behavior and close-packing morphology of precursors were captured during STM measurements, and DFT calculations indicated that the inter-molecular interaction is responsible for the accumulation and close-packing of the precursors. The noticeable increment in the dehydrogenation barrier from 1.27 eV for monomer adsorption to 1.62 eV for dimer adsorption is well consistent with the observed drastic reduction of the graphitization temperature at lower precursor coverage, suggesting the crucial influence of inter-molecular vdW interaction on the dehydrogenation process.

  3. Imaging of metal ion dissolution and electrodeposition by anodic stripping voltammetry-scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpuche-Aviles, Mario A; Baur, John E; Wipf, David O

    2008-05-15

    We have developed a new imaging method for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) employing fast-scan anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) to provide sensitive and selective imaging of multiple chemical species at interfaces immersed in solution. A rapid cyclic voltammetry scan (100 V/s) is used along with a short preconcentration time (300-750 ms) to allow images to be acquired in a normal SECM time frame. A Hg-Pt film electrode is developed having an equivalent Hg thickness of 40 nm that has good sensitivity at short preconcentration times and also retains thin-film behavior with high-speed voltammetric stripping. Fast-scan anodic stripping currents are shown to be linear for 1-100 microM of Pb (2+) and Cd (2+) solutions using a preconcentration time of 300 ms. SECM images showing the presence of Pb (2+) and Cd (2+) at concentrations as low as 1 microM are presented. In addition, a single ASV-SECM image is shown to produce unique concentration maps indicating Cd (2+) and Pb (2+), generated in situ from a corroding sample, while simultaneously detecting the depletion of O 2 at this sample. The transient voltammetric response at the film electrode is simulated and shows good agreement with the experimental behavior. We discuss the behavior of images and concentration profiles obtained with different imaging conditions and show that mass-transport limitations in the tip-substrate gap can induce dissolution. ASV-SECM can thus be used to detect and study induced dissolution not only at bulk metal surfaces but also on underpotential deposition layers, in this case Cd and Pb on Pt. In addition, we discuss how surface diffusion phenomena may relate to the observed ASV-SECM behavior.

  4. Imaging of whole tumor cut sections using a novel scanning beam confocal fluorescence MACROscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Paul; Vukovic, Vojislav; Haugland, Hans K.; Nicklee, Trudey; Hedley, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2001-07-01

    Hypoxia caused by inadequate structure and function of the tumor vasculature has been found to negatively determine the prognosis of cancer patients. Hence, understanding the biological basis of tumor hypoxia is of significant clinical interest. To study solid tumor microenvironments in sufficient detail, large areas (several mm in diameter) need to be imaged at micrometers resolutions. We have used a novel confocal scanning laser MACROscopeTM (CSLM) capable of acquiring images over fields of view up to 2 cm X 2 cm. To demonstrate its performance, frozen sections from a cervical carcinoma xenograft were triple labeled for tissue hypoxia, blood vessels and hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1 alpha (HIF-1(alpha) ), imaged using the CSLM and compared to images obtained using a standard epifluorescence microscope imaging system. The results indicate that the CSLM is a useful instrument for imaging tissue-based fluorescence at resolutions comparable to standard low-power microscope objectives.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of the Femoral Tunnel Position in Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung Leung Kwun

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: MPFL reconstruction with anatomic positioning of the femoral tunnel guided by intraoperative X-ray showed satisfactory accuracy in postoperative MRI results, indicating that a well-positioned MPFL graft results in better clinical outcomes.

  6. [A new laser scan system for video ophthalmoscopy. Initial clinical experiences also in relation to digital image processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, E; Mertz, M; Hofmann, H; Wertheimer, R; Foos, C

    1990-06-01

    The clinical advantages of a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) and video imaging of fundus pictures are described. Image quality (contrast, depth of field) and imaging possibilities (confocal stop) are assessed. Imaging with different lasers (argon, He-Ne) and changes in imaging rendered possible by confocal alignment of the imaging optics are discussed. Hard copies from video images are still of inferior quality compared to fundus photographs. Methods of direct processing and retrieval of digitally stored SLO video fundus images are illustrated by examples. Modifications for a definitive laser scanning system - in regard to the field of view and the quality of hard copies - are proposed.

  7. Clinical evaluation of synthetic aperture harmonic imaging for scanning focal malignant liver lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Hansen, Peter Møller

    2015-01-01

    interleaved using a commercialultrasound system (UltraView 800, BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark). Thirty-one patients with malignantfocal liver lesions (confirmed by biopsy or computed tomography/magnetic resonance) were scanned. Detectionof malignant focal liver lesions and preference of image quality were...... evaluated blinded off-line by eight radiologists.In total, 2,032 evaluations of 127 image sequences were completed. The sensitivity (77% SASB-THI, 76%DRF-THI, p 5 0.54) and specificity (71% SASB-THI, 72% DRF-THI, p 5 0.67) of detection of liver lesions andthe evaluation of image quality (p 5 0.63) did...

  8. Imaging plant nuclei and membrane-associated cytoskeleton by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišerová, Jindřiška; Goldberg, Martin W

    2014-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a powerful technique that can image exposed surfaces in 3D. Modern scanning electron microscopes, with field emission electron sources and in-lens specimen chambers, achieve resolutions of better than 0.5 nm and thus offer views of ultrastructural details of subcellular structures or even macromolecular complexes. Obtaining a reliable image is, however, dependent on sample preparation methods that robustly but accurately preserve biological structures. In plants, exposing the object of interest may be difficult due to the existence of a cell wall. This protocol shows how to isolate plant nuclei for SEM imaging of the nuclear envelope and associated structures from both sides of the nuclear envelope in cultured cells as well as in leaf or root cells. Further, it provides a method for uncovering membrane-associated cytoskeletal structures.

  9. Ribbon scanning confocal for high-speed high-resolution volume imaging of brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Watson

    Full Text Available Whole-brain imaging is becoming a fundamental means of experimental insight; however, achieving subcellular resolution imagery in a reasonable time window has not been possible. We describe the first application of multicolor ribbon scanning confocal methods to collect high-resolution volume images of chemically cleared brains. We demonstrate that ribbon scanning collects images over ten times faster than conventional high speed confocal systems but with equivalent spectral and spatial resolution. Further, using this technology, we reconstruct large volumes of mouse brain infected with encephalitic alphaviruses and demonstrate that regions of the brain with abundant viral replication were inaccessible to vascular perfusion. This reveals that the destruction or collapse of large regions of brain micro vasculature may contribute to the severe disease caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Visualization of this fundamental impact of infection would not be possible without sampling at subcellular resolution within large brain volumes.

  10. Single-body lensed-fiber scanning probe actuated by magnetic force for optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Eun Jung; Na, Jihoon; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2009-06-15

    We propose a fiber-based hand-held scanning probe suitable for the sample arm of an optical imaging system including optical coherence tomography. To achieve compactness, a single-body lensed-fiber and a solenoid actuator were utilized. The focusing lens of the probe was directly formed onto the distal end of a fiber, which eliminated the need for additional optical components and optical alignment. A ferromagnetic iron bead was glued onto the middle of the fiber to enable actuation by magnetic force, which allowed easy fabrication and good practicality. The fiber piece having the built-in fiber lens was forced to oscillate in its resonant frequency. With the implemented probe, optical coherence tomography images of a human fingertip and a pearl were obtained at an imaging speed of 30 frames/s over a scanning range of 4 mm.

  11. Evaluation of Yogurt Microstructure Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skytte, Jacob L; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F; Andersen, Ulf; Møller, Flemming; Dahl, Anders B; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-06-01

    The microstructure of protein networks in yogurts defines important physical properties of the yogurt and hereby partly its quality. Imaging this protein network using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) has shown good results, and CSLM has become a standard measuring technique for fermented dairy products. When studying such networks, hundreds of images can be obtained, and here image analysis methods are essential for using the images in statistical analysis. Previously, methods including gray level co-occurrence matrix analysis and fractal analysis have been used with success. However, a range of other image texture characterization methods exists. These methods describe an image by a frequency distribution of predefined image features (denoted textons). Our contribution is an investigation of the choice of image analysis methods by performing a comparative study of 7 major approaches to image texture description. Here, CSLM images from a yogurt fermentation study are investigated, where production factors including fat content, protein content, heat treatment, and incubation temperature are varied. The descriptors are evaluated through nearest neighbor classification, variance analysis, and cluster analysis. Our investigation suggests that the texton-based descriptors provide a fuller description of the images compared to gray-level co-occurrence matrix descriptors and fractal analysis, while still being as applicable and in some cases as easy to tune. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. SmartScan: a robust pushbroom imaging concept for moderate spacecraft attitude stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janschek, K.; Tchernykh, V.; Dyblenko, S.; Harnisch, B.

    2017-11-01

    Pushbroom scan cameras with linear image sensors, commonly used for Earth observation from satellites, require high attitude stability during the image acquisition. Especially noticeable are the effects of high frequency attitude variations originating from micro shocks and vibrations, produced by momentum and reaction wheels, mechanically activated coolers, steering and deployment mechanics and other reasons. The SMARTSCAN imaging concept offers high quality imaging even with moderate satellite attitude stability on a sole opto-electronic basis without any moving parts. It uses real-time recording of the actual image motion in the focal plane of the remote sensing camera during the frame acquisition and a posteriori correction of the obtained image distortions on base of the image motion record. Exceptional real-time performances with subpixel accuracy image motion measurement are provided by an innovative high-speed onboard optoelectronic correlation processor. SMARTSCAN allows therefore using smart pushbroom cameras for hyper-spectral imagers on satellites and platforms which are not specially intended for imaging missions, e.g. micro satellites. The paper gives an overview on the system concept and main technologies used (advanced optical correlator for ultra high-speed image motion tracking), it discusses the conceptual design for a smart compact space camera and it reports on airborne test results of a functional breadboard model.

  13. Learning-based scan plane identification from fetal head ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Annangi, Pavan; Gupta, Mithun; Yu, Bing; Padfield, Dirk; Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Krishnan, Kajoli

    2012-03-01

    Acquisition of a clinically acceptable scan plane is a pre-requisite for ultrasonic measurement of anatomical features from B-mode images. In obstetric ultrasound, measurement of gestational age predictors, such as biparietal diameter and head circumference, is performed at the level of the thalami and cavum septum pelucidi. In an accurate scan plane, the head can be modeled as an ellipse, the thalami looks like a butterfly, the cavum appears like an empty box and the falx is a straight line along the major axis of a symmetric ellipse inclined either parallel to or at small angles to the probe surface. Arriving at the correct probe placement on the mother's belly to obtain an accurate scan plane is a task of considerable challenge especially for a new user of ultrasound. In this work, we present a novel automated learning-based algorithm to identify an acceptable fetal head scan plane. We divide the problem into cranium detection and a template matching to capture the composite "butterfly" structure present inside the head, which mimics the visual cues used by an expert. The algorithm uses the stateof- the-art Active Appearance Models techniques from the image processing and computer vision literature and tie them to presence or absence of the inclusions within the head to automatically compute a score to represent the goodness of a scan plane. This automated technique can be potentially used to train and aid new users of ultrasound.

  14. Secret shared multiple-image encryption based on row scanning compressive ghost imaging and phase retrieval in the Fresnel domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianye; Meng, Xiangfeng; Wang, Yurong; Yang, Xiulun; Yin, Yongkai; Peng, Xiang; He, Wenqi; Dong, Guoyan; Chen, Hongyi

    2017-09-01

    A multiple-image encryption method is proposed that is based on row scanning compressive ghost imaging, (t, n) threshold secret sharing, and phase retrieval in the Fresnel domain. In the encryption process, after wavelet transform and Arnold transform of the target image, the ciphertext matrix can be first detected using a bucket detector. Based on a (t, n) threshold secret sharing algorithm, the measurement key used in the row scanning compressive ghost imaging can be decomposed and shared into two pairs of sub-keys, which are then reconstructed using two phase-only mask (POM) keys with fixed pixel values, placed in the input plane and transform plane 2 of the phase retrieval scheme, respectively; and the other POM key in the transform plane 1 can be generated and updated by the iterative encoding of each plaintext image. In each iteration, the target image acts as the input amplitude constraint in the input plane. During decryption, each plaintext image possessing all the correct keys can be successfully decrypted by measurement key regeneration, compression algorithm reconstruction, inverse wavelet transformation, and Fresnel transformation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations both verify the feasibility of the proposed method.

  15. Image scanning fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on a detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Liu, S; Liu, D; Sun, S; Kuang, C; Ding, Z; Liu, X

    2017-06-01

    We propose a novel imaging method that enables the enhancement of three-dimensional resolution of confocal microscopy significantly and achieve experimentally a new fluorescence emission difference method for the first time, based on the parallel detection with a detector array. Following the principles of photon reassignment in image scanning microscopy, images captured by the detector array were arranged. And by selecting appropriate reassign patterns, the imaging result with enhanced resolution can be achieved with the method of fluorescence emission difference. Two specific methods are proposed in this paper, showing that the difference between an image scanning microscopy image and a confocal image will achieve an improvement of transverse resolution by approximately 43% compared with that in confocal microscopy, and the axial resolution can also be enhanced by at least 22% experimentally and 35% theoretically. Moreover, the methods presented in this paper can improve the lateral resolution by around 10% than fluorescence emission difference and 15% than Airyscan. The mechanism of our methods is verified by numerical simulations and experimental results, and it has significant potential in biomedical applications. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. ANALYSIS OF MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA AND MULTI-VIEW IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Briese

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The combination of laser scanning (LS, active, direct 3D measurement of the object surface and photogrammetry (high geometric and radiometric resolution is widely applied for object reconstruction (e.g. architecture, topography, monitoring, archaeology. Usually the results are a coloured point cloud or a textured mesh. The geometry is typically generated from the laser scanning point cloud and the radiometric information is the result of image acquisition. In the last years, next to significant developments in static (terrestrial LS and kinematic LS (airborne and mobile LS hardware and software, research in computer vision and photogrammetry lead to advanced automated procedures in image orientation and image matching. These methods allow a highly automated generation of 3D geometry just based on image data. Founded on advanced feature detector techniques (like SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform very robust techniques for image orientation were established (cf. Bundler. In a subsequent step, dense multi-view stereo reconstruction algorithms allow the generation of very dense 3D point clouds that represent the scene geometry (cf. Patch-based Multi-View Stereo (PMVS2. Within this paper the usage of mobile laser scanning (MLS and simultaneously acquired image data for an advanced integrated scene reconstruction is studied. For the analysis the geometry of a scene is generated by both techniques independently. Then, the paper focuses on the quality assessment of both techniques. This includes a quality analysis of the individual surface models and a comparison of the direct georeferencing of the images using positional and orientation data of the on board GNSS-INS system and the indirect georeferencing of the imagery by automatic image orientation. For the practical evaluation a dataset from an archaeological monument is utilised. Based on the gained knowledge a discussion of the results is provided and a future strategy for the integration of

  17. Simulation of inelastic electronic tunneling spectra of adsorbates from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hao; Yang, Jinlong; Luo, Yi

    2009-04-01

    We present first-principles simulations for inelastic electron tunneling spectra of molecules adsorbed on metal surface as measured in scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. Both elastic and inelastic tunneling processes are modeled in terms of Tersoff-Hamann approximation with a full vibration analysis at density functional theory levels. The calculated spectra of carbon oxide and acetylene molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) surface have well reproduced their experimental counterparts. The inelastic electron tunneling images of the observable vibration modes have been provided. The performance of gradient-corrected density functional is compared with that of local density functional.

  18. Simulation of inelastic electronic tunneling spectra of adsorbates from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hao; Yang, Jinlong; Luo, Yi

    2009-04-07

    We present first-principles simulations for inelastic electron tunneling spectra of molecules adsorbed on metal surface as measured in scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. Both elastic and inelastic tunneling processes are modeled in terms of Tersoff-Hamann approximation with a full vibration analysis at density functional theory levels. The calculated spectra of carbon oxide and acetylene molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) surface have well reproduced their experimental counterparts. The inelastic electron tunneling images of the observable vibration modes have been provided. The performance of gradient-corrected density functional is compared with that of local density functional.

  19. Compact MEMS-driven pyramidal polygon reflector for circumferential scanned endoscopic imaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Zhou, Guangya; Yu, Hongbin; Du, Yu; Feng, Hanhua; Tsai, Julius Ming Lin; Chau, Fook Siong

    2012-03-12

    A novel prototype of an electrothermal chevron-beam actuator based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) platform has been successfully developed for circumferential scan. Microassembly technology is utilized to construct this platform, which consists of a MEMS chevron-beam type microactuator and a micro-reflector. The proposed electrothermal microactuators with a two-stage electrothermal cascaded chevron-beam driving mechanism provide displacement amplification, thus enabling a highly reflective micro-pyramidal polygon reflector to rotate a large angle for light beam scanning. This MEMS platform is ultra-compact, supports circumferential imaging capability and is suitable for endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) applications, for example, for intravascular cancer detection.

  20. Image Interpolation via Scanning Line Algorithm and Discontinuous B-Spline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-ming Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Image interpolation is a basic operation in image processing. Lots of methods have been proposed, including convolution-based methods, edge modeling methods, point spread function (PSF-based methods or learning-based methods. Most of them, however, present a high computational complexity and are not suitable for real time applications. However, fast methods are not able to provide artifacts-free images. In this paper we describe a new image interpolation method by using scanning line algorithm which can generate C - 1 curves or surfaces. The C - 1 interpolation can truncate the interpolation curve at big skipping; hence, the image edge can be kept. Numerical experiments illustrate the efficiency of the novel method.