WorldWideScience

Sample records for scanning proton microprobe

  1. Elemental maps of Amoeba proteus by a scanning proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Minqian; Zhu Jieqing; Huang Zeqi (Shanghai Inst. of Nuclear Research, Academia Sinica, SH (China)); Zhu Jingde; Zhou Zheng; Zhou Weiying (Shanghai Inst. of Cell Biology, Academia Sinica, SH (China)); Cholewa, M.; Legge, G.J.F. (Micro Analytical Research Centre, Univ. of Melbourne, School of Physics, Parkville (Australia))

    1991-03-01

    Elemental maps for P, S, Cl, K, Ca and Zn of individual Amoeba proteus were obtained with the Melbourne scanning proton microprobe. The emphasis was put on the relationship of both distribution and concentration of Zn within the cell and the growth inhibitory effect of higher Zn concentrations in the culture medium. At a concentration of 0.04 mmol ZnCl{sub 2}. Amoeba growth was inhibited. But at a concentration of 0.0016 mmol, the Amoeba grew as well as a control grown without addition of Zn. We found that in the former (0.04 mmol) Zn concentrated three times more than in the latter (0.0016 mmol), and also that Zn was enriched much more in the nucleus and endoplasm (five to six times) than in other parts of the cell (two times). Future work along these lines may provide insight into the mechanism by which Zn affects the growth of Amoeba proteus and other cells. (orig.).

  2. A study of aluminium-exposed fish using a scanning proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholewa, M.; Legge, G.L.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Eeckhaoudt, S.; Van Grieken, R. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium)

    1993-12-31

    A major problem has arisen in Europe with the depopulation of fresh water fish in lakes and streams collecting acid rain. The sensitivity to acidification is species specific and appears to be associated with metal levels. The Scanning Proton Microprobe (SPMP) at the Micro Analytical Research Centre of the University of Melbourne was used to study the subcellular distribution of aluminium and other elements in the gills of fish exposed to acidified water with elevated Al-levels. Experiments were performed on thin sections taken from fish exposed to media with different pH and aluminium concentration. Aluminium was found on the surface of the gill lamellae, but also inside the tissue. Bulk analysis of the gills showed much higher concentrations in the aluminium-exposed fish, compared to the control ones, but no information regarding the actual accumulation sites can be inferred. Extensive study of damage done to the sample by intense proton beams during elemental analysis was performed with scanning transmission ion microscopy. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  3. An analysis of the optics of a field ionization ion source for application with a scanning proton microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, R. A.; Allan, G. L.; Legge, G. J. F.

    1992-12-01

    This article analyzes a field ionization source for use within a pelletron accelerator which provides the primary beam for a scanning proton microprobe. The charge simulation method is used to calculate the electrostatic field, and ray tracing is used to determine optical properties. Current characteristics are taken from experimental results. Gaussian properties indicate an effective source radius of below 10-3 μm at low angles. Chromatic aberration is calculated by perturbing initial particle energies, then tracing back from field-free trajectories. Calculations indicate that at typical source voltages, the beam is never chromatically limited. Spherical aberration is also calculated and the source is found to be spherically limited above a divergence of approximately 0.1 rad. Finally, calculations indicate that a brightness of 106 A m-2 rad-2 V-1 is achieved by the source producing 150 pA of current at a tip electric field of 25 V/nm.

  4. A new Krakow scanning nuclear microprobe performance tests and early application experienc

    CERN Document Server

    Lebed, S; Polak, W; Potempa, A W; Stachura, Z; Paszkowski, M

    2001-01-01

    A new scanning nuclear microprobe (MP) with a short-length probe forming system was designed,installed and tested at the 3MV Van de Graaff accelerator in Krakow.The MP resolution of 3.3 mu m was reached for 2.4 MeV proton beam in the high-current mode (>= 100pA).The MP facility provides a local,non-destructive,quantitative elemental microanalysis using a Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique.As example of possible application an analysis of a geological sample containing monazite crystals investigated by PIXE method is presented.

  5. Proton microprobe study of tin-polymetallic deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murao, S. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1996-12-31

    Tin-polymetallic vein type deposits are a complex mixture of cassiterite and sulfides and they are the main source of technologically important rare metals such as indium and bismuth. Constituent minerals are usually fine grained having wide range of chemical composition and often the elements of interest occur as trace elements not amenable to electron microprobe analysis. PIXE with a proton microprobe can be an effective tool to study such deposits by delineating the distribution of trace elements among carrier minerals. Two representative indium-bearing deposits of tin- polymetallic type, Tosham of India (Cu-ln-Bi-Sn-W-Ag), and Mount Pleasant of Canada (Zn-Cu-In-Bi-Sn-W), were studied to delineate the distribution of medical/high-tech rare metals and to examine the effectiveness of the proton probe analysis of such ore. One of the results of the study indicated that indium and bismuth are present in chalcopyrite in the deposits. In addition to these important rare metals, zinc, copper, arsenic, antimony, selenium, and tin are common in chalcopyrite and pyrite. Arsenopyrite contains nickel, copper, zinc, silver, tin, antimony and bismuth. In chalcopyrite and pyrite, zinc, arsenic, indium, bismuth and lead are richer in Mount Pleasant ore, but silver is higher at Tosham. Also thallium and gold were found only in Tosham pyrite. The Tosham deposit is related to S-type granite, while Mount Pleasant to A-type. It appears that petrographic character of the source magma is one of the factors to determine the trace element distribution in tin-polymetallic deposit. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  6. The design of the 300 MeV proton microprobe system in Harbin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yanxin; Jamieson, David N.; Liu, Jianli; Lv, Kun; Li, Liyi

    2017-08-01

    In Harbin, a 300 MeV proton microprobe system is under development for many applications in space science studies including upset studies in microelectronic devices, radiation hardness of materials for satellites and radiation effects in human tissues. The microprobe system, as a component of Space Environment Simulation Research Infrastructure (SESRI), will employ a purpose-built synchrotron to provide the proton beam. Our design goal for the 300 MeV proton microprobe is for energy spread 0.1%, emittance 10π mm mrad, intensity 109 per pulse and a probe size of 10 μm. A magnetic quadrupole lens system will be used to focus the microprobe with a demagnification of 50. This paper presents a systematic investigation of the ion beam optics to optimize the design. The feasibility of the design for the Harbin system is evaluated by comparison with existing microprobe systems designed for high energy ions.

  7. Scanning deep level transient spectroscopy using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laird, J.S.; Bardos, R.A.; Saint, A.; Moloney, G.M.; Legge, G.F.J. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Traditionally the scanning ion microprobe has given little or no information regarding the electronic structure of materials in particular semiconductors. A new imaging technique called Scanning Ion Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (SIDLTS) is presented which is able to spatially map alterations in the band gap structure of materials by lattice defects or impurities. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Focussed ion beam lithography using a MeV proton beam microprobe for microoptics fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, L.M.; Roberts, A.; Jamieson, D.N.; Saint, A.

    1995-10-01

    Deep, high-aspect ratio trenches have been fabricated in the resist polymethyl methacrylate by exposure to a focussed beam of MeV protons followed by development. The depth of the trenches depends on the energy of the protons and simulations suggest that this can be up to 300 {mu}m. The University of Melbourne Microprobe is capable of producing a focussed spot size of the order of a few microns. This opens up the possibility of fabrication extremely high-aspect ratio microstructures for use as optical components. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  9. The non-destructive analysis of fluid inclusions in minerals using the proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, C.G.; Van Achterbergy, E. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Heinrich, C.A. [ETH Zentrum, Zurich, (Switzerland). Department Erdwissenschaften; Mernagh, T.P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany); Zaw, K. [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The study of ore forming fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals is the key to understanding fluid flow paths at the time of ore formation and to predicting the location of ore bodies within large-scale magmatic hydrothermal systems. The large penetration depths and the predictable nature of MeV proton trajectories and X-ray absorption enables reliable modelling of PIXE yields and the development of standardless quantitative analytical methods. This permits quantitative microanalysis of minerals at ppm levels, and more recently has enabled the development of methods for quantitative trace-element imaging and the quantitative, non-destructive analysis of individual fluid inclusions. This paper reports on recent developments in Proton Microprobe techniques with special emphasis on ore systems and fluid inclusion analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Millimeter length micromachining using a heavy ion nuclear microprobe with standard magnetic scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesprías, F. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Debray, M.E., E-mail: debray@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología. Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martín, M. De Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Davidson, J. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, A.J. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología. Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martín, M. De Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-04-01

    In order to increase the scanning length of our microprobe, we have developed an irradiation procedure suitable for use in any nuclear microprobe, extending at least up to 400% the length of our heavy ion direct writing facility using standard magnetic exploration. Although this method is limited to patterns of a few millimeters in only one direction, it is useful for the manufacture of curved waveguides, optical devices such Mach–Zehnder modulators, directional couplers as well as channels for micro-fluidic applications. As an example, this technique was applied to the fabrication of 3 mm 3D-Mach–Zehnder modulators in lithium niobate with short Y input/output branches and long shaped parallel-capacitor control electrodes. To extend and improve the quality of the machined structures we developed new scanning control software in LabView™ platform. The new code supports an external dose normalization, electrostatic beam blanking and is capable of scanning figures at 16 bit resolution using a National Instruments™ PCI-6731 High-Speed I/O card. A deep and vertical micromachining process using swift {sup 35}Cl ions 70 MeV bombarding energy and direct write patterning was performed on LiNbO{sub 3}, a material which exhibits a strong natural anisotropy to conventional etching. The micromachined structures show the feasibility of this method for manufacturing micro-fluidic channels as well.

  11. Trace element partitioning between aqueous fluids and silicate melts measured with a proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, J.; Green, T.H. [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde, NSW (Australia). School of Earth Sciences; Sie, S.H. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1996-12-31

    A series of experiments were performed to examine the capacity of H{sub 2}O-fluids to concentrate and transport incompatible elements through peridotitic mantle and metamorphosed (eclogitic) ocean crust. Two naturally occurring rock compositions, trondhjemitic and basanitic, were used in experiments. The proton microprobe was used to determine the trace element concentrations in the solutes from H{sub 2}O-fluids equilibrated at 900-1100 degree C, 2.0 GPa with water saturated melts of trondhjemitic and basanitic compositions. Partitioning data for H{sub 2}O-fluids and silicate melts show that H{sub 2}O-fluids equilibrated with mantle peridotites will not be strongly enriched in trace elements relative to their wallrocks, and thus they melts do not strongly concentrate alkaline earths Th and U, relative to high-field strength elements. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  12. A new method for true quantitative elemental imaging using PIXE and the proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, C.G. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Churms, C.L.; Pilcher, J.V. [National Accelerator Centre, Faure (South Africa)

    1993-12-31

    Traditional methods for X-ray imaging using PIXE and the Proton Microprobe have used a simple gate set on an X-ray peak in a spectrum from a Si(Li) detector to provide an image of the distribution of an element. This method can produce artefacts in images, due to overlapping X-ray lines from interfering elements, charge collection tails on peaks, background variation, Si escape peaks and pileup, all of which can render images misleading or qualitative at best. To address this problem, a matrix transform method has been developed at the CSIRO which not only eliminates most artefacts, but can be implemented on-line. The method has been applied to study trace gold distribution in a complex gold bearing ore from Fiji , and more recently has been installed for direct on-line elemental imaging at the NAC in South Africa. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Fluid catalytic cracking catalyst microstructure as determined by a scanning ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, J. K.; Koermer, G. S.; Macaoay, J. M.; Chabala, J. M.; Levi-Setti, R.

    1992-02-01

    Zeolite and matrix phases are observed in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) elemental maps of fluid cracking catalyst microspheres prepared by the in-situ zeolite growth procedure. Digitized high lateral resolution (≈50 nm) analytical SIMS images were obtained with a scanning ion microprobe, and zeolite, matrix and precipitate image subareas were identified and analyzed retrospectively. Zeolite Y regions are differentiated from the calcined aluminosilicate matrix in catalyst microspheres by differences in their silicon and aluminum secondary ion yields. Sodium ion maps show that intrinsic and added sodium counter ions are associated predominantly with the zeolites in non-steamed samples. Catalyst steaming promotes zeolite debris formation and causes sodium repartitioning between the zeolite and matrix phases, increasing sodium concentration in the matrix. The data demonstrate the capabilities of high-resolution imaging SIMS studies of these materials and suggest further investigations of zeolite counter ion migration.

  14. Highly reproducible laser beam scanning device for an internal source laser desorption microprobe Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (˜5 μm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ˜9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  15. An investigation of the optics of an accelerating column for use with a high brightness ion source and a proton microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, R. A.; Legge, G. J. F.

    1993-04-01

    The accelerating column of a 5U Pelletron accelerator is analysed in this paper. This accelerator provides the primary beam for the Melbourne Scanning Proton Microprobe. The finite element method is used to calculate the electrostatic field in the accelerator column, and optical properties are extracted from ray tracing. Gaussian properties are presented which specify object location for the column to produce an exit plane focus for five and three accelerating elements. Column acceptance is discussed and found to match emittance for all practical configurations. Chromatic and spherical aberrations are calculated for the column for a range of image distances and for five and three accelerating elements. The optical combination of the column with an ion source lens and a high brightness ion source is discussed. The contribution of the column is found to be principally dependent on the magnification and accelerating voltage of the lens. Where very low currents are required from the accelerator, beam brightness is limited by chromatic aberration, and for very low divergences by diffraction. At such currents the high brightness phase space "core" of the beam may be degraded by chromatic aberration in the accelerating column if the ion source lens magnification is low, or the lens acceleration is particularly high. Where high currents are required (for example above 100 pA), beam divergence angles are higher, and the brightness is no longer chromatically or diffraction limited. Under these circumstances, accelerating column aberrations will not degrade beam brightness.

  16. Electron Microprobe

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The JEOL JXA-8600 is a conventional hairpin filament thermal emission electron microprobe that is more than 20 years old. It is capable of performing qualitative and...

  17. Physical design of scanning gantry for proton therapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yi; Guan, Xia-Ling; Satogata, Todd; Fang, Shou-Xian; Wei, Jie; Tang, Jing-Yu; Chen, Yuan; Qiu, Jing; Shu, Hang

    2010-03-01

    A proton therapy facility based on a linac injector and a slow cycling synchrotron is proposed. To achieve effective treatment of cancer, a scanning gantry is required. The flexible transmission of beam and high beam position accuracy are the most basic requirements for a gantry. The designed gantry optics and scanning system are presented. Great efforts are put into studying the sensitivity of the beam position in the isocenter to the element misalignments. It shows that quadrupole shift makes the largest contribution and special attention should be paid to it.

  18. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J.; Mautner, M. N.; Barry, B.; Markwitz, A.

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  19. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, J. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)]. E-mail: j.kennedy@gns.cri.nz; Mautner, M.N. [Soil, Plant and Ecological Sciences Division, Lincoln University (New Zealand) and Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8001 (New Zealand)]. E-mail: m.mautner@solis1.com; Barry, B. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Markwitz, A. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2007-07-15

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  20. Spot-Scanning Proton Arc (SPArc) Therapy: The First Robust and Delivery-Efficient Spot-Scanning Proton Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng, E-mail: Xuanfeng.ding@beaumont.org; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, J. Michele; Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Stevens, Craig; Yan, Di

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To present a novel robust and delivery-efficient spot-scanning proton arc (SPArc) therapy technique. Methods and Materials: A SPArc optimization algorithm was developed that integrates control point resampling, energy layer redistribution, energy layer filtration, and energy layer resampling. The feasibility of such a technique was evaluated using sample patients: 1 patient with locally advanced head and neck oropharyngeal cancer with bilateral lymph node coverage, and 1 with a nonmobile lung cancer. Plan quality, robustness, and total estimated delivery time were compared with the robust optimized multifield step-and-shoot arc plan without SPArc optimization (Arc{sub multi-field}) and the standard robust optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan. Dose-volume histograms of target and organs at risk were analyzed, taking into account the setup and range uncertainties. Total delivery time was calculated on the basis of a 360° gantry room with 1 revolutions per minute gantry rotation speed, 2-millisecond spot switching time, 1-nA beam current, 0.01 minimum spot monitor unit, and energy layer switching time of 0.5 to 4 seconds. Results: The SPArc plan showed potential dosimetric advantages for both clinical sample cases. Compared with IMPT, SPArc delivered 8% and 14% less integral dose for oropharyngeal and lung cancer cases, respectively. Furthermore, evaluating the lung cancer plan compared with IMPT, it was evident that the maximum skin dose, the mean lung dose, and the maximum dose to ribs were reduced by 60%, 15%, and 35%, respectively, whereas the conformity index was improved from 7.6 (IMPT) to 4.0 (SPArc). The total treatment delivery time for lung and oropharyngeal cancer patients was reduced by 55% to 60% and 56% to 67%, respectively, when compared with Arc{sub multi-field} plans. Conclusion: The SPArc plan is the first robust and delivery-efficient proton spot-scanning arc therapy technique, which could potentially be implemented

  1. Contour scanning for penumbra improvement in pencil beam scanned proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, G.; Leiser, D.; Besson, R.; Mayor, A.; Safai, S.; Weber, D. C.; Lomax, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    Proton therapy, especially in the form of pencil beam scanning (PBS), allows for the delivery of highly conformal dose distributions for complex tumor geometries. However, due to scattering of protons inside the patient, lateral dose gradients cannot be arbitrarily steep, which is of importance in cases with organs at risk (OARs) in close proximity to, or overlapping with, planning target volumes (PTVs). In the PBS approach, physical pencil beams are planned using a regular grid orthogonal to the beam direction. In this work, we propose an alternative to this commonly used approach where pencil beams are placed on an irregular grid along concentric paths based on the target contour. Contour driven pencil beam placement is expected to improve dose confirmation by allowing the optimizer to best enhance the penumbra of irregularly shaped targets using edge enhancement. Its effectiveness has been shown to improve dose confirmation to the target volume and reduce doses to OARs in head-and-neck planning studies. Furthermore, the deliverability of such plans, as well as the dosimetric improvements over conventional grid-based plans, have been confirmed in first phantom based verifications.

  2. Electron microprobe petrochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael; Jercinovic, Michael; Mahan, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    Petrochronology involves the incorporation of chronometer phases into the petrologic (and tectonic) evolution of their host rocks, such that direct age constraints can be placed on petrologic and structural processes. The electron microprobe has a central and critical role to play in establishing the linkage between chronometer phases and their host assemblage. In addition to characterizing the composition of the major silicate phases, the probe can be used to locate and map compositional zonation in accessory phases including chronometers such as monazite, xenotime, zircon, titanite, etc. One particularly effective technique for integrating petrology and geochronology is to combine high-resolution images of chronometer phases with large-scale images of polished sections. Chronometers can be evaluated in the context of their local compositional environment. This has proven to be useful for placing the chronometer domains within the reaction history of the host rock. Key chronometer domains, once selected, can be dated by the most appropriate tool, or by multiple techniques. For relatively old or small domains in monazite or xenotime, EPMA can provide precise age constraints. However, the analysis strategy must be designed as a trace element analysis from the beginning. Unlike major element analysis, background analysis is both critical and challenging, and new methodology is required, currently either wavelength scanning or multipoint analysis. Errors on the order of 2% are possible with standard instruments, and errors of 1% or better can be achieved with optimized instruments. Future improvements in electron microprobe hardware, software, and procedures will further enhance EPMA characterization of chronometer phases and petrochronological relationships. New thermodynamic modeling and experimental data will increasingly allow accessory chronometer phases to be integrated in petrological calculations and render petrochronology a routine part of petrologic analysis.

  3. Deformable motion reconstruction for scanned proton beam therapy using on-line x-ray imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ye; Knopf, A; Tanner, Colby; Boye, Dirk; Lomax, Antony J.

    2013-01-01

    Organ motion is a major problem for any dynamic radiotherapy delivery technique, and is particularly so for spot scanned proton therapy. On the other hand, the use of narrow, magnetically deflected proton pencil beams is potentially an ideal delivery technique for tracking tumour motion on-line. At

  4. Optimization, Characterization and Commissioning of a Novel Uniform Scanning Proton Beam Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Anthony Edward

    Purpose: To develop and characterize the required detectors for uniform scanning optimization and characterization, and to develop the methodology and assess their efficacy for optimizing, characterizing and commissioning a novel proton beam uniform scanning system. Methods and Materials: The Multi Layer Ion Chamber (MLIC), a 1D array of vented parallel plate ion chambers, was developed in-house for measurement of longitudinal profiles. The Matrixx detector (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) and XOmat V film (Kodak, USA) were characterized for measurement of transverse profiles. The architecture of the uniform scanning system was developed and then optimized and characterized for clinical proton radiotherapy. Results: The MLIC detector significantly increased data collection efficiency without sacrificing data quality. The MLIC was capable of integrating an entire scanned and layer stacked proton field with one measurement, producing results with the equivalent spatial sampling of 1.0mm. The Matrixx detector and modified 1D water phantom jig improved data acquisition efficiency and complemented the film measurements. The proximal, central and distal proton field planes were measured using these methods, yielding better than 3% uniformity. The binary range modulator was programmed, optimized and characterized such that the proton field ranges were separated by approximately 5.0mm modulation width and delivered with an accuracy of 1.0mm in water. Several wobbling magnet scan patterns were evaluated and the raster pattern, spot spacing, scan amplitude and overscan margin were optimized for clinical use. Conclusion: Novel detectors and methods are required for clinically efficient optimization and characterization of proton beam scanning systems. Uniform scanning produces proton beam fields that are suited for clinical proton radiotherapy.

  5. Positron annihilation microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canter, K.F. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Advances in positron annihilation microprobe development are reviewed. The present resolution achievable is 3 {mu}m. The ultimate resolution is expected to be 0.1 {mu}m which will enable the positron microprobe to be a valuable tool in the development of 0.1 {mu}m scale electronic devices in the future. (author)

  6. Vernier Scan Results from the First RHIC Proton Run at 250 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Drees, Angelika

    2010-01-01

    Using the Vernier scan or Van der Meer scan technique, where one beam is swept stepwise transversely across the other while measuring the collision rate as a function of beam displacement, the transverse beam profiles, the luminosity and the effective cross section of the detector in question can be measured. This report briefly recalls the vernier scan technique and presents results from the first RHIC polarized proton run at 250GeV per beam in 2009

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary neutron dose for scanning proton therapy using FLUKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chaeyeong; Lee, Sangmin; Lee, Seung-Jae; Song, Hankyeol; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Cho, Sungkoo; Jo, Kwanghyun; Han, Youngyih; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung

    2017-01-01

    Proton therapy is a rapidly progressing field for cancer treatment. Globally, many proton therapy facilities are being commissioned or under construction. Secondary neutrons are an important issue during the commissioning process of a proton therapy facility. The purpose of this study is to model and validate scanning nozzles of proton therapy at Samsung Medical Center (SMC) by Monte Carlo simulation for beam commissioning. After the commissioning, a secondary neutron ambient dose from proton scanning nozzle (Gantry 1) was simulated and measured. This simulation was performed to evaluate beam properties such as percent depth dose curve, Bragg peak, and distal fall-off, so that they could be verified with measured data. Using the validated beam nozzle, the secondary neutron ambient dose was simulated and then compared with the measured ambient dose from Gantry 1. We calculated secondary neutron dose at several different points. We demonstrated the validity modeling a proton scanning nozzle system to evaluate various parameters using FLUKA. The measured secondary neutron ambient dose showed a similar tendency with the simulation result. This work will increase the knowledge necessary for the development of radiation safety technology in medical particle accelerators.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary neutron dose for scanning proton therapy using FLUKA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaeyeong Lee

    Full Text Available Proton therapy is a rapidly progressing field for cancer treatment. Globally, many proton therapy facilities are being commissioned or under construction. Secondary neutrons are an important issue during the commissioning process of a proton therapy facility. The purpose of this study is to model and validate scanning nozzles of proton therapy at Samsung Medical Center (SMC by Monte Carlo simulation for beam commissioning. After the commissioning, a secondary neutron ambient dose from proton scanning nozzle (Gantry 1 was simulated and measured. This simulation was performed to evaluate beam properties such as percent depth dose curve, Bragg peak, and distal fall-off, so that they could be verified with measured data. Using the validated beam nozzle, the secondary neutron ambient dose was simulated and then compared with the measured ambient dose from Gantry 1. We calculated secondary neutron dose at several different points. We demonstrated the validity modeling a proton scanning nozzle system to evaluate various parameters using FLUKA. The measured secondary neutron ambient dose showed a similar tendency with the simulation result. This work will increase the knowledge necessary for the development of radiation safety technology in medical particle accelerators.

  9. SU-F-T-173: One-Scan Protocol: Verifying the Delivery of Spot-Scanning Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, M; Li, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Basking Ridge, NJ (United States); Chen, C; Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Tang, X [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, West Harrison, NY (United States); Li, X [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Rockville Centre, NY (United States); Tang, G [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Radiochromic film for spot-scanning QA provides high spatial resolution and efficiency gains from one-shot irradiation for multiple depths. However, calibration can be a tedious procedure which may limit widespread use. Moreover, since there may be an energy dependence, which manifests as a depth dependence, this may require additional measurements for each patient. We present a one-scan protocol to simplify the procedure. Methods: We performed the calibration using an EBT3 film at depths of 18, 20, 24cm of Plastic Water exposed by a 6-level step-wedge plan on a Proteus Plus proton system (IBA, Belgium). The calibration doses ranged 65–250 cGy(RBE) for proton energies of 170–200MeV. A clinical prostate+nodes plan was used for validation. The planar doses at selected depths were measured with EBT3 films and analyzed using one-scan protocol (one-scan digitization of QA film and at least one film exposed to known dose). The Gamma passing rates, dose-difference maps, and profiles of 2D planar doses measured with EBT3 film, IBA MatriXX PT, versus TPS calculations were analyzed and compared. Results: The EBT3 film measurement results matched well with the TPS calculation data with an average passing rate of ∼95% for 2%/2mm and slightly lower passing rates were obtained from an ion chamber array detector. We were able to demonstrate that the use of a proton step-wedge provided clinically acceptable results and minimized variations between film-scanner orientation, inter-scan, and scanning conditions. Furthermore, it could be derived from no more than two films exposed to known doses (one could be zero) for rescaling the master calibration curve at each depth. Conclusion: The use of a proton step-wedge for calibration of EBT3 film increases efficiency. The sensitivity of the calibration to depth variations has been explored. One-scan protocol results appear to be comparable to that of the ion chamber array detector. One author has a research grant from

  10. Eddy current analysis and optimization of fast scanning magnet for a proton therapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Qin, Bin; Liu, Kaifeng; Chen, Wei; Liang, Zhikai; Chen, Qushan; Chen, Dezhi; Fan, Mingwu

    2017-08-01

    Proton therapy is now recognized as one of the most effective radiation therapy methods for cancers. A proton therapy facility with multiple gantry treatment rooms is under development in HUST (Huazhong University of Science and Technology), which is based on isochronous superconducting cyclotron scheme. In the beam line, the scanning system spreads out the proton beam on the target according to the complex tumour shape by two scanning magnets for horizontal and vertical scanning independently. Since these two magnets are excited by alternating currents and the maximum repetition frequency is up to 100 Hz, eddy currents and losses are expected to be significant. Slits are proven to be an effective way to reduce the eddy currents. To evaluate the heat distribution due to eddy losses in the pole end of the scanning magnet, the transient electromagnetic analysis and steady-state thermal analysis are performed. This paper describes design considerations of the scanning system and mainly analyses the eddy current effect of the scanning magnets. Different coil shapes and slit arrangements are simulated and compared to obtain the optimal configuration. The maximum temperatures of two magnets are optimized below 70 °C. In addition, the lag effect due to eddy currents is also discussed.

  11. A design of a compact gantry for proton therapy with 2D-scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrenken, H.; Schuitema, R.; Dermois, O.C.; Schippers, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A compact gantry (3 m radius) for proton therapy in which a so-called ''pencil" beam scans a 30 x 30 cm(2) surface, has been designed. The advantages of this gantry are its small size and the bet that no mechanical movements of magnets or patient couch are necessary to accomplish the two-dimensional

  12. SU-E-T-439: Fundamental Verification of Respiratory-Gated Spot Scanning Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamano, H; Yamakawa, T [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Hayashi, N; Kato, H [School of Health Sciences, Fujita Health University, Tayoake (Japan); Yasui, K [Department of Proton Therapy Technology, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The spot-scanning proton beam irradiation with respiratory gating technique provides quite well dose distribution and requires both dosimetric and geometric verification prior to clinical implementation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of gating irradiation as a fundamental verification. Methods: We evaluated field width, flatness, symmetry, and penumbra in the gated and non-gated proton beams. The respiration motion was distinguished into 3 patterns: 10, 20, and 30 mm. We compared these contents between the gated and non-gated beams. A 200 MeV proton beam from PROBEAT-III unit (Hitachi Co.Ltd) was used in this study. Respiratory gating irradiation was performed by Quasar phantom (MODUS medical devices) with a combination of dedicated respiratory gating system (ANZAI Medical Corporation). For radiochromic film dosimetry, the calibration curve was created with Gafchromic EBT3 film (Ashland) on FilmQA Pro 2014 (Ashland) as film analysis software. Results: The film was calibrated at the middle of spread out Bragg peak in passive proton beam. The field width, flatness and penumbra in non-gated proton irradiation with respiratory motion were larger than those of reference beam without respiratory motion: the maximum errors of the field width, flatness and penumbra in respiratory motion of 30 mm were 1.75% and 40.3% and 39.7%, respectively. The errors of flatness and penumbra in gating beam (motion: 30 mm, gating rate: 25%) were 0.0% and 2.91%, respectively. The results of symmetry in all proton beams with gating technique were within 0.6%. Conclusion: The field width, flatness, symmetry and penumbra were improved with the gating technique in proton beam. The spot scanning proton beam with gating technique is feasible for the motioned target.

  13. Neutrons in proton pencil beam scanning: parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uwe; Hälg, Roger A; Baiocco, Giorgio; Lomax, Tony

    2016-08-21

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons produced during proton therapy in inducing cancer is unknown, but potentially large. In particular, since neutron biological effectiveness is energy dependent, it is necessary to estimate, besides the dose, also the energy spectra, in order to obtain quantities which could be a measure of the biological effectiveness and test current models and new approaches against epidemiological studies on cancer induction after proton therapy. For patients treated with proton pencil beam scanning, this work aims to predict the spatially localized neutron energies, the effective quality factor, the weighting factor according to ICRP, and two RBE values, the first obtained from the saturation corrected dose mean lineal energy and the second from DSB cluster induction. A proton pencil beam was Monte Carlo simulated using GEANT. Based on the simulated neutron spectra for three different proton beam energies a parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE was calculated. The pencil beam algorithm used for treatment planning at PSI has been extended using the developed parameterizations in order to calculate the spatially localized neutron energy, quality factors and RBE for each treated patient. The parameterization represents the simple quantification of neutron energy in two energy bins and the quality factors and RBE with a satisfying precision up to 85 cm away from the proton pencil beam when compared to the results based on 3D Monte Carlo simulations. The root mean square error of the energy estimate between Monte Carlo simulation based results and the parameterization is 3.9%. For the quality factors and RBE estimates it is smaller than 0.9%. The model was successfully integrated into the PSI treatment planning system. It was found that the parameterizations for neutron energy, quality factors and RBE were independent of proton energy in the investigated energy range of interest for proton therapy. The pencil beam algorithm has

  14. Comparison of Out-Of-Field Neutron Equivalent Doses in Scanning Carbon and Proton Therapies for Cranial Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athar, B.; Henker, K.; Jäkel, O.

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to compare the secondary neutron lateral doses from scanning carbon and proton beam therapies. Method and Materials: We simulated secondary neutron doses for out-of-field organs in an 11-year old male patient. Scanned carbon and proton beams were simulated...... beams neutrons produced inside the patient are emitted at small angles, predominantly in the forward direction, whereas in proton therapy, neutrons are emitted more isotropic. Therefore the absorbed neutron doses in carbon therapy lateral to the field edge are smaller compared to the corresponding...... proton fields. In forward direction though, the neutron doses from carbon ion therapy can be expected to be higher compared to proton therapy. Conclusions: Secondary neutron doses received by tonsils (out-of-field organ) in scanned carbon and proton therapies are found to be 5x10-4 mSv/GyE and 0.6 m...

  15. Patient-Specific QA of Spot-Scanning Proton Beams using Radiochromic Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Maria F; Chen, Chin-Cheng; Shi, Chengyu; Li, Jingdong; Tang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiang; Mah, Dennis

    2017-05-01

    Radiochromic film for spot-scanning QA provides high spatial resolution and efficiency gains from one-shot irradiation for multiple depths. However, calibration can be a tedious procedure which may limit widespread use. Moreover, since there may be an energy dependence, which manifests as a depth dependence, this may require additional measurements for each patient. We present a one-scan protocol to simplify the procedure. A calibration using an EBT3 film, exposed by a 6-level step-wedge plan on a Proteus ® PLUS proton system (IBA, Belgium), was performed at depths of 18, 20, 24cm using Plastic Water ® (CIRS, Norfolk, VA). The calibration doses ranged from 65-250 cGy(RBE) (relative biological effectiveness) for proton energies of 170-200 MeV. A clinical prostate+nodes plan was used for validation. The planar doses at selected depths were measured with EBT3 films and analyzed using One-scan protocol (one-scan digitization of QA film and at least one film exposed to a known dose). The gamma passing rates, dose-difference maps, and profiles of 2D planar doses measured with EBT3 film and IBA MatriXX-PT, versus the RayStation TPS calculations were analyzed and compared. The EBT3 film measurement results matched well with the TPS calculation data with an average passing rate of ~95% for 2%/2mm and slightly lower passing rates were obtained from an ion chamber array detector. We were able to demonstrate that the use of a proton step-wedge provided clinically acceptable results and minimized variations between film-scanner orientation, inter-scan, and scanning conditions. Furthermore, for relative dosimetry (calibration is not done at the time of experiment) it could be derived from no more than two films exposed to known doses (one could be zero) for rescaling the master calibration curve at each depth. The sensitivity of the calibration to depth variations has been explored. One-scan protocol results appear to be comparable to that of the ion chamber array detector

  16. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2015-01-01

    development) have both been proposed as methods for obtaining patient stopping power maps. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of proton CT using dual energy CT scans of phantoms to establish reference accuracy levels. Material and methods. A CT calibration phantom and an abdomen cross section...... phantom containing inserts were scanned with dual energy and single energy CT with a state-of-the-art dual energy CT scanner. Proton CT scans were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The simulations followed the setup used in current prototype proton CT scanners and included realistic modeling...

  17. Mixed beams for the nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A.; Breese, M.B.H.; Legge, G.L.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Recently the Micro-Analytical Research Centre (MARC) at Melbourne University has developed a technique to provide mixed beams of ions for a magnetically focussed nuclear microprobe. Such a mixed beam is defined as two (or more) beams of different species ions that can quickly and easily be made to have the same magnetic rigidity R{sub m} = (mE/q{sup 2}) and therefore be transported, focused and scanned the same in a magnetic nuclear microprobe. The production of mixed beams in an electrostatically focussed micro- probe have already been demonstrated. This paper will show how mixed beams can be produced on a single-ended accelerator. Indications of how to produce them on a tandem will also be given. Applications of these mixed beams in micro-lithography, scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) imaging and ion beam induced charge (IBIC) imaging will also be presented. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Beam Size Estimation from Luminosity Scans at the LHC During 2015 Proton Physics Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hostettler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    As a complementary method for measuring the beam size for high-intensity beams at 6.5 TeV flat-top energy, beam separation scans were done regularly at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during 2015 proton physics operation. The luminosities measured by the CMS experiment during the scans were used to derive the convoluted beam size and orbit offset bunch-by-bunch. This contribution will elaborate on the method used to derive plane-by-plane, bunch-by-bunch emittances from the scan data, including uncertainties and corrections. The measurements are then compared to beam size estimations from absolute luminosity, synchrotron light telescopes, and wire scanners. In particular, the evolution of the emittance over the course of several hours in collisions is studied and bunch-by-bunch differences are highlighted.

  19. Impact of beam angle choice on pencil beam scanning breath-hold proton therapy for lung lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgisyan, Jenny; Perrin, Rosalind; Lomax, Antony J

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The breath-hold technique inter alia has been suggested to mitigate the detrimental effect of motion on pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton therapy dose distributions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the robustness of incident proton beam angles to day-to-day anatomical variation...

  20. Three-dimensional gamma criterion for patient-specific quality assurance of spot scanning proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chang; Poole, Kendra L; Teran, Anthony V; Luckman, Scott; Mah, Dennis

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of full three-dimensional (3D) gamma algorithm for spot scanning proton fields, also referred to as pencil beam scanning (PBS) fields. The difference between the full 3D gamma algorithm and a simplified two-dimensional (2D) version was presented. Both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms are used for dose evaluations of clinical proton PBS fields. The 3D gamma algorithm was implemented in an in-house software program without resorting to 2D interpolations perpendicular to the proton beams at the depths of measurement. Comparison between calculated and measured dose points was car-ried out directly using Euclidian distance in 3D space and the dose difference as a fourth dimension. Note that this 3D algorithm faithfully implemented the original concept proposed by Low et al. (1998) who described gamma criterion using 3D Euclidian distance and dose difference. Patient-specific proton PBS plans are separated into two categories, depending on their optimization method: single-field optimization (SFO) or multifield optimized (MFO). A total of 195 measurements were performed for 58 SFO proton fields. A MFO proton plan with four fields was also calculated and measured, although not used for treatment. Typically three dif-ferent depths were selected from each field for measurements. Each measurement was analyzed by both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms. The resultant 3D and 2D gamma passing rates are then compared and analyzed. Comparison between 3D and 2D gamma passing rates of SFO fields showed that 3D algorithm does show higher passing rates than its 2D counterpart toward the distal end, while little difference is observed at depths away from the distal end. Similar phenomenon in the lateral penumbra was well documented in photon radiation therapy, and in fact brought about the concept of gamma criterion. Although 2D gamma algorithm has been shown to suffice in addressing dose comparisons in lateral penumbra for photon

  1. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  2. Measurement of stray neutron doses inside the treatment room from a proton pencil beam scanning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojżeszek, N; Farah, J; Kłodowska, M; Ploc, O; Stolarczyk, L; Waligórski, M P R; Olko, P

    2017-02-01

    To measure the environmental doses from stray neutrons in the vicinity of a solid slab phantom as a function of beam energy, field size and modulation width, using the proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) technique. Measurements were carried out using two extended range WENDI-II rem-counters and three tissue equivalent proportional counters. Detectors were suitably placed at different distances around the RW3 slab phantom. Beam irradiation parameters were varied to cover the clinical ranges of proton beam energies (100-220MeV), field sizes ((2×2)-(20×20)cm(2)) and modulation widths (0-15cm). For pristine proton peak irradiations, large variations of neutron H(∗)(10)/D were observed with changes in beam energy and field size, while these were less dependent on modulation widths. H(∗)(10)/D for pristine proton pencil beams varied between 0.04μSvGy(-1) at beam energy 100MeV and a (2×2)cm(2) field at 2.25m distance and 90° angle with respect to the beam axis, and 72.3μSvGy(-1) at beam energy 200MeV and a (20×20) cm(2) field at 1m distance along the beam axis. The obtained results will be useful in benchmarking Monte Carlo calculations of proton radiotherapy in PBS mode and in estimating the exposure to stray radiation of the patient. Such estimates may be facilitated by the obtained best-fitted simple analytical formulae relating the stray neutron doses at points of interest with beam irradiation parameters. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A beam monitoring and validation system for continuous line scanning in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimpki, G.; Psoroulas, S.; Bula, C.; Rechsteiner, U.; Eichin, M.; Weber, D. C.; Lomax, A.; Meer, D.

    2017-08-01

    Line scanning represents a faster and potentially more flexible form of pencil beam scanning than conventional step-and-shoot irradiations. It seeks to minimize dead times in beam delivery whilst preserving the possibility of modulating the dose at any point in the target volume. Our second generation proton gantry features irradiations in line scanning mode, but it still lacks a dedicated monitoring and validation system that guarantees patient safety throughout the irradiation. We report on its design and implementation in this paper. In line scanning, we steer the proton beam continuously along straight lines while adapting the speed and/or current frequently to modulate the delivered dose. We intend to prevent delivery errors that could be clinically relevant through a two-stage system: safety level 1 monitors the beam current and position every 10 μs. We demonstrate that direct readings from ionization chambers in the gantry nozzle and Hall probes in the scanner magnets provide required information on current and position, respectively. Interlocks will be raised when measured signals exceed their predefined tolerance bands. Even in case of an erroneous delivery, safety level 1 restricts hot and cold spots of the physically delivered fraction dose to  ±36~mGy (±2% of 2~Gy biologically). In safety level 2—an additional, partly redundant validation step—we compare the integral line profile measured with a strip monitor in the nozzle to a forward-calculated prediction. The comparison is performed between two line applications to detect amplifying inaccuracies in speed and current modulation. This level can be regarded as an online quality assurance of the machine. Both safety levels use devices and functionalities already installed along the beamline. Hence, the presented monitoring and validation system preserves full compatibility of discrete and continuous delivery mode on a single gantry, with the possibility of switching between modes during the

  4. A beam monitoring and validation system for continuous line scanning in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimpki, G; Psoroulas, S; Bula, C; Rechsteiner, U; Eichin, M; Weber, D C; Lomax, A; Meer, D

    2017-07-12

    Line scanning represents a faster and potentially more flexible form of pencil beam scanning than conventional step-and-shoot irradiations. It seeks to minimize dead times in beam delivery whilst preserving the possibility of modulating the dose at any point in the target volume. Our second generation proton gantry features irradiations in line scanning mode, but it still lacks a dedicated monitoring and validation system that guarantees patient safety throughout the irradiation. We report on its design and implementation in this paper. In line scanning, we steer the proton beam continuously along straight lines while adapting the speed and/or current frequently to modulate the delivered dose. We intend to prevent delivery errors that could be clinically relevant through a two-stage system: safety level 1 monitors the beam current and position every 10 μs. We demonstrate that direct readings from ionization chambers in the gantry nozzle and Hall probes in the scanner magnets provide required information on current and position, respectively. Interlocks will be raised when measured signals exceed their predefined tolerance bands. Even in case of an erroneous delivery, safety level 1 restricts hot and cold spots of the physically delivered fraction dose to  ±[Formula: see text] (±[Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text] biologically). In safety level 2-an additional, partly redundant validation step-we compare the integral line profile measured with a strip monitor in the nozzle to a forward-calculated prediction. The comparison is performed between two line applications to detect amplifying inaccuracies in speed and current modulation. This level can be regarded as an online quality assurance of the machine. Both safety levels use devices and functionalities already installed along the beamline. Hence, the presented monitoring and validation system preserves full compatibility of discrete and continuous delivery mode on a single gantry, with the possibility

  5. A LabVIEW{sup TM}-based scanning and control system for proton beam micromachining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, Andrew A. E-mail: phybaa@nus.edu.sg; Kan, J.A. van; Sum, T.C.; Watt, F

    2001-07-01

    LabVIEW{sup TM} is steadily gaining in popularity as the programming language of choice for scientific data acquisition and control. This is due to the vast array of measurement instruments and data acquisition cards supported by the LabVIEW{sup TM} environment, and the relative ease with which advanced software can be programmed. Furthermore, virtual instruments that are designed for a given system can be easily ported to other LabVIEW{sup TM} platforms and hardware. This paper describes the new LabVIEW{sup TM} based scanning and control system developed specifically for proton beam micromachining (PBM) applications. The new system is capable of scanning figures at 16-bit resolution with improved sub-microsecond scan rates. Support for electrostatic beam blanking and external dose normalization using a TTL signal have been implemented. The new software incorporates a semi-automated dose calibration system, and a number of novel dose normalization methods. Limitations of the current beam scanning hardware are discussed in light of new results obtained from micromachining experiments performed in SU-8 photoresist.

  6. Spot Scanning and Passive Scattering Proton Therapy: Relative Biological Effectiveness and Oxygen Enhancement Ratio in Cultured Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Hiromitsu, E-mail: h-iwa-ncu@nifty.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Ogino, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya (Japan); Hashimoto, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Yamada, Maho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya (Japan); Shibata, Hiroki; Yasui, Keisuke [Department of Proton Therapy Technology, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki; Omachi, Chihiro [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya (Japan); Tatekawa, Kotoha [Department of Radiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Manabe, Yoshihiko [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Mizoe, Jun-etsu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya (Japan); Shibamoto, Yuta [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE), oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and contribution of the indirect effect of spot scanning proton beams, passive scattering proton beams, or both in cultured cells in comparison with clinically used photons. Methods and Materials: The RBE of passive scattering proton beams at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) was determined from dose-survival curves in 4 cell lines using 6-MV X rays as controls. Survival of 2 cell lines after spot scanning and passive scattering proton irradiation was then compared. Biological effects at the distal end region of the SOBP were also investigated. The OER of passive scattering proton beams and 6 MX X rays were investigated in 2 cell lines. The RBE and OER values were estimated at a 10% cell survival level. The maximum degree of protection of radiation effects by dimethyl sulfoxide was determined to estimate the contribution of the indirect effect against DNA damage. All experiments comparing protons and X rays were made under the same biological conditions. Results: The RBE values of passive scattering proton beams in the 4 cell lines examined were 1.01 to 1.22 (average, 1.14) and were almost identical to those of spot scanning beams. Biological effects increased at the distal end of the SOBP. In the 2 cell lines examined, the OER was 2.74 (95% confidence interval, 2.56-2.80) and 3.08 (2.84-3.11), respectively, for X rays, and 2.39 (2.38-2.43) and 2.72 (2.69-2.75), respectively, for protons (P<.05 for both cells between X rays and protons). The maximum degree of protection was significantly higher for X rays than for proton beams (P<.05). Conclusions: The RBE values of spot scanning and passive scattering proton beams were almost identical. The OER was lower for protons than for X rays. The lower contribution of the indirect effect may partly account for the lower OER of protons.

  7. SU-C-207A-02: Proton Radiography Using Pencil Beam Scanning and a Novel, Low-Cost Range Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolney, D; Mayers, G; Newcomer, M; Bollinger, D; Desai, N; Maughan, R; Solberg, T; Hollebeek, R [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Weiss, D [Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States); Meekins, E [James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: While the energy of therapeutic proton beams can be adjusted to penetrate to any given depth in water, range uncertainties arise in patients due in part to imprecise knowledge of the stopping power of protons in human tissues [1]. Proton radiography is one approach to reduce the beam range uncertainty [2], thereby allowing for a reduction in treatment margins and dose escalation. Methods: The authors have adapted a novel detector technology based on Micromesh Gaseous Structure (“Micromegas”) for proton therapy beams and have demonstrated fine spatial and time resolution of magnetically scanned proton pencil beams, as well as wide dynamic range for dosimetry [3]. The authors have constructed a prototype imaging system comprised of 5 Micromegas layers. Proton radiographs were obtained downstream of solid water assemblies. The position-sensitive monitor chambers in the IBA proton delivery nozzle provide the beam entrance position. Results: Our technique achieves spatial resolution as low as 300 µm and water-equivalent thickness (WET) resolution as good as 0.02% (60 µm out of 31 cm total thickness). The dose delivered to the patient is kept below 2 cGy. The spatial resolution as a function of sample rate and number of delivered protons is found to be near the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound. By extrapolating the CR bound, we argue that the imaging dose could be further lowered to 1 mGy, while still achieving submillimeter spatial resolution, by achievable instrumentation and beam delivery modifications. Conclusion: For proton radiography, high spatial and WET resolution can be achieved, with minimal additional dose to patient, by using magnetically scanned proton pencil beams and Micromegas detectors.

  8. Effect of Intrafraction Prostate Motion on Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Delivery: A Quantitative Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shikui, E-mail: TangS@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Deville, Curtiland; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact caused by the interplay between intrafraction prostate motion and the intermittent delivery of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Methods and Materials: A cohort of 10 prostate patients was treated with PBS using a bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. Bilateral intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were generated for comparison. Because beam-on time in PBS was intermittent, the actual beam-on time was determined from treatment logs. Prostate motion was generalized according to real-time Calypso tracking data from our previously reported prospective photon trial. We investigated potential dose deviations by considering the interplay effect resulting from the worst-case scenario motion and the PBS delivery sequence. Results: For both bilateral-field SFUD and IMPT plans, clinical target volume (CTV) D{sub 99}% coverage was degraded <2% owing to prostate intrafraction motion when averaged over the course of treatment, but was >10% for the worst fraction. The standard deviation of CTV D{sub 99}% distribution was approximately 1.2%. The CTV coverage of individual fields in SFUD plans degraded as time elapsed after the initial alignment, owing to prostate drift. Intensity-modulated proton therapy and SFUD demonstrated comparable results when bilateral opposed fields were used. Single-field SFUD plans that were repainted twice, which could reduce half of the treatment time, resulted in similar CTV coverage as bilateral-field plans. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate motion affects the actual delivered dose to CTV; however, when averaged over the course of treatment, CTV D{sub 99}% coverage degraded only approximately 2% even for the worst-case scenario. The IMPT plan results are comparable to those of the SFUD plan, and similar coverage can be achieved if treated by SFUD 1 lateral field per day when rescanning the field twice to shorten the treatment time and mitigate intrafraction motion.

  9. A Novel Approach to Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Using Scanned Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depauw, Nicolas, E-mail: ndepauw@partners.org [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Batin, Estelle; Daartz, Julianne [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Adams, Judith; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), currently offered at Massachusetts General Hospital, uses proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with intensity modulation, achieving complete target coverage of the chest wall and all nodal regions and reduced dose to the cardiac structures. This work presents the current methodology for such treatment and the ongoing effort for its improvements. Methods and Materials: A single PBS field is optimized to ensure appropriate target coverage and heart/lung sparing, using an in–house-developed proton planning system with the capability of multicriteria optimization. The dose to the chest wall skin is controlled as a separate objective in the optimization. Surface imaging is used for setup because it is a suitable surrogate for superficial target volumes. In order to minimize the effect of beam range uncertainties, the relative proton stopping power ratio of the material in breast implants was determined through separate measurements. Phantom measurements were also made to validate the accuracy of skin dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Additionally, the treatment planning robustness was evaluated relative to setup perturbations and patient breathing motion. Results: PBS PMRT planning resulted in appropriate target coverage and organ sparing, comparable to treatments by passive scattering (PS) beams but much improved in nodal coverage and cardiac sparing compared to conventional treatments by photon/electron beams. The overall treatment time was much shorter than PS and also shorter than conventional photon/electron treatment. The accuracy of the skin dose calculation by the planning system was within ±2%. The treatment was shown to be adequately robust relative to both setup uncertainties and patient breathing motion, resulting in clinically satisfying dose distributions. Conclusions: More than 25 PMRT patients have been successfully treated at Massachusetts General Hospital by using single-PBS fields

  10. Characterizing a Proton Beam Scanning System for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation in Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassberger, C; Lomax, Tony; Paganetti, H

    2015-01-01

    The presented work has two goals. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of accurately characterizing a proton radiation field at treatment head exit for Monte Carlo dose calculation of active scanning patient treatments. Second, to show that this characterization can be done based on measured depth dose curves and spot size alone, without consideration of the exact treatment head delivery system. This is demonstrated through calibration of a Monte Carlo code to the specific beam lines of two institutions, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Comparison of simulations modeling the full treatment head at MGH to ones employing a parameterized phase space of protons at treatment head exit reveals the adequacy of the method for patient simulations. The secondary particle production in the treatment head is typically below 0.2% of primary fluence, except for low–energy electrons (protons), whose contribution to skin dose is negligible. However, there is significant difference between the two methods in the low-dose penumbra, making full treatment head simulations necessary to study out-of field effects such as secondary cancer induction. To calibrate the Monte Carlo code to measurements in a water phantom, we use an analytical Bragg peak model to extract the range-dependent energy spread at the two institutions, as this quantity is usually not available through measurements. Comparison of the measured with the simulated depth dose curves demonstrates agreement within 0.5mm over the entire energy range. Subsequently, we simulate three patient treatments with varying anatomical complexity (liver, head and neck and lung) to give an example how this approach can be employed to investigate site-specific discrepancies between treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:25549079

  11. Development of beam monitoring system for proton pencil beam scanning using fiber-optic radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jaeman; Koo, Jihye; Moon, Sunyoung; Yoon, Myonggeun; Jeong, Jonghwi; Kim, Sun-Young; Lim, Youngkyung; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Meyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to develop a beam monitoring system based on a fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS), which can be used in real time in a beam control room, to monitor a beam in proton therapy, where patients are treated using a pencil beam scanning (PBS) mode, by measuring the beam spot width (BSW) and beam spot position (BSP) of the PBS. We developed two-dimensional detector arrays to monitor the PBS beam in the beam control room. We measured the BSW for five energies of the PBS beam and compared the measurements with those of Lynx and EBT3 film. In order to confirm the BSP, we compared the BSP values of the PBS calculated from radiation treatment planning (RTP), to five BSP values measured using FORS at 224.2 MeV. When comparing BSW values obtained using developed monitoring system to the measurements obtained using commercial EBT3 film, the average difference in BSW value of the PBS beam was 0.1 ± 0.1 mm. In the comparison of BSW values with the measurements obtained using Lynx, the average difference was 0.2 ± 0.1 mm. When comparing BSP measurements to the values calculated from RTP, the average difference was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. The study results confirmed that the developed FORS-based beam monitoring system can monitor a PBS beam in real time in a beam control room, where proton beam is controlled for the patient.

  12. Optimization of a general-purpose, actively scanned proton beamline for ocular treatments: Geant4 simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersimoni, Pierluigi; Rimoldi, Adele; Riccardi, Cristina; Pirola, Michele; Molinelli, Silvia; Ciocca, Mario

    2015-03-08

    The Italian National Center for Hadrontherapy (CNAO, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica), a synchrotron-based hospital facility, started the treatment of patients within selected clinical trials in late 2011 and 2012 with actively scanned proton and carbon ion beams, respectively. The activation of a new clinical protocol for the irradiation of uveal melanoma using the existing general-purpose proton beamline is foreseen for late 2014. Beam characteristics and patient treatment setup need to be tuned to meet the specific requirements for such a type of treatment technique. The aim of this study is to optimize the CNAO transport beamline by adding passive components and minimizing air gap to achieve the optimal conditions for ocular tumor irradiation. The CNAO setup with the active and passive components along the transport beamline, as well as a human eye-modeled detector also including a realistic target volume, were simulated using the Monte Carlo Geant4 toolkit. The strong reduction of the air gap between the nozzle and patient skin, as well as the insertion of a range shifter plus a patient-specific brass collimator at a short distance from the eye, were found to be effective tools to be implemented. In perspective, this simulation toolkit could also be used as a benchmark for future developments and testing purposes on commercial treatment planning systems.

  13. Impacts of gantry angle dependent scanning beam properties on proton PBS treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuting; Clasie, Benjamin; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Flanz, Jacob; Shen, Tim; Jee, Kyung-Wook

    2017-01-01

    While proton beam models in treatment planning systems are generally assumed invariant with respect to the beam deliveries at different gantry angles. Physical properties of scanning pencil beams can change. The gantry angle dependent properties include the delivered charge to the monitor unit chamber, the spot position and the spot shape. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent of the changes and their dosimetric impacts using historical pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment data. Online beam delivery records at the time of the patient-specific qualify assurance were retrospectively collected for a total of 34 PBS fields from 28 patients treated at our institution. For each field, proton beam properties at two different gantry angles (the planned and zero gantry angles) were extracted by a newly-developed machine log analysis method and used to reconstruct the delivered dose distributions in the cubic water phantom geometry. The reconstructed doses at the two different angles and a planar dose measurement by a 2D ion-chamber array were compared and the dosimetric impacts of the gantry angle dependency were accessed by a 3D γ-index analysis. In addition, the pencil beam spot size was independently characterized as a function of the gantry angle and the beam energy. The dosimetric effects of the perturbed beam shape were also investigated. Comparisons of spot-by-spot beam positions between both gantry angles show a mean deviation of 0.4 and 0.7 mm and a standard deviation of 0.3 and 0.6 mm for x and y directions, respectively. The delivered giga-protons per spot show a percent mean difference and a standard deviation of 0.01% and 0.3%, respectively, from each planned spot weight. These small deviations lead to an excellent agreement in dose comparisons with an average γ passing rate of 99.1%. When each calculation for both planned and zero gantry angles was compared to the measurement, a high correlation in γ values was also observed, also

  14. Dual ring multilayer ionization chamber and theory-based correction technique for scanning proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Taisuke; Nihongi, Hideaki; Nishiuchi, Hideaki; Tadokoro, Masahiro; Ito, Yuki; Nakashima, Chihiro; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Umezawa, Masumi; Matsuda, Koji; Sakae, Takeji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    To develop a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and a correction technique that suppresses differences between the MLIC and water phantom measurements in order to achieve fast and accurate depth dose measurements in pencil beam scanning proton therapy. The authors distinguish between a calibration procedure and an additional correction: 1-the calibration for variations in the air gap thickness and the electrometer gains is addressed without involving measurements in water; 2-the correction is addressed to suppress the difference between depth dose profiles in water and in the MLIC materials due to the nuclear interaction cross sections by a semiempirical model tuned by using measurements in water. In the correction technique, raw MLIC data are obtained for each energy layer and integrated after multiplying them by the correction factor because the correction factor depends on incident energy. The MLIC described here has been designed especially for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. This MLIC is called a dual ring multilayer ionization chamber (DRMLIC). The shape of the electrodes allows the DRMLIC to measure both the percentage depth dose (PDD) and integrated depth dose (IDD) because ionization electrons are collected from inner and outer air gaps independently. IDDs for which the beam energies were 71.6, 120.6, 159, 180.6, and 221.4 MeV were measured and compared with water phantom results. Furthermore, the measured PDDs along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 × 10 cm(2) were compared. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 and 3 cm for fields with a range of 6.9 cm. The IDDs measured with the DRMLIC using the correction technique were consistent with those that of the water phantom; except for the beam energy of 71.6 MeV, all of the points satisfied the 1% dose/1 mm distance to agreement criterion of the gamma index. The 71.6 MeV depth dose profile showed slight differences in the shallow

  15. Dosimetry intercomparison of four proton therapy institutions in Germany employing spot scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumer, Christian; Koska, Benjamin [Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum, Essen (Germany); Ackermann, Benjamin; Latzel, Harald [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (Germany); Hillbrand, Martin; Kaiser, Franz-Joachim [Rinecker Proton Therapy Center, Muenchen (Germany); Luehr, Armin [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Menkel, Stefan [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Timmermann, Beate [Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Essen Univ. Hospital (Germany). West German Cancer Center (WTZ)

    2017-08-01

    To verify the consistency of dose and range measurement in an interinstitution comparison among proton therapy institutions in Germany which use the pencil-beam scanning technique. Following a peer-to-peer approach absorbed dose and range have been intercompared in several missions at two hosting centers with two or three visiting physics teams of participating institutions using their own dosimetry equipment. A meta-analysis has been performed integrating the results of the individual missions. Dose has been determined with ionization chambers according to the dosimetry protocol IAEA TRS-398. For determination of the depth of the distal 80% dose the teams used either a scanning water phantom, a variable water column or a multi-layer ionization chamber. The systematic deviation between measured doses of the participating institutions is less than 1%. Ranges differ systematically less than 0.4 mm. The match of measured dose and range is better than expected from the respective uncertainties. As all physics teams agree on the assessment of absorbed dose and range, an important prerequisite for a start of joint clinical studies is fulfilled.

  16. Optimization of GEANT4 settings for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning simulations using GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevillot, Loic, E-mail: loic.grevillot@gmail.co [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); IBA, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Frisson, Thibault [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); Zahra, Nabil [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); IPNL, CNRS UMR 5822, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); Bertrand, Damien; Stichelbaut, Frederic [IBA, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Freud, Nicolas [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); CNDRI, INSA-Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Sarrut, David [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France)

    2010-10-15

    This study reports the investigation of different GEANT4 settings for proton therapy applications in the context of Treatment Planning System comparisons. The GEANT4.9.2 release was used through the GATE platform. We focused on the Pencil Beam Scanning delivery technique, which allows for intensity modulated proton therapy applications. The most relevant options and parameters (range cut, step size, database binning) for the simulation that influence the dose deposition were investigated, in order to determine a robust, accurate and efficient simulation environment. In this perspective, simulations of depth-dose profiles and transverse profiles at different depths and energies between 100 and 230 MeV have been assessed against reference measurements in water and PMMA. These measurements were performed in Essen, Germany, with the IBA dedicated Pencil Beam Scanning system, using Bragg-peak chambers and radiochromic films. GEANT4 simulations were also compared to the PHITS.2.14 and MCNPX.2.5.0 Monte Carlo codes. Depth-dose simulations reached 0.3 mm range accuracy compared to NIST CSDA ranges, with a dose agreement of about 1% over a set of five different energies. The transverse profiles simulated using the different Monte Carlo codes showed discrepancies, with up to 15% difference in beam widening between GEANT4 and MCNPX in water. A 8% difference between the GEANT4 multiple scattering and single scattering algorithms was observed. The simulations showed the inability of reproducing the measured transverse dose spreading with depth in PMMA, corroborating the fact that GEANT4 underestimates the lateral dose spreading. GATE was found to be a very convenient simulation environment to perform this study. A reference physics-list and an optimized parameters-list have been proposed. Satisfactory agreement against depth-dose profiles measurements was obtained. The simulation of transverse profiles using different Monte Carlo codes showed significant deviations. This point

  17. Impact of Intrafraction and Residual Interfraction Effect on Prostate Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shikui, E-mail: shktang@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Deville, Curtiland; Tochner, Zelig [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); McDonough, James; Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the impact of interplay effect and plan robustness associated with intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with weekly verification CTs underwent pencil beam scanning with the bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. A typical field had 10-15 energy layers and 500-1000 spots. According to their treatment logs, each layer delivery time was <1 s, with average time to change layers of approximately 8 s. Real-time intrafraction prostate motion was determined from our previously reported prospective study using Calypso beacon transponders. Prostate motion and beam delivering sequence of the worst-case scenario patient were synchronized to calculate the “true” dose received by the prostate. The intrafraction effect was examined by applying the worst-case scenario prostate motion on the planning CT, and the residual interfraction effect was examined on the basis of weekly CT scans. The resultant dose variation of target and critical structures was examined to evaluate the interplay effect. Results: The clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was degraded because of both effects. The CTV D{sub 99} (percentage dose to 99% of the CTV) varied up to 10% relative to the initial plan in individual fractions. However, over the entire course of treatment the total dose degradation of D{sub 99} was 2%-3%, with a standard deviation of <2%. Absolute differences between SFUD, intensity modulate proton therapy, and one-field-per-day SFUD plans were small. The intrafraction effect dominated over the residual interfraction effect for CTV coverage. Mean dose to the anterior rectal wall increased approximately 10% because of combined residual interfraction and intrafraction effects, the interfraction effect being dominant. Conclusions: Both intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion degrade CTV coverage within a

  18. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  19. Systematic analysis of biological and physical limitations of proton beam range verification with offline PET/CT scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knopf, A; Parodi, K.; Bortfeld, Thomas; Shih, Helen A; Paganetti, Harald

    2009-01-01

    The clinical use of offline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans for proton range verification is currently under investigation at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Validation is achieved by comparing measured activity distributions, acquired in patients after

  20. Nuclear micro-probe analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, F. J.; Ynsa, M. D.; Domínguez-Solís, J. R.; López-Martín, M. C.; Gotor, C.; Romero, L. C.

    2003-09-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective plant-based approach for remediation of soils and waters which takes advantage of the remarkable ability of some plants to concentrate elements and compounds from the environment and to metabolize various molecules in their tissues, such as toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants. Nowadays, phytoremediation technology is becoming of paramount importance when environmental decontamination is concerned, due to the emerging knowledge of its physiological and molecular mechanisms and the new biological and engineering strategies designed to optimize and improve it. In addition, the feasibility of using plants for environmental cleanup has been confirmed by many different trials around the world. Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be used for basic studies to improve the technology on phytoremediation. Making use of nuclear microscopy techniques, in this paper we study leaves of wild type and transgenic A. thaliana plants grown in a cadmium-rich environment under different conditions. Micro-PIXE, RBS and SEM analyses, performed on the scanning proton micro-probe at the CNA in Seville (Spain), prove that cadmium is preferentially sequestered in the central region of epidermal trichome and allow comparing the effects of genetic modifications.

  1. Off-axis dose equivalent due to secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams during proton radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M R; Collums, T L; Zheng, Y; Monson, J; Benton, E R

    2013-11-21

    The production of secondary neutrons is an undesirable byproduct of proton therapy and it is important to quantify the contribution from secondary neutrons to patient dose received outside the treatment volume. The purpose of this study is to investigate the off-axis dose equivalent from secondary neutrons experimentally using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD) at ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK. In this experiment, we placed several layers of CR-39 PNTD laterally outside the treatment volume inside a phantom and in air at various depths and angles with respect to the primary beam axis. Three different proton beams with max energies of 78, 162 and 226 MeV and 4 cm modulation width, a 5 cm diameter brass aperture, and a small snout located 38 cm from isocenter were used for the entire experiment. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed based on the experimental setup using a simplified snout configuration and the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The measured ratio of secondary neutron dose equivalent to therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranged from 0.3 ± 0.08 mSv Gy−1 for 78 MeV proton beam to 37.4 ± 2.42 mSv Gy−1 for 226 MeV proton beam. Both experiment and simulation showed a similar decreasing trend in dose equivalent with distance to the central axis and the magnitude varied by a factor of about 2 in most locations. H/D was found to increase as the energy of the primary proton beam increased and higher H/D was observed at 135° compared to 45° and 90°. The overall higher H/D in air indicates the predominance of external neutrons produced in the nozzle rather than inside the body.

  2. SU-E-T-337: Treatment Planning Study of Craniospinal Irradiation with Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasson, A; Beltran, C; Laack, N; Childs, S; Tryggestad, E; Whitaker, T [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning technique that achieves optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, and interfield position errors for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using spot scanning proton radiotherapy. Methods: Eighteen CSI patients who had previously been treated using photon radiation were used for this study. Eight patients were less than 10 years old. The prescription dose was 23.4Gy in 1.8Gy fractions. Two different field arrangement types were investigated: 1 posterior field per isocenter and 2 posterior oblique fields per isocenter. For each field type, two delivery configurations were used: 5cm bolus attached to the treatment table and a 4.5cm range shifter located inside the nozzle. The target for each plan was the whole brain and thecal sac. For children under the age of 10, all plan types were repeated with an additional dose of 21Gy prescribed to the vertebral bodies. Treatment fields were matched by stepping down the dose in 10% increments over 9cm. Robustness against 3% and 3mm uncertainties, as well as a 3mm inter-field error was analyzed. Dose coverage of the target and critical structure sparing for each plan type will be considered. Ease of planning and treatment delivery was also considered for each plan type. Results: The mean dose volume histograms show that the bolus plan with posterior beams gave the best overall plan, and all proton plans were comparable to or better than the photon plans. The plan type that was the most robust against the imposed uncertainties was also the bolus plan with posterior beams. This is also the plan configuration that is the easiest to deliver and plan. Conclusion: The bolus plan with posterior beams achieved optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, as well as inter-field position errors.

  3. Range optimization for mono- and bi-energetic proton modulated arc therapy with pencil beam scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, Daniel; Kirk, Maura; Fager, Marcus; Burgdorf, Brendan; Stowe, Malorie; Solberg, Tim; Carabe, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    The development of rotational proton therapy plans based on a pencil-beam-scanning (PBS) system has been limited, among several other factors, by the energy-switching time between layers, a system-dependent parameter that ranges between a fraction of a second and several seconds. We are investigating mono- and bi-energetic rotational proton modulated arc therapy (PMAT) solutions that would not be affected by long energy switching times. In this context, a systematic selection of the optimal proton energy for each arc is vital. We present a treatment planning comparison of four different range selection methods, analyzing the dosimetric outcomes of the resulting treatment plans created with the ranges obtained. Given the patient geometry and arc definition (gantry and couch trajectories, snout elevation) our in-house treatment planning system (TPS) FoCa was used to find the maximum, medial and minimum water-equivalent thicknesses (WETs) of the target viewed from all possible field orientations. Optimal ranges were subsequently determined using four methods: (1) by dividing the max/min WET interval into equal steps, (2) by taking the average target midpoints from each field, (3) by taking the average WET of all voxels from all field orientations, and (4) by minimizing the fraction of the target which cannot be reached from any of the available angles. After the range (for mono-energetic plans) or ranges (for bi-energetic plans) were selected, the commercial clinical TPS in use in our institution (Varian Eclipse™) was used to produce the PMAT plans using multifield optimization. Linear energy transfer (LET) distributions of all plans were also calculated using FoCa and compared among the different methods. Mono- and bi-energetic PMAT plans, composed of a single 180° arc, were created for two patient geometries: a C-shaped target located in the mediastinal area of a thoracic tissue-equivalent phantom and a small brain tumor located directly above the brainstem. All

  4. Deformable motion reconstruction for scanned proton beam therapy using on-line x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Knopf, A.; Tanner, C.; Boye, D.; Lomax, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Organ motion is a major problem for any dynamic radiotherapy delivery technique, and is particularly so for spot scanned proton therapy. On the other hand, the use of narrow, magnetically deflected proton pencil beams is potentially an ideal delivery technique for tracking tumour motion on-line. At PSI, our new Gantry is equipped with a Beams Eye View (BEV) imaging system which will be able to acquire 2D x-ray images in fluoroscopy mode during treatment delivery. However, besides precisely tracking motion from BEVs, it is also essential to obtain information on the 3D motion vector throughout the whole region of interest, and any sparsely acquired surrogate motion is generally not sufficient to describe the deformable behaviour of the whole volume in three dimensions. In this study, we propose a method by which 3D deformable motions can be estimated from surrogate motions obtained using this monoscopic imaging system. The method assumes that example motions over a number of breathing cycles can be acquired before treatment for each patient using 4DMRI. In this study, for each of 11 different subjects, 100 continuous breathing cycles have been extracted from extended 4DMRI studies in the liver and then subject specific motion models have been built using principle component analysis (PCA). To simulate treatment conditions, a different set of 30 continuous breathing cycles from the same subjects have then been used to generate a set of simulated 4DCT data sets (so-called 4DCT(MRI) data sets), from which time-resolved digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were calculated using the BEV geometry for three treatment fields respectively. From these DRRs, surrogate motions from fiducial markers or the diaphragm have been used as a predictor to estimate 3D motions in the liver region for each subject. The prediction results have been directly compared to the ‘ground truth’ motions extracted from the same 30 breath cycles of the originating 4DMRI data set. Averaged

  5. Deformable motion reconstruction for scanned proton beam therapy using on-line x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Knopf, A; Tanner, C; Boye, D; Lomax, A J

    2013-12-21

    Organ motion is a major problem for any dynamic radiotherapy delivery technique, and is particularly so for spot scanned proton therapy. On the other hand, the use of narrow, magnetically deflected proton pencil beams is potentially an ideal delivery technique for tracking tumour motion on-line. At PSI, our new Gantry is equipped with a Beams Eye View (BEV) imaging system which will be able to acquire 2D x-ray images in fluoroscopy mode during treatment delivery. However, besides precisely tracking motion from BEVs, it is also essential to obtain information on the 3D motion vector throughout the whole region of interest, and any sparsely acquired surrogate motion is generally not sufficient to describe the deformable behaviour of the whole volume in three dimensions. In this study, we propose a method by which 3D deformable motions can be estimated from surrogate motions obtained using this monoscopic imaging system. The method assumes that example motions over a number of breathing cycles can be acquired before treatment for each patient using 4DMRI. In this study, for each of 11 different subjects, 100 continuous breathing cycles have been extracted from extended 4DMRI studies in the liver and then subject specific motion models have been built using principle component analysis (PCA). To simulate treatment conditions, a different set of 30 continuous breathing cycles from the same subjects have then been used to generate a set of simulated 4DCT data sets (so-called 4DCT(MRI) data sets), from which time-resolved digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were calculated using the BEV geometry for three treatment fields respectively. From these DRRs, surrogate motions from fiducial markers or the diaphragm have been used as a predictor to estimate 3D motions in the liver region for each subject. The prediction results have been directly compared to the 'ground truth' motions extracted from the same 30 breath cycles of the originating 4DMRI data set. Averaged over

  6. Spot scanning proton therapy for malignancies of the base of skull: treatment planning, acute toxicities, and preliminary clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosshans, David R; Zhu, X Ronald; Melancon, Adam; Allen, Pamela K; Poenisch, Falk; Palmer, Matthew; McAleer, Mary Frances; McGovern, Susan L; Gillin, Michael; DeMonte, Franco; Chang, Eric L; Brown, Paul D; Mahajan, Anita

    2014-11-01

    To describe treatment planning techniques and early clinical outcomes in patients treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma or chondrosarcoma of the skull base. From June 2010 through August 2011, 15 patients were treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma (n=10) or chondrosarcoma (n=5) at a single institution. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated and scored weekly and at all follow-up visits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Treatment planning techniques and dosimetric data were recorded and compared with those of passive scattering plans created with clinically applicable dose constraints. Ten patients were treated with single-field-optimized scanning beam plans and 5 with multifield-optimized intensity modulated proton therapy. All but 2 patients received a simultaneous integrated boost as well. The mean prescribed radiation doses were 69.8 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range, 68-70 Gy [RBE]) for chordoma and 68.4 Gy (RBE) (range, 66-70) for chondrosarcoma. In comparison with passive scattering plans, spot scanning plans demonstrated improved high-dose conformality and sparing of temporal lobes and brainstem. Clinically, the most common acute toxicities included fatigue (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 8 patients) and nausea (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 6 patients). No toxicities of grades 3 to 5 were recorded. At a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 13-42 months), 1 patient had experienced local recurrence and a second developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients had magnetic resonance imaging-documented temporal lobe changes, and a third patient developed facial numbness. No other subacute or late effects were recorded. In comparison to passive scattering, treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy displayed improved high-dose conformality. Clinically, the treatment was well tolerated, and with short-term follow-up, disease control rates and toxicity

  7. Proton beam micromachining on PMMA, Foturan and CR-39 materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rajta, I; Kiss, A Z; Gomez-Morilla, I; Abraham, M H

    2003-01-01

    Proton Beam Micromachining was demonstrated at the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences using three different types of resists: PMMA, Foturan and CR-39 type Solid State Nuclear Track Detector material. Irradiations have been performed on the nuclear microprobe facility at ATOMKI. The beam scanning was done using a National Instruments (NI) card (model 6711), and the new C++ version of the program IonScan, developed specifically for PBM applications called IonScan 2.0. (R.P.)

  8. Surface as a motion surrogate for gated re-scanned pencil beam proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Huth, Isabel; Wegner, Martin; Weber, Damien C.; Lomax, Antony J.

    2017-05-01

    This simulation study investigated the dosimetric effectiveness and treatment efficiency of surface motion guided gating of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for liver tumour treatments. Dedicated 4D dose calculations were performed for simulating gated treatments using 4DCT data for six patients derived from 4DMRI (4DCT(MRI)). Surface motion as a surrogate for tumour motion was extracted from the 4DMRI images and a linear internal-external correlation model applied to derive amplitude-based gating windows (GWs) of 10 and 5 mm. 4D treatments were simulated using gating and layered/volumetric rescanning (either alone or combined) and four assumed system latencies (50/100/200/500 ms) for the response time of the beam gating to the surrogate. Resulting 4D plans were compared using D5-D95 and V95 in the CTV as the primary metrics, as well as dose to the healthy liver and total treatment time. With no motion mitigation, interplay effects deteriorate the dose homogeneity by more than 30% with respect to the static reference plan, whereas with surface motion guided gating alone, this could be reduced to 12/20% and 5/10% (mean/max over all cases) for 10 mm and 5 mm GWs, respectively. Furthermore, by combining  ×5 layered rescans with 5 mm GW, plan homogeneities to within 1/5% of the static references could be achieved. Dose inhomogeneities were however still pronounced for latencies  ⩾200 ms but limited when  ⩽100 ms. ITV volumes could be decreased by 19/25% when 10/5 mm GW was employed, leading to reductions in mean dose to the healthy liver tissue of 2.6/3.3%. Our results confirm the potential of combining gating and re-scanning (re-gating) for mitigating large tumor motions, and the potential of surface motion monitoring as a gating signal.

  9. SU-F-T-133: Uniform Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer: Toxicity and Its Correlation with Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y; Rana, S; Larson, G [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity of uniform scanning proton therapy for lung cancer patients and its correlation with dose distribution. Methods: In this study, we analyzed the toxicity of 128 lung cancer patients, including 18 small cell lung cancer and 110 non small cell lung cancer patients. Each patient was treated with uniform scanning proton beams at our center using typically 2–4 fields. The prescription was typically 74 Cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) at 2 CGE per fraction. 4D Computerized Tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate the target motion and contour the internal target volume, and repeated 3 times during the course of treatment to evaluate the need for plan adaptation. Toxicity data for these patients were obtained from the proton collaborative group (PCG) database. For cases of grade 3 toxicities or toxicities of interest such as esophagitis and radiation dermatitis, dose distributions were reviewed and analyzed in attempt to correlate the toxicity with radiation dose. Results: At a median follow up time of about 21 months, none of the patients had experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis (81%: 52%-Grade 1, 28%-Grade 2, and 1% Grade 3), followed by fatigue (48%), Cough (46%), and Esophagitis (45%), as shown in Figure 1. Severe toxicities, such as Grade 3 dermatitis or pain of skin, had a clear correlation with high radiation dose. Conclusion: Uniform scanning proton therapy is well tolerated by lung cancer patients. Preliminary analysis indicates there is correlation between severe toxicity and high radiation dose. Understanding of radiation resulted toxicities and careful choice of beam arrangement are critical in minimizing toxicity of skin and other organs.

  10. SU-F-T-169: A Periodic Quality Assurance Program for a Spot-Scanning Proton Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, D; Tryggestad, E; Beltran, C; Furutani, K; Gilson, G; Ito, S; Johnson, J; Kruse, J; Remmes, N; Tasson, A; Whitaker, T; Herman, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop daily and monthly quality assurance (QA) programs in support of a new spot-scanning proton treatment facility using a combination of commercial and custom equipment and software. Emphasis was placed on efficiency and evaluation of key quality parameters. Methods: The daily QA program was developed to test output, spot size and position, proton beam energy, and image guidance using the Sun Nuclear Corporation rf-DQA™3 device and Atlas QA software. The program utilizes standard Atlas linear accelerator tests repurposed for proton measurements and a custom jig for indexing the device to the treatment couch. The monthly QA program was designed to test mechanical performance, image quality, radiation quality, isocenter coincidence, and safety features. Many of these tests are similar to linear accelerator QA counterparts, but many require customized test design and equipment. Coincidence of imaging, laser marker, mechanical, and radiation isocenters, for instance, is verified using a custom film-based device devised and manufactured at our facility. Proton spot size and position as a function of energy are verified using a custom spot pattern incident on film and analysis software developed in-house. More details concerning the equipment and software developed for monthly QA are included in the supporting document. Thresholds for daily and monthly tests were established via perturbation analysis, early experience, and/or proton system specifications and associated acceptance test results. Results: The periodic QA program described here has been in effect for approximately 9 months and has proven efficient and sensitive to sub-clinical variations in treatment delivery characteristics. Conclusion: Tools and professional guidelines for periodic proton system QA are not as well developed as their photon and electron counterparts. The program described here efficiently evaluates key quality parameters and, while specific to the needs of our facility

  11. SU-F-T-156: Monte Carlo Simulation Using TOPAS for Synchrotron Based Proton Discrete Spot Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, V; Pirlepesov, F; Tsiamas, P; Axente, M; Lukose, R; Zhao, L; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Shin, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Brookline, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study provides an overview of the design and commissioning of the Monte Carlo (MC) model of the spot-scanning proton therapy nozzle and its implementation for the patient plan simulation. Methods: The Hitachi PROBEAT V scanning nozzle was simulated based on vendor specifications using the TOPAS extension of Geant4 code. FLUKA MC simulation was also utilized to provide supporting data for the main simulation. Validation of the MC model was performed using vendor provided data and measurements collected during acceptance/commissioning of the proton therapy machine. Actual patient plans using CT based treatment geometry were simulated and compared to the dose distributions produced by the treatment planning system (Varian Eclipse 13.6), and patient quality assurance measurements. In-house MATLAB scripts are used for converting DICOM data into TOPAS input files. Results: Comparison analysis of integrated depth doses (IDDs), therapeutic ranges (R90), and spot shape/sizes at different distances from the isocenter, indicate good agreement between MC and measurements. R90 agreement is within 0.15 mm across all energy tunes. IDDs and spot shapes/sizes differences are within statistical error of simulation (less than 1.5%). The MC simulated data, validated with physical measurements, were used for the commissioning of the treatment planning system. Patient geometry simulations were conducted based on the Eclipse produced DICOM plans. Conclusion: The treatment nozzle and standard option beam model were implemented in the TOPAS framework to simulate a highly conformal discrete spot-scanning proton beam system.

  12. A Monte Carlo pencil beam scanning model for proton treatment plan simulation using GATE/GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevillot, L; Freud, N; Sarrut, D [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Bertrand, D; Dessy, F, E-mail: loic.grevillot@creatis.insa-lyon.fr [IBA, B-1348, Louvain-la Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-08-21

    This work proposes a generic method for modeling scanned ion beam delivery systems, without simulation of the treatment nozzle and based exclusively on beam data library (BDL) measurements required for treatment planning systems (TPS). To this aim, new tools dedicated to treatment plan simulation were implemented in the Gate Monte Carlo platform. The method was applied to a dedicated nozzle from IBA for proton pencil beam scanning delivery. Optical and energy parameters of the system were modeled using a set of proton depth-dose profiles and spot sizes measured at 27 therapeutic energies. For further validation of the beam model, specific 2D and 3D plans were produced and then measured with appropriate dosimetric tools. Dose contributions from secondary particles produced by nuclear interactions were also investigated using field size factor experiments. Pristine Bragg peaks were reproduced with 0.7 mm range and 0.2 mm spot size accuracy. A 32 cm range spread-out Bragg peak with 10 cm modulation was reproduced with 0.8 mm range accuracy and a maximum point-to-point dose difference of less than 2%. A 2D test pattern consisting of a combination of homogeneous and high-gradient dose regions passed a 2%/2 mm gamma index comparison for 97% of the points. In conclusion, the generic modeling method proposed for scanned ion beam delivery systems was applicable to an IBA proton therapy system. The key advantage of the method is that it only requires BDL measurements of the system. The validation tests performed so far demonstrated that the beam model achieves clinical performance, paving the way for further studies toward TPS benchmarking. The method involves new sources that are available in the new Gate release V6.1 and could be further applied to other particle therapy systems delivering protons or other types of ions like carbon.

  13. Supine craniospinal irradiation using a proton pencil beam scanning technique without match line changes for field junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haibo; Ding, Xuanfeng; Kirk, Maura; Liu, Haoyang; Zhai, Huifang; Hill-Kayser, Christine E; Lustig, Robert A; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan; McDonough, James

    2014-09-01

    To propose and validate a craniospinal irradiation approach using a proton pencil beam scanning technique that overcomes the complexity of the planning associated with feathering match lines. Ten craniospinal irradiation patients had treatment planned with gradient dose optimization using the proton pencil beam scanning technique. The robustness of the plans was evaluated by shifting the isocenter of each treatment field by ±3 mm in the longitudinal direction and was compared with the original nonshifted plan with metrics of conformity number, homogeneity index, and maximal cord doses. An anthropomorphic phantom study using film measurements was carried out on a plan with 5-cm junction length. To mimic setup errors in the phantom study, fields were recalculated with isocenter shifts of 1, 3, 5, and 10 mm longitudinally, and compared with the original plans and measurements. Uniform dose coverage to the entire target volumes was achieved using the gradient optimization approach with averaged junction lengths of 6.7 ± 0.5 cm. The average conformity number and homogeneity index equaled 0.78 ± 0.03 and 1.09 ± 0.01, respectively. Setup errors of 3 mm per field (6 mm in worst-case scenario) caused on average 4.6% lower conformity number 2.5% higher homogeneity index and maximal cord dose of 4216.1 ± 98.2 cGy. When the junction length was 5 cm or longer, setup errors of 6 mm resulted in up to 12% dosimetric deviation. Consistent results were reached between film measurements and planned dose profiles in the junction area. Longitudinal setup errors directly reduce the dosimetric accuracy of the proton craniospinal irradiation treatment with matched proton pencil beam scanning fields. The reported technique creates a slow dose gradient in the junction area, which makes the treatment more robust to longitudinal setup errors compared to conventional feathering methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Initial Report of Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Posthysterectomy Patients With Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Lilie L., E-mail: lin@xrt.upenn.edu; Kirk, Maura; Scholey, Jessica; Taku, Nicolette; Kiely, Janid B.; White, Benjamin; Both, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicities associated with pencil beam scanning proton beam radiation therapy (PBS) for whole pelvis radiation therapy in women with gynecologic cancers and the results of a dosimetric comparison of PBS versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with posthysterectomy gynecologic cancer received PBS to the whole pelvis. The patients received a dose of 45 to 50.4 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in 1.8 Gy (RBE) daily fractions. Acute toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4. A dosimetric comparison between a 2-field posterior oblique beam PBS and an IMRT plan was conducted. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to assess the potential dosimetric differences between the 2 plans and PBS target coverage robustness relative to setup uncertainties. Results: The median patient age was 55 years (range 23-76). The primary site was cervical in 7, vaginal in 1, and endometrial in 3. Of the 11 patients, 7 received concurrent cisplatin, 1 each received sandwich carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy, both sandwich and concurrent chemotherapy, and concurrent and adjuvant chemotherapy, and 1 received no chemotherapy. All patients completed treatment. Of the 9 patients who received concurrent chemotherapy, the rate of grade 2 and 3 hematologic toxicities was 33% and 11%, respectively. One patient (9%) developed grade 3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity; no patient developed grade ≥3 genitourinary toxicity. The volume of pelvic bone marrow, bladder, and small bowel receiving 10 to 30 Gy was significantly lower with PBS than with intensity modulated radiation therapy (P<.001). The target coverage for all PBS plans was robust relative to the setup uncertainties (P>.05) with the clinical target volume mean dose percentage received by 95% and 98% of the target volume coverage changes within 2% for the individual plans. Conclusions: Our

  15. Scanning of irradiated silicon detectors using $\\alpha$ particles and low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Casse, G L; Glaser, M; Kohout, Z; Konícek, J; Lemeilleur, F; Leroy, C; Linhart, V; Mares, J J; Pospísil, S; Roy, P; Sopko, B; Sinor, M; Svejda, J; Vorobel, V; Wilhelm, I

    1999-01-01

    In a spectroscopic study of non-irradiated and proton-irradiated silicon diodes, the detectors were illuminated from the front side and from the rear side by various alpha particle sources (mainly ThC') and by monoenergetic protons with energies from 1.0 to 2.5~MeV. Their response characteristics have been studied as a function of the incoming particle energy and the applied bias voltage. The charge collection efficiency was determined as a function of fluence

  16. Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Malignancies of the Base of Skull: Treatment Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald; Melancon, Adam [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Poenisch, Falk; Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McAleer, Mary Frances; McGovern, Susan L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); DeMonte, Franco [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brown, Paul D.; Mahajan, Anita [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To describe treatment planning techniques and early clinical outcomes in patients treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma or chondrosarcoma of the skull base. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 through August 2011, 15 patients were treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma (n=10) or chondrosarcoma (n=5) at a single institution. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated and scored weekly and at all follow-up visits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Treatment planning techniques and dosimetric data were recorded and compared with those of passive scattering plans created with clinically applicable dose constraints. Results: Ten patients were treated with single-field-optimized scanning beam plans and 5 with multifield-optimized intensity modulated proton therapy. All but 2 patients received a simultaneous integrated boost as well. The mean prescribed radiation doses were 69.8 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range, 68-70 Gy [RBE]) for chordoma and 68.4 Gy (RBE) (range, 66-70) for chondrosarcoma. In comparison with passive scattering plans, spot scanning plans demonstrated improved high-dose conformality and sparing of temporal lobes and brainstem. Clinically, the most common acute toxicities included fatigue (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 8 patients) and nausea (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 6 patients). No toxicities of grades 3 to 5 were recorded. At a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 13-42 months), 1 patient had experienced local recurrence and a second developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients had magnetic resonance imaging-documented temporal lobe changes, and a third patient developed facial numbness. No other subacute or late effects were recorded. Conclusions: In comparison to passive scattering, treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy displayed improved high-dose conformality. Clinically, the treatment was well tolerated, and

  17. Spot scanning proton therapy plan assessment: design and development of a dose verification application for use in routine clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Walsh, Timothy J.; Beltran, Chris J.; Stoker, Joshua B.; Mundy, Daniel W.; Parry, Mark D.; Bues, Martin; Fatyga, Mirek

    2016-04-01

    The use of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been carried out clinically since the late 1800's. Early on however, it was discovered that a radiation dose sufficient to destroy cancer cells can also cause severe injury to surrounding healthy tissue. Radiation oncologists continually strive to find the perfect balance between a dose high enough to destroy the cancer and one that avoids damage to healthy organs. Spot scanning or "pencil beam" proton radiotherapy offers another option to improve on this. Unlike traditional photon therapy, proton beams stop in the target tissue, thus better sparing all organs beyond the targeted tumor. In addition, the beams are far narrower and thus can be more precisely "painted" onto the tumor, avoiding exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. To safely treat patients with proton beam radiotherapy, dose verification should be carried out for each plan prior to treatment. Proton dose verification systems are not currently commercially available so the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Mayo Clinic developed its own, called DOSeCHECK, which offers two distinct dose simulation methods: GPU-based Monte Carlo and CPU-based analytical. The three major components of the system include the web-based user interface, the Linux-based dose verification simulation engines, and the supporting services and components. The architecture integrates multiple applications, libraries, platforms, programming languages, and communication protocols and was successfully deployed in time for Mayo Clinic's first proton beam therapy patient. Having a simple, efficient application for dose verification greatly reduces staff workload and provides additional quality assurance, ultimately improving patient safety.

  18. An anthropomorphic breathing phantom of the thorax for testing new motion mitigation techniques for pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, R L; Zakova, M; Peroni, M; Bernatowicz, K; Bikis, C; Knopf, A K; Safai, S; Fernandez-Carmona, P; Tscharner, N; Weber, D C; Parkel, T C; Lomax, A J

    2017-03-21

    Motion-induced range changes and incorrectly placed dose spots strongly affect the quality of pencil-beam-scanned (PBS) proton therapy, especially in thoracic tumour sites, where density changes are large. Thus motion-mitigation techniques are necessary, which must be validated in a realistic patient-like geometry. We report on the development and characterisation of a dynamic, anthropomorphic, thorax phantom that can realistically mimic thoracic motions and anatomical features for verifications of proton and photon 4D treatments. The presented phantom is of an average thorax size, and consists of inflatable, deformable lungs surrounded by a skeleton and skin. A mobile 'tumour' is embedded in the lungs in which dosimetry devices (such as radiochromic films) can be inserted. Motion of the tumour and deformation of the thorax is controlled via a custom made pump system driving air into and out of the lungs. Comprehensive commissioning tests have been performed to evaluate the mechanical performance of the phantom, its visibility on CT and MR imaging and its feasibility for dosimetric validation of 4D proton treatments. The phantom performed well on both regular and irregular pre-programmed breathing curves, reaching peak-to-peak amplitudes in the tumour of  90% in the central planes of the target. The results of this study demonstrate that this anthropomorphic thorax phantom is suitable for imaging and dosimetric studies in a thoracic geometry closely-matched to lung cancer patients under realistic motion conditions.

  19. Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Using a Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Technique Without Match Line Changes for Field Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Haibo, E-mail: LinH@uphs.upenn.edu; Ding, Xuanfeng; Kirk, Maura; Liu, Haoyang; Zhai, Huifang; Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Lustig, Robert A.; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan; McDonough, James

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To propose and validate a craniospinal irradiation approach using a proton pencil beam scanning technique that overcomes the complexity of the planning associated with feathering match lines. Methods and Materials: Ten craniospinal irradiation patients had treatment planned with gradient dose optimization using the proton pencil beam scanning technique. The robustness of the plans was evaluated by shifting the isocenter of each treatment field by ±3 mm in the longitudinal direction and was compared with the original nonshifted plan with metrics of conformity number, homogeneity index, and maximal cord doses. An anthropomorphic phantom study using film measurements was carried out on a plan with 5-cm junction length. To mimic setup errors in the phantom study, fields were recalculated with isocenter shifts of 1, 3, 5, and 10 mm longitudinally, and compared with the original plans and measurements. Results: Uniform dose coverage to the entire target volumes was achieved using the gradient optimization approach with averaged junction lengths of 6.7 ± 0.5 cm. The average conformity number and homogeneity index equaled 0.78 ± 0.03 and 1.09 ± 0.01, respectively. Setup errors of 3 mm per field (6 mm in worst-case scenario) caused on average 4.6% lower conformity number 2.5% higher homogeneity index and maximal cord dose of 4216.1 ± 98.2 cGy. When the junction length was 5 cm or longer, setup errors of 6 mm resulted in up to 12% dosimetric deviation. Consistent results were reached between film measurements and planned dose profiles in the junction area. Conclusions: Longitudinal setup errors directly reduce the dosimetric accuracy of the proton craniospinal irradiation treatment with matched proton pencil beam scanning fields. The reported technique creates a slow dose gradient in the junction area, which makes the treatment more robust to longitudinal setup errors compared to conventional feathering methods.

  20. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into intact and tape-stripped human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szikszai, Z., E-mail: szikszai@atomki.h [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Kertesz, Zs. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Bodnar, E. [Department of Dermatology, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen (Hungary); Major, I. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Borbiro, I. [Abiol Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary); Kiss, A.Z. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Hunyadi, J. [Department of Dermatology, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2010-06-15

    Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the small particle size makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. In the present work the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into intact and tape-stripped human skin was investigated using nuclear microprobe techniques, such as proton induced X-ray spectroscopy and scanning transmission ion microscopy. Our results indicate that the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide, in a hydrophobic basis gel with 48 h application time, is limited to the stratum corneum layer of the intact skin. Removing the stratum corneum partially or entirely by tape-stripping did not cause the penetration of the particles into the deeper dermal layers; the zinc particles remained on the surface of the skin.

  1. SU-E-CAMPUS-J-06: The Impact of CT-Scan Energy On Range Uncertainty in Proton Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grantham, K [University of Missouri-Columbia, St. Louis, MO (United States); Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Zhao, T [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Klein, E [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of tube potential (kVp) on the CTnumber (HU) to proton stopping power ratio (PSPR) conversion table; the range uncertainty and the dosimetric change introduced by a mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table used to calculate dose are analyzed. Methods: A CIRS CT-ED phantom was scanned with a Philips Brilliance 64-slice scanner under 90kVp and 120kVp tube potentials. Two HU to PSPR curves were then created. Using Eclipse (Varian) a treatment plan was created for a single beam in a water phantom (HU=0) passing through a wedge-shaped heterogeneity (HU=1488). The dose was recalculated by changing only the HU to PSPR table used in the dose calculation. The change in range (the distal 90% isodose line) relative to a distal structure was recorded as a function of heterogeneity thickness in the beam. To show the dosimetric impact of a mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table, we repeated this procedure using a clinical plan comparing DVH data. Results: The HU to PSPR tables diverge for low-density bone and higher density structures. In the phantom plan, the divergence of the tables results in a change in range of ~1mm per cm of bone in the beam path for the HU used. For the clinical plan, a mismatch in kVp showed a 28% increase in mean dose to the brainstem along with a 10% increase in maximum dose to the brainstem center. Conclusion: A mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table can introduce significant uncertainty in the proton beam range. For dense bone, the measured range uncertainty is about 1mm per cm of bone in the beam. CT-scan energy verification should be employed, particularly when high-density media is in the proton beam path.

  2. An anthropomorphic breathing phantom of the thorax for testing new motion mitigation techniques for pencil beam scanning proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, R. L.; Zakova, M.; Peroni, M.; Bernatowicz, K.; Bikis, C.; Knopf, A. K.; Safai, S.; Fernandez-Carmona, P.; Tscharner, N.; Weber, D. C.; Parkel, T. C.; Lomax, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    Motion-induced range changes and incorrectly placed dose spots strongly affect the quality of pencil-beam-scanned (PBS) proton therapy, especially in thoracic tumour sites, where density changes are large. Thus motion-mitigation techniques are necessary, which must be validated in a realistic patient-like geometry. We report on the development and characterisation of a dynamic, anthropomorphic, thorax phantom that can realistically mimic thoracic motions and anatomical features for verifications of proton and photon 4D treatments. The presented phantom is of an average thorax size, and consists of inflatable, deformable lungs surrounded by a skeleton and skin. A mobile ‘tumour’ is embedded in the lungs in which dosimetry devices (such as radiochromic films) can be inserted. Motion of the tumour and deformation of the thorax is controlled via a custom made pump system driving air into and out of the lungs. Comprehensive commissioning tests have been performed to evaluate the mechanical performance of the phantom, its visibility on CT and MR imaging and its feasibility for dosimetric validation of 4D proton treatments. The phantom performed well on both regular and irregular pre-programmed breathing curves, reaching peak-to-peak amplitudes in the tumour of  materials were clearly visualised in CT scans, and all, except the bone and lung components, were MRI visible. Radiochromic film measurements in the phantom showed that imaging for repositioning was required (as for a patient treatment). Dosimetry was feasible with Gamma Index agreements (4%/4 mm) between film dose and planned dose  >90% in the central planes of the target. The results of this study demonstrate that this anthropomorphic thorax phantom is suitable for imaging and dosimetric studies in a thoracic geometry closely-matched to lung cancer patients under realistic motion conditions.

  3. Technical Note: Validation of halo modeling for proton pencil beam spot scanning using a quality assurance test pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Liyong, E-mail: linl@uphs.upenn.edu; Huang, Sheng; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D.; McDonough, James E.; Ainsley, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive test pattern in validating calculation models that include the halo component (low-dose tails) of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) spots. Such a pattern has been used previously for quality assurance purposes to assess spot shape, position, and dose. Methods: In this study, a scintillation detector was used to measure the test pattern in air at isocenter for two proton beam energies (115 and 225 MeV) of two IBA universal nozzles (UN #1 and UN #2). Planar measurements were compared with calculated dose distributions based on the weighted superposition of location-independent (UN #1) or location-dependent (UN #2) spot profiles, previously measured using a pair-magnification method and between two nozzles. Results: Including the halo component below 1% of the central dose is shown to improve the gamma-map comparison between calculation and measurement from 94.9% to 98.4% using 2 mm/2% criteria for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #1. In contrast, including the halo component below 1% of the central dose does not improve the gamma agreement for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #2, due to the cutoff of the halo component at off-axis locations. When location-dependent spot profiles are used for calculation instead of spot profiles at central axis, the gamma agreement is improved from 98.0% to 99.5% using 2 mm/2% criteria. The two nozzles clearly have different characteristics, as a direct comparison of measured data shows a passing rate of 89.7% for the 115 MeV proton beam. At 225 MeV, the corresponding gamma comparisons agree better between measurement and calculation, and between measurements in the two nozzles. Conclusions: In addition to confirming the primary component of individual PBS spot profiles, a comprehensive test pattern is useful for the validation of the halo component at off-axis locations, especially for low energy protons.

  4. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials: For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV){sub 50Gy} or PTV{sub 62.5Gy} (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results: SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D{sub 98} was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D{sub 98} was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D{sub 98} was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D{sub 98} was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions: The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup

  5. SU-F-J-51: A Cone-Based Scintillator Detector for IGRT QA for Scattered and Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesten, H; Clasie, B; Jee, K [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Nelson, B [Logos Systems Intl, Scotts Valley, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: IGRT commissioning and QA are critical components for precise delivery of proton treatment beams to patients. In order to ensure high quality IGRT, a new cone-based scintillator detector was evaluated for our QA activities for double-scattered and scanning proton modalities. This allows a routine evaluation of the gantry-angle dependent position offset between the radiation and imaging. Methods: The cone-based scintillator detector (XRV-124, Logos Systems, Int’l CA, USA) features a unique configuration of measuring stereotactic paths of proton and x-ray beams in a single setup with arbitrary gantry angles. For the beams-eye-view (BEV) analysis of x-ray crosshair images, a cylindrical representation of the cone image was newly developed. The calibration accuracy was evaluated using different CT resolutions for a range of 55 – 95mm in patient’s cranial direction and ±9mm in the lateral direction. Energy-dependent spot sizes (σ) of pencil beams were characterized and compared to measurements by the MatriXX detector (IBA, Germany). Iso-centric deviations between radiation and x-ray imaging were characterized as a function of gantry angle. Results: The position calibration of the detector was successfully verified with a reproducible positioning by x-ray imaging. The measurements were reproducible within clinical tolerances (±1mm). The spot size vs. energy at zero gantry angle measured with the scintillating cone detector agreed with the MatriXX detector measurements within 17%. Conclusion: The new approach to investigate the accuracy of IGRT and pencil beam properties could successfully be implemented into the QA program. The system will improve efficiency in our QA activities for proton treatments.

  6. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K., E-mail: aklee@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  7. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandula, Shravan [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu, Xiaorong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 50} values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life.

  8. Report on the Acadiana Research Laboratory nuclear microprobe system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Gary A.; Hollerman, William A.; Hynes, Shelly F.; Fournet, Justin; Bailey, Alan M.; Liao, Changgeng

    2001-07-01

    The Acadiana Research Laboratory of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette provides high energy ion beams for materials research. Major components of the ion beam systems include a National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator system with both SNICS and RF ion sources and a Varian CF-4 200 kV implanter. The NEC Pelletron has three operational beamlines that provide a wide range of capabilities for materials modification and analysis, including such techniques as PIXE, PIGE, RBS, RFS, TOF-ERDA and ion implantation. An Oxford Microbeams Ltd. microprobe system was recently declared operational with the attainment of a 1.5 μm×2.0 μm beam spot size. Microprobe techniques presently available include μPIXE, μRBS and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM).

  9. Gradient echo single scan inversion recovery: application to proton and fluorine relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, KowsalyaDevi; Ramanathan, K V

    2016-02-01

    Single scan longitudinal relaxation measurement experiments enable rapid estimation of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 ) as the time series of spin relaxation is encoded spatially in the sample at different slices resulting in an order of magnitude saving in time. We consider here a single scan inversion recovery pulse sequence that incorporates a gradient echo sequence. The proposed pulse sequence provides spectra with significantly enhanced signal to noise ratio leading to an accurate estimation of T1 values. The method is applicable for measuring a range of T1 values, thus indicating the possibility of routine use of the method for several systems. A comparative study of different single scan methods currently available is presented, and the advantage of the proposed sequence is highlighted. The possibility of the use of the method for the study of cross-correlation effects for the case of fluorine in a single shot is also demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. SU-F-T-188: A Robust Treatment Planning Technique for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Cranial Spinal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, M; Mehta, M; Badiyan, S; Young, K; Malyapa, R; Regine, W; Langen, K [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yam, M [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) cranial spinal irradiation (CSI) treatment planning technique robust against patient roll, isocenter offset and proton range uncertainty. Method: Proton PBS plans were created (Eclipse V11) for three previously treated CSI patients to 36 Gy (1.8 Gy/fractions). The target volume was separated into three regions: brain, upper spine and lower spine. One posterior-anterior (PA) beam was used for each spine region, and two posterior-oblique beams (15° apart from PA direction, denoted as 2PO-15) for the brain region. For comparison, another plan using one PA beam for the brain target (denoted as 1PA) was created. Using the same optimization objectives, 98% CTV was optimized to receive the prescription dose. To evaluate plan robustness against patient roll, the gantry angle was increased by 3° and dose was recalculated without changing the proton spot weights. On the re-calculated plan, doses were then calculated using 12 scenarios that are combinations of isocenter shift (±3mm in X, Y, and Z directions) and proton range variation (±3.5%). The worst-case-scenario (WCS) brain CTV dosimetric metrics were compared to the nominal plan. Results: For both beam arrangements, the brain field(s) and upper-spine field overlap in the T2–T5 region depending on patient anatomy. The maximum monitor unit per spot were 48.7%, 47.2%, and 40.0% higher for 1PA plans than 2PO-15 plans for the three patients. The 2PO-15 plans have better dose conformity. At the same level of CTV coverage, the 2PO-15 plans have lower maximum dose and higher minimum dose to the CTV. The 2PO-15 plans also showed lower WCS maximum dose to CTV, while the WCS minimum dose to CTV were comparable between the two techniques. Conclusion: Our method of using two posterior-oblique beams for brain target provides improved dose conformity and homogeneity, and plan robustness including patient roll.

  11. Benchmarking of a treatment planning system for spot scanning proton therapy: Comparison and analysis of robustness to setup errors of photon IMRT and proton SFUD treatment plans of base of skull meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, R., E-mail: ruth.harding2@wales.nhs.uk [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Swansea SA2 8QA (United Kingdom); Trnková, P.; Lomax, A. J. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Centre for Proton Therapy, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Weston, S. J.; Lilley, J.; Thompson, C. M.; Cosgrove, V. P. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Short, S. C. [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oncology and Clinical Research, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand St James’s Institute of Oncology, Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Loughrey, C. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Base of skull meningioma can be treated with both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and spot scanned proton therapy (PT). One of the main benefits of PT is better sparing of organs at risk, but due to the physical and dosimetric characteristics of protons, spot scanned PT can be more sensitive to the uncertainties encountered in the treatment process compared with photon treatment. Therefore, robustness analysis should be part of a comprehensive comparison between these two treatment methods in order to quantify and understand the sensitivity of the treatment techniques to uncertainties. The aim of this work was to benchmark a spot scanning treatment planning system for planning of base of skull meningioma and to compare the created plans and analyze their robustness to setup errors against the IMRT technique. Methods: Plans were produced for three base of skull meningioma cases: IMRT planned with a commercial TPS [Monaco (Elekta AB, Sweden)]; single field uniform dose (SFUD) spot scanning PT produced with an in-house TPS (PSI-plan); and SFUD spot scanning PT plan created with a commercial TPS [XiO (Elekta AB, Sweden)]. A tool for evaluating robustness to random setup errors was created and, for each plan, both a dosimetric evaluation and a robustness analysis to setup errors were performed. Results: It was possible to create clinically acceptable treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy of meningioma with a commercially available TPS. However, since each treatment planning system uses different methods, this comparison showed different dosimetric results as well as different sensitivities to setup uncertainties. The results confirmed the necessity of an analysis tool for assessing plan robustness to provide a fair comparison of photon and proton plans. Conclusions: Robustness analysis is a critical part of plan evaluation when comparing IMRT plans with spot scanned proton therapy plans.

  12. Beam specific planning target volumes incorporating 4DCT for pencil beam scanning proton therapy of thoracic tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Liyong; Huang, Sheng; Mayer, Rulon; Thomas, Andrew; Solberg, Timothy D; McDonough, James E; Simone, Charles B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using +-3% uncertainty in stopping power, and +-3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8X12X10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and...

  13. Homogeneity study of proton and carbon ion scanning beams using combinations of different spot sizes and grid sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ying; Wu, Xianwei; Li, Yongqiang; Zhao, Jun

    2017-09-08

    Different scanning ion beam delivery systems have different delivery accuracies, and the resulting delivery errors will affect field homogeneity. This study was performed to determine an appropriate combination of spot size (FWHM) and spot grid size (GS), which can provide homogenous dose distributions for both proton and carbon ion scanning beam radiotherapy. The combination of the two parameters is represented by a combination factor named n, which is the quotient of FWHM divided by GS. Delivery uncertainties of our beam delivery system were analyzed using log files from the treatment of 28 patients. Square fields for different n values were simulated with and without considering the delivery uncertainties, and the homogeneity of these square fields was analyzed. All spots were located on a rectilinear grid with equal spacing in the x and y directions. In addition to the simulations, we performed experimental measurements using both protons and carbon ions. We selected six energy levels for both proton and carbon ions. For each energy level, we created six square field plans with different n values (1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5). These plans were delivered and the field homogeneity was determined using a film measurement. The simulations demonstrated that under ideal condition (i.e., the delivery system has no delivery errors), the homogeneity is within 3% when n ≥ 1.1. When delivery uncertainties were included in the simulation, the homogeneity is within 3% when n ≥ 2.3. For film measurements, homogeneity under 3% was achieved when n ≥ 2.5. A practical method to determine the appropriate combination of spot size and grid size is here presented. Considering the uncertainties of the beam delivery system, an n value of 2.5 is good enough to meet the lateral homogeneity requests in our center. The methods used here can be easily repeated in other particle therapy centers. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. SU-E-T-286: Dose Verification of Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Using GafChromic EBT3 Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C; Tang, S; Mah, D [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Chan, M [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Basking Ridge, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose verification of spot-scanning proton pencil beam is performed via planar dose measurements at several depths using an ionization-chamber array, requiring repeat irradiations of each field for each depth. Here we investigate film dosimetry which has two advantages: higher resolution and efficiency from one-shot irradiation for multiple depths. Methods: Film calibration was performed using an EBT3 film at 20-cm depth of Plastic Water (CIRS, Norfolk, VA) exposed by a 10-level step wedge on a Proteus Plus proton system (IBA, Belgium). The calibration doses ranged from 25–250 cGy(RBE) for proton energies of 170–200 MeV. A uniform 1000 cm{sup 3} dose cube and a clinical prostate combined with seminal-vesicle and pelvic-nodes plan were used for this study. All treatment plans were generated in the RayStation (RaySearch Lab, Sweden). The planar doses at different depths for both cases were measured with film using triple-channel dosimetry and the MatriXX PT (IBA Dosimetry, Germany). The Gamma passing rates, dose-difference maps, and profiles of 2D planar doses measured with EBT3 film and MatriXX, versus treatment planning system (TPS) calculations were analyzed and compared using the FilmQA Pro (Ashland Inc., Bridgewater, NJ). Results: The EBT3 film measurement results matched well with the TPS calculation data with an average passing rate >95% for 2%/2mm and are comparable with the MatriXX measurements (0.7%, 1.8%, 3.8% mean differences corresponding to 3%/3mm, 3%/2mm, 2%/2mm, respectively). Overall passing rates for EBT3 films appear higher than those with MatriXX detectors. Conclusion: The energy dependence of the film response could be minimized by calibration using proton beam with mixed energies. The greater efficiency of the dose verification using GafChromic EBT3 results in a potential cost trade-off between room capacity and film cost. EBT3 film may offer distinct advantages in highly intensity-modulated fields due to its higher resolution

  15. Towards Effective and Efficient Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ronald. Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA program based on measurement alone can be very time consuming due to the highly modulated dose distributions of IMPT fields. Incorporating independent dose calculation and treatment log file analysis could reduce the time required for measurements. In this article, we summarize our effort to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program that consists of three components: measurements, independent dose calculation, and analysis of patient-specific treatment delivery log files. Measurements included two-dimensional (2D measurements using an ionization chamber array detector for each field delivered at the planned gantry angles with the electronic medical record (EMR system in the QA mode and the accelerator control system (ACS in the treatment mode, and additional measurements at depths for each field with the ACS in physics mode and without the EMR system. Dose distributions for each field in a water phantom were calculated independently using a recently developed in-house pencil beam algorithm and compared with those obtained using the treatment planning system (TPS. The treatment log file for each field was analyzed in terms of deviations in delivered spot positions from their planned positions using various statistical methods. Using this improved PSQA program, we were able to verify the integrity of the data transfer from the TPS to the EMR to the ACS, the dose calculation of the TPS, and the treatment delivery, including the dose delivered and spot positions. On the basis of this experience, we estimate that the in-room measurement time required for each complex IMPT case (e.g., a patient receiving bilateral IMPT for head and neck cancer is less than 1 h using the improved PSQA program. Our experience demonstrates that it is possible to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program for IMPT with the equipment and resources available in the clinic.

  16. Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo code parameters for spot scanning proton beam based on simulation with FLUKA general-purpose code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosu, Keita; Das, Indra J.; Moskvin, Vadim P.

    2016-01-01

    Spot scanning, owing to its superior dose-shaping capability, provides unsurpassed dose conformity, in particular for complex targets. However, the robustness of the delivered dose distribution and prescription has to be verified. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has the potential to generate significant advantages for high-precise particle therapy, especially for medium containing inhomogeneities. However, the inherent choice of computational parameters in MC simulation codes of GATE, PHITS and FLUKA that is observed for uniform scanning proton beam needs to be evaluated. This means that the relationship between the effect of input parameters and the calculation results should be carefully scrutinized. The objective of this study was, therefore, to determine the optimal parameters for the spot scanning proton beam for both GATE and PHITS codes by using data from FLUKA simulation as a reference. The proton beam scanning system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled in FLUKA, and the geometry was subsequently and identically transferred to GATE and PHITS. Although the beam transport is managed by spot scanning system, the spot location is always set at the center of a water phantom of 600 × 600 × 300 mm3, which is placed after the treatment nozzle. The percentage depth dose (PDD) is computed along the central axis using 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3 voxels in the water phantom. The PDDs and the proton ranges obtained with several computational parameters are then compared to those of FLUKA, and optimal parameters are determined from the accuracy of the proton range, suppressed dose deviation, and computational time minimization. Our results indicate that the optimized parameters are different from those for uniform scanning, suggesting that the gold standard for setting computational parameters for any proton therapy application cannot be determined consistently since the impact of setting parameters depends on the proton irradiation technique. We

  17. Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo code parameters for spot scanning proton beam based on simulation with FLUKA general-purpose code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosu, Keita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Moskvin, Vadim P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Spot scanning, owing to its superior dose-shaping capability, provides unsurpassed dose conformity, in particular for complex targets. However, the robustness of the delivered dose distribution and prescription has to be verified. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has the potential to generate significant advantages for high-precise particle therapy, especially for medium containing inhomogeneities. However, the inherent choice of computational parameters in MC simulation codes of GATE, PHITS and FLUKA that is observed for uniform scanning proton beam needs to be evaluated. This means that the relationship between the effect of input parameters and the calculation results should be carefully scrutinized. The objective of this study was, therefore, to determine the optimal parameters for the spot scanning proton beam for both GATE and PHITS codes by using data from FLUKA simulation as a reference. The proton beam scanning system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled in FLUKA, and the geometry was subsequently and identically transferred to GATE and PHITS. Although the beam transport is managed by spot scanning system, the spot location is always set at the center of a water phantom of 600 × 600 × 300 mm{sup 3}, which is placed after the treatment nozzle. The percentage depth dose (PDD) is computed along the central axis using 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm{sup 3} voxels in the water phantom. The PDDs and the proton ranges obtained with several computational parameters are then compared to those of FLUKA, and optimal parameters are determined from the accuracy of the proton range, suppressed dose deviation, and computational time minimization. Our results indicate that the optimized parameters are different from those for uniform scanning, suggesting that the gold standard for setting computational parameters for any proton therapy application cannot be determined consistently since the impact of setting parameters depends on the proton irradiation

  18. Consensus Guidelines for Implementing Pencil-Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Thoracic Malignancies on Behalf of the PTCOG Thoracic and Lymphoma Subcommittee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Knopf, Antje; Li, Heng; Mori, Shinichiro; Dong, Lei; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Liu, Wei; Badiyan, Shahed N.; Both, Stephen; Meijers, Arturs; Lin, Liyong; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Umegaki, Kikuo; Simone, Charles B.; Zhu, Xiaorong R.

    2017-01-01

    Pencil-beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy (PT), particularly intensity modulated PT, represents the latest advanced PT technology for treating cancers, including thoracic malignancies. On the basis of virtual clinical studies, PBS-PT appears to have great potential in its ability to tightly tailor

  19. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony; Albertini, Francesca; Persson, Gitte F; Josipovic, Mirjana; Aznar, Marianne C.; Weber, Damien C.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery

  20. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delive...

  1. SU-E-T-621: Analysis of Robustness of Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Technique for Delivery of Craniospinal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H; Kirk, M; Zhai, H; Ding, X; Liu, H; Hill-Kayser, C; Lustig, R; Tochner, Z; McDonough, J; Both, S [UniversityPennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the robustness and safety of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) planned with a proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) technique which overcomes the complexity of the planning associated with feathering match lines. Methods: Six CSI patients were planned with gradient-dose matching using PBS technique. Uniform dose coverage to the entire target volumes was achieved with averaged junction lengths of 6.9±0.3 cm. Robustness of the plans was evaluated by shifting the isocenter of each treatment field by ±3 mm in longitudinal direction and compared with the original non-shifted plan with metrics of conformity number (CN) and homogeneity index (HI). An anthropomorphic phantom study using film measurements was also carried out on a plan with 5 cm junction length. Results: For a given junction length, the dose errors were directly proportional to the setup errors. Setup errors of 3 mm from each field caused on average 3.5% lower CN and 2.1% higher HI. Minimal D95% to PTV and D98% to CTV were reduced by 2.2%±1.5% and 2.8%±1.7% respectively. A drop of maximal 6.8%±5.5% on the minimal dose to the cribriform plate was also observed. When the junction length was 5cm or longer, these 3mm setup errors from each field resulted in up to 12% dose errors. Consistent results were reached between film measurements and planned dose profiles in the junction area. Due to near-zero exit doses beyond the target volume, sparing of anterior organs such as heart, liver, lung and kidney were observed. Conclusions: Longitudinal setup errors directly reduce the dosimetric accuracy of the CSI treatment with matched proton fields. The reported technique creates a slow dose gradient in the junction area, which makes the treatment more robust and safe to longitudinal setup errors compared to conventional feathering methods.

  2. Characterization and validation of a Monte Carlo code for independent dose calculation in proton therapy treatments with pencil beam scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracchiolla, F.; Lorentini, S.; Widesott, L.; Schwarz, M.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a method of creating and validating a Monte Carlo (MC) model of a proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) machine using only commissioning measurements and avoiding the nozzle modeling. Measurements with a scintillating screen coupled with a CCD camera, ionization chamber and a Faraday Cup were used to model the beam in TOPAS without using any machine parameter information but the virtual source distance from the isocenter. Then the model was validated on simple Spread Out Bragg Peaks (SOBP) delivered in water phantom and with six realistic clinical plans (many involving 3 or more fields) on an anthropomorphic phantom. In particular the behavior of the moveable Range Shifter (RS) feature was investigated and its modeling has been proposed. The gamma analysis (3%,3 mm) was used to compare MC, TPS (XiO-ELEKTA) and measured 2D dose distributions (using radiochromic film). The MC modeling proposed here shows good results in the validation phase, both for simple irradiation geometry (SOBP in water) and for modulated treatment fields (on anthropomorphic phantoms). In particular head lesions were investigated and both MC and TPS data were compared with measurements. Treatment plans with no RS always showed a very good agreement with both of them (γ -Passing Rate (PR)  >  95%). Treatment plans in which the RS was needed were also tested and validated. For these treatment plans MC results showed better agreement with measurements (γ -PR  >  93%) than the one coming from TPS (γ -PR  <  88%). This work shows how to simplify the MC modeling of a PBS machine for proton therapy treatments without accounting for any hardware components and proposes a more reliable RS modeling than the one implemented in our TPS. The validation process has shown how this code is a valid candidate for a completely independent treatment plan dose calculation algorithm. This makes the code an important future tool for the patient specific QA verification process.

  3. SU-F-T-151: Measurement Evaluation of Skin Dose in Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J; Nichols, E; Strauss, D; Chung, H; Langner, U; Langen, K [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the skin dose and compare it with the calculated dose from a treatment planning system (TPS) for breast cancer treatment using scanning proton beam therapy (SPBT). Methods: A single en-face-beam SPBT plan was generated by a commercial TPS for two breast cancer patients. The treatment volumes were the entire breasts (218 cc and 1500 cc) prescribed to 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. A range shifter of 5 cm water equivalent thickness was used. The organ at risk (skin) was defined to be 5 mm thick from the surface. The skin doses were measured in water with an ADCL calibrated parallel plate (PP) chamber. The measured data were compared with the values calculated in the TPS. Skin dose calculations can be subject to uncertainties created by the definition of the external contour and the limitations of the correction based algorithms, such as proton convolution superposition. Hence, the external contours were expanded by 0, 3 mm and 1 cm to include additional pixels for dose calculation. In addition, to examine the effects of the cloth gown on the skin dose, the skin dose measurements were conducted with and without gown. Results: On average the measured skin dose was 4% higher than the calculated values. At deeper depths, the measured and calculated doses were in better agreement (< 2%). Large discrepancy occur for the dose calculated without external expansion due to volume averaging. The addition of the gown only increased the measured skin dose by 0.4%. Conclusion: The implemented TPS underestimated the skin dose for breast treatments. Superficial dose calculation without external expansion would result in large errors for SPBT for breast cancer.

  4. Investigation of elemental distribution in human femoral head by PIXE and SRXRF microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.X. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: yxzhang@sinap.ac.cn; Wang, Y.S. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: wangyinsong@sinap.ac.cn; Zhang, Y.P. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: zhangyongping@sinap.ac.cn; Zhang, G.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: zhangguilin@sinap.ac.cn; Huang, Y.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: huangyy@mail.ihep.ac.cn; He, W. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: hew@mail.ihep.ac.cn

    2007-07-15

    In order to study the distribution and possible degenerative processes inducing the loss of inorganic substances in bone and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method is used for the determination of elemental concentrations in femoral heads from five autopsies and seven patients with femoral neck fractures. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe analysis technique is used to scan a slice of the femoral head from its periphery to its center, via cartilage, compact and spongy zones. The specimen preparation and experiment procedure are described in detail. The results show that the concentrations of P, Ca, Fe, Cu, Sr in the control group are higher than those in the patient group, but the concentrations of S, K, Zn, Mn are not significantly different. The quantitative results of elemental distribution, such as Ca, P, K, Fe, Zn, Sr and Pb in bone slice tissue including cartilage, substantial compact and substantial spongy, are investigated. The data obtained show that the concentrations of Ca, P, K, (the major elements of bone composition), are obviously low in both spongy and cartilage zones in the patient group, but there are no remarkable differences in the compact zone. Combined with the correlations between P, K, Zn, Sr and Ca, the loss mechanism of minerals and the physiological functions of some metal elements in bone are also discussed.

  5. Proton therapy posterior beam approach with pencil beam scanning for esophageal cancer. Clinical outcome, dosimetry, and feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yue-Can [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center, Shenyang (China); University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Campus Box 356043, Seattle, WA (United States); Vyas, Shilpa; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Zeng, Jing [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Campus Box 356043, Seattle, WA (United States); Dang, Quang; Schultz, Lindsay [Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Proton Therapy Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Campus Box 356043, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Shankaran, Veena [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Medical Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Farjah, Farhood [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Surgical Outcomes Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Oelschlager, Brant K. [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study is to present the dosimetry, feasibility, and preliminary clinical results of a novel pencil beam scanning (PBS) posterior beam technique of proton treatment for esophageal cancer in the setting of trimodality therapy. From February 2014 to June 2015, 13 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (T3-4N0-2M0; 11 adenocarcinoma, 2 squamous cell carcinoma) were treated with trimodality therapy (neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by esophagectomy). Eight patients were treated with uniform scanning (US) and 5 patients were treated with a single posterior-anterior (PA) beam PBS technique with volumetric rescanning for motion mitigation. Comparison planning with PBS was performed using three plans: AP/PA beam arrangement; PA plus left posterior oblique (LPO) beams, and a single PA beam. Patient outcomes, including pathologic response and toxicity, were evaluated. All 13 patients completed chemoradiation to 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness, RBE) and 12 patients underwent surgery. All 12 surgical patients had an R0 resection and pathologic complete response was seen in 25 %. Compared with AP/PA plans, PA plans have a lower mean heart (14.10 vs. 24.49 Gy, P < 0.01), mean stomach (22.95 vs. 31.33 Gy, P = 0.038), and mean liver dose (3.79 vs. 5.75 Gy, P = 0.004). Compared to the PA/LPO plan, the PA plan reduced the lung dose: mean lung dose (4.96 vs. 7.15 Gy, P = 0.020) and percentage volume of lung receiving 20 Gy (V{sub 20}; 10 vs. 17 %, P < 0.01). Proton therapy with a single PA beam PBS technique for preoperative treatment of esophageal cancer appears safe and feasible. (orig.) [German] Wir stellen die Vergleichsdosimetrie, Realisierbarkeit und die vorlaeufigen klinischen Ergebnisse einer neuen Pencil-Beam-Scanning(-PBS)/Posterior-Beam-Methode innerhalb der Protonentherapie fuer Speiseroehrenkrebs im Setting einer trimodalen Therapie vor. Von Februar 2014 bis Juni 2015 erhielten 13 Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenem

  6. Spatial investigation of some uranium minerals using nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valter, Anton A.; Knight, Kim B.; Eremenko, Gelij K.; Magilin, Dmitry V.; Ponomarov, Artem A.; Pisansky, Anatoly I.; Romanenko, Alexander V.; Ponomarev, Alexander G.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, several individual grains of uranium minerals—uraninite with high content of Ca, Ca-rich boltwoodite, growths of uranophane with β-uranophane, and weeksite—from different uranium deposits were studied by a scanning nuclear microprobe. Particle-induced X-ray emission technique provided by the microprobe (µ-PIXE) was carried out to obtain a concentration and 2D distribution of elements in these minerals. In addition, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) provided by a scanning electron microscope was used. The types of minerals were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. Results of this study improved the understanding of trace elemental composition of the uranium minerals depending on their origin. Obtained signatures could be linked then to the sample provenance. Such data are important for nuclear forensics to identify the ore types and even specific ore bodies, when only small samples may be available for analysis. In this study, the µ-PIXE technique was used for obtaining the 2D distribution of trace elements that are not commonly measured by SEM-EDS at the relevant concentrations. The detected levels and precisions of elements determination by µ-PIXE were also defined. Using µ-PIXE, several micro mineral inclusions such as phosphate with high level of V and Si were identified. The age of the uranium minerals was estimated due to a significant content of radiogenic Pb that provides an additional parameter for determination of the main attributive characteristics of the minerals. This work also showed that due to its high elemental sensitivity the nuclear microprobe can be a new analytical tool for creating a nuclear forensic database from the known uranium deposits and a subsequent analysis of the intercepted illicit materials.

  7. Pencil beam scanning proton therapy for treatment of the retroperitoneum after nephrectomy for Wilms tumor: A dosimetric comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Jennifer; Lin, Haibo; Both, Stefan; Tochner, Zelig; Balis, Frank; Hill-Kayser, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Multimodality treatment for patients with Wilms tumor has improved patient survival, but is associated with acute and long-term toxicity, partially due to irradiation. Proton therapy using pencil beam scanning (PBS) is a promising technique to reduce dose to organs at risk (OAR). In this study, we evaluate PBS plans for postoperative irradiation in patients with Wilms tumor. Patients were treated with anterior-posterior-posterior-anterior (AP-PA) photon fields encompassing the preoperative tumor volume. Patients requiring whole lung irradiation were treated with AP-PA photon fields covering the bilateral lungs. Prescription doses were generally 1,080 and 1,200 cGy, respectively. Flank PBS plans encompassing the ipsilateral retroperitoneum and para-arotic nodes were generated for dosimetric evaluation. Treatment records and comparison plans of 11 patients were reviewed. Mean dose and median dose to 50% or more of the contralateral kidney (D50) were 135 cGy and 139 cGy with photons and 52 cGy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) (P = 0.009) and 5 cGy RBE (P = 0.000001) with PBS. Mean dose and median D50 to bowel was 639 cGy and 979 cGy with photons and 379 cGy RBE (P = 0.001) and 47 cGy RBE (P = 0.004) with PBS. Mean dose and median D50 to the liver were 755 cGy and 1,013 cGy with photons and 411 cGy RBE (P = 0.02) and 132 cGy RBE (P = 0.02) with PBS. For patients with right-sided tumors, mean liver dose following sequential whole lung irradiation was 1,252 cGy with photons and 845 cGy RBE (P = 0.04) with PBS. PBS proton therapy is a feasible method for irradiating the retroperitoneum and provides significant sparing of dose to critical OAR. This may translate to improved long-term health outcomes for patients and warrants further clinical investigation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Microprobe investigations of irradiated uranium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleykamp, H.

    1973-12-01

    A shielded Cameca microprobe, MS 46, was used to examine a UC sample canned in SAP and irradiated to a burnup of 0.7%. An annular zone at about 40% of the outer sample radius was seen to contain precipitates loaded with fission products; microprobe analysis showed the precipitates to be U/sub 2/ (Tc, Ru, Rh)C/sub 2/. Small amounts of palladium can be stabilized in this phase. Zirconium and molybdenum were verified in homogeneous distribution in the fuel. The Vickers hardness of the irradiated UC is 1000 to 1200 kg/mm/sup 2/. No signs of incompatibility with the canning material were detected. (auth)

  9. Measurement of stray radiation within a scanning proton therapy facility: EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise of active dosimetry systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, J., E-mail: jad.farah@irsn.fr; Trompier, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Pôle Radioprotection de l’Homme, BP17, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92260 (France); Mares, V.; Schinner, K.; Wielunski, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Neuherberg 85764 (Germany); Romero-Expósito, M.; Domingo, C. [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain); Trinkl, S. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Neuherberg 85764, Germany and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching 85748 (Germany); Dufek, V. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Břehová 7, Prague 115 19, Czech Republic and National Radiation Protection Institute, Bartoškova 28, Prague 140 00 (Czech Republic); Klodowska, M.; Liszka, M.; Stolarczyk, L.; Olko, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Kubancak, J. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Břehová 7, Prague 115 19, Czech Republic and Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež CZ-250 68 (Czech Republic); and others

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize stray radiation around the target volume in scanning proton therapy and study the performance of active neutron monitors. Methods: Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS WG9—Radiation protection in medicine) carried out a large measurement campaign at the Trento Centro di Protonterapia (Trento, Italy) in order to determine the neutron spectra near the patient using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry (BSS) systems. In addition, the work focused on acknowledging the performance of different commercial active dosimetry systems when measuring neutron ambient dose equivalents, H{sup ∗}(10), at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room. Detectors included three TEPCs—tissue equivalent proportional counters (Hawk type from Far West Technology, Inc.) and six rem-counters (WENDI-II, LB 6411, RadEye™ NL, a regular and an extended-range NM2B). Meanwhile, the photon component of stray radiation was deduced from the low-lineal energy transfer part of TEPC spectra or measured using a Thermo Scientific™ FH-40G survey meter. Experiments involved a water tank phantom (60 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}) representing the patient that was uniformly irradiated using a 3 mm spot diameter proton pencil beam with 10 cm modulation width, 19.95 cm distal beam range, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field size. Results: Neutron spectrometry around the target volume showed two main components at the thermal and fast energy ranges. The study also revealed the large dependence of the energy distribution of neutrons, and consequently of out-of-field doses, on the primary beam direction (directional emission of intranuclear cascade neutrons) and energy (spectral composition of secondary neutrons). In addition, neutron mapping within the facility was conducted and showed the highest H{sup ∗}(10) value of ∼51 μSv Gy{sup −1}; this was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H{sup ∗}(10) values

  10. Micro Electron MicroProbe and Sample Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, Harish; Bearman, Gregory; Douglas, Susanne; Bronikowski, Michael; Urgiles, Eduardo; Kowalczyk, Robert; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    A proposed, low-power, backpack-sized instrument, denoted the micro electron microprobe and sample analyzer (MEMSA), would serve as a means of rapidly performing high-resolution microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) of soil, dust, and rock particles in the field. The MEMSA would be similar to an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) but would be much smaller and designed specifically for field use in studying effects of geological alteration at the micrometer scale. Like an ESEM, the MEMSA could be used to examine uncoated, electrically nonconductive specimens. In addition to the difference in size, other significant differences between the MEMSA and an ESEM lie in the mode of scanning and the nature of the electron source.

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of a commercial proton spot scanning Monte-Carlo dose algorithm: comparisons against measurements and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Jatinder; Maes, Dominic; Egan, Alexander; Bowen, Stephen R.; St. James, Sara; Janson, Martin; Wong, Tony; Bloch, Charles

    2017-10-01

    RaySearch Americas Inc. (NY) has introduced a commercial Monte Carlo dose algorithm (RS-MC) for routine clinical use in proton spot scanning. In this report, we provide a validation of this algorithm against phantom measurements and simulations in the GATE software package. We also compared the performance of the RayStation analytical algorithm (RS-PBA) against the RS-MC algorithm. A beam model (G-MC) for a spot scanning gantry at our proton center was implemented in the GATE software package. The model was validated against measurements in a water phantom and was used for benchmarking the RS-MC. Validation of the RS-MC was performed in a water phantom by measuring depth doses and profiles for three spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams with normal incidence, an SOBP with oblique incidence, and an SOBP with a range shifter and large air gap. The RS-MC was also validated against measurements and simulations in heterogeneous phantoms created by placing lung or bone slabs in a water phantom. Lateral dose profiles near the distal end of the beam were measured with a microDiamond detector and compared to the G-MC simulations, RS-MC and RS-PBA. Finally, the RS-MC and RS-PBA were validated against measured dose distributions in an Alderson-Rando (AR) phantom. Measurements were made using Gafchromic film in the AR phantom and compared to doses using the RS-PBA and RS-MC algorithms. For SOBP depth doses in a water phantom, all three algorithms matched the measurements to within  ±3% at all points and a range within 1 mm. The RS-PBA algorithm showed up to a 10% difference in dose at the entrance for the beam with a range shifter and  >30 cm air gap, while the RS-MC and G-MC were always within 3% of the measurement. For an oblique beam incident at 45°, the RS-PBA algorithm showed up to 6% local dose differences and broadening of distal fall-off by 5 mm. Both the RS-MC and G-MC accurately predicted the depth dose to within  ±3% and distal fall-off to within 2

  12. Geant4 simulation of clinical proton and carbon ion beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the full 3-D pencil beam scanning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, Edoardo; Riccardi, Cristina; Rimoldi, Adele; Tamborini, Aurora [University of Pavia and the INFN section of Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Piersimoni, Pierluigi [Division of Radiation Research, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Ciocca, Mario [Medical Physics Unit, CNAO Foundation, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the possibility to use carbon ion beams delivered with active scanning modality, for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) in Pavia. The radiotherapy with carbon ions offers many advantages with respect to the radiotherapy with protons or photons, such as a higher relative radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) and a dose release better localized to the tumor. The Monte Carlo (MC) Geant4 10.00 patch-03 toolkit is used to reproduce the complete CNAO extraction beam line, including all the active and passive components characterizing it. The simulation of proton and carbon ion beams and radiation scanned field is validated against CNAO experimental data. For the irradiation study of the ocular melanoma an eye-detector, representing a model of a human eye, is implemented in the simulation. Each element of the eye is reproduced with its chemical and physical properties. Inside the eye-detector a realistic tumor volume is placed and used as the irradiation target. A comparison between protons and carbon ions eye irradiations allows to study possible treatment benefits if carbon ions are used instead of protons. (authors)

  13. Carbon corrosion of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layers studied by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Adam P.; Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Lee, Vincent; West, Marcia; Colbow, Vesna; Dutta, Monica; Wessel, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) at the C 1s, F 1s and S 2p edges has been used to investigate degradation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM-FC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) subjected to accelerated testing protocols. Quantitative chemical maps of the catalyst, carbon support and ionomer in the cathode layer are reported for beginning-of-test (BOT), and end-of-test (EOT) samples for two types of carbon support, low surface area carbon (LSAC) and medium surface area carbon (MSAC), that were exposed to accelerated stress testing with upper potentials (UPL) of 1.0, 1.2, and 1.3 V. The results are compared in order to characterize catalyst layer degradation in terms of the amounts and spatial distributions of these species. Pt agglomeration, Pt migration and corrosion of the carbon support are all visualized, and contribute to differing degrees in these samples. It is found that there is formation of a distinct Pt-in-membrane (PTIM) band for all EOT samples. The cathode thickness shrinks due to loss of the carbon support for all MSAC samples that were exposed to the different upper potentials, but only for the most aggressive testing protocol for the LSAC support. The amount of ionomer per unit volume significantly increases indicating it is being concentrated in the cathode as the carbon corrosion takes place. S 2p spectra and mapping of the cathode catalyst layer indicates there are still sulfonate groups present, even in the most damaged material.

  14. Spot Scanning-Based Proton Therapy for Intracranial Meningioma: Long-Term Results From the Paul Scherrer Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Damien C., E-mail: damien.weber@unige.ch [Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Koch, Tamara; Ares, Carmen; Geismar, Jan H.; Schertler, Andreas; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hug, Eugen B. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Viligen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Background: To assess the long-term clinical results of spot scanning proton therapy (PT) in the treatment of intracranial meningiomas. Patients and Methods: Thirty-nine patients with meningioma (histologically proven 34/39) were treated with PT between July 1997 and January 2010. Thirty-two (82.1%) patients were treated as primary treatment (exclusive PT, n = 8; postoperative PT, n = 24). Mean age was 48.3 {+-} 17.9 years and 32 (82.1%) patients had skull base lesions. For patients undergoing surgery, 24 patients had a diagnosis of World Health Organization (WHO) Grade I and 10 of a WHO Grade II/III meningioma, respectively. The female-to-male ratio was 3.3. The median administered dose was 56.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]) (range, 52.2-66.6) at 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 0.76 to 546.5 cm{sup 3} (median, 21.5). Late toxicity was assessed according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Mean follow-up time was 62.0 months and all patients were followed for >6 months. Results: Six patients presented with tumor recurrence and 6 patients died during follow-up, of which 4 of tumor progression. Five-year actuarial local control and overall survival rates were 84.8% and 81.8%, respectively, for the entire cohort and 100% for benign histology. Cumulative 5-year Grade {>=}3 late toxicity-free survival was 84.5%. On univariate analysis, LC was negatively influenced by WHO grade (p = 0.001), GTV (p = 0.013), and male gender (p = 0.058). Conclusions: PT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with untreated, recurrent, or incompletely resected intracranial meningiomas. WHO grade and tumor volume was an adverse prognostic factor for local control.

  15. SU-E-T-375: Passive Scattering to Pencil-Beam-Scanning Comparison for Medulloblastoma Proton Therapy: LET Distributions and Radiobiological Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, D; MacDonald, S; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the linear energy transfer (LET) distributions between passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton radiation therapy techniques for medulloblastoma patients and study the potential radiobiological implications. Methods: A group of medulloblastoma patients, previously treated with passive scattering (PS) proton craniospinal irradiation followed by prosterior fossa or involved field boost, were selected from the patient database of our institution. Using the beam geometry and planning computed tomography (CT) image sets of the original treatment plans, pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment plans were generated for the cranial treatment for each patient, with average beam spot size of 8mm (sigma in air at isocenter). 3-dimensional dose and LET distributions were calculated by Monte Carlo methods (TOPAS) both for the original passive scattering and new pencil beam scanning treatment plans. LET volume histograms were calculated for the target and OARs and compared for the two delivery methods. Variable RBE weighted dose distributions and volume histograms were also calculated using a variable dose and LET-based model. Results: Better dose conformity was achieved with PBS planning compared to PS, leading to increased dose coverage for the boost target area and decreased average dose to the structures adjacent to it and critical structures outside the whole brain treatment field. LET values for the target were lower for PBS plans. Elevated LET values for OARs close to the boosted target areas were noticed, due to end of range of proton beams falling inside these structures, resulting in higher RBE weighted dose for these structures compared to the clinical RBE value of 1.1. Conclusion: Transitioning from passive scattering to pencil beam scanning proton radiation treatment can be dosimetrically beneficial for medulloblastoma patients. LET–guided treatment planning could contribute to better decision making for these cases, especially for

  16. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Jenny, E-mail: jenny.dueck@psi.ch [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Knopf, Antje-Christin [Joint Department of Physics at the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Lomax, Antony [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Albertini, Francesca [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Persson, Gitte F. [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Josipovic, Mirjana [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Weber, Damien C. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); University of Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Munck af Rosenschöld, Per [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V{sub 95%} (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V{sub 95%} was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V{sub 95%} (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V{sub 95%} are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  17. Stained glasses under the nuclear microprobe: A window into history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilarigues, M.; Fernandes, P.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, R. C.

    2009-06-01

    Stained glass fragments from the 15th, 16th and 20th centuries, belonging to Mosteiro de Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha (Portugal), were characterised non-destructively in a nuclear microprobe. The work aimed at finding the composition of the glasses and glass paintings and relating these with the corresponding production periods. The elemental compositions of the glass fragments were obtained by means of scanning micro-beam Particle Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) spectrometry in selected cross-sections. These were complemented by micro X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry. Characterisation of colour was performed by optical absorption spectroscopy in the UV-vis range, while the corrosion products were identified by optical microscopy and μ-FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red) spectroscopy in combination with the data generated by μ-PIXE. Nuclear microprobe analysis allowed unveiling the compositions and structures, in particular of glass paintings and corrosion products. While it is not surprising that Fe, Cu and Pb were the main elements identified in the grisaille paintings of all studied periods, as well as Ag and Cu found in the glasses decorated with yellow silver painting, their distribution gave important clues on the materials and techniques used to manufacture these stained glasses. Furthermore, it allowed establishing a definite relation between the compositions found and the periods of production, with the added bonus of correctly reassigning the manufacturing period of some samples.

  18. Microprobe PIXE analysis and EDX analysis on the brain of patients with Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumoto, S. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Fujii, K.; Kakimi, S.; Mizutani, T.; Matsushima, H.; Ishikawa, A.

    1996-12-31

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer`s disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer`s disease type), we examined aluminium (Al) in the brain (hippocampus) of patients with Alzheimer`s disease using heavy ion (5 MeV Si{sup 3+}) microprobe particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si{sup 2+}) have several times higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. We also examined Al in the brain of these patients by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). (1) Al was detected in the cell nuclei isolated from the brain of patients with Alzheimer`s disease using 5 MeV Si{sup 3+} microprobe PIXE analysis, and EDX analysis. (2) EDX analysis demonstrated high levels of Al in the nucleolus of nerve cells in frozen sections prepared from the brain of these patients. Our results support the theory that Alzheimer`s disease is caused by accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

  19. A patient-specific aperture system with an energy absorber for spot scanning proton beams: Verification for clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Keisuke, E-mail: k.yasui.20@west-med.jp [Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, 1-1-1, Hirate-cho, Kita-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken 462-8508, Japan and Department of Radiological Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20, Daikouminami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki; Omachi, Chihiro; Kibe, Yoshiaki; Hayashi, Kensuke; Shibata, Hiroki; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Nikawa, Eiki; Asai, Kumiko; Shimomura, Akira; Kinou, Hideto; Isoyama, Shigeru; Mizoe, Jun-etsu [Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, 1-1-1, Hirate-cho, Kita-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken 462-8508 (Japan); Fujii, Yusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Hirayama, Shusuke [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 7-1-1, Omika-chou, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1292 (Japan); Nagamine, Yoshihiko [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, 3-1-1, Saiwai-chou, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 317-8511 (Japan); Shibamoto, Yuta [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1, Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken 467-8601 (Japan); Komori, Masataka [Department of Radiological Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20, Daikouminami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken 461-8673 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In the authors’ proton therapy system, the patient-specific aperture can be attached to the nozzle of spot scanning beams to shape an irradiation field and reduce lateral fall-off. The authors herein verified this system for clinical application. Methods: The authors prepared four types of patient-specific aperture systems equipped with an energy absorber to irradiate shallow regions less than 4 g/cm{sup 2}. The aperture was made of 3-cm-thick brass and the maximum water equivalent penetration to be used with this system was estimated to be 15 g/cm{sup 2}. The authors measured in-air lateral profiles at the isocenter plane and integral depth doses with the energy absorber. All input data were obtained by the Monte Carlo calculation, and its parameters were tuned to reproduce measurements. The fluence of single spots in water was modeled as a triple Gaussian function and the dose distribution was calculated using a fluence dose model. The authors compared in-air and in-water lateral profiles and depth doses between calculations and measurements for various apertures of square, half, and U-shaped fields. The absolute doses and dose distributions with the aperture were then validated by patient-specific quality assurance. Measured data were obtained by various chambers and a 2D ion chamber detector array. Results: The patient-specific aperture reduced the penumbra from 30% to 70%, for example, from 34.0 to 23.6 mm and 18.8 to 5.6 mm. The calculated field width for square-shaped apertures agreed with measurements within 1 mm. Regarding patient-specific aperture plans, calculated and measured doses agreed within −0.06% ± 0.63% (mean ± SD) and 97.1% points passed the 2%-dose/2 mm-distance criteria of the γ-index on average. Conclusions: The patient-specific aperture system improved dose distributions, particularly in shallow-region plans.

  20. High-speed microprobe for roughness measurements in high-aspect-ratio microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Lutz; Brand, Uwe; Bütefisch, Sebastian; Ahbe, Thomas; Weimann, Thomas; Peiner, Erwin; Frank, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Cantilever-type silicon microprobes with an integrated tip and a piezoresistive signal read out have successfully proven to bridge the gap between scanning force microscopy and stylus profilometry. Roughness measurements in high-aspect-ratio microstructures (HARMS) with depths down to 5 mm and widths down to 50 µm have been demonstrated. To improve the scanning speed up to 15 mm s-1, the wear of the tip has to be reduced. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique with alumina (Al2O3) has been tested for this purpose. Repeated wear measurements with coated and uncoated microprobe cantilevers have been carried out on a roughness standard at a speed of 15 mm s-1. The tip shape and the wear have been measured using a new probing tip reference standard containing rectangular silicon grooves with widths from 0.3 µm to 3 µm. The penetration depth of the microprobe allows one to measure the wear of the tip as well as the tip width and the opening angle of the tip. The roughness parameters obtained on the roughness standard during wear experiments agree well with the reference values measured with a calibrated stylus instrument, nevertheless a small amount of wear still is observable. Further research is necessary in order to obtain wear resistant microprobe tips for non-destructive inspection of microstructures in industry and microform measurements, for example in injection nozzles.

  1. Measurement of visible cross sections in proton-lead collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV in van der Meer scans with the ALICE detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anti.cíc, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Biel.cík, J.; Biel.cíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A R; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divìa, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J. Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; H. Khan, K.; Haake, R.; Haaland, O.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H S Y; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Krav.cáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron De Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; Léon Monźon, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Ĺopez Torres, E.; Lu, X. G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mare.s, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Mískowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montano Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paíc, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petrá.cek, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Ploskón, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H O; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Safarík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Sándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J M; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Sumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J M; Szabo, A.; Szanto De Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Munoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limon, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C S; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I. K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the Large Hadron Collider provided proton-lead and lead-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair s NN=5.02 TeV . Van der Meer scans were performed for both configurations of colliding beams, and the cross section was measured for two reference processes, based on

  2. Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo code parameters for uniform scanning proton beam based on simulation with FLUKA general-purpose code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosu, Keita; Takashina, Masaaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Das, Indra J.; Moskvin, Vadim P.

    2014-10-01

    Although three general-purpose Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tools: Geant4, FLUKA and PHITS have been used extensively, differences in calculation results have been reported. The major causes are the implementation of the physical model, preset value of the ionization potential or definition of the maximum step size. In order to achieve artifact free MC simulation, an optimized parameters list for each simulation system is required. Several authors have already proposed the optimized lists, but those studies were performed with a simple system such as only a water phantom. Since particle beams have a transport, interaction and electromagnetic processes during beam delivery, establishment of an optimized parameters-list for whole beam delivery system is therefore of major importance. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimized parameters list for GATE and PHITS using proton treatment nozzle computational model. The simulation was performed with the broad scanning proton beam. The influences of the customizing parameters on the percentage depth dose (PDD) profile and the proton range were investigated by comparison with the result of FLUKA, and then the optimal parameters were determined. The PDD profile and the proton range obtained from our optimized parameters list showed different characteristics from the results obtained with simple system. This led to the conclusion that the physical model, particle transport mechanics and different geometry-based descriptions need accurate customization in planning computational experiments for artifact-free MC simulation.

  3. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavpetič, P., E-mail: primoz.vavpetic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, K. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeromel, L. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potočnik, N. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pongrac, P. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Plant Physiology, University of Bayreuth, Universitätstr. 30, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pelicon, P. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on–off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm{sup 2} and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  4. SU-F-T-123: The Simulated Effect of the Breath-Hold Reproducibility Treating Locally-Advanced Lung Cancer with Pencil Beam Scanned Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, J [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Perrin, R [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Persson, G F; Engelholm, S A [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lomax, A [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Physics, ETH, Zürich (Switzerland); Josipovic, M; Rosenschöld, AF [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Weber, D C [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); University of Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Munck, P

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The breath-hold (BH) technique has been suggested to mitigate motion and reduce target coverage degradation due to motion effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inter-BH residual motion on the dose distribution for pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton therapy of locally-advanced lung cancer patients. Methods: A dataset of visually-guided BH CT scans was acquired (10 scans per patient) taken from five lung cancer patients: three intra-fractionally repeated CT scans on treatment days 2,16 and 31, in addition to the day 0 planning CT scan. Three field intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed on the planning CT scan. Dose delivery on fraction 2, 16 and 31 were simulated on the three consecutive CT scans, assuming BH duration of 20s and soft tissue match. The dose was accumulated in the planning CT using deformable image registration, and scaled to simulate the full treatment of 66Gy(RBE) in 33 fractions. Results: The mean dose to the lungs and heart, and maximum dose to the spinal cord and esophagus were within 1% of the planned dose. The CTV V95% decreased and the inhomogeneity (D5%–D95%) increased on average 4.1% (0.4–12.2%) and 5.8% (2.2–13.4%), respectively, over the five patient cases. Conclusion: The results showed that the BH technique seems to spare the OARs in spite of inter-BH residual motion. However, small degradation of target coverage occurred for all patients, with 3/5 patients having a decrease in V95% ≤1%. For the remaining two patients, where V95% decreased up to 12%, the cause could be related to treatment related anatomical changes and, as in photon therapy, plan adaptation may be necessary to ensure target coverage. This study showed that BH could be a potential treatment option to reliably mitigate motion for the treatment of locally-advanced lung cancer using PBS proton therapy.

  5. Comparison of organ-at-risk sparing and plan robustness for spot-scanning proton therapy and volumetric modulated arc photon therapy in head-and-neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barten, Danique L. J., E-mail: d.barten@vumc.nl; Tol, Jim P.; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R. [Department of Radiotherapy, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1118, Amsterdam 1081 HV (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) aims to improve organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing over photon radiotherapy. However, it may be less robust for setup and range uncertainties. The authors investigated OAR sparing and plan robustness for spot-scanning proton planning techniques and compared these with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) photon plans. Methods: Ten HNC patients were replanned using two arc VMAT (RapidArc) and spot-scanning proton techniques. OARs to be spared included the contra- and ipsilateral parotid and submandibular glands and individual swallowing muscles. Proton plans were made using Multifield Optimization (MFO, using three, five, and seven fields) and Single-field Optimization (SFO, using three fields). OAR sparing was evaluated using mean dose to composite salivary glands (Comp{sub Sal}) and composite swallowing muscles (Comp{sub Swal}). Plan robustness was determined for setup and range uncertainties (±3 mm for setup, ±3% HU) evaluating V95% and V107% for clinical target volumes. Results: Averaged over all patients Comp{sub Sal}/Comp{sub Swal} mean doses were lower for the three-field MFO plans (14.6/16.4 Gy) compared to the three-field SFO plans (20.0/23.7 Gy) and VMAT plans (23.0/25.3 Gy). Using more than three fields resulted in differences in OAR sparing of less than 1.5 Gy between plans. SFO plans were significantly more robust than MFO plans. VMAT plans were the most robust. Conclusions: MFO plans had improved OAR sparing but were less robust than SFO and VMAT plans, while SFO plans were more robust than MFO plans but resulted in less OAR sparing. Robustness of the MFO plans did not increase with more fields.

  6. Proton transfer and protein conformation dynamics in photosensitive proteins by time-resolved step-scan Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; Heberle, Joachim

    2014-06-27

    Monitoring the dynamics of protonation and protein backbone conformation changes during the function of a protein is an essential step towards understanding its mechanism. Protonation and conformational changes affect the vibration pattern of amino acid side chains and of the peptide bond, respectively, both of which can be probed by infrared (IR) difference spectroscopy. For proteins whose function can be repetitively and reproducibly triggered by light, it is possible to obtain infrared difference spectra with (sub)microsecond resolution over a broad spectral range using the step-scan Fourier transform infrared technique. With -10(2)-10(3) repetitions of the photoreaction, the minimum number to complete a scan at reasonable spectral resolution and bandwidth, the noise level in the absorption difference spectra can be as low as -10(-) (4), sufficient to follow the kinetics of protonation changes from a single amino acid. Lower noise levels can be accomplished by more data averaging and/or mathematical processing. The amount of protein required for optimal results is between 5-100 µg, depending on the sampling technique used. Regarding additional requirements, the protein needs to be first concentrated in a low ionic strength buffer and then dried to form a film. The protein film is hydrated prior to the experiment, either with little droplets of water or under controlled atmospheric humidity. The attained hydration level (g of water / g of protein) is gauged from an IR absorption spectrum. To showcase the technique, we studied the photocycle of the light-driven proton-pump bacteriorhodopsin in its native purple membrane environment, and of the light-gated ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 solubilized in detergent.

  7. SU-F-T-217: A Comprehensive Monte-Carlo Study of Out-Of-Field Secondary Neutron Spectra in a Scanned-Beam Proton Therapy Treatment Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englbrecht, F; Parodi, K [LMU Munich, Department of Medical Physics, Garching / Munich, Bavaria (Germany); Trinkl, S; Mares, V; Ruehm, W; Wielunski, M [Helmholtz Zentrum Munich, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg, Bavaria (Germany); Wilkens, J [Technical University of Munich, Department of Physics, Munich, Germany, Garching, Bavaria (Germany); Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Hillbrand, M [Rinecker Proton Therapy Center, Munich, Bavaria (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To simulate secondary neutron radiation-fields produced at different positions during phantom irradiation inside a scanning proton therapy gantry treatment room. Further, to identify origin, energy distribution and angular emission as function of proton beam energy. Methods: GEANT4 and FLUKA Monte-Carlo codes were used to model the relevant parts of the treatment room in a gantry-equipped pencil beam scanning proton therapy facility including walls, floor, metallic gantry-components, patient table and the homogeneous PMMA target. The proton beams were modeled based on experimental beam ranges in water and spot shapes in air. Neutron energy spectra were simulated at 0°, 45°, 90° and 135° relative to the beam axis at 2m distance from isocenter, as well as 11×11 cm2 fields for 75MeV, 140MeV, 200MeV and for 118MeV with 5cm PMMA range-shifter. The total neutron energy distribution was recorded for these four positions and proton energies. Additionally, the room-components generating secondary neutrons in the room and their contributions to the total spectrum were identified and quantified. Results: FLUKA and GEANT4 simulated neutron spectra showed good general agreement in the whole energy range of 10{sup −}9 to 10{sup 2} MeV. Comparison of measured spectra with the simulated contributions of the various room components helped to limit the complexity of the room model, by identifying the dominant contributions to the secondary neutron spectrum. The iron of the bending magnet and counterweight were identified as sources of secondary evaporation-neutrons, which were lacking in simplified room models. Conclusion: Thorough Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed to complement Bonner-sphere spectrometry measurements of secondary neutrons in a clinical proton therapy treatment room. Such calculations helped disentangling the origin of secondary neutrons and their dominant contributions to measured spectra, besides providing a useful validation of widely

  8. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  9. A high energy, heavy ion microprobe for ion beam research on the tandem accelerator at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D.D.; Siegele, R.; Dytlewski, N.

    1996-04-01

    A comprehensive review is given on the production and use of heavy ion beams with spot sizes of a few {mu}m. The development of a high energy, heavy ion microprobe at ANSTO and its possible applications are discussed. The microprobe is designed to focus a wide range of ion beam types, from light ions such as protons up to ions as heavy as iodine. Details of the ion beam optics, optical calculations and a description of the proposed microbeam design are given. The unique combination of high energy, heavy ions and improved detection systems will provide high sensitivity elemental composition and depth profiling information, allowing surface topography and 3D surface reconstruction to be performed on a broad range of materials. 86 refs., 5 tabs., 15 figs.

  10. Integration of a real-time tumor monitoring system into gated proton spot-scanning beam therapy: an initial phantom study using patient tumor trajectory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Shimizu, Shinichi; Fujii, Yusuke; Umezawa, Masumi; Takao, Seishin; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Sutherland, Kenneth; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Maeda, Kenichiro; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-07-01

    In spot-scanning proton therapy, the interplay effect between tumor motion and beam delivery leads to deterioration of the dose distribution. To mitigate the impact of tumor motion, gating in combination with repainting is one of the most promising methods that have been proposed. This study focused on a synchrotron-based spot-scanning proton therapy system integrated with real-time tumor monitoring. The authors investigated the effectiveness of gating in terms of both the delivered dose distribution and irradiation time by conducting simulations with patients' motion data. The clinically acceptable range of adjustable irradiation control parameters was explored. Also, the relation between the dose error and the characteristics of tumor motion was investigated. A simulation study was performed using a water phantom. A gated proton beam was irradiated to a clinical target volume (CTV) of 5 × 5 × 5 cm(3), in synchronization with lung cancer patients' tumor trajectory data. With varying parameters of gate width, spot spacing, and delivered dose per spot at one time, both dose uniformity and irradiation time were calculated for 397 tumor trajectory data from 78 patients. In addition, the authors placed an energy absorber upstream of the phantom and varied the thickness to examine the effect of changing the size of the Bragg peak and the number of required energy layers. The parameters with which 95% of the tumor trajectory data fulfill our defined criteria were accepted. Next, correlation coefficients were calculated between the maximum dose error and the tumor motion characteristics that were extracted from the tumor trajectory data. With the assumed CTV, the largest percentage of the data fulfilled the criteria when the gate width was ± 2 mm. Larger spot spacing was preferred because it increased the number of paintings. With a prescribed dose of 2 Gy, it was difficult to fulfill the criteria for the target with a very small effective depth (the sum of an assumed

  11. ns-μs Time-Resolved Step-Scan FTIR of ba3 Oxidoreductase from Thermus thermophilus: Protonic Connectivity of w941-w946-w927

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonis Nicolaides

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved step-scan FTIR spectroscopy has been employed to probe the dynamics of the ba3 oxidoreductase from Thermus thermophilus in the ns-μs time range and in the pH/pD 6–9 range. The data revealed a pH/pD sensitivity of the D372 residue and of the ring-A propionate of heme a3. Based on the observed transient changes a model in which the protonic connectivity of w941-w946-927 to the D372 and the ring-A propionate of heme a3 is described.

  12. Application of Nuclear Microprobes towards Understanding Complex Ore Geo-electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymanski R.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on recent development on the CSIRO Nuclear Microprobe (NMP towards catering for long exposure mapping required for large area scanning. A new data collection system based on Labview FPGA highly co-ordinated with beam transport sits at the heart of the upgrade. These upgrades are discussed and an example of the systems use for μ-Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE analysis in the area of complex ore geo-electrochemistry is briefly described.

  13. Impact of Real-Time Image Gating on Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Tumors: A Simulation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanehira, Takahiro [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Matsuura, Taeko, E-mail: matsuura@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Takao, Seishin; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Fujii, Yusuke; Fujii, Takaaki [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ito, Yoichi M. [Department of Biostatistics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Miyamoto, Naoki [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Inoue, Tetsuya [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Katoh, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Shimizu, Shinichi [Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Umegaki, Kikuo [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of real-time-image gated proton beam therapy for lung tumors and to establish a suitable size for the gating window (GW). Methods and Materials: A proton beam gated by a fiducial marker entering a preassigned GW (as monitored by 2 fluoroscopy units) was used with 7 lung cancer patients. Seven treatment plans were generated: real-time-image gated proton beam therapy with GW sizes of ±1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 mm and free-breathing proton therapy. The prescribed dose was 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness)/10 fractions to 99% of the target. Each of the 3-dimensional marker positions in the time series was associated with the appropriate 4-dimensional computed tomography phase. The 4-dimensional dose calculations were performed. The dose distribution in each respiratory phase was deformed into the end-exhale computed tomography image. The D99 and D5 to D95 of the clinical target volume scaled by the prescribed dose with criteria of D99 >95% and D5 to D95 <5%, V20 for the normal lung, and treatment times were evaluated. Results: Gating windows ≤ ±2 mm fulfilled the CTV criteria for all patients (whereas the criteria were not always met for GWs ≥ ±3 mm) and gave an average reduction in V20 of more than 17.2% relative to free-breathing proton therapy (whereas GWs ≥ ±4 mm resulted in similar or increased V20). The average (maximum) irradiation times were 384 seconds (818 seconds) for the ±1-mm GW, but less than 226 seconds (292 seconds) for the ±2-mm GW. The maximum increased considerably at ±1-mm GW. Conclusion: Real-time-image gated proton beam therapy with a GW of ±2 mm was demonstrated to be suitable, providing good dose distribution without greatly extending treatment time.

  14. SU-D-304-05: Validation of Low-Dose-Tail Modeling for Proton Pencil Beam Spot Scanning Using a Quality Assurance Test Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Huang, S; Kang, M; Solberg, T; McDonough, J; Ainsley, C [Univ Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this manuscript is to demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive test pattern in validating calculation models of the low-dose tails of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) spots. Such a pattern has been used previously for quality assurance purposes to assess spot shape and location, and for determining monitor units. Methods: In this study, a scintillation detector was used to measure the test pattern in air at isocenter for two proton beam energies (115 and 225 MeV) of two IBA universal nozzles (UN). Planar measurements were compared with calculated dose distribution based on the weighted superposition of spot profiles previously measured using a pair-magnification method. Results: Including the halo component below 1% of the central dose is shown to improve the gamma-map comparison between calculation and measurement from 94.9% to 98.4% using 2 mm/2% criteria for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #1. In contrast, including the halo component below 1% of the central dose does not improve the gamma agreement for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #2, due to the cutoff of the halo component at off-axis locations. When location-dependent spot profiles are used for calculation instead of spot profiles at central axis, the gamma agreement is improved from 98.0% to 99.5% using 2 mm/2% criteria. The cutoff of the halo component is smaller at higher energies, and is not observable for the 225 MeV proton beam for UN #2. Conclusion: In conclusion, the use of a comprehensive test pattern can facilitate the validation of the halo component of proton PBS spots at off axis locations. The cutoff of the halo component should be taken into consideration for large fields or PBS systems that intend to trim spot profiles using apertures. This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.

  15. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  16. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Wolden, S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yeh, B [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm{sup 3} of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  17. SU-E-T-189: Commission Range Shifter On a Spot Scanning Proton System Using Raystation Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, X; Wu, H [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Rosen, L [willis knighton medical center, Shreveport, Louisiana (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To treat superficial target e.g. chest wall, head&neck or cranial cases, we commissioned two range shifter(RS) in Raystation4.0 with 7.37cm(RS1) and 4.1cm(RS2) Water Equivalent Thickness(WET) respectively. However, current beam model has limitations due to the secondary scattered proton. This study provides a detailed and critical commission data and provides suggestions for using RS in clinic. Methods: RS’ WET was verified by Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber from 120MeV to 226.7MeV before TPS modeling. Spot characteristics were measured using 2D scintillate detector at ISO with different air gap. A 8×8×10cm3 cube is created in 8cm depth of water to verify the absolute dose accuracy. Plans were created with different air gap using both RS. Absolute dose verification was measured along the central axis from distal end to surface using PPC05. 10 clinical RS2 plans were measured using MatriXXPT in 3 planes (proximal, distal and midSOBP). Results: RS material’s proton stopping power is energy dependent(from 70MeV to 226.7MeV) ranging from 7.42 to 7.31cm and from 4.10 to 4.03cm respectively. We chose 7.37cm (RS1) and 4.10cm (RS2) to favor the low and median proton energy. With different air gap(3cm to 32cm), spot size expands from 3.2mm to 5.5mm(RS1) and from 3.1mm to 4.1mm(RS2) respectively(226.7MeV in air, 1-sigma). For the absolute dose verification, the larger air gap and shallower depth causes larger discrepancy between TPS and measurements. All 10 clinical plans with 5–10cm air gap passed gamma index 95% with 3%/3mm criteria and outputs differences were within 3%. Conclusion: We strongly recommend each institution to verify the WET independently and choose the value to fit the clinical needs. To minimize the output difference in Raystation4.0 while avoid potential collision to the patient, we recommend to use 5–10cm air gap to minimize the output difference within 2% and preferably use RS with smaller WET if possible.

  18. Environmental applications of the LANL nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, D. D.; Herrin, J. M.; Abell, R.; George, M.; Stimac, J.; Gauerke, E. R.; Denniston, R. F.

    1997-07-01

    The LANL nuclear microprobe has been used to study the distributions of trace elements (TE) of environmental interest including: (1) metals in coal and fly ash, (2) Pb in the Bandelier Tuff (BT), (3) Ba in tree rings, (4) Mn, Fe, Sr and Y in Yucca Mountain calcites. These studies illustrate environmental problems that can be addressed using nuclear microprobes. Micro-PIXE (MP) analyses with 5-10 micrometer spatial resolution provide constraints on processes that redistribute contaminants in the environment, and hence may help answer environmental problems where fine-scale chemical records are important. MP analyses of particulates in coal and ash show that pyrite contains As, Se, Hg and Pb; macerals contain Cr, halogens and S; cenospheres contain As, Se and Ni; and hematite ash contains Ni and As. Understanding these elemental modes of occurrence allows prediction of metal behavior in boilers and may enhance compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments. Fine-grained high-Pb minerals were identified using SEM and MP analyses of BT minerals. These minerals were from samples associated with deep-groundwater wells containing Pb at levels greater than regulatory limits. Pb is concentrated in Pb minerals (e.g. cerussite), smectite, and hematite formed during low-T alteration of tuff. Understanding mineralogic speciation of metals may provide insights into sources of groundwater pollution. Tree rings from ponderosa pines that grew in a Ba-contaminated drainage were analyzed using MP. Ba concentrations are typically higher in rings that formed after operations discharging Ba to the environment began. Such tree-ring analyses may ultimately provide information on rates of contaminant migration in the environment. TE in zoned calcites from Yucca Mountain were analyzed by MP. Calcites from the saturated zone (SZ) have distinct chemical signatures (high Fe, Mn and low Y). No calcites in the unsaturated zone with SZ chemical signatures were found using MP. MP analyses of vein

  19. Evaluation of Robustness to Setup and Range Uncertainties for Head and Neck Patients Treated With Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyapa, Robert; Lowe, Matthew; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J; Weber, Damien C; Albertini, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the robustness of head and neck plans for treatment with intensity modulated proton therapy to range and setup errors, and to establish robustness parameters for the planning of future head and neck treatments. Ten patients previously treated were evaluated in terms of robustness to range and setup errors. Error bar dose distributions were generated for each plan, from which several metrics were extracted and used to define a robustness database of acceptable parameters over all analyzed plans. The patients were treated in sequentially delivered series, and plans were evaluated for both the first series and for the combined error over the whole treatment. To demonstrate the application of such a database in the head and neck, for 1 patient, an alternative treatment plan was generated using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach and plans of differing numbers of fields. The robustness database for the treatment of head and neck patients is presented. In an example case, comparison of single and multiple field plans against the database show clear improvements in robustness by using multiple fields. A comparison of sequentially delivered series and an SIB approach for this patient show both to be of comparable robustness, although the SIB approach shows a slightly greater sensitivity to uncertainties. A robustness database was created for the treatment of head and neck patients with intensity modulated proton therapy based on previous clinical experience. This will allow the identification of future plans that may benefit from alternative planning approaches to improve robustness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Integration of a real-time tumor monitoring system into gated proton spot-scanning beam therapy: An initial phantom study using patient tumor trajectory data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Takao, Seishin; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Sutherland, Kenneth; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Maeda, Kenichiro [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Shimizu, Shinichi; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8648 (Japan); Fujii, Yusuke; Umezawa, Masumi [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 319-1221 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: In spot-scanning proton therapy, the interplay effect between tumor motion and beam delivery leads to deterioration of the dose distribution. To mitigate the impact of tumor motion, gating in combination with repainting is one of the most promising methods that have been proposed. This study focused on a synchrotron-based spot-scanning proton therapy system integrated with real-time tumor monitoring. The authors investigated the effectiveness of gating in terms of both the delivered dose distribution and irradiation time by conducting simulations with patients' motion data. The clinically acceptable range of adjustable irradiation control parameters was explored. Also, the relation between the dose error and the characteristics of tumor motion was investigated.Methods: A simulation study was performed using a water phantom. A gated proton beam was irradiated to a clinical target volume (CTV) of 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 cm{sup 3}, in synchronization with lung cancer patients' tumor trajectory data. With varying parameters of gate width, spot spacing, and delivered dose per spot at one time, both dose uniformity and irradiation time were calculated for 397 tumor trajectory data from 78 patients. In addition, the authors placed an energy absorber upstream of the phantom and varied the thickness to examine the effect of changing the size of the Bragg peak and the number of required energy layers. The parameters with which 95% of the tumor trajectory data fulfill our defined criteria were accepted. Next, correlation coefficients were calculated between the maximum dose error and the tumor motion characteristics that were extracted from the tumor trajectory data.Results: With the assumed CTV, the largest percentage of the data fulfilled the criteria when the gate width was {+-}2 mm. Larger spot spacing was preferred because it increased the number of paintings. With a prescribed dose of 2 Gy, it was difficult to fulfill the

  1. Clinically applicable Monte Carlo-based biological dose optimization for the treatment of head and neck cancers with spot-scanning proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Tseung, H Wan Chan; Kreofsky, C R; Ma, D; Beltran, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Monte Carlo (MC) based inverse biological planning for the treatment of head and neck tumors in spot-scanning proton therapy. Methods: Recently, a fast and accurate Graphics Processor Unit (GPU)-based MC simulation of proton transport was developed and used as the dose calculation engine in a GPU-accelerated IMPT optimizer. Besides dose, the dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) can be simultaneously scored, which makes biological dose (BD) optimization possible. To convert from LETd to BD, a linear relation was assumed. Using this novel optimizer, inverse biological planning was applied to 4 patients: 2 small and 1 large thyroid tumor targets, and 1 glioma case. To create these plans, constraints were placed to maintain the physical dose (PD) within 1.25 times the prescription while maximizing target BD. For comparison, conventional IMRT and IMPT plans were created for each case in Eclipse (Varian, Inc). The same critical structure PD constraints were use...

  2. Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Muenter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-hedielberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

  3. Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma: Clinical Outcome of 26 Patients Treated at Paul Scherrer Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rombi, Barbara [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); ATreP (Provincial Agency for Proton Therapy), Trento (Italy); Ares, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.ares@psi.ch [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hug, Eugen B. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Staab, Adrian; Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Timmermann, Beate [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); WestGerman Proton Therapy Center Essen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical results of fractionated spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) in 26 pediatric patients treated at Paul Scherrer Institute for chordoma (CH) or chondrosarcoma (CS) of the skull base or axial skeleton. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2010, 19 CH and 7 CS patients with tumors originating from the skull base (17) and the axial skeleton (9) were treated with PT. Mean age at the time of PT was 13.2 years. The mean prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) for CH and 66 Gy (RBE) for CS, at a dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Results: Mean follow-up was 46 months. Actuarial 5-year local control (LC) rates were 81% for CH and 80% for CS. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) was 89% for CH and 75% for CS. Two CH patients had local failures: one is alive with evidence of disease, while the other patient succumbed to local recurrence in the surgical pathway. One CS patient died of local progression of the disease. No high-grade late toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Spot-scanning PT for pediatric CH and CS patients resulted in excellent clinical outcomes with acceptable rates of late toxicity. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to fully assess tumor control and late effects of treatment.

  4. SU-E-T-262: Planning for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS): Applications of Gradient Optimization for Field Matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H; Kirk, M; Zhai, H; Ding, X; Liu, H; Hill-Kayser, C; Lustig, R; Tochner, Z; Deville, C; Vapiwala, N; McDonough, J; Both, S [University Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To propose the gradient optimization(GO) approach in planning for matching proton PBS fields and present two commonly used applications in our institution. Methods: GO is employed for PBS field matching in the scenarios that when the size of the target is beyond the field size limit of the beam delivery system or matching is required for beams from different angles to either improve the sparing of important organs or to pass through a short and simple beam path. Overlap is designed between adjacent fields and in the overlapped junction, the dose was optimized such that it gradually decreases in one field and the decrease is compensated by increase from another field. Clinical applications of this approach on craniospinal irradiation(CSI) and whole pelvis treatment were presented. Mathematical model was developed to study the relationships between dose errors, setup errors and junction lengths. Results: Uniform and conformal dose coverage to the entire target volumes was achieved for both applications using GO approach. For CSI, the gradient matching (6.7cm junction) between fields overcame the complexity of planning associated with feathering match lines. A slow dose gradient in the junction area significantly reduced the sensitivity of the treatment to setup errors. For whole pelvis, gradient matching (4cm junction) between posterior fields for superior target and bilateral fields for inferior target provided dose sparing to organs such as bowel, bladder and rectum. For a setup error of 3 mm in longitudinal direction from one field, mathematical model predicted dose errors of 10%, 6% and 4.3% for junction length of 3, 5 and 7cm. Conclusion: This GO approach improves the quality of the PBS treatment plan with matching fields while maintaining the safety of treatment delivery relative to potential misalignments.

  5. SU-E-T-383: Evaluation of Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique for Post-Mastectomy Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depauw, N; Patel, S; MacDonald, S; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath-hold techniques (DIBH) have been shown to carry significant dosimetric advantages in conventional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of DIBH techniques for post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) using proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Method: Ten PMRT patients, with or without breast implant, underwent two helical CT scans: one with free breathing and the other with deep inspiration breath-hold. A prescription of 50.4 Gy(RBE) to the whole chest wall and lymphatics (axillary, supraclavicular, and intramammary nodes) was considered. PBS plans were generated for each patient’s CT scan using Astroid, an in-house treatment planning system, with the institution conventional clinical PMRT parameters; that is, using a single en-face field with a spot size varying from 8 mm to 14 mm as a function of energy. Similar optimization parameters were used in both plans in order to ensure appropriate comparison. Results: Regardless of the technique (free breathing or DIBH), the generated plans were well within clinical acceptability. DIBH allowed for higher target coverage with better sparing of the cardiac structures. The lung doses were also slightly improved. While the use of DIBH techniques might be of interest, it is technically challenging as it would require a fast PBS delivery, as well as the synchronization of the beam delivery with a gating system, both of which are not currently available at the institution. Conclusion: DIBH techniques display some dosimetric advantages over free breathing treatment for PBS PMRT patients, which warrants further investigation. Plans will also be generated with smaller spot sizes (2.5 mm to 5.5 mm and 5 mm to 9 mm), corresponding to new generation machines, in order to further quantify the dosimetric advantages of DIBH as a function of spot size.

  6. The new confocal heavy ion microprobe beamline at ANSTO: The first microprobe resolution tests and applications for elemental imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuovic, Z.; Siegele, R.; Cohen, D. D.; Mann, M.; Ionescu, M.; Button, D.; Long, S.

    2017-08-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science facility at ANSTO has been expanded with the new NEC 6 MV ;SIRIUS; accelerator system in 2015. In this paper we present a detailed description of the new nuclear microprobe-Confocal Heavy Ion Micro-Probe (CHIMP) together with results of the microprobe resolution testing and the elemental analysis performed on typical samples of mineral ore deposits and hyper-accumulating plants regularly measured at ANSTO. The CHIMP focusing and scanning systems are based on the OM-150 Oxford quadrupole triplet and the OM-26 separated scan-coil doublet configurations. A maximum ion rigidity of 38.9 amu-MeV was determined for the following nuclear microprobe configuration: the distance from object aperture to collimating slits of 5890 mm, the working distance of 165 mm and the lens bore diameter of 11 mm. The overall distance from the object to the image plane is 7138 mm. The CHIMP beamline has been tested with the 3 MeV H+ and 6 MeV He2+ ion beams. The settings of the object and collimating apertures have been optimized using the WinTRAX simulation code for calculation of the optimum acceptance settings in order to obtain the highest possible ion current for beam spot sizes of 1 μm and 5 μm. For optimized aperture settings of the CHIMP the beam brightness was measured to be ∼0.9 pA μm-2 mrad-2 for 3 MeV H+ ions, while the brightness of ∼0.4 pA μm-2 mrad-2 was measured for 6 MeV He2+ ions. The smallest beam sizes were achieved using a microbeam with reduced particle rate of 1000 Hz passing through the object slit apertures several micrometers wide. Under these conditions a spatial resolution of ∼0.6 μm × 1.5 μm for 3 MeV H+ and ∼1.8 μm × 1.8 μm for 6 MeV He2+ microbeams in horizontal (and vertical) dimension has been achieved. The beam sizes were verified using STIM imaging on 2000 and 1000 mesh Cu electron microscope grids.

  7. Clinically Applicable Monte Carlo–based Biological Dose Optimization for the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancers With Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Chan Tseung, Hok Seum, E-mail: wanchantseung.hok@mayo.edu; Ma, Jiasen; Kreofsky, Cole R.; Ma, Daniel J.; Beltran, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Our aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of fast Monte Carlo (MC)–based inverse biological planning for the treatment of head and neck tumors in spot-scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Recently, a fast and accurate graphics processor unit (GPU)–based MC simulation of proton transport was developed and used as the dose-calculation engine in a GPU-accelerated intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimizer. Besides dose, the MC can simultaneously score the dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET{sub d}), which makes biological dose (BD) optimization possible. To convert from LET{sub d} to BD, a simple linear relation was assumed. By use of this novel optimizer, inverse biological planning was applied to 4 patients, including 2 small and 1 large thyroid tumor targets, as well as 1 glioma case. To create these plans, constraints were placed to maintain the physical dose (PD) within 1.25 times the prescription while maximizing target BD. For comparison, conventional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and IMPT plans were also created using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) in each case. The same critical-structure PD constraints were used for the IMRT, IMPT, and biologically optimized plans. The BD distributions for the IMPT plans were obtained through MC recalculations. Results: Compared with standard IMPT, the biologically optimal plans for patients with small tumor targets displayed a BD escalation that was around twice the PD increase. Dose sparing to critical structures was improved compared with both IMRT and IMPT. No significant BD increase could be achieved for the large thyroid tumor case and when the presence of critical structures mitigated the contribution of additional fields. The calculation of the biologically optimized plans can be completed in a clinically viable time (<30 minutes) on a small 24-GPU system. Conclusions: By exploiting GPU acceleration, MC-based, biologically optimized plans were created for

  8. Assessing the radiation-induced second cancer risk in proton therapy for pediatric brain tumors: the impact of employing a patient-specific aperture in pencil beam scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Changran; Moteabbed, Maryam; Xie, Yunhe; Schuemann, Jan; Yock, Torunn; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation-induced second cancer risks for in-field and out-of-field organs and tissues for pencil beam scanning (PBS) and passive scattering proton therapy (PPT) and assess the impact of adding patient-specific apertures to sharpen the penumbra in pencil beam scanning for pediatric brain tumor patients. Five proton therapy plans were created for each of three pediatric patients using PPT as well as PBS with two spot sizes (average sigma of ~17 mm and ~8 mm at isocenter) and choice of patient-specific apertures. The lifetime attributable second malignancy risks for both in-field and out-of-field tissues and organs were compared among five delivery techniques. The risk for in-field tissues was calculated using the organ equivalent dose, which is determined by the dose volume histogram. For out-of-field organs, the organ-specific dose equivalent from secondary neutrons was calculated using Monte Carlo and anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. We find that either for small spot size PBS or for large spot size PBS, a patient-specific aperture reduces the in-field cancer risk to values lower than that for PPT. The reduction for large spot sizes (on average 43%) is larger than for small spot sizes (on average 21%). For out-of-field organs, the risk varies only marginally by employing a patient-specific aperture (on average from  -2% to 16% with increasing distance from the tumor), but is still one to two orders of magnitude lower than that for PPT. In conclusion, when pencil beam spot sizes are large, the addition of apertures to sharpen the penumbra decreases the in-field radiation-induced secondary cancer risk. There is a slight increase in out-of-field cancer risk as a result of neutron scatter from the aperture, but this risk is by far outweighed by the in-field risk benefit from using an aperture with a large PBS spot size. In general, the risk for developing a second malignancy in out-of-field organs for PBS remains

  9. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ice, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barbee, T.; Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Howells, M.; Thompson, A.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Yun, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E{>=}5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called {open_quotes}jelly roll{close_quotes} or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes.

  10. The elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloy in molten salt corrosion by using nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qiantao; Liu, Ke; Gao, Jie; Li, Xiaolin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Nickel-based alloys as candidate materials for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR), need to be used under high temperature in molten salt environment. In order to ensure the safety of the reactor running, it is necessary to study the elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloys in the high temperature molten salts. In this work, the scanning nuclear microprobe at Fudan University was applied to study the elemental move. The Nickel-based alloy samples were corroded by molten salt at different temperatures. The element concentrations in the Nickel-based alloys samples were determined by the scanning nuclear microprobe. Micro-PIXE results showed that the element concentrations changed from the interior to the exterior of the alloy samples after the corrosion.

  11. Evaluation of the influence of double and triple Gaussian proton kernel models on accuracy of dose calculations for spot scanning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Shusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Fujii, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Umezawa, Masumi; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Hosaka, Masahiro; Yasui, Keisuke; Omachi, Chihiro; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    The main purpose in this study was to present the results of beam modeling and how the authors systematically investigated the influence of double and triple Gaussian proton kernel models on the accuracy of dose calculations for spot scanning technique. The accuracy of calculations was important for treatment planning software (TPS) because the energy, spot position, and absolute dose had to be determined by TPS for the spot scanning technique. The dose distribution was calculated by convolving in-air fluence with the dose kernel. The dose kernel was the in-water 3D dose distribution of an infinitesimal pencil beam and consisted of an integral depth dose (IDD) and a lateral distribution. Accurate modeling of the low-dose region was important for spot scanning technique because the dose distribution was formed by cumulating hundreds or thousands of delivered beams. The authors employed a double Gaussian function as the in-air fluence model of an individual beam. Double and triple Gaussian kernel models were also prepared for comparison. The parameters of the kernel lateral model were derived by fitting a simulated in-water lateral dose profile induced by an infinitesimal proton beam, whose emittance was zero, at various depths using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The fitted parameters were interpolated as a function of depth in water and stored as a separate look-up table. These stored parameters for each energy and depth in water were acquired from the look-up table when incorporating them into the TPS. The modeling process for the in-air fluence and IDD was based on the method proposed in the literature. These were derived using MC simulation and measured data. The authors compared the measured and calculated absolute doses at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) under various volumetric irradiation conditions to systematically investigate the influence of the two types of kernel models on the dose calculations. The authors investigated the difference

  12. SU-E-T-147: Beam Specific Planning Target Volumes Incorporating 4DCT for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Thoracic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Kang, M; Huang, S; McDonough, J; Solberg, T; Simone, C [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mayer, R [Henry Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD (United States); Thomas, A [ATC healthcare, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Methods: Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using ±3% uncertainty in stopping power, and ±3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8*12*10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. Results: The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus and heart dose were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04 and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p= 0.146). Conclusion: PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.

  13. Biological effect of dose distortion by fiducial markers in spot-scanning proton therapy with a limited number of fields: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Taeko; Maeda, Kenichiro; Sutherland, Kenneth; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Shimizu, Shinichi; Takao, Seishin; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 319-1221 (Japan); Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, 3-1-1 Saiwai-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan); Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 319-1221 (Japan); Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: In accurate proton spot-scanning therapy, continuous target tracking by fluoroscopic x ray during irradiation is beneficial not only for respiratory moving tumors of lung and liver but also for relatively stationary tumors of prostate. Implanted gold markers have been used with great effect for positioning the target volume by a fluoroscopy, especially for the cases of liver and prostate with the targets surrounded by water-equivalent tissues. However, recent studies have revealed that gold markers can cause a significant underdose in proton therapy. This paper focuses on prostate cancer and explores the possibility that multiple-field irradiation improves the underdose effect by markers on tumor-control probability (TCP). Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the dose distortion effect. A spherical gold marker was placed at several characteristic points in a water phantom. The markers were with two different diameters of 2 and 1.5 mm, both visible on fluoroscopy. Three beam arrangements of single-field uniform dose (SFUD) were examined: one lateral field, two opposite lateral fields, and three fields (two opposite lateral fields + anterior field). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was set to 1.1 and a dose of 74 Gy (RBE) was delivered to the target of a typical prostate size in 37 fractions. The ratios of TCP to that without the marker (TCP{sub r}) were compared with the parameters of the marker sizes, number of fields, and marker positions. To take into account the dependence of biological parameters in TCP model, {alpha}/{beta} values of 1.5, 3, and 10 Gy (RBE) were considered. Results: It was found that the marker of 1.5 mm diameter does not affect the TCPs with all {alpha}/{beta} values when two or more fields are used. On the other hand, if the marker diameter is 2 mm, more than two irradiation fields are required to suppress the decrease in TCP from TCP{sub r} by less than 3%. This is especially true when multiple

  14. SU-F-T-152: Experimental Validation and Calculation Benchmark for a Commercial Monte Carlo Pencil BeamScanning Proton Therapy Treatment Planning System in Heterogeneous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Huang, S; Kang, M; Ainsley, C; Simone, C; McDonough, J; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Eclipse AcurosPT 13.7, the first commercial Monte Carlo pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment planning system (TPS), was experimentally validated for an IBA dedicated PBS nozzle in the CIRS 002LFC thoracic phantom. Methods: A two-stage procedure involving the use of TOPAS 1.3 simulations was performed. First, Geant4-based TOPAS simulations in this phantom were experimentally validated for single and multi-spot profiles at several depths for 100, 115, 150, 180, 210 and 225 MeV proton beams, using the combination of a Lynx scintillation detector and a MatriXXPT ionization chamber array. Second, benchmark calculations were performed with both AcurosPT and TOPAS in a phantom identical to the CIRS 002LFC, with the exception that the CIRS bone/mediastinum/lung tissues were replaced with similar tissues that are predefined in AcurosPT (a limitation of this system which necessitates the two stage procedure). Results: Spot sigmas measured in tissue were in agreement within 0.2 mm of TOPAS simulation for all six energies, while AcurosPT was consistently found to have larger spot sigma (<0.7 mm) than TOPAS. Using absolute dose calibration by MatriXXPT, the agreements between profiles measurements and TOPAS simulation, and calculation benchmarks are over 97% except near the end of range using 2 mm/2% gamma criteria. Overdosing and underdosing were observed at the low and high density side of tissue interfaces, respectively, and these increased with increasing depth and decreasing energy. Near the mediastinum/lung interface, the magnitude can exceed 5 mm/10%. Furthermore, we observed >5% quenching effect in the conversion of Lynx measurements to dose. Conclusion: We recommend the use of an ionization chamber array in combination with the scintillation detector to measure absolute dose and relative PBS spot characteristics. We also recommend the use of an independent Monte Carlo calculation benchmark for the commissioning of a commercial TPS. Partially

  15. WE-EF-303-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING- THERAPY): A Comprehensive Simulation of Image Guided Beam Gating for Liver Tumor Treatments Using Scanned Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Knopf, A; Weber, D; Lomax, A [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen-PSI, Aargau (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of image guided beam gating for PBS liver treatments under realistic breathing conditions. Methods: We have previously proposed a Beams’ Eye View (BEV) X-ray image system as an online motion monitoring device for deriving a gating signal for PBS proton therapy. Using dedicated 4D dose calculations (4DDC), in this work we have simulated gated liver treatments using three amplitude-based gating windows (10/5/3mm) based on motion extracted from BEV imaging of fiducial markers or the diaphragm. In order to improve motion mitigation, BEV guided gating has also been combined with either volumetric (VS) or layered (LS) rescanning. Nine 4DCT(MRI) liver data-sets have been used for the investigation, which not only consider realistic patient geometries but also motion variations between different breathing cycles. All 4D plans have been quantified in terms of plan homogeneity in the PTV (D5-D95), the total estimated treatment time and the beam-on duty cycle. Results: Neither gating nor rescanning can fully retrieve a comparable plan homogeneity to the static case, and considerable reductions of the duty cycle (<10%) were observed as a Result motion variations when small gating windows are used. However, once combined with rescanning, dose homogeneity within 1% of the static plan could be achieved with reasonable prolongation of the treatment time for all 9 subjects. No differences were observed between the efficacy of layered or volumetric re-scanning, or of gating signals extracted from fiducial or diaphragm motions. However, layered rescanning may be preferred over volumetric rescanning when performed in combination with gating as it is generally more time-efficient and dosimetrically robust to patient and motion variations Conclusion Combining BEV beam gating with rescanning is an efficient and effective approach to treating mobile liver tumours, and is equally effective if either the diaphragm or fiducial markers are used as

  16. Long term outcomes of patients with skull-base low-grade chondrosarcoma and chordoma patients treated with pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Damien C; Malyapa, Robert; Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Kliebsch, Ulrike; Walser, Marc; Pica, Alessia; Combescure, Christophe; Lomax, Antony J; Schneider, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the long term tumor control and toxicity of skull base tumors treated with pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PT). PT was delivered to 151 (68%) and 71 (32%) chordoma and chondrosarcoma (ChSa) patients, respectively. Mean age of patients was 40.8±18.4years and the male to female ratio was 0.53. The postoperative tumor was abutting the brainstem or optic apparatus in 71 (32.0%) patients. The postoperative mean gross tumor volume (GTV) was 35.7±29.1cm(3). The delivered mean PT dose was 72.5±2.2GyRBE. After a mean follow-up of 50 (range, 4-176) months, 35 local (15.8%) failures were observed between 10.9 and 85.4months. The estimated 7-year LC rate for chordoma (70.9%; CI95% 61.5-81.8) was significantly lower compared to the LC rate for ChSa patients (93.6%; 95%CI 87.8-99.9; P=0.014). The estimated 7-year distant metastasis-free- and overall survival rate was 91.6% (95%CI 91.6-98.6) and 81.7% (95%CI 74.7-89.5), respectively. On multivariate analysis, optic apparatus and/or brainstem compression, histology and GTV were independent prognostic factors for LC and OS. The 7-year high grade toxicity-free survival was 87.2 (95%CI 82.4-92.3). PBS PT is an effective treatment for skull base tumors with acceptable late toxicity. Optic apparatus and/or brainstem compression, histology and GTV allow independent prediction of the risk of local failure and death in skull base tumor patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Interaction between Octenidine-based Solution and Sodium Hypochlorite: A Mass Spectroscopy, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and Scanning Electron Microscopy-based Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaha, Khaleel Ahamed; Varma, R Luxmi; Nair, Mali G; Sam Joseph, V G; Krishnan, Unni

    2017-01-01

    Octenisept (OCT; Schülke & Mayr, Nordersdedt, Germany), an antimicrobial, antibiofilm agent and a promising root canal irrigant, can be potentially combined with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) during endodontic treatment. The aim of this study was first to identify the precipitate formed on the interaction between OCT and NaOCl and secondly to compare its effect on dentinal tubules with that of precipitate formed on combining chlorhexidine (CHX) and NaOCl. This observational study was conducted in 3 stages. Initially, the color changes and precipitate formation were assessed when the test solution 0.1% OCT and 5.2% NaOCl were mixed. Color changes were compared with those observed when 2% CHX was mixed with 5.2% NaOCl. The residue obtained on combining OCT and NaOCl was subjected to proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and mass spectrometric (MS) analysis. In the final stage, dentinal surfaces irrigated alternatively with OCT and NaOCl were compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with the dentinal surface irrigated with CHX and NaOCl. The OCT-NaOCl mixture changed in color from initial milky white to transparent over time, whereas the CHX-NaOCl mixture showed an immediate peach-brown discoloration. 1H NMR and MS analysis established that the whitish precipitate obtained on combining OCT and NaOCl solutions correlated with the structure of phenoxyethanol (PE). SEM revealed dense precipitate occluding the dentinal tubules with the CHX and NaOCl group, whereas the precipitate was sparse and partially occluded in the OCT and NaOCl group. The whitish precipitate formed with the OCT-NaOCl mixture was identified as PE, a compound already present in OCT, and it partly occluded the dentinal tubules. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. All rights reserved.

  18. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  19. Ion beam analysis - development and application of nuclear reaction analysis methods, in particular at a nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoeland, K.A.

    1996-11-01

    This thesis treats the development of Ion Beam Analysis methods, principally for the analysis of light elements at a nuclear microprobe. The light elements in this context are defined as having an atomic number less than approx. 13. The work reported is to a large extent based on multiparameter methods. Several signals are recorded simultaneously, and the data can be effectively analyzed to reveal structures that can not be observed through one-parameter collection. The different techniques are combined in a new set-up at the Lund Nuclear Microprobe. The various detectors for reaction products are arranged in such a way that they can be used for the simultaneous analysis of hydrogen, lithium, boron and fluorine together with traditional PIXE analysis and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy as well as photon-tagged Nuclear Reaction Analysis. 48 refs.

  20. SU-F-T-121: Abdominal Compression Effectively Reduces the Interplay Effect and Enables Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souris, K [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Glick, A; Kang, M; Lin, H; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Solberg, T; Ben-Josef, E; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Sterpin, E [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lee, J [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study if abdominal compression can reduce breathing motion and mitigate interplay effect in pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBSPT) treatment of liver tumors in order to better spare healthy liver volumes compared with photon therapy. Methods: Ten patients, six having large tumors initially treated with IMRT and four having small tumors treated with SBRT, were replanned for PBSPT. ITV and beam-specific PTVs based on 4D-CT were used to ensure target coverage in PBSPT. The use of an abdominal compression belt and volumetric repainting was investigated to mitigate the interplay effect between breathing motion and PBSPT dynamic delivery. An in-house Matlab script has been developed to simulate this interplay effect. The dose is computed on each phase individually by sorting all spots according to their simulated delivery timing. The final dose distribution is then obtained by accumulating all dose maps to a reference phase. Results: For equivalent target coverage PBSPT reduced average healthy liver dose by 9.5% of the prescription dose compared with IMRT/SBRT. Abdominal compression of 113.2±42.2 mmHg was effective for all 10 patients and reduced average motion by 2.25 mm. As a result, the average ITV volume decreased from 128.2% to 123.1% of CTV volume. Similarly, the average beam-specific PTV volume decreased from 193.2% to 183.3%. For 8 of the 10 patients, the average motion was reduced below 5 mm, and up to 3 repainting were sufficient to mitigate interplay. For the other two patients with larger residual motion, 4–5 repainting were needed. Conclusion: We recommend evaluation of the 4DCT motion histogram following simulation and the interplay effect following treatment planning in order to personalize the use of compression and volumetric repainting for each patient. Abdominal compression enables safe and more effective PBS treatment of liver tumors by reduction of motion and interplay effect. Kevin Souris is supported by IBA and Televie Grant

  1. Measurement of visible cross sections in proton-lead collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=5.02 TeV in van der Meer scans with the ALICE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty Bezverkhny; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agostinelli, Andrea; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Berger, Martin Emanuel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubskiy, Mikhail; Boehmer, Felix Valentin; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile Ioan; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dang, Ruina; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; De Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dorheim, Sverre; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutt Mazumder, Abhee Kanti; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Esposito, Marco; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigory; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floratos, Emmanouil; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gumbo, Mervyn; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Khan, Kamal; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kadyshevskiy, Vladimir; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskikh, Artem; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Okatan, Ali; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Sahoo, Pragati; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palmeri, Armando; Pant, Divyash; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitry; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Pohjoisaho, Esko Heikki Oskari; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Rauf, Aamer Wali; Razazi, Vahedeh; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Sharma, Rohni; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sanchez Rodriguez, Fernando Javier; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Segato, Gianfranco; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wagner, Vladimir; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Xiang, Changzhou; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yang, Shiming; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yi, Jungyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zyzak, Maksym

    2014-11-04

    In 2013, the Large Hadron Collider provided proton-lead and lead-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV. Van der Meer scans were performed for both configurations of colliding beams, and the cross section was measured for two reference processes, based on particle detection by the T0 and V0 detectors, with pseudo-rapidity coverage 4.6 < $\\eta$ < 4.9, -3.3 < $\\eta$ < -3.0 and 2.8 < $\\eta$ < 5.1, -3.7 < $\\eta$ < -1.7, respectively. Given the asymmetric detector acceptance, the cross section was measured separately for the two configurations. The measured visible cross sections are used to calculate the integrated luminosity of the proton-lead and lead-proton data samples, and to indirectly measure the cross section for a third, configuration-independent, reference process, based on neutron detection by the Zero Degree Calorimeters.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of multifield and single-field optimization for the treatment planning of spot-scanning proton therapy of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Liu, Wei; Wu, Richard; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Li, Yupeng [Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using multifield optimization (MFO) can generate highly conformal dose distributions, but it is more sensitive to setup and range uncertainties than SSPT using single-field optimization (SFO). The authors compared the two optimization methods for the treatment of head and neck cancer with bilateral targets and determined the superior method on the basis of both the plan quality and the plan robustness in the face of setup and range uncertainties.Methods: Four patients with head and neck cancer with bilateral targets who received SSPT treatment in the authors' institution were studied. The patients had each been treated with a MFO plan using three fields. A three-field SFO plan (3F-SFO) and a two-field SFO plan (2F-SFO) with the use of a range shifter in the beam line were retrospectively generated for each patient. The authors compared the plan quality and robustness to uncertainties of the SFO plans with the MFO plans. Robustness analysis of each plan was performed to generate the two dose distributions consisting of the highest and the lowest possible doses (worst-case doses) from the spatial and range perturbations at every voxel. Dosimetric indices from the nominal and worst-case plans were compared.Results: The 3F-SFO plans generally yielded D95 and D5 values in the targets that were similar to those of the MFO plans. 3F-SFO resulted in a lower dose to the oral cavity than MFO in all four patients by an average of 9.9 Gy, but the dose to the two parotids was on average 6.7 Gy higher for 3F-SFO than for MFO. 3F-SFO plans reduced the variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the targets by 22.8% compared to the MFO plans. Variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the organs at risk (OARs) varied between organs and between patients, although they were on average 9.2% less for the 3F-SFO plans than for the MFO plans. Compared with the MFO plans, the 2F-SFO plans showed a reduced dose to

  3. Study of ancient Islamic gilded pieces combining PIXE-RBS on external microprobe with sem images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ynsa, M.D.; Gutierrez, P.C.; Enguita, O. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Madrid (Spain); Chamon, J.; Pardo, A.I.; Arroyo, M.; Barrio, J. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dpto. Prehistoria y Arqueologia, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Morilla, I. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute fuer Stroemungsmechanik, Dresden (Germany); Ferretti, M. [CNR - Istituto per le Tecnologie Aplicate ai Beni Culturali, Monterotondo St., Roma (Italy); Climent-Font, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Madrid (Spain); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dpto. Fisica Aplicada C-12, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    Numerous metallic objects with very aesthetic and technological qualities have been recovered by archaeological excavations. Adequate processes of restoration and conservation treatments require the accurate determination of the elemental composition and distribution within the objects, as well as the identification of the nature and distribution of the corrosion products. Ideally the identification method should cause no alteration in the sample. In this work, different archaeological pieces with a gilded look have been characterized using simultaneously PIXE and RBS at the CMAM external microprobe in order to study the gilding metalworking done in the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages. The gold layer thickness and its elemental concentrations of Ag, Au and Hg were determined by both techniques and compared with the scanning electron microscopy images obtained for some fragments of pieces. (orig.)

  4. Photobleaching setup for the biological end-station of the darmstadt heavy-ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merk, B., E-mail: b.merk@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6-8, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Voss, K.-O.; Müller, I.; Fischer, B.E.; Jakob, B.; Taucher-Scholz, G. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Trautmann, C.; Durante, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6-8, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We report the upgrade of the epifluorescence microscope of the GSI heavy-ion microprobe with a galvo-scanned, 488 nm laser diode. The laser is focussed into the object plane by the water-immersion objective resulting in a focal spot size of about 1 μm. To increase temporal and spatial resolution a water-immersion objective with a high numerical aperture is integrated into the custom-build microscope. The upgraded system can now be used to bleach GFP-tagged proteins recruited to DNA damage induced by targeted single-ion irradiation. The system is demonstrated on NIH 3T3 cells with Ku80-GFP ion-targeted in heterochromatic and euchromatic DNA. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is shown to be significantly slower in heterochromatin.

  5. Application of nuclear microprobes to material of archaeological interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demortier, G.

    1988-03-01

    Strongly focused nuclear microprobes have not been widely used until recently for characterization of material of archaeological interest. The main reasons are (1) the large size of many artefacts are not suitable for measurements in vacuum together with the requirement of avoiding sampling from (often) unique material; (2) the frequent surface corrosion of objects to depths thicker than the range of the incident particles; (3) the high cost of analyses when compared with the budgets of Museum's curators for scientific investigations. About ten laboratories throughout the world are concerned with nuclear milliprobe for investigation of bones, glasses, papers and parchments, potsherds, coins, iron and bronze artefacts, silver and gold jewelry. The nuclear microprobe facilities in this field of research have mostly been developed at Bartol-Delaware and Los Alamos (USA), Lower Hutt (New Zealand), Saclay (France) and LARN — Namur (Belgium).

  6. A PIN detector array for the determination of boron using nuclear reaction analysis at a nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sziki, Gusztav E-mail: sziki@atomki.hu; Dobos, Erik; Kertesz, Zsofia; Szikszai, Zita; Uzonyi, Imre E-mail: uzonyi@atomki.hu; Kiss, Arpad Zoltan

    2004-06-01

    A new micro-NRA set-up for boron analysis has been developed at the Debrecen scanning nuclear microprobe facility. It consists of four large area PIN silicon photodiodes in an optimised geometrical arrangement providing 1.87 sr solid angle. The new set-up was calibrated for boron in the low concentration region with NIST type glass standards and also with a macusanite glass standard. The calculated MDL value for boron was 5 {mu}g/g for 1 {mu}C accumulated charge in a glassy matrix. The capability of this set-up for precise concentration measurement is demonstrated via the analysis of geological obsidian samples.

  7. Feasibility of Pencil Beam Scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy in Breath-hold for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgisyan, Jenny; Munck Af Rosenschold, Per; Perrin, Rosalind

    2017-01-01

    with image guided photon radiation therapy were included in the present simulation study. In addition to a planning breath-hold computed tomography (CT) scan before the treatment start, a median of 6 (range 3-9) breath-hold CT scans per patient were acquired prospectively throughout the radiation therapy......) in terms of the percentage of voxels with 3-mm or more undershoot on repeat CT scans. The dose to the organs at risk was similar for the planned and simulated dose distributions. Three or fewer breath-holds per field would be required for 12 of the 15 patients, which was clinically feasible. CONCLUSIONS...

  8. SU-F-T-153: Experimental Validation and Calculation Benchmark for a Commercial Monte Carlo Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Treatment Planning System in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Huang, S; Kang, M; Ainsley, C; Solberg, T; McDonough, J; Simone, C [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hiltunen, P; Vanderstraeten, R; Lindberg, J; Siljamaki, S; Wareing, T; Davis, I; Barnett, A; McGhee, J [Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Eclipse proton Monte Carlo AcurosPT 13.7 was commissioned and experimentally validated for an IBA dedicated PBS nozzle in water. Topas 1.3 was used to isolate the cause of differences in output and penumbra between simulation and experiment. Methods: The spot profiles were measured in air at five locations using Lynx. PTW-34070 Bragg peak chamber (Freiburg, Germany) was used to collect the relative integral Bragg peak for 15 proton energies from 100 MeV to 225 MeV. The phase space parameters (σx, σθ, ρxθ) number of protons per MU, energy spread and calculated mean energy provided by AcurosPT were identically implemented into Topas. The absolute dose, profiles and field size factors measured using ionization chamber arrays were compared with both AcurosPT and Topas. Results: The beam spot size, σx, and the angular spread, σθ, in air were both energy-dependent: in particular, the spot size in air at isocentre ranged from 2.8 to 5.3 mm, and the angular spread ranged from 2.7 mrad to 6 mrad. The number of protons per MU increased from ∼9E7 at 100 MeV to ∼1.5E8 at 225 MeV. Both AcurosPT and TOPAS agree with experiment within 2 mm penumbra difference or 3% dose difference for scenarios including central axis depth dose and profiles at two depths in multi-spot square fields, from 40 to 200 mm, for all the investigated single-energy and multi-energy beams, indicating clinically acceptable source model and radiation transport algorithm in water. Conclusion: By comparing measured data and TOPAS simulation using the same source model, the AcurosPT 13.7 was validated in water within 2 mm penumbra difference or 3% dose difference. Benchmarks versus an independent Monte Carlo code are recommended to study the agreement in output, filed size factors and penumbra differences. This project is partially supported by the Varian grant under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian.

  9. Exploring ocean biogeochemistry by single-cell microprobe analysis of protist elemental composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Benjamin S; Baines, Stephen B; Vogt, Stefan; de Jonge, Martin D

    2008-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of many elements in the ocean are linked by their simultaneous incorporation into protists. In order to understand these elemental interactions and their implications for global biogeochemical cycles, accurate measures of cellular element stoichiometries are needed. Bulk analysis of size-fractionated particulate material obscures the unique biogeochemical roles of different functional groups such as diatoms, calcifying protists, and diazotrophs. Elemental analysis of individual protist cells can be performed using electron, proton, and synchrotron X-ray microprobes. Here we review the capabilities and limitations of each approach and the application of these advanced techniques to cells collected from natural communities. Particular attention is paid to recent studies of plankton biogeochemistry in low-iron waters of the Southern Ocean. Single-cell analyses have revealed significant inter-taxa differences in phosphorus, iron, and nickel quotas. Differences in the response of autotrophs and heterotrophs to iron fertilization were also observed. Two-dimensional sub-cellular mapping indicates the importance of iron to photosynthetic machinery and of zinc to nuclear organelles. Observed changes in diatom silicification and cytoplasm content following iron fertilization modify our understanding of the relationship between iron availability and silicification. These examples demonstrate the advantages of studying ocean biogeochemistry at the level of individual cells.

  10. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors delivered with active raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT: early treatment results and study concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieken Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particle irradiation was established at the University of Heidelberg 2 years ago. To date, more than 400 patients have been treated including patients with primary brain tumors. In malignant glioma (WHO IV patients, two clinical trials have been set up-one investigating the benefit of a carbon ion (18 GyE vs. a proton boost (10 GyE in addition to photon radiotherapy (50 Gy, the other one investigating reirradiation with escalating total dose schedules starting at 30 GyE. In atypical meningioma patients (WHO °II, a carbon ion boost of 18 GyE is applied to macroscopic tumor residues following previous photon irradiation with 50 Gy. This study was set up in order to investigate toxicity and response after proton and carbon ion therapy for gliomas and meningiomas. Methods 33 patients with gliomas (n = 26 and meningiomas (n = 7 were treated with carbon ion (n = 26 and proton (n = 7 radiotherapy. In 22 patients, particle irradiation was combined with photon therapy. Temozolomide-based chemotherapy was combined with particle therapy in 17 patients with gliomas. Particle therapy as reirradiation was conducted in 7 patients. Target volume definition was based upon CT, MRI and PET imaging. Response was assessed by MRI examinations, and progression was diagnosed according to the Macdonald criteria. Toxicity was classified according to CTCAE v4.0. Results Treatment was completed and tolerated well in all patients. Toxicity was moderate and included fatigue (24.2%, intermittent cranial nerve symptoms (6% and single episodes of seizures (6%. At first and second follow-up examinations, mean maximum tumor diameters had slightly decreased from 29.7 mm to 27.1 mm and 24.9 mm respectively. Nine glioma patients suffered from tumor relapse, among these 5 with infield relapses, causing death in 8 patients. There was no progression in any meningioma patient. Conclusions Particle radiotherapy is safe and feasible in patients with primary brain

  11. Friction microprobe investigation of particle layer effects on sliding friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, P. J.

    Interfacial particles (third-bodies), resulting from wear or external contamination, can alter and even dominate the frictional behavior of solid-solid sliding in the absence of effective particle removal processes (e.g., lubricant flow). A unique friction microprobe, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was used to conduct fine-scale friction studies using 1.0 mm diameter stainless steel spheres sliding on several sizes of loose layers of fine aluminum oxide powders on both aluminum and alumina surfaces. Conventional pin-on-disk experiments were conducted to compare behavior with the friction microprobe results. The behavior of the relatively thick particle layers was found to be independent of the nature of underlying substrate, substantiating previous work by other investigators. The time-dependent behavior of friction, for a spherical macrocontact starting from rest, could generally be represented by a series of five rather distinct phases involving static compression, slider breakaway, transition to steady state, and dynamic layer instability. A friction model for the steady state condition, which incorporates lamellar powder layer behavior, is described.

  12. General theory of three-dimensional radiance measurements with optical microprobes RID A-1977-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FukshanskyKazarinova, N.; Fukshansky, L.; Kuhl, M.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of the radiance distribution and fluence rate within turbid samples with fiber-optic radiance microprobes contain a large variable instrumental error caused by the nonuniform directional sensitivity of the microprobes. A general theory of three-dimensional radiance measurements...

  13. Dosimetric accuracy of a treatment planning system for actively scanned proton beams and small target volumes: Monte Carlo and experimental validation

    CERN Document Server

    Magro, G; Mairani, A; Mirandola, A; Panizza, D; Russo, S; Ferrari, A; Valvo, F; Fossati, P; Ciocca, M

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), in optimising proton pencil beam dose distributions for small targets of different sizes (5–30 mm side) located at increasing depths in water. The TPS analytical algorithm was benchmarked against experimental data and the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code, previously validated for the selected beam-line. We tested the Siemens syngo® TPS plan optimisation module for water cubes fixing the configurable parameters at clinical standards, with homogeneous target coverage to a 2 Gy (RBE) dose prescription as unique goal. Plans were delivered and the dose at each volume centre was measured in water with a calibrated PTW Advanced Markus® chamber. An EBT3® film was also positioned at the phantom entrance window for the acquisition of 2D dose maps. Discrepancies between TPS calculated and MC simulated values were mainly due to the different lateral spread modeling and resulted in being related to the field-to-spot size r...

  14. Analysis of biological materials using a nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    The use of nuclear microprobe techniques including: Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) for elemental analysis and quantitative elemental imaging of biological samples is especially useful in biological and biomedical research because of its high sensitivity for physiologically important trace elements or toxic heavy metals. The nuclear microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) has been used to study the enhancement in metal uptake of two different plants. The roots of corn (Zea mays) have been analyzed to study the enhancement of iron uptake by adding Fe (II) or Fe(III) of different concentrations to the germinating medium of the seeds. The Fe uptake enhancement effect produced by lacing the germinating medium with carbon nanotubes has also been investigated. The aim of this investigation is to ensure not only high crop yield but also Fe-rich food products especially from calcareous soil which covers 30% of world's agricultural land. The result will help reduce iron deficiency anemia, which has been identified as the leading nutritional disorder especially in developing countries by the World Health Organization. For the second plant, Mexican marigold (Tagetes erecta ), the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices ) for the improvement of lead phytoremediation of lead contaminated soil has been investigated. Phytoremediation provides an environmentally safe technique of removing toxic heavy metals (like lead), which can find their way into human food, from lands contaminated by human activities like mining or by natural disasters like earthquakes. The roots of Mexican marigold have been analyzed to study the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in enhancement of lead uptake from the contaminated rhizosphere.

  15. The risk of radiation-induced second cancers in the high to medium dose region: a comparison between passive and scanned proton therapy, IMRT and VMAT for pediatric patients with brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Yock, Torunn I.; Paganetti, Harald

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of second malignant tumors is a clinically observed adverse late effect of radiation therapy, especially in organs close to the treatment site, receiving medium to high doses (>2.5 Gy). For pediatric patients, choosing the least toxic radiation modality is of utmost importance, due to their high radiosensitivity and small size. This study aims to evaluate the risk of second cancer incidence in the vicinity of the primary radiation field, for pediatric patients with brain/head and neck tumors and compare four treatment modalities: passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PPT and PBS), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For a cohort of six pediatric patients originally treated with PPT, additional PBS, IMRT and VMAT plans were created. Dose distributions from these plans were used to calculate the excess absolute risk (EAR) and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for developing a second tumor in soft tissue and skull. A widely used risk assessment formalism was employed and compared with a linear model based on recent clinical findings. In general, LAR was found to range between 0.01%-2.8% for PPT/PBS and 0.04%-4.9% for IMRT/VMAT. PBS was associated with the lowest risk for most patients using carcinoma and sarcoma models, whereas IMRT and VMAT risks were comparable and the highest among all modalities. The LAR for IMRT/VMAT relative to PPT ranged from 1.3-4.6 for soft tissue and from 3.5-9.5 for skull. Larger absolute LAR was observed for younger patients and using linear risk models. The number of fields used in proton therapy and IMRT had minimal effect on the risk. When planning treatments and deciding on the treatment modality, the probability of second cancer incidence should be carefully examined and weighed against the possibility of developing acute side effects for each patient individually.

  16. Development and Clinical Implementation of a Universal Bolus to Maintain Spot Size During Delivery of Base of Skull Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, Stefan, E-mail: Stefan.Both@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shen, Jiajian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Tang, Shikui; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Lustig, Robert; Lin, Haibo; Deville, Curtiland; Hill-Kayser, Christine; Tochner, Zelig; McDonough, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report on a universal bolus (UB) designed to replace the range shifter (RS); the UB allows the treatment of shallow tumors while keeping the pencil beam scanning (PBS) spot size small. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with brain cancers treated from 2010 to 2011 were planned using the PBS technique with bolus and the RS. In-air spot sizes of the pencil beam were measured and compared for 4 conditions (open field, with RS, and with UB at 2- and 8-cm air gap) in isocentric geometry. The UB was applied in our clinic to treat brain tumors, and the plans with UB were compared with the plans with RS. Results: A UB of 5.5 cm water equivalent thickness was found to meet the needs of the majority of patients. By using the UB, the PBS spot sizes are similar with the open beam (P>.1). The heterogeneity index was found to be approximately 10% lower for the UB plans than for the RS plans. The coverage for plans with UB is more conformal than for plans with RS; the largest increase in sparing is usually for peripheral organs at risk. Conclusions: The integrity of the physical properties of the PBS beam can be maintained using a UB that allows for highly conformal PBS treatment design, even in a simple geometry of the fixed beam line when noncoplanar beams are used.

  17. A Monte-Carlo study to assess the effect of 1.5 T magnetic fields on the overall robustness of pencil-beam scanning proton radiotherapy plans for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Christopher; Landry, Guillaume; Resch, Andreas F.; Dedes, George; Kamp, Florian; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Parodi, Katia

    2017-11-01

    Combining magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI) and proton therapy (PT) using pencil-beam scanning (PBS) may improve image-guided radiotherapy. We aimed at assessing the impact of a magnetic field on PBS-PT plan quality and robustness. Specifically, the robustness against anatomical changes and positioning errors in an MRI-guided scenario with a 30 cm radius 1.5 T magnetic field was studied for prostate PT. Five prostate cancer patients with three consecutive CT images (CT1-3) were considered. Single-field uniform dose PBS-PT plans were generated on the segmented CT1 with Monte-Carlo-based treatment planning software for inverse optimization. Plans were optimized at 90° gantry angle without B-field (no B), with  ±1.5 T B-field (B and minus B), as well as at 81° gantry angle and  +1.5 T (B G81). Plans were re-calculated on aligned CT2 and CT3 to study the impact of anatomical changes. Dose distributions were compared in terms of changes in DVH parameters, proton range and gamma-index pass-rates. To assess the impact of positioning errors, DVH parameters were compared for  ±5 mm CT1 patient shifts in anterior–posterior (AP) and left–right (LR) direction. Proton beam deflection considerably reduced robustness against inter-fractional changes for the B scenario. Range agreement, gamma-index pass-rates and PTV V95% were significantly lower compared to no B. Improved robustness was obtained for minus B and B G81, the latter showing only minor differences to no B. The magnetic field introduced slight dosimetric changes under LR shifts. The impact of AP shifts was considerably larger, and equivalent for scenarios with and without B-field. Results suggest that robustness equivalent to PT without magnetic field can be achieved by adaptation of the treatment parameters, such as B-field orientation (minus B) with respect to the patient and/or gantry angle (B G81). MRI-guided PT for prostate cancer might thus be implemented without compromising robustness

  18. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  19. Nuclear microprobe analysis of chlorine distribution in the blue-light-exposed rat retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Enping; Pallon, Jan; Forslind, Bo

    1995-09-01

    Blue-light exposure is a possible environment factor which causes senile macular degeneration, a prominent cause of visual impairment in elderly. Blue-light exposure causes inner segment edema and photoreceptor degeneration, probably by inhibiting the sodium-potassium pump on the inner segment membrane. Disturbance of the pump function may cause chlorine and sodium redistribution in the inner and outer segments, and edema in the inner segment. In the present study, 11 eyes from 11 Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Six rats were exposed to blue light (404 nm) at a retinal dose of 380 kJ/m 2, five were control. Chlorine and sulphur distribution were measured with the Lund Nuclear Microprobe (beam size: 12 × 12 μm, proton energy: 2.55 MeV, beam density at the target: 10-20 pA/μm 2). The chlorine concentration was calculated using sulphur as reference. The secondary characteristic X-rays were measured with a Kevex Si(Li) detector. The mean chlorine concentration was 0.82 mg/mg sulphur in the control inner segment layer. It was 1.83 and 2.00 mg/mg sulphur, 1 and 12 h after exposure, respectively. The mean chlorine concentration was 2.55 mg/mg sulphur in the control outer segment layer. It was 1.17 and 1.21 mg/mg sulphur, 1 and 12 h after exposure, respectively. The sodium signal is severely attenuated by the detector window, and the sodium distribution is assumed to be indicated by the chlorine distribution since these two elements follow each other closely in the cellular edema caused by metabolic inhibition. An accumulation of chlorine and sodium could be one of the reasons of the inner segment edema after blue-light exposure.

  20. The nuclear microprobe: An insight of applications in cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Ph.; Llabador, Y.

    1997-07-01

    During the last five years, the evolution of biomedical research based upon nuclear microprobe analysis has followed the development of experimental models of cultured or isolated cells. Fundamental studies of cellular mechanisms have been approached by means of in vitro assays associated with single cell analysis. Within those groups which are involved in such programs, special emphasis has been placed on cell culture and processing techniques which fulfill the methodological requirements for intracellular ion beam analysis. Great efforts have been orientated towards the improvement of normalization procedures. It is now possible to provide reliable quantitative results expressed in such units that they can be easily cross-checked using conventional methods. Imaging techniques have been also developed for the identification of the analyzed structures. In this paper, different domains of cell biology which have been addressed during the last years are reviewed. Studies dealing with cellular physiology and pharmacology are briefly presented as are also those related to the role of trace elements. Topics under development in our group as well as ongoing investigations will be also evoked.

  1. Imaging mass spectrometry with nuclear microprobes for biological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: yukai@nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Yamada, H.; Honda, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ninomiya, S. [Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Seki, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Aoki, T. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Matsuo, J. [Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    A mass spectrometric technique using nuclear microprobes is presented in this paper for biological applications. In recent years, imaging mass spectrometry has become an increasingly important technique for visualizing the spatial distribution of molecular species in biological tissues and cells. However, due to low yields of large molecular ions, the conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), that uses keV primary ion beams, is typically applied for imaging of either elements or low mass compounds. In this study, we performed imaging mass spectrometry using MeV ion beams collimated to about 10 {mu}m, and successfully obtained molecular ion images from plant and animal cell sections. The molecular ion imaging of the pollen section showed high intensities of PO{sub 3}{sup -} ions in the pollen cytoplasm, compared to the pollen wall, and indicated the heterogeneous distribution in the cytoplasm. The 3T3-L1 cell image revealed the high intensity of PO{sub 3}{sup -} ions, in particular from the cell nucleus. The result showed that not only the individual cell, but also the cell nucleus could be identified with the present imaging technique.

  2. Raman microprobe measurements of stress in ion implanted materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S.; Weiser, P.S.; Dooley, S.P. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Raman microprobe measurements of ion implanted diamond and silicon have shown significant shifts in the Raman line due to stresses in the materials. The Raman line shifts to higher energy if the stress is compressive and to lower energy for tensile stress{sup 1}. The silicon sample was implanted in a 60 {mu}m square with 2.56 x 10{sup 17} ions per square centimeter of 2 MeV Helium. This led to the formation of raised squares with the top 370mm above the original surface. In Raman studies of silicon using visible light, the depth of penetration of the laser beam into the sample is much less than one micron. It was found that the Raman line is due to the silicon overlying the damage region. The diamond sample was implanted with 2 x 10{sup 15} ions per square centimeter of 2.8 MeV carbon. It was concluded that the Raman spectrum could provide information concerning both the magnitude and the direction of stress in an ion implanted sample. It was possible in some cases to determine whether the stress direction is parallel or perpendicular to the sample surface. 1 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Optimum Design of Cantilevered Microprobes for Inspecting Lcd Panels and Measurement of Contacting Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol; Kim, Kwang-Joong

    Fine pitch microprobe arrays are microneedle-like probes for inspecting the pixels of LCD panels or IC. They are usually made of multi-layers of metallic, nonmetallic, or combination of the two. The design requirement for a contacting force is less than 2 gf and a deflection should be less than 100 µm. Many microprobe shapes satisfying the design requirements are possible. A cantilever-type microprobe having many needles was chosen and optimized in this study. Several candidate shapes were chosen using topology and shape optimization technique subjected to design requirements. Then, the microprobe arrays were fabricated using the process applied for MEMS fabrication and they were made of BeNi, BeCu, or Si. The contact probing forces and deflections were measured for checking the results from optimum design by newly developed measuring equipment in our laboratory. Numerical and experimental results were compared and both showed a good correlation.

  4. Single-stage quintuplet for upgrading triplet based lens system: Simulation for Atomki microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarov, Artem; Rajta, Istvan; Nagy, Gyula; Romanenko, Oleksandr V.

    2017-08-01

    Among different configurations of lens systems for nuclear microprobes, the most common one is a triplet of magnetic quadrupole lenses. Nowadays, microanalysis and material modification will undoubtedly benefit from an improvement in spatial resolution. This work presents the results of simulations for improvement of the Oxford Triplet lens system at the Atomki microprobe with consideration of its system parameters and measured beam brightness distribution. For this purpose, an additional single-unit doublet of lenses with two power supplies was introduced. Using earlier developed methods, such a quintuplet system was optimized in order to determine the parameters which provided the highest resolution for different current operational modes with the same microprobe geometry. The tolerances for lens positioning accuracy were also calculated. The obtained quintuplet parameters indicate a resolution improvement for the Atomki microprobe compared to the Oxford Triplet system and these results validate further experimental testing of the proposed quintuplet.

  5. [Why proton therapy? And how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariat, Juliette; Habrand, Jean Louis; Lesueur, Paul; Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Kammerer, Emmanuel; Lecomte, Delphine; Batalla, Alain; Balosso, Jacques; Tessonnier, Thomas

    2018-02-05

    Proton therapy is a radiotherapy, based on the use of protons, charged subatomic particles that stop at a given depth depending on their initial energy (pristine Bragg peak), avoiding any output beam, unlike the photons used in most of the other modalities of radiotherapy. Proton therapy has been used for 60 years, but has only become ubiquitous in the last decade because of recent major advances in particle accelerator technology. This article reviews the history of clinical implementation of protons, the nature of the technological advances that now allows its expansion at a lower cost. It also addresses the technical and physical specificities of proton therapy and the clinical situations for which proton therapy may be relevant but requires evidence. Different proton therapy techniques are possible. These are explained in terms of their clinical potential by explaining the current terminology (such as cyclotrons, synchrotrons or synchrocyclotrons, using superconducting magnets, fixed line or arm rotary with passive diffusion delivery or active by scanning) in basic words. The requirements associated with proton therapy are increased due to the precision of the depth dose deposit. The learning curve of proton therapy requires that clinical indications be prioritized according to their associated uncertainties (such as range uncertainties and movement in lung tumors). Many clinical indications potentially fall under proton therapy ultimately. Clinical strategies are explained in a paralleled manuscript. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Theory of equidistant three-dimensional radiance measurements with optical microprobes RID A-1977-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FukshanskyKazarinova, N.; Fukshansky, L.; Kuhl, Morten

    1996-01-01

    Fiber-optic radiance microprobes, increasingly applied for measurements of internal light fields in living tissues, provide three-dimensional radiance distribution solids and radiant energy fluence rates at different depths of turbid samples. These data are, however, distorted because...... of an inherent feature of optical fibers: nonuniform angular sensitivity. Because of this property a radiance microprobe during a single measurement partly underestimates light from the envisaged direction and partly senses light from other directions. A theory of three-dimensional equidistant radiance...

  7. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  8. Electron Microprobe Analysis Techniques for Accurate Measurements of Apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoff, B. A.; Webster, J. D.; Harlov, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F, Cl, OH)] is a ubiquitous accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The mineral contains halogens and hydroxyl ions, which can provide important constraints on fugacities of volatile components in fluids and other phases in igneous and metamorphic environments in which apatite has equilibrated. Accurate measurements of these components in apatite are therefore necessary. Analyzing apatite by electron microprobe (EMPA), which is a commonly used geochemical analytical technique, has often been found to be problematic and previous studies have identified sources of error. For example, Stormer et al. (1993) demonstrated that the orientation of an apatite grain relative to the incident electron beam could significantly affect the concentration results. In this study, a variety of alternative EMPA operating conditions for apatite analysis were investigated: a range of electron beam settings, count times, crystal grain orientations, and calibration standards were tested. Twenty synthetic anhydrous apatite samples that span the fluorapatite-chlorapatite solid solution series, and whose halogen concentrations were determined by wet chemistry, were analyzed. Accurate measurements of these samples were obtained with many EMPA techniques. One effective method includes setting a static electron beam to 10-15nA, 15kV, and 10 microns in diameter. Additionally, the apatite sample is oriented with the crystal’s c-axis parallel to the slide surface and the count times are moderate. Importantly, the F and Cl EMPA concentrations are in extremely good agreement with the wet-chemical data. We also present EMPA operating conditions and techniques that are problematic and should be avoided. J.C. Stormer, Jr. et al., Am. Mineral. 78 (1993) 641-648.

  9. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  10. Protonated nitrosamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.; Øgaard Madsen, J.

    1994-01-01

    The protonated nitrosamide, NH3NO+, has been generated by chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Although a direct search for this species in ammonia flames has proved negative, fast proton transfer to major flame constituents is supported experimentally as well as by MO calculations....

  11. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy is one of the most precise and advanced forms of radiation treatment available. How Proton Therapy is Delivered The patient is positioned on a table with a head frame or face mask covering the head. As the cyclotron smashes atoms, the protons released are directed toward ...

  12. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  13. Major and Trace Element Concentrations in Garnet Performed by Electron Microprobe and MicroPIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, A.; Cossio, R.; Mazzoli, C.; Olmi, F.; Vaggelli, G.

    2003-12-01

    The chemical composition of rock-forming minerals reflects their crystallisation history and provides information on the temperature and pressure conditions during their formation. Among metamorphic minerals, garnet is one of the most commonly studied in metamorphic petrology because a chemical zoning is often observed in porphyroblasts that potentially records the changes in the reaction history of the rock. In the past, only major element composition could be determined by non-destructive analytical procedure. However, at high temperature major element growth zoning may be significantly modified by intra-crystalline diffusion. Consequently, the study of trace elements distribution, which may be less susceptible to diffusional modification, becomes of fundamental importance. In this regard, an inverse correlation between yttrium concentration in garnet and metamorphic grade has been recently proposed for pelitic rocks (Pyle & Spear, 2000). This coupling is of great advantage as it may be used to calibrate new geothermometers based on exchange equilibria involving trace elements in garnet In the present paper, a micro-beam Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (micro-PIXE) analytical technique and a WDS electron microprobe (EPMA), were been applied to a specific geological problem particularly affected by the limitations of other techniques. The collected samples come from meta-pelitic samples belonging to the tectonic unit of Monte Rosa Nappe (Western Alps). Selected garnet crystals were analysed for major (Si, Al, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe) and trace elements. The former were analysed by EPMA and the latter by micro-PIXE. The considered garnet crystals show well-defined compositional zoning, characterised by a smooth and concentric variation of the selected elements from core to rim. As regards the trace elements distribution, the two-dimensional X-ray maps display a strong Y enrichment in the core, followed by a flat pattern at the inner and outer rim. Y concentration spreads over

  14. Proton interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  15. A 5 MeV RBS microprobe for materials analysis in the semiconductor industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klody, G. M.; Schroeder, J. B.; Ferry, J. A.; Pollock, T. J.; Adams, E. D.

    1991-05-01

    In the development and manufacturing environment, there is a growing need for easy analysis of materials within sample regions smaller than 100 νm with automation for unattended multiple-sample analysis. A recently developed system with a new microprobe lens has been tested for industrial applications of microbeam RBS and channeling analysis. A 1.7 MV tandem accelerator, NEC Model 5SDH Pelletron, provides helium ions at energies up to 5.1 MeV. The new electrostatic quadrupole lens is fitted in a Charles Evans & Associates, Inc. Model RBS-400 end station. The accelerator, microprobe beamline, and end station are computer controlled for unattended, multiple sample analysis. We compare the performance of the microprobe lens to ion optic calculations and describe examples of applications.

  16. Applications of nuclear microprobe analysis in cancer cell biology and pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, R. [Bordeaux 1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France)

    1999-07-01

    Nuclear microprobe analysis studies in cancer cell pharmacology and biology carried out at Bordeaux-Gradignan are reported. The cellular pharmacology of two anticancer agents, cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum(II), and 4'-iodo-4'-deoxy-doxorubicin, were investigated, as well as the role of iron in neuroblastoma carcinogenesis, and chromium(III) in trans-generation carcinogenesis. Nuclear microprobe analysis, using PIXE and particle backscattering microanalysis, was able to reveal intracellular and tissue distributions of the elements under investigation. Moreover, the fully quantitative and multi-elemental character of nuclear microprobe analysis offered information on possible mechanisms of drug action, metal carcinogenesis, and interactions with endogenous trace elements in cancer cells. (author)

  17. Emerging technologies in proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, Jacobus M.; Lomax, Antony J.

    An increasing number of proton therapy facilities are being planned and built at hospital based centers. Most facilities are employing traditional dose delivery methods. A second generation of dose application techniques, based on pencil beam scanning, is slowly being introduced into the

  18. Renal scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003790.htm Renal scan To use the sharing features on this ... anaphylaxis . Alternative Names Renogram; Kidney scan Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Chernecky CC, ...

  19. Data acquisition and analysis system for the ion microprobe mass analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darby, D.M.; Cristy, S.S.

    1979-02-01

    A computer was interfaced to an ion microprobe mass analyzer for more rapid data acquisition and analysis. The interface is designed to allow data acquisition, independent of the computer. A large data analysis package was developed and implemented. Performance of the computerized system was evaluated and compared to manual operation.

  20. Microprobe investigation of brittle segregates in aluminum MIG and TIG welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larssen, P. A.; Miller, E. L.

    1968-01-01

    Quantitative microprobe analysis of segregated particles in aluminum MIG /Metal Inert Gas/ and TIG /Tungsten Inert Gas/ welds indicated that there were about ten different kinds of particles, corresponding to ten different intermetallic compounds. Differences between MIG and TIG welds related to the individual cooling rates of these welds.

  1. Laser microprobe for the study of noble gases and nitrogen in single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    A laser microprobe capable of analysing nitrogen and noble gases in individual grains with masses less than a milligram is described. It can be ... resulted in attenuation of laser energy reaching the sample surface during successive ... high vacuum (UHV) cleanup system to get low system blanks. Here we report in detail ...

  2. Laser microprobe for the study of noble gases and nitrogen in single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 112; Issue 1. Laser microprobe for the study of noble gases and nitrogen in single grains: A case study of individual chondrules from the Dhajala meteorite. R R Mahajan S V S Murty. Volume 112 Issue 1 March 2003 pp 113-127 ...

  3. Results from the nuclear microprobe PIXE analysis of selected rare earth fluor compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerman, William A. E-mail: hollerman@louisiana.edu; Gates, Earl; Boudreaux, Philip; Glass, Gary A

    2002-04-01

    Most previous research measures fluorescence properties over the macroscopic regime. Properties of individual microscopic grains could be significantly different than those measured over the macroscopic scale. Until recently, it was difficult to measure properties of individual fluor grains. Existing characterization techniques like scanning electron microscopy are not practical, since the resulting fluorescence masks the electron surface profile. Starting in September 2000, a research program was initiated at the Acadiana Research Laboratory to determine microscopic fluorescence properties for selected inorganic rare earth compounds. The initial phase of this program utilized microscopic proton induced X-ray emission ({mu}PIXE) to characterize the elemental composition of individual fluor grains. Results show that both individual grains and small clusters of grains could be seen using {mu}PIXE. Maps of this type can be used to estimate grain dimensions for the selected rare earth fluor. This technique is a new and innovative method to characterize a fluor material.

  4. Results from the nuclear microprobe PIXE analysis of selected rare earth fluor compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerman, William A.; Gates, Earl; Boudreaux, Philip; Glass, Gary A.

    2002-04-01

    Most previous research measures fluorescence properties over the macroscopic regime. Properties of individual microscopic grains could be significantly different than those measured over the macroscopic scale. Until recently, it was difficult to measure properties of individual fluor grains. Existing characterization techniques like scanning electron microscopy are not practical, since the resulting fluorescence masks the electron surface profile. Starting in September 2000, a research program was initiated at the Acadiana Research Laboratory to determine microscopic fluorescence properties for selected inorganic rare earth compounds. The initial phase of this program utilized microscopic proton induced X-ray emission (μPIXE) to characterize the elemental composition of individual fluor grains. Results show that both individual grains and small clusters of grains could be seen using μPIXE. Maps of this type can be used to estimate grain dimensions for the selected rare earth fluor. This technique is a new and innovative method to characterize a fluor material.

  5. Proton therapy - Present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Radhe; Grosshans, David

    2017-01-15

    In principle, proton therapy offers a substantial clinical advantage over conventional photon therapy. This is because of the unique depth-dose characteristics of protons, which can be exploited to achieve significant reductions in normal tissue doses proximal and distal to the target volume. These may, in turn, allow escalation of tumor doses and greater sparing of normal tissues, thus potentially improving local control and survival while at the same time reducing toxicity and improving quality of life. Protons, accelerated to therapeutic energies ranging from 70 to 250MeV, typically with a cyclotron or a synchrotron, are transported to the treatment room where they enter the treatment head mounted on a rotating gantry. The initial thin beams of protons are spread laterally and longitudinally and shaped appropriately to deliver treatments. Spreading and shaping can be achieved by electro-mechanical means to treat the patients with "passively-scattered proton therapy" (PSPT) or using magnetic scanning of thin "beamlets" of protons of a sequence of initial energies. The latter technique can be used to treat patients with optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), the most powerful proton modality. Despite the high potential of proton therapy, the clinical evidence supporting the broad use of protons is mixed. It is generally acknowledged that proton therapy is safe, effective and recommended for many types of pediatric cancers, ocular melanomas, chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Although promising results have been and continue to be reported for many other types of cancers, they are based on small studies. Considering the high cost of establishing and operating proton therapy centers, questions have been raised about their cost effectiveness. General consensus is that there is a need to conduct randomized trials and/or collect outcomes data in multi-institutional registries to unequivocally demonstrate the advantage of protons. Treatment planning and plan

  6. New X-ray microprobe system for trace heavy element analysis using ultraprecise X-ray mirror optics of long working distance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terada, Yasuko, E-mail: yterada@spring8.or.j [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yamauchi, Kazuto [Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Uruga, Tomoya [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2010-05-01

    A new X-ray microprobe system for trace heavy element analysis using ultraprecise X-ray mirror optics of 300 mm long working distance has been developed at beamline 37XU of SPring-8. A focusing test has been performed in the X-ray energy range 20-37.7 keV. A focused beam size of 1.3 mum (V)x1.5 mum (H) has been achieved at an X-ray energy of 30 keV, and a total photon flux of the focused beam was about 2.7x10{sup 10} photons/s. Micro-X-ray fluorescence (mu-XRF) analysis of eggplant roots has been carried out using the developed microprobe. It is clearly observed in the XRF images that cadmium is highly accumulated in the endodermis, exodermis and epidermis of roots. This study demonstrates the potential of scanning microscopy for heavy elements analysis in the high-energy X-ray region.

  7. Characterization and analysis of individual fly-ash particles from coal-fired power stations by a combination of optical microscopy, electron microscopy and quantitative electron microprobe analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, A. R.; Shibaoka, M.

    Quantitative electron microprobe analysis has been used to determine the inorganic chemical composition of individual fly-ash particles previously categorized on the basis of properties recognizable by light and scanning electron microscopy. Seven categories may be recognized: (1) unfused detrital minerals (principally quartz), (2) irregular-spongy particles derived from partly-fused clay minerals, (3) vesicular colourless glass (in the form of irregular particles and cenospheres) derived from viscous melts, (4) solid glass (mostly in the form of spherical particles and sometimes pigmented) derived from fluid melts, (5) dendritic iron oxide particles (mostly spherical) containing variable amounts of glass matrix, (6) crystalline iron oxide particles (mostly spherical) containing minimal amounts of glass and (7) unburnt char particles. The use of computerized energy dispersive X-ray analysis on the electron microprobe enables an analysis for all the inorganic elements present in a particle to be carried out simultaneously in about 60s. The rapidity and comprehensive nature of the procedure makes it possible to determine the composition of a large number of individual fly-ash particles in a relatively short time and thereby characterize the types and compositions that comprise the population.

  8. Determination of the chemical properties of residues retained in individual cloud droplets by XRF microprobe at SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C.-J. E-mail: ma@uji.energy.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tohno, S.; Kasahara, M.; Hayakawa, S

    2004-06-01

    To determine the chemical properties of residue retained in individual cloud droplets is primarily important for the understanding of rainout mechanism and aerosol modification in droplet. The sampling of individual cloud droplets were carried out on the summit of Mt. Taiko located in Tango peninsula, Kyoto prefecture, during Asian dust storm event in March of 2002. XRF microprobe system equipped at SPring-8, BL-37XU was applied to the subsequent quantification analysis of ultra trace elements in residues of individual cloud droplets. It was possible to form the replicas of separated individual cloud droplets on the thin collodion film. The two dimensional XRF maps for the residues in individual cloud droplets were clearly drawn by scanning of micro-beam. Also, XRF spectra of trace elements in residues were well resolved. From the XRF spectra for individual residues, the chemical mixed state of residues could be assumed. The chemical forms of Fe (Fe{sup +++}) and Zn (Zn{sup +}) could be clearly characterized by their K-edge micro-XANES spectra. By comparison of Z/Si mass ratios of residues in cloud droplets and those of the original sands collected in desert areas in China, the aging of ambient dust particles and their in cloud modification were indirectly assumed.

  9. Iron redistribution in a zirconium alloy after neutron and proton irradiation studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) using an aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, E.M., E-mail: Elisabeth.Francis@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Manchester Materials Science Centre, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Harte, A., E-mail: allan.harte@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Manchester Materials Science Centre, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Frankel, P., E-mail: philipp.frankel@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Manchester Materials Science Centre, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Haigh, S.J., E-mail: Sarah.Haigh@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Manchester Materials Science Centre, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jädernäs, D., E-mail: daniel.jadernas@studsvik.se [Studsvik Nuklear AB, SE 611 82 Nyköping (Sweden); Romero, J., E-mail: romeroje@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Company, Columbia, SC (United States); Hallstadius, L., E-mail: hallstlg@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, SE-72163 Västerås (Sweden); Preuss, M., E-mail: Michael.preuss@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Manchester Materials Science Centre, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Zirconium alloys used as cladding materials in nuclear reactors can exhibit accelerated irradiation induced growth, often termed linear growth, after sustained neutron irradiation. This phenomenon has been linked to the formation of -component dislocation loops and to the concentration of interstitial solute atoms. It is well documented for the Zircaloys that Fe dissolves from second phase particles (SPPs) during irradiation thus increasing the interstitial solute concentration in the matrix. However, no progress has yet been made into understanding whether a similar process occurs for the newer ZIRLO™ alloys. We aim to overcome this shortcoming here by studying compositional changes in second phase particles in Low Tin ZIRLO™ after neutron and proton irradiation using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Material irradiated to 18 dpa (displacements per atom) using neutrons and to 2.3 and 7 dpa by protons was investigated. The results show that Fe is lost from Zr–Nb–Fe-SPPs during both neutron and proton irradiation. Prior to irradiation, Fe was detected at the interface of β-Nb-SPPs. This Fe enrichment is also dispersed during irradiation. Qualitatively, excellent agreement was found regarding the elemental redistribution processes observed after proton and neutron irradiation.

  10. Proton aurora and substorm intensifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, J.C.; Xu, B.; Lyons, L.R.; Newell, P.T.; Creutzberg, F.

    1993-10-01

    Ground based measurements from the CANOPUS array of meridian scanning photometers and precipitating ion and electron data from the DMSP F9 satellite show that the electron arc which brightens to initiate substorm intensifications is formed within a region of intense proton precipitation that is well equatorward (approximately four to six degrees) of the nightside open-closed field line boundary. The precipitating protons are from a population that is energized via earthward convection from the magnetotail into the dipolar region of the magnetosphere and may play an important role in the formation of the electron arcs leading to substorm intensifications on dipole-like field lines.

  11. Proton aurora and substorm intensifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, J.C.; Lyons, L.R.; Newell, P.T.; Creutzberg, F.; Xu, B. (Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada) Aerospace Corp., Space and Environmental Technology Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States) National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Inst. of Astrophysics, Ottawa (Canada) Canadian Network for Space Research, Edmonton (Canada))

    1992-11-01

    Ground based measurements from the CANOPUS array of meridian scanning photometers and precipitating ion and electron data from the DMSP F9 satellite show that the electron arc which brightens to initiate substorms intensifications is formed within a region of intense proton precipitation that is well equatorward (about 4-6 deg) of the nightside open-closed field line boundary. The precipitating protons are from a population that is energized via Earthward convection from the magnetotail into the dipolar region of the magnetosphere and may play an important role in the formation of the electron arcs leading to substorm intensifications on dipolelike field lines. 12 refs.

  12. Cooperative scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Zukowski (Marcin); P.A. Boncz (Peter); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractData mining, information retrieval and other application areas exhibit a query load with multiple concurrent queries touching a large fraction of a relation. This leads to individual query plans based on a table scan or large index scan. The implementation of this access path in most

  13. Smart chip with selective micro-probes on Si(111) IC chips for detecting nerve potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi; Takao, Hidekuni; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2003-10-01

    A large number of single crystal Si micro-probes on Si(111) were fabricated selectively using VLS (Vapor-Liquid-Solid) growth method after IC process. The Si probes can be grown with a high aspect ratio more than a few hundreds. A diameter of the probes can be controlled from sub-micron to a few hundred microns. The Si probe position on the chip is also controlled and the chip with IC circuits can work even after the Si probe growth. Conductivity of the Si probes was controlled by using phosphorous diffusion, resulting in a resistivity of 10-2 Ω×cm from 104 Ω×cm for a diffusion temperature of 1100°C. In in-vivo studies, penetrating micro-probe array of low impedance such as the VLS growth Si probes has been desired, therefore electrical and mechanical properties were studied detected successfully.

  14. X-Ray And Electron Microprobe Analysis Of Some Plagioclases From The Jabal Abu Safiyah Intrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Al Mohandis, Ahmed A. [احمد عبد القادر المهندس

    1992-01-01

    The Jabal Abu Safiyah is a layered intrusion, which was emplaced within volcanosedimentary rocks. It extends in an arc for about 15 km and displays clear layering. The lower zone plagioclases were studied by electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction techniques to investigate their chemistry and structural state. Cumulus plagioclase forms the dominant phase in all thin sections studied, except in the amphibolized clinopyroxenite. Cumulus plagioclases from the lower zone of the Jabal Abu Saf...

  15. Study of microstructure and silicon segregation in cast iron using color etching and electron microprobe analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazehrad, S., E-mail: vazehrad@kth.se [Dep. Materials Science and Engineering/Casting of Metals, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Elfsberg, J., E-mail: jessica.elfsberg@scania.com [Scania CV AB, SE-151 87 Södertälje (Sweden); Diószegi, A., E-mail: attila.dioszegi@jth.hj.se [Dep. Materials Science and Engineering/Casting of Metals, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Dep. Mechanical Engineering/Materials and Manufacturing-Foundry Technology, Jönköping University, SE-551 11 Jönköping (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    An investigation on silicon segregation of lamellar, compacted and nodular graphite iron was carried out by applying a selective, immersion color etching and a modified electron microprobe to study the microstructure. The color etched micrographs of the investigated cast irons by revealing the austenite phase have provided data about the chronology and mechanism of microstructure formation. Moreover, electron microprobe has provided two dimensional segregation maps of silicon. A good agreement was found between the segregation profile of silicon in the color etched microstructure and the silicon maps achieved by electron microprobe analysis. However, quantitative silicon investigation was found to be more accurate than color etching results to study the size of the eutectic colonies. - Highlights: • Sensitivity of a color etchant to silicon segregation is quantitatively demonstrated. • Si segregation measurement by EMPA approved the results achieved by color etching. • Color etched micrographs provided data about solidification mechanism in cast irons. • Austenite grain boundaries were identified by measuring the local Si concentration.

  16. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  17. Bone Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... posts Join Mayo Clinic Connect Bone scan About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  18. Proton scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, Gregory H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This note presents analytic estimates of the performance of proton beams in remote surveillance for nuclear materials. The analysis partitions the analysis into the eight steps used by a companion note: (1) Air scattering, (2) Neutron production in the ship and cargo, (3) Target detection probability, (4) Signal produced by target, (5) Attenuation of signal by ship and cargo, (6) Attenuation of signal by air, (7) Geometric dilution, and (8) Detector Efficiency. The above analyses indicate that the dominant air scattering and loss mechanisms for particle remote sensing are calculable with reliable and accepted tools. They make it clear that the conversion of proton beams into neutron sources rapidly goes to completion in all but thinnest targets, which means that proton interrogation is for all purposes executed by neutrons. Diffusion models and limiting approximations to them are simple and credible - apart from uncertainty over the cross sections to be used in them - and uncertainty over the structure of the vessels investigated. Multiplication is essentially unknown, in part because it depends on the details of the target and its shielding, which are unlikely to be known in advance. Attenuation of neutron fluxes on the way out are more complicated due to geometry, the spectrum of fission neutrons, and the details of their slowing down during egress. The attenuation by air is large but less uncertain. Detectors and technology are better known. The overall convolution of these effects lead to large but arguably tolerable levels of attenuation of input beams and output signals. That is particularly the case for small, mobile sensors, which can more than compensate for size with proximity to operate reliably while remaining below flux limits. Overall, the estimates used here appear to be of adequate accuracy for decisions. That assessment is strengthened by their agreement with companion calculations.

  19. Use of X-ray microprobe to diagnose bone tissue demineralization after caffeine administration Use of X-ray microprobe to diagnose bone tissue demineralization after caffeine administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Tomaszewski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is a methylxanthine which permeates the placenta. In studies on animals, it has been
    shown to produce teratogenic and embryotoxic effects in large doses. The objective of this study was to
    assess the influence of caffeine on the development of bone tissue, with particular reference to elemental
    bone composition using an X-ray microprobe. The research was conducted on rats. The fertilized females
    were randomly divided into an experimental and a control group. The experimental group was
    given caffeine orally in 30 mg/day doses from the 8th to the 21st day of pregnancy, while the control group
    was given water. The fetuses were used to assess the growth and mineralization of the skeleton. On the
    basis of double dyeing, a qualitative analysis of the bone morphology and mineralization was conducted.
    For calcium and potassium analysis, an X-ray microprobe was used. In 67 fetuses from the experimental
    group, changes in skeleton staining with the alcian-alizarin method were noticed. The frequency of the
    development of variants in the experimental group was statistically higher. In the experimental group,
    a significant decrease in the calcium level, as well as an increase in the potassium level, was observed.
    The X-ray microprobe’s undoubted advantage is that is offers a quick qualitative and quantitative analysis
    of the elemental composition of the examined samples. Employing this new technique may furnish us
    with new capabilities when investigating the essence of the pathology process.Caffeine is a methylxanthine which permeates the placenta. In studies on animals, it has been
    shown to produce teratogenic and embryotoxic effects in large doses. The objective of this study was to
    assess the influence of caffeine on the development of bone tissue, with particular reference to elemental
    bone composition using an X-ray microprobe. The research was conducted on

  20. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X. Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-10-01

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To ‘scan’ the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient’s body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10-20 m s-1, changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%-18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed.

  1. Scanning table

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Before the invention of wire chambers, particles tracks were analysed on scanning tables like this one. Today, the process is electronic and much faster. Bubble chamber film - currently available - (links can be found below) was used for this analysis of the particle tracks.

  2. Scan Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Glaz, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for graduate students and researchers in applied probability and statistics, as well as for scientists in biology, computer science, pharmaceutical science and medicine, this title brings together a collection of chapters illustrating the depth and diversity of theory, methods and applications in the area of scan statistics.

  3. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byungjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, 110–746 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, 138–736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 410–769 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungyong [Proton Therapy Center, McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  4. New 2-stage ion microprobes and a move to higher energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legge, G.J.F.; Dymnikov, A.; Moloney, G.; Saint, A. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Cohen, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Recent moves in Ion Beam Microanalysis towards the use of a rapidly growing number of very high resolution, low current and single ion techniques has led to the need for high demagnification and greatly improved beam quality. There is also a move to apply Microbeams at higher energies and with heavier ions. This also puts demands on the focusing system and beam control. This paper describes the recent development of 2-stage lens systems to be applied here and overseas, both at very high resolution and at high energies with heavy ions. It looks at new ion beam analysis applications of such ion microprobes. 8 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  5. Microprobe analyses of rare-earth-element fractionation in meteoritic minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, T.M.; Duffy, C.J.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Maggiore, C.J.; Woolum, D.S.; Burnett, D.S.; Murrell, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    Two meteorites were analyzed by PIXE with the Los Alamos Nuclear Microprobe. The enstatite achondrite Pena Blanca Spring and the ordinary chondrite St. Severin were chosen as likely candidates for use in /sup 244/Pu (t/sub 1/2/ = 82 my) cosmochronology and geochronology. These applications require the meteoritic minerals to have unfractionated actinides and lanthanides relative to cosmic elemental abundance ratios. The PIXE analyses produced evidence of actinide-lanthanide fractionation in Pena Blanca Spring oldhamite (CaS) whereas the St Severin phosphates, whitlockite and chlorapatite, do not exhibit this fractionation.

  6. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  7. Development of Ultra Low Temperature, Impact Resistant Lithium Battery for the Mars Microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, H.; Deligiannis, F.; Davies, E.; Ratnakumar, Bugga V.; Surampudi, S.; Russel, P. G.; Reddy, T. B.

    1998-01-01

    The requirements of the power source for the Mars Microprobe, to be backpacked on the Mars 98 Spacecraft, are fairly demanding, with survivability to a shock of the order of 80,000 g combined with an operational requirement at -80 C. Development of a suitable power system, based on primary lithium-thionyl chloride is underway for the last eighteen months, together with Yardney Technical Products Inc., Pawcatuck, CT. The battery consists of 4 cells of 2 Ah capacity at 25 C, of which at least 25 % would be available at -80 C, at a moderate rate of C/20. Each probe contains two batteries and two such probes will be deployed. The selected cell is designed around an approximate 1/2 "D" cells, with flat plate electrodes. Significant improvements to the conventional Li-SOCl2 cell include: (a) use of tetrachlorogallate salt instead of aluminate for improved low temperature performance and reduced voltage delay, (b) optimization of the salt concentration, and (c) modification of the cell design to develop shock resistance to 80,000 g. We report here results from our several electrical performance tests, mission simulation tests, microcalorimetry and AC impedance studies, and Air gun tests. The cells have successfully gone through mission-enabling survivability and performance tests for the Mars Microprobe penetrator.

  8. Nuclear microprobe studies of elemental distribution in the seagrass Thalassodendron ciliatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnabas, A.D. E-mail: alban@pixie.udw.ac.za; Przybylowicz, W.J.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J.; Pineda, C.A

    1999-09-02

    Elemental levels and distributions in various organs (leaves, upright stems, rhizomes and roots) of the seagrass Thalassodendron ciliatum were determined using the NAC nuclear microprobe. Elemental distributions were obtained using the true elemental imaging system Dynamic Analysis (DA). Cl was the most abundant element present in the organs, occurring in all tissues, but present in relatively low concentrations in epidermal cells of leaves and roots. Na, K, S and Mg were also abundant and occurred in all organ tissues. Ca concentration was highest in the leaves, especially in the epidermis. Low concentrations of P were found and its tissue distribution was limited. Although Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Br, Ti and Si were present in relatively small amounts, enrichment of the epidermis with Fe, Ti and Si in all organs, was observed. Fe concentration was the highest in rhizomes while Si concentration was highest in upright stems. The significance of these elemental distribution patterns and the value of the nuclear microprobe in elemental analysis of seagrasses are discussed.

  9. In situ titanium dioxide nanoparticles quantitative microscopy in cells and in C. elegans using nuclear microprobe analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Trequesser, Quentin [Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS, UMR 5797, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Saez, Gladys; Devès, Guillaume; Michelet, Claire; Barberet, Philippe [Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS, UMR 5797, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France); Delville, Marie-Hélène [CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Seznec, Hervé, E-mail: herve.seznec@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS, UMR 5797, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France)

    2014-12-15

    Detecting and tracking nanomaterials in biological systems is challenging and essential to understand the possible interactions with the living. In this context, in situ analyses were conducted on human skin cells and a multicellular organism (Caenorhabditiselegans) exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2} NPs) using nuclear microprobe. Coupled to conventional methods, nuclear microprobe was found to be suitable for accurate description of chemical structure of biological systems and also for detection of native TiO{sub 2} NPs. The method presented herein opens the field to NPs exposure effects analyses and more generally to toxicological analyses assisted by nuclear microprobe. This method will show applications in key research areas where in situ imaging of chemical elements is essential.

  10. Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM) for High Resolution Probing of Earth's Microstructural Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikedi, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cambrian explosion; occurrence of landslides in very dry weather conditions; rockslides; dead, shriveled-up and crumbled leaves possessing fossil records with the semblance of well preserved, flat leaves; abundance of trilobite tracks in lower and higher rock layers; and sailing stones are enigmas demanding demystifications. These enigmas could be elucidated when data on soil structure, texture and strength are provided by some device with submicrometre accuracy; for these and other reasons, the design of a Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM), is being proposed; it is expected to deliver soft X-rays, at spatial resolution, ϛ≥600nm and to probe at the depth of 0.5m in 17s. The microprobe is portable compared to a synchrotron radiation facility (Diamond Light Source has land size of 43,300m2); spatial resolution,ϛ , of the DPSXRM surpasses those of the X-ray Fluorescence microanalysis (10µm), electron microprobe (1-3µm) and ion microprobe (5->30µm); the DPSXRM has allowance for multiple targets. Vanadium and Manganese membranes are proposed owing to respective 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 X-rays emitted, which best suits micro-probing of Earth's microstructural samples. Compound systems like the Kirk-Patrick and Baez and Wolter optics, aspheric mirrors like elliptical and parabolic optics, small apertures and Abbe sine condition are employed to reduce or remove astigmatism, obliquity, comatic and spherical aberrations—leading to good image quality. Results show that 5.899KeV MnKα1 and 4.952KeV VKα1 soft X-rays will travel a distance of 2.75mm to form circular patches of radii 2.2mm and 2.95mm respectively. Zone plate with nth zone radius of 1.5mm must be positioned 1.5mm and 2mm from the electron gun if circular patches must be formed from 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 soft X-rays respectively. The focal lengths of 0.25μm≤ƒ≤1.50μm and 0.04μm≤ƒ≤0.2μm covered by 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV Mn Kα1 soft X-Rays, will

  11. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine; Castro, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  12. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy and calcification in amelogenesis imperfecta in anterior and posterior human teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Quevedo, M.C.; Ceballos, G.; García, J. M.; Rodriguez, I. A.; Gómez de Ferraris, M.E.; Campos, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Teeth fragments from members of a famil? clinically and genetically diagnosed as having amelogenesis imperfecta were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microprobe analysis to establish the morphological patterns and the quantitative concentration of calcium in the enamel of anterior (canine, incisor) and posterior (premolar and molar) teeth. The prism patterns in the enamel of teeth from both regions were parallel or irregularly decussate, with ...

  14. High density scintillating glass proton imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, C. J.; Goranson, K.; Turney, A.; Xie, Q.; Tillman, I. J.; Thune, Z. L.; Dong, A.; Pritchett, D.; McInally, W.; Potter, A.; Wang, D.; Akgun, U.

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proton therapy has achieved remarkable precision in delivering doses to cancerous cells while avoiding healthy tissue. However, in order to utilize this high precision treatment, greater accuracy in patient positioning is needed. An accepted approximate uncertainty of +/-3% exists in the current practice of proton therapy due to conversions between x-ray and proton stopping power. The use of protons in imaging would eliminate this source of error and lessen the radiation exposure of the patient. To this end, this study focuses on developing a novel proton-imaging detector built with high-density glass scintillator. The model described herein contains a compact homogeneous proton calorimeter composed of scintillating, high density glass as the active medium. The unique geometry of this detector allows for the measurement of both the position and residual energy of protons, eliminating the need for a separate set of position trackers in the system. Average position and energy of a pencil beam of 106 protons is used to reconstruct the image rather than by analyzing individual proton data. Simplicity and efficiency were major objectives in this model in order to present an imaging technique that is compact, cost-effective, and precise, as well as practical for a clinical setting with pencil-beam scanning proton therapy equipment. In this work, the development of novel high-density glass scintillator and the unique conceptual design of the imager are discussed; a proof-of-principle Monte Carlo simulation study is performed; preliminary two-dimensional images reconstructed from the Geant4 simulation are presented.

  15. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ... the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is a ...

  16. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ... the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is a ...

  17. Results from a nuclear microprobe analysis of selected rare earth fluor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerman, W. A.; Gates, E.; Boudreaux, P.; Glass, G. A.

    2002-06-01

    Until recently, it was difficult to measure properties of individual fluor grains. The development of an accelerator-based nuclear microprobe, as is currently available at the Louisiana Accelerator Center, has made this type of research possible. Using ion beams as small as 1 /spl times/ 1 /spl mu/m (horizontal /spl times/ vertical extent), it is now possible to measure properties of individual fluor grains. Starting in 2000, a research program was initiated to determine the microscopic fluorescence properties for selected rare earth compounds, like Y/sub 2/O/sub 2/S:Eu. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was used to characterize individual fluor grains. Individual Y/sub 2/O/sub 2/S:Eu grains are clearly visible in the analysis and are less than 10 /spl mu/m in extent.

  18. Early works on the nuclear microprobe for microelectronics irradiation tests at the CEICI (Sevilla, Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, F.R., E-mail: rogelio@gte.esi.us.es [Electronic Engineering Dept., School of Engineering, Sevilla University, Avda. de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Morilla, Y. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, CNA, Sevilla University, C/Thomas Alva Edison n0 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Mogollon, J.M. [Electronic Engineering Dept., School of Engineering, Sevilla University, Avda. de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Garcia-Lopez, J.; Labrador, J.A. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, CNA, Sevilla University, C/Thomas Alva Edison n0 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Aguirre, M.A. [Electronic Engineering Dept., School of Engineering, Sevilla University, Avda. de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    Particle radiation effects are a fundamental problem in the use of numerous electronic devices for space applications, which is aggravated with the technology shrinking towards smaller and smaller scales. The suitability of low-energy accelerators for irradiation testing is being considered nowadays. Moreover, the possibility to use a nuclear microprobe, with a lateral resolution of a few microns, allows us to evaluate the behavior under ion irradiation of specific elements in an electronic device. The CEICI is the new CEnter for Integrated Circuits Irradiation tests, created into the facilities at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) in Sevilla-Spain. We have verified that our 3 MV Tandem accelerator, typically used for ion beam characterization of materials, is also a valuable tool to perform irradiation experiments in the low LET (Linear Energy Transfer) region.

  19. Nuclear microprobe analysis of muscle biopsies: Applications in pathology and clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Ph; Coquet, M.; Gherardi, R. K.; Stoedzel, P.

    2000-03-01

    The nuclear microprobe analysis of muscle biopsy sections has been recently applied to investigate different muscle disorders. This technique, employed as a complementary examination in the frame of pathological studies, permitted to confirm the diagnosis for a first pathology and to elucidate the cause of a second. In skeletal muscles of a young patient suffering from a slow progressive myopathy, calcium accumulations have been demonstrated in histologically abnormal fibers. These findings have been compared to histopathological characteristics previously described. On the other hand, we have evaluated muscle sections from two patients who presented symptoms of an inflammatory myopathy, a rare pathology that recently emerged in France. The chemical analyses permitted us to highlight local aluminium infiltration in muscles. The hypothesis of an unusual reaction to intramuscular aluminium accumulation has been advanced. These studies demonstrate the capability for ion beam microanalytical techniques to address acute problems in pathology.

  20. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  1. Lithium tracer-diffusion in an alkali-basaltic melt — An ion-microprobe determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, R. K.; Reed, S. J. B.; Nolan, J.; Henderson, P.; Long, J. V. P.

    1981-03-01

    An ion-microprobe-based technique has been used to measure lithium tracer-diffusion coefficients ( D Li) in an alkali-basaltic melt at 1300, 1350 and 1400°C. The results can be expressed in the form: D Li=7.5 ×10 -2exp(-27,600/RT)cm 2S -1 The results show significantly faster diffusion rates than those previously recorded for other monovalent, divalent and trivalent cations in a tholeiitic melt. Consequently, diffusive transport of ions acting over a given time in a basaltic melt can produce a wider range of transport distance values than hitherto supposed. Hence, it is concluded that great care should be exercised when applying diffusion data to petrological problems.

  2. Proton pump inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  3. Proton: The Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  4. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  5. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  6. Crystal Collimation with protons at injection energy

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Roberto; Masi, Alessandro; Mirarchi, Daniele; Montesano, Simone; Redaelli, Stefano; Valentino, Gianluca; Scandale, Walter; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    During this MD, performed on August 30th, 2015, bent silicon crystals were tested with protons beams for a possible usage of crystal-assisted collimation. Tests were performed at injection energy, using both horizontal and vertical crystals, providing a crucial test of the hardware for precise crystal angle adjustments (goniometers). Proton channeling was observed for the first time with LHC beams and the channeled beams were probed with scans performed with secondary collimators. Measurements of cleaning efficiency of a crystal-based collimation system were also performed.

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... limitations of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used to ...

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used to determine ...

  9. Lumbar spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower ... The lumbar CT scan is good for evaluating large herniated disks, ... smaller ones. This test can be combined with a myelogram to get ...

  10. Arm CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the arm area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  11. Thoracic spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - thoracic spine; Computed axial tomography scan - thoracic spine; Computed tomography scan - thoracic spine; CT scan - ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 44. US Food and Drug Administration. Computed tomography (CT). Updated August ...

  12. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  13. Protons in Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodisch, K. M.; Bagenal, F.; Dougherty, L.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind, the icy moons and Jupiter's ionosphere are all potential sources of protons found in the Jovian magnetosphere. In an attempt to quantify the relative importance of these different sources we explore the spatial distribution of density and temperature of the protons in Jupiter's magnetosphere. Through re-analysis of Voyager 1 and 2 Plasma Science (PLS) data obtained between 4 and 40 RJ we produce temperature and density profiles of protons in those regions. By combining profiles of protons and heavy ions (under the assumption of anisotropic Maxwellian distributions) we extrapolate the ion densities along the magnetic field to create global maps of proton density and temperature. Using these models of plasma distributions in the Jovian magnetosphere we predict the proton conditions likely encountered by the Juno spacecraft along its trajectory.

  14. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Gil

    2017-09-01

    In 2010 the proton charge radius was extracted for the first time from muonic hydrogen, a bound state of a muon and a proton. The value obtained was five standard deviations away from the regular hydrogen extraction. Taken at face value, this might be an indication of a new force in nature coupling to muons, but not to electrons. It also forces to reexamine our understanding of the structure of the proton. In this talk I will describe an ongoing theoretical research effort that seeks to address and resolve this ''proton radius puzzle''. In particular, I will present a reevaluation of the proton structure effects, correcting 40 years of such calculations, and the development of new effective field theoretical tools that would allow to directly connect muonic hydrogen and muon-proton scattering.

  15. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  16. The use of field indentation microprobe in measuring mechanical properties of welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggag, F.M.; Wong, H.; Alexander, D.J.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    A field indentation microprobe (FIM) was conceived for evaluating the structural integrity of metallic components (including base metal, welds, and heat-affected zones) in situ in a nondestructive manner. The FIM consists of an automated ball indentation (ABI) unit for determining the mechanical properties (yield strength, flow properties, estimates of fracture toughness, etc.) and a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) unit (consisting of ultrasonic transducers and a video camera) for determining the physical properties such as crack size, material pileup around indentation, and residual stress presence and orientation. The laboratory version used in this work performs only ABI testing. ABI tests were performed on stainless steel base metal (type 316L), heat-affected zone, and welds (type 308). Excellent agreement was obtained between yield strength and flow properties (true-stress/true-plastic-strain curve) measured by the ABI tests and those from uniaxial tensile tests conducted on 308 stainless steel welds, thermally aged at 343/degree/C for different times, and on the base material. 4 refs., 17 figs.

  17. The biological research programme of the nuclear microprobe at the National Accelerator Centre, Faure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozesky, V. M.; Pineda, C. A.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Churms, C. L.; Springhorn, K. A.; Moretto, Ph; Michelet, C.; Chikte, U.; Wenzl, P.

    2000-03-01

    The nuclear microprobe (NMP) unit of the National Accelerator Centre (NAC) has initiated a focused research programme on studies of biological material, ranging from applications in medicine to agriculture and botany. During this period a state-of-the-art cryo-preparation laboratory was also developed. This research programme has resulted in a wide range of projects, and has shown how well suited the NMP is for studies of biological material in general. This paper reports on some of the problems and demands in this field, as well as some of the results obtained using particle induced X-ray spectroscopy (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS). True elemental imaging is routinely performed using the dynamic analysis (DA) method, which forms part of the GeoPIXE suite of programmes. A collaborative project, together with the CENBG group of Bordeaux-Gradignan in France, on the development of a facility with the aim of studying effects of single-events of radiation in living cells was recently established and is discussed.

  18. X-ray Microprobe Investigation of Iron During a Simulated Silicon Feedstock Extraction Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardis, Sarah; Fakra, Sirine C.; Dal Martello, Elena; Larsen, Rune B.; Newman, Bonna K.; Fenning, David P.; Di Sabatino, Marisa; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-12-01

    Elemental silicon is extracted through carbothermic reduction from silicon-bearing raw feedstock materials such as quartz and quartzites. We investigate the micron-scale distribution and valence state of iron, a deleterious impurity in several iron-sensitive applications, in hydrothermal quartz samples of industrial relevance during a laboratory-scale simulated reduction process. We use X-ray diffraction to inspect the quartz structural change and synchrotron-based microprobe techniques to monitor spatial distribution and oxidation state of iron. In the untreated quartz, most of the iron is embedded in foreign minerals, both as ferric (Fe3+, e.g., in muscovite) and ferrous (Fe2+, e.g., as in biotite) iron. Upon heating the quartz to 1273 K (1000 °C) under industrial-like conditions in a CO(g) environment, iron is found in ferrous (Fe2+) particles. At this temperature, its chemical state is influenced by mineral decomposition and melting processes, whereas at higher temperatures it is influenced by the silicate melts. As the quartz grains partially transform to cristobalite 1873 K (1600 °C), iron diffuses towards liquid-solid interfaces forming ferrous clusters. Silica is liquid at 2173 K (1900 °C) and the iron migrates towards the interfaces between gas phases and the silicate liquid.

  19. Determination of nitrogen partitioning coefficients in superduplex stainless steels by NRA using a nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, C. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, Isla de La Cartuja, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: camulu@us.es; Morilla, Y.; Garcia Lopez, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, Isla de La Cartuja, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Paul, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y de los Materiales ESI, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41092 Sevilla, Av. de los Descubrimientos s/n (Spain); Odriozola, J.A. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica e Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Universidad de Sevilla - CSIC, E-41092 Sevilla, Av. Americo Vespucio 49 (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Superduplex stainless steels (SDSSs) combine the good mechanical behavior and the high corrosion resistance of the ferrite ({alpha}-Fe) and austenite ({gamma}-Fe) phases. The SDSSs properties depend strongly on the partitioning of the elements that form the alloy. The ferrite is generally enriched in P, Si, Cr and Mo while the content of Ni, Mn, Cu and N in the austenite phase is higher. Nitrogen is known to be a strong austenite stabilizer and its presence increases the strength and the pitting corrosion resistance of the stainless steels. While the global nitrogen content in SDSSs can be readily determined using elemental analyzers, it cannot be measured at a microscopic scale. In this work, the nuclear microprobe of the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (Sevilla) was used to obtain the quantitative distribution of nitrogen in SDSSs. A deuteron beam of 1.8 MeV was employed to determine the overall elemental concentration of the matrix by deuteron-induced X-ray emission, whereas the nitrogen partitioning coefficients were obtained by using the {sup 14}N(d, {alpha}{sub 0}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction. Mappings of this element show that the nitrogen ratio between the ferrite and austenite phases ranges from 0.3 to 0.6 in the analyzed samples.

  20. Errors in the determination of the limits of detection using JEOL's electron microprobe interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkacheev, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    The first commercially available electron microprobe was made in the middle of XIX century. At the moment, this technique of determination of chemical composition of matter has a lot of applications in Geoscience, even in trace element analysis. During our work in the field of spectroscopy of minerals, it was necessary to determine the EPMA limits of detection for trace elements in sulphides. We measured several samples of synthetic sulfides (sphalerite, covellite) with the concentration of gold in the range from 15 to 5000 ppm using JEOL-JXA8200 in IGEM RAS and JEOL-JXA8230 in MSU equipped with energy-dispersive and 5 wavelength spectrometers, employing different crystals (PETH or LIFH), modes (integral or differential), acceleration voltage, counting time, and the beam size. We calculated the real limit of detection, using the equation from the EPMA JXA-8200 Manual and [Reed, 2000]. Our data did not correspond with the values appears on the screen after the analysis. The difference in estimation of the limits of detection between our and computer's data varies from 8 up to 13 times. We suggested that observed dissimilarity of the typed and the real values may be related to desire JEOL Ltd to promote devices for better selling. We are firmly recommend checking this values while performing the trace element analysis. References JEOL JXA8200 Manual Reed S.J.B. (2000) Quantitative trace analysis by wavelength-dispersive EPMA. Mikrochim. Acta 132 145-151.

  1. Direct localised measurement of electrical resistivity profile in rat and embryonic chick retinas using a microprobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald van Lintel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an alternative technique to perform a direct and local measurement of electrical resistivities in a layered retinal tissue. Information on resistivity changes along the depth in a retina is important for modelling retinal stimulation by retinal prostheses. Existing techniques for resistivity-depth profiling have the drawbacks of a complicated experimental setup, a less localised resistivity probing and/or lower stability for measurements. We employed a flexible microprobe to measure local resistivity with bipolar impedance spectroscopy at various depths in isolated rat and chick embryo retinas for the first time. Small electrode spacing permitted high resolution measurements and the probe flexibility contributed to stable resistivity profiling. The resistivity was directly calculated based on the resistive part of the impedance measured with the Peak Resistance Frequency (PRF methodology. The resistivity-depth profiles for both rat and chick embryo models are in accordance with previous mammalian and avian studies in literature. We demonstrate that the measured resistivity at each depth has its own PRF signature. Resistivity profiles obtained with our setup provide the basis for the construction of an electric model of the retina. This model can be used to predict variations in parameters related to retinal stimulation and especially in the design and optimisation of efficient retinal implants.

  2. Leukemia — Its manifestation in the microelement profile in individual blood cells as determined in the nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Erland; Lindh, Ulf

    1984-04-01

    Leukemia is characterised by perturbations of the hemopoiesis leading to altered production patterns of lymphocytes or granulocytes. Deviations in the microelement profile in blood cells from leukemic patients were thus judged to be of significance. To assess the concentration of trace and more abundant elements within individual blood cells, the Studsvik Nuclear Microprobe was employed. The results on blood cells from leukemic patients revealed strong irregularities in the microelement profiles as compared with a control group.

  3. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the effects of ionization and displacement damage in vertical, high voltage GaN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizkelethy, G.; King, M. P.; Aktas, O.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Kaplar, R. J.

    2017-08-01

    Radiation responses of high-voltage, vertical gallium-nitride (GaN) diodes were investigated using Sandia National Laboratories' nuclear microprobe. Effects of the ionization and the displacement damage were studied using various ion beams. We found that the devices show avalanche effect for heavy ions operated under bias well below the breakdown voltage. The displacement damage experiments showed a surprising effect for moderate damage: the charge collection efficiency demonstrated an increase instead of a decrease for higher bias voltages.

  4. Numerical studies of triplet and Russian quadruplet quadrupole lens systems with the given spot size on the target, for use in a microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazhnik, V.A.; Lebed, S.A.; Ponomarev, A.G.; Storizhko, V.E. [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Sumy (Ukraine). Applied Physics Institute; Dymnikov, A.D. [University of St Petersburg, Stary (Russian Federation). Institute of Computational Mathematics and Control Processes; Jamieson, D.N.; Legge, S.A. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    In a nuclear microprobe the focusing system is an essential component which determines the beam spot size, i.e. the microprobe resolution. A small beam cross section at the target is the most important of the many conflicting requirements imposed on the beam The second most important factor is the current of the beam which at the given brightness is proportional to the phase volume (or emittance) of the beam. Existing microprobes frequently use a triplet or a Russian quadruplet as the focusing systems. This paper describes the numerical studies of some optimal quadrupole lens systems consisting of three or four lenses suitable for use in a nuclear microprobe taking into account geometrical aberrations of third order. The maximum emittance of changed particle beams for these systems has been found. It is shown how the maximum emittance depends on the spot size. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Ion microprobe analyses of oxygen three-isotope ratios of chondrules from the Sayh al Uhaymir 290 CH chondrite using a multiple-hole disk

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakashima, D.; Ushikubo, T.; Gowda, R.N.; Kita, N.T.; Valley, J.W.; Naga, K.

    The ion microprobe is the only technique capable of determining high-precision stable isotope ratios in individual tiny extraterrestrial particles (less than or equal to 100 mu m in diameter), but these small samples present special analytical...

  6. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have false results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  7. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Calcium Scan Coronary Calcium Scan Also known as Calcium Scan Test A coronary calcium scan is a CT scan of your heart that detects and measures the amount of calcium in the walls of your coronary arteries. Overview ...

  8. Maskless proton beam writing in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, P. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom) and Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.mistry@surrey.ac.uk; Gomez-Morilla, I. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Smith, R.C. [Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thomson, D. [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Grime, G.W. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Webb, R.P. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jeynes, C. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Cansell, A. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Merchant, M. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Kirkby, K.J. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    Proton beam writing (PBW) is a direct write technique that employs a focused MeV proton beam which is scanned in a pre-determined pattern over a target material which is subsequently electrochemically etched or chemically developed. By changing the energy of the protons the range of the protons can be changed. The ultimate depth of the structure is determined by the range of the protons in the material and this allows structures to be formed to different depths. PBW has been successfully employed on etchable glasses, polymers and semiconductor materials such as silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). This study reports on PBW in p-type GaAs and compares experimental results with computer simulations using the Atlas (copy right) semiconductor device package from SILVACO. It has already been proven that hole transport is required for the electrochemical etching of GaAs using Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-m-benzenedisulfonic acid, di-sodium salt). PBW in GaAs results in carrier removal in the irradiated regions and consequently minimal hole transport (in these regions) during electrochemical etching. As a result the irradiated regions are significantly more etch resistant than the non-irradiated regions. This allows high aspect ratio structures to be formed.

  9. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is ... code: Phone no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  11. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is ... taking our brief survey: Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  13. CALCMIN - an EXCEL™ Visual Basic application for calculating mineral structural formulae from electron microprobe analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandelik, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    CALCMIN, an open source Visual Basic program, was implemented in EXCEL™. The program was primarily developed to support geoscientists in their routine task of calculating structural formulae of minerals on the basis of chemical analysis mainly obtained by electron microprobe (EMP) techniques. Calculation programs for various minerals are already included in the form of sub-routines. These routines are arranged in separate modules containing a minimum of code. The architecture of CALCMIN allows the user to easily develop new calculation routines or modify existing routines with little knowledge of programming techniques. By means of a simple mouse-click, the program automatically generates a rudimentary framework of code using the object model of the Visual Basic Editor (VBE). Within this framework simple commands and functions, which are provided by the program, can be used, for example, to perform various normalization procedures or to output the results of the computations. For the clarity of the code, element symbols are used as variables initialized by the program automatically. CALCMIN does not set any boundaries in complexity of the code used, resulting in a wide range of possible applications. Thus, matrix and optimization methods can be included, for instance, to determine end member contents for subsequent thermodynamic calculations. Diverse input procedures are provided, such as the automated read-in of output files created by the EMP. Furthermore, a subsequent filter routine enables the user to extract specific analyses in order to use them for a corresponding calculation routine. An event-driven, interactive operating mode was selected for easy application of the program. CALCMIN leads the user from the beginning to the end of the calculation process.

  14. Ion microprobe analyses of carbon in Fe-Ni metal in iron meteorites and mesosiderites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Huss, Gary R.; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon concentrations in kamacite, taenite, and plessite (kamacite-taenite intergrowths) were measured in 18 iron meteorites and 2 mesosiderites using the Cameca ims 1280 ion microprobe at the University of Hawai'i with a 5-7 μm beam and a detection limit of 115 ppm in cloudy taenite as nickel decreases from 50% to 35%. Low carbon levels in tetrataenite may reflect ordering of iron and nickel; higher carbon in cloudy taenite is attributed to metastable bcc phase, possibly martensite, with ∼300 ppm carbon intergrown with tetrataenite. Pearlitic plessite, which only forms in carbon-rich irons, contains much less carbon than martensitic plessite: 10-20 ppm and 300-500, respectively, in IAB irons. Pearlitic plessite consists of μm-scale intergrowths of low-nickel kamacite and tetrataenite, which formed during cooling from ∼450 to 300 °C when haxonite was forming. Martensitic plessite decomposed to tetrataenite and metastable high-nickel kamacite at temperatures below 300 °C, which depended on nickel content. Carbon accumulated in untransformed taenite when haxonite growth ceased, producing M-shaped carbon profiles. Bulk carbon concentrations inferred from our ion probe data are 3-4 ppm in IVA, IVB, and Tishomingo, which has IVB-like depletions of moderately volatile siderophiles. Published bulk carbon contents of IVA and IVB irons are >10 times higher suggesting contamination problems. Our ion probe analyses and observations of carbide and graphite show that bulk carbon decreases with decreasing germanium and other moderately volatile elements from group IAB, through IIAB and IIIAB, to group IVA and IVB. These trends may have been inherited from fractionated chondritic precursors, or may have been produced by impacts that caused volatile loss, separation of mantle from core material, and relatively rapid cooling of irons poor in volatiles and carbon.

  15. Assessment of dye distribution in sensitized solar cells by microprobe techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiros, M.A., E-mail: alexandra.barreiros@lneg.pt [Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, LEN/UES, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Corregidor, V. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [C2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Guimarães, F. [Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, LGM/UCTM, Rua da Amieira, Apartado 1089, 4466-901 S. Mamede de Infesta (Portugal); Mascarenhas, J.; Torres, E.; Brites, M.J. [Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, LEN/UES, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-04-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have received considerable attention once this technology offers economic and environmental advantages over conventional photovoltaic (PV) devices. The PV performance of a DSC relies on the characteristics of its photoanode, which typically consists of a nanocrystalline porous TiO{sub 2} film, enabled with a large adsorptive surface area. Dye molecules that capture photons from light during device operation are attached to the film nanoparticles. The effective loading of the dye in the TiO{sub 2} electrode is of paramount relevance for controlling and optimizing solar cell parameters. Relatively few methods are known today for quantitative evaluation of the total dye adsorbed on the film. In this context, microprobe techniques come out as suitable tools to evaluate the dye surface distribution and depth profile in sensitized films. Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA) and Ion Beam Analytical (IBA) techniques using a micro-ion beam were used to quantify and to study the distribution of the Ru organometallic dye in TiO{sub 2} films, making use of the different penetration depth and beam sizes of each technique. Different 1D nanostructured TiO{sub 2} films were prepared, morphologically characterized by SEM, sensitized and analyzed by the referred techniques. Dye load evaluation in different TiO{sub 2} films by three different techniques (PIXE, RBS and EPMA/WDS) provided similar results of Ru/Ti mass fraction ratio. Moreover, it was possible to assess dye surface distribution and its depth profile, by means of Ru signal, and to visualize the dye distribution in sample cross-section through X-ray mapping by EPMA/EDS. PIXE maps of Ru and Ti indicated an homogeneous surface distribution. The assessment of Ru depth profile by RBS showed that some films have homogeneous Ru depth distribution while others present different Ru concentration in the top layer (2 μm thickness). These results are consistent with the EPMA/EDS maps obtained.

  16. Zircon ion microprobe dating of high-grade rocks in Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroener, A.; Williams, I.S.; Compston, W.; Baur, N.; Vitanage, P.W.; Perera, L.R.K.

    1987-11-01

    The high-grade gneisses of Sri Lanka display spectacular in-situ granulitization phenomena similar to those observed in southern India and of current interest for evolutionary models of the lower continental crust. The absolute ages of these rocks are poorly constrained and so, using the SHRIMP ion microprobe, the authors have analyzed small spots on zircons from upper amphibolite to granulite grade quartzitic and pelitic metasediments. Detrital grains from a metaquartzite of the Highland Group preserve premetamorphic U-Pb ages of between 3.17 and 2.4 Ga and indicate derivation of the sediment from an unidentified Archean source terrain. The Pb-loss patterns of these zircons and the other samples suggest severe disturbance at ca 1100 Ma ago, which the authors attribute to high-grade regional metamorphism. Two pelitic gneisses contain detrital zircons with ages up to 2.04 Ga and also record an approx. = 1100 Ma event that is also apparent from metamorphic rims around old cores and new zircon growth. A granite intrusive into the Highland Group granulites records an emplacement age of 1000-1100 Ma as well as metamorphic disturbance some 550 Ma ago but also contains older, crustally derived xenocrysts. Zircons from a metaquartzite xenolith within the granitoid Vijayan Complex are not older than approx. 1100 Ma; therefore the Vijayan is neither Archean in age nor acted as basement to the Highland Group, as previously proposed. The authors suggest that the Vijayan Complex formed significantly later than the Highland Group and that the two units were brought into contact through post-1.1 Ga thrusting. Although the granulitization phenomena in India and Sri Lanka are similar, the granulite event in Sri Lanka is not Archean in age but took place in the late Proterozoic.

  17. Nuclear microprobe analysis of serpentine from the mid-Atlantic ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orberger, Beate E-mail: orberger@geol.u-psud.fr; Metrich, Nicole; Mosbah, Michelle E-mail: mosbah@drecam.cea.fr; Mevel, Catherine; Fouquet, Yves

    1999-09-02

    At mid-ocean ridges, ultramafic rocks are serpentinized by interaction with seawater-derived fluids. Elements, dissolved in large quantities in seawater, e.g., Na, K, Cl, Br, Ca and Sr, can be, in small amounts, incorporated as traces into the crystal structure of the various serpentine minerals (Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}). These trace elements can be used to track the composition of the reacting fluids and to constrain physico-chemical conditions. This paper represents the first application of particle-induced X- and {gamma}-ray emission (PIXE/PIGE) analysis to serpentine using the nuclear microprobe at the Laboratoire Pierre Suee (CEA-CNRS). Three types of serpentine, belonging to two different serpentinization generations, have been analysed in samples collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (14 deg. 45'N/45 deg. W) that exposes serpentinized peridotites on which the Logachev black smoker is placed. The trace elements Cl, F, S, Cu, Zn, Ca, K, Ni, Cr and Mn were detected from several tens to several thousands of ppm. Bromine, As and Sr are close to the detection limit of about 5 ppm. The trace element concentrations and interelement relationships in serpentines vary (a) with the serpentine type and (b) with the geographic location to the black smoker. Chlorine and in part S originated from seawater, whereas Cu, Zn, Ca, K, Ni, Cr and Fe and the major amount of S were mobilized from the unaltered host rock and partitioned between the serpentine and the aqueous solution.

  18. Development of an NMR microprobe procedure for high-throughput environmental metabolomics of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagato, Edward G; Lankadurai, Brian P; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary platform used in high-throughput environmental metabolomics studies because its non-selectivity is well suited for non-targeted approaches. However, standard NMR probes may limit the use of NMR-based metabolomics for tiny organisms because of the sample volumes required for routine metabolic profiling. Because of this, keystone ecological species, such as the water flea Daphnia magna, are not commonly studied because of the analytical challenges associated with NMR-based approaches. Here, the use of a 1.7-mm NMR microprobe in analyzing tissue extracts from D. magna is tested. Three different extraction procedures (D2O-based buffer, Bligh and Dyer, and acetonitrile : methanol : water) were compared in terms of the yields and breadth of polar metabolites. The D2O buffer extraction yielded the most metabolites and resulted in the best reproducibility. Varying amounts of D. magna dry mass were extracted to optimize metabolite isolation from D. magna tissues. A ratio of 1-1.5-mg dry mass to 40 µl of extraction solvent provided excellent signal-to-noise and spectral resolution using (1)H NMR. The metabolite profile of a single daphnid was also investigated (approximately 0.2 mg). However, the signal-to-noise of the (1)H NMR was considerably lower, and while feasible for select applications would likely not be appropriate for high-throughput NMR-based metabolomics. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on D. magna extracts were also performed using the 1.7-mm NMR probe to confirm (1)H NMR metabolite assignments. This study provides an NMR-based analytical framework for future metabolomics studies that use D. magna in ecological and ecotoxicity studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Low LET protons focused to submicrometer shows enhanced radiobiological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, T E; Greubel, C; Hable, V; Zlobinskaya, O; Michalski, D; Girst, S; Siebenwirth, C; Schmid, E; Molls, M; Multhoff, G; Dollinger, G

    2012-10-07

    This study shows that enhanced radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) values can be generated focusing low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and thus changing the microdose distribution. 20 MeV protons (LET = 2.65 keV µm(-1)) are focused to submicrometer diameter at the ion microprobe superconducting nanoprobe for applied nuclear (Kern) physics experiments of the Munich tandem accelerator. The RBE values, as determined by measuring micronuclei (RBE(MN) = 1.48 ± 0.07) and dicentrics (RBE(D) = 1.92 ± 0.15), in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells are significantly higher when 117 protons were focused to a submicrometer irradiation field within a 5.4 × 5.4 µm(2) matrix compared to quasi homogeneous in a 1 × 1 µm(2) matrix applied protons (RBE(MN) = 1.28 ± 0.07; RBE(D) = 1.41 ± 0.14) at the same average dose of 1.7 Gy. The RBE values are normalized to standard 70 kV (dicentrics) or 200 kV (micronuclei) x-ray irradiation. The 117 protons applied per point deposit the same amount of energy like a (12)C ion with 55 MeV total energy (4.48 MeV u(-1)). The enhancements are about half of that obtained for (12)C ions (RBE(MN) = 2.20 ± 0.06 and RBE(D) = 3.21 ± 0.10) and they are attributed to intertrack interactions of the induced damages. The measured RBE values show differences from predictions of the local effect model (LEM III) that is used to calculate RBE values for irradiation plans to treat tumors with high LET particles.

  20. Proton-Proton Physics with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the ALICE experiment at LHC is to study strongly interacting matter at high energy densities as well as the signatures and properties of the quark-gluon plasma. This goal manifests itself in a rich physics program. Although ALICE will mainly study heavy-ion collisions, a dedicated program will concentrate on proton-proton physics. The first part will introduce the ALICE experiment from a pp measurement's point of view. Two unique properties are its low pT cut-off and the excellent PID capabilities. The various topics of the proton-proton physics program, which will allow a close scrutiny of existing theoretical models, will be described. Furthermore, the interpretation of measurements of heavy-ion collisions necessitates the comparison to measurements of pp collisions. The second part will concentrate on the day-1 physics program of ALICE. At startup, neither the LHC luminosity nor its energy will have their nominal values. Furthermore, the ALICE detector is in the process of being aligned and cal...

  1. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  2. In-situ study of ferric iron distribution in synthetic spinels by electron microprobe analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Alexey; Olga, Sinelshikova; Rustam, Lukmanov

    2017-04-01

    The iron oxidation state in mantle minerals is a key value in oxygen fugacity calculation and the most widely used analytical approach for Fe3+/ΣFe determination is Mössbauer spectroscopy, which is a bulk method and there is a lack of information on Fe3+/ΣFe zonation in individual mineral grains and Fe3+/ΣFe in inclusions. Here we present application of the flank method using the electron microprobe by analysing the FeLα and FeLβ X-ray emission spectra to a suite of 20 synthetic MgAl2O2-Cr2O3-Fe2O3(FeO) spinels. Materials were done with 5 - 25 FeO wt.%, and 2-70 Cr2O3 wt.% and Fe3+/ΣFe = 0.10 to 0.80, where Fe3+/ΣFe was determined independently using Mössbauer spectroscopy on the same grains used for the flank method measurements. Synthesis of the samples produced using a pyrolysis method of organic salt compositions in MgAl2O2-Cr2O3-Fe2O3(FeO) system with following heating in corundum crucibles at 1300 ° C for 5 -10 hours under controlled oxygen fugacity. All synthetic materials were investigated by X-ray and Mössbauer spectroscopy to examine a phase and iron oxidation state features. In terms of chemical composition and Fe3+/ΣFe resulting synthetic material covers a whole range of spinels derived in mantle peridotites and pyroxenites. These synthetic products were used as a standard sample to investigate co-variations of ratios of intensities measured on the flanks of FeLα and Lβ peaks and Fe3+/ΣFe, FeO content and Cr#. The obtained correlations can be used to perform in-situ studies of ferric iron distribution in natural mantle spinels. The presented approach will allow investigating the difference in mantle spinel Fe3+/ΣFe at a microscale from core to rim in individual grain, inclusion, melting pocket and in intergrows with other mantle mineral assemblage. The reported study was funded by RFBR according to the research project № 16-35-60076 mol_a_dk.

  3. Ion Microprobe U-Pb Dating and Sr Isotope Measurement of Conodont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Y.; Ishida, A.; Kagoshima, T.; Takahata, N.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a method of in situ ion microprobe U-Pb dating and Sr isotope measurement of biogenic apatite using NanoSIMS. This was applied to a protoconodont, an early Cambrian phosphate microfossil [1]. On a single fragment of a fossil derived from a sedimentary layer in the Meishucunian Yuhucun Formation, southern China [2], 23 spots provide a 238U/206Pb isochron age of 547 ± 43 Ma (2sigma), which is consistent with the depositional age, 536.5 ± 2.5 Ma estimated using zircon U-Pb dating of interbedded tuffs [3]. However, five spots on a small region in the same protoconodont yield an isochron age of 417 ± 74 Ma (2sigma), apparently younger than the formation age. The younger age might be attributable to a later hydrothermal event, perhaps associated with Caledonian orogenic activity recorded in younger zircon with an age of 420-440 Ma [4]. We measured Sr isotopic ratios of the protoconodont by NanoSIMS. In the older domain, 19 spots give the ratio of 0.71032 ± 0.00023 (2sigma), although seven spots on the younger region provide the ratio of 0.70862 ± 0.00045; which is significantly less radiogenic than the older domain. We also measured U-Pb age and Sr isotopes of a Carboniferous conodont derived from the Kinderhookian stage from the Illinois Basin region in North America. 20 spots yield a 238U/206Pb isochron age of 291 ± 56 Ma (2sigma), which is markedly younger than the depositional age of the fossil of 350-363 Ma. On the other hand, 9 spots give a Sr isotopic ratio of 0.70784 ± 0.00030, less radiogenic than the older domain of protoconodont. These data together with other isotopes such as Cl may provide a constraint on the model for chemical evolution of seawater. [1] Sano et al. (2014) J. Asian Earth Sci. 92, 10-17. [2] Condon et al. (2005) Science 308, 95-98. [3] Sawaki et al. (2008) Gondwana Res. 14, 148-158. [4] Guo et al. (2009) Geochem. J. 43, 101-122.

  4. Lorentz contracted proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro, D. Bedoya; Kelkar, N.G.; Nowakowski, M. [Dept. de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, Cra. 1E No. 18A-10, Santafe de Bogota (Colombia)

    2015-09-30

    The proton charge and magnetization density distributions can be related to the well known Sachs electromagnetic form factors G{sub E,M}(/emph {q}{sup 2}) through Fourier transforms, only in the Breit frame. The Breit frame however moves with relativistic velocities in the Lab and a Lorentz boost must be applied before extracting the static properties of the proton from the corresponding densities. Apart from this, the Fourier transform relating the densities and form factors is inherently a non-relativistic expression. We show that the relativistic corrections to it can be obtained by extending the standard Breit equation to higher orders in its 1/c{sup 2} expansion. We find that the inclusion of the above corrections reduces the size of the proton as determined from electron proton scattering data by about 4%.

  5. Inauguration of Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    On 5 February 1960, the Proton Synchrotron (PS) was formally inaugurated. The great Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, releases a bottle of champagne against a shielding block to launch the PS on its voyage in physics.

  6. Proton computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible.

  7. Plant proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Schumacher, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react...

  8. Jovian proton aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, M. G.; Edgar, B. C.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Auroral and polar cap emissions in a model Jovian atmosphere are determined for proton precipitation. The incident protons, which are characterized by representative spectra, are degraded in energy by applying the continuous slowing down approximation. All secondary and higher generation electrons are assumed to be absorbed locally and their contributions to the total emissions are included. Volume emission rates are calculated from the total direct excitation rates with corrections for cascading applied. Results show that most molecular hydrogen and helium emissions for polar cap precipitation are below the ambient dayglow values. Charge capture by precipitating protons is an important source of Lyman alpha and Balmer alpha emissions and offers a key to the detection of large fluxes of low energy protons.

  9. Proton conduction in phosphatidylethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, N; Gonda, K; Kagami, I; Koga, S

    1977-08-01

    The dc conductivity of polycrystalline phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was measured in the temperature range 60-120 degrees C. Since no conclusive evidence had so far been obtained for the presence of proteon conduction in this phospholipid, hydrogen gas was shown in the present experiment to evolve during the electrolysis in its premelted state between 91 and 124 degrees C. In this temperature range molecules assume rotation around the molecular axes and proton conduction of the Grotthus type takes place possibly along two chains of intermolecular hydrogen bonds running in parallel. Zwitter-ions behave cooperatively as proton donors and acceptors in transferring proton from molecule and molecule via the hydrogen bond networks. This efficient push-pull way of proton transferring seems to account for the fact that no polarization was observed in the dc conduction experiments. The amount of devolved gas appears to be not exactly in accordance with Faraday's law and discussions are made on possible causes for this slight deviation.

  10. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  11. Software platform for simulation of a prototype proton CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Valentina; Bashkirov, Vladimir A; Piersimoni, Pierluigi; Guatelli, Susanna; Plautz, Tia E; Sadrozinski, Hartmut F-W; Johnson, Robert P; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Tessonnier, Thomas; Parodi, Katia; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Schulte, Reinhard W

    2017-03-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a promising imaging technique to substitute or at least complement x-ray CT for more accurate proton therapy treatment planning as it allows calculating directly proton relative stopping power from proton energy loss measurements. A proton CT scanner with a silicon-based particle tracking system and a five-stage scintillating energy detector has been completed. In parallel a modular software platform was developed to characterize the performance of the proposed pCT. The modular pCT software platform consists of (1) a Geant4-based simulation modeling the Loma Linda proton therapy beam line and the prototype proton CT scanner, (2) water equivalent path length (WEPL) calibration of the scintillating energy detector, and (3) image reconstruction algorithm for the reconstruction of the relative stopping power (RSP) of the scanned object. In this work, each component of the modular pCT software platform is described and validated with respect to experimental data and benchmarked against theoretical predictions. In particular, the RSP reconstruction was validated with both experimental scans, water column measurements, and theoretical calculations. The results show that the pCT software platform accurately reproduces the performance of the existing prototype pCT scanner with a RSP agreement between experimental and simulated values to better than 1.5%. The validated platform is a versatile tool for clinical proton CT performance and application studies in a virtual setting. The platform is flexible and can be modified to simulate not yet existing versions of pCT scanners and higher proton energies than those currently clinically available. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  13. The physics of proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Newhauser, Wayne D; ZHANG, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes a...

  14. Liquid fiducial marker applicability in proton therapy of locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherman Rydhög, Jonas; Perrin, Rosalind; Jølck, Rasmus Irming

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: We investigated the clinical applicability of a novel liquid fiducial marker (LFM) for image-guided pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton therapy (PBSPT) of locally advanced lung cancer (LALC). Materials and methods: The relative proton stopping power (RSP) of the LFM was calcu...

  15. The first private-hospital based proton therapy center in Korea; status of the Proton Therapy Center at Samsung Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Han, Youngyih; Kim, Jinsung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sang Gyu; Jung, Sang Hoon; Chung, Yoonsun; Cho, Sungkoo; Jo, Kwanghyun; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Hong, Chae-Seon; Shin, Jung Suk; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Boram; Shibagaki, Gantaro; Nonaka, Hideki; Sasai, Kenzo; Koyabu, Yukio; Choi, Changhoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Ahn, Yong Chan; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Oh, Dong Ryul; Noh, Jae Myung; Yu, Jeong Il; Song, Sanghyuk; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Bomi; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC-PTS) including the proton beam generator, irradiation system, patient positioning system, patient position verification system, respiratory gating system, and operating and safety control system, and review the current status of the SMC-PTS. The SMC-PTS has a cyclotron (230 MeV) and two treatment rooms: one treatment room is equipped with a multi-purpose nozzle and the other treatment room is equipped with a dedicated pencil beam scanning nozzle. The proton beam generator including the cyclotron and the energy selection system can lower the energy of protons down to 70 MeV from the maximum 230 MeV. The multi-purpose nozzle can deliver both wobbling proton beam and active scanning proton beam, and a multi-leaf collimator has been installed in the downstream of the nozzle. The dedicated scanning nozzle can deliver active scanning proton beam with a helium gas filled pipe minimizing unnecessary interactions with the air in the beam path. The equipment was provided by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., RayStation from RaySearch Laboratories AB is the selected treatment planning system, and data management will be handled by the MOSAIQ system from Elekta AB. The SMC-PTS located in Seoul, Korea, is scheduled to begin treating cancer patients in 2015.

  16. The first private-hospital based proton therapy center in Korea; Status of the proton therapy center at Samsung Medical Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kwang Zoo; Han, Young Yih; Kim, Jin Sung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this report is to describe the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC-PTS) including the proton beam generator, irradiation system, patient positioning system, patient position verification system, respiratory gating system, and operating and safety control system, and review the current status of the SMC-PTS. The SMC-PTS has a cyclotron (230 MeV) and two treatment rooms: one treatment room is equipped with a multi-purpose nozzle and the other treatment room is equipped with a dedicated pencil beam scanning nozzle. The proton beam generator including the cyclotron and the energy selection system can lower the energy of protons down to 70 MeV from the maximum 230 MeV. The multi-purpose nozzle can deliver both wobbling proton beam and active scanning proton beam, and a multi-leaf collimator has been installed in the downstream of the nozzle. The dedicated scanning nozzle can deliver active scanning proton beam with a helium gas filled pipe minimizing unnecessary interactions with the air in the beam path. The equipment was provided by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., RayStation from RaySearch Laboratories AB is the selected treatment planning system, and data management will be handled by the MOSAIQ system from Elekta AB. The SMC-PTS located in Seoul, Korea, is scheduled to begin treating cancer patients in 2015.

  17. Quantitative proton radiography of an animal patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uwe; Dellert, Matthias; Pedroni, Eros; Pemler, Peter; Besserer, Juergen; Moosburger, Martin; Theiler, Prisca; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara

    2003-06-01

    Images (with a spatial resolution of 1 mm x 1mm) were produced both, with range and range dilution information of the protons passing through a dog. The radiographies were taken prior to a proton radiotherapy treatment of a nasal tumor, while the dog patient was under anesthetics. The first image was created by calculating the mean range of the protons detected in each pixel. This image was compared to calculations of the treatment planning system based on a CT-scan of the dog. Errors in the calculated range could be detected. The second image was produced by calculating the width of the range spectrum in each pixel. This value is a measure of the dilution of the range due to tissue inhomogeneities. The dilution image can be used to indicate critical situations during proton therapy, to determine the safety margin around the tumor volume, or to optimise treatment. In a preliminary analysis of the radiography data we found range uncertainty and range dilution effects in the order of up to 10 mm.

  18. Operation of the preclinical head scanner for proton CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H.F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@ucsc.edu [SCIPP, U.C. Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Geoghegan, T.; Harvey, E.; Johnson, R.P.; Plautz, T.E.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [SCIPP, U.C. Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bashkirov, V.; Hurley, R.F.; Piersimoni, P.; Schulte, R.W. [Division of Radiation Research, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Karbasi, P.; Schubert, K.E.; Schultze, B. [School of Engineering and Computer Science, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Giacometti, V. [Center for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2016-09-21

    We report on the operation and performance tests of a preclinical head scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT). After extensive preclinical testing, pCT is intended to be employed in support of proton therapy treatment planning and pre-treatment verification in patients undergoing particle-beam therapy. In order to assess the performance of the scanner, we have performed CT scans with 200 MeV protons from both the synchrotron of the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) and the cyclotron of the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center (NMCPC). The very high sustained rate of data acquisition, exceeding one million protons per second, allowed a full 360° scan to be completed in less than 7 min. The reconstruction of various phantoms verified accurate reconstruction of the proton relative stopping power (RSP) and the spatial resolution in a variety of materials. The dose for an image with better than 1% uncertainty in the RSP is found to be close to 1 mGy.

  19. Quantification and localization of trace metals in natural plancton using a synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twining, B. S.; Baines, S. B.; Fisher, N. S.; Jacobsen, C.; Maser, J.; State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook

    2003-03-01

    The accumulation of trace metals by planktonic protists influences the growth of primary producers, metal biogeochemical cycling, and metal bioaccumulation in aquatic food chains. Despite their importance, unequivocal measurements of trace element concentrations in individual plankton cells have not been possible to date. We have used the 2-ID-E side-branch hard x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source to measure trace elements in individual marine plankton cells. This microprobe employs zoneplate optics to produce the sub-micron spatial resolution and low background fluorescence required to produce trace element maps of planktonic protist cells ranging in size from 3 to >50 {micro}m. We have developed preservation, rinsing, and mounting protocols that remove most of the salt from our marine samples, thus simplifying the identification of unknown cells and reducing high Cl-related background fluorescence. We have also developed spectral modeling techniques that account for the frequent overlap of adjacent fluorescence peaks and non-uniform detector response. Finally, we have used parallel soft x-ray transmission and epifluorescence microscopy images to estimate C normalized trace element concentrations, identify functional cell types (e.g., photosynthetic vs. non-photosynthetic), and correlate cell structures with spatial patterns in trace element fluorescence.

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... concern for you. If you had an intravenous line inserted for the procedure, it will usually be ... procedure that same day that requires an intravenous line. Actual scanning time for a thyroid scan is ...

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid ... body converts food to energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The ...

  2. RBC nuclear scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  3. Journal of Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Proton Therapy (JPT is an international open access, peer-reviewed journal, which publishes original research, technical reports, reviews, case reports, editorials, and other materials on proton therapy with focus on radiation oncology, medical physics, medical dosimetry, and radiation therapy.No article processing/submission feeNo publication feePeer-review completion within 3-6 weeksImmediate publication after the completion of final author proofreadDOI assignment for each published articleFree access to published articles for all readers without any access barriers or subscriptionThe views and opinions expressed in articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the Journal of Proton Therapy.Authors are encouraged to submit articles for publication in the inaugural issue of the Journal of Proton Therapy by online or email to editor@protonjournal.comOfficial Website of Journal of Proton Therapy: http://www.protonjournal.org/

  4. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2014-01-01

    360◦ rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom...... nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully...... power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT...

  5. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  6. Proton relativistic model; Modelo relativistico do proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-12-31

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author) 42 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The physics of proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-04-21

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy.

  8. The physics of proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Zhang, Rui

    2015-04-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy.

  9. Filtered backprojection proton CT reconstruction along most likely paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rit, Simon; Dedes, George; Freud, Nicolas; Sarrut, David; Letang, Jean Michel [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Centre Leon Berard, 69008 Lyon (France)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) has the potential to accurately measure the electron density map of tissues at low doses but the spatial resolution is prohibitive if the curved paths of protons in matter is not accounted for. The authors propose to account for an estimate of the most likely path of protons in a filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Methods: The energy loss of protons is first binned in several proton radiographs at different distances to the proton source to exploit the depth-dependency of the estimate of the most likely path. This process is named the distance-driven binning. A voxel-specific backprojection is then used to select the adequate radiograph in the distance-driven binning in order to propagate in the pCT image the best achievable spatial resolution in proton radiographs. The improvement in spatial resolution is demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations of resolution phantoms. Results: The spatial resolution in the distance-driven binning depended on the distance of the objects from the source and was optimal in the binned radiograph corresponding to that distance. The spatial resolution in the reconstructed pCT images decreased with the depth in the scanned object but it was always better than previous FBP algorithms assuming straight line paths. In a water cylinder with 20 cm diameter, the observed range of spatial resolutions was 0.7 - 1.6 mm compared to 1.0 - 2.4 mm at best with a straight line path assumption. The improvement was strongly enhanced in shorter 200 Degree-Sign scans. Conclusions: Improved spatial resolution was obtained in pCT images with filtered backprojection reconstruction using most likely path estimates of protons. The improvement in spatial resolution combined with the practicality of FBP algorithms compared to iterative reconstruction algorithms makes this new algorithm a candidate of choice for clinical pCT.

  10. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic...... molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...

  11. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  12. Proton Radiography (pRad)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose more than 300 dynamic experiments in support...

  13. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  14. Proton beam deflection in MRI fields: Implications for MRI-guided proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oborn, B M; Dowdell, S; Metcalfe, P E; Crozier, S; Mohan, R; Keall, P J

    2015-05-01

    beam axis and those fired from a point source. This is indicative of the 3D spatially variant nature of the MRI fringe field. For the first time, accurate magnetic and Monte Carlo modeling have been used to assess the transport of generic proton beams toward a 1 T split-bore MRI. Significant rotation is observed in the inline orientation, while more complex deflection and distortion are seen in the perpendicular orientation. The results of this study suggest that due to the complexity and energy-dependent nature of the magnetic deflection and distortion, the pencil beam scanning method will be the only choice for delivering a therapeutic proton beam inside a potential MRI-guided proton therapy system in either the inline or perpendicular orientation. Further to this, significant correction strategies will be required to account for the MRI fringe fields.

  15. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proton-pump inhibitors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) work by binding irreversibly to the. H+/K+-ATPase pump of the parietal cell, leading to inhibition of acid production in approximately 70% of active pumps.1The result is a dramatic increase in gastric pH mitigating the deleterious effects of acid in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and.

  17. Proton transfer events in GFP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Donato, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Stuart, T. C.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; van Grondelle, R.; Groot, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton

  18. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamonti, C., E-mail: cinzia.talamonti@unifi.i [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Reggioli, V. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Civinini, C. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Marrazzo, L. [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Menichelli, D. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Pallotta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-01-11

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  19. The role of nuclear microprobes in the study of technology, provenance and corrosion of cultural heritage: The case of gold and silver items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, M.F., E-mail: maria.guerra@culture.gouv.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France and UMR 8220 CNRS, Palais du Louvre – 14, Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Tissot, I., E-mail: isabel.tissot@archeofactu.pt [Archeofactu, Rua do Cerrado das Oliveiras n°14, 2°Dto., 2610-035 Alfragide (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    This work gives an overview of the main questions raised by gold and silver items kept in museum collections and of the role of nuclear microprobes in their study and conservation. The different approached questions are illustrated by examples; analytical data is given and discussed; and the advantages of IBA are considered: spatial resolution, penetration depth, limits of detection, mapping, etc.

  20. Automatic registration of pelvic computed tomography data and magnetic resonance scans including a full circle method for quantitative accuracy evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herk, M.; de Munck, J. C.; Lebesque, J. V.; Muller, S.; Rasch, C.; Touw, A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for registration of CT and MR scans of the pelvis with minimal user interaction and to obtain a means for objective quantification of the registration accuracy of clinical data without markers. CT scans were registered with proton density MR scans

  1. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  2. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J. E-mail: iamzhu@hotmail.com; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T

    2000-03-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd{sup 3+} by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 {mu}m size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores (<10 {mu}m) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation.

  3. Antideuteron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Duperray, R. P.; K. V. Protasov; Voronin, A. Yu.(P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, 53 Leninsky Prospekt, 117924 Moscow, Russia)

    2002-01-01

    The experimental data of the antideuteron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions are analyzed within a simple model based on the diagrammatic approach to the coalescence model. This model is shown to be able to reproduce most of existing data without any additional parameter.

  4. Micro-patterns fabrication using focused proton beam lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutroneo, M., E-mail: cutroneo@ujf.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute, AS CR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Havranek, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute, AS CR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Mackova, A. [Nuclear Physics Institute, AS CR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Semian, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute, AS CR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Torrisi, L. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Messina University, V.le F.S. d’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Calcagno, L. [Department of Physics, Catania University, V. S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Proton beam writing technique was recently introduced at 3MV Tandetron accelerator at Nuclear Physics Institute in Rez (Czech Republic). It has been used, to produce three-dimensional (3D) micro-structures in poly(methylmethacrylate) by 2.0 MeV and 2.6 MeV protons micro-beam. Micro-channels (52 μm × 52 μm) have been realized. After chemical etching, the quality of the bottom and side walls of the produced structures in PMMA were analyzed using Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM).

  5. Micro-patterns fabrication using focused proton beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, M.; Havranek, V.; Mackova, A.; Semian, V.; Torrisi, L.; Calcagno, L.

    2016-03-01

    Proton beam writing technique was recently introduced at 3MV Tandetron accelerator at Nuclear Physics Institute in Rez (Czech Republic). It has been used, to produce three-dimensional (3D) micro-structures in poly(methylmethacrylate) by 2.0 MeV and 2.6 MeV protons micro-beam. Micro-channels (52 μm × 52 μm) have been realized. After chemical etching, the quality of the bottom and side walls of the produced structures in PMMA were analyzed using Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM).

  6. Scanning laser Doppler vibrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Marie; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    With a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) a vibrating surface is automatically scanned over predefined grid points, and data processed for displaying vibration properties like mode shapes, natural frequencies, damping ratios, and operational deflection shapes. Our SLDV – a PSV-500H from...

  7. Frequency scanning microstrip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Magnus; Jørgensen, Rolf

    1979-01-01

    The principles of using radiating microstrip resonators as elements in a frequency scanning antenna array are described. The resonators are cascade-coupled. This gives a scan of the main lobe due to the phase-shift in the resonator in addition to that created by the transmission line phase...

  8. Fast proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Walker, Joel W.

    2010-10-01

    We consider proton decay in the testable flipped SU(5)×U(1)X models with TeV-scale vector-like particles which can be realized in free fermionic string constructions and F-theory model building. We significantly improve upon the determination of light threshold effects from prior studies, and perform a fresh calculation of the second loop for the process p→eπ from the heavy gauge boson exchange. The cumulative result is comparatively fast proton decay, with a majority of the most plausible parameter space within reach of the future Hyper-Kamiokande and DUSEL experiments. Because the TeV-scale vector-like particles can be produced at the LHC, we predict a strong correlation between the most exciting particle physics experiments of the coming decade.

  9. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognini, A.; Amaro, F. D.; Biraben, F.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Covita, D. S.; Dax, A.; Dhawan, S.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Giesen, A.; Graf, T.; Hänsch, T. W.; Indelicato, P.; Julien, L.; Kao, C.-Y.; Knowles, P.; Kottmann, F.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Liu, Y.-W.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Ludhova, L.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mulhauser, F.; Nebel, T.; Nez, F.; Rabinowitz, P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schaller, L. A.; Schuhmann, K.; Schwob, C.; Taqqu, D.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Pohl, R.

    2011-09-01

    By means of pulsed laser spectroscopy applied to muonic hydrogen (μ- p) we have measured the 2SF = 11/2 - 2PF = 23/2 transition frequency to be 49881.88(76) GHz [1]. By comparing this measurement with its theoretical prediction [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] based on bound-state QED we have determined a proton radius value of rp = 0.84184(67) fm. This new value differs by 5.0 standard deviations from the COD ATA value of 0.8768(69) fm [8], and 3 standard deviation from the e-p scattering results of 0.897(18) fm [9]. The observed discrepancy may arise from a computational mistake of the energy levels in μp or H, or a fundamental problem in bound-state QED, an unknown effect related to the proton or the muon, or an experimental error.

  10. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  11. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  12. Low LET proton microbeam to understand high-LET RBE by shaping spatial dose distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greubel, Christoph; Ilicic, Katarina; Rösch, Thomas; Reindl, Judith; Siebenwirth, Christian; Moser, Marcus; Girst, Stefanie; Walsh, Dietrich W. M.; Schmid, Thomas E.; Dollinger, Günther

    2017-08-01

    High LET radiation, like heavy ions, are known to have a higher biological effectiveness (RBE) compared to low LET radiation, like X- or γ -rays. Theories and models attribute these higher effectiveness mostly to their extremely inhomogeneous dose deposition, which is concentrated in only a few micron sized spots. At the ion microprobe SNAKE, low LET 20 MeV protons (LET in water of 2.6 keV/μm) can be applied to cells either randomly distributed or focused to submicron spots, approximating heavy ion dose deposition. Thus, the transition between low and high LET energy deposition is experimentally accessible and the effect of different spatial dose distributions can be analysed. Here, we report on the technical setup to cultivate and irradiate 104 cells with submicron spots of low LET protons to measure cell survival in unstained cells. In addition we have taken special care to characterise the beam spot of the 20 MeV proton microbeam with fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  13. Heavy quarks in proton

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)655637

    The measurement of prompt photon associated with a b jet in proton-proton interactions can provide us insight into the inner structure of proton. This is because precision of determination of parton distribution functions of b quark and gluon can be increased by such a measurement. The measurement of cross-section of prompt photon associated with a b jet (process $pp\\longrightarrow \\gamma + b + X$) at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is presented. Full 8 TeV dataset collected by ATLAS during the year 2012 was used in this analysis. Corresponding integrated luminosity is 20.3 $fb^{-1}$. Fiducial differential cross-section as a function of photon transverse momentum at particle level was extracted from data and compared with the prediction of leading order event generator Pythia 8. Cross-section extracted from data is normalised independently on the Monte Carlo prediction. Values of data distribution lie above Monte Carlo values. The difference can be explained by presence of higher order effects not ...

  14. Proton Minibeam Radiation Therapy Reduces Side Effects in an In Vivo Mouse Ear Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.girst@unibw.de [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, Christoph; Reindl, Judith [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Siebenwirth, Christian [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Zlobinskaya, Olga [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Walsh, Dietrich W.M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Ilicic, Katarina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel [Research Unit Analytical Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Oberschleißheim (Germany); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy is a novel approach to minimize normal tissue damage in the entrance channel by spatial fractionation while keeping tumor control through a homogeneous tumor dose using beam widening with an increasing track length. In the present study, the dose distributions for homogeneous broad beam and minibeam irradiation sessions were simulated. Also, in an animal study, acute normal tissue side effects of proton minibeam irradiation were compared with homogeneous irradiation in a tumor-free mouse ear model to account for the complex effects on the immune system and vasculature in an in vivo normal tissue model. Methods and Materials: At the ion microprobe SNAKE, 20-MeV protons were administered to the central part (7.2 × 7.2 mm{sup 2}) of the ear of BALB/c mice, using either a homogeneous field with a dose of 60 Gy or 16 minibeams with a nominal 6000 Gy (4 × 4 minibeams, size 0.18 × 0.18 mm{sup 2}, with a distance of 1.8 mm). The same average dose was used over the irradiated area. Results: No ear swelling or other skin reactions were observed at any point after minibeam irradiation. In contrast, significant ear swelling (up to fourfold), erythema, and desquamation developed in homogeneously irradiated ears 3 to 4 weeks after irradiation. Hair loss and the disappearance of sebaceous glands were only detected in the homogeneously irradiated fields. Conclusions: These results show that proton minibeam radiation therapy results in reduced adverse effects compared with conventional homogeneous broad-beam irradiation and, therefore, might have the potential to decrease the incidence of side effects resulting from clinical proton and/or heavy ion therapy.

  15. Laser Scanning in Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Olsson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS to forests has been revolutionary during the last decade. This development was facilitated by combining earlier ranging lidar discoveries [1–5], with experience obtained from full-waveform ranging radar [6,7] to new airborne laser scanning systems which had components such as a GNSS receiver (Global Navigation Satellite System, IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit and a scanning mechanism. Since the first commercial ALS in 1994, new ALS-based forest inventory approaches have been reported feasible for operational activities [8–12]. ALS is currently operationally applied for stand level forest inventories, for example, in Nordic countries. In Finland alone, the adoption of ALS for forest data collection has led to an annual savings of around 20 M€/year, and the work is mainly done by companies instead of governmental organizations. In spite of the long implementation times and there being a limited tradition of making changes in the forest sector, laser scanning was commercially and operationally applied after about only one decade of research. When analyzing high-ranked journal papers from ISI Web of Science, the topic of laser scanning of forests has been the driving force for the whole laser scanning research society over the last decade. Thus, the topic “laser scanning in forests” has provided a significant industrial, societal and scientific impact. [...

  16. Proton Radiography Imager:Generates Synthetic Proton Radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-09-12

    ProRad is a computer program that is used to generate synthetic images of proton (or other charged particles) radiographs. The proton radiographs arc images that arc obtained by sending energetic protons (or electrons or positrons, for example) through 11 plasma where electric and/or magnetic fields alter the particles trajectory, Dnd the variations me imaged on RC film, image plate, or equivalent

  17. Differential Cross Sections for Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering is investigated within the framework of the one pion exchange model in an attempt to model nucleon-nucleon interactions spanning the large range of energies important to cosmic ray shielding. A quantum field theoretic calculation is used to compute both differential and total cross sections. A scalar theory is then presented and compared to the one pion exchange model. The theoretical cross sections are compared to proton-proton scattering data to determine the validity of the models.

  18. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  19. Physics controversies in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsman, Martijn; Schwarz, Marco; Dong, Lei

    2013-04-01

    The physical characteristics of proton beams are appealing for cancer therapy. The rapid increase in operational and planned proton therapy facilities may suggest that this technology is a "plug-and-play" valuable addition to the arsenal of the radiation oncologist and medical physicist. In reality, the technology is still evolving, so planning and delivery of proton therapy in patients face many practical challenges. This review article discusses the current status of proton therapy treatment planning and delivery techniques, indicates current limitations in dealing with range uncertainties, and proposes possible developments for proton therapy and supplementary technology to try to realize the actual potential of proton therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  1. Deciphering the Complex Chemistry of Deep-Ocean Particles Using Complementary Synchrotron X-ray Microscope and Microprobe Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, Brandy M; German, Christopher R; Dick, Gregory J; Breier, John A

    2016-01-19

    The reactivity and mobility of natural particles in aquatic systems have wide ranging implications for the functioning of Earth surface systems. Particles in the ocean are biologically and chemically reactive, mobile, and complex in composition. The chemical composition of marine particles is thought to be central to understanding processes that convert globally relevant elements, such as C and Fe, among forms with varying bioavailability and mobility in the ocean. The analytical tools needed to measure the complex chemistry of natural particles are the subject of this Account. We describe how a suite of complementary synchrotron radiation instruments with nano- and micrometer focusing, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) capabilities are changing our understanding of deep-ocean chemistry and life. Submarine venting along mid-ocean ridges creates hydrothermal plumes where dynamic particle-forming reactions occur as vent fluids mix with deep-ocean waters. Whether plumes are net sources or sinks of elements in ocean budgets depends in large part on particle formation, reactivity, and transport properties. Hydrothermal plume particles have been shown to host microbial communities and exhibit complex size distributions, aggregation behavior, and composition. X-ray microscope and microprobe instruments can address particle size and aggregation, but their true strength is in measuring chemical composition. Plume particles comprise a stunning array of inorganic and organic phases, from single-crystal sulfides to poorly ordered nanophases and polymeric organic matrices to microbial cells. X-ray microscopes and X-ray microprobes with elemental imaging, XAS, and XRD capabilities are ideal for investigating these complex materials because they can (1) measure the chemistry of organic and inorganic constituents in complex matrices, usually within the same particle or aggregate, (2) provide strong signal-to-noise data with exceedingly small

  2. Using Stable Distributions to Characterize Proton Pencil Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Heuvel, Frank Van den; Schreuder, Niek; George, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce and evaluate the use of stable distributions as a means of describing the behavior of charged particle pencil beams in a medium, with specific emphasis on proton beam scanning (PBS). Methods: The proton pencil beams of a clinically commissioned proton treatment facility are replicated in a Monte Carlo simulation system (FLUKA). For each available energy the beam deposition in water medium is characterized by the dose deposition. Using an alpha--stable distribution methodology each beam with a nominal energy $E$ is characterized by the lateral spread at depth $z$: $S(z;\\alpha,\\gamma,E)$ and a total energy deposition $I_D(z)$. The beams are then described as a function of the variation of the parameters at depth. Finally, an implementation in a freely available open source dose calculation suite (matRad, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany) is proposed. Results: Quantitatively, the fit of the stable distributions, compared to those implemented in standard treatment planning systems, are equivalent. ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used ... gland evaluate changes in the gland following medication use, surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy top of page How ...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential to ... tells you otherwise, you may resume your normal activities after your nuclear medicine scan. If any special ...

  5. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special ... the Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scan and uptake uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special camera and a computer ... last two months that used iodine-based contrast material. Your doctor will instruct you on how to ...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluate changes in the gland following medication use, surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy top of page How should ... such as an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated contrast material within the ...

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information needed to make a ... any. Nuclear medicine is less expensive and may yield more precise information than exploratory surgery. Risks Because ...

  9. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Actual scanning time for each thyroid uptake is five minutes or less. top of page What will ... diagnostic procedures have been used for more than five decades, and there are no known long-term ...

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  11. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. Jewelry and ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iodine, medications and anesthetics. are breastfeeding. In the days prior to your examination, blood tests may be ... are scheduled for an additional procedure that same day that requires an intravenous line. Actual scanning time ...

  13. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gland in the neck that controls metabolism , a chemical process that regulates the rate at which the body converts food to energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is ...

  14. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liquid or capsule form, it is typically swallowed up to 24 hours before the scan. The radiotracer given by intravenous injection is usually given up to 30 minutes prior to the test. When ...

  15. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... regulates the rate at which the body converts food to energy. top of page What are some ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information ...

  16. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential ... or imaging device that produces pictures and provides molecular information. The thyroid scan and thyroid uptake provide ...

  17. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. top of page How does the procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an image is ... with other imaging techniques, such as CT or MRI. However, nuclear medicine scans are more sensitive than ...

  18. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a special camera or imaging device that produces pictures and provides molecular information. The thyroid scan and ... and with the help of a computer, create pictures offering details on both the structure and function ...

  19. Pediatric CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. If you had an ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. Actual scanning time for ...

  1. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scan and thyroid uptake provide information about the structure and function of the thyroid. The thyroid is ... computer, create pictures offering details on both the structure and function of organs and tissues in your ...

  3. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scan you are undergoing. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera and ... area of your body. top of page How does the procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information ...

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. If you had an intravenous line ... found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. Actual scanning time for each thyroid ...

  7. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used to determine ... you are undergoing. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera and imaging ...

  9. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions. ... but is often performed on hospitalized patients as well. Thyroid Scan You will be positioned on an ...

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Uptake? A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) ... of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that ...

  11. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical tests that help physicians diagnose and evaluate medical conditions. These imaging scans use radioactive materials called radiopharmaceuticals or radiotracers . Depending on the type of nuclear medicine exam, the radiotracer is either injected into the body, ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities within the body. Because ... with other imaging techniques, such as CT or MRI. However, nuclear medicine scans are more sensitive than ...

  13. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are noninvasive and, with the exception of intravenous injections, are usually painless medical tests that help physicians ... before the scan. The radiotracer given by intravenous injection is usually given up to 30 minutes prior ...

  14. Application of fluence field modulation to proton computed tomography for proton therapy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedes, G.; De Angelis, L.; Rit, S.; Hansen, D.; Belka, C.; Bashkirov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Coutrakon, G.; Schubert, K. E.; Schulte, R. W.; Parodi, K.; Landry, G.

    2017-08-01

    This simulation study presents the application of fluence field modulated computed tomography, initially developed for x-ray CT, to proton computed tomography (pCT). By using pencil beam (PB) scanning, fluence modulated pCT (FMpCT) may achieve variable image quality in a pCT image and imaging dose reduction. Three virtual phantoms, a uniform cylinder and two patients, were studied using Monte Carlo simulations of an ideal list-mode pCT scanner. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected for high image quality and only PBs intercepting them preserved full fluence (FF). Image quality was investigated in terms of accuracy (mean) and noise (standard deviation) of the reconstructed proton relative stopping power compared to reference values. Dose calculation accuracy on FMpCT images was evaluated in terms of dose volume histograms (DVH), range difference (RD) for beam-eye-view (BEV) dose profiles and gamma evaluation. Pseudo FMpCT scans were created from broad beam experimental data acquired with a list-mode pCT prototype. FMpCT noise in ROIs was equivalent to FF images and accuracy better than  -1.3%(-0.7%) by using 1% of FF for the cylinder (patients). Integral imaging dose reduction of 37% and 56% was achieved for the two patients for that level of modulation. Corresponding DVHs from proton dose calculation on FMpCT images agreed to those from reference images and 96% of BEV profiles had RD below 2 mm, compared to only 1% for uniform 1% of FF. Gamma pass rates (2%, 2 mm) were 98% for FMpCT while for uniform 1% of FF they were as low as 59%. Applying FMpCT to preliminary experimental data showed that low noise levels and accuracy could be preserved in a ROI, down to 30% modulation. We have shown, using both virtual and experimental pCT scans, that FMpCT is potentially feasible and may allow a means of imaging dose reduction for a pCT scanner operating in PB scanning mode. This may be of particular importance to proton therapy given the low integral dose found

  15. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for whic...

  16. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  17. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jae-ik [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Division of Heavy Ion Clinical Research, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Chiyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sungkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Byeong, E-mail: sblee@ncc.re.kr [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hyun [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jung Sook [Department of refinement education, Dongseo University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jung Keun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Incerti, Sebastien [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Université Bordeaux 1, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2015-04-15

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the ‘NETSCAN’ method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  18. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-ik; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung; Jeong, Chiyoung; Cho, Sungkoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jung Sook; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil; Incerti, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the 'NETSCAN' method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  19. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR-microscopy exper...

  20. Effects of relativity in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, G.H.; Scholten, O.; Tjon, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the influence of negative-energy states in proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a fully relativistic framework using the T matrix of Fleischer and Tjon. The contribution from negative-energy states in the single-scattering diagrams is shown to be large, indicating that relativistic effects

  1. Proton-proton virtual bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, GH; Scholten, O; Tjon, J

    1999-01-01

    Lepton-pair production (virtual bremsstrahlung) in proton-proton scattering is investigated using a relativistic covariant model. The effects of negative-energy slates and two-body currents are studied. These are shown to have large effects in some particular structure functions, even at the

  2. Electromagnetic off-shell effects in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kondratyuk, S.A.; Martinus, G.H.; Scholten, O.

    1998-01-01

    We study the influence of the off-shell structure of the nucleon electromagnetic vertex on proton-proton bermsstrahlung observables. Realistic choices for the off-shell behavior are found to have considerable influences on observables such as cross sections and analyzing powers. The rescattering

  3. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Slope analysis for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at intermediate square of momentum transfer in the main. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slope is approximated by various analytic functions in a model-independent fashion. The expanded standard logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range at qualitative level reasonably. Various f...

  5. Microscopic and microprobe analysis of fine roots in healthy and declining spruce (Picea abies (L. ) Karst. ) from different sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stienen, H.; Bauch, J.; Barckhausen, R.; Schaub, H.

    1984-09-01

    In order to contribute to the identification of primary causes of the spruce decline - evident in many regions of the Federal Republic of Germany - fine roots of 30 trees from altogether 14 healthy and damage forest locations were investigated microscopically, anatomically, histometrically and by cellular microprobe analysis. In addition, fine roots of young plants grown in hydroponic cultures at different pH levels and Al input were studied. Fine roots of declining trees developed cortex cells with a reduced diameter and at the same time thicker cell walls; in addition accessory compounds were accumulated in this presumably protective tissue. Tannins were deposited in the parenchyma of the vascular cylinder of fine roots from declining trees, and many pit membranes of the primary xylem often did not differentiate fully. The X-ray energy-dispersive analysis of individual cells revealed, in particular, an insufficient uptake of Ca and Mg in the fine roots of declining trees. Compared with healthy trees, the concentration of aluminium increased in the cortex of the fine roots; this, in turn, had an antagonistic effect on the uptake of Ca and Mg. Moreover, the concentration of iron and sulphur increased in the fine roots of declining trees. This evidence of alterations and damages in the fine roots of damaged spruce indicates that, besides the direct detrimental impact on the needles through the atmosphere serious damage is inflicted also indirectly through the soil.

  6. Combined chemical and topographic imaging at atmospheric pressure via microprobe laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry-atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, James A; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Meyer, Kent A; Goeringer, Douglas E

    2009-12-01

    The operational characteristics and imaging performance are described for a new instrument comprising an atomic force microscope coupled with a pulsed laser and a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The operating mode of the atomic force microscope is used to produce topographic surface images having sub-micrometer spatial and height resolution. Spatially resolved mass spectra of ions, produced from the same surface via microprobe-mode laser desorption/ionization at atmospheric pressure, are also used to create a 100 x 100 microm chemical image. The effective spatial resolution of the image (approximately 2 microm) was constrained by the limit of detection (estimated to be 10(9)-10(10) molecules) rather than by the diameter of the focused laser spot or the step size of the sample stage. The instrument has the potential to be particularly useful for surface analysis scenarios in which chemical analysis of targeted topographic features is desired; consequently, it should have extensive application in a number of scientific areas. Because the number density of desorbed neutral species in laser desorption/ionization is known to be orders-of-magnitude greater than that of ions, it is expected that improvements in imaging performance can be realized by implementation of post-ionization methods.

  7. Effect of gibberellic acid on the ion ratios in a dwarf maize mutant (Zea mays L. d1) : An electron microprobe study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, D; Jánossy, A G

    1977-01-01

    The effect of gibberellic acid (GA3) on ion ratios in a dwarf maize mutant (Zea mays L. d1) exhibiting normal growth after hormone treatment has been investigated by electron microprobe analysis. Gibberellic-acid treatment increased the ion content in chloroplasts and vacuoles whereas no change of the ion content was found in the cytoplasm. The relation of these observations to the action of the hormone is discussed.

  8. 7th international conference on Nuclear microprobe technology and applications; 7. conference internationale sur la technologie et les applications des microsondes nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This colloquium gives an up-to-date report on the continuously advancing applications and development of microbeam technology. It presents abstracts and oral contributions in the following domains: microprobes facilities, analysis techniques, imaging techniques, micro-ion beam modification of materials, microelectronics, applications in Material Sciences in Biology in Medicine in earth and planetary Sciences in environment in art in archaeology, alternative techniques. (A.L.B.)

  9. Transverse spin effects in proton-proton scattering and $Q \\bar Q$ production

    OpenAIRE

    Goloskokov, S. V.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss transverse spin effects caused by the spin-flip part of the Pomeron coupling with the proton. The predicted spin asymmetries in proton-proton scattering and QQ production in proton-proton and lepton-proton reactions are not small and can be studied in future polarized experiments.

  10. Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eric W.; Zelten, J. Peter; Wiseman, Benjamin A.

    1988-06-01

    We report on the development of a laser scanning fluorescence microscope possessing several features which facilitate its application to biological and biophysical analyses in living cells. It is built around a standard inverted microscope stand, enabling the use of standard optics, micromanipulation apparatus, and conventional (including video) microscopy in conjunction with laser scanning. The beam is scanned across the specimen by a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors, driven by a programmable controller which can operate in three modes: full raster scan, region of interest, and random-access. A full 512x512 pixel image can be acquired in one second. In region of interest mode, several subareas of the field can be selected for more rapid or detailed analysis. For those cases where the time scale of the observed phenomenon precludes full-field imaging, or where a full-field image is unnecessary, the random access mode enables an arbitrary pattern of isolated points to be selected and rapidly sequenced through. Via a graphical user interface implemented on the system's host computer, a user will be able to take a scout image either with video or a full-field laser scan, select regions or points on the scout image with a mouse, and set up experimental parameters such as detector integration times with a window-style menu. The instrument is designed to be a flexible testbed for investigating new techniques, without compromising its utility as a tool for biological research.

  11. Analytical calculation of proton linear energy transfer in voxelized geometries including secondary protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Dolney, D.; Kondrla, M.; Fager, M.; Carabe, A.

    2016-02-01

    In order to integrate radiobiological modelling with clinical treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, we extended our in-house treatment planning system FoCa with a 3D analytical algorithm to calculate linear energy transfer (LET) in voxelized patient geometries. Both active scanning and passive scattering delivery modalities are supported. The analytical calculation is much faster than the Monte-Carlo (MC) method and it can be implemented in the inverse treatment planning optimization suite, allowing us to create LET-based objectives in inverse planning. The LET was calculated by combining a 1D analytical approach including a novel correction for secondary protons with pencil-beam type LET-kernels. Then, these LET kernels were inserted into the proton-convolution-superposition algorithm in FoCa. The analytical LET distributions were benchmarked against MC simulations carried out in Geant4. A cohort of simple phantom and patient plans representing a wide variety of sites (prostate, lung, brain, head and neck) was selected. The calculation algorithm was able to reproduce the MC LET to within 6% (1 standard deviation) for low-LET areas (under 1.7 keV μm-1) and within 22% for the high-LET areas above that threshold. The dose and LET distributions can be further extended, using radiobiological models, to include radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) calculations in the treatment planning system. This implementation also allows for radiobiological optimization of treatments by including RBE-weighted dose constraints in the inverse treatment planning process.

  12. Analytical calculation of proton linear energy transfer in voxelized geometries including secondary protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Dolney, D; Kondrla, M; Fager, M; Carabe, A

    2016-02-21

    In order to integrate radiobiological modelling with clinical treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, we extended our in-house treatment planning system FoCa with a 3D analytical algorithm to calculate linear energy transfer (LET) in voxelized patient geometries. Both active scanning and passive scattering delivery modalities are supported. The analytical calculation is much faster than the Monte-Carlo (MC) method and it can be implemented in the inverse treatment planning optimization suite, allowing us to create LET-based objectives in inverse planning. The LET was calculated by combining a 1D analytical approach including a novel correction for secondary protons with pencil-beam type LET-kernels. Then, these LET kernels were inserted into the proton-convolution-superposition algorithm in FoCa. The analytical LET distributions were benchmarked against MC simulations carried out in Geant4. A cohort of simple phantom and patient plans representing a wide variety of sites (prostate, lung, brain, head and neck) was selected. The calculation algorithm was able to reproduce the MC LET to within 6% (1 standard deviation) for low-LET areas (under 1.7 keV μm(-1)) and within 22% for the high-LET areas above that threshold. The dose and LET distributions can be further extended, using radiobiological models, to include radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) calculations in the treatment planning system. This implementation also allows for radiobiological optimization of treatments by including RBE-weighted dose constraints in the inverse treatment planning process.

  13. Scanning laser video camera/ microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. P.; Bow, R. T.

    1984-10-01

    A laser scanning system capable of scanning at standard video rate has been developed. The scanning mirrors, circuit design and system performance, as well as its applications to video cameras and ultra-violet microscopes, are discussed.

  14. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  15. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  16. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya 462-8508 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  17. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647.

  18. Calibration of scanning Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast. Additio......This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast...

  19. Tomographic scanning imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Harald

    2009-07-06

    In tomographic scanning (TOSCA) imaging, light from a scene is focused onto a reticle mask using conical scan optics, and collected on a single element detector. Alternatively, one or several detectors replace the reticle. Tomographic processing techniques are then applied to the one-dimensional signal to reproduce a two-dimensional image. The TOSCA technique is presented in detail, including its mathematical foundations and some of its limitations. It is shown how TOSCA imaging can be used in a multispectral configuration, and compares well with more conventional alternatives both in simplicity and performance. Examples of image reconstruction using TOSCA techniques are shown.

  20. Scanning the phenomenological MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Wuerzinger, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    A framework to perform scans in the 19-dimensional phenomenological MSSM is developed and used to re-evaluate the ATLAS experiments' sensitivity to R-parity-conserving supersymmetry with LHC Run 2 data ($\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV), using results from 14 separate ATLAS searches. We perform a $\\tilde{t}_1$ dedicated scan, only considering models with $m_{\\tilde{t}_1}<1$ TeV, while allowing both a neutralino ($\\tilde{\\chi}_1^0$) and a sneutrino ($\\tilde{\

  1. Measurement of inelastic, single- and double-diffraction cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with ALICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B; Adam, J; Adamová, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agocs, A G; Agostinelli, A; Aguilar Salazar, S; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S A; Ahn, S U; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Anson, C; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Äystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldini Ferroli, R; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Bán, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Bergognon, A A E; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhom, J; Bianchi, N; Bianchi, L; Bianchin, C; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bock, N; Böttger, S; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bose, S; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Botta, E; Boyer, B; Braidot, E; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caballero Orduna, D; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Canoa Roman, V; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carlin Filho, N; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Castillo Castellanos, J; Castillo Hernandez, J F; Casula, E A R; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Ceballos Sanchez, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Chawla, I; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Coccetti, F; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Constantin, P; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Cotallo, M E; Crescio, E; Crochet, P; Cruz Alaniz, E; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; Dalsgaard, H H; Danu, A; Das, D; Das, K; Das, I; Dash, S; Dash, A; De, S; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; Delagrange, H; Deloff, A; Demanov, V; De Marco, N; Dénes, E; De Pasquale, S; Deppman, A; D Erasmo, G; de Rooij, R; Diaz Corchero, M A; Di Bari, D; Dietel, T; Di Giglio, C; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Divià, R; Djuvsland, Ø; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Domínguez, I; Dönigus, B; Dordic, O; Driga, O; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Elia, D; Emschermann, D; Engel, H; Erazmus, B; Erdal, H A; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Evans, D; Eyyubova, G; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fearick, R; Fedunov, A; Fehlker, D; Feldkamp, L; Felea, D; Fenton-Olsen, B; Feofilov, G; Fernández Téllez, A; Ferretti, A; Ferretti, R; Festanti, A; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhøje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Garishvili, I; Gerhard, J; Germain, M; Geuna, C; Gheata, M; Gheata, A; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Gianotti, P; Girard, M R; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glässel, P; Gomez, R; Ferreiro, E G; González-Trueba, L H; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Goswami, A; Gotovac, S; Grabski, V; Graczykowski, L K; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoras, A; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, S; Grigoryan, A; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J-Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerra Gutierrez, C; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Gutbrod, H; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Han, B H; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayrapetyan, A; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hille, P T; Hippolyte, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hřivnáčová, I; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, P G; Innocenti, G M; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivan, C; Ivanov, A; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Ivanytskyi, O; Jachołkowski, A; Jacobs, P M; Jang, H J; Janik, R; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, S; Jha, D M; Jimenez Bustamante, R T; Jirden, L; Jones, P G; Jung, H; Jusko, A; Kaidalov, A B; Kakoyan, V; Kalcher, S; Kaliňák, P; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Karasu Uysal, A; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Khan, P; Khan, S A; Khan, M M; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, S; Kim, B; Kim, T; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, J H; Kim, J S; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kliemant, M; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Koch, K; Köhler, M K; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskikh, A; Korneev, A; Kour, R; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G; Kral, J; Králik, I; Kramer, F; Kraus, I; Krawutschke, T; Krelina, M; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucheriaev, Y; Kugathasan, T; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kulakov, I; Kumar, J; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A B; Kurepin, A; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, V; Kushpil, S; Kvaerno, H; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; La Pointe, S L; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; La Rocca, P; Lea, R; Le Bornec, Y; Lechman, M; Lee, S C; Lee, G R; Lee, K S; Lefèvre, F; Lehnert, J; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; León, H; Leoncino, M; León Monzón, I; León Vargas, H; Lévai, P; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, L; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohn, S; Lohner, D; Loizides, C; Loo, K K; Lopez, X; López Torres, E; Løvhøiden, G; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luo, J; Luparello, G; Luquin, L; Luzzi, C; Ma, K; Ma, R; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Mal'Kevich, M V D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Marin Tobon, C A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Martashvili, I; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez Davalos, A; Martínez García, G; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Matthews, Z L; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mercado Pérez, J; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Montaño Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Moon, T; Morando, M; Moreira De Godoy, D A; Moretto, S; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Musa, L; Musso, A; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Nattrass, C; Naumov, N P; Navin, S; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nazarov, G; Nedosekin, A; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Nielsen, B S; Niida, T; Nikolaev, S; Nikolic, V; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A; Nyatha, A; Nygaard, C; Nystrand, J; Ochirov, A; Oeschler, H; Oh, S; Oh, S K; Oleniacz, J; Oppedisano, C; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Ortona, G; Oskarsson, A; Ostrowski, P; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Padilla, F; Pagano, P; Paić, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Pal, S K; Palaha, A; Palmeri, A; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Passfeld, A; Pastirčák, B; Patalakha, D I; Paticchio, V; Pavlinov, A; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Pereira Da Costa, H; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E; Peresunko, D; Pérez Lara, C E; Perez Lezama, E; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peryt, W; Pesci, A; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Petráček, V; Petran, M; Petris, M; Petrov, P; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Piano, S; Piccotti, A; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Pitz, N; Piyarathna, D B; Planinic, M; Płoskoń, M; Pluta, J; Pocheptsov, T; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polák, K; Polichtchouk, B; Pop, A; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Pospíšil, V; Potukuchi, B; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puchagin, S; Puddu, G; Pulvirenti, A; Punin, V; Putiš, M; Putschke, J; Quercigh, E; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Rademakers, A; Räihä, T S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Ramírez Reyes, A; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Read, K F; Real, J S; Redlich, K; Reichelt, P; Reicher, M; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J-P; Reygers, K; Riccati, L; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M; Rodriguez Manso, A; Røed, K; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossi, A; Roy, P; Roy, C; Rubio Montero, A J; Rui, R; Russo, R; Ryabinkin, E; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Šafařík, K; Sahoo, R; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakaguchi, H; Sakai, S; Sakata, D; Salgado, C A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sanchez Castro, X; Šándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Sano, S; Santo, R; Santoro, R; Sarkamo, J; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schreiner, S; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, R; Segato, G; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senyukov, S; Seo, J; Serci, S; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Shabetai, A; Shabratova, G; Shahoyan, R; Sharma, N; Sharma, S; Rohni, S; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siciliano, M; Sicking, E; Siddhanta, S; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singha, S; Singhal, V; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Søgaard, C; Soltz, R; Son, H; Song, M; Song, J; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Sputowska, I; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Stolpovskiy, M; Strabykin, K; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Subieta Vásquez, M A; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhorukov, M; Sultanov, R; Šumbera, M; Susa, T; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szostak, A; Szymański, M; Takahashi, J; Tapia Takaki, J D; Tauro, A; Tejeda Muñoz, G; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Thäder, J; Thomas, D; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Toia, A; Torii, H; Toscano, L; Trubnikov, V; Truesdale, D; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Ulrich, J; Uras, A; Urbán, J; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Valencia Palomo, L; Vallero, S; Vande Vyvre, P; van Leeuwen, M; Vannucci, L; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vechernin, V; Veldhoen, M; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Vikhlyantsev, O; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, Y; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Voloshin, S; Voloshin, K; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vranic, D; Øvrebekk, G; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, V; Wagner, B; Wan, R; Wang, M; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Watanabe, K; Weber, M; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, A; Wilk, G; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Yaldo, C G; Yamaguchi, Y; Yang, H; Yang, S; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yoo, I-K; Yoon, J; Yu, W; Yuan, X; Yushmanov, I; Zaccolo, V; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zgura, I S; Zhalov, M; Zhang, X; Zhang, H; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhou, F; Zhu, J; Zhu, J; Zhu, X; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M; Zyzak, M

    Measurements of cross sections of inelastic and diffractive processes in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies were carried out with the ALICE detector. The fractions of diffractive processes in inelastic collisions were determined from a study of gaps in charged particle pseudorapidity distributions: for single diffraction (diffractive mass M X 3) σ DD / σ INEL =0.11±0.03,0.12±0.05, and [Formula: see text], respectively at [Formula: see text]. To measure the inelastic cross section, beam properties were determined with van der Meer scans, and, using a simulation of diffraction adjusted to data, the following values were obtained: [Formula: see text] mb at [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]. The single- and double-diffractive cross sections were calculated combining relative rates of diffraction with inelastic cross sections. The results are compared to previous measurements at proton-antiproton and proton-proton colliders at lower energies, to measurements by other experiments at the LHC, and to theoretical models.

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you: have had any tests, such as an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated ... page How does the procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an image is made by passing x- ...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be performed to measure the level of thyroid hormones in your blood. You may be told not to eat for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the ... as well. Thyroid Scan You will be positioned on an examination ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or less. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan ... areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo. ...

  6. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  7. Cervical MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer in the spine Arthritis in the spine MRI works better than CT scan in diagnosing these problems ... test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants to not work as well. It can also cause a piece ...

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top of page ... and Neck Cancer Treatment Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear ... to Thyroid Scan and Uptake ...

  9. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. ... a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions. Nuclear ... medical tests that help physicians diagnose and evaluate medical conditions. ...

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake ...

  11. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  12. SPM: Scanning positron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Dickmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Munich scanning positron microscope, operated by the Universität der Bundeswehr München and the Technische Universität München, located at NEPOMUC, permits positron lifetime measurements with a lateral resolution in the µm range and within an energy range of 1 – 20 keV.

  13. Laser Beam Scanning Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    metal mirror. Multiple thermocouple wires attached to the rear of the mirror provide temperature (and hence beam power) information at various points...on the mirror. Scanning is achieved by means of a selector switch which sequentially samples the thermocouple outputs. The thermocouple output voltages are measured and recorded as a function of laser beam power.

  14. A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkard, Melvyn; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Schettino, Giuseppe; Atkinson, Kirk; Prise, Kevin, M.; Michael, Barry, D.

    2007-01-23

    The Gray Cancer Institute has pioneered the use of X ray focussing techniques to develop systems for micro irradiating individual cells and sub cellular targets in vitro. Cellular micro irradiation is now recognised as a highly versatile technique for understanding how ionising radiation interacts with living cells and tissues. The strength of the technique lies in its ability to deliver precise doses of radiation to selected individual cells (or sub cellular targets). The application of this technique in the field of radiation biology continues to be of great interest for investigating a number of phenomena currently of concern to the radiobiological community. One important phenomenon is the so called ‘bystander effect’ where it is observed that unirradiated cells can also respond to signals transmitted by irradiated neighbours. Clearly, the ability of a microbeam to irradiate just a single cell or selected cells within a population is well suited to studying this effect. Our prototype ‘tabletop’ X-ray microprobe was optimised for focusing 278 eV C-K X rays and has been used successfully for a number of years. However, we have sought to develop a new variable energy soft X-ray microprobe capable of delivering focused CK (0.28 keV), Al-K (1.48 keV) and notably, Ti-K (4.5 keV) X rays. Ti-K X rays are capable of penetrating several cell layers and are therefore much better suited to studies involving tissues and multi cellular layers. In our new design, X-rays are generated by the focussed electron bombardment of a material whose characteristic-K radiation is required. The source is mounted on a 1.5 x 1.0 metre optical table. Electrons are generated by a custom built gun, designed to operate up to 15 kV. The electrons are focused using a permanent neodymium iron boron magnet assembly. Focusing is achieved by adjusting the accelerating voltage and by fine tuning the target position via a vacuum position feedthrough. To analyze the electron beam properties, a

  15. Three Proterozoic orogenic cycles in the Livingstone Mountains, Tanzania: Evidence from petrology and ion microprobe dating of zircon and monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Christoph; Schenk, Volker; Schmitt, Axel; Kazimoto, Emmanuel

    2017-04-01

    The Livingstone Mountains at Lake Nyasa in southern Tanzania are situated in an area where three orogenic belts seem to be overlapping: the Ubendian-Usagaran belts, the Irumide Belt and the East African Orogen, whose formations are linked to the assembly of the Proterozoic supercontinents of Columbia, Rodinia and Gondwana. Granulite-facies migmatitic metapelites and two orthogneisses were studied petrologically and by ion microprobe dating of monazite and zircon to decipher their tectono-metamorphic history and to find out if and to which degree the rocks of the Livingstone Mountains were affected by the different orogenies. Zircon dating of orthogneiss yielded a magmatic age of ca. 2.2 Ga. Texturally controlled ion microprobe U-Pb dating of monazite inclusions in garnet of a Grt-Sil-Bt migmatite in combination with discordant zircon data point to sillimanite-garnet grade metamorphism at 1857±27 Ma during the Ubendian-Usagaran orogeny. Oscillatory zoned concordant zircon of another orthogneiss was dated at 997±8.6 Ma, whereas the age of monazite inclusions in garnet and matrix of a garnet-sillimanite-gneiss revealed an associated high-grade metamorphism at 1067±20 Ma during the Irumide orogeny. Low Th/U overgrowths on orthogneiss zircon and concordant matrix monazite in metapelite are dated at 653±9.1 Ma, which is in agreement with the known ages of Pan-African events in the East African Orogen and in the Ubendian Belt (655-550 Ma) (Möller et al., 2000; Boniface et al, 2012). Garnet is homogeneous in Fe and Mg, but cores are mantled by Ca-rich garnet which shows rim-ward depletion in Ca. Thermobarometry using compositions of garnet rims and matrix minerals yielded 770-820 °C and 7-8 kbar, which we interpret to represent conditions during the Neoproterozoic metamorphic event. The high-grossular mantle might reflect earlier conditions of kyanite-grade metamorphism tentatively correlated with high-pressure metamorphism during the Mesoproterozoic Irumide orogeny

  16. Visualizing trace element distribution in quartz using cathodoluminescence, electron microprobe, and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusk, Brian; Koenig, Alan; Lowers, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Cathodoluminescent (CL) textures in quartz reveal successive histories of the physical and chemical fluctuations that accompany crystal growth. Such CL textures reflect trace element concentration variations that can be mapped by electron microprobe or laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Trace element maps in hydrothermal quartz from four different ore deposit types (Carlin-type Au, epithermal Ag, porphyry-Cu, and MVT Pb-Zn) reveal correlations among trace elements and between trace element concentrations and CL textures. The distributions of trace elements reflect variations in the physical and chemical conditions of quartz precipitation. These maps show that Al is the most abundant trace element in hydrothermal quartz. In crystals grown at temperatures below 300 °C, Al concentrations may vary by up to two orders of magnitude between adjacent growth zones, with no evidence for diffusion. The monovalent cations Li, Na, and K, where detectable, always correlate with Al, with Li being the most abundant of the three. In most samples, Al is more abundant than the combined total of the monovalent cations; however, in the MVT sample, molar Al/Li ratios are ~0.8. Antimony is present in concentrations up to ~120 ppm in epithermal quartz (~200–300 °C), but is not detectable in MVT, Carlin, or porphyry-Cu quartz. Concentrations of Sb do not correlate consistently with those of other trace elements or with CL textures. Titanium is only abundant enough to be mapped in quartz from porphyry-type ore deposits that precipitate at temperatures above ~400 °C. In such quartz, Ti concentration correlates positively with CL intensity, suggesting a causative relationship. In contrast, in quartz from other deposit types, there is no consistent correlation between concentrations of any trace element and CL intensity fluctuations.

  17. Electron microprobe Th-U-Pb monazite dating and metamorphic evolution of the Acaiaca Granulite Complex, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros Junior, Edgar Batista; Marques, Rodson Abreu, E-mail: edgarjr@ymail.com, E-mail: rodson.marques@ufes.br [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Alegre, ES (Brazil). Departamento de Geologia; Jordt-Evangelista, Hanna; Queiroga, Glaucia Nascimento, E-mail: hanna@degeo.ufop.br, E-mail: glauciaqueiroga@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil). Escola de Minas. Departamento de Geologia; Schulz, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.schulz@mineral.tu-freiberg.de [TU Bergakademie - Institute of Mineralogy, Freiberg - Saxony (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The Acaiaca Complex (AC) is located in southeastern Minas Gerais state, and comprises felsic, mafic, ultramafic, and aluminous granulite as well as lower grade gneisses and mylonite. The complex is distributed over an area of ca. 36 km by 6 km, surrounded by amphibolite facies gneisses of the Mantiqueira Complex (MC). The discrepancy in the metamorphic grade between both complexes led to the present study aiming to understand the metamorphic history of the AC by means of geothermobarometry calculations and electron microprobe Th-U-Pb monazite dating. Estimates of the metamorphic conditions of the granulite based on conventional geothermobarometry and THERMOCALC resulted in temperatures around 800 deg C and pressures between of 5.0 and 9.9 kbar and a retro metamorphic path characterized by near-isobaric cooling. Part of the granulite was affected by anatexis. The melting of felsic granulite resulted in the generation of pegmatites and two aluminous lithotypes. These are: 1) garnet-sillimanite granulite with euhedral plagioclase and cordierite that show straight faces against quartz, and is the crystallization product of an anatectic melt, and 2) garnet-kyanite-cordierite granulite, which is probably the restite of anatexis, as indicated by textures and high magnesium contents. Th-U-Pb monazite geochronology of two granulite samples resulted in a metamorphic age around 2060 Ma, which is similar to the age of the MC registered in the literature. The similar Paleoproterozoic metamorphic ages of both complexes lead to the conclusion that the Acaiaca Complex may be the high grade metamorphic unit geochronological related to the lower grade Mantiqueira Complex. (author)

  18. Can active proton interrogation find shielded nuclear threats at human-safe radiation levels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, Seth Van, E-mail: vanliew@gmail.com

    2017-05-21

    A new method of low-dose proton radiography is presented. The system is composed of an 800 MeV proton source, bending magnets, and compact detectors, and is designed for drive-through cargo scanning. The system has been simulated using GEANT4. Material identification algorithms and pixel sorting methods are presented that allow the system to perform imaging at doses low enough to scan passenger vehicles and people. Results are presented on imaging efficacy of various materials and cluttered cargoes. The identification of shielded nuclear materials at human-safe doses has been demonstrated.

  19. The Ulysses fast latitude scans: COSPIN/KET results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Heber

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Ulysses, launched in October 1990, began its second out-of-ecliptic orbit in December 1997, and its second fast latitude scan in September 2000. In contrast to the first fast latitude scan in 1994/1995, during the second fast latitude scan solar activity was close to maximum. The solar magnetic field reversed its polarity around July 2000. While the first latitude scan mainly gave a snapshot of the spatial distribution of galactic cosmic rays, the second one is dominated by temporal variations. Solar particle increases are observed at all heliographic latitudes, including events that produce >250 MeV protons and 50 MeV electrons. Using observations from the University of Chicago’s instrument on board IMP8 at Earth, we find that most solar particle events are observed at both high and low latitudes, indicating either acceleration of these particles over a broad latitude range or an efficient latitudinal transport. The latter is supported by "quiet time" variations in the MeV electron background, if interpreted as Jovian electrons. No latitudinal gradient was found for >106 MeV galactic cosmic ray protons, during the solar maximum fast latitude scan. The electron to proton ratio remains constant and has practically the same value as in the previous solar maximum. Both results indicate that drift is of minor importance. It was expected that, with the reversal of the solar magnetic field and in the declining phase of the solar cycle, this ratio should increase. This was, however, not observed, probably because the transition to the new magnetic cycle was not completely terminated within the heliosphere, as indicated by the Ulysses magnetic field and solar wind measurements. We argue that the new A<0-solar magnetic modulation epoch will establish itself once both polar coronal holes have developed.Key words. Interplanetary physics (cosmic rays; energetic particles; interplanetary magnetic fields

  20. The underlying event in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, F.

    2009-05-15

    In this thesis, studies of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 10 TeV are presented. Crucial ingredient to underlying event models are multiple parton-parton scatters in single proton-proton collisions. The feasibility of measuring the underlying event was investigated with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using charged particles and charged-particle jets. Systematic uncertainties of the underlying event measurement due to detector misalignment and imperfect track reconstruction are found to be negligible after {integral}Ldt=1 pb{sup -1} of data are available. Different model predictions are compared with each other using fully simulated Monte Carlo samples. It is found, that distinct models differ strongly enough to tell them apart with early data. (orig.)

  1. The proton-proton scattering without Coulomb force renormalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glöckle W.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate numerically that proton-proton (pp scattering observables can be determined directly by standard short range methods using a screened pp Coulomb force without renormalization. We numerically investigate solutions of the 3-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS equation for an exponentially screened Coulomb potential. For the limit of large screening radii we confirm analytically predicted properties for off-shell, half-shell and on-shell elements of the Coulomb t-matrix.

  2. An efficient method to determine double Gaussian fluence parameters in the eclipse™ proton pencil beam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiajian; Liu, Wei; Stoker, Joshua; Ding, Xiaoning; Anand, Aman; Hu, Yanle; Herman, Michael G; Bues, Martin

    2016-12-01

    To find an efficient method to configure the proton fluence for a commercial proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment planning system (TPS). An in-water dose kernel was developed to mimic the dose kernel of the pencil beam convolution superposition algorithm, which is part of the commercial proton beam therapy planning software, eclipse™ (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The field size factor (FSF) was calculated based on the spot profile reconstructed by the in-house dose kernel. The workflow of using FSFs to find the desirable proton fluence is presented. The in-house derived spot profile and FSF were validated by a direct comparison with those calculated by the eclipse TPS. The validation included 420 comparisons of the FSFs from 14 proton energies, various field sizes from 2 to 20 cm and various depths from 20% to 80% of proton range. The relative in-water lateral profiles between the in-house calculation and the eclipse TPS agree very well even at the level of 10(-4). The FSFs between the in-house calculation and the eclipse TPS also agree well. The maximum deviation is within 0.5%, and the standard deviation is less than 0.1%. The authors' method significantly reduced the time to find the desirable proton fluences of the clinical energies. The method is extensively validated and can be applied to any proton centers using PBS and the eclipse TPS.

  3. Proton radiography to improve proton radiotherapy: Simulation study at different proton beam energies

    CERN Document Server

    Biegun, A K; van Goethem, M-J; van der Graaf, E R; van Beuzekom, M; Visser, J; Brandenburg, S

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4\\% and even up to 10\\% in region containing bone~\\cite{USchneider1995,USchneider1996,WSchneider2000,GCirrone2007,HPaganetti2012,TPlautz2014,GLandry2013,JSchuemann2014}. As a consequence, part of a tumor may receive no dose, or a very high dose can be delivered in healthy ti\\-ssues and organs at risks~(e.g. brain stem)~\\cite{ACKnopf2013}. A transmission radiograph of high-energy protons measuring proton stopping powers directly will allow to reduce these uncertainties, and thus improve the quality of treatment. The best way to obtain a sufficiently accurate radiograph is by tracking individual protons traversing the phantom (patient)~\\cite{GCirrone2007,TPlautz2014,VSipala2013}. In our simulations ...

  4. Mammographic scanning equalization radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, J M; Soutar, I C; Plewes, D B

    1993-01-01

    It is well recognized that variations in breast thickness and parenchymal composition can produce a range of exposure which exceeds the latitude of high contrast mammographic film/screen combinations. Optimal imaging of the dense breast is desired since 30%-60% of women present with dense breasts, and they are believed to be at the highest relative risk of developing breast cancer. The application of scanning equalization radiography to mammography has been investigated through the construction and characterization of a prototype mammographic scanning equalization radiography (MSER) system, designed to image mammographic phantoms. The MSER system exposes a Min-R/MRH cassette by raster scanning a 2.0 x 1.6 cm beam of pulsed x-rays across the cassette. A scanning detector behind the cassette measures the local x-ray transmission of the breast. Feedback of the transmission information is used to modulate the duration of each x-ray pulse, to equalize the film exposure. The effective dynamic range of the MSER system is 25 times greater than that of conventional mammography. Artifact-free images of mammographic phantoms show that MSER effectively overcomes the latitude limitations of film/screen mammography, enabling high contrast imaging over a wide range of object x-ray transmission. Anthropomorphic phantom images show that MSER offers up to a sixfold increase in film contrast in the normally underexposed regions of conventional mammograms. Characterization of the entrance exposure shows that there is not a significant difference in exposure between MSER and conventional mammographic techniques, suggesting that both would pose comparable risk to the patient. Calculations show that the construction of a clinical multiple beam MSER system is feasible with minor changes to existing technology.

  5. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the object and, connected to the detector, a device for processing the detected electrons so as to form an object image, wherein a beam splitter is provided for dividing the electron beam from the electron...

  6. Scanning micro-sclerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Warren C.; Blau, Peter J.

    1994-01-01

    A scanning micro-sclerometer measures changes in contact stiffness and correlates these changes to characteristics of a scratch. A known force is applied to a contact junction between two bodies and a technique employing an oscillating force is used to generate the contact stiffness between the two bodies. As the two bodies slide relative to each other, the contact stiffness changes. The change is measured to characterize the scratch.

  7. Scanning drop sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Shinde, Aniketa A.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Jones, Ryan J.; Marcin, Martin R.; Mitrovic, Slobodan

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical or electrochemical and photochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  8. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  9. MO-A-201-01: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, J. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  10. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M. Ladra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric sarcomas represent a distinct group of pathologies, with approximately 900 new cases per year in the United States alone. Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the local control of these tumors, which often arise adjacent to critical structures and growing organs. The physical properties of proton beam radiotherapy provide a distinct advantage over standard photon radiation by eliminating excess dose deposited beyond the target volume, thereby reducing both the dose of radiation delivered to non-target structures as well as the total radiation dose delivered to a patient. Dosimetric studies comparing proton plans to IMRT and 3D conformal radiation have demonstrated the superiority of protons in numerous pediatric malignancies and data on long-term clinical outcomes and toxicity is emerging. In this article, we review the existing clinical and dosimetric data regarding the use of proton beam radiation in malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  11. Protonation Equilibrium of Linear Homopolyacids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Požar J.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a short summary of investigations dealing with protonation equilibrium of linear homopolyacids, in particularly those of high charge density. Apart from the review of experimental results which can be found in the literature, a brief description of theoretical models used in processing the dependence of protonation constants on monomer dissociation degree and ionic strength is given (cylindrical model based on Poisson-Boltzmann equation, cylindrical Stern model, the models according to Ising, Högfeldt, Mandel and Katchalsky. The applicability of these models regarding the polyion charge density, electrolyte concentration and counterion type is discussed. The results of Monte Carlo simulations of protonation equilibrium are also briefly mentioned. In addition, frequently encountered errors connected with calibration of of glass electrode and the related unreliability of determined protonation constants are pointed out.

  12. Proton Football European Championship 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Check out the European championship of proton football 2016 at CERN. Produced by: CERN Audiovisual Productions Service Director: Jacques Fichet Editor: Jacques Fichet Music : Burnt of Jingle Punks You can follow us on:

  13. Proton Therapy Facility Planning From a Clinical and Operational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indra J; Moskvin, Vadim P; Zhao, Qingya; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Johnstone, Peter A

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a model for planning a new proton therapy center based on clinical data, referral pattern, beam utilization and technical considerations. The patient-specific data for the depth of targets from skin in each beam angle were reviewed at our center providing megavoltage photon external beam and proton beam therapy respectively. Further, data on insurance providers, disease sites, treatment depths, snout size and the beam angle utilization from the patients treated at our proton facility were collected and analyzed for their utilization and their impact on the facility cost. The most common disease sites treated at our center are head and neck, brain, sarcoma and pediatric malignancies. From this analysis, it is shown that the tumor depth from skin surface has a bimodal distribution (peak at 12 and 26 cm) that has significant impact on the maximum proton energy, requiring the energy in the range of 130-230 MeV. The choice of beam angles also showed a distinct pattern: mainly at 90° and 270°; this indicates that the number of gantries may be minimized. Snout usage data showed that 70% of the patients are treated with 10 cm snouts. The cost of proton beam therapy depends largely on the type of machine, maximum beam energy and the choice of gantry versus fixed beam line. Our study indicates that for a 4-room center, only two gantry rooms could be needed at the present pattern of the patient cohorts, thus significantly reducing the initial capital cost. In the USA, 95% and 100% of patients can be treated with 200 and 230 MeV proton beam respectively. Use of multi-leaf collimators and pencil beam scanning may further reduce the operational cost of the facility. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Kaon photoproduction off proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoupil Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently constructed our version of the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR model and two variants of an isobar model for photoproduction of kaons on the proton, utilizing new experimental data from CLAS, LEPS, and GRAAL collaborations for adjusting free parameters of the models. Higher-spin nucleon (3/2 and 5/2 and hyperon (3/2 resonances were included using the consistent formalism by Pascalutsa and found to play an important role in data description. The set of chosen nucleon resonances in our new isobar models agrees well with the set of the most probable contributing states determined in the Bayesian analysis with the RPR model whilst only 6 out of 10 N*’s selected in the RPR fit of ours overlap with the nucleon resonant states in the Bayesian analysis. Results of two versions of the isobar model are compared to the new version of the RPR model and experimental data in the third-resonance region and their properties are discussed. We place an emphasis on the choice of resonances, the predictions in the forward- and backward-angle region as well as the choice of the hadron form factor.

  15. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  16. Proton Structure and PHENIX Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We briefly summarize the important and critical roles that PHENIX Experiment has played in determining the proton's internal structure in terms of quarks and gluons, and their dynamics. Some pioneering measurements by PHENIX Experiment on the motion and polarization of quarks and gluons, as well as their correlations inside a fast moving proton are presented. Some future opportunities and potentials of PHENIX Experiment are also discussed.

  17. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  18. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-06-05

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2-10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora.

  19. An evaluation of spatial resolution of a prototype proton CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Tia E; Bashkirov, V; Giacometti, V; Hurley, R F; Johnson, R P; Piersimoni, P; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Schulte, R W; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the spatial resolution of proton CT using both a prototype proton CT scanner and Monte Carlo simulations. A custom cylindrical edge phantom containing twelve tissue-equivalent inserts with four different compositions at varying radial displacements from the axis of rotation was developed for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a prototype proton CT scanner. Two scans of the phantom, centered on the axis of rotation, were obtained with a 200 MeV, low-intensity proton beam: one scan with steps of 4°, and one scan with the phantom continuously rotating. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations of the phantom scan were performed using scanners idealized to various degrees. The data were reconstructed using an iterative projection method with added total variation superiorization based on individual proton histories. Edge spread functions in the radial and azimuthal directions were obtained using the oversampling technique. These were then used to obtain the modulation transfer functions. The spatial resolution was defined by the 10% value of the modulation transfer function (MTF10%) in units of line pairs per centimeter (lp/cm). Data from the simulations were used to better understand the contributions of multiple Coulomb scattering in the phantom and the scanner hardware, as well as the effect of discretization of proton location. The radial spatial resolution of the prototype proton CT scanner depends on the total path length, W, of the proton in the phantom, whereas the azimuthal spatial resolution depends both on W and the position, u-, at which the most-likely path uncertainty is evaluated along the path. For protons contributing to radial spatial resolution, W varies with the radial position of the edge, whereas for protons contributing to azimuthal spatial resolution, W is approximately constant. For a pixel size of 0.625 mm, the radial spatial resolution of the image reconstructed from the fully idealized simulation data ranged between

  20. When the proton becomes larger

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has just confirmed that, at high energy, protons behave as if they were becoming larger. In more technical terms, their total cross-section – a parameter linked to the proton-proton interaction probability – increases with energy. This phenomenon, expected from previous measurements performed at much lower energy, has now been confirmed for the first time at the LHC’s unprecedented energy.   One arm of a TOTEM T2 detector during its installation at interaction point 5. A composite particle like the proton is a complex system that in no way resembles a static Lego construction: sub-components move inside and interactions keep the whole thing together, but in a very dynamic way. This partly explains why even the very common proton can still be hiding secrets about its nature, decades after its discovery. One way of studying the inner properties of protons is to observe how they interact with each other, which, in technical terms, i...

  1. 3-D Microprobe Metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swallow, Kevin

    2008-10-14

    This report documents the results of a project undertaken to develop an ultra-high-accuracy measurement capability, which is necessary to address a rising trend toward miniaturized mechanical products exhibiting dramatically reduced product tolerances. A significant improvement in measurement capability is therefore required to insure that a 4:1 ratio can be maintained between product tolerances and measurement uncertainty.

  2. High-density volatiles in the system C-O-H-N for the calibration of a laser Raman microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Pasteris, J.D.; Seitz, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Three methods have been used to produce high-density volatiles in the system C-O-H-N for the calibration of a laser Raman microprobe (LRM): synthetic fluid-inclusion, sealed fused-quartz-tube, and high-pressure-cell methods. Because quantitative interpretation of a Raman spectrum of mixed-volatile fluid inclusions requires accurate knowledge of pressure- and composition-sensitive Raman scattering efficiencies or quantification factors for each species, calibrations of these parameters for mixtures of volatiles of known composition and pressure are necessary. Two advantages of the synthetic fluid-inclusion method are that the inclusions can be used readily in complementary microthermometry (MT) studies and that they have sizes and optical properties like those in natural samples. Some disadvantages are that producing H2O-free volatile mixtures is difficult, the composition may vary from one inclusion to another, the exact composition and density of the inclusions are difficult to obtain, and the experimental procedures are complicated. The primary advantage of the method using sealed fused-quartz tubes is its simplicity. Some disadvantages are that exact compositions for complex volatile mixtures are difficult to predict, densities can be approximated only, and complementary MT studies on the tubes are difficult to conduct. The advantages of the high-pressure-cell method are that specific, known compositions of volatile mixtures can be produced and that their pressures can be varied easily and are monitored during calibration. Some disadvantages are that complementary MT analysis is impossible, and the setup is bulky. Among the three methods for the calibration of an LRM, the high-pressure-cell method is the most reliable and convenient for control of composition and total pressure. We have used the high-pressure cell to obtain preliminary data on 1. (1) the ratio of the Raman quantification factors for CH4 and N2 in an equimolar CH4N2 mixture and 2. (2) the

  3. Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS), 2

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, P J; Benedikt, Michael; Crescenti, M; Holy, P; Maier, A T; Pullia, M; Reimoser, S; Rossi, S; Borri, G; Knaus, P; Gramatica, F; Pavlovic, M; Weisser, L

    2000-01-01

    The Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) group was formed following an agreement between the Med-AUSTRON (Austria) and the TERA Foundation (Italy) to combine their efforts in the design of a cancer therapy synchrotron capable of accelerating either light ions or protons. CERN agreed to support and host this study in its PS Division. A close collaboration was also set up with GSI (Germany). The study group was later joined by Onkologie-2000 (Czech Republic). Effort was first focused on the theoretical understanding of slow extraction and the techniques required to produce a smooth beam spill for the conformal treatment of complex-shaped tumours with a sub-millimetre accuracy by active scanning with proton and carbon ion beams. Considerations for passive beam spreading were also included for protons. The study has been written in two parts. The more general and theoretical aspects are recorded in Part I and the specific technical design considerations are presented in the present volume, Part II. An accompa...

  4. Scanning radiographic apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    Visual display of dental, medical or other radiographic images is realized with an x-ray tube in which an electron beam is scanned through an x-y raster pattern on a broad anode plate, the scanning being synchronized with the x-y sweep signals of a cathode ray tube display and the intensity signal for the display being derived from a small x-ray detector which receives x-rays that have passed through the subject to be imaged. Positioning and support of the detector are provided for by disposing the detector in a probe which may be attached to the x-ray tube at any of a plurality of different locations and by providing a plurality of such probes of different configuration in order to change focal length, to accommodate to different detector placements relative to the subject, to enhance patient comfort and to enable production of both periapical images and wider angle pantomographic images. High image definition with reduced radiation dosage is provided for by a lead glass collimator situated between the x-ray tube and subject and having a large number of spaced-apart minute radiation transmissive passages convergent on the position of the detector. Releasable mounting means enable changes of collimator in conjunction with changes of the probe to change focal length. A control circuit modifies the x-y sweep signals applied to the x-ray tube and modulates electron beam energy and current in order to correct for image distortions and other undesirable effects which can otherwise be present in a scanning x-ray system.

  5. Horizon Scanning for Pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepage-Nefkens, Isabelle; Douw, Karla; Mantjes, GertJan

    In 2016, the Belgian, Dutch, Luxembourg and Austrian governments declared their intention to collaborate on pharmaceutical policy (BeNeLuxA Collaboration). KCE was asked to lead a task force responsible for developing a Horizon Scanning methodology for pharmaceuticals and a possible model...... and filtration of new and emerging pharmaceutical products. It will maintain and update the HS database, organise company pipeline meetings, and disseminate the HSS’s outputs.  The HS unit works closely together with the designated national HS experts in each collaborating country. The national HS experts...

  6. Surface micromachined scanning mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1992-01-01

    Both aluminum cantilever and torsional scanning mirrors have been fabricated and their static and dynamic properties are studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments showed resonance frequencies in the range of 163 k-Hz - 632 kHz for cantilever beams with Q values between 5 and 11....... Torsional mirrors showed resonance frequencies in the range of 410 kHz - 667 kHz with Q values of 10 - 17. All measurements performed at atmospheric pressure. Both types of mechanical structures were deflected electrostatically at large angles (± 5°) more than 1011 times without breaking and without any...

  7. Confocal scanning Mueller polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lompado, Arthur

    2009-08-01

    We describe the design, construction, calibration and testing of a confocal scanning Mueller polarimeter. A polarization state generator and polarization state analyzer have been inserted into the optical path of a conventional confocal scanning imager to collect the reflectance Muller matrix of samples measuring up to 6.26 mm on a side. Four sources are available for sample interrogation using diode lasers centered at 532 nm, 635 nm, 670 nm, and 785 nm. The device captures all required imagery to calculate the Mueller matrix of each image pixel in approximately 90 s. These matrices are then reduced into polarization imagery such as the diattenuation, retardance and depolarization index. Oftentimes this polarization imagery is quite different and potentially more informative than a conventional intensity image. There are a number of fields that can benefit from alternative/enhanced imagery, most notably in the biomedical, discrimination, and target recognition communities. The sensor has been designed for biomedical applications aimed at improving the technique of noninvasive detection of melanoma lesions.

  8. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%-5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm(2) CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%-5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R(2) > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%-5% gold solutions in a small animal sized water phantom has been demonstrated

  9. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  10. A simple solution of the proton crisis

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan

    2014-01-01

    In this work we suggest a simple theoretical model of the proton able to effectively solve proton spin crisis. Within domain of applicability of this simple model proton consists only of two u quarks and one d quarks (two of which have spin opposite to proton and one identical to proton) and one neutral vector phi meson (with spin two times larger than proton spin and directed identically to proton spin). This model is in full agreement not only with existing DIS experiments, but also with spin and electric charge conservation as well as in a satisfactory agreement with rest mass-energy conservation (since phi meson mass is close to proton rest mass). Our model opens an interesting possibility of the solution of the quarks and leptons families problem (proton is not an absolutely non-strange particle, but only a particle with almost totally effectively hidden strange).

  11. SU-F-T-163: Improve Proton Therapy Efficiency: Report of a Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Flanz, J [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Pankuch, M; Kreydick, B [Northwestern Medicine Proton Center, Warrenville, IL (United States); Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Robison, B; Schreuder, A [Provision Healthcare Partners, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The technology of proton therapy, especially the pencil beam scanning technique, is evolving very quickly. However, the efficiency of proton therapy seems to lag behind conventional photon therapy. The purpose of the abstract is to report on the findings of a workshop on improvement of QA, planning and treatment efficiency in proton therapy. Methods: A panel of physicists, clinicians, and vendor representatives from over 18 institutions in the United States and internationally were convened in Knoxville, Tennessee in November, 2015. The panel discussed several topics on how to improve proton therapy efficiency, including 1) lean principle and failure mode and effects analysis, 2) commissioning and machine QA, 3) treatment planning, optimization and evaluation, 4) patient positioning and IGRT, 5) vendor liaison and machine availability, and 6) staffing, education and training. Results: The relative time needed for machine QA, treatment planning & check in proton therapy was found to range from 1 to 2.5 times of that in photon therapy. Current status in proton QA, planning and treatment was assessed. Key areas for efficiency improvement, such as elimination of unnecessary QA items or steps and development of efficient software or hardware tools, were identified. A white paper to summarize our findings is being written. Conclusion: It is critical to improve efficiency by developing reliable proton beam lines, efficient software tools on treatment planning, optimization and evaluation, and dedicated proton QA device. Conscious efforts and collaborations from both industry leaders and proton therapy centers are needed to achieve this goal and further advance the technology of proton therapy.

  12. Water-mediated proton hopping on an iron oxide surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merte, Lindsay R; Peng, Guowen; Bechstein, Ralf; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A; Grabow, Lars C; Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Wendt, Stefan; Lægsgaard, Erik; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2012-05-18

    The diffusion of hydrogen atoms across solid oxide surfaces is often assumed to be accelerated by the presence of water molecules. Here we present a high-resolution, high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the diffusion of H atoms on an FeO thin film. STM movies directly reveal a water-mediated hydrogen diffusion mechanism on the oxide surface at temperatures between 100 and 300 kelvin. Density functional theory calculations and isotope-exchange experiments confirm the STM observations, and a proton-transfer mechanism that proceeds via an H(3)O(+)-like transition state is revealed. This mechanism differs from that observed previously for rutile TiO(2)(110), where water dissociation is a key step in proton diffusion.

  13. Proton conductive membranes based on doped sulfonated polytriazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaventura, M.; Brandao, L.; Mendes, A. [Laboratorio de Engenharia de Processos, Ambiente e Energia (LEPAE), Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Ponce, M.L.; Nunes, S.P. [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht GmbH, Max Planck Str. 1, D-21502, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    This work reports the preparation and characterization of proton conducting sulfonated polytriazole membranes doped with three different agents: 1H-benzimidazole-2-sulfonic acid, benzimidazole and phosphoric acid. The modified membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectra, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The addition of doping agents resulted in a decrease of the glass transition temperature. For membranes doped with 85 wt.% phosphoric acid solution proton conductivity increased up to 2.10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} at 120 C and at 5% relative humidity. The performance of the phosphoric acid doped membranes was evaluated in a fuel cell set-up at 120 C and 2.5% relative humidity. (author)

  14. Heuristic optimization of the scanning path of particle therapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, J.; Donetti, M.; Bourhaleb, F.; Ansarinejad, A.; Attili, A.; Cirio, R.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; La Rosa, A.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Russo, G.; Sacchi, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy) and Fondazione CNAO, Via Caminadella 16, I-20123, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    Quasidiscrete scanning is a delivery strategy for proton and ion beam therapy in which the beam is turned off when a slice is finished and a new energy must be set but not during the scanning between consecutive spots. Different scanning paths lead to different dose distributions due to the contribution of the unintended transit dose between spots. In this work an algorithm to optimize the scanning path for quasidiscrete scanned beams is presented. The classical simulated annealing algorithm is used. It is a heuristic algorithm frequently used in combinatorial optimization problems, which allows us to obtain nearly optimal solutions in acceptable running times. A study focused on the best choice of operational parameters on which the algorithm performance depends is presented. The convergence properties of the algorithm have been further improved by using the next-neighbor algorithm to generate the starting paths. Scanning paths for two clinical treatments have been optimized. The optimized paths are found to be shorter than the back-and-forth, top-to-bottom (zigzag) paths generally provided by the treatment planning systems. The gamma method has been applied to quantify the improvement achieved on the dose distribution. Results show a reduction of the transit dose when the optimized paths are used. The benefit is clear especially when the fluence per spot is low, as in the case of repainting. The minimization of the transit dose can potentially allow the use of higher beam intensities, thus decreasing the treatment time. The algorithm implemented for this work can optimize efficiently the scanning path of quasidiscrete scanned particle beams. Optimized scanning paths decrease the transit dose and lead to better dose distributions.

  15. LHC Report: Ions cross protons

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    The first stable beams were achieved on 20 January with 13 individual bunches per beam. In the next fill, the first bunch-trains were injected and stable beams were achieved with 96 proton on 120 ion bunches.  This fill was very important because we were able to study the so-called moving long-range beam-beam encounters. Long-range encounters, which are also seen in proton-proton runs, occur when the bunches in the two beams “see” each other as they travel in the same vacuum chamber at either side of the experiments.  The situation becomes more complicated with proton-lead ions because the two species have different revolution times (until the frequencies are locked at top energy- see “Cogging exercises”) and thus these encounters move. We found that this effect does not cause significant beam losses...

  16. Towards a proton imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civinini, C., E-mail: Carlo.Civinini@fi.infn.i [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Candiano, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Capineri, L. [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Lo Presti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Marrazzo, L. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Mazzaglia, E. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Menichelli, D.; Pieri, S. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-11-01

    Hadron therapy for tumor treatment is nowadays used in several medical centres. The main advantage in using protons or light ions beams is the possibility of tightly shaping the radiation dose to the target volume. Presently the spatial accuracy of the therapy is limited by the uncertainty in stopping power distribution, which is derived, for each treatment, from the photon attenuation coefficients measured by X-ray tomography. A direct measurement of the stopping powers will help in reducing this uncertainty. This can be achieved by using a proton beam and a detection system able to reconstruct a tomography image of the patient. As a first step towards such a system an apparatus able to perform a proton transmission radiography (pCR) has been designed. It consists of a silicon microstrip tracker, measuring proton trajectories, and a YAG:Ce calorimeter to determine the particle residual energy. Proton beam and laboratory tests have been performed on the system components prototypes: the main results will be shown and discussed.

  17. The Structure of the Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  18. ATLAS proton-proton event containing four muons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event with four identified muons from a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. This event is consistent with coming from two Z particles decaying: both Z particles decay to two muons each. Such events are produced by Standard Model processes without Higgs particles. They are also a possible signature for Higgs particle production, but many events must be analysed together in order to tell if there is a Higgs signal. This view is a zoom into the central part of the detector. The four muons are picked out as red tracks. Other tracks and deposits of energy in the calorimeters are shown in yellow.

  19. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jingyu; Chai, Weiping; Chen, Fusan; Chen, Nian; Chou, Weiren; Dong, Haiyi; Gao, Jie; Han, Tao; Leng, Yongbin; Li, Guangrui; Gupta, Ramesh; Li, Peng; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Baiqi; Liu, Yudong; Lou, Xinchou; Luo, Qing; Malamud, Ernie; Mao, Lijun; Palmer, Robert B.; Peng, Quanling; Peng, Yuemei; Ruan, Manqi; Sabbi, GianLuca; Su, Feng; Su, Shufang; Stratakis, Diktys; Sun, Baogeng; Wang, Meifen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Liantao; Wang, Xiangqi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Ming; Xing, Qingzhi; Xu, Qingjin; Xu, Hongliang; Xu, Wei; Witte, Holger; Yan, Yingbing; Yang, Yongliang; Yang, Jiancheng; Yuan, Youjin; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yuhong; Zheng, Shuxin; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Zian; Zou, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  20. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jingyu; et al.

    2015-07-12

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  1. ATLAS proton-proton event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background. The photons are indicated, in the different projections and views, by the clusters of energy shown in yellow.

  2. Scanning quantum decoherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jared H; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2009-12-09

    The use of qubits as sensitive nanoscale magnetometers has been studied theoretically and recently demonstrated experimentally. In this paper we propose a new concept, in which a scanning two-state quantum system is used to probe a sample through the subtle effects of decoherence. Mapping both the Hamiltonian and decoherence properties of a qubit simultaneously provides a unique image of the magnetic (or electric) field properties at the nanoscale. The resulting images are sensitive to the temporal as well as spatial variation in the fields created by the sample. As examples we theoretically study two applications; one from condensed matter physics, the other biophysics. The individual components required to realize the simplest version of this device (characterization and measurement of qubits, nanoscale positioning) have already been demonstrated experimentally.

  3. Automatic Ultrasound Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin

    Medical ultrasound has been a widely used imaging modality in healthcare platforms for examination, diagnostic purposes, and for real-time guidance during surgery. However, despite the recent advances, medical ultrasound remains the most operator-dependent imaging modality, as it heavily relies...... on the user adjustments on the scanner interface to optimize the scan settings. This explains the huge interest in the subject of this PhD project entitled “AUTOMATIC ULTRASOUND SCANNING”. The key goals of the project have been to develop automated techniques to minimize the unnecessary settings...... on the scanners, and to improve the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) in ultrasound by introducing new quantitative measures. Thus, four major issues concerning automation of the medical ultrasound are addressed in this PhD project. They touch upon gain adjustments in ultrasound, automatic synthetic aperture image...

  4. Proton Pump Inhibitors: Risk for Myopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, Evan W; Pappas, Ashley L

    2016-08-18

    The purpose of this article is to describe the relationship between proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and symptoms of myopathy based on case reports. A literature search was conducted in PubMed (1946 to June 2016) using MeSH terms proton pump inhibitors, omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, dexlansoprazole, rabeprazole, pantoprazole, and muscular diseases Additionally, a search was conducted in ToxNet and EMBASE using similar search criteria. The resulting articles were scanned to assess relevance to the review. Bibliographies of all relevant articles were evaluated for additional sources; 26 articles resulted from the search of PubMed, ToxNet, and EMBASE; articles that involved medications typically considered to have myalgia-like side effects (eg, statins), or included patients who presented with a confounding disease state (eg, Guillain-Barré) were excluded. In total, 11 case reports as well as a review of an adverse event reporting database that included 292 cases were evaluated. Association of PPI use and myopathy symptoms does not have a clear etiology. Overall, the available published data do not show a high risk of myopathy with PPI use but should be considered if a patient presents with myopathy symptoms and concurrent PPI use. A limited body of published data suggests that PPI use has been associated with myopathy-like symptoms without long-term effects following discontinuation. Although myopathy is a rare adverse effect observed with PPIs, it can be a serious side effect to be considered when starting a patient on acid suppression therapy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Dosimetric accuracy of proton therapy for chordoma patients with titanium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, Joost M.; Seco, Joao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric errors in proton therapy treatment planning due to titanium implants, and to determine how these affect postoperative passively scattered proton therapy for chordoma patients with orthopedic hardware. Methods: The presence of titanium hardware near the tumor may affect the dosimetric accuracy of proton therapy. Artifacts in the computed tomography (CT) scan can cause errors in the proton stopping powers used for dose calculation, which are derived from CT numbers. Also, clinical dose calculation algorithms may not accurately simulate proton beam transport through the implants, which have very different properties as compared to human tissue. The authors first evaluated the impact of these two main issues. Dose errors introduced by metal artifacts were studied using phantoms with and without titanium inserts, and patient scans on which a metal artifact reduction method was applied. Pencil-beam dose calculations were compared to models of nuclear interactions in titanium and Monte Carlo simulations. Then, to assess the overall impact on treatment plans for chordoma, the authors compared the original clinical treatment plans to recalculated dose distributions employing both metal artifact reduction and Monte Carlo methods. Results: Dose recalculations of clinical proton fields showed that metal artifacts cause range errors up to 6 mm distal to regions affected by CT artifacts. Monte Carlo simulations revealed dose differences >10% in the high-dose area, and range differences up to 10 mm. Since these errors are mostly local in nature, the large number of fields limits the impact on target coverage in the chordoma treatment plans to a small decrease of dose homogeneity. Conclusions: In the presence of titanium implants, CT metal artifacts and the approximations of pencil-beam dose calculations cause considerable errors in proton dose calculation. The spatial distribution of the errors however limits the overall impact on passively

  6. An ion microprobe study of individual zircon phenocrysts from voluminous post-caldera rhyolites of the Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, K. E.; Bindeman, I. N.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    Following the formation of the Yellowstone caldera from the 640 ka supereruption of the Lava Creek Tuff (LCT), a voluminous episode of post-caldera volcanism filled the caldera with >600 km3 of low-δ18O rhyolite. Such low-δ18O signatures require remelting of 100s of km3 of hydrothermally altered (18O-depleted) rock in the shallow crust. We present a high resolution oxygen isotope and geochronology (U-Th and U-Pb) study of individual zircon crystals from seven of these voluminous post-caldera rhyolites in order to elucidate their genesis. Oxygen isotope and geochronology analyses of zircon were performed with an ion microprobe that enabled us to doubly fingerprint 25-30 µm diameter spots. Host groundmass glasses and coexisting quartz were analyzed in bulk for oxygen isotopes by laser fluorination. We find that zircons from the youngest (200-80 ka) post-caldera rhyolites have oxygen isotopic compositions that are in equilibrium with low-δ18O host groundmass glasses and quartz and are unzoned in oxygen and U-Th age. This finding is in contrast to prior work on older (500-250 ka) post-caldera rhyolites, which exhibit isotopic disequilibria and age zoning, including the presence of clearly inherited zircon cores. Average U-Th crystallization ages and δ18O zircon values for Pitchstone Plateau flow (81±7 ka, 2.8±0.2‰), West Yellowstone flow (118±8 ka, 2.8±0.1‰), Elephant Back flow (175±22 ka, 2.7±0.2‰) and Tuff of Bluff Point (176±20 ka, 2.7±0.1‰) are overlapping or nearly overlapping in age and identical in oxygen isotope composition within uncertainty (2 SE). New U-Pb geochronology and oxygen isotope data for the North Biscuit Basin flow establish that it has an age (188±33 ka) and δ18O signature (2.8±0.2‰) that is distinctive of the youngest post-caldera rhyolites. Conversely, the South Biscuit Basin flow has a heterogeneous zircon population with ages that range from 550-250 ka. In this unit, older and larger (200-400 µm) zircons have more

  7. Protons in near earth orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Béné, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Cavalletti, R; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Chiarini, A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Crespo, P; Cristinziani, M; Da Cunha, J P; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; D'Antone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, Pierre; Favier, Jean; Feng, C C; Fiandrini, E; Finelli, F; Fisher, P H; Flaminio, R; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu Hong Tao; Lolli, M; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Massera, F; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mezzanotte, F; Mezzenga, R; Mihul, A; Molinari, G; Mourão, A M; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Pancaldi, G; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pilastrini, R; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Postolache, V; Prati, E; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Recupero, S; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Santos, D; Sartorelli, G; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torromeo, G; Torsti, J; Trümper, J E; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Van den Hirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Von Gunten, H P; Waldmeier-Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan Lu Guang; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye Shu Wei; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A

    2000-01-01

    The proton spectrum in the kinetic energy range 0.1 to 200 GeV was measuredby the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) during space shuttle flight STS-91 atan altitude of 380 km. Above the geomagnetic cutoff the observed spectrum isparameterized by a power law. Below the geomagnetic cutoff a substantial secondspectrum was observed concentrated at equatorial latitudes with a flux ~ 70m^-2 sec^-1 sr^-1. Most of these second spectrum protons follow a complicatedtrajectory and originate from a restricted geographic region.

  8. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  9. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  10. Perspectives for sensitivity enhancement in proton-detected solid-state NMR of highly deuterated proteins by preserving water magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin, E-mail: shevelkov@fmp-berlin.de; Xiang, ShengQi; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam [Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie (MPI-bpc) (Germany); Reif, Bernd [Technische Universität München (TUM), Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science (CIPS-M), Department Chemie (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    In this work, we show how the water flip-back approach that is widely employed in solution-state NMR can be adapted to proton-detected MAS solid-state NMR of highly deuterated proteins. The scheme allows to enhance the sensitivity of the experiment by decreasing the recovery time of the proton longitudinal magnetization. The method relies on polarization transfer from non-saturated water to the protein during the inter-scan delay.

  11. Search for Sphalerons in Proton-Proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-04-14

    In a recent paper, Tye and Wong (TW) have argued that sphaleron-induced transitions in high-energy proton-proton collisions should be enhanced compared to previous calculations, based on a construction of a Bloch wave function in the periodic sphaleron potential and the corresponding pass band structure. Here we convolute the calculations of TW with parton distribution functions and simulations of final states to explore the signatures of sphaleron transitions at the LHC and possible future colliders. We calculate the increase of sphaleron transition rates in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 13/14/33/100 TeV for different sphaleron barrier heights, while recognising that the rates have large overall uncertainties. We use a simulation to show that LHC searches for microscopic black holes should have good efficiency for detecting sphaleron-induced final states, and discuss their experimental signatures and observability in Run 2 of the LHC and beyond. We recast the early ATLAS Run-2 search...