WorldWideScience

Sample records for scanning probe microscopy

  1. Scanning Probe Microscopy of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautz, Pamela

    2011-10-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to study the unusual electronic properties of graphene. In an effort to support the graphene with minimal interaction with the substrate, we used a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) substrate. To minimize contaminants between the CVD graphene and boron nitride, the graphene samples were cleaned with distilled water and isopropanol prior to transfer to hBN substrate. We have also examined the growth of graphene flakes by chemical vapor deposition. In particular, we examined the relationship between the orientations of the first and second layer of CVD grown graphene. We found the growth mechanism preferentially resulted in rotations of 9^o or less indicating flakes with first and second layers aligned.

  2. Soft stylus probes for scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Träuble, Markus; Li, Fei; Busnel, Jean-Marc; Gassner, Anne-Laure; Hojeij, Mohamad; Wittstock, Gunther; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-08-15

    A soft stylus microelectrode probe has been developed to carry out scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) of rough, tilted, and large substrates in contact mode. It is fabricated by first ablating a microchannel in a polyethylene terephthalate thin film and filling it with a conductive carbon ink. After curing the carbon track and lamination with a polymer film, the V-shaped stylus was cut thereby forming a probe, with the cross section of the carbon track at the tip being exposed either by UV-photoablation machining or by blade cutting followed by polishing to produce a crescent moon-shaped carbon microelectrode. The probe properties have been assessed by cyclic voltammetry, approach curves, and line scans over electrochemically active and inactive substrates of different roughness. The influence of probe bending on contact mode imaging was then characterized using simple patterns. Boundary element method simulations were employed to rationalize the distance-dependent electrochemical response of the soft stylus probes.

  3. Scanning Probe Microscopy of Organic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Obadiah G.

    Nanostructured composites of organic semiconductors are a promising class of materials for the manufacture of low-cost solar cells. Understanding how the nanoscale morphology of these materials affects their efficiency as solar energy harvesters is crucial to their eventual potential for large-scale deployment for primary power generation. In this thesis we describe the use of optoelectronic scanning-probe based microscopy methods to study this efficiency-structure relationship with nanoscale resolution. In particular, our objective is to make spatially resolved measurements of each step in the power conversion process from photons to an electric current, including charge generation, transport, and recombination processes, and correlate them with local device structure. We have achieved two aims in this work: first, to develop and apply novel electrically sensitive scanning probe microscopy experiments to study the optoelectronic materials and processes discussed above; and second, to deepen our understanding of the physics underpinning our experimental techniques. In the first case, we have applied conductive-, and photoconductive atomic force (cAFM & pcAFM) microscopy to measure both local photocurrent collection and dark charge transport properties in a variety of model and novel organic solar cell composites, including polymer/fullerene blends, and polymer-nanowire/fullerene blends, finding that local heterogeneity is the rule, and that improvements in the uniformity of specific beneficial nanostructures could lead to large increases in efficiency. We have used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) and time resolved-electrostatic force microscopy (trEFM) to characterize all-polymer blends, quantifying their sensitivity to photochemical degradation and the subsequent formation of local charge traps. We find that while trEFM provides a sensitive measure of local quantum efficiency, SKPM is generally unsuited to measurements of efficiency, less sensitive than tr

  4. Full information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Somnath, Suhas

    2017-04-04

    Apparatus and methods are described for scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy based on acquisition of full probe response. The full probe response contains valuable information about the probe-sample interaction that is lost in traditional scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy methods. The full probe response is analyzed post data acquisition using fast Fourier transform and adaptive filtering, as well as multivariate analysis. The full response data is further compressed to retain only statistically significant components before being permanently stored.

  5. Scanned probe microscopy for thin film superconductor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Scanned probe microscopy is a general term encompassing the science of imaging based on piezoelectric driven probes for measuring local changes in nanoscale properties of materials and devices. Techniques like scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning potentiometry are becoming common tools in the production and development labs in the semiconductor industry. The author presents several examples of applications specific to the development of high temperature superconducting thin films and thin-film devices.

  6. Semiconductor Surface Characterization by Scanning Probe Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    potentiometry (STP)8 and ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM)9 which allow mapping of lateral surface potential and local subsurface Schottky...A.P.Fein. "Tunneling Spectroscopy of the Si(1 1 1)2xl Surface", Surf.Sci. 181, 295- 306, 1987. 8. P.Muralt, D.W.Pohl, "Scanning tunneling potentiometry

  7. EDITORIAL: Scanning probe microscopy: a visionary development Scanning probe microscopy: a visionary development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-07-01

    The development of scanning probe microscopy repositioned modern physics. When Rohrer and Binnig first used electronic tunnelling effects to image atoms and quantum states they did more than pin down theoretical hypotheses to real-world observables; the scanning tunnelling microscope fed imaginations, prompting researchers to consider new directions and possibilities [1]. As Rohrer once commented, 'We could show that you can easily manipulate or position something small in space with an accuracy of 10 pm.... When you can do that, you simply have ideas of what you can do' [2]. The development heralded a cavalry of scanning probe techniques—such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) [3-5], scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) [6-8] and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) [9, 10]—that still continue to bring nanomaterials and nanoscale phenomena into fresh focus. Not long after the development of scanning tunnelling microscopy, Binnig, Quate and Gerber collaborating in California in the US published work on a new type of microscope also capable of atomic level resolution [3]. The original concept behind scanning tunnelling microscopy uses electrical conductance, which places substantial limitations on the systems that it can image. Binnig, Quate and Gerber developed the AFM to 'feel' the topology of surfaces like the needle of an old fashioned vinyl player. In this way insulators could be imaged as well. The development of a force modulation mode AFM extended the tool's reach to soft materials making images of biological samples accessible with the technique [4]. There have now been a number of demonstrations of image capture at rates that allow dynamics at the nanoscale to be tracked in real time, opening further possibilities in applications of the AFM as described in a recent review by Toshio Ando at Kanazawa University [5]. Researchers also found a way to retrieve optical information at 'super-resolution' [6, 7]. Optical microscopy provides spectral

  8. Challenges of scanning hall microscopy using batch fabricated probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatakeyama, Kodai

    2016-01-01

    Scanning Hall probe microscopy is a widely used technique for quantitative high resolution imaging of magnetic stray fields. Up to now probes with nanometer spatial resolution have only been realized by electron beam lithography, which is a slow and expensive fabrication technique. In this thesis,

  9. Plant cell wall characterization using scanning probe microscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, John M; Himmel, Michael E; Ding, Shi-You

    2009-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is today considered a promising renewable resource for bioenergy production. A combined chemical and biological process is currently under consideration for the conversion of polysaccharides from plant cell wall materials, mainly cellulose and hemicelluloses, to simple sugars that can be fermented to biofuels. Native plant cellulose forms nanometer-scale microfibrils that are embedded in a polymeric network of hemicelluloses, pectins, and lignins; this explains, in part, the recalcitrance of biomass to deconstruction. The chemical and structural characteristics of these plant cell wall constituents remain largely unknown today. Scanning probe microscopy techniques, particularly atomic force microscopy and its application in characterizing plant cell wall structure, are reviewed here. We also further discuss future developments based on scanning probe microscopy techniques that combine linear and nonlinear optical techniques to characterize plant cell wall nanometer-scale structures, specifically apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. PMID:19703302

  10. Plant cell wall characterization using scanning probe microscopy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himmel Michael E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lignocellulosic biomass is today considered a promising renewable resource for bioenergy production. A combined chemical and biological process is currently under consideration for the conversion of polysaccharides from plant cell wall materials, mainly cellulose and hemicelluloses, to simple sugars that can be fermented to biofuels. Native plant cellulose forms nanometer-scale microfibrils that are embedded in a polymeric network of hemicelluloses, pectins, and lignins; this explains, in part, the recalcitrance of biomass to deconstruction. The chemical and structural characteristics of these plant cell wall constituents remain largely unknown today. Scanning probe microscopy techniques, particularly atomic force microscopy and its application in characterizing plant cell wall structure, are reviewed here. We also further discuss future developments based on scanning probe microscopy techniques that combine linear and nonlinear optical techniques to characterize plant cell wall nanometer-scale structures, specifically apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

  11. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software Package Gxsm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahl P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2009-08-10

    Gxsm is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected toan instrument, it is operating many different avors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy(STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) or in general two-dimensional multi channel data acquisition instruments. The Gxsm core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and oating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor (DSP) subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable Gxsm vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) or tip formation. The Gxsm software is released under the GNU general public license (GPL) and can be obtained via the Internet.

  12. Gold nanocone near-field scanning optical microscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Monika; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Altoe, M Virginia P; Schwartzberg, Adam M; Schuck, P James; Cabrini, Stefano; Kern, Dieter P

    2011-04-26

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy enables the simultaneous topographical and subdiffraction limited optical imaging of surfaces. A process is presented for the implementation of single individually engineered gold cones at the tips of atomic force microscopy cantilevers. These cantilevers act as novel high-performance optical near-field probes. In the fabrication, thin-film metallization, electron beam induced deposition of etch masks, and Ar ion milling are combined. The cone constitutes a well-defined highly efficient optical antenna with a tip radius on the order of 10 nm and an adjustable plasmon resonance frequency. The sharp tip enables high resolution topographical imaging. By controllably varying the cone size, the resonance frequency can be adapted to the application of choice. Structural properties of these sharp-tipped probes are presented together with topographical images recorded with a cone probe. The antenna functionality is demonstrated by gathering the near-field enhanced Raman signature of individual carbon nanotubes with a gold cone scanning probe.

  13. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  14. Integrated Confocal and Scanning Probe Microscopy for Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J. Haupt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM continues to be developed, not only in design, but also in application. The new focus of using AFM is changing from pure material to biomedical studies. More frequently, it is being used in combination with other optical imaging methods, such as confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM and fluorescent imaging, to provide a more comprehensive understanding of biological systems. To date, AFM has been used increasingly as a precise micromanipulator, probing and altering the mechanobiological characteristics of living cells and tissues, in order to examine specific, receptor-ligand interactions, material properties, and cell behavior. In this review, we discuss the development of this new hybrid AFM, current research, and potential applications in diagnosis and the detection of disease.

  15. Elimination of periodic damped artifacts in scanning probe microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhang; Huang, Wenhao

    2010-04-01

    When scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is operated at high scan rates, stripe-like artifacts will appear frequently in the SPM images. The removal of the image artifacts is highly demanded because they will distort the results in precise measurements. In this work, a method based on Prony analysis has been introduced to erase such periodic damped artifacts. Results demonstrate that this method prevails against the conventional fast Fourier transformation (FFT) method. Clean eliminations of the image artifacts are obtained, with almost no sacrifice of the detailed surface information. Even for arbitrary rough surfaces, the image artifacts can also be reduced by more than one order of magnitude. However, small amounts of stripes may still remain in the images. In these cases, the Prony analysis combined with locally weighted smoothing will provide better image quality. The artifacts reduction can have a meaning in the SPM-based visualization of dynamic phenomena with a nanoscale resolution.

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1996-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy III provides a unique introduction to the theoretical foundations of scanning tunneling microscopy and related scanning probe methods. The different theoretical concepts developed in the past are outlined, and the implications of the theoretical results for the interpretation of experimental data are discussed in detail. Therefore, this book serves as a most useful guide for experimentalists as well as for theoreticians working in the filed of local probe methods. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  17. Computer vision distortion correction of scanning probe microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaponenko, Iaroslav; Tückmantel, Philippe; Ziegler, Benedikt; Rapin, Guillaume; Chhikara, Manisha; Paruch, Patrycja

    2017-04-06

    Since its inception, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has established itself as the tool of choice for probing surfaces and functionalities at the nanoscale. Although recent developments in the instrumentation have greatly improved the metrological aspects of SPM, it is still plagued by the drifts and nonlinearities of the piezoelectric actuators underlying the precise nanoscale motion. In this work, we present an innovative computer-vision-based distortion correction algorithm for offline processing of functional SPM measurements, allowing two images to be directly overlaid with minimal error - thus correlating position with time evolution and local functionality. To demonstrate its versatility, the algorithm is applied to two very different systems. First, we show the tracking of polarisation switching in an epitaxial Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 thin film during high-speed continuous scanning under applied tip bias. Thanks to the precise time-location-polarisation correlation we can extract the regions of domain nucleation and track the motion of domain walls until the merging of the latter in avalanche-like events. Secondly, the morphology of surface folds and wrinkles in graphene deposited on a PET substrate is probed as a function of applied strain, allowing the relaxation of individual wrinkles to be tracked.

  18. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  19. PROBING STRESS EFFECTS IN SINGLE CRYSTAL ORGANIC TRANSISTORS BY SCANNING KELVIN PROBE MICROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teague, L

    2010-06-11

    We report scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) of single crystal difluoro bis(triethylsilylethynyl) anthradithiophene (diF-TESADT) organic transistors. SKPM provides a direct measurement of the intrinsic charge transport in the crystals independent of contact effects and reveals that degradation of device performance occurs over a time period of minutes as the diF-TESADT crystal becomes charged.

  20. Nanolithography on hydrogen terminateed silicon by scanning probe microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönenberger, Christian; Kramer, Niels; Kramer, N.

    1996-01-01

    Scanning-probe microscopes (SPM), i.e. the scanning-tunneling and force microscopes, can be used to locally oxidize hydrogen-terminated silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Because of its reliability and potential for pattern transfer, this lithography process has found great attention and

  1. Scanning probe microscopy investigation of complex-oxide heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Feng

    Advances in the growth of precisely tailored complex-oxide heterostructures have led to new emergent behavior and associated discoveries. One of the most successful examples consists of an ultrathin layer of LaAlO 3 (LAO) deposited on TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 (STO), where a high mobility quasi-two dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) is formed at the interface. Such 2DEL demonstrates a variety of novel properties, including field tunable metal-insulator transition, superconductivity, strong spin-orbit coupling, magnetic and ferroelectric like behavior. Particularly, for 3-unit-cell (3 u.c.) LAO/STO heterostructures, it was demonstrated that a conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) tip can be used to "write" or "erase" nanoscale conducting channels at the interface, making LAO/STO a highly flexible platform to fabricate novel nanoelectronics. This thesis is focused on scanning probe microscopy studies of LAO/STO properties. We investigate the mechanism of c-AFM lithography over 3 u.c. LAO/STO in controlled ambient conditions by using a vacuum AFM, and find that the water molecules dissociated on the LAO surface play a critical role during the c-AFM lithography process. We also perform electro-mechanical response measurements over top-gated LAO/STO devices. Simultaneous piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and capacitance measurements reveal a correlation between LAO lattice distortion and interfacial carrier density, which suggests that PFM could not only serve as a powerful tool to map the carrier density at the interface but also provide insight into previously reported frequency dependence of capacitance enhancement of top-gated LAO/STO structures. To study magnetism at the LAO/STO interface, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and magnetoelectric force microscopy (MeFM) are carried out to search for magnetic signatures that depend on the carrier density at the interface. Results demonstrate an electronicallycontrolled ferromagnetic phase on top-gated LAO

  2. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate...... in a direct manner and has most often been inferred from the apparent quality of recorded optical images. Complicated near-field optical imaging characteristics, together with the possibility of topographically induced artefacts, however, has increased demands for a more reliable probe characterization...... technique. Here we present experimental results obtained for optical characterization of two different probes by imaging of a well-specified near-field intensity distribution at various spatial frequencies. In particular, we observe that a sharply pointed dielectric probe can be highly suitable for imaging...

  3. Monolithically Integrated, Mechanically Resilient Carbon-Based Probes for Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Jennings, Andrew T.; Greer, Julia R.

    2010-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is an important tool for performing measurements at the nanoscale in imaging bacteria or proteins in biology, as well as in the electronics industry. An essential element of SPM is a sharp, stable tip that possesses a small radius of curvature to enhance spatial resolution. Existing techniques for forming such tips are not ideal. High-aspect-ratio, monolithically integrated, as-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have been formed that show promise for SPM applications by overcoming the limitations present in wet chemical and separate substrate etching processes.

  4. Combination of scanning probe microscopy techniques for evaluating the electrical parameters of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, D. V.; Davletkildeev, N. A.; Bolotov, V. V.; Lobov, I. A.

    2017-10-01

    Using two techniques of scanning probe microscopy, the electrical properties (work function, Fermi level position, free carriers’ concentration, electrical resistance, conductivity, and carriers’ mobility) of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes were evaluated.

  5. Preparation of platinum/iridium scanning probe microscopy tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Hvid, U.; Mortensen, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    material being etched is platinum/iridium (10%) the influence of the stop phase of the ac current terminating each pulse in the second etching is found to be negligible, while in the case of second etching of tungsten wires it is important to break the pulse in a certain phase to avoid formation of a thick...... of platinum from the wire surface and hereby give rise to "etching" of the wire. In the second etching blunt tips become sharp while tips which are already sharp apparently stay sharp. Therefore, the second etching scheme with pulses separated by pauses is found to be a very important factor...... for the production of sharp tips. After being etched the tips are ready for use in scanning tunneling microscopes, or they may be bent to form integrated tip/cantilever systems in ordinary commercial atomic force microscopes, being applicable as tapping mode tips and as electrostatic force microscopy tips. ©1999...

  6. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  7. An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope. Scanning probe Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    1991-01-01

    An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope (EFOM) is presented, which employs frustrated total internal reflection on a highly localized scale by means of a sharp dielectric tip. The coupling of the evanescent field to the sub-micrometer probe as a function of probe-sample distance, angle of incidence

  8. Batch fabrication of scanning microscopy probes for thermal and magnetic imaging using standard micromachining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarajlic, Edin; Vermeer, Rolf; Delalande, M.Y.; Siekman, Martin Herman; Huijink, R.; Fujita, H.; Abelmann, Leon

    2010-01-01

    We present a process for batch fabrication of a novel scanning microscopy probe for thermal and magnetic imaging using standard micromachining and conventional optical contact lithography. The probe features an AFM-type cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip composed of four freestanding silicon

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1993-01-01

    While the first two volumes on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and its related scanning probe (SXM) methods have mainly concentrated on intro­ ducing the experimental techniques, as well as their various applications in different research fields, this third volume is exclusively devoted to the theory of STM and related SXM methods. As the experimental techniques including the reproducibility of the experimental results have advanced, more and more theorists have become attracted to focus on issues related to STM and SXM. The increasing effort in the development of theoretical concepts for STM/SXM has led to considerable improvements in understanding the contrast mechanism as well as the experimental conditions necessary to obtain reliable data. Therefore, this third volume on STM/SXM is not written by theorists for theorists, but rather for every scientist who is not satisfied by just obtaining real­ space images of surface structures by STM/SXM. After a brief introduction (Chap. 1), N. D. Lang first co...

  10. Fabrication and characterization of probes for combined scanning electrochemical/optical microscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngmi; Bard, Allen J

    2002-08-01

    A technique that combines scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and optical microscopy (OM) was implemented with a new probe tip. The tip for scanning electrochemicaVoptical microscopy (SECM/OM) was constructed by insulating a typical gold-coated near-field scanning optical microscopy tip using electrophoretic anodic paint. Once fabricated, the tip was characterized by steady-state cyclic voltammetry, as well as optical and electrochemical approach experiments. This tip generated a stable steady-state current and well-defined SECM approach curves for both conductive and insulating substrates. Durable tips whose geometry was a ring with < 1 microm as outer ring radius could be consistently fabricated. Simultaneous electrochemical and optical images of an interdigitated array electrode were obtained with a resolution on the micrometer scale, demonstrating good performance of the tip as both an optical and an electrochemical probe for imaging microstructures. The SECM feedback current measurements were successfully employed to determine tip-substrate distances for imaging.

  11. Data analysis using the Internet: the World Wide Web scanning probe microscopy data analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P M; Davies, M C; Roberts, C J; Tendler, S J

    1997-10-01

    The first interactive world-wide web-based image analysis system is presented (http://pharm6.pharm.nottingham.ac.uk/processing/main. html). The system, currently tailored to scanning probe microscopy image data, has been developed to permit the use of software algorithms developed within our laboratory by researchers throughout the world. The implementation and functionality of the scanning probe microscopy server is described. Feedback from users of the facility has demonstrated its value within the research community, and highlighted key operational issues which are to be addressed. A future role of Internet-based data processing software is also discussed.

  12. Combined nanoprobes for scanning probe microscopy: laser technology for processing and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiko, V. P.; Golubok, A. O.; Zuong, Z.; Varkentina, N. V.; Yakovlev, E. B.

    2008-02-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a high spatial resolution method of surface topography visualization and measurement of its local properties. The detecting of interaction arising between the sharp solid-state probe and the sample surface is the foundation of SPM. In dependence from nature of this interaction the scanning tunnel microscopy (STM), scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM), etc. are distinguished. The spatial resolution of all types of probe microscopy determins both sharpness of increasing of interaction between a probe and a sample at their approach, and shape and size of a top of a solid-state probe. So, the progress in SPM information capabilities is highly depends from probe properties and first of all from properly fabricated aperture size. Fabrication procedures are rather complicated because of nanometric scale size of aperture and hard requirements to reproducibility and need to be improved. The way how to do it is involving of feed-back in a processing procedure-results in two types of feedback for the process of drawing-out has been suggested, tested and installed into the technological set-up. Different probes have been fabricated by laser-assisted drawing-out during this work: SNOM types from optical fibers, micropipettes from quartz glass capillaries, micropipettes with microwires inside and with metallic covers outside. Some examples of application of above mentioned combined probes for cell membrane technology are described. Most important from them are topographical studying of cells and bacteria in living condition (in liquid) and studying of the mechanical properties of cell (rigidity of cell membrane) using the nanopipette as a tip of a force sensor. Also measurement of ion current that runs through cell membrane during its metabolic process using the nanopipette as well as in the well-known patch-clamp method have been done.

  13. Tuning Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance in Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Thiago L; Archanjo, Bráulio S; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Oliveira, Bruno S; Riikonen, Juha; Li, Changfeng; Ribeiro, Douglas S; Rabelo, Cassiano; Rodrigues, Wagner N; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A; Cançado, Luiz Gustavo

    2015-06-23

    A reproducible route for tuning localized surface plasmon resonance in scattering type near-field optical microscopy probes is presented. The method is based on the production of a focused-ion-beam milled single groove near the apex of electrochemically etched gold tips. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy are employed to obtain highly spatially and spectroscopically resolved maps of the milled probes, revealing localized surface plasmon resonance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. By changing the distance L between the groove and the probe apex, the localized surface plasmon resonance energy can be fine-tuned at a desired absorption channel. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is applied as a test platform, and the results prove the reliability of the method to produce efficient scattering type near-field optical microscopy probes.

  14. Combining optical tweezers and scanning probe microscopy to study DNA-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisstede, Jurgen H G; Subramaniam, Vinod; Bennink, Martin L

    We present the first results obtained with a new instrument designed and built to study DNA-protein interactions at the single molecule level. This microscope combines optical tweezers with scanning probe microscopy and allows us to locate DNA-binding proteins on a single suspended DNA molecule. A

  15. Artifact mitigation of ptychography integrated with on-the-fly scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Yan, Hanfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Öztürk, Hande; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Robinson, Ian K.; Chu, Yong S.

    2017-07-01

    We report our experiences with conducting ptychography simultaneously with the X-ray fluorescence measurement using the on-the-fly mode for efficient multi-modality imaging. We demonstrate that the periodic artifact inherent to the raster scan pattern can be mitigated using a sufficiently fine scan step size to provide an overlap ratio of >70%. This allows us to obtain transmitted phase contrast images with enhanced spatial resolution from ptychography while maintaining the fluorescence imaging with continuous-motion scans on pixelated grids. This capability will greatly improve the competence and throughput of scanning probe X-ray microscopy.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Tip Probes: Stability and Lateral Resolution in Scanning Probe Microscopy and Application to Surface Science to Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Chao, Kuo-Jen; Stevens, Ramsey M. D.; Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, Alan; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present results on the stability and lateral resolution capability of carbon nanotube (CNT) scanning probes as applied to atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface topography images of ultra-thin films (2-5 nm thickness) obtained with AFM are used to illustrate the lateral resolution capability of single-walled carbon nanotube probes. Images of metal films prepared by ion beam sputtering exhibit grain sizes ranging from greater than 10 nm to as small as approximately 2 nm for gold and iridium respectively. In addition, imaging stability and lifetime of multi-walled carbon nanotube scanning probes are studied on a relatively hard surface of silicon nitride (Si3N4). AFM images Of Si3N4 surface collected after more than 15 hrs of continuous scanning show no detectable degradation in lateral resolution. These results indicate the general feasibility of CNT tips and scanning probe microscopy for examining nanometer-scale surface features of deposited metals as well as non-conductive thin films. AFM coupled with CNT tips offers a simple and nondestructive technique for probing a variety of surfaces, and has immense potential as a surface characterization tool in integrated circuit manufacturing.

  17. Scanning probe microscopy estimation of the wear resistance of the surface of a modified PVC film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkova, A. S.; Gorbushin, P. N.; Sosnov, E. A.; Kolert, K.; Malygin, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    An atomic force microscopy technique is proposed to determine the wear resistance of a protective coating deposited by the sol-gel method on the surface of a polyvinylchloride film. The force of action of a probe on a sample is estimated under various scanning conditions. It is shown that the obtained data on the resistance of a coating to the action of a probe in the contact mode can be used to qualitatively estimate the adhesion of the coating to the surface of a polymer matrix.

  18. Growth of Pd-Filled Carbon Nanotubes on the Tip of Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Sakamoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized Pd-filled carbon nanotubes (CNTs oriented perpendicular to Si substrates using a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD for the application of scanning probe microscopy (SPM tip. Prior to the CVD growth, Al thin film (10 nm was coated on the substrate as a buffer layer followed by depositing a 5∼40 nm-thick Pd film as a catalyst. The diameter and areal density of CNTs grown depend largely on the initial Pd thickness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM images clearly show that Pd is successfully encapsulated into the CNTs, probably leading to higher conductivity. Using optimum growth conditions, Pd-filled CNTs are successfully grown on the apex of the conventional SPM cantilever.

  19. In Situ Scanning Probe Microscopy and New Perspectives in Analytical Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin

    1999-01-01

    for molecular- and mesoscopic-scale analytical chemistry, are then reviewed. They are illustrated by metallic electro-crystallisation and -dissolution, and in situ STM spectroscopy of large redox molecules. The biophysically oriented analytical options of in situ atomic force microscopy, and analytical chemical......The resolution of scanning probe microscopies is unpresedented but the techniques are fraught with limitations as analytical tools. These limitations and their relationship to the physical mechanisms of image contrast are first discussed. Some new options based on in situ STM, which hold prospects...

  20. The Use Of Scanning Probe Microscopy To Investigate Crystal-Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C A; Giocondi, J L

    2007-04-16

    Over the past decade there has been a natural drive to extend the investigation of dynamic surfaces in fluid environments to higher resolution characterization tools. Various aspects of solution crystal growth have been directly visualized for the first time. These include island nucleation and growth using transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy; elemental step motion using scanning probe microscopy; and the time evolution of interfacial atomic structure using various diffraction techniques. In this lecture we will discuss the use of one such in situ method, scanning probe microscopy, as a means of measuring surface dynamics during crystal growth and dissolution. We will cover both practical aspects of imaging such as environmental control, fluid flow, and electrochemical manipulation, as well as the types of physical measurements that can be made. Measurements such as step motion, critical lengths, nucleation density, and step fluctuations, will be put in context of the information they provide about mechanistic processes at surfaces using examples from metal and mineral crystal growth.

  1. Scanning probe microscopy: instrumentation and applications on thin films and magnetic multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoutsos, Vagelis

    2009-12-01

    In this article we present a review on instrumentation and the modes of operation of a scanning probe microscope. In detail, we review the main techniques of Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), which are Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), focusing our attention on the latter one. The AFM instrument provides information on the roughness and grain size of thin films. As an example we review recent results on two metallic thin film systems: thin Ag films deposited on glass, and Ni/Pt compositionally modulated multilayers deposited on glass, Si, and polyimide substrates. To show the validity of the grain size measurements, we compare the data with the ones resulting from X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. We show that the AFM results are reliable for grain diameters as small as 14 nm, which is approximately comparable to the tip radius. Finally, we deal with Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) results on Co/Pt and Co/Au multilayers. We observe perpendicularly magnetized domains. The domain configurations are correlated to the magnetization hysteresis curves.

  2. Microscopic techniques bridging between nanoscale and microscale with an atomically sharpened tip - field ion microscopy/scanning probe microscopy/ scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Sasahara, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Over a hundred years an atomistic point of view has been indispensable to explore fascinating properties of various materials and to develop novel functional materials. High-resolution microscopies, rapidly developed during the period, have taken central roles in promoting materials science and related techniques to observe and analyze the materials. As microscopies with the capability of atom-imaging, field ion microscopy (FIM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be cited, which have been highly evaluated as methods to ultimately bring forward the viewpoint of reductionism in materials science. On one hand, there have been difficulties to derive useful and practical information on large (micro) scale unique properties of materials using these excellent microscopies and to directly advance the engineering for practical materials. To make bridges over the gap between an atomic scale and an industrial engineering scale, we have to develop emergence science step-by-step as a discipline having hierarchical structures for future prospects by combining nanoscale and microscale techniques; as promising ways, the combined microscopic instruments covering the scale gap and the extremely sophisticated methods for sample preparation seem to be required. In addition, it is noted that spectroscopic and theoretical methods should implement the emergence science.Fundamentally, the function of microscope is to determine the spatial positions of a finite piece of material, that is, ultimately individual atoms, at an extremely high resolution with a high stability. To define and control the atomic positions, the STM and AFM as scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have successfully demonstrated their power; the technological heart of SPM lies in an atomically sharpened tip, which can be observed by FIM and TEM. For emergence science we would like to set sail using the tip as a base. Meanwhile, it is significant

  3. Plasma-deposited fluorocarbon films: insulation material for microelectrodes and combined atomic force microscopy-scanning electrochemical microscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemair, Justyna; Balu, Balamurali; Moon, Jong-Seok; Hess, Dennis W; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine

    2008-07-01

    Pinhole-free insulation of micro- and nanoelectrodes is the key to successful microelectrochemical experiments performed in vivo or in combination with scanning probe experiments. A novel insulation technique based on fluorocarbon insulation layers deposited from pentafluoroethane (PFE, CF3CHF2) plasmas is presented as a promising electrical insulation approach for microelectrodes and combined atomic force microscopy-scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) probes. The deposition allows reproducible and uniform coating, which is essential for many analytical applications of micro- and nanoelectrodes such as, e.g., in vivo experiments and SECM experiments. Disk-shaped microelectrodes and frame-shaped AFM tip-integrated electrodes have been fabricated by postinsulation focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The thin insulation layer for combined AFM-SECM probes renders this fabrication technique particularly useful for submicro insulation providing radius ratios of the outer insulation versus the disk electrode (RG values) suitable for SECM experiments. Characterization of PFE-insulated AFM-SECM probes will be presented along with combined AFM-SECM approach curves and imaging.

  4. THE INTEGRATED USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY, AND VIRTUAL REALITY TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the last decade three new techniques scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (YR) and computational chemistry ave emerged with the combined capability of a priori predicting the chemically reactivity of environmental surfaces. Computational chemistry provides the cap...

  5. Practical aspects of single-pass scan Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangyong; Mao, Bin; Lan, Fei; Liu, Liming

    2012-11-01

    The single-pass scan Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in ambient condition has a few advantages over the dual-pass lift-up scan KPFM. For example, its spatial resolution is expected to be higher; and its topographical errors caused by electrostatic forces are minimized because electrostatic forces are actively suppressed during the simultaneous topographical and KPFM measurement. Because single-pass scan KPFM in ambient condition is relatively new, it received little attention in the literature so far. In this article, we discuss several major practical aspects of single-pass scan KPFM especially in ambient condition. First, we define the resolution using a point spread function. With this definition, we analyze the relation between the resolution and the scanning parameters such as tip apex radius and tip-surface distance. We further study the accuracy of KPFM based on the point spread function. Then, we analyze the sensitivity of KPFM under different operation modes. Finally, we investigate the crosstalk between the topographical image and the surface potential image and demonstrate the practical ways to minimize the crosstalk. These discussions not only help us to understand the single-pass scan KPFM but also provide practical guidance in using single-pass scan KPFM.

  6. Vortex imaging and local magnetization studies in HTS by scanning Hall probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crisan, A.; Pross, A.; Cole, D.; Bending, S

    2004-08-01

    We have used scanning Hall probe microscopy to correlate vortex images and local magnetisation measurements in two different high temperature superconducting samples. Near the edge of a continuous YBCO thin film we have observed local hysteresis inversion and negative remanent fields, which can be semi-quantitatively explained in terms of a theoretical model of flux penetration in an infinitely long superconducting strip. In a YBCO film containing a regular square array of antidots we have further find that vortices trapped at antidots exhibit an unusual behaviour upon field sweep reversal.

  7. Low-Level Detection of Poly(amidoamine PAMAM Dendrimers Using Immunoimaging Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chevelle A. Cason

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunoimaging scanning probe microscopy was utilized for the low-level detection and quantification of biotinylated G4 poly(amidoamine PAMAM dendrimers. Results were compared to those of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and found to provide a vastly improved analytical method for the low-level detection of dendrimers, improving the limit of detection by a factor of 1000 (LOD=2.5×10−13 moles. The biorecognition method is reproducible and shows high specificity and good accuracy. In addition, the capture assay platform shows a promising approach to patterning dendrimers for nanotechnology applications.

  8. Low-Level Detection of Poly(amidoamine) PAMAM Dendrimers Using Immunoimaging Scanning Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Chevelle A; Fabré, Thomas A; Buhrlage, Andrew; Haik, Kristi L; Bullen, Heather A

    2012-01-01

    Immunoimaging scanning probe microscopy was utilized for the low-level detection and quantification of biotinylated G4 poly(amidoamine) PAMAM dendrimers. Results were compared to those of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and found to provide a vastly improved analytical method for the low-level detection of dendrimers, improving the limit of detection by a factor of 1000 (LOD = 2.5 × 10(-13) moles). The biorecognition method is reproducible and shows high specificity and good accuracy. In addition, the capture assay platform shows a promising approach to patterning dendrimers for nanotechnology applications.

  9. Teaching Plasmonics, Scanning Probe Microscopy and Other Useful Experiments at the Upper Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Erik

    2012-10-01

    It is important to teach students concepts and experimental skills relating to modern research being performed today. Experiments that help educate students about the latest research helps them get jobs and into the doors at many great academic institutions. PSU's Advanced Experimental Class for physics undergraduates offers many novel experiments to help the students accomplish this task. Labs involving Plasmonics, thin film deposition, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and more will be discussed. In addition, a new NSF funded project involving the building of a Do-It-Yourself (DIY) SPM will be discussed.

  10. Direct Measurement of Built-in Electrical Potential in Photovoltaic Devices by Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C. S.; Mutinho, H. R.; Hasoon, F. S.; Al-Thani, H. A.; Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Wang, Q.; Romero, M. J.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2003-05-01

    We report on direct measurements of the built-in electrical potential in Cu(In,Ga)Se2, GaInP2 single-junction, and GaInP2/GaAs tandem-junction solar cells, by using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. Potential profiles on cross sections of the devices were measured quantitatively and spatially resolved in open and short circuit, under and without illuminations, with selective photon energies matching the band gaps of the junctions. The measurements provide valuable information about the electrical properties of the devices and are useful for understanding the performance and improving the design of solar cells.

  11. Calibration and examination of piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge cantilevers for scanning probe microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotszalk, Teodor; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the method of determining the force constant and displacement sensitivity of piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge cantilevers applied in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). In the procedure presented here, the force constant for beams with various geometry is determined based on resonance frequency measurement. The displacement sensitivity is measured by the deflection of the cantilever with the calibrated piezoactuator stage. Preliminary results show that our method is capable of measuring the force constant of Wheatstone bridge cantilevers with an accuracy of better than 5% and this is used as feedback for improvement of sensor micromachining process.

  12. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Scanning Probe Microscopy : Characterization, Nanofabrication and Device Application of Functional Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Vilarinho, Paula Maria; Kingon, Angus; Scanning Probe Microscopy : Characterization, Nanofabrication and Device Application of Functional Materials

    2005-01-01

    As the characteristic dimensions of electronic devices continue to shrink, the ability to characterize their electronic properties at the nanometer scale has come to be of outstanding importance. In this sense, Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is becoming an indispensable tool, playing a key role in nanoscience and nanotechnology. SPM is opening new opportunities to measure semiconductor electronic properties with unprecedented spatial resolution. SPM is being successfully applied for nanoscale characterization of ferroelectric thin films. In the area of functional molecular materials it is being used as a probe to contact molecular structures in order to characterize their electrical properties, as a manipulator to assemble nanoparticles and nanotubes into simple devices, and as a tool to pattern molecular nanostructures. This book provides in-depth information on new and emerging applications of SPM to the field of materials science, namely in the areas of characterisation, device application and nanofabrica...

  13. Green's function modeling of response of two-dimensional materials to point probes for scanning probe microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewary, V K; Quardokus, Rebecca C; DelRio, Frank W

    2016-04-29

    A Green's function (GF) method is developed for interpreting scanning probe microscopy (SPM) measurements on new two-dimensional (2D) materials. GFs for the Laplace/Poisson equations are calculated by using a virtual source method for two separate cases of a finite material containing a rectangular defect and a hexagonal defect. The prescribed boundary values are reproduced almost exactly by the calculated GFs. It is suggested that the GF is not just a mathematical artefact but a basic physical characteristic of material systems, which can be measured directly by SPM for 2D solids. This should make SPM an even more powerful technique for characterization of 2D materials.

  14. MRT letter: An extended scanning probe microscopy system for macroscopic topography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ji; Li, Faxin

    2014-10-01

    Enlightened by the principle of scanning probe microscopy or atomic force microscope (AFM), we proposed a novel surface topography imaging system based on the scanning of a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever. The height of sample surface can be obtained by recording the cantilever's strain using an ultra-sensitive strain gauge and the Z-axis movement is realized by electric bending of the cantilever. This system can be operated in the way similar to the contact mode in AFM, with the practical height detection resolution better than 100 nm. Imaging of the inner surface of a steel tube and on a transparent wing of a honey bee were conducted and the obtained results showed that this proposed system is a very promising solution for in situ topography mapping. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Scanning MWCNT-Nanopipette and Probe Microscopy: Li Patterning and Transport Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jonathan M; Bharath, Satyaveda C; Cullen, William G; Reutt-Robey, Janice E

    2015-10-07

    A carbon-nanotube-enabling scanning probe technique/nanotechnology for manipulating and measuring lithium at the nano/mesoscale is introduced. Scanning Li-nanopipette and probe microscopy (SLi-NPM) is based on a conductive atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever with an open-ended multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) affixed to its apex. SLi-NPM operation is demonstrated with a model system consisting of a Li thin film on a Si(111) substrate. By control of bias, separation distance, and contact time, attograms of Li can be controllably pipetted to or from the MWCNT tip. Patterned surface Li features are then directly probed via noncontact AFM measurements with the MWCNT tip. The subsequent decay of Li features is simulated with a mesoscale continuum model, developed here. The Li surface diffusion coefficient for a four (two) Li layer thick film is measured as D=8(±1.2)×10(-15) cm(2) s(-1) (D=1.75(±0.15)×10(-15) cm(2) s(-1)). Dual-Li pipetting/measuring with SLi-NPM enables a broad range of time-dependent Li and nanoelectrode characterization studies of fundamental importance to energy-storage research. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy of Magnetic Vortices inVery Underdoped yttrium-barium-copper-oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guikema, Janice Wynn; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-12-02

    Since their discovery by Bednorz and Mueller (1986), high-temperature cuprate superconductors have been the subject of intense experimental research and theoretical work. Despite this large-scale effort, agreement on the mechanism of high-T{sub c} has not been reached. Many theories make their strongest predictions for underdoped superconductors with very low superfluid density n{sub s}/m*. For this dissertation I implemented a scanning Hall probe microscope and used it to study magnetic vortices in newly available single crystals of very underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (Liang et al. 1998, 2002). These studies have disproved a promising theory of spin-charge separation, measured the apparent vortex size (an upper bound on the penetration depth {lambda}{sub ab}), and revealed an intriguing phenomenon of ''split'' vortices. Scanning Hall probe microscopy is a non-invasive and direct method for magnetic field imaging. It is one of the few techniques capable of submicron spatial resolution coupled with sub-{Phi}{sub 0} (flux quantum) sensitivity, and it operates over a wide temperature range. Chapter 2 introduces the variable temperature scanning microscope and discusses the scanning Hall probe set-up and scanner characterizations. Chapter 3 details my fabrication of submicron GaAs/AlGaAs Hall probes and discusses noise studies for a range of probe sizes, which suggest that sub-100 nm probes could be made without compromising flux sensitivity. The subsequent chapters detail scanning Hall probe (and SQUID) microscopy studies of very underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} crystals with T{sub c} {le} 15 K. Chapter 4 describes two experimental tests for visons, essential excitations of a spin-charge separation theory proposed by Senthil and Fisher (2000, 2001b). We searched for predicted hc/e vortices (Wynn et al. 2001) and a vortex memory effect (Bonn et al. 2001) with null results, placing upper bounds on the vison energy inconsistent with

  17. Scanning probe acceleration microscopy (SPAM) in fluids: mapping mechanical properties of surfaces at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Justin; Park, Matthew; Cusick, Brian; Kowalewski, Tomasz

    2006-03-28

    One of the major thrusts in proximal probe techniques is combination of imaging capabilities with simultaneous measurements of physical properties. In tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM), the most straightforward way to accomplish this goal is to reconstruct the time-resolved force interaction between the tip and surface. These tip-sample forces can be used to detect interactions (e.g., binding sites) and map material properties with nanoscale spatial resolution. Here, we describe a previously unreported approach, which we refer to as scanning probe acceleration microscopy (SPAM), in which the TMAFM cantilever acts as an accelerometer to extract tip-sample forces during imaging. This method utilizes the second derivative of the deflection signal to recover the tip acceleration trajectory. The challenge in such an approach is that with real, noisy data, the second derivative of the signal is strongly dominated by the noise. This problem is solved by taking advantage of the fact that most of the information about the deflection trajectory is contained in the higher harmonics, making it possible to filter the signal by "comb" filtering, i.e., by taking its Fourier transform and inverting it while selectively retaining only the intensities at integer harmonic frequencies. Such a comb filtering method works particularly well in fluid TMAFM because of the highly distorted character of the deflection signal. Numerical simulations and in situ TMAFM experiments on supported lipid bilayer patches on mica are reported to demonstrate the validity of this approach.

  18. Touching is believing: interrogating halide perovskite solar cells at the nanoscale via scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangyu; Huang, Boyuan; Nasr Esfahani, Ehsan; Wei, Linlin; Yao, Jianjun; Zhao, Jinjin; Chen, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Halide perovskite solar cells based on CH3NH3PbI3 and related materials have emerged as the most exciting development in the next generation photovoltaic technologies, yet the microscopic phenomena involving photo-carriers, ionic defects, spontaneous polarization, and molecular vibration and rotation interacting with numerous grains, grain boundaries, and interfaces are still inadequately understood. In fact, there is still need for an effective method to interrogate the local photovoltaic properties of halide perovskite solar cells that can be directly traced to their microstructures on one hand and linked to their device performance on the other hand. In this perspective, we propose that scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques have great potential to realize such promises at the nanoscale, and highlight some of the recent progresses and challenges along this line of investigation toward local probing of photocurrent, work function, ionic activities, polarization switching, and chemical degradation. We also emphasize the importance of multi-modality imaging, in-operando scanning, big data analysis, and multidisciplinary collaboration for further studies toward fully understanding of these complex systems.

  19. Scanning probe microscopy studies on the adsorption of selected molecular dyes on titania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub S. Prauzner-Bechcicki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide, or titania, sensitized with organic dyes is a very attractive platform for photovoltaic applications. In this context, the knowledge of properties of the titania–sensitizer junction is essential for designing efficient devices. Consequently, studies on the adsorption of organic dyes on titania surfaces and on the influence of the adsorption geometry on the energy level alignment between the substrate and an organic adsorbate are necessary. The method of choice for investigating the local environment of a single dye molecule is high-resolution scanning probe microscopy. Microscopic results combined with the outcome of common spectroscopic methods provide a better understanding of the mechanism taking place at the titania–sensitizer interface. In the following paper, we review the recent scanning probe microscopic research of a certain group of molecular assemblies on rutile titania surfaces as it pertains to dye-sensitized solar cell applications. We focus on experiments on adsorption of three types of prototypical dye molecules, i.e., perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA, phtalocyanines and porphyrins. Two interesting heteromolecular systems comprising molecules that are aligned with the given review are discussed as well.

  20. Charge-imaging field-effect transistors for scanned probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lester Hao-Lin

    This thesis presents experiments on integrating a charge-imaging field-effect transistor onto a scanned probe microscopy cantilever to make a moveable charge-imager. Such an imager would be used for imaging the spatial distribution of electric charge in semiconductor heterostructures and devices. Learning about the spatial distribution of charge yields knowledge about electrical transport at the microscopic level. The information gained from measuring the spatial distribution of charge increases with improvements in the spatial resolution and charge sensitivity of the charge-imaging probes. So, the goal is to devise a charge-imager with sub-micron spatial resolution and single-electron charge sensitivity. To achieve high spatial resolution and excellent charge sensitivity, the charge-imaging field-effect transistors are made with a quantum point contact geometry. The charge response is confined to a disc with full width half-maximum comparable to its channel width, and the charge noise spectrum reaches values "1 e/Hz½ at 30 kHz. Their low power dissipation (deflections of the cantilever to map the sample topography. The strain-sensing field-effect transistors have a white noise value for the deflection noise of 0.5 nm/Hz½ at 10 kHz. This thesis describes the fabrication and characterization of charge-imaging field-effect transistors and scanned microscopy cantilevers with integrated strain-sensing transistors. The transistors and cantilevers were fabricated in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure using electron-beam lithography and were characterized at liquid Helium temperatures. Possible future experiments include demonstrating the charge-imaging FET's sensitivity to single electrons, creating a charge- and topography-imaging cantilever, and directly measuring the electron distributions in nanostructures.

  1. Neutral Red as a Probe for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy Studies of Plant Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUBROVSKY, JOSEPH G.; GUTTENBERGER, MARTIN; SARALEGUI, ANDRES; NAPSUCIALY-MENDIVIL, SELENE; VOIGT, BORIS; BALUŠKA, FRANTIŠEK; MENZEL, DIEDRIK

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Neutral red (NR), a lipophilic phenazine dye, has been widely used in various biological systems as a vital stain for bright-field microscopy. In its unprotonated form it penetrates the plasma membrane and tonoplast of viable plant cells, then due to protonation it becomes trapped in acidic compartments. The possible applications of NR for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies were examined in various aspects of plant root biology. • Methods NR was used as a fluorochrome for living roots of Phaseolus vulgaris, Allium cepa, A. porrum and Arabidopsis thaliana (wild-type and transgenic GFP-carrying lines). The tissues were visualized using CLSM. The effect of NR on the integrity of the cytoskeleton and the growth rate of arabidopsis primary roots was analysed to judge potential toxic effects of the dye. • Key Results The main advantages of the use of NR are related to the fact that NR rapidly penetrates root tissues, has affinity to suberin and lignin, and accumulates in the vacuoles. It is shown that NR is a suitable probe for visualization of proto- and metaxylem elements, Casparian bands in the endodermis, and vacuoles in cells of living roots. The actin cytoskeleton and the microtubule system of the cells, as well as the dynamics of root growth, remain unchanged after short-term application of NR, indicating a relatively low toxicity of this chemical. It was also found that NR is a useful probe for the observation of the internal structures of root nodules and of fungal hyphae in vesicular–arbuscular mycorrhizas. • Conclusions Ease, low cost and absence of tissue processing make NR a useful probe for structural, developmental and vacuole-biogenetic studies of plant roots with CLSM. PMID:16520341

  2. Observation of silicon carbide Schottky barrier diode under applied reverse bias using atomic force microscopy/Kelvin probe force microscopy/scanning capacitance force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uruma, Takeshi; Satoh, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hidekazu

    2017-08-01

    We have observed a commercial silicon-carbide Schottky barrier diode (SiC-SBD) using our novel analysis system, in which atomic force microscopy (AFM) is combined with both Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM; for surface-potential measurement) and scanning capacitance force microscopy (SCFM; for differential-capacitance measurement). The results obtained for the SiC-SBD under an applied reverse bias indicate both the scan area in the sample and a peak value of the SCFM signal in the region where the existence of trapped electrons is deduced from the KFM analysis. Thus, our measurement system can be used to examine commercial power devices; however, novel polishing procedures are required in order to investigate the Schottky contact region.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Static states and dynamic behaviour of charges: observation and control by scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masashi

    2010-05-01

    This paper reviews charges that locally functionalize materials. Microscopic analyses and operation of charges using various scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques have revealed static, quasi-static/quasi-dynamic and dynamic charge behaviours. Charge-sensitive SPM has allowed for the visualization of the distribution of functionalized charges in electronic devices. When used as bit data in a memory system, the charges can be operated by SPM. The behaviour of quasi-static/quasi-dynamic charges is discussed here. In the data-writing process, spatially dispersive charges rather than a fast injection rate are introduced, but the technical problems can be solved by using nanostructures. Careful charge operations using SPM should realize a memory with a larger density than Tbit/inch2. Dynamic charges have been introduced in physical analyses and chemical processes. Although the observable timescale is limited by the SPM system response time of the order of several seconds, dynamics such as photon-induced charge redistributions and probe-assisted chemical reactions are observed.

  4. Invited review article: A 10 mK scanning probe microscopy facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Jae; Otte, Alexander F; Shvarts, Vladimir; Zhao, Zuyu; Kuk, Young; Blankenship, Steven R; Band, Alan; Hess, Frank M; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2010-12-01

    We describe the design, development and performance of a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) facility operating at a base temperature of 10 mK in magnetic fields up to 15 T. The microscope is cooled by a custom designed, fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible dilution refrigerator (DR) and is capable of in situ tip and sample exchange. Subpicometer stability at the tip-sample junction is achieved through three independent vibration isolation stages and careful design of the dilution refrigerator. The system can be connected to, or disconnected from, a network of interconnected auxiliary UHV chambers, which include growth chambers for metal and semiconductor samples, a field-ion microscope for tip characterization, and a fully independent additional quick access low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) system. To characterize the system, we present the cooling performance of the DR, vibrational, tunneling current, and tip-sample displacement noise measurements. In addition, we show the spectral resolution capabilities with tunneling spectroscopy results obtained on an epitaxial graphene sample resolving the quantum Landau levels in a magnetic field, including the sublevels corresponding to the lifting of the electron spin and valley degeneracies.

  5. PREDICTING CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES FOR MINERALS AND XENOBIOTICS: USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY AND VIRTUAL REALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this chapter we review the literature on scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (VR), and computational chemistry and our earlier work dealing with modeling lignin, lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC), humic substances (HSs) and non-bonded organo-mineral interactions...

  6. Direct imaging of defect formation in strained organic flexible electronics by Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Tobias; Travaglini, Lorenzo; Lai, Stefano; Patruno, Luca; de Miranda, Stefano; Bonfiglio, Annalisa; Cosseddu, Piero; Fraboni, Beatrice

    2016-12-02

    The development of new materials and devices for flexible electronics depends crucially on the understanding of how strain affects electronic material properties at the nano-scale. Scanning Kelvin-Probe Microscopy (SKPM) is a unique technique for nanoelectronic investigations as it combines non-invasive measurement of surface topography and surface electrical potential. Here we show that SKPM in non-contact mode is feasible on deformed flexible samples and allows to identify strain induced electronic defects. As an example we apply the technique to investigate the strain response of organic thin film transistors containing TIPS-pentacene patterned on polymer foils. Controlled surface strain is induced in the semiconducting layer by bending the transistor substrate. The amount of local strain is quantified by a mathematical model describing the bending mechanics. We find that the step-wise reduction of device performance at critical bending radii is caused by the formation of nano-cracks in the microcrystal morphology of the TIPS-pentacene film. The cracks are easily identified due to the abrupt variation in SKPM surface potential caused by a local increase in resistance. Importantly, the strong surface adhesion of microcrystals to the elastic dielectric allows to maintain a conductive path also after fracture thus providing the opportunity to attenuate strain effects.

  7. Intermittent trapping of a liquid-like vortex state visualized by scanning Hall probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crisan, A; Bending, S J [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Li, Z Z; Raffy, H [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud, Batiment 510, UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-11-15

    We have used scanning Hall probe microscopy to investigate vortex structures and vortex dynamics in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} thin films in very low perpendicular magnetic fields. After nominally zero field cooling in the Earth's field we find that the vortices appear to be in a stable glassy state in our highly disordered samples. After applying a cancellation field of a few Oersted at low temperature, however, the system enters a new regime at very low magnetic induction when the only image contrast is due to vortices that are intermittently trapped on strong pinning centres. This state shares many of the signatures of the re-entrant vortex liquid phase that has been theoretically predicted in these highly anisotropic materials at very low vortex densities. Analysing the trapping times for vortices in the fluctuating state we estimate that the pinning potential of typical strong pinning centres is about 900 K under our experimental conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first direct experimental evidence for the existence of a dynamic liquid-like vortex state in this highly anisotropic material at very low magnetic induction.

  8. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM) introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926-1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf) of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I) flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111) surface.

  9. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Leinen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926–1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111 surface.

  10. Sensing the facet orientation in silver nano-plates using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdellatif, M.H. [Department of Nanostructures, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Physics Department, National Research Center, Elbehoos st., 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Salerno, M., E-mail: marco.salerno@iit.it [Department of Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Polovitsyn, Anatolii [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Dipartimentodi Fisica, Università di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Marras, Sergio [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); De Angelis, Francesco [Department of Nanostructures, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • The surface potential of drop cast nanocrystals was measured by SKPM in ambient air. • The nanocrystal facet work function was derived by theory. • By comparing theory and experiment we distinguished the nanocrystal facets. • Nanocrystal facet control is of practical interest for optoelectronic devices. - Abstract: The work function of nano-materials is important for a full characterization of their electronic properties. Because the band alignment, band bending and electronic noise are very sensitive to work function fluctuations, the dependence of the work function of nano-scale crystals on facet orientation can be a critical issue in optimizing optoelectronic devices based on these materials. We used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy to assess the local work function on samples of silver nano-plates at sub-micrometric spatial resolution. With the appropriate choice of the substrate and based on statistical analysis, it was possible to distinguish the surface potential of the different facets of silver nano-plates even if the measurements were done in ambient conditions without the use of vacuum. A phenomenological model was used to calculate the differences of facet work function of the silver nano-plates and the corresponding shift in Fermi level. This theoretical prediction and the experimentally observed difference in surface potential on the silver nano-plates were in good agreement. Our results show the possibility to sense the nano-crystal facets by appropriate choice of the substrate in ambient conditions.

  11. RTSPM: real-time Linux control software for scanning probe microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, V; Mehta, M M

    2013-01-01

    Real time computer control is an essential feature of scanning probe microscopes, which have become important tools for the characterization and investigation of nanometer scale samples. Most commercial (and some open-source) scanning probe data acquisition software uses digital signal processors to handle the real time data processing and control, which adds to the expense and complexity of the control software. We describe here scan control software that uses a single computer and a data acquisition card to acquire scan data. The computer runs an open-source real time Linux kernel, which permits fast acquisition and control while maintaining a responsive graphical user interface. Images from a simulated tuning-fork based microscope as well as a standard topographical sample are also presented, showing some of the capabilities of the software.

  12. In situ surface reduction of a NiO-YSZ-alumina composite using scanning probe microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Jacobsen, Torben; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune

    2014-01-01

    In situ surface reductions of NiO-YSZ-Al2O3 composites into Ni-YSZ-Al2O3 cermets were carried out at 312–525 °C in a controlled atmosphere high-temperature scanning probe microscope (CAHT-SPM) in dry and humidified 9 % H2 in N2. The reduction of NiO was followed by contact mode scanning of topogr......In situ surface reductions of NiO-YSZ-Al2O3 composites into Ni-YSZ-Al2O3 cermets were carried out at 312–525 °C in a controlled atmosphere high-temperature scanning probe microscope (CAHT-SPM) in dry and humidified 9 % H2 in N2. The reduction of NiO was followed by contact mode scanning...

  13. General three-dimensional image simulation and surface reconstruction in scanning probe microscopy using a dexel representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaoping; Villarrubia, J S

    2007-12-01

    The ability to image complex general three-dimensional (3D) structures, including reentrant surfaces and undercut features using scanning probe microscopy, is becoming increasing important in many small length-scale applications. This paper presents a dexel data representation and its algorithm implementation for scanning probe microscope (SPM) image simulation (morphological dilation) and surface reconstruction (erosion) on such general 3D structures. Validation using simulations, some of which are modeled upon actual atomic force microscope data, demonstrates that the dexel representation can efficiently simulate SPM imaging and reconstruct the sample surface from measured images, including those with reentrant surfaces and undercut features.

  14. Quantitative imaging of electrospun fibers by PeakForce Quantitative NanoMechanics atomic force microscopy using etched scanning probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlanda, Adrian; Rebis, Janusz; Kijeńska, Ewa; Wozniak, Michal J; Rozniatowski, Krzysztof; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J

    2015-05-01

    Electrospun polymeric submicron and nanofibers can be used as tissue engineering scaffolds in regenerative medicine. In physiological conditions fibers are subjected to stresses and strains from the surrounding biological environment. Such stresses can cause permanent deformation or even failure to their structure. Therefore, there is a growing necessity to characterize their mechanical properties, especially at the nanoscale. Atomic force microscopy is a powerful tool for the visualization and probing of selected mechanical properties of materials in biomedical sciences. Image resolution of atomic force microscopy techniques depends on the equipment quality and shape of the scanning probe. The probe radius and aspect ratio has huge impact on the quality of measurement. In the presented work the nanomechanical properties of four different polymer based electrospun fibers were tested using PeakForce Quantitative NanoMechanics atomic force microscopy, with standard and modified scanning probes. Standard, commercially available probes have been modified by etching using focused ion beam (FIB). Results have shown that modified probes can be used for mechanical properties mapping of biomaterial in the nanoscale, and generate nanomechanical information where conventional tips fail. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Vacuum scanning capillary photoemission microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aseyev, S.A.; Cherkun, A P; Mironov, B N

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a conical capillary in a scanning probe microscopy for surface analysis. The probe can measure photoemission from a substrate by transmitting photoelectrons along the capillary as a function of probe position. The technique is demonstrated on a model substrate consisting...

  16. DTAF: an efficient probe to study cyanobacterial-plant interaction using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of microscopic techniques have been utilized to study cyanobacterial associations with plant roots, but confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the least used due to the unavailability of a suitable fluorescent dye. Commonly used lectins have problems with their binding ability with

  17. DTAF: an efficient probe to study cyanobacterial-plant interaction using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of microscopic techniques have been utilized to study cyanobacterial associations with plant roots, but confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the least used due to the unavailability of a suitable fluorescent dye. Commonly used lectins have problems with their binding ability with

  18. Surface polymerization of (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) probed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy on Au(111) in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shahzada; Carstens, Timo; Berger, Rüdiger; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Endres, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The electropolymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) to poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was investigated in the air and water-stable ionic liquids 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate [HMIm]FAP and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) amide [EMIm]TFSA. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) results show that the electropolymerization of EDOT in the ionic liquid can be probed on the nanoscale. In contrast to present understanding, it was observed that the EDOT can be oxidised in ionic liquids well below its oxidation potential and the under potential growth of polymer was visualized by in situ STM. These results serve as the first study to confirm the under potential growth of conducting polymers in ionic liquids. Furthermore, ex situ microscopy measurements were performed. Quite a high current of 670 nA was observed on the nanoscale by conductive scanning force microscopy (CSFM).

  19. Improved accuracy and speed in scanning probe microscopy by image reconstruction from non-gridded position sensor data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Dominik; Meyer, Travis R; Farnham, Rodrigo; Brune, Christoph; Bertozzi, Andrea L; Ashby, Paul D

    2013-08-23

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has facilitated many scientific discoveries utilizing its strengths of spatial resolution, non-destructive characterization and realistic in situ environments. However, accurate spatial data are required for quantitative applications but this is challenging for SPM especially when imaging at higher frame rates. We present a new operation mode for scanning probe microscopy that uses advanced image processing techniques to render accurate images based on position sensor data. This technique, which we call sensor inpainting, frees the scanner to no longer be at a specific location at a given time. This drastically reduces the engineering effort of position control and enables the use of scan waveforms that are better suited for the high inertia nanopositioners of SPM. While in raster scanning, typically only trace or retrace images are used for display, in Archimedean spiral scans 100% of the data can be displayed and at least a two-fold increase in temporal or spatial resolution is achieved. In the new mode, the grid size of the final generated image is an independent variable. Inpainting to a few times more pixels than the samples creates images that more accurately represent the ground truth.

  20. Circular photocurrent response of a topological insulator thin film probed by scanning photocurrent microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Dong-Xia; Kou, Xufeng; Lang, Murong; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Armstrong, Michael; Zaug, Joseph; Wang, Kang L.; Chapline, George

    2015-03-01

    The remarkable nature of surface states in topological insulators is expected to have a unique photocurrent response to electromagnetic radiation. However, the surface and bulk photo-excited charge transport mechanisms, in relation to the band bending at the electrode-topological insulator interface, have not been well understood. Here, we present scanning photocurrent microscopy measurements on a gated topological insulator microdevice and show that the spin-polarized photocurrent displays direction reversal near the electrical contact interfaces. We discuss two possible mechanisms, which alternatively play dominant roles in the helicity-dependent photocurrent map. Our analysis determines the magnitude of each contribution, and reveals the governing process under different gate conditions.

  1. Towards non-invasive high-resolution 3D nano-tomography by ultrasonic scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharahi, Hossein J.; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak; Egberts, Philip; Kim, Seonghwan

    2017-07-01

    Nanoscale imaging techniques that can be used to visualize and characterize local aggregations of the embedded nanoparticulates with sufficient resolution have attracted a great deal of interest. Ultrasonic scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and its derivatives are nondestructive techniques that can be used to elucidate subsurface nanoscale features and mechanical properties. Although many different ultrasonic methods have been used for subsurface imaging, the mechanisms and crucial parameters associated with the contrast formation in subsurface imaging are still unclear. Here, the impact of mechanical properties of the nanoparticulates/matrix, size of the nanoparticulates, buried depth of the nanoparticulates, and the ultrasonic excitation frequency on the developed ultrasonic SPM images have been investigated. To verify our theoretical model, experimental measurements of scanning near-field ultrasound holography (SNFUH) have been recreated in our theoretical analysis to reveal comparable variations in phase contrast measured in SNFUH while scanning over the nanoparticulates embedded in bacteria.

  2. The memory effect of nanoscale memristors investigated by conducting scanning probe microscopy methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Moreno

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the use of scanning force microscopy as a versatile tool for the electrical characterization of nanoscale memristors fabricated on ultrathin La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO films. Combining conventional conductive imaging and nanoscale lithography, reversible switching between low-resistive (ON and high-resistive (OFF states was locally achieved by applying voltages within the range of a few volts. Retention times of several months were tested for both ON and OFF states. Spectroscopy modes were used to investigate the I–V characteristics of the different resistive states. This permitted the correlation of device rectification (reset with the voltage employed to induce each particular state. Analytical simulations by using a nonlinear dopant drift within a memristor device explain the experimental I–V bipolar cycles.

  3. Electrical Study of Trapped Charges in Copper-Doped Zinc Oxide Films by Scanning Probe Microscopy for Nonvolatile Memory Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Su

    Full Text Available Charge trapping properties of electrons and holes in copper-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Cu films have been studied by scanning probe microscopy. We investigated the surface potential dependence on the voltage and duration applied to the copper-doped ZnO films by Kelvin probe force microscopy. It is found that the Fermi Level of the 8 at.% Cu-doped ZnO films shifted by 0.53 eV comparing to undoped ZnO films. This shift indicates significant change in the electronic structure and energy balance in Cu-doped ZnO films. The Fermi Level (work function of zinc oxide films can be tuned by Cu doping, which are important for developing this functional material. In addition, Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements demonstrate that the nature of contact at Pt-coated tip/ZnO:Cu interface is changed from Schottky contact to Ohmic contact by increasing sufficient amount of Cu ions. The charge trapping property of the ZnO films enhance greatly by Cu doping (~10 at.%. The improved stable bipolar charge trapping properties indicate that copper-doped ZnO films are promising for nonvolatile memory applications.

  4. Probing the electronic structure of graphene sheets with various thicknesses by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Lili; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Jing; Sun, Xuhui, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn; Zhong, Jun, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2013-12-16

    The electronic structure of an aggregation of graphene sheets with various thicknesses was probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. A uniform oxidation of the graphene sheets in the flat area was observed regardless of the thickness, while in the folded area the result could be strongly affected by the geometry. Moreover, thick parts of the aggregation showed strong angle-dependence to the incident X-ray, while thin parts showed less angle-dependence, which might be related to the surface wrinkles and ripples. The electronic structure differences due to the geometry and thickness suggest a complicated situation in the aggregation of graphene sheets.

  5. Observation of photodynamically-induced cell destruction probed by video microscopy, laser-scanning microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueck, Angelika C.; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Gschwend, Michael H.; Koenig, Karsten; Brunner, B.; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Walt, Heinrich; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1993-07-01

    In order to study light-induced reactions during PDT, the fluorescence response of the photosensitizer meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS4) was observed in different cell systems and correlated with the sensitivity to photodynamic induced destructions. RR 1022 epithelial cells from the rat were grown on microscopic slides at a high and low cell density. Using video microscopy in combination with microspectrofluorometry we observed a different fluorescence behavior for high and low cell conditions during light exposure. A fluorescence relocalization from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and an intensity increase-- correlated with the formation of a new molecular species--could be detected only for low cell density. Moreover, cell cultures at a high density showed to be less sensitive to photodynamic destructions. In addition to cell culture-experiments, we observed the light-induced reactions of TPPS4 accumulated in multicellular tumor spheroids. For these measurements laser scanning microscopy was used. Fluorescence relocalization and intensity increase could be detected only for the peripheric parts of the spheroids. The different fluorescence response seems to reflect different metabolic and physiologic states of the cells.

  6. Nanoscale patterning and deformation of soft matter by scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassavetis, S. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films - Nanosystems and Nanometrology, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: skasa@physics.auth.gr; Mitsakakis, K.; Logothetidis, S. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films - Nanosystems and Nanometrology, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2007-09-15

    In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used for the surface nanopatterning as well as to study the nanoscale deformation of soft, carbon-based thin films and polymeric (polyethylene terephthalate, PET) membranes. The process of the AFM nanolithography was realized by application of contact force pulses to the samples, using silicon rectangular cantilevers of relatively high spring constant (k{sub c} = 11 N/m, nominal value). Simultaneously, AFM is functioned as a nanometrology instrument, for nanomechanical measurements of the applied force and pressure for plastic deformation of the surface, which were found to vary between 200 and 2500 nN and between 1 and 4 GPa, respectively. The derived data were cross-checked with the materials' nanomechanical properties, which were measured using depth-sensing Nanoindentation, and the limits of the possible applied forces were specified. During the herein presented AFM nanolithography, several types of well-defined shapes, like pits and lines, were made. The dimensions of the patterned structures were correlated with the nanolithography parameters (e.g. applied force). The contact mechanics for the formation of uniformly patterned surfaces are discussed, in terms of shape geometry and dimensions, which comprise the essential characteristics for advanced applications like 'probe-based data storage', where data storage capacity is determined by pattern dimensions, or preferential adsorption of biomolecules on a patterned surface.

  7. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for whic...

  8. Probing the surface chemistry of polycrystalline ZnO with scanning tunneling microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, G.S.; Bonnell, D.A. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States))

    This paper describes the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spatially resolved tunneling spectroscopy to examine polycrystalline ZnO surface in ultrahigh vacuum after bake-out, after a low temperature anneal that cleaned the surface, after a high temperature anneal, which segregated bismuth to the surface, after being dosed with O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, and after exposure to air. The tunneling spectra depend both on the proximity to structural features, such as grain boundaries, and on the chemical composition of the surface. For example, the segregation of bismuth to the surface causes the tunneling spectra to have a p-type rectification. Our results also indicate that the rectification of tunneling spectra acquired in air is caused by surface hydration and that images of surfaces that have not been heated in vacuum have inferior resolution due to a reduction in the height of the apparent tunnel barrier. Spatially resolved tunneling spectroscopy has been used to demonstrate that surface hydration has a greater effect on the crystallite surfaces than on the grain boundary surfaces.

  9. A menu of electron probes for optimising information from scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D T; Findlay, S D; Etheridge, J

    2018-01-01

    We assess a selection of electron probes in terms of the spatial resolution with which information can be derived about the structure of a specimen, as opposed to the nominal image resolution. Using Ge [001] as a study case, we investigate the scattering dynamics of these probes and determine their relative merits in terms of two qualitative criteria: interaction volume and interpretability. This analysis provides a 'menu of probes' from which an optimum probe for tackling a given materials science question can be selected. Hollow cone, vortex and spherical wave fronts are considered, from unit cell to Ångstrom size, and for different defocus and specimen orientations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Enabling low-noise null-point scanning thermal microscopy by the optimization of scanning thermal microscope probe through a rigorous theory of quantitative measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwangseok; Chung, Jaehun; Kwon, Ohmyoung

    2014-11-01

    The application of conventional scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is severely limited by three major problems: (i) distortion of the measured signal due to heat transfer through the air, (ii) the unknown and variable value of the tip-sample thermal contact resistance, and (iii) perturbation of the sample temperature due to the heat flux through the tip-sample thermal contact. Recently, we proposed null-point scanning thermal microscopy (NP SThM) as a way of overcoming these problems in principle by tracking the thermal equilibrium between the end of the SThM tip and the sample surface. However, in order to obtain high spatial resolution, which is the primary motivation for SThM, NP SThM requires an extremely sensitive SThM probe that can trace the vanishingly small heat flux through the tip-sample nano-thermal contact. Herein, we derive a relation between the spatial resolution and the design parameters of a SThM probe, optimize the thermal and electrical design, and develop a batch-fabrication process. We also quantitatively demonstrate significantly improved sensitivity, lower measurement noise, and higher spatial resolution of the fabricated SThM probes. By utilizing the exceptional performance of these fabricated probes, we show that NP SThM can be used to obtain a quantitative temperature profile with nanoscale resolution independent of the changing tip-sample thermal contact resistance and without perturbation of the sample temperature or distortion due to the heat transfer through the air.

  11. Domain wall magnetoresistance in BiFeO3 thin films measured by scanning probe microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domingo, N.; Farokhipoor, S.; Santiso, J.; Noheda, B.; Catalan, G.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the magnetotransport properties of individual 71 degrees domain walls in multiferroic BiFeO3 by means of conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in the presence of magnetic fields up to one Tesla. The results suggest anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature, with the sign of

  12. Scanning probe microscopy and field emission schemes for studying electron emission from polycrystalline diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Chubenko, Oksana; Baturin, Stanislav S.; Baryshev, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    The letter introduces a diagram that rationalizes tunneling atomic force microscopy (TUNA) observations of electron emission from polycrystalline diamonds as described in recent publications. The direct observations of electron emission from grain boundary sites by TUNA could indeed be evidence of electrons originating from grain boundaries under external electric fields. At the same time, from the diagram it follows that TUNA and field emission schemes are complimentary rather than equivalen...

  13. Fabrication and Demonstration of Mercury Disc-Well Probes for Stripping-Based Cyclic Voltammetry Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Zachary J; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2017-03-07

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is a rising technique for the study of energy storage materials. Hg-based probes allow the extension of SECM investigations to ionic processes, but the risk of irreversible Hg amalgam saturation limits their operation to rapid timescales and dilute analyte solutions. Here, we report a novel fabrication protocol for Hg disc-well ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs), which retain access to stripping information but are less susceptible to amalgam saturation than traditional Hg sphere-caps or thin-films. The amalgamation and stripping behaviors of Hg disc-well UMEs are compared to those of traditional Hg sphere-cap UMEs and corroborated with data from finite element simulations. The improved protection against amalgam saturation allows Hg disc-wells to operate safely in highly concentrated environments at long timescales. The utility of the probes for bulk measurements extends also to SECM studies, where the disc geometry facilitates small tip-substrate gaps and improves both spatial and temporal resolution. Because they can carry out slow, high-resolution anodic stripping voltammetry approaches and imaging in concentrated solutions, Hg disc-well electrodes fill a new analytical niche for studies of ionic reactivity and are a valuable addition to the electrochemical toolbox.

  14. Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

    2013-07-09

    An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

  15. Two-step controllable electrochemical etching of tungsten scanning probe microscopy tips

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic electrochemical etching technique is optimized to produce tungsten tips with controllable shape and radius of curvature of less than 10 nm. Nascent features such as dynamic electrochemical etching and reverse biasing after drop-off are utilized, and two-step dynamic electrochemical etching is introduced to produce extremely sharp tips with controllable aspect ratio. Electronic current shut-off time for conventional dc drop-off technique is reduced to ?36 ns using high speed analog electronics. Undesirable variability in tip shape, which is innate to static dc electrochemical etching, is mitigated with novel dynamic electrochemical etching. Overall, we present a facile and robust approach, whereby using a novel etchant level adjustment mechanism, 30° variability in cone angle and 1.5 mm controllability in cone length were achieved, while routinely producing ultra-sharp probes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Scanning Probe Microscopy on heterogeneous CaCu3Ti4O12 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorenza Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The conductive atomic force microscopy provided a local characterization of the dielectric heterogeneities in CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO thin films deposited by MOCVD on IrO2 bottom electrode. In particular, both techniques have been employed to clarify the role of the inter- and sub-granular features in terms of conductive and insulating regions. The microstructure and the dielectric properties of CCTO thin films have been studied and the evidence of internal barriers in CCTO thin films has been provided. The role of internal barriers and the possible explanation for the extrinsic origin of the giant dielectric response in CCTO has been evaluated.

  17. High-Resolution Imaging of Proteins in Human Teeth by Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruverman, A. [North Carolina State University; Wu, D. [North Carolina State University; Rodriguez, Brian J [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Habelitz, S. [University of California, San Francisco

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution studies of dental tissues are of considerable interest for biomedical engineering and clinical applications. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) to nanoscale imaging of internal structure of human teeth by monitoring the local mechanical response to an electrical bias applied via a conductive tip. It is shown that PFM is capable of detecting dissimilar components of dental tissues, namely, proteins and calcified matrix, which have resembling morphology but different piezoelectric properties. It is demonstrated that collagen fibrils revealed in chemically treated intertubular dentin exhibit high piezoelectric activity and can be visualized in PFM with spatial resolution of 10 nm. Evidence of the presence of protein inclusions of 100-200 nm wide and several micrometers long in tooth enamel has been obtained. Furthermore, it is found that the peritubular dentin and intertubular dentin exhibit different piezoelectric behavior suggesting different concentration of collagen fibrils. The obtained results demonstrate a high potential of PFM in providing an additional insight into the structure of dental tissues. It is suggested that the PFM approach can be used to study the structure of a wide range of biological materials by monitoring their electromechanical behavior at the nanoscale.

  18. Availability of feature-oriented scanning probe microscopy for remote-controlled measurements on board a space laboratory or planet exploration Rover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, Rostislav V

    2009-06-01

    Prospects for a feature-oriented scanning (FOS) approach to investigations of sample surfaces, at the micrometer and nanometer scales, with the use of scanning probe microscopy under space laboratory or planet exploration rover conditions, are examined. The problems discussed include decreasing sensitivity of the onboard scanning probe microscope (SPM) to temperature variations, providing autonomous operation, implementing the capabilities for remote control, self-checking, self-adjustment, and self-calibration. A number of topical problems of SPM measurements in outer space or on board a planet exploration rover may be solved via the application of recently proposed FOS methods.

  19. CdSe/CdS-quantum rods: fluorescent probes for in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Jelena; Krapf, Lisa; Wolter, Christopher; Schmidtke, Christian; Merkl, Jan-Philip; Jochum, Tobias; Kornowski, Andreas; Schüth, Anna; Gebert, Andreas; Hüttmann, Gereon; Vossmeyer, Tobias; Weller, Horst

    2014-08-01

    CdSe/CdS-Quantum-dots-quantum-rods (QDQRs) with an aspect ratio of ~6 are prepared via the seeded growth method, encapsulated within a shell of crosslinked poly(isoprene)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PI-b-PEG) diblock copolymer, and transferred from the organic phase into aqueous media. Their photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 78% is not compromised by the phase transfer. Within a period of two months the PLQY of QDQRs in aqueous solution at neutral pH decreases only slightly (to ~65%). The two-photon (TP) action cross sections of QDQRs (~105 GM) are two orders of magnitude higher than those of CdSe/CdS/ZnS-core/shell/shell quantum dots (QDs, ~103 GM) with comparable diameter (~5 nm). After applying PI-b-PEG encapsulated QDQRs onto the small intestinal mucosa of mice in vivo, their strong red fluorescence can easily be observed by two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) and clearly distinguished from autofluorescent background. Our results demonstrate that PI-b-PEG encapsulated CdSe/CdS-QDQRs are excellent probes for studying the uptake and fate of nanoparticles by two-photon imaging techniques in vivo.CdSe/CdS-Quantum-dots-quantum-rods (QDQRs) with an aspect ratio of ~6 are prepared via the seeded growth method, encapsulated within a shell of crosslinked poly(isoprene)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PI-b-PEG) diblock copolymer, and transferred from the organic phase into aqueous media. Their photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 78% is not compromised by the phase transfer. Within a period of two months the PLQY of QDQRs in aqueous solution at neutral pH decreases only slightly (to ~65%). The two-photon (TP) action cross sections of QDQRs (~105 GM) are two orders of magnitude higher than those of CdSe/CdS/ZnS-core/shell/shell quantum dots (QDs, ~103 GM) with comparable diameter (~5 nm). After applying PI-b-PEG encapsulated QDQRs onto the small intestinal mucosa of mice in vivo, their strong red fluorescence can easily be observed by two-photon laser

  20. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  1. Scanning probe microscopies for the creation and characterization of interfacial architectures: Studies of alkyl thiolate monolayers at gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, John -Bruce [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-01-10

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) offers access to the structural and material properties of interfaces, and when combined with macroscopic characterization techniques results in a powerful interfacial development tool. However, the relative infancy of SPM techniques has dictated that initial investigations concentrate on model interfacial systems as benchmarks for testing the control and characterization capabilities of SPM. One such family of model interfacial systems results from the spontaneous adsorption of alkyl thiols to gold. This dissertation examines the application of SPM to the investigation of the interfacial properties of these alkyl thiolate monolayers. Structural investigations result in a proposed explanation for counterintuitive correlations between substrate roughness and heterogeneous electron transfer barrier properties. Frictional measurements are used for characterization of the surface free energy of a series of end-group functionalized monolayers, as well as for the material properties of monolayers composed of varying chain length alkyl thiols. Additional investigations used these characterization techniques to monitor the real-time evolution of chemical and electrochemical surface reactions. The results of these investigations demonstrates the value of SPM technology to the compositional mapping of surfaces, elucidation of interfacial defects, creation of molecularly sized chemically heterogeneous architectures, as well as to the monitoring of surface reactions. However, it is the future which will demonstrate the usefulness of SPM technology to the advancement of science and technology.

  2. Workshop on the coupling of synchrotron radiation IR and X-rays with tip based scanning probe microscopies X-TIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comin, F.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Mundboth, K.; Susini, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France); Purans, J.; Sammelselg, V. [Tartu Univ. (Estonia); Chevrier, J.; Huant, S. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, LEPES, 38 (France); Hamilton, B. [School of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Manchester (United Kingdom); Saito, A. [Osaka Univ., RIKEN/SPring8 (Japan); Dhez, O. [OGG, INFM/CNR, 38 - Grenoble (France); Brocklesby, W.S. [Southampton Univ., Optoelectronics Research Centre (United Kingdom); Alvarez-Prado, L.M. [Ovieado, Dept. de Fisica (Spain); Kuzmin, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics - Riga (Latvia); Pailharey, D. [CRMC-N - CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France); Tonneau, D. [CRMCN - Faculte des sciences de Luminy, 13 - Marseille (France); Chretien, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Cricenti, A. [ISM-CNR, Rome (Italy); DeWilde, Y. [ESPCI, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    The coupling of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) with synchrotron radiation is attracting increasing attention from nano-science community. By combining these 2 tools one can visualize, for example, the sample nano-structure prior to any X-ray characterization. Coupled with focusing devices or independently, SPM can provide spatial resolution below the optical limits. Furthermore, the possibility of employing SPM to manipulate nano-objects under X-ray beams is another exciting perspective. This document gathers the transparencies of 6 of the presentations made at the workshop: 1) the combination of atomic force microscopy and X-ray beam - experimental set-up and objectives; 2) the combination of scanning probe microscope and X-rays for detection of electrons; 3) towards soft X-ray scanning microscopy using tapered capillaries and laser-based high harmonic sources; 4) near-field magneto-optical microscopy; 5) near-field scanning optical microscopy - a brief overview -; and 6) from aperture-less near-field optical microscopy to infra-red near-field night vision. 4 posters entitled: 1) development of laboratory setup for X-ray/AFM experiments, 2) towards X-ray diffraction on single islands, 3) nano-XEOL using near-field detection, and 4) local collection with a STM tip of photoelectrons emitted by a surface irradiated by visible of UV laser beam, are included in the document.

  3. Sensing Performance Analysis on Quartz Tuning Fork-Probe at the High Order Vibration Mode for Multi-Frequency Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-frequency scanning near-field optical microscopy, based on a quartz tuning fork-probe (QTF-p sensor using the first two orders of in-plane bending symmetrical vibration modes, has recently been developed. This method can simultaneously achieve positional feedback (based on the 1st in-plane mode called the low mode and detect near-field optically induced forces (based on the 2nd in-plane mode called the high mode. Particularly, the high mode sensing performance of the QTF-p is an important issue for characterizing the tip-sample interactions and achieving higher resolution microscopic imaging but the related researches are insufficient. Here, we investigate the vibration performance of QTF-p at high mode based on the experiment and finite element method. The frequency spectrum characteristics are obtained by our homemade laser Doppler vibrometer system. The effects of the properties of the connecting glue layer and the probe features on the dynamic response of the QTF-p sensor at the high mode are investigated for optimization design. Finally, compared with the low mode, an obvious improvement of quality factor, of almost 50%, is obtained at the high mode. Meanwhile, the QTF-p sensor has a high force sensing sensitivity and a large sensing range at the high mode, indicating a broad application prospect for force sensing.

  4. Sensing Performance Analysis on Quartz Tuning Fork-Probe at the High Order Vibration Mode for Multi-Frequency Scanning Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Gao, Fengli; Li, Xide

    2018-01-24

    Multi-frequency scanning near-field optical microscopy, based on a quartz tuning fork-probe (QTF-p) sensor using the first two orders of in-plane bending symmetrical vibration modes, has recently been developed. This method can simultaneously achieve positional feedback (based on the 1st in-plane mode called the low mode) and detect near-field optically induced forces (based on the 2nd in-plane mode called the high mode). Particularly, the high mode sensing performance of the QTF-p is an important issue for characterizing the tip-sample interactions and achieving higher resolution microscopic imaging but the related researches are insufficient. Here, we investigate the vibration performance of QTF-p at high mode based on the experiment and finite element method. The frequency spectrum characteristics are obtained by our homemade laser Doppler vibrometer system. The effects of the properties of the connecting glue layer and the probe features on the dynamic response of the QTF-p sensor at the high mode are investigated for optimization design. Finally, compared with the low mode, an obvious improvement of quality factor, of almost 50%, is obtained at the high mode. Meanwhile, the QTF-p sensor has a high force sensing sensitivity and a large sensing range at the high mode, indicating a broad application prospect for force sensing.

  5. Differential-concentration scanning ion conductance microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, David; Page, Ashley; Chen, Baoping; Frenguelli, Bruno G.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2017-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a nanopipette-based scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the ionic current flowing between an electrode inserted inside a nanopipette probe containing electrolyte solution and a second electrode placed in a bulk electrolyte bath, to provide information on a substrate of interest. For most applications to date, the composition and concentration of the electrolyte inside and outside the nanopipette is identical, but it is shown herein t...

  6. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in STM I, these studies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described in chapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Together, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspects of STM. They provide essential reading and reference material for all students and researchers involved in this field. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  8. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in Vol. I, these sudies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described inchapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Togehter, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspcets of STM. They provide essentialreading and reference material for all students and researchers involvedin this field.

  9. Scanning quantum decoherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jared H; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2009-12-09

    The use of qubits as sensitive nanoscale magnetometers has been studied theoretically and recently demonstrated experimentally. In this paper we propose a new concept, in which a scanning two-state quantum system is used to probe a sample through the subtle effects of decoherence. Mapping both the Hamiltonian and decoherence properties of a qubit simultaneously provides a unique image of the magnetic (or electric) field properties at the nanoscale. The resulting images are sensitive to the temporal as well as spatial variation in the fields created by the sample. As examples we theoretically study two applications; one from condensed matter physics, the other biophysics. The individual components required to realize the simplest version of this device (characterization and measurement of qubits, nanoscale positioning) have already been demonstrated experimentally.

  10. Bias assisted scanning probe microscopy direct write lithography enables local oxygen enrichment of lanthanum cuprates thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavini, Francesco; Yang, Nan; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Strelcov, E.; Jesse, S.; Okatan, M. B.; Kravchenko, I.; Di Castro, Daniele; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Aruta, Carmela; Foglietti, Vittorio

    2015-08-01

    Scanning probe bias techniques have been used as a method to locally dope thin epitaxial films of La2CuO4 (LCO) fabricated by pulsed laser deposition. The local electrochemical oxidation of LCO very efficiently introduces interstitial oxygen defects in the thin film. Details on the influence of the tip voltage bias and environmental conditions on the surface morphology have been investigated. The results show that a local uptake of oxygen occurs in the oxidized films.

  11. Multifunctional scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ashley; Perry, David; Unwin, Patrick R

    2017-04-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a nanopipette-based technique that has traditionally been used to image topography or to deliver species to an interface, particularly in a biological setting. This article highlights the recent blossoming of SICM into a technique with a much greater diversity of applications and capability that can be used either standalone, with advanced control (potential-time) functions, or in tandem with other methods. SICM can be used to elucidate functional information about interfaces, such as surface charge density or electrochemical activity (ion fluxes). Using a multi-barrel probe format, SICM-related techniques can be employed to deposit nanoscale three-dimensional structures and further functionality is realized when SICM is combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), with simultaneous measurements from a single probe opening up considerable prospects for multifunctional imaging. SICM studies are greatly enhanced by finite-element method modelling for quantitative treatment of issues such as resolution, surface charge and (tip) geometry effects. SICM is particularly applicable to the study of living systems, notably single cells, although applications extend to materials characterization and to new methods of printing and nanofabrication. A more thorough understanding of the electrochemical principles and properties of SICM provides a foundation for significant applications of SICM in electrochemistry and interfacial science.

  12. Designing topological defects in 2D materials using scanning probe microscopy and a self-healing mechanism: a density functional-based molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Igor; Đurišić, Ivana; Belić, Milivoj R.

    2017-12-01

    Engineering of materials at the atomic level is one of the most important aims of nanotechnology. The unprecedented ability of scanning probe microscopy to address individual atoms opened up the possibilities for nanomanipulation and nanolitography of surfaces and later on of two-dimensional materials. While the state-of-the-art scanning probe lithographic methods include, primarily, adsorption, desorption and repositioning of adatoms and molecules on substrates or tailoring nanoribbons by etching of trenches, the precise modification of the intrinsic atomic structure of materials is yet to be advanced. Here we introduce a new concept, scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip, for engineering of the atomic structure of membranes based on two-dimensional materials. In order to indicate the viability of the concept, we present our theoretical research, which includes atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, Fourier analysis and electronic transport calculations. While stretching can be employed for fabrication of atomic chains only, our comprehensive molecular dynamics simulations indicate that nanomanipulation by scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip is capable of assembling a wide range of topological defects in two-dimensional materials in a rather controllable and reproducible manner. We analyze two possibilities. In the first case the probe tip is retracted from the membrane while in the second case the tip is released beneath the membrane allowing graphene to freely relax and self-heal the pore made by the tip. The former approach with the tip rotation can be achieved experimentally by rotation of the sample, which is equivalent to rotation of the tip, whereas irradiation of the membrane by nanoclusters can be utilized for the latter approach. The latter one has the potential to yield a yet richer diversity of topological defects on account of a lesser determinacy. If successfully realized experimentally the concept proposed here could

  13. Scanning probe microscopy applied to the study of domains and domain walls in a ferroelectric KNbO3 crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Pastor, J.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A commercial Atomic Force Microscope (AFM and a semi-home made Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope (SNOM have been used to characterize electrically, topographically and optically the domain walls among natural ferroelectric domains in a KNbO3 crystal. The AFM measurements have been performed with a metallic coated tip in order to detect electrostatic forces between the polarization field at the ferroelectric surface and the tip. An external electric field has also been applied between the sample surface and the tip to tune this electrostatic interaction over the atomic forces. In optical transmission images, acquired under near field conditions, we observe a clear contrast of the signal at the domain walls between 180º spontaneous polarization domains; while the images of the surface topography, obtained simultaneously, show a reasonably flat surface of the crystal. The scanning probe microscopy techniques used in this work are valuable tools for the investigation of ferroelectric materials and, in particular, to characterize the domain walls, without needing a either especial preparation or damage of the sample surface.Hemos utilizado un Microscopio de Fuerzas Atómicas (AFM comercial y un Microscopio Óptico de Campo Cercano (SNOM semi-casero para caracterizar eléctrica, óptica y topográficamente las paredes de dominio presentes entre los dominios ferroeléctricos naturales de un cristal de KNbO3. Las medidas de AFM las hemos realizado con una punta recubierta con metal, para detectar las fuerzas electrostáticas entre los campos de polarización de la superficie ferroeléctrica y la punta. Además, hemos aplicado campos eléctricos externos entre la superficie de la muestra y la punta, de manera que se pueda variar la fuerza electrostática en relación a las fuerzas atómicas. En imágenes de transmisión óptica, bajo condiciones de campo cercano, observamos un claro contraste de la señal en las fronteras entre los dominios ferroel

  14. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy in Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Albert; Nebel, Michaela; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews recent work involving the application of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to the study of individual cultured living cells, with an emphasis on topographical and functional imaging of neuronal and secretory cells of the nervous and endocrine system. The basic principles of biological SECM and associated negative amperometric-feedback and generator/collector-mode SECM imaging are discussed, and successful use of the methodology for screening soft and fragile membranous objects is outlined. The drawbacks of the constant-height mode of probe movement and the benefits of the constant-distance mode of SECM operation are described. Finally, representative examples of constant-height and constant-distance mode SECM on a variety of live cells are highlighted to demonstrate the current status of single-cell SECM in general and of SECM in neuroscience in particular.

  15. Scanning near-field microscopy of microdisk resonator with InP/GalnP quantum dots using cantilever-based probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelaev, A. V.; Mintairov, A. M.; Dorozhkin, P. S.; Bykov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    We present cantilever-probe based scanning near-field microscopy (SNOM) studies of GaInP microdisks resonators (radii R=2 um and quality factors Q∼1000) with embedded InP quantum dots (QDs) emitting at ∼750 nm. Near-field photoluminescence spectroscopy in collection regime, using side excitation from micro-objective, was used for imaging of whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) with a spatial resolution below the light diffraction limit. Using collection-illumination regime we imaged the position of single InP/GaInP QDs in microdisk.

  16. INFLUENCE OF FILM STRUCTURE AND LIGHT ON CHARGE TRAPPING AND DISSIPATION DYNAMICS IN SPUN-CAST ORGANIC THIN-FILM TRANSISTORS MEASURED BY SCANNING KELVIN PROBE MICROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teague, L.; Moth, M.; Anthony, J.

    2012-05-03

    Herein, time-dependent scanning Kelvin probe microscopy of solution processed organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) reveals a correlation between film microstructure and OTFT device performance with the location of trapped charge within the device channel. The accumulation of the observed trapped charge is concurrent with the decrease in I{sub SD} during operation (V{sub G}=-40 V, V{sub SD}= -10 V). We discuss the charge trapping and dissipation dynamics as they relate to the film structure and show that application of light quickly dissipates the observed trapped charge.

  17. Confocal scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    This report is based on a metrological investigation on confocal microscopy technique carried out by Uffe Rolf Arlø Theilade and Paolo Bariani. The purpose of the experimental activity was twofold a metrological instrument characterization and application to assessment of rough PP injection moulded...... replicated topography. Confocal microscopy is seen to be a promising technique in metrology of microstructures. Some limitations with respect to surface metrology were found during the experiments. The experiments were carried out using a Zeiss LSM 5 Pascal microscope owned by the Danish Polymer Centre...

  18. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy of polymer nanoparticles: probing morphology on sub-10 nm length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kerry B.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Vaughan, Ben; Zhou, Xiaojing; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C.

    2011-07-01

    Water-processable nanoparticle dispersions of semiconducting polymers offer an attractive approach to the fabrication of organic electronic devices since they offer: (1) control of nanoscale morphology and (2) environmentally friendly fabrication. Although the nature of phase segregation in these polymer nanoparticles is critical to device performance, to date there have been no techniques available to directly determine their intra-particle structure, which consequently has been poorly understood. Here, we present scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) compositional maps for nanoparticles fabricated from poly(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene-2,7-diyl-co-bis-N, N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N, N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylenedi-amine) (PFB) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) 1:1 blend mixtures. The images show distinct phase segregation within the nanoparticles. The compositional data reveals that, within these nanoparticles, PFB and F8BT segregate into a core-shell morphology, with an F8BT-rich core and a PFB-rich shell. Structural modelling demonstrates that the STXM technique is capable of quantifying morphological features on a sub-10 nm length scale; below the spot size of the incident focused x-ray beam. These results have important implications for the development of water-based 'solar paints' fabricated from microemulsions of semiconducting polymers.

  19. Oxidation of arsenopyrite and deposition of gold on the oxidized surfaces: A scanning probe microscopy, tunneling spectroscopy and XPS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhlin, Yuri L.; Romanchenko, Alexander S.; Asanov, Igor P.

    2006-10-01

    We have used ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study the surfaces of natural arsenopyrite samples that were electrochemically polarized in 1 M HCl, or leached in acidic solutions containing ferric iron salts, and then reacted with aqueous gold (III) chloride at ambient temperatures. For arsenopyrite oxidized on a positive-going potential sweep, progressively increasing amounts of surface Fe(III)-O and As-O species, and of S/Fe and S/As ratios in a non-stoichiometric sulfidic layer were found. The products formed in the sweep to a potential of 0.6 V (Ag/AgCl) of the passivity region are shaped in about 100 nm protrusions of two sorts, which are arranged in micrometer-size separate areas, while they are largely mixed at higher, "transpassive" potentials. The quantities of surface alteration substances notably decrease after leaching in ferric chloride and ferric sulfate acidic solutions. Passivation of arsenopyrite was suggested to associate with the disordered, metal-deficient surface layer having moderate excess of sulfur rather than with the products of arsenopyrite oxidation. Exposure of arsenopyrite to 10 -5-10 -3 M AuCl4- (pH 2) solutions results in the deposition of 8-50 nm gold particles; only a small fraction of the gold is present as Au(I)-S species. The electrochemical oxidation at 0.6 V or ageing of arsenopyrite in air promotes the subsequent gold deposition; in contrast, the amount of Au deposited on arsenopyrite that was treated by leaching in ferric chloride and sulfate solutions was about 10 times smaller than with polished arsenopyrite samples. It has been concluded that reducing agents formed as intermediates of arsenopyrite decomposition facilitate the Au 0 cementation although other factors related to the surface state of the arsenopyrite play a role as well. A decrease in the tunneling current magnitudes with decreasing the Au 0 particle

  20. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  1. Nanobits - exchangable and customisable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Izzet

    Invention of atomic force microscopy (AFM) pioneered a novel aspect for the surface metrology concept. A range of scanning probe methods have been developed over the years based on different sorts of tip-surface interaction: electrical, optical, thermal, force. Reproducible and fast fabrication...

  2. A dark mode in scanning thermal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiandrisoa, Liana; Allard, Alexandre; Joumani, Youssef; Hay, Bruno; Gomés, Séverine

    2017-12-01

    The need for high lateral spatial resolution in thermal science using Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) has pushed researchers to look for more and more tiny probes. SThM probes have consequently become more and more sensitive to the size effects that occur within the probe, the sample, and their interaction. Reducing the tip furthermore induces very small heat flux exchanged between the probe and the sample. The measurement of this flux, which is exploited to characterize the sample thermal properties, requires then an accurate thermal management of the probe-sample system and to reduce any phenomenon parasitic to this system. Classical experimental methodologies must then be constantly questioned to hope for relevant and interpretable results. In this paper, we demonstrate and estimate the influence of the laser of the optical force detection system used in the common SThM setup that is based on atomic-force microscopy equipment on SThM measurements. We highlight the bias induced by the overheating due to the laser illumination on the measurements performed by thermoresistive probes (palladium probe from Kelvin Nanotechnology). To face this issue, we propose a new experimental procedure based on a metrological approach of the measurement: a SThM "dark mode." The comparison with the classical procedure using the laser shows that errors between 14% and 37% can be reached on the experimental data exploited to determine the heat flux transferred from the hot probe to the sample.

  3. Measuring the Thickness and Potential Profiles of the Space-Charge Layer at Organic/Organic Interfaces under Illumination and in the Dark by Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Geoffrey A; Wu, Yanfei; Haugstad, Greg; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-03-09

    Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy was used to measure band-bending at the model donor/acceptor heterojunction poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/fullerene (C60). Specifically, we measured the variation in the surface potential of C60 films with increasing thicknesses grown on P3HT to produce a surface potential profile normal to the substrate both in the dark and under illumination. The results confirm a space-charge carrier region with a thickness of 10 nm, consistent with previous observations. We discuss the possibility that the domain size in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, which is comparable to the space-charge layer thickness, is actually partly responsible for less than expected electron/hole recombination rates.

  4. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard...... silicon processing. Using a microgripper they were detached from an array and fixed to a standard pyramidal AFM probe or alternatively inserted into a tipless cantilever equipped with a narrow slit. The nanobit-enhanced probes were used for imaging of deep trenches, without visible deformation, wear...... or dislocation of the tips of the nanobit after several scans. This approach allows an unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of scanning probe tips to the surface topology or to the specific application....

  5. Scanning electron microscopy of cold gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Bodhaditya; Ott, Herwig

    2015-06-01

    Ultracold quantum gases offer unique possibilities to study interacting many-body quantum systems. Probing and manipulating such systems with ever increasing degree of control requires novel experimental techniques. Scanning electron microscopy is a high resolution technique which can be used for in situ imaging, single site addressing in optical lattices and precision density engineering. Here, we review recent advances and achievements obtained with this technique and discuss future perspectives.

  6. High Resolution Scanning Ion Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the thesis is the following. The first chapter is an introduction to scanning microscopy, where the path that led to the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is described and the main differences between electrons and ion beams are highlighted. Chapter 2 is what is normally referred to (which I

  7. Analysing magnetism using scanning SQUID microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, P; Renshaw Wang, X; Hilgenkamp, H

    2017-12-01

    Scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscopy (SSM) is a scanning probe technique that images local magnetic flux, which allows for mapping of magnetic fields with high field and spatial accuracy. Many studies involving SSM have been published in the last few decades, using SSM to make qualitative statements about magnetism. However, quantitative analysis using SSM has received less attention. In this work, we discuss several aspects of interpreting SSM images and methods to improve quantitative analysis. First, we analyse the spatial resolution and how it depends on several factors. Second, we discuss the analysis of SSM scans and the information obtained from the SSM data. Using simulations, we show how signals evolve as a function of changing scan height, SQUID loop size, magnetization strength, and orientation. We also investigated 2-dimensional autocorrelation analysis to extract information about the size, shape, and symmetry of magnetic features. Finally, we provide an outlook on possible future applications and improvements.

  8. Limitations on the use of scanning probe microscopy for the measurement of field emission from copper surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Y.

    2004-02-25

    conductive AFM is a topography-imaging instrument capable of extremely high magnification, making it possible to image the actual point of field emission. The technique appeared to be a powerful tool for in-situ measurement of the F-N current combined with imaging of the emitter itself. Following initially promising results, we began a systematic program of characterizing FE from natively-oxidized and oxide-coated polished copper surfaces. The results obtained were, however, not consistently repeatable and we believed that the difficulty was due to a lack of a mechanically-robust and electrically-conductive coating for the AFM tip surface. Similar problems have been recently reported by O'Shea et a1 for similar measurements. The metal-coated tips have been found to wear rapidly during image scanning and measuring current such that the conductive layer on the very end of the tip becomes insulating after minimal use. This difficulty is magnified by working in ambient because the sample and/or tip becomes quickly contaminated, producing chemical changes to the surface barrier heights in the high electric field region. Even in vacuum, wear of tip is found to affect tip-sample adhesion. In general, metal-coated tips are not reliable for obtaining repeatable FE data, although the problem is not completely resolved. We present our data for conductive-AFM using Pt/Ir-coated Si tips generating FE from natively-oxidized Cu, and films of Au on mica, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Pt, Mg on Cu, Hf and W on Cu and, also, Hf ion-implanted into Cu, all in dry nitrogen atmosphere. Hardened surfaces, such as Hf-implanted, and oxide coatings on metals have historically exhibited higher breakdown thresholds and were chosen as sample surfaces for our investigation. F-N behavior was observed in all cases; however, the difficulties pointed out by O'Shea et a1 were readily observable.

  9. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy of Live Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, V.; Mason, A.; Saliev, T.; Smith, F. J. D.; McLean, W. H. I.; Campbell, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is perhaps the least well known technique from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) family of instruments. As with its more familiar counterpart, atomic force microscopy (AFM), the technique provides high-resolution topographic imaging, with the caveat that target structures must be immersed in a conducting solution so that a controllable ion current may be utilised as the basis for feedback. In operation, this non-contact characteristic of SICM makes it ideal for the study of delicate structures, such as live cells. Moreover, the intrinsic architecture of the instrument, incorporating as it does, a scanned micropipette, lends itself to combination approaches with complementary techniques such as patch-clamp electrophysiology: SICM therefore boasts the capability for both structural and functional imaging. For the present observations, an ICnano S system (Ionscope Ltd., Melbourn, UK) operating in 'hopping mode' was used, with the objective of assessing the instrument's utility for imaging live keratinocytes under physiological buffers. In scans employing cultured HaCaT cells (spontaneously immortalised, human keratinocytes), we compared the qualitative differences of live cells imaged with SICM and AFM, and also with their respective counterparts after chemical fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde. Characteristic surface microvilli were particularly prominent in live cell imaging by SICM. Moreover, time lapse SICM imaging on live cells revealed that changes in the pattern of microvilli could be tracked over time. By comparison, AFM imaging on live cells, even at very low contact forces (monitoring the most delicate living structures with attendant high spatial resolutions.

  10. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  11. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Manson-Smith, S K

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provi...

  12. The black silicon method IV: the fabrication of three-dimensional structures in silicon with high aspect ratios for scanning probe microscopy and other applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Henricus V.; de Boer, Meint J.; Boer, M.A.; Otter, A.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    1995-01-01

    The recently developed black silicon method (BSM) is presented as a powerful tool in finding recipes for the fabrication of MEMS building blocks such as Ay-stages. scanning probe tips, inkjet filters, multi-electrodes for neuro-electronic interfaces, and mouldings Lor direct patterning into

  13. Hollow-tip scanning photoelectron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkun, A. P.; Mironov, B. N.; Aseyev, S. A.; Chekalin, S. V.

    2014-07-01

    A new type of microscopy based on scanning in vacuum by a beam of charged particles transmitted through a hollow probe has been implemented. This approach provides controllable motion of spatially localized ion, electron, molecular (atomic), and soft X-ray beams and investigation of the surface in the shear force mode. In the photoelectron mode, in which electrons are transmitted through a 2-μm quartz capillary, a surface profile of gadolinium irradiated by 400-nm femtosecond laser pulses has been visualized with a subwave spatial resolution. The new method of microscopy opens an opportunity of investigations in the field of nanometer local photodesorption of molecular ions (one of the last ideas of V.S. Letokhov).

  14. Differential-Concentration Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David; Page, Ashley; Chen, Baoping; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Unwin, Patrick R

    2017-11-21

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a nanopipette-based scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the ionic current flowing between an electrode inserted inside a nanopipette probe containing electrolyte solution and a second electrode placed in a bulk electrolyte bath, to provide information on a substrate of interest. For most applications to date, the composition and concentration of the electrolyte inside and outside the nanopipette is identical, but it is shown herein that it can be very beneficial to lift this restriction. In particular, an ionic concentration gradient at the end of the nanopipette, generates an ionic current with a greatly reduced electric field strength, with particular benefits for live cell imaging. This differential concentration mode of SICM (ΔC-SICM) also enhances surface charge measurements and provides a new way to carry out reaction mapping measurements at surfaces using the tip for simultaneous delivery and sensing of the reaction rate. Comprehensive finite element method (FEM) modeling has been undertaken to enhance understanding of SICM as an electrochemical cell and to enable the interpretation and optimization of experiments. It is shown that electroosmotic flow (EOF) has much more influence on the nanopipette response in the ΔC-SICM configuration compared to standard SICM modes. The general model presented advances previous treatments, and it provides a framework for quantitative SICM studies.

  15. Probing the structure and nano-scale mechanical properties of polymer surfaces with scanning force microscopy and sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracias, David Hugo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) has been used to quantitatively measure the elastic modulus, friction and hardness of polymer surfaces with special emphasis on polyethylene and polypropylene. In the experiments, tips of different radii of curvature ranging from 20 nm to 1000 nm have been used and the high pressure applied by the SFM have been observed to affect the values obtained in the measurements. The contact of the SFM tip with the polymer surface is explained by fitting the experimental curves to theoretical predictions of contact mechanics. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) Vibrational Spectroscopy has been used to measure vibrational spectra of polymer surfaces in the vibrational range of 2700 to 3100 cm-1. Strong correlations are established between surface chemistry and surface structure as probed by SFG and mechanical properties measured by SFM on the surfaces. In these studies segregation of low surface energy moieties, from the bulk of the polymer to the surface have been studied. It was found that surface segregation occurs in miscible polymer blends and a small concentration of surface active polymer can be used to totally modify the surface properties of the blend. A novel high vacuum SFM was built to do temperature dependent measurements of mechanical changes occurring at the surface of polypropylene during the glass transition of the polymer. Using this instrument the modulus and friction of polypropylene was measured in the range of room temperature to ˜-60°C. An increase in the ordering of the backbone of the polymer chains below the glass transition measured by SFG correlates well with the increase in modulus measured on the same surface with SFM. Friction measurements have been done on polyethylene with three different instruments by applying loads ranging from nN to sub newton i.e. over eight orders of magnitude. Pressure and contact area effects were observed to play a significant role in determining the frictional response of the polymer

  16. Angular Approach Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Andrew; Tokar, Sergiy; Gopal, Sahana; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Tarasov, Andrei I; Vélez-Ortega, A Catalina; Chiappini, Ciro; Rorsman, Patrik; Stevens, Molly M; Gorelik, Julia; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2016-05-24

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a super-resolution live imaging technique that uses a glass nanopipette as an imaging probe to produce three-dimensional (3D) images of cell surface. SICM can be used to analyze cell morphology at nanoscale, follow membrane dynamics, precisely position an imaging nanopipette close to a structure of interest, and use it to obtain ion channel recordings or locally apply stimuli or drugs. Practical implementations of these SICM advantages, however, are often complicated due to the limitations of currently available SICM systems that inherited their design from other scanning probe microscopes in which the scan assembly is placed right above the specimen. Such arrangement makes the setting of optimal illumination necessary for phase contrast or the use of high magnification upright optics difficult. Here, we describe the designs that allow mounting SICM scan head on a standard patch-clamp micromanipulator and imaging the sample at an adjustable approach angle. This angle could be as shallow as the approach angle of a patch-clamp pipette between a water immersion objective and the specimen. Using this angular approach SICM, we obtained topographical images of cells grown on nontransparent nanoneedle arrays, of islets of Langerhans, and of hippocampal neurons under upright optical microscope. We also imaged previously inaccessible areas of cells such as the side surfaces of the hair cell stereocilia and the intercalated disks of isolated cardiac myocytes, and performed targeted patch-clamp recordings from the latter. Thus, our new, to our knowledge, angular approach SICM allows imaging of living cells on nontransparent substrates and a seamless integration with most patch-clamp setups on either inverted or upright microscopes, which would facilitate research in cell biophysics and physiology. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bode, M

    2003-01-01

    The recent experimental progress in spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy (SP-STM) - a magnetically sensitive imaging technique with ultra-high resolution - is reviewed. The basics of spin-polarized electron tunnelling are introduced as they have been investigated in planar tunnel junctions for different electrode materials, i.e. superconductors, optically excited GaAs, and ferromagnets. It is shown that ferromagnets and antiferromagnets are suitable tip materials for the realization of SP-STM. Possible tip designs and modes of operations are discussed for both classes of materials. The results of recent spatially resolved measurements as performed with different magnetic probe tips and using different modes of operation are reviewed and discussed in terms of applicability to surfaces, thin films, and nanoparticles. The limits of spatial resolution, and the impact of an external magnetic field on the imaging process.

  18. Non-invasive current and voltage imaging techniques for integrated circuits using scanning probe microscopy. Final report, LDRD Project FY93 and FY94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, A.N.; Cole, E.I. Jr.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the first practical, non-invasive technique for detecting and imaging currents internal to operating integrated circuits (ICs). This technique is based on magnetic force microscopy and was developed under Sandia National Laboratories` LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) program during FY 93 and FY 94. LDRD funds were also used to explore a related technique, charge force microscopy, for voltage probing of ICs. This report describes the technical work performed under this LDRD as well as the outcomes of the project in terms of publications and awards, intellectual property and licensing, synergistic work, potential future work, hiring of additional permanent staff, and benefits to DOE`s defense programs (DP).

  19. Polarization contrast in photon scanning tunnelling microscopy combined with atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Propstra, K.; Propstra, K.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Photon scanning tunnelling microscopy combined with atomic force microscopy allows simultaneous acquisition and direct comparison of optical and topographical images, both with a lateral resolution of about 30 nm, far beyond the optical diffraction limit. The probe consists of a modified

  20. In-Plane Anisotropy in Mono- and Few-Layer ReS2 Probed by Raman Spectroscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenet, Daniel A; Aslan, O Burak; Huang, Pinshane Y; Fan, Chris; van der Zande, Arend M; Heinz, Tony F; Hone, James C

    2015-09-09

    Rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is a semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide that exhibits a stable distorted 1T phase. The reduced symmetry of this system leads to in-plane anisotropy in various material properties. Here, we demonstrate the strong anisotropy in the Raman scattering response for linearly polarized excitation. Polarized Raman scattering is shown to permit a determination of the crystallographic orientation of ReS2 through comparison with direct structural analysis by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Analysis of the frequency difference of appropriate Raman modes is also shown to provide a means of precisely determining layer thickness up to four layers.

  1. MEMS-based handheld scanning probe with pre-shaped input signals for distortion-free images in Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, Andrea; Canavesi, Cristina; Hayes, Adam; Tankam, Patrice; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Santhanam, Anand; Thompson, Kevin P; Rolland, Jannick P

    2016-06-13

    High-speed scanning in optical coherence tomography (OCT) often comes with either compromises in image quality, the requirement for post-processing of the acquired images, or both. We report on distortion-free OCT volumetric imaging with a dual-axis micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based handheld imaging probe. In the context of an imaging probe with optics located between the 2D MEMS and the sample, we report in this paper on how pre-shaped open-loop input signals with tailored non-linear parts were implemented in a custom control board and, unlike the sinusoidal signals typically used for MEMS, achieved real-time distortion-free imaging without post-processing. The MEMS mirror was integrated into a compact, lightweight handheld probe. The MEMS scanner achieved a 12-fold reduction in volume and 17-fold reduction in weight over a previous dual-mirror galvanometer-based scanner. Distortion-free imaging with no post-processing with a Gabor-domain optical coherence microscope (GD-OCM) with 2 μm axial and lateral resolutions over a field of view of 1 × 1 mm2 is demonstrated experimentally through volumetric images of a regular microscopic structure, an excised human cornea, and in vivo human skin.

  2. Ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM) can probe single atoms on a silicon surface with simultaneous sub-nanometer and sub-picosecond spatio-temporal resolution. THz-STM is established as a new technique for exploring high-field non-equilibrium tunneling...

  3. Introduction to scanning tunneling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C Julian

    2008-01-01

    The scanning tunneling and the atomic force microscope, both capable of imaging individual atoms, were crowned with the Physics Nobel Prize in 1986, and are the cornerstones of nanotechnology today. This is a thoroughly updated version of this 'bible' in the field.

  4. Scanning Electron Microscopy in modern dentistry research

    OpenAIRE

    Paradella, Thaís Cachuté; Unesp-FOSJC; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Unesp-FOSJC

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the usage of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in dentistry research nowadays, through a careful and updated literature review. By using the key-words Scanning Electron Microscopy and one of the following areas of research in dentistry (Endodontics, Periodontics and Implant), in international database (PubMed), in the year of 2012 (from January to September), a total of 112 articles were found. This data was tabled and the articles were classified ac...

  5. Towards high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabak, Femke Chantal

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, two routes towards high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are described. The first possibility for high-speed scanning that is discussed is the use of MEMS (Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems) devices as high-speed add-ons in STM microscopes. The functionality of these devices

  6. Spiral scanning method for atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shao-Kang

    2010-07-01

    A spiral scanning method is proposed for atomic force microscopy with thoroughgoing analysis and implementation. Comparing with the traditional line-by-line scanning method, the spiral scanning method demonstrates higher imaging speed, minor image distortion, and lower acceleration, which can damage the piezoelectric scanner. Employing the spiral scanning method to replace the line-by-line scanning method, the experiment shows that the time to complete an imaging cycle can be reduced from 800 s to 314 s without sacrificing the image resolution.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This chapter described methods for Scanning Electron Microscopical imaging of bone and bone cells. Backscattered electron (BSE) imaging is by far the most useful in the bone field, followed by secondary electrons (SE) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analytical modes. This chapter considers preparing and imaging samples of unembedded bone having 3D detail in a 3D surface, topography-free, polished or micromilled, resin-embedded block surfaces, and resin casts of space in bone matrix. The chapter considers methods for fixation, drying, looking at undersides of bone cells, and coating. Maceration with alkaline bacterial pronase, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium or potassium hydroxide to remove cells and unmineralised matrix is described in detail. Attention is given especially to methods for 3D BSE SEM imaging of bone samples and recommendations for the types of resin embedding of bone for BSE imaging are given. Correlated confocal and SEM imaging of PMMA-embedded bone requires the use of glycerol to coverslip. Cathodoluminescence (CL) mode SEM imaging is an alternative for visualising fluorescent mineralising front labels such as calcein and tetracyclines. Making spatial casts from PMMA or other resin embedded samples is an important use of this material. Correlation with other imaging means, including microradiography and microtomography is important. Shipping wet bone samples between labs is best done in glycerol. Environmental SEM (ESEM, controlled vacuum mode) is valuable in eliminating -"charging" problems which are common with complex, cancellous bone samples.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy study of Trichomonas gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Tiana; De Carli, Geraldo A

    2003-12-01

    A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of Trichomonas gallinae (Rivolta, 1878), provided more information about the morphology of this flagellated protozoan. SEM showed the morphological features of the trophozoites; the emergence of the anterior flagella, the structure of the undulating membrane, the position and shape of the pelta, axostyle and posterior flagellum. Of special interest were the pseudocyst forms.

  9. Laser scanning laser diode photoacoustic microscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Kumavor, Patrick D; Zhu, Quing

    2018-03-01

    The development of low-cost and fast photoacoustic microscopy systems enhances the clinical applicability of photoacoustic imaging systems. To this end, we present a laser scanning laser diode-based photoacoustic microscopy system. In this system, a 905 nm, 325 W maximum output peak power pulsed laser diode with 50 ns pulsewidth is utilized as the light source. A combination of aspheric and cylindrical lenses is used for collimation of the laser diode beam. Two galvanometer scanning mirrors steer the beam across a focusing aspheric lens. The lateral resolution of the system was measured to be ∼21 μm using edge spread function estimation. No averaging was performed during data acquisition. The imaging speed is ∼370 A-lines per second. Photoacoustic microscopy images of human hairs, ex vivo mouse ear, and ex vivo porcine ovary are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and potentials of the proposed system.

  10. Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McVitie, S., E-mail: stephen.mcvitie@glasgow.ac.uk; McGrouther, D.; McFadzean, S.; MacLaren, D.A.; O’Shea, K.J.; Benitez, M.J.

    2015-05-15

    We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale. - Highlights: • Demonstration of nanometre scale resolution in magnetic field free environment using aberration correction in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). • Implementation of differential phase contrast mode of Lorentz microscopy in aberration corrected STEM with improved sensitivity. • Quantitative imaging of magnetic induction of nanostructures in amorphous and cross-section samples.

  11. Transfer functions in collection scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnaya, Elena A.

    1999-01-01

    are considered with respect to the relation between near-field optical images and the corresponding intensity distributions. Our conclusions are supported with numerical simulations and experimental results obtained by using a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an uncoated fiber tip.......It is generally accepted that, if in collection near-field optical microscopy the probe-sample coupling can be disregarded, a fiber probe can be considered as a detector of the near-field intensity whose size can be accounted for via an intensity transfer function. We show that, in general...

  12. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  13. Imaging by in situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy and its Nanotechnological Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2002-01-01

    in the interpretation of the imaging procedure. Other methods of in situ Scanning Probe Microscopy (in situ SPM), such as in situ Scanning Force Microscopy (in situ AFM) are considered for the sake of comparison and they are applied to imaging of non-conducting systems. Major results include demonstration of atomic...

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of molluscum contagiosum*

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida Jr,Hiram Larangeira de; Abuchaim,Martha Oliveira; Schneide, Maiko Abel; Marques, Leandra; Castro, Luis Antônio Suíta de

    2013-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a disease caused by a poxvirus. It is more prevalent in children up to 5 years of age. There is a second peak of incidence in young adults. In order to examine its ultrastructure, three lesions were curetted without disruption, cut transversely with a scalpel, and routinely processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The oval structure of molluscum contagiosum could be easily identified. In its core, there was a central umbilication and just below this depressio...

  16. SCANNING KELVIN PROBE APPLIED TO LOCALISED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-15

    Jan 15, 2015 ... SCANNING KELVIN PROBE APPLIED TO LOCALISED CORROSION. A. Hussain and Sk M. Haque. Department of Chemical Engineering and Process Technology, Jubail Industrial College,. P. O. Box. 10099, Al-Jubail, KSA. Received: 19 October 2014 / Accepted: 12 January 2015 / Published online: 15 ...

  17. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Boppart

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT, utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR. In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR.

  18. Pump-probe optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qiujie; Applegate, Brian E.

    2010-02-01

    High-resolution optical molecular imaging has become a vital tool for understanding and measuring physiologically important biometrics on the cellular and subcellular level. In spite of significant recent advances in microscopy, molecular imaging of most endogenous biomolecular species remains elusive. Directly imaging endogenous biomolecules without the aid of exogenous tags is highly desirable. We developed pump-probe optical coherence microscopy (PPOCM) based on our previous success in integrating pump-probe absorption spectroscopy with optical coherence tomography. A fixed human skin tissue with melanoma was imaged by the PPOCM system. The preliminary results show that PPOCM can provide better can clear contrast between normal tissue and melanoma than OCM. This system also can be used to image other chromophores.

  19. Improved controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Wu, Yuehua; Jacobsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    ) is monitored by an oxygen sensor. We present here some examples of its capabilities demonstrated by high temperature topography with simultaneously ac electrical conductance measurements during atmosphere changes, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at various temperatures, and measurements of the surface......To locally access electrochemical active surfaces and interfaces in operando at the sub-micron scale at high temperatures in a reactive gas atmosphere is of great importance to understand the basic mechanisms in new functional materials, for instance, for energy technologies, such as solid oxide...... fuel cells and electrolyzer cells. Here, we report on advanced improvements of our original controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope, CAHT-SPM. The new microscope can employ a broad range of the scanning probe techniques including tapping mode, scanning tunneling microscopy...

  20. Nanofabrication of magnetic scanned-probe microscope sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Chong, B K

    2001-01-01

    experiments were carried out under ambient conditions. The experiments required no extra preparation to be done to the specimen before imaging and measurements were carried out under ambient conditions. These probes offer the prospect of direct magnetic field measurement, non- invasiveness, very close proximity, possible local manipulation, better control over the tip- specimen interaction distance and topographic imaging. It is hoped that these magnetic microscope probes will be of great interest and general utility for academic and industrial magneticians. This thesis presents the development of novel magnetic sensor combined with Atomic Force Microscope probe (AFM) using conventional semiconductor processing techniques and Electron Beam Lithography (EBL). The fabrication of these magnetic sensors was performed on a common micromachined silicon substrate using a generic batch fabrication technique. Sub-micron Hall bar for Scanning Hall probe Microscopy (SHPM) and electromagnetic force coil magnet for Scanni...

  1. Chemical Phenomena of Atomic Force Microscopy Scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ievlev, Anton V; Brown, Chance; Burch, Matthew J; Agar, Joshua C; Velarde, Gabriel A; Martin, Lane W; Maksymovych, Petro; Kalinin, Sergei V; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2018-02-12

    Atomic force microscopy is widely used for nanoscale characterization of materials by scientists worldwide. The long-held belief of ambient AFM is that the tip is generally chemically inert but can be functionalized with respect to the studied sample. This implies that basic imaging and scanning procedures do not affect surface and bulk chemistry of the studied sample. However, an in-depth study of the confined chemical processes taking place at the tip-surface junction and the associated chemical changes to the material surface have been missing as of now. Here, we used a hybrid system that combines time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with an atomic force microscopy to investigate the chemical interactions that take place at the tip-surface junction. Investigations showed that even basic contact mode AFM scanning is able to modify the surface of the studied sample. In particular, we found that the silicone oils deposited from the AFM tip into the scanned regions and spread to distances exceeding 15 μm from the tip. These oils were determined to come from standard gel boxes used for the storage of the tips. The explored phenomena are important for interpreting and understanding results of AFM mechanical and electrical studies relying on the state of the tip-surface junction.

  2. Simplifying Electron Beam Channeling in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ryan J; Mittal, Anudha; Odlyzko, Michael L; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2017-08-01

    Sub-angstrom scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows quantitative column-by-column analysis of crystalline specimens via annular dark-field images. The intensity of electrons scattered from a particular location in an atomic column depends on the intensity of the electron probe at that location. Electron beam channeling causes oscillations in the STEM probe intensity during specimen propagation, which leads to differences in the beam intensity incident at different depths. Understanding the parameters that control this complex behavior is critical for interpreting experimental STEM results. In this work, theoretical analysis of the STEM probe intensity reveals that intensity oscillations during specimen propagation are regulated by changes in the beam's angular distribution. Three distinct regimes of channeling behavior are observed: the high-atomic-number (Z) regime, in which atomic scattering leads to significant angular redistribution of the beam; the low-Z regime, in which the probe's initial angular distribution controls intensity oscillations; and the intermediate-Z regime, in which the behavior is mixed. These contrasting regimes are shown to exist for a wide range of probe parameters. These results provide a new understanding of the occurrence and consequences of channeling phenomena and conditions under which their influence is strengthened or weakened by characteristics of the electron probe and sample.

  3. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  4. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin C.; Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications.

  5. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications. PMID:27036751

  6. Phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoda, Hiroki; Tamai, Takayuki; Iijima, Hirofumi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kondo, Yukihito

    2015-06-01

    This report introduces the first results obtained using phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (P-STEM). A carbon-film phase plate (PP) with a small center hole is placed in the condenser aperture plane so that a phase shift is introduced in the incident electron waves except those passing through the center hole. A cosine-type phase-contrast transfer function emerges when the phase-shifted scattered waves interfere with the non-phase-shifted unscattered waves, which passed through the center hole before incidence onto the specimen. The phase contrast resulting in P-STEM is optically identical to that in phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy that is used to provide high contrast for weak phase objects. Therefore, the use of PPs can enhance the phase contrast of the STEM images of specimens in principle. The phase shift resulting from the PP, whose thickness corresponds to a phase shift of π, has been confirmed using interference fringes displayed in the Ronchigram of a silicon single crystal specimen. The interference fringes were found to abruptly shift at the edge of the PP hole by π. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A GRISM-based probe for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitris, C; Bouma, B; Shiskov, M; Tearney, G

    2003-01-27

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a novel approach for obtaining high resolution, depth-sectioned images of microstructure within turbid samples. By encoding one spatial dimension in wavelength, imaging probes can be greatly simplified compared to standard scanning confocal microscopes, potentially enabling endoscopic implementation. The use of a diffraction grating for spectral encoding, however, skews the optical axis through the probe, thus complicating the design of narrow diameter instruments. In this Letter, we describe a novel use of a single-optical-axis element based on high index-of-refraction prisms and a transmission holographic grating for the design of narrow diameter SECM devices. Confocal images obtained with a 10.0 mm probe demonstrate a transverse resolution of 1.1 microm and a field of view of 650 microm.

  8. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Collins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid–gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe–sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present. Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM, a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids, KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions. EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  9. Investigations in optoelectronic image processing in scanning laser microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaliha, Hiranya Kumar

    A considerable amount of work has been done on scann-ing laser microscopy since its applications were first pointed out by Roberts and Young[1], Minsky [2] and Davidovits et al [3]. The advent of laser has made it possible to focus an intense beam of laser light in a scanning optical microscope (SOM) [4, 5] and hence explore regions of microscopy[6] uncovered by conven-tional microscopy. In the simple SOM [7, 8, 9], the upper spatial frequency in amplitude transmittance or reflectance of an object for which transfer function is nonzero is same as that in a conventional optical microscope. However, in Type II SOM [7] or confocal SOM that employs a coherent or a point detector, the spatial frequency bandwidth is twice that obtained in a conventional microscope. Besides this confocal set-up is found to be very useful in optical sectioning and consequently in 3-D image processing[10, 11, 12] specially of biological specimens. Such systems are also suitable for studies of semiconductor materials [13], super-resolution [14] and various imaginative ways of image processing[15, 16, 17] including phase imaging[18]. A brief survey of related advances in scanning optical microscopy has been covered in the chapter 1 of the thesis. The performance of SOM may be investigated by concent-rating also on signal derived by one dimensional scan of the object specimen. This simplified mode may also be adapted to give wealth of information for biological and semiconductor specimens. Hence we have investigated the design of a scanning laser system suited specifically for studies of line scan image signals of microscopic specimens when probed through a focused laser spot. An electro-mechanical method of scanning of the object specimen has been designed with this aim in mind. Chapter 2, Part A of the thesis deals with the design consider-ations of such a system. For analysis of scan signals at a later instant of time so as to facilitate further processing, an arrangement of microprocessor

  10. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  11. Aligned ion implementation using scanning probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persaud, A.

    2006-12-12

    A new technique for precision ion implantation has been developed. A scanning probe has been equipped with a small aperture and incorporated into an ion beamline, so that ions can be implanted through the aperture into a sample. By using a scanning probe the target can be imaged in a non-destructive way prior to implantation and the probe together with the aperture can be placed at the desired location with nanometer precision. In this work first results of a scanning probe integrated into an ion beamline are presented. A placement resolution of about 120 nm is reported. The final placement accuracy is determined by the size of the aperture hole and by the straggle of the implanted ion inside the target material. The limits of this technology are expected to be set by the latter, which is of the order of 10 nm for low energy ions. This research has been carried out in the context of a larger program concerned with the development of quantum computer test structures. For that the placement accuracy needs to be increased and a detector for single ion detection has to be integrated into the setup. Both issues are discussed in this thesis. To achieve single ion detection highly charged ions are used for the implantation, as in addition to their kinetic energy they also deposit their potential energy in the target material, therefore making detection easier. A special ion source for producing these highly charged ions was used and their creation and interactions with solids of are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  12. Voice coil based scanning probe microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klapetek, P.; Valtr, M.; Duchoň, V.; Sobota, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2012), 332:1-7 ISSN 1931-7573 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/241; GA AV ČR KAN311610701; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : SPM * Voice coil * Interferometry Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.524, year: 2012

  13. Control theory for scanning probe microscopy revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Stirling

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We derive a theoretical model for studying SPM feedback in the context of control theory. Previous models presented in the literature that apply standard models for proportional-integral-derivative controllers predict a highly unstable feedback environment. This model uses features specific to the SPM implementation of the proportional-integral controller to give realistic feedback behaviour. As such the stability of SPM feedback for a wide range of feedback gains can be understood. Further consideration of mechanical responses of the SPM system gives insight into the causes of exciting mechanical resonances of the scanner during feedback operation.

  14. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-04

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of molluscum contagiosum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Abuchaim, Martha Oliveira; Schneider, Maiko Abel; Marques, Leandra; de Castro, Luis Antônio Suíta

    2013-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a disease caused by a poxvirus. It is more prevalent in children up to 5 years of age. There is a second peak of incidence in young adults. In order to examine its ultrastructure, three lesions were curetted without disruption, cut transversely with a scalpel, and routinely processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The oval structure of molluscum contagiosum could be easily identified. In its core, there was a central umbilication and just below this depression, there was a keratinized tunnel. Under higher magnification, a proliferation similar to the epidermis was seen. Moreover, there were areas of cells disposed like a mosaic. Under higher magnification, rounded structures measuring 0.4 micron could be observed at the end of the keratinized tunnel and on the surface of the lesion. PMID:23539009

  16. High-speed Lissajous-scan atomic force microscopy: Scan pattern planning and control design issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaei, A.; Yong, Yuen K.; Moheimani, S. O. Reza

    2012-06-01

    Tracking of triangular or sawtooth waveforms is a major difficulty for achieving high-speed operation in many scanning applications such as scanning probe microscopy. Such non-smooth waveforms contain high order harmonics of the scan frequency that can excite mechanical resonant modes of the positioning system, limiting the scan range and bandwidth. Hence, fast raster scanning often leads to image distortion. This paper proposes analysis and design methodologies for a nonlinear and smooth closed curve, known as Lissajous pattern, which allows much faster operations compared to the ordinary scan patterns. A simple closed-form measure is formulated for the image resolution of the Lissajous pattern. This enables us to systematically determine the scan parameters. Using internal model controllers (IMC), this non-raster scan method is implemented on a commercial atomic force microscope driven by a low resonance frequency positioning stage. To reduce the tracking errors due to actuator nonlinearities, higher order harmonic oscillators are included in the IMC controllers. This results in significant improvement compared to the traditional IMC method. It is shown that the proposed IMC controller achieves much better tracking performances compared to integral controllers when the noise rejection performances is a concern.

  17. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of AdsorbateStructure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions: Novel Design of anUltra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling MicroscopeSystem for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David Chi-Wai [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-16

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope’s (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 °C).

  19. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy by Dissipative Electrostatic Force Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Topple, Jessica; Schumacher, Zeno; Grutter, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We report an experimental technique for Kelvin probe force microscopy using the dissipation signal of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy for bias-voltage feedback. It features a simple implementation and faster scanning as it requires no low-frequency modulation. The dissipation is caused by the oscillating electrostatic force that is coherent with the tip oscillation, which is induced by a sinusoidally oscillating voltage applied between the tip and sample. We analyze the effect of the phase of the oscillating force on the frequency shift and dissipation and found that the relative phase of 90° that causes only the dissipation is the most appropriate for Kelvin-probe-force-microscopy measurements. The present technique requires a significantly smaller ac-voltage amplitude by virtue of enhanced force detection due to the resonance enhancement and the use of fundamental flexural-mode oscillation for electrostatic force detection. This feature will be of great importance in the electrical characterizations of technically relevant materials whose electrical properties are influenced by the externally applied electric field as is the case in semiconductor electronic devices.

  20. High Resolution Helium Ion Scanning Microscopy of the Rat Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, William L.; Van Hoek, Alfred N.; Păunescu, Teodor G.; Huynh, Chuong; Goetze, Bernhard; Singh, Bipin; Scipioni, Larry; Stern, Lewis A.; Brown, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details and provide

  1. High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, William L; Van Hoek, Alfred N; Păunescu, Teodor G; Huynh, Chuong; Goetze, Bernhard; Singh, Bipin; Scipioni, Larry; Stern, Lewis A; Brown, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details and provide

  2. High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L Rice

    Full Text Available Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details

  3. Two-color two-photon fluorescence laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentmeier, S; Denicke, S; Gericke, K-H

    2009-11-01

    We present the first realization of a Two-Color Two-Photon Laser-Scanning Microscope (2c2pLSM) and UV fluorescence images of cells acquired with this technique. Fluorescence is induced by two-color two-photon absorption using the fundamental and the second harmonic of a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser. Simultaneous absorption of an 800 nm photon and a 400 nm photon energetically corresponds to one-photon absorption at 266 nm. This technique for Laser-Scanning Microscopy extends the excitation wavelength range of a Ti:Sa powered fluorescence microscope to the UV. In addition to the known advantages of multi-photon microscopy like intrinsic 3D resolution, reduced photo damage and high penetration depth 2c2pLSM offers the possibility of using standard high numeric aperture objectives for UV fluorescence imaging. The effective excitation wavelength of 266 nm corresponds especially well to the excitation spectrum of tryptophan. Hence, it is an ideal tool for label free fluorescence studies and imaging of intrinsic protein fluorescence which originates mainly from tryptophan. Thus a very sensitive natural lifetime probe can be used for monitoring protein reactions or changes in conformation. First measurements of living MIN-6 cells reveal differences between the UV fluorescence lifetimes of the nucleus and cytoplasm. The significance of this method was further demonstrated by monitoring the binding of biotin to avidin.

  4. Scanning ion microscopy with low energy lithium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twedt, Kevin A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Chen, Lei [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); McClelland, Jabez J., E-mail: jabez.mcclelland@nist.gov [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Using an ion source based on photoionization of laser-cooled lithium atoms, we have developed a scanning ion microscope with probe sizes of a few tens of nanometers and beam energies from 500 eV to 5 keV. These beam energies are much lower than the typical operating energies of the helium ion microscope or gallium focused ion beam systems. We demonstrate how low energy can be advantageous in ion microscopy when detecting backscattered ions, due to a decreased interaction volume and the potential for surface sensitive composition analysis. As an example application that demonstrates these advantages, we non-destructively image the removal of a thin residual resist layer during plasma etching in a nano-imprint lithography process. - Highlights: • We use an ion source based on photoionization of laser-cooled lithium atoms. • The ion source makes possible a low energy (500 eV to 5 keV) scanning ion microscope. • Low energy is preferred for ion microscopy with backscattered ions. • We use the microscope to image a thin resist used in nano-imprint lithography.

  5. Temperature mapping of operating nanoscale devices by scanning probe thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Fabian; Mensch, Philipp; Schmid, Heinz; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Imaging temperature fields at the nanoscale is a central challenge in various areas of science and technology. Nanoscopic hotspots, such as those observed in integrated circuits or plasmonic nanostructures, can be used to modify the local properties of matter, govern physical processes, activate chemical reactions and trigger biological mechanisms in living organisms. The development of high-resolution thermometry techniques is essential for understanding local thermal non-equilibrium processes during the operation of numerous nanoscale devices. Here we present a technique to map temperature fields using a scanning thermal microscope. Our method permits the elimination of tip-sample contact-related artefacts, a major hurdle that so far has limited the use of scanning probe microscopy for nanoscale thermometry. We map local Peltier effects at the metal-semiconductor contacts to an indium arsenide nanowire and self-heating of a metal interconnect with 7 mK and sub-10 nm spatial temperature resolution.

  6. Miniaturized probe based on a microelectromechanical system mirror for multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woonggyu; Tang, Suo; McCormic, Daniel T; Xie, Tiquiang; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Su, Jianping; Tomov, Ivan V; Krasieva, Tatiana B; Tromberg, Bruce J; Chen, Zhongping

    2008-06-15

    A factor that limits the use of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) in clinical and preclinical studies is the lack of a compact and flexible probe. We report on a miniaturized MPM probe employing a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanning mirror and a double-clad photonic crystal fiber (DCPCF). The use of a MEMS mirror and a DCPCF provides many advantages, such as size reduction, rapid and precise scanning, efficient delivery of short pulses, and high collection efficiency of fluorescent signals. The completed probe was 1 cm in outer diameter and 14 cm in length. The developed probe was integrated into an MPM system and used to image fluorescent beads, paper, and biological specimens.

  7. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  8. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.; Russell, K.F.

    1990-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications.

  9. Optimal lens design and use in laser-scanning microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negrean, A.; Mansvelder, H.D.

    2014-01-01

    In laser-scanning microscopy often an off-the-shelf achromatic doublet is used as a scan lens which can reduce the available diffraction-limited field-of-view (FOV) by a factor of 3 and introduce chromatic aberrations that are scan angle dependent. Here we present several simple lens designs of

  10. Scanning Surface Potential Microscopy of Spore Adhesion on Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  12. The Scanning Theremin Microscope: A Model Scanning Probe Instrument for Hands-On Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Wasio, Natalie A.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2014-01-01

    A model scanning probe microscope, designed using similar principles of operation to research instruments, is described. Proximity sensing is done using a capacitance probe, and a mechanical linkage is used to scan this probe across surfaces. The signal is transduced as an audio tone using a heterodyne detection circuit analogous to that used in…

  13. Scanning near-field infrared microscopy on semiconductor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Rainer

    2011-01-15

    literature. While the structures of the first system were in the micrometer regime, the capability to probe buried nanostructures is demonstrated at a sample of indium arsenide quantum dots. Those dots are covered by a thick layer of gallium arsenide. For the first time ever, it is shown experimentally that transitions between electron states in single quantum dots can be investigated by near-field microscopy. By monitoring the near-field response of these quantum dots while scanning the wavelength of the incident light beam, it was possible to obtain characteristic near-field signatures of single dots. Near-field contrasts up to 30 % could be measured for resonant excitation of electrons in the conduction band of the indium arsenide dots. (orig.)

  14. Scanning ion conductance microscopy for visualizing the three-dimensional surface topography of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masato; Mizutani, Yusuke; Iwata, Futoshi; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2018-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), which belongs to the family of scanning probe microscopy, regulates the tip-sample distance by monitoring the ion current through the use of an electrolyte-filled nanopipette as the probing tip. Thus, SICM enables "contact-free" imaging of cell surface topography in liquid conditions. In this paper, we applied hopping mode SICM for obtaining topographical images of convoluted tissue samples such as trachea and kidney in phosphate buffered saline. Some of the SICM images were compared with the images obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after drying the same samples. We showed that the imaging quality of hopping mode SICM was excellent enough for investigating the three-dimensional surface structure of the soft tissue samples. Thus, SICM is expected to be used for imaging a wide variety of cells and tissues - either fixed or alive- at high resolution under physiologically relevant liquid conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D., E-mail: peter.nellist@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Cosgriff, Eireann C.; D' Alfonso, Adrian J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Allen, Leslie J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hashimoto, Ayako [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Quantum Dot Research Center, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. -- Research Highlights: {yields} The confocal probe image in a scanning confocal electron microscopy image reveals information about the thickness and height of the crystalline layer. {yields} The form of the contrast in a three-dimensional bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy image can be explained in terms of the confocal probe image. {yields} Despite the complicated form of the contrast in bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy, we see that depth information is transferred on a 10 nm scale.

  16. Scanning microscopic four-point conductivity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Leth; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Bøggild, Peter

    2002-01-01

    the conducting material either for a silicon wafer or a single probe unit. Using shadow masking photolithography an electrode spacing (pitch) down to 1.1 mum was obtained, with cantilever separation down to 200 run. Characterisation measurements have shown the microscopic probes to be mechanically very flexible......A method for fabricating microscopic four-point probes is presented. The method uses silicon-based microfabrication technology involving only two patterning steps. The last step in the fabrication process is an unmasked deposition of the conducting probe material, and it is thus possible to select...

  17. Further observations on cerebellar climbing fibers. A study by means of light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, O J; Castejón, H V; Alvarado, M V

    2000-12-01

    The intracortical pathways of climbing fibers were traced in several vertebrate cerebella using light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. They were identified as fine fibers up to 1(micron thick, with a characteristic crossing-over bifurcation pattern. Climbing fiber collaterals were tridimensionally visualized forming thin climbing fiber glomeruli in the granular layer. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed three types of collateral processes at the interface between granular and Purkinje cell layers. Scanning electron microscopy showed climbing fiber retrograde collaterals in the molecular layer. Asymmetric synaptic contacts of climbing fibers with Purkinje dendritic spines and stellate neuron dendrites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Correlative microscopy allowed us to obtain the basic three-dimensional morphological features of climbing fibers in several vertebrates and to show with more accuracy a higher degree of lateral collateralization of these fibers within the cerebellar cortex. The correlative microscopy approach provides new views in the cerebellar cortex information processing.

  18. Optomechatronics Design and Control for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is considered as one of the major advancements in microscopy in the last century and is widely accepted as a 3D fluorescence imaging tool for biological studies. For the emerging biological questions CLSM requires fast imaging to detect rapid biological

  19. Characterization of tip size and geometry of the pipettes used in scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognoni, Elisabetta; Baschieri, Paolo; Ascoli, Cesare; Pellegrini, Monica; Pellegrino, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM) belongs to the family of scanning-probe microscopies. The spatial resolution of these techniques is limited by the size of the probe. In SICM the probe is a pipette, obtained by heating and pulling a glass capillary tubing. The size of the pipette tip is therefore an important parameter in SICM experiments. However, the characterization of the tip is not a consolidated routine in SICM experimental practice. In addition, potential and limitations of the different methods available for this characterization may not be known to all users. We present an overview of different methods for characterizing size and geometry of the pipette tip, with the aim of collecting and facilitating the use of several pieces of information appeared in the literature in a wide interval of time under different disciplines. In fact, several methods that have been developed for pipettes used in cell physiology can be also fruitfully employed in the characterization of the SICM probes. The overview includes imaging techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy and atomic Force microscopy, and indirect methods, which measure some physical parameter related to the size of the pipette. Examples of these parameters are the electrical resistance of the pipette filled with a saline solution and the surface tension at the pipette tip. We discuss advantages and drawbacks of the methods, which may be helpful in answering a wide range of experimental questions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards Automated Nanomanipulation under Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xutao

    Robotic Nanomaterial Manipulation inside scanning electron microscopes (SEM) is useful for prototyping functional devices and characterizing one-dimensional nanomaterial's properties. Conventionally, manipulation of nanowires has been performed via teleoperation, which is time-consuming and highly skill-dependent. Manual manipulation also has the limitation of low success rates and poor reproducibility. This research focuses on a robotic system capable of automated pick-place of single nanowires. Through SEM visual detection and vision-based motion control, the system transferred individual silicon nanowires from their growth substrate to a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device that characterized the nanowires' electromechanical properties. The performances of the nanorobotic pick-up and placement procedures were quantified by experiments. The system demonstrated automated nanowire pick-up and placement with high reliability. A software system for a load-lock-compatible nanomanipulation system is also designed and developed in this research.

  1. Force-gradient sensitive Kelvin probe force microscopy by dissipative electrostatic force modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We report a Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) implementation using the dissipation signal of a frequency modulation atomic force microscopy that is capable of detecting the gradient of electrostatic force rather than electrostatic force. It features a simple implementation and faster scanning as it requires no low frequency modulation. We show that applying a coherent ac voltage with two times the cantilever oscillation frequency induces the dissipation signal proportional to the electrost...

  2. Fast scanning probe for tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedo, J.; Gray, D.; Chousal, L.; Conn, R.; Hiller, B.; Finken, K. H.

    1998-07-01

    We describe a fast reciprocating probe drive, which has three main new features: (1) a detachable and modular probe head for easy maintenance, (2) a combination of high heat flux capability, high bandwidth, and low-Z materials construction, and (3) low weight, compact, inexpensive construction. The probe is mounted in a fast pneumatic drive in order to reach plasma regions of interest and remain inserted long enough to obtain good statistics while minimizing the heat flux to the tips and head. The drive is pneumatic and has been designed to be compact and reliable to comply with space and maintenance requirements of tokamaks. The probe described here has five tips which obtain a full spectrum of plasma parameters: electron temperature profile Te(r), electron density profile ne(r), floating potential profile Vf(r), poloidal electric field profile Eθ(r), saturation current profile Isat(r), and their fluctuations up to 3 MHz. We describe the probe show radial profiles of various parameters. We compare the density and temperature data to that obtained with a helium beam. We also discuss the techniques to process the data optimally, particularly double probe data and profile fits.

  3. New Applications of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas Philip Edward

    This dissertation describes the application of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) technique to four new fields of study: thin organic films, phonon spectroscopy of bulk surfaces, the vibrational spectroscopy of molecules, and the tribological forces which occur between STM tip and sample. Images with atomic resolution were obtained with speeds approaching video rates. Two types of microscopes were used: one operated at room temperature in air, another at 4.2K in liquid helium. At room temperature, the STM was able to image molecules of cadmium arachidate deposited onto graphite by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. The packing of molecules in the lipid bilayer was found to be partially ordered, with density of 1 molecule per 19.4 square angstroms. At liquid-helium temperature, inelastic electron processes were detected, and it was possible to determine within an area of a few square angstroms where the vibrational excitations occurred. On a bare graphite substrate, phonons of the sample and tip caused step increases in the tunneling conductivity at the phonon energies. Molecules of sorbic acid could be resolved when deposited onto graphite, and these molecules caused spatially localized peaks in conductivity at the energies of the bond vibrations. Although the STM is usually considered a non-contact instrument, under certain circumstances the tip and sample exerted strong forces on each other. With a tungsten tip and a graphite sample, friction and mechanical deformations on the atomic scale were observed.

  4. Vector sensor for scanning SQUID microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Vu The; Toji, Masaki; Thanh Huy, Ho; Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Shishido, Hiroaki; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Hayashi, Masahiko; Ishida, Takekazu

    2017-07-01

    We plan to build a novel 3-dimensional (3D) scanning SQUID microscope with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. In the system, a vector sensor consists of three SQUID sensors and three pick-up coils realized on a single chip. Three pick-up coils are configured in orthogonal with each other to measure the magnetic field vector of X, Y, Z components. We fabricated some SQUID chips with one uniaxial pick-up coil or three vector pick-up coils and carried out fundamental measurements to reveal the basic characteristics. Josephson junctions (JJs) of sensors are designed to have the critical current density J c of 320 A/cm2, and the critical current I c becomes 12.5 μA for the 2.2μm × 2.2μm JJ. We carefully positioned the three pickup coils so as to keep them at the same height at the centers of all three X, Y and Z coils. This can be done by arranging them along single line parallel to a sample surface. With the aid of multilayer technology of Nb-based fabrication, we attempted to reduce an inner diameter of the pickup coils to enhance both sensitivity and spatial resolution. The method for improving a spatial resolution of a local magnetic field image is to employ an XYZ piezo-driven scanner for controlling the positions of the pick-up coils. The fundamental characteristics of our SQUID sensors confirmed the proper operation of our SQUID sensors and found a good agreement with our design parameters.

  5. Analysis of Scanned Probe Images for Magnetic Focusing in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sagar; Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Philip; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2017-07-01

    We have used cooled scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to study electron motion in nanoscale devices. The charged tip of the microscope was raster-scanned at constant height above the surface as the conductance of the device was measured. The image charge scatters electrons away, changing the path of electrons through the sample. Using this technique, we imaged cyclotron orbits that flow between two narrow contacts in the magnetic focusing regime for ballistic hBN-graphene-hBN devices. We present herein an analysis of our magnetic focusing imaging results based on the effects of the tip-created charge density dip on the motion of ballistic electrons. The density dip locally reduces the Fermi energy, creating a force that pushes electrons away from the tip. When the tip is above the cyclotron orbit, electrons are deflected away from the receiving contact, creating an image by reducing the transmission between contacts. The data and our analysis suggest that the graphene edge is rather rough, and electrons scattering off the edge bounce in random directions. However, when the tip is close to the edge, it can enhance transmission by bouncing electrons away from the edge, toward the receiving contact. Our results demonstrate that cooled SPM is a promising tool to investigate the motion of electrons in ballistic graphene devices.

  6. Plasmonic interferometry: probing launching dipoles in scanning-probe plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Mollet, O; Genet, C; Huant, S; Drezet, A

    2014-01-01

    We develop a semi-analytical method for analyzing surface plasmon interferometry using near-field scanning optical sources. We compare our approach to Young double hole interferometry experiments using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) discussed in the literature and realize experiments with an aperture near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) source positioned near a ring like aperture slit milled in a thick gold film. In both cases the agreement between experiments and model is very good. We emphasize the role of dipole orientations and discuss the role of magnetic versus electric dipole contributions to the imaging process as well as the directionality of the effective dipoles associated with the various optical and plasmonic sources.

  7. Scanning force microscopy with chemical specificity : An extensive study of chemically specific tip-surface interactions and the chemical imaging of surface functional groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    An extensive and systematic scanning force microscopy (SFM) study is presented. The observations are based on hydrogen bonding, van der Waals, and Coulombic interactions between the scanning probe (tip) and the substrate and provide the basis for scanning force microscopy with chemical specificity

  8. Cadherin interaction probed by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgartner, W.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ness, W.; Raab, A.; Vestweber, D; Schindler, H; Drenckhahn, D

    2000-01-01

    Single molecule atomic force microscopy was used to characterize structure, binding strength (unbinding force), and binding kinetics of a classical cadherin, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, secreted by transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells as cis-dimerized full-length external domain fused to Fc-portion of human IgG. In physiological buffer, the external domain of VE-cadherin dimers is a ≈20-nm-long rod-shaped molecule that collapses and dissociates into monomers (V-shaped structures) i...

  9. Scanning probe studies of the pilus nanowires in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Joshua P.

    In microbial organisms like bacteria, pili (singular: pilus) are filament-like appendages that are nanometers in diameter and microns long. The sizes and structures of the different types of pili found in nature are adapted to serve one of many distinct functions for the organism from which they come. The pili expressed by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens act as electrically conductive nanowires that provide conduits for electrons to leave the cell during its respiratory cycle. Biological experiments have suggested that long range electron transfer across micron distances may proceed along the protein matrix, rather than by metal cofactors (metal atoms bound to the protein). Protein conductivity across such distances would require a novel transport mechanism. In an effort to elucidate this mechanism, our lab has used two electronically sensitive scanning probe techniques: Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Conductive Probe Atomic Force Microscopy (CP-AFM). I employed the high resolution imaging and electronic sensitivity of STM to resolve the molecular sub-structure and local electronic density of states (LDOS) at different points above pili from purified preparations, deposited onto a conducting substrate. The significant and stable tunneling currents achieved for biologically relevant voltages, in the absence of metal cofactors, demonstrated conduction between tip and substrate via the protein matrix. We observed periodicity of roughly 10 nm and 2.5 nm in topographs of the pili. In our acquisition of LDOS, we observed gap-like asymmetric energy spectra that were dependent upon the location of the tip above the pilus, suggestive of easier current flow out of one side of the cylindrical pilus and into the opposite side. Voltage-dependent STM imaging, which also contains information about the LDOS at each pixel, was consistent with this interpretation. The asymmetry in spectra observed on one pilus edge had a slightly larger magnitude than the other edge

  10. Local analysis of semiconductor nanoobjects by scanning tunneling atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Lashkova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of the current–voltage (I–V measurements in local regions of semiconductor nanostructures by conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM are discussed. The standard procedure of I–V measurements in conductive AFM leads not infrequently to the thermomechanical stresses in the sample and, as a consequence, nonreproducibility and unreliability of measurements. The technique of obtaining reproducible current–voltage characteristics is proposed. According to the technique, a series of measurements of the selected scanning area in the mode of conducting AFM should be taken, each at the certain value of the potential. According to a series of scans I–V curve at a particular point (for any point of the scan was plotted. The program is realized in the LabVIEW software. The proposed method extends the capabilities of scanning probe microscopy in the diagnosis of nanostructured semiconductor materials.

  11. Applications of orientation mapping by scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    The potentials of orientation mapping techniques (in the following referred to as OIM) for studies of thermomechanical processes are analysed. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based OIM techniques are considered. Among the thermomechanical processes...... information is achieved when the results of OIM and these various techniques are combined. Examples hereof are given to illustrate the potentials of OIM techniques. Finally, limitations of TEM and SEM based OIM for specific applications are discussed....

  12. Alternative configuration scheme for signal amplification with scanning ion conductance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonhui; Kim, Seong-Oh; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-02-01

    Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (SICM) is an emerging nanotechnology tool to investigate the morphology and charge transport properties of nanomaterials, including soft matter. SICM uses an electrolyte filled nanopipette as a scanning probe and detects current changes based on the distance between the nanopipette apex and the target sample in an electrolyte solution. In conventional SICM, the pipette sensor is excited by applying voltage as it raster scans near the surface. There have been attempts to improve upon raster scanning because it can induce collisions between the pipette sidewalls and target sample, especially for soft, dynamic materials (e.g., biological cells). Recently, Novak et al. demonstrated that hopping probe ion conductance microscopy (HPICM) with an adaptive scan method can improve the image quality obtained by SICM for such materials. However, HPICM is inherently slower than conventional raster scanning. In order to optimize both image quality and scanning speed, we report the development of an alternative configuration scheme for SICM signal amplification that is based on applying current to the nanopipette. This scheme overcomes traditional challenges associated with low bandwidth requirements of conventional SICM. Using our alternative scheme, we demonstrate successful imaging of L929 fibroblast cells and discuss the capabilities of this instrument configuration for future applications.

  13. Alternative configuration scheme for signal amplification with scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonhui; Kim, Seong-Oh; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-02-01

    Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (SICM) is an emerging nanotechnology tool to investigate the morphology and charge transport properties of nanomaterials, including soft matter. SICM uses an electrolyte filled nanopipette as a scanning probe and detects current changes based on the distance between the nanopipette apex and the target sample in an electrolyte solution. In conventional SICM, the pipette sensor is excited by applying voltage as it raster scans near the surface. There have been attempts to improve upon raster scanning because it can induce collisions between the pipette sidewalls and target sample, especially for soft, dynamic materials (e.g., biological cells). Recently, Novak et al. demonstrated that hopping probe ion conductance microscopy (HPICM) with an adaptive scan method can improve the image quality obtained by SICM for such materials. However, HPICM is inherently slower than conventional raster scanning. In order to optimize both image quality and scanning speed, we report the development of an alternative configuration scheme for SICM signal amplification that is based on applying current to the nanopipette. This scheme overcomes traditional challenges associated with low bandwidth requirements of conventional SICM. Using our alternative scheme, we demonstrate successful imaging of L929 fibroblast cells and discuss the capabilities of this instrument configuration for future applications.

  14. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  15. Scanning Emitter Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Spontaneous Emission Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimmer, Martin; Chen, Yuntian; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2011-01-01

    We report an experimental technique to map and exploit the local density of optical states of arbitrary planar nanophotonic structures. The method relies on positioning a spontaneous emitter attached to a scanning probe deterministically and reversibly with respect to its photonic environment while...

  16. Use of Kelvin probe force microscopy for identification of CVD grown graphene flakes on copper foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Mehta, B. R.; Kanjilal, D.

    2017-05-01

    Graphene flakes have been grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method on Cu foils. The obtained graphene flakes have been characterized by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The graphene flakes grown on Cu foil comprise mainly single layer graphene and confirm that the nucleation for graphene growth starts very quickly. Moreover, KPFM has been found to be a valuable technique to differentiate between covered and uncovered portion of Cu foil by graphene flakes deposited for shorter duration. The results show that KPFM can be a very useful technique in understanding the mechanism of graphene growth.

  17. Structural examination of lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals by combining scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremova, P. V.; Ped'ko, B. B.; Kuznecova, Yu. V.

    2016-02-01

    The structure of lithium niobate single crystals is studied by a complex technique that combines scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. By implementing the piezoresponse force method on an atomic force microscope, the domain structure of lithium niobate crystals, which was not revealed without electron beam irradiation, is visualized

  18. Outwitting the series resistance in scanning spreading resistance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, A; Cao, R; Eyben, P; Hantschel, T; Vandervorst, W

    2016-02-01

    The performance of nanoelectronics devices critically depends on the distribution of active dopants inside these structures. For this reason, dopant profiling has been defined as one of the major metrology challenges by the international technology roadmap of semiconductors. Scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) has evolved as one of the most viable approaches over the last decade due to its excellent spatial resolution, sensitivity and quantification accuracy. However, in case of advanced device architectures like fins and nanowires a proper measurement of the spreading resistance is often hampered by the increasing impact of parasitic series resistances (e.g. bulk series resistance) arising from the confined nature of the aforementioned structures. In order to overcome this limitation we report in this paper the development and implementation of a novel SSRM mode (fast Fourier transform-SSRM: FFT-SSRM) which essentially decouples the spreading resistance from parasitic series resistance components. We show that this can be achieved by a force modulation (leading to a modulated spreading resistance signal) in combination with a lock-in deconvolution concept. In this paper we first introduce the principle of operation of the technique. We discuss in detail the underlying physical mechanisms as well as the technical implementation on a state-of-the-art atomic force microscope (AFM). We demonstrate the performance of FFT-SSRM and its ability to remove substantial series resistance components in practice. Eventually, the possibility of decoupling the spreading resistance from the intrinsic probe resistance will be demonstrated and discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cadherin interaction probed by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, W.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ness, W.; Raab, A.; Vestweber, D.; Schindler, H.; Drenckhahn, D.

    2000-04-01

    Single molecule atomic force microscopy was used to characterize structure, binding strength (unbinding force), and binding kinetics of a classical cadherin, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, secreted by transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells as cis-dimerized full-length external domain fused to Fc-portion of human IgG. In physiological buffer, the external domain of VE-cadherin dimers is a 20-nm-long rod-shaped molecule that collapses and dissociates into monomers (V-shaped structures) in the absence of Ca2+. Trans-interaction of dimers is a low-affinity reaction (KD = 10-3-10-5 M, koff = 1.8 s-1, kon = 103-105 M-1·s-1) with relatively low unbinding force (35-55 pN at retrace velocities of 200-4,000 nm·s-1). Higher order unbinding forces, that increase with interaction time, indicate association of cadherins into complexes with cumulative binding strength. These observations favor a model by which the inherently weak unit binding strength and affinity of cadherin trans-interaction requires clustering and cytoskeletal immobilization for amplification. Binding is regulated by low-affinity Ca2+ binding sites (KD = 1.15 mM) with high cooperativity (Hill coefficient of 5.04). Local changes of free extracellular Ca2+ in the narrow intercellular space may be of physiological importance to facilitate rapid remodeling of intercellular adhesion and communication.

  20. Is scanning in probed order recall articulatory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Simon; Lelièvre, Anna

    2009-09-01

    We consider how theories of serial recall might apply to other short-term memory tasks involving recall of order. In particular, we consider the possibility that when participants are cued to recall an item at an arbitrary position in a sequence, they covertly serially recall the list up to the cued position. One question is whether such "scanning" is articulatory in nature. Two experiments are presented in which the syllabic length of words preceding and following target positions were manipulated, to test the prediction of an articulatory-based mechanism that time to recall an item at a particular position will depend on the number of preceding long words. Although latency was dependent on target position, no word length effects on latency were observed. Additionally, the effects of word length on accuracy replicate recent demonstrations in serial recall that recall accuracy is dependent on the word length of all list items, not just that of target items, in line with distinctiveness assumptions. It is concluded that if scanning does occur, it is not carried out by covert or overt articulation.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The distribution of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) in himematsutake was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The atomic percentage of the metals was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Results show that the accumulation of ...

  2. Nanochannel alignment analysis by scanning transmission ion microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajta, I.; Gál, G.A.B.; Szilasi, S.Z.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a study on the ion transmission ratio of a nanoporous alumina sample is presented. The sample was investigated by scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) with different beam sizes. The hexagonally close-packed AlO nanocapillary array, realized as a suspended membrane of 15 νm...

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of Dermatobia hominis reveals cutaneous anchoring features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Mempel, Martin; Weichenmeier, Ingrid; Engst, Reinhard; Ring, Johannnes; Behrendt, Heidrun

    2007-10-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman suffering from cutaneous myiasis. With the use of scanning electron microscopy, we placed special focus on the mechanisms by which Dermatobia hominis can fasten securely within the human skin.

  4. Characterization of Polycaprolactone Films Biodeterioration by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubanová, Kamila; Voberková, S.; Hermanová, S.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, S3 (2014), s. 1950-1951 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : polycaprolactone films * biodeterioration * scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.877, year: 2014

  5. Application of scanning force and near field microscopies to the characterization of minimally adhesive polymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhremitchev, Boris B; Bemis, Jason E; al-Maawali, Sabah; Sun, Yujie; Stebounova, Larissa; Walker, Gilbert C

    2003-04-01

    This mini-review reports efforts to develop new scanning probe microscopies to characterize the function and aging of textured, minimally adhesive polymer surfaces used for antifouling applications in the marine environment. Novel atomic force and infrared near field microscopy techniques have been used to characterize the polymer surface adhesion and structural properties. These techniques may find promise for characterizing the deposition of the extracellular matrix of organisms as well as aging of the polymer coating itself. The reported work is part of a larger effort to reduce biofouling on ships' hulls through the development and use of improved coating materials.

  6. EDITORIAL: Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    Three decades ago, with a tiny tip of platinum, the scientific world saw the real space imaging of single atoms with unprecedented spatial resolution. This signalled the birth of one of the most versatile surface probes, based on the physics of quantum mechanical tunnelling: the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Invented in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer of IBM, Zurich, it led to their award of the 1986 Nobel Prize. Atoms, once speculated to be abstract entities used by theoreticians for mere calculations, can be seen to exist for real with the nano-eye of an STM tip that also gives real-space images of molecules and adsorbed complexes on surfaces. From a very fundamental perspective, the STM changed the course of surface science and engineering. STM also emerged as a powerful tool to study various fundamental phenomena relevant to the properties of surfaces in technological applications such as tribology, medical implants, catalysis, sensors and biology—besides elucidating the importance of local bonding geometries and defects, non-periodic structures and the co-existence of nano-scale phases. Atom-level probing, once considered a dream, has seen the light with the evolution of STM. An important off-shoot of STM was the atomic force microscope (AFM) for surface mapping of insulating samples. Then followed the development of a flurry of techniques under the general name of scanning probe microscopy (SPM). These techniques (STM, AFM, MFM, PFM etc) designed for atomic-scale-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, have led to brand new developments in surface analysis. All of these novel methods enabled researchers in recent years to image and analyse complex surfaces on microscopic and nanoscopic scales. All of them utilize a small probe for sensing the surface. The invention of AFM by Gerd Binnig, Calvin Quate and Christopher Gerber opened up new opportunities for characterization of a variety of materials, and various industrial applications could be

  7. Hot-spot detection and calibration of a scanning thermal probe with a noise thermometry gold wire sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitas, A.; Wolgast, S.; Covington, E.; Kurdak, C.

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the temperature profile of a nanoscale sample using scanning thermal microscopy is challenging due to a scanning probe's non-uniform heating. In order to address this challenge, we have developed a calibration sample consisting of a 1-?m wide gold wire, which can be heated electrically by

  8. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes as an essential part of their life cycle. While living inside erythrocytes, the parasite remodels the cell's intracellular organization as well as its outer surface. Late trophozoite-stage parasites and schizonts introduce numerous small protrusions on the erythrocyte surface, called knobs. Current methods for studying these knobs include atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy. Standard electron microscopy methods rely on chemical fixation and dehydration modifying cell size. Here, a novel method is presented using rapid freezing and scanning electron microscopy under cryogenic conditions allowing for high resolution and magnification of erythrocytes. This novel technique can be used for precise estimates of knob density and for studies on cytoadhesion. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Scanning probe and micropatterning approaches for biomolecular screening applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wilde, L M

    2002-01-01

    Force mapping using atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for the simultaneous acquisition of topography and probe-sample interaction data. For example, AFM probes functionalised with an antigen can be employed to map the spatial distribution of recognition events on a substrate functionalised with the complementary specific antibody. However, this technique is currently limited to the detection of a single receptor-ligand species. Were the detection of multiple receptor-ligand interactions possible, AFM force mapping would offer greater scope as a sensitive tool for bioassay and screening applications. This thesis outlines developments in probe and substrate immobilisation methods to facilitate this process. We have developed an immobilisation strategy, which allows two antigen species, human serum albumin (HSA) and the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta hCG) to be simultaneously present on an AFM probe. Single point force spectroscopy results have revealed the ability of such probes to discri...

  10. In vivo pump-probe microscopy of melanoma and pigmented lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Mitropoulos, Tanya; Selim, M. Angelica; Zhang, Jennifer Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2012-03-01

    A growing number of dermatologists and pathologists are concerned that the rapidly rising incidence of melanoma reflects not a true 'epidemic' but an increasing tendency to overdiagnose pigmented lesions. Addressing this problem requires both a better understanding of early-stage melanoma and new diagnostic criteria based on more than just cellular morphology and architecture. Here we present a method for in-vivo optical microscopy that utilizes pump-probe spectroscopy to image the distribution of the two forms of melanin in skin: eumelanin and pheomelanin. Images are acquired in a scanning microscope with a sensitive modulation transfer technique by analyzing back-scattered probe light with a lock-in amplifier. Early-stage melanoma is studied in a human skin xenografted mouse model. Individual melanocytes have been observed, in addition to pigmented keratinocytes. Combining the pump-probe images simultaneously with other noninvasive laser microscopy methods (confocal reflectance, multiphoton autofluorescence, and second harmonic generation) allows visualization of the skin architecture, framing the functional pump-probe image in the context of the surrounding tissue morphology. It is found that pump-probe images of melanin can be acquired with low peak intensities, enabling wide field-of-view pigmentation surveys. Finally, we investigate the diagnostic potential of the additional chemical information available from pump-probe microscopy.

  11. Non-linear image scanning microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Ingo; Ros, Robert; Enderlein, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, multiphoton microscopy can be considered as a routine method for the observation of living cells, organs, up to whole organisms. Second-harmonics generation (SHG) imaging has evolved to a powerful qualitative and label-free method for studying fibrillar structures, like collagen networks. However, examples of super-resolution non-linear microscopy are rare. So far, such approaches require complex setups and advanced synchronization of scanning elements limiting the image acquisition rates. We describe theory and realization of a super-resolution image scanning microscope [1, 2] using two-photon excited fluorescence as well as second-harmonic generation. It requires only minor modifications compared to a classical two-photon laser-scanning microscope and allows image acquisition at the high frame rates of a resonant galvo-scanner. We achieve excellent sensitivity and high frame-rate in combination with two-times improved lateral resolution. We applied this method to fixed cells, collagen hydrogels, as well as living fly embryos. Further, we proofed the excellent image quality of our setup for deep tissue imaging. 1. Müller C.B. and Enderlein J. (2010) Image scanning microscopy. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104(19), 198101. 2. Sheppard C.J.R. (1988) Super-resolution in confocal imaging. Optik (Stuttg) 80 53-54.

  12. Video rate near-field scanning optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukofsky, S. J.; Grober, R. D.

    1997-11-01

    The enhanced transmission efficiency of chemically etched near-field optical fiber probes makes it possible to greatly increase the scanning speed of near-field optical microscopes. This increase in system bandwidth allows sub-diffraction limit imaging of samples at video rates. We demonstrate image acquisition at 10 frames/s, rate-limited by mechanical resonances in our scanner. It is demonstrated that the optical signal to noise ratio is large enough for megahertz single pixel acquisition rates.

  13. The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, D.C. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Surface morphology of Trichinella spiralis by scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.W. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook); Ledbetter, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    The surface morphology of larval and adult Trichinella spiralis was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fixed, dried, and metal-coated specimens. The results are compared with those found earlier by various investigators using light and transmission electron microscopy. Some morphological features reported here are revealed uniquely by SEM. These include the pores of the cephalic sense organs, the character of secondary cuticular folds, variations of the hypodermal gland cell openings or pores, and the presence of particles on the copulatory bell.

  15. Scanning conductance microscopy investigations on fixed human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Jensen, Linda Boye

    2008-01-01

    Scanning conductance microscopy investigations were carried out in air on human chromosomes fixed on pre-fabricated SiO2 surfaces with a backgate. The point of the investigation was to estimate the dielectric constant of fixed human chromosomes in order to use it for microfluidic device...... optimization. The phase shift caused by the electrostatic forces, together with geometrical measurements of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and the chromosomes were used to estimate a value,for the dielectric constant of different human chromosomes....

  16. Spontaneous Polarization in Bio-organic Materials Studied by Scanning Pyroelectric Microscopy (SPEM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzeys, T.; Wübbenhorst, M.; van der Veen, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    Bio-organic materials such as bones, teeth, and tendon generally show nonlinear optical (Masters and So in Handbook of Biomedical Nonlinear Optical Microscopy, 2008), pyro- and piezoelectric (Fukada and Yasuda in J Phys Soc Jpn 12:1158, 1957) properties, implying a permanent polarization, the presence of which can be rationalized by describing the growth of the sample and the creation of a polar axis according to Markov's theory of stochastic processes (Hulliger in Biophys J 84:3501, 2003; Batagiannis et al. in Curr Opin Solid State Mater Sci 17:107, 2010). Two proven, versatile techniques for probing spontaneous polarization distributions in solids are scanning pyroelectric microscopy (SPEM) and second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM). The combination of pyroelectric scanning with SHG-microscopy in a single experimental setup leading to complementary pyroelectric and nonlinear optical data is demonstrated, providing us with a more complete image of the polarization in organic materials. Crystals consisting of a known polar and hyperpolarizable material, CNS (4-chloro-4-nitrostilbene) are used as a reference sample, to verify the functionality of the setup, with both SPEM and SHGM images revealing the same polarization domain information. In contrast, feline and human nails exhibit a pyroelectric response, but a second harmonic response is absent for both keratin containing materials, implying that there may be symmetry-allowed SHG, but with very inefficient second harmonophores. This new approach to polarity detection provides additional information on the polar and hyperpolar nature in a variety of (bio) materials.

  17. Ultrafast Photon Counting Applied to Resonant Scanning STED Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xundong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico; Wu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Summary To take full advantage of fast resonant scanning in super-resolution STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy, we have developed an ultrafast photon counting system based on a multi-giga-sample per second analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) chip that delivers an unprecedented 450 MHz pixel clock (2.2 ns pixel dwell time in each scan). The system achieves a large field of view (~50 × 50 μm) with fast scanning that reduces photobleaching, and advances the time-gated continuous wave (CW) STED technology to the usage of resonant scanning with hardware based time-gating. The assembled system provides superb signal-to-noise ratio and highly linear quantification of light that result in superior image quality. Also, the system design allows great flexibility in processing photon signals to further improve the dynamic range. In conclusion, we have constructed a frontier photon counting image acquisition system with ultrafast readout rate, excellent counting linearity, and with the capacity of realizing resonant-scanning CW-STED microscopy with on-line time-gated detection. PMID:25227160

  18. Force-gradient sensitive Kelvin probe force microscopy by dissipative electrostatic force modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We report a Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) implementation using the dissipation signal of a frequency modulation atomic force microscopy that is capable of detecting the gradient of electrostatic force rather than electrostatic force. It features a simple implementation and faster scanning as it requires no low frequency modulation. We show that applying a coherent ac voltage with two times the cantilever oscillation frequency induces the dissipation signal proportional to the electrostatic force gradient which depends on the effective dc bias voltage including the contact potential difference. We demonstrate the KPFM images of a MoS2 flake taken with the present method are in quantitative agreement with those taken with the frequency modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy technique.

  19. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adaptive optical probe design for optical coherence tomography and microscopy using tunable optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Minseog; Lee, Seungwan; Chang, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Eunsung; Jung, Kyu-Dong; Kim, Woonbae

    2013-01-28

    We present a tunable, adaptive optical imaging probe for multimodal imaging such as optical coherence tomography and microscopy. The probe is compatible with forward-looking scanning laser imaging devices such as an endoscope. The lens configuration includes a tunable iris and two varifocal lenses, both driven by microelectrofluidics, as well as several conventional fixed focus lenses. The modulation transfer function and spot size in the focal plane is evaluated, and we show using optical simulations that there are three possible imaging modes with different transverse resolutions and focal depths.

  1. Modeling the hysteresis of a scanning probe microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirscherl, Kai; Garnæs, Jørgen; Nielsen, L.

    2000-01-01

    Most scanning probe microscopes use piezoelectric actuators in open loop configurations. Therefore a major problem related to these instruments is the image distortion due to the hysteresis effect of the piezo. In order to eliminate the distortions, cost effective software control based on a model...

  2. Handheld probes and galvanometer scanning for optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, V.-F.; Dobre, G.; Demian, D.; Cernat, R.; Sinescu, C.; Topala, F. I.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Rolland, J. P.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    As part of the ongoing effort of the biomedical imaging community to move Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) systems from the lab to the clinical environment and produce OCT systems appropriate for multiple types of investigations in a medical department, handheld probes equipped with different types of scanners need to be developed. These allow different areas of a patient's body to be investigated using OCT with the same system and even without changing the patient's position. This paper reviews first the state of the art regarding OCT handheld probes. Novel probes with a uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer-based scanner (GS) developed in our groups are presented. Their advantages and limitations are discussed. Aspects regarding the use of galvoscanners with regard to Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are pointed out, in relationship with our studies on optimal scanning functions of galvanometer devices in OCT. These scanning functions are briefly discussed with regard to their main parameters: profile, theoretical duty cycle, scan frequency, and scan amplitude. The optical design of the galvoscanner and refractive optics combination in the probe head, optimized for various applications, is considered. Perspectives of the field are pointed out in the final part of the paper.

  3. [Advances of in vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ke-bin; Zhou, Guo-yu

    2006-02-01

    In vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy is being widely established as a time-saving, non-invasive, investigative methods in the study of body surfaces. Skin can be observed in its native state in vivo without the fixing, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. It is a new technology that can provide detailed images of tissue architecture and cellular morphology of living tissue. This paper reviews the fundamentals of in vivo confocal imaging and its clinical applications.

  4. Sub-Kelvin scanning tunneling microscopy on magnetic molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic molecules have attracted lots interest. In this work, an ultra-stable and low noise scanning tunneling microscopy operating at 400 mK using He-3 (930 mK using He-4) has been developed. The magnetic behavior of different magnetic molecules on substrates, especially the exchange interaction between the magnetic ions, the magnetic anisotropy on the surface, the magnetic excitations as well as the Kondo effect, were studied by using STM.

  5. Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cristispira Species in Chesapeake Bay Oysters

    OpenAIRE

    Tall, Ben D.; Nauman, Robert K.

    1981-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was employed to observe the physical interactions between Cristispira spp. and the crystalline style of the Chesapeake Bay oyster (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin 1791). Cristispira organisms were found associated with both the inner and outer layers of the posterior two-thirds of the style. The spirochetes possessed blunt-tipped ends, a cell diameter range of 0.6 to 0.8 μm, and distended spirochetal envelopes which followed the contour of the cells. Transmission ele...

  6. Playing peekaboo with graphene oxide: a scanning electrochemical microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapino, Stefania; Treossi, Emanuele; Palermo, Vincenzo; Marcaccio, Massimo; Paolucci, Francesco; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2014-11-07

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can image graphene oxide (GO) flakes on insulating and conducting substrates. The contrast between GO and the substrate is controlled by the electrostatic interactions that are established between the charges of the molecular redox mediator and the charges present in the sheet/substrate. SECM also allows quantitative measurement - at the nano/microscale - of the charge transfer kinetics between single monolayer sheets and agent molecules.

  7. Scanning gate microscopy of ultra clean carbon nanotube quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Jiamin; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; LeRoy, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We perform scanning gate microscopy on individual suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. The size and position of the quantum dots can be visually identified from the concentric high conductance rings. For the ultra clean devices used in this study, two new effects are clearly identified. Electrostatic screening creates non-overlapping multiple sets of Coulomb rings from a single quantum dot. In double quantum dots, by changing the tip voltage, the interactions between the quantum dots can b...

  8. An instrumental approach to combining confocal microspectroscopy and 3D scanning probe nanotomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalov, Konstantin E; Chistyakov, Anton A; Solovyeva, Daria O; Mezin, Alexey V; Oleinikov, Vladimir A; Vaskan, Ivan S; Molinari, Michael; Agapov, Igor I; Nabiev, Igor; Efimov, Anton E

    2017-11-01

    In the past decade correlative microscopy, which combines the potentials of different types of high-resolution microscopies with a variety of optical microspectroscopy techniques, has been attracting increasing attention in material science and biological research. One of outstanding solutions in this area is the combination of scanning probe microscopy (SPM), which provides data on not only the topography, but also the spatial distribution of a wide range of physical properties (elasticity, conductivity, etc.), with ultramicrotomy, allowing 3D multiparametric examination of materials. The combination of SPM and ultramicrotomy (scanning probe nanotomography) is very appropriate for characterization of soft multicompound nanostructurized materials, such as polymer matrices and microstructures doped with different types of nanoparticles (magnetic nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanotubes, etc.), and biological materials. A serious problem of this technique is a lack of chemical and optical characterization tools, which may be solved by using optical microspectroscopy. Here, we report the development of an instrumental approach to combining confocal microspectroscopy and 3D scanning probe nanotomography in a single apparatus. This approach retains all the advantages of SPM and upright optical microspectroscopy and allows 3D multiparametric characterization using both techniques. As the first test of the system developed, we have performed correlative characterization of the morphology and the magnetic and fluorescent properties of fluorescent magnetic microspheres doped with a fluorescent dye and magnetic nanoparticles. The results of this study can be used to obtain 3D volume images of a specimen for most high-resolution near-field scanning probe microscopies: SNOM, TERS, AFM-IR, etc. This approach will result in development of unique techniques combining the advantages of SPM (nanoscale morphology and a wide range of physical parameters) and high-resolution optical

  9. Final report: Mapping Interactions in Hybrid Systems with Active Scanning Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezovsky, Jesse [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-09-29

    This project aimed to study and map interactions between components of hybrid nanodevices using a novel scanning probe approach. To enable this work, we initially constructed a flexible experimental apparatus allowing for simultaneous scanning probe and confocal optical microscopy measurements. This setup was first used for all-optical measurements of nanostructures, with the focus then shifting to hybrid devices in which single coherent electron spins are coupled to micron-scale ferromagnetic elements, which may prove useful for addressing single spins, enhanced sensing, or spin-wave-mediated coupling of spins for quantum information applications. A significant breakthrough was the realization that it is not necessary to fabricate a magnetic structure on a scanning probe – instead a ferromagnetic vortex core can act as an integrated, solid state, scanning probe. The core of the vortex produces a very strong, localized fringe field which can be used analogously to an MFM tip. Unlike a traditional MFM tip, however, the vortex core is scanned within an integrated device (eliminating drift), and can be moved on vastly faster timescales. This approach allows the detailed investigation of interactions between single spins and complex driven ferromagnetic dynamics.

  10. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    PASCARETTI-GRIZON, Florence; MABILLEAU, Guillaume; CHAPPARD, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Material and Methods Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Results Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Conclusion Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials. PMID:24212995

  11. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascaretti-Grizon, Florence; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Chappard, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials.

  12. Analysis of leaf surfaces using scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Shaun C; Allen, Stephanie; Bell, Gordon; Roberts, Clive J

    2015-05-01

    Leaf surfaces are highly complex functional systems with well defined chemistry and structure dictating the barrier and transport properties of the leaf cuticle. It is a significant imaging challenge to analyse the very thin and often complex wax-like leaf cuticle morphology in their natural state. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and to a lesser extent Atomic force microscopy are techniques that have been used to study the leaf surface but their remains information that is difficult to obtain via these approaches. SEM is able to produce highly detailed and high-resolution images needed to study leaf structures at the submicron level. It typically operates in a vacuum or low pressure environment and as a consequence is generally unable to deal with the in situ analysis of dynamic surface events at submicron scales. Atomic force microscopy also possess the high-resolution imaging required and can follow dynamic events in ambient and liquid environments, but can over exaggerate small features and cannot image most leaf surfaces due to their inherent roughness at the micron scale. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), which operates in a liquid environment, provides a potential complementary analytical approach able to address these issues and which is yet to be explored for studying leaf surfaces. Here we illustrate the potential of SICM on various leaf surfaces and compare the data to SEM and atomic force microscopy images on the same samples. In achieving successful imaging we also show that SICM can be used to study the wetting of hydrophobic surfaces in situ. This has potentially wider implications than the study of leaves alone as surface wetting phenomena are important in a range of fundamental and applied studies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiaobin [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Shi, Xuetao, E-mail: mrshixuetao@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Ostrovidov, Serge [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Wu, Hongkai, E-mail: chhkwu@ust.hk [Department of Chemistry & Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Nakajima, Ken [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation. • The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. • AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring stem cell differentiation in a non-invasive manner. - Abstract: A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  14. Visualization of Live Cochlear Stereocilia at a Nanoscale Resolution Using Hopping Probe Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Ortega, A Catalina; Frolenkov, Gregory I

    2016-01-01

    The mechanosensory apparatus that detects sound-induced vibrations in the cochlea is located on the apex of the auditory sensory hair cells and it is made up of actin-filled projections, called stereocilia. In young rodents, stereocilia bundles of auditory hair cells consist of 3-4 rows of stereocilia of decreasing height and varying thickness. Morphological studies of the auditory stereocilia bundles in live hair cells have been challenging because the diameter of each stereocilium is near or below the resolution limit of optical microscopy. In theory, scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy, could visualize the surface of a living cell at a nanoscale resolution. However, their implementations for hair cell imaging have been largely unsuccessful because the probe usually damages the bundle and disrupts the bundle cohesiveness during imaging. We overcome these limitations by using hopping probe ion conductance microscopy (HPICM), a non-contact scanning probe technique that is ideally suited for the imaging of live cells with a complex topography. Organ of Corti explants are placed in a physiological solution and then a glass nanopipette-which is connected to a 3D-positioning piezoelectric system and to a patch clamp amplifier-is used to scan the surface of the live hair cells at nanometer resolution without ever touching the cell surface.Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the imaging of mouse or rat stereocilia bundles in live auditory hair cells using HPICM. We provide information about the fabrication of the nanopipettes, the calibration of the HPICM setup, the parameters we have optimized for the imaging of live stereocilia bundles and, lastly, a few basic image post-processing manipulations.

  15. Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy with high temporal dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke, Matthias; Rapp, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P

    2012-04-23

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy is a common method for time and space resolved imaging of short and ultra-short pulse laser ablation. The temporal delay between the ablating pump pulse and the illuminating probe pulse is tuned either by an optical delay, resulting in several hundred femtoseconds temporal resolution for delay times up to a few ns, or by an electronic delay, resulting in several nanoseconds resolution for longer delay times. In this work we combine both delay types for temporally high resolved observations of complete ablation processes ranging from femtoseconds to microseconds, while ablation is initiated by an ultrafast 660 fs laser pump pulse. For this purpose, we also demonstrate the calibration of the delay time zero point, the synchronization of both probe sources, as well as a method for image quality enhancing. In addition, we present for the first time to our knowledge pump-probe microscopy investigations of the complete substrate side selective ablation process of molybdenum films on glass. The initiation of mechanical film deformation is observed at about 400 ps, continues until approximately 15 ns, whereupon a Mo disk is sheared off free from thermal effects due to a directly induced laser lift-off ablation process. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  16. Multimodal nonlinear endo-microscopy probe design for high resolution, label-free intraoperative imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Daniel T.; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Stephen T.C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a portable, multimodal, nonlinear endo-microscopy probe designed for intraoperative oncological imaging. Application of a four-wave mixing noise suppression scheme using dual wavelength wave plates (DWW) and a polarization-maintaining fiber improves tissue signal collection efficiency, allowing for miniaturization. The probe, with a small 14 mm transversal diameter, includes a customized miniaturized two-axis MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) raster scanning mirror and micro-optics with an illumination laser delivered by a polarization-maintaining fiber. The probe can potentially be integrated into the arms of a surgical robot, such as da Vinci robotic surgery system, due to its minimal cross sectional area. It has the ability to incorporate multiple imaging modalities including CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering), SHG (second harmonic generation), and TPEF (two-photon excited fluorescence) in order to allow the surgeon to locate tumor cells within the context of normal stromal tissue. The resolution of the endo-microscope is experimentally determined to be 0.78 µm, a high level of accuracy for such a compact probe setup. The expected resolution of the as-built multimodal, nonlinear, endo-microscopy probe is 1 µm based on the calculation tolerance allocation using Monte-Carlo simulation. The reported probe is intended for use in laparoscopic or radical prostatectomy, including detection of tumor margins and avoidance of nerve impairment during surgery. PMID:26203361

  17. Microvascular quantification based on contour-scanning photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Soetikno, Brian; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-09-01

    Accurate quantification of microvasculature remains of interest in fundamental pathophysiological studies and clinical trials. Current photoacoustic microscopy can noninvasively quantify properties of the microvasculature, including vessel density and diameter, with a high spatial resolution. However, the depth range of focus (i.e., focal zone) of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is often insufficient to encompass the depth variations of features of interest-such as blood vessels-due to uneven tissue surfaces. Thus, time-consuming image acquisitions at multiple different focal planes are required to maintain the region of interest in the focal zone. We have developed continuous three-dimensional motorized contour-scanning OR-PAM, which enables real-time adjustment of the focal plane to track the vessels' profile. We have experimentally demonstrated that contour scanning improves the signal-to-noise ratio of conventional OR-PAM by as much as 41% and shortens the image acquisition time by 3.2 times. Moreover, contour-scanning OR-PAM more accurately quantifies vessel density and diameter, and has been applied to studying tumors with uneven surfaces.

  18. Magnetic scanning gate microscopy of CoFeB lateral spin valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte-León, Héctor; Scarioni, Alexander Fernandez; Mansell, Rhodri; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Cox, David; McGrouther, Damien; McVitie, Stephen; Cowburn, Russell; Schumacher, Hans W.; Antonov, Vladimir; Kazakova, Olga

    2017-05-01

    Devices comprised of CoFeB nanostructures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and non-magnetic Ta channel were operated in thermal lateral spin valve (LSV) mode and studied by magnetotransport measurements and magnetic scanning gate microscopy (SGM). Due to the short spin diffusion length of Ta, the spin diffusion signal was suppressed, allowing the study of the contribution from the anomalous Nernst (ANE) and anomalous Hall effects (AHE). The magnetotransport measurements identified the switching fields of the CoFeB nanostructures and demonstrated a combination of AHE and ANE when the devices were operated in thermally-driven spin-injection mode. Modified scanning probe microscopy probes were fabricated by placing a NdFeB magnetic bead (MB) on the apex of a commercial Si probe. The dipole magnetic field distribution around the MB was characterized by using differential phase contrast technique and direct measurement of the switching field induced by the bead in the CoFeB nanodevices. Using SGM we demonstrate the influence of localized magnetic field on the CoFeB nanostructures near the non-magnetic channel. This approach provides a promising route towards the study of thermal and spin diffusion effects using local magnetic fields.

  19. Magnetic scanning gate microscopy of CoFeB lateral spin valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Corte-León

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Devices comprised of CoFeB nanostructures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and non-magnetic Ta channel were operated in thermal lateral spin valve (LSV mode and studied by magnetotransport measurements and magnetic scanning gate microscopy (SGM. Due to the short spin diffusion length of Ta, the spin diffusion signal was suppressed, allowing the study of the contribution from the anomalous Nernst (ANE and anomalous Hall effects (AHE. The magnetotransport measurements identified the switching fields of the CoFeB nanostructures and demonstrated a combination of AHE and ANE when the devices were operated in thermally-driven spin-injection mode. Modified scanning probe microscopy probes were fabricated by placing a NdFeB magnetic bead (MB on the apex of a commercial Si probe. The dipole magnetic field distribution around the MB was characterized by using differential phase contrast technique and direct measurement of the switching field induced by the bead in the CoFeB nanodevices. Using SGM we demonstrate the influence of localized magnetic field on the CoFeB nanostructures near the non-magnetic channel. This approach provides a promising route towards the study of thermal and spin diffusion effects using local magnetic fields.

  20. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning...... Electron Microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Twenty intact human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into four groups (n=5) treated as follows: G1- storage in artificial saliva (control group); G2- four 30-minute applications of 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure...

  1. [Pulmonary hydatidosis. Comparison of cytology and scanning electron microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaud, F; Nou, J M; Sadrin, R; de Montreynaud, J M; Adnet, J J

    1986-01-01

    The puncture of a hydatid cyst with a fine needle is not generally recommended as a procedure and may even be contra-indicated in the first instance. Sometimes, however, the cytologist will be surprised to discover some scolices in the aspirate when the radiology is misleading, or not suggestive, and the serology is negative. We report two cases where the diagnosis was made by the cytological examination of the aspirate. The cytological study of the liquids was compared with electron microscopy scanning, enabling the stages of development of the parasite in the tissue of the pulmonary parenchyma to be assessed.

  2. Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy and X Ray Microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsley, David

    This text is the third in a group that evolved from a short course taught annually at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pa., since 1972. Chapters on magnetic contrast a nd electron channeling, dropped from the second volume for reasons of space, are included here along with new topics such as image processing. The first seven chapters should be oT value to those geologists interested in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microanalysis. Chapters 8 and 9, concerned with specimen preparation for biological SEM a nd cryomicroscopy, make up about one third of the text.

  3. Nanometrology using a through-focus scanning optical microscopy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attota, Ravikiran; Silver, Richard

    2011-02-01

    We present an initial review of a novel through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM pronounced as 'tee-som') imaging method that produces nanometer-dimensional measurement sensitivity using a conventional bright-field optical microscope. In the TSOM method a target is scanned through the focus of an optical microscope, acquiring conventional optical images at different focal positions. The TSOM images are constructed using the through-focus optical images. A TSOM image is unique under given experimental conditions and is sensitive to changes in the dimensions of a target in a distinct way. We use this characteristic for nanoscale-dimensional metrology. This technique can be used to identify the dimension which is changing between two nanosized targets and to determine the dimensions using a library-matching method. This methodology has potential utility for a wide range of target geometries and application areas, including nanometrology, nanomanufacturing, defect analysis, inspection, process control and biotechnology.

  4. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indebetouw, Guy; Tada, Yoshitaka; Leacock, John

    2006-11-28

    This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example), while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  5. Quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukojevic, Vladana; Heidkamp, Marcus; Ming, Yu; Johansson, Björn; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf

    2008-11-25

    A new approach to quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is presented. It relies on fluorescence intensity distribution to analyze the molecular occurrence statistics captured by digital imaging and enables direct determination of the number of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion rates without resorting to temporal or spatial autocorrelation analyses. Digital images of fluorescent molecules were recorded by using fast scanning and avalanche photodiode detectors. In this way the signal-to-background ratio was significantly improved, enabling direct quantitative imaging by CLSM. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using standard solutions of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules, quantum dots, and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein in solution and in live cells. The method was verified by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The relevance for biological applications, in particular, for live cell imaging, is discussed.

  6. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assesment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Yoshitaka

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example, while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  7. Nanoscale live cell imaging using hopping probe ion conductance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Pavel; Li, Chao; Shevchuk, Andrew I.; Stepanyan, Ruben; Caldwell, Matthew; Hughes, Simon; Smart, Trevor G.; Gorelik, Julia; Ostanin, Victor P.; Lab, Max J.; Moss, Guy W. J.; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a major advance in scanning ion conductance microscopy: a new hopping mode that allows non-contact imaging of the complex surfaces of live cells with resolution better than 20 nm. The effectiveness of this novel technique was demonstrated by imaging networks of cultured rat hippocampal neurons and mechanosensory stereocilia of mouse cochlear hair cells. The technique allows studying nanoscale phenomena on the surface of live cells under physiological conditions. PMID:19252505

  8. Processing of Graphene combining Optical Detection and Scanning Probe Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmermann Sören

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental setup tailored for robotic processing of graphene with in-situ vision based control. A robust graphene detection approach is presented applying multiple image processing operations of the visual feedback provided by a high-resolution light microscope. Detected graphene flakes can be modified using a scanning probe based lithographical process that is directly linked to the in-situ optical images. The results of this process are discussed with respect to further application scenarios.

  9. Integrated microfluidic linking chip for scanning probe nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kee Suk; Wang, Xuefeng; Shaikh, Kashan; Bullen, David; Goluch, Edgar; Zou, Jun; Liu, Chang; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2004-07-01

    This letter reports an architecture for a microfluidic chip that dresses (inks) multiple nanolithography tips in a high-density array in a parallel and multiplexed fashion. The microfluidic chip consists of multiple precision patterned thin-film poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) patches serving as porous inking pads. Inking chemicals are supplied from loading reservoirs to the inking pads through microfluidic channels. The gas-permeable thin PDMS membranes allow ink molecules to diffuse through while preventing bulk liquid from overflowing or evaporating. The inking chip provides high-density inking, easy loading of inks, and reduced evaporation losses. We present the fabrication process and inking of scanning probe contact printing probes and commercial nitride probes.

  10. Attachment of micro- and nano-particles on tipless cantilevers for colloidal probe microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Sa, Dexter J; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2014-07-15

    Current colloidal probe preparation techniques face several challenges in the production of functional probes using particles ⩽5 μm. Challenges include: glue encapsulated particles, glue altered particle properties, improper particle or agglomerate attachment, and lengthy procedures. We present a method to rapidly and reproducibly produce functional micro and nano-colloidal probes. Using a six-step procedure, cantilevers mounted on a custom designed 45° holder were used to approach and obtain a minimal amount of epoxy resin (viscosity of ∼14,000 cP) followed by a single micron/nano particle on the apex of a tipless cantilever. The epoxy and particles were prepared on individual glass slides and subsequently affixed to a 10× or 40× optical microscope lens using another custom designed holder. Scanning electron microscopy and comparative glue-colloidal probe measurements were used to confirm colloidal probe functionality. The method presented allowed rapid and reproducible production of functional colloidal probes (80% success). Single nano-particles were prominently affixed to the apex of the cantilever, unaffected by the epoxy. Nano-colloidal probes were used to conduct topographical, instantaneous force, and adhesive force mapping measurements in dry and liquid media conveying their versatility and functionality in studying nano-colloidal systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Giulia; Breedijk, Ronald; Hoebe, Ron; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik

    2017-03-01

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, are characterized and compared with properties of standard confocal microscopy. The results show that the lateral resolution of RCM is ~170 nm compared to ~240 nm of confocal microscopy for 488 nm excitation and 1.49 NA. As the theory predicts, this improved lateral resolution is independent of the pinhole diameter. In standard confocal microscopy, the same lateral resolution can only be achieved with an almost closed pinhole and, consequently, with a major loss of signal. We show that the sectioning capabilities of the standard confocal microscope are preserved in RCM and that the axial resolution of RCM is slightly better (~15%) than the standard confocal microscope. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio in RCM is a factor of 2 higher than in standard confocal microscopy, also due to the use of highly sensitive modern cameras. In case the pinhole of a confocal microscope is adjusted in such way that the lateral resolution is comparable to that of RCM, the signal-to-noise ratio in RCM is 4 times higher than standard confocal microscopy. Therefore, RCM offers a good alternative to standard confocal microscopy for higher lateral resolution with the main advantage of strongly improved sensitivity.

  12. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis of daily disposable limbal ring contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Kathrine Osborn; Kakkassery, Joseph; Boree, Danielle; Pinto, David

    2014-09-01

    Limbal ring (also known as 'circle') contact lenses are becoming increasingly popular, especially in Asian markets because of their eye-enhancing effects. The pigment particles that give the eye-enhancing effects of these lenses can be found on the front or back surface of the contact lens or 'enclosed' within the lens matrix. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pigment location and surface roughness of seven types of 'circle' contact lenses. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis was performed using a variable pressure Hitachi S3400N instrument to discern the placement of lens pigments. Atomic force microscopy (Dimension Icon AFM from Bruker Nano) was used to determine the surface roughness of the pigmented regions of the contact lenses. Atomic force microscopic analysis was performed in fluid phase under contact mode using a Sharp Nitride Lever probe (SNL-10) with a spring constant of 0.06 N/m. Root mean square (RMS) roughness values were analysed using a generalised linear mixed model with a log-normal distribution. Least square means and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were estimated for each brand, location and pigment combination. SEM cross-sectional images at 500× and 2,000× magnification showed pigment on the surface of six of the seven lens types tested. The mean depth of pigment for 1-DAY ACUVUE DEFINE (1DAD) lenses was 8.1 μm below the surface of the lens, while the remaining lens types tested had pigment particles on the front or back surface. Results of the atomic force microscopic analysis indicated that 1DAD lenses had significantly lower root mean square roughness values in the pigmented area of the lens than the other lens types tested. SEM and AFM analysis revealed pigment on the surface of the lens for all types tested with the exception of 1DAD. Further research is required to determine if the difference in pigment location influences on-eye performance. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental

  13. The use of scanning ion conductance microscopy to image A6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, Julia; Zhang, Yanjun; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Sánchez, Daniel; Lab, Max J; Vodyanoy, Igor; Edwards, Christopher R W; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2004-03-31

    Continuous high spatial resolution observations of living A6 cells would greatly aid the elucidation of the relationship between structure and function and facilitate the study of major physiological processes such as the mechanism of action of aldosterone. Unfortunately, observing the micro-structural and functional changes in the membrane of living cells is still a formidable challenge for a microscopist. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), which uses a glass nanopipette as a sensitive probe, has been shown to be suitable for imaging non-conducting surfaces bathed in electrolytes. A specialized version of this microscopy has been developed by our group and has been applied to image live cells at high-resolution for the first time. This method can also be used in conjunction with patch clamping to study both anatomy and function and identify ion channels in single cells. This new microscopy provides high-resolution images of living renal cells which are comparable with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Continuous 24h observations under normal physiological conditions showed how A6 kidney epithelial cells changed their height, volume, and reshaped their borders. The changes in cell area correlated with the density of microvilli on the surface. Surface microvilli density ranged from 0.5 microm(-2) for extended cells to 2.5 microm(2) for shrunk cells. Patch clamping of individual cells enabled anatomy and function to be correlated. Scanning ion conductance microscopy provides unique information about living cells that helps to understand cellular function. It has the potential to become a powerful tool for research on living renal cells.

  14. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yue, E-mail: shenyue@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhou, Yuan, E-mail: zhouy@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The humidity dramatically affects the contrast of scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) imaging on mica surface. • This influence roots in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the humidity change. • A strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM is proposed. - Abstract: Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  15. Plasmons and Electrons as Nanosecond-Fast Sensors for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    The ability to measure the fast dynamical evolution of atomic-scale systems often holds the key to their understanding. We combine fast pump-probe spectroscopy tools with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to study atomically assembled arrays of magnetic atoms. The dynamical information quantifies spin lifetimes, magnetic stability and even allows identifying the cross-over between quantum spins and classical magnetism. The spin relaxation times of transition metal atoms can be measured by all-electronic pump probe spectroscopy in which nanosecond-fast voltage pulses excite the spins and probe the average time-dependent response by variations in the spin-polarized tunnel current. In addition, the fast evolution of the local electrostatic potential can be mapped by detecting plasmonic light emission from the STM tunnel junction with time correlating single photon counting. The combination of electrical stimulus and optical detection provides precise control of the excitation process of individual atoms enabling new experiments to probe charge and spin dynamics in the scanning tunneling microscope.

  16. Characterizing gelatin hydrogel viscoelasticity with diffusing colloidal probe microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabaniverki, Soheila; Juárez, Jaime J

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we investigate viscoelasticity in gelatin hydrogels using diffusing colloidal probe microscopy (DCPM) to directly measure the elastic potential energy interaction between colloidal probes and the underlying viscoelastic media. Gelatin samples are prepared in four different concentrations between 0.3wt% and 0.6wt% to examine changes in viscoelasticity with concentration. A force balance describing the interaction between the colloidal probes and the hydrogel as a spring-damper system lead to a simple model for mean square displacement. A histogram of locations sampled by the colloidal probes is directly related to the elastic potential energy and the effective spring constant of the gelatin hydrogels. The effective spring constant is a fixed parameter used in the mean square displacement model to find effective viscosity. These parameters are comparable to viscoelastic parameters obtain by a microrheology analysis of two-dimensional mean square displacements. These results can serve as a guide for assessing hydrogel systems where viscoelastic properties are an important factor in biomaterial design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gold-coated conducting-atomic force microscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Neena Susan; Kulkarni, G U

    2005-04-01

    Some aspects of the performance of gold-coated conductive probes used in conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) technique are discussed. The resistance of the nanocontact between the gold-coated AFM tip and the graphite substrate has been monitored at various applied forces. For small forces (forces in the range 100-150 nN, beyond which the tip seems to undergo plastic deformation. The resistance of the nanocontact increased when current on the order of 100 microA was allowed to pass through, finally resulting in melting of the gold coating.

  18. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  19. Theoretical analysis of a dual-probe scanning tunneling microscope setup on graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen R.; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    Experimental advances allow for the inclusion of multiple probes to measure the transport properties of a sample surface. We develop a theory of dual-probe scanning tunneling microscopy using a Green's function formalism, and apply it to graphene. Sampling the local conduction properties at finite...... length scales yields real space conductance maps which show anisotropy for pristine graphene systems and quantum interference effects in the presence of isolated impurities. Spectral signatures in the Fourier transforms of real space conductance maps include characteristics that can be related...... to different scattering processes. We compute the conductance maps of graphene systems with different edge geometries or height fluctuations to determine the effects of nonideal graphene samples on dual-probe measurements. © 2014 American Physical Society....

  20. Adaptive and robust statistical methods for processing near-field scanning microwave microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, K J; Imtiaz, A; Wallis, T M; Weber, J C; Berweger, S; Kabos, P

    2015-03-01

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy offers great potential to facilitate characterization, development and modeling of materials. By acquiring microwave images at multiple frequencies and amplitudes (along with the other modalities) one can study material and device physics at different lateral and depth scales. Images are typically noisy and contaminated by artifacts that can vary from scan line to scan line and planar-like trends due to sample tilt errors. Here, we level images based on an estimate of a smooth 2-d trend determined with a robust implementation of a local regression method. In this robust approach, features and outliers which are not due to the trend are automatically downweighted. We denoise images with the Adaptive Weights Smoothing method. This method smooths out additive noise while preserving edge-like features in images. We demonstrate the feasibility of our methods on topography images and microwave |S11| images. For one challenging test case, we demonstrate that our method outperforms alternative methods from the scanning probe microscopy data analysis software package Gwyddion. Our methods should be useful for massive image data sets where manual selection of landmarks or image subsets by a user is impractical. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Atomic bonding effects in annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. I. Computational predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odlyzko, Michael L.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre, E-mail: mkhoyan@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Himmetoglu, Burak [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 and Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Cococcioni, Matteo [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 and Theory and Simulations of Materials, National Centre for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    Annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) image simulations were performed for zone-axis-oriented light-element single crystals, using a multislice method adapted to include charge redistribution due to chemical bonding. Examination of these image simulations alongside calculations of the propagation of the focused electron probe reveal that the evolution of the probe intensity with thickness exhibits significant sensitivity to interatomic charge transfer, accounting for observed thickness-dependent bonding sensitivity of contrast in all ADF-STEM imaging conditions. Because changes in image contrast relative to conventional neutral atom simulations scale directly with the net interatomic charge transfer, the strongest effects are seen in crystals with highly polar bonding, while no effects are seen for nonpolar bonding. Although the bonding dependence of ADF-STEM image contrast varies with detector geometry, imaging parameters, and material temperature, these simulations predict the bonding effects to be experimentally measureable.

  2. Magnetic hydroxyapatite coatings as a new tool in medicine: A scanning probe investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambardella, A., E-mail: a.gambardella@biomec.ior.it [Laboratorio di NanoBiotecnologie (NaBi), Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Bianchi, M. [Laboratorio di NanoBiotecnologie (NaBi), Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Kaciulis, S.; Mezzi, A.; Brucale, M. [Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Salaria km 29.300, P.O. Box 10, 00015 Monterotondo Staz, Roma (Italy); Cavallini, M. [Magnetic Nanostructures for Spintronics and Nanomedicine, CNR-ISMN, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Chanda, G.; Uhlarz, M. [Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory (HLD-EMFL), Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Cellini, A.; Pedna, M.F. [Unità Operativa Microbiologia Laboratorio Unico del Centro Servizi AUSL della Romagna, Pievesestina, Cesena (Italy); Sambri, V. [Unità Operativa Microbiologia Laboratorio Unico del Centro Servizi AUSL della Romagna, Pievesestina, Cesena (Italy); Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale (DIMES), Università degli Studi di Bologna, Via Zamboni 33, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Marcacci, M.; Russo, A. [Laboratorio di NanoBiotecnologie (NaBi), Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Laboratorio di Biomeccanica ed Innovazione Tecnologica, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano1/10, I-40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite films enriched with magnetite have been fabricated via a Pulsed Plasma Deposition (PPD) system with the final aim of representing a new platform able to disincentivate bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. The chemical composition and magnetic properties of films were respectively examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) measurements. The morphology and conductive properties of the magnetic films were investigated via a combination of scanning probe technologies including atomic force microscopy (AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Interestingly, the range of adopted techniques allowed determining the preservation of the chemical composition and magnetic properties of the deposition target material while STM analysis provided new insights on the presence of surface inhomogeneities, revealing the presence of magnetite-rich islands over length scales compatible with the applications. Finally, preliminary results of bacterial adhesion tests, indicated a higher ability of magnetic hydroxyapatite films to reduce Escherichia coli adhesion at 4 h from seeding compared to control hydroxyapatite films. - Highlights: • Pulsed Plasma Deposition technique is used to deposit magnetite-rich films of hydroxyapatite for antibacterial purposes. • The preservation of the chemical composition and magnetic properties of the deposition target material is demonstrated. • Scanning tunnelling microscopy is employed for the first time to reveal the presence of magnetite-rich states at the surface. • Preliminary tests suggest that Mag HA films hamper the adhesion of Escherichia coli compared to not magnetic films.

  3. MEMS ultrasonic probe rotary scanning imaging system for medical endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Wen, Shijie; Yu, Daoyin

    2006-11-01

    Medical ultrasonic endoscope is the combination of electronic endoscope and ultrasonic sensor technology. Ultrasonic endoscope sends the ultrasonic probe into coelom through the biopsy channel of an electronic endoscope and rotates it by a micro motor, acquiring fault histology features of digestive organs. Compared with external ultrasonic detection, the system reduces the distance between the transducer and the organ, diminishing the effects on imaging of fats and body cavity gas. On the basis of ultrasonic imaging system, this paper implements a pulse echo imaging system. We describe the ultrasonic probe, emission circuit, receiving circuit and protective circuit in detail. With the demodulation circuit, we get the amplitude of echo which indicates the objects. And to achieve the rotary scan, we design a synchronous control circuit and a data transfer circuit basing on the USB2.0 interface. Finally we get a grey image with 256 grey levels after coordinate conversion.

  4. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2011-01-20

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

  5. Immunolabeling for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Martin W

    2008-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a high resolution surface imaging technique. Many biological process and structures occur at surfaces and if antibodies are available, their components can be located within the surface structure. This is usually done in a similar way to immuno-fluorescence, using an unconjugated primary antibody followed by a tagged secondary antibody against the primary. In this case the tag is usually a colloidal gold particle instead of a fluorophore. Therefore it is quite straightforward to adapt an immuno-fluorescence procedure for SEM, as long as certain precautions are followed, as discussed here. Progressing from immuno-fluorescence, which essentially only indicates the position of a protein within the volume of a cell, to immuno-SEM, puts the labeling into the context of cellular structures. The principles and practices of sample preparation, labeling and imaging are described here.

  6. Ultramicrosensors based on transition metal hexacyanoferrates for scanning electrochemical microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Komkova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report here a way for improving the stability of ultramicroelectrodes (UME based on hexacyanoferrate-modified metals for the detection of hydrogen peroxide. The most stable sensors were obtained by electrochemical deposition of six layers of hexacyanoferrates (HCF, more specifically, an alternating pattern of three layers of Prussian Blue and three layers of Ni–HCF. The microelectrodes modified with mixed layers were continuously monitored in 1 mM hydrogen peroxide and proved to be stable for more than 5 h under these conditions. The mixed layer microelectrodes exhibited a stability which is five times as high as the stability of conventional Prussian Blue-modified UMEs. The sensitivity of the mixed layer sensor was 0.32 A·M−1·cm−2, and the detection limit was 10 µM. The mixed layer-based UMEs were used as sensors in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM experiments for imaging of hydrogen peroxide evolution.

  7. Confocal laser scanning microscopy-guided surgery for neurofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, S; Horn, M; Weger, W; Massone, C; Smolle, J; Gerger, A

    2009-12-01

    The neurofibromatoses comprise at least two separate genetic disorders with variable clinical features and an unpredictable course. The most common type, neurofibromatosis 1, is characterized by > or = 6 café-au-lait spots and the occurrence of neurofibromas, which may present as cutaneous, subcutaneous or plexiform lesions. Normally, excision of neurofibromas is only indicated in the presence of neurological symptoms, suspicion of malignancy or for exceptional cosmetic reasons. For a good functional and aesthetic result with the least danger of recurrence, the surgeon's goal is to excise as much tissue as necessary and as little tissue as possible. One of the main issues during the surgical procedure is to distinguish between neurofibroma and surrounding tissue. We report for the first time the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy to differentiate between neurofibroma and healthy skin.

  8. Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy of Captured Cirrus Ice Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, N. B.; Boaggio, K.; Bandamede, M.; Bancroft, L.; Hurler, K.

    2016-12-01

    We present the latest collection of high-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy images and microanalysis of cirrus ice particles captured by high-altitude balloon (ICE-Ball, see abstracts by K. Boaggio and M. Bandamede). Ice particle images and sublimation-residues are derived from particles captured during approximately 15 balloon flights conducted in Pennsylvania and New Jersey over the past 12 months. Measurements include 3D digital elevation model reconstructions of ice particles, and associated statistical analyses of entire particles and particle sub-facets and surfaces. This 3D analysis reveals that morphologies of most ice particles captured deviate significantly from ideal habits, and display geometric complexity and surface roughness at multiple measureable scales, ranging from 100's nanometers to 100's of microns. The presentation suggests potential a path forward for representing scattering from a realistically complex array of ice particle shapes and surfaces.

  9. Local deposition of anisotropic nanoparticles using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Roman G; Mandler, Daniel

    2013-02-28

    We demonstrate localized electrodeposition of anisotropic metal nanoobjects, namely Au nanorods (GNR), on indium tin oxide (ITO) using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). A gold microelectrode was the source of the gold ions whereby double pulse chronoamperometry was employed to generate initially Au seeds which were further grown under controlled conditions. The distance between the microelectrode and the ITO surface as well as the different experimental parameters (electrodeposition regime, solution composition and temperature) were optimized to produce faceted gold seeds with the required characteristics (size and distribution). Colloidal chemical synthesis was successfully exploited for better understanding the role of the surfactant and different additives in breaking the crystallographic symmetry and anisotropic growth of GNR. Experiments performed in a conventional three-electrode cell revealed the most appropriate electrochemical conditions allowing high yield synthesis of nanorods with well-defined shape as well as nanocubes and bipyramids.

  10. Method for determining a spring constant for a deformable scanning probe microscope element, and scanning probe microscope and calibration device arranged for determining a spring constant for a probe element

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghian, H.; Yang, C.K.; Bossche, A.; French, P.J.; Goosen, J.F.L.; Van Keulen, A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for determining a spring constant k for a deformable probe element (102) of a scanning probe microscope SPM (100). The probe (102) has an outer surface area consisting of a tip area (112) on a first probe side (108) and a tip-less area (113). The probe (102) also has a probe electrode (114)

  11. High Speed Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for Quantitative Analysis of Nanoscale Dynamics of Microvilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hiroki; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Kumatani, Akichika; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2017-06-06

    Observation of nanoscale structure dynamics on cell surfaces is essential to understanding cell functions. Hopping-mode scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) was used to visualize the topography of fragile convoluted nanoscale structures on cell surfaces under noninvasive conditions. However, conventional hopping mode SICM does not have sufficient temporal resolution to observe cell-surface dynamics in situ because of the additional time required for performing vertical probe movements of the nanopipette. Here, we introduce a new scanning algorithm for high speed SICM measurements using low capacitance and high-resonance-frequency piezo stages. As a result, a topographic image is taken within 18 s with a 64 × 64 pixel resolution at 10 × 10 μm. The high speed SICM is applied to the characterization of microvilli dynamics on surfaces, which shows clear structural changes after the epidermal growth factor stimulation.

  12. Destructive effects induced by the electron beam in scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M. C.; Bita, B. I.; Banu, M. A.; Tomescu, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscopy has been validated by its impressive imaging and reliable measuring as an essential characterization tool for a variety of applications and research fields. This paper is a comprehensive study dedicated to the undesirable influence of the accelerated electron beam associated with the dielectric materials, sensitive structures or inappropriate sample manipulation. Depending on the scanning conditions, the electron beam may deteriorate the investigated sample due to the extended focusing or excessive high voltage and probe current applied on vulnerable configurations. Our aim is to elaborate an instructive material for improved SEM visualization capabilities by overcoming the specific limitations of the technique. Particular examination and measuring methods are depicted along with essential preparation and manipulation procedures in order to protect the integrity of the sample. Various examples are mentioned and practical solutions are described in respect to the general use of the electron microscope.

  13. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  14. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  16. Water-Immersible MEMS scanning mirror designed for wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Martel, Catherine; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Gao, Liang; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    By offering images with high spatial resolution and unique optical absorption contrast, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has gained increasing attention in biomedical research. Recent developments in OR-PAM have improved its imaging speed, but have sacrificed either the detection sensitivity or field of view or both. We have developed a wide-field fast-scanning OR-PAM by using a water-immersible MEMS scanning mirror (MEMS-ORPAM). Made of silicon with a gold coating, the MEMS mirror plate can reflect both optical and acoustic beams. Because it uses an electromagnetic driving force, the whole MEMS scanning system can be submerged in water. In MEMS-ORPAM, the optical and acoustic beams are confocally configured and simultaneously steered, which ensures uniform detection sensitivity. A B-scan imaging speed as high as 400 Hz can be achieved over a 3 mm scanning range. A diffraction-limited lateral resolution of 2.4 μm in water and a maximum imaging depth of 1.1 mm in soft tissue have been experimentally determined. Using the system, we imaged the flow dynamics of both red blood cells and carbon particles in a mouse ear in vivo. By using Evans blue dye as the contrast agent, we also imaged the flow dynamics of lymphatic vessels in a mouse tail in vivo. The results show that MEMS-OR-PAM could be a powerful tool for studying highly dynamic and time-sensitive biological phenomena.

  17. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari, E-mail: tetsu-n@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Imai, Koichi [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Akio [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 {mu}m/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  18. Scanning X-ray microscopy of superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Claudia; Ruoss, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Schuetz, Gisela [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart (Germany); Zahn, Patrick; Bayer, Jonas [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart (Germany); Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic flux distribution arising from a high-T{sub c} superconductor is detected and visualized with high spatial resolution using scanning x-ray microscopy (SXM). Therefore, we introduce a sensor layer, namely, an amorphous, soft-magnetic CoFeB cover layer. The magnetic stray fields of the supercurrents lead to a local reorientation of the magnetic moments in the ferromagnet, which is visualized using the large x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) effect of the Co and Fe L3-edge. We show that the XMCD contrast in the sensor layer corresponds to the in-plane magnetic flux distribution of the superconductor and can hence be used to image magnetic structures in superconductors with high spatial resolution. Using the total electron yield (TEY) mode the surface structure and the magnetic domains can be imaged simultaneously and can be correlated. The measurements are carried out at our scanning x-ray microscope MAXYMUS at Bessy II, Berlin with the new low temperature setup.

  19. Post-processing strategies in image scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, J E; Mitchell, C A; Hartell, N A

    2015-10-15

    Image scanning microscopy (ISM) coupled with pixel reassignment offers a resolution improvement of √2 over standard widefield imaging. By scanning point-wise across the specimen and capturing an image of the fluorescent signal generated at each scan position, additional information about specimen structure is recorded and the highest accessible spatial frequency is doubled. Pixel reassignment can be achieved optically in real time or computationally a posteriori and is frequently combined with the use of a physical or digital pinhole to reject out of focus light. Here, we simulate an ISM dataset using a test image and apply standard and non-standard processing methods to address problems typically encountered in computational pixel reassignment and pinholing. We demonstrate that the predicted improvement in resolution is achieved by applying standard pixel reassignment to a simulated dataset and explore the effect of realistic displacements between the reference and true excitation positions. By identifying the position of the detected fluorescence maximum using localisation software and centring the digital pinhole on this co-ordinate before scaling around translated excitation positions, we can recover signal that would otherwise be degraded by the use of a pinhole aligned to an inaccurate excitation reference. This strategy is demonstrated using experimental data from a multiphoton ISM instrument. Finally we investigate the effect that imaging through tissue has on the positions of excitation foci at depth and observe a global scaling with respect to the applied reference grid. Using simulated and experimental data we explore the impact of a globally scaled reference on the ISM image and, by pinholing around the detected maxima, recover the signal across the whole field of view. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Metal particles in a ceramic matrix--scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, K

    2006-09-01

    This paper is concerned with ceramic matrix (Al(2)O(3)) composites with introduced metal particles (Ni, Fe). The composites were obtained via sintering of powders under very high pressure (2.5 GPa). Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were chosen as the tools for the identification and description of the shape, size and distribution of the metal particles. The Al(2)O(3)-Ni composite contained agglomerates of the Ni particles surrounded by ceramic grains and nanometre-size Ni particles located inside the ceramic grains and at the ceramic grain boundaries. In the Al(2)O(3)-Fe composite, the Fe particles were mostly surrounded by ceramic grains. Moreover, holes left by the Fe particles were found. The high pressure used in the fabrication of the composites changed the shape of the metal and ceramic powder grains via plastic deformation.

  1. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  2. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electronic properties of (Zn,CoO systems probed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Moldovan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to gain insight into theelectronic properties of (Zn,CoO system - a widebandgap Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors (DMSshowing room temperature (RT ferromagnetism undern-type doping conditions. On the experimental side, ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunnelling microscopy andspectroscopy (STM and STS at variable temperature (Tare used to probe the local electronic structure of thesystem. It is presented the map of the local density ofstates (LDOS of polar ZnO surfaces. Then, it is possibleto decorate (incorporate Co atoms onto (into thesemiconductor.

  4. The scanning probe microscopy study of thin polymer films

    CERN Document Server

    Harron, H R

    1995-01-01

    spherulites fibrils was influenced by the chemical nature of the solvent Results reported here confirm that the fibril structure and spherulite size was significantly affected by the chemical nature of the plasticizing solvent. Detailed observations of the spherulites are included herein. A tapping mode AFM was used in conjunction with the usual contact mode AFM to image the fine spherulitic lamellae structure. It was found that the AFM operated in the tapping mode was less destructive than when operated in the contact mode and gave higher resolution images of the lamellae structure. The lamellae were found to be structurally very similar to the features observed in the study using STM indicating that under certain circumstances, the STM was less destructive over the 'insulating' polymer than the contact mode AFM. technique. Furthermore, images of the crystalline film contained elongated units that were attributed to the lamellae formations that form the basic building blocks of polymer spherulites. The study...

  5. Solid state physics: advanced spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, nanostructure fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Aghion, Stefano

    Thin films of hybrid solar cells and metal oxide semiconductors -IGZO in particular– and homogeneous PMMA polymers have been studied at the Positron Laboratory (L-NESS centre, Politecnico di Milano, Polo Territoriale di Como). A slow energy positron beam and a positron lifetime spectrometer have been employed for these studies. The positron spectroscopy information have been correlated with electrical and optical properties of the materials. The chemical composition and the morphology of voids and porosities in hybrid solar cells and thin film metal oxide semiconductors have been studied, and a strong correlation between positronium fraction, S-parameter and the electrical properties of these materials has been found. In PMMA polymers, free volume measurements have shown that the optical properties of the material depend on the presence of monomer residual fraction and even slight changes in the dimensions and concentration of free volumes. Positrons have been also applied to the study of positron to positr...

  6. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  7. Reflection across plant cell boundaries in confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D Y T; Kuhlmey, B T; Smith, P M C; Day, D A; Faulkner, C R; Overall, R L

    2008-08-01

    The fluorescence patterns of proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its derivatives are routinely used in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy to identify their sub-cellular localization in plant cells. GFP-tagged proteins localized to plasmodesmata, the intercellular junctions of plants, are often identified by single or paired punctate labelling across the cell wall. The observation of paired puncta, or 'doublets', across cell boundaries in tissues that have been transformed through biolistic bombardment is unexpected if there is no intercellular movement of the GFP-tagged protein, since bombardment usually leads to the transformation of single, isolated cells. We expressed a putative plasmodesmal protein tagged with GFP by bombarding Allium porrum epidermal cells and assessed the nature of the doublets observed at the cell boundaries. Doublets were formed when fluorescent spots were abutting a cell boundary and were only observable at certain focal planes. Fluorescence emitted from the half of a doublet lying outside the transformed cells was polarized. Optical simulations performed using finite-difference time-domain computations showed a dramatic distortion of the confocal microscope's point spread function when imaging voxels close to the plant cell wall due to refractive index differences between the wall and the cytosol. Consequently, axially and radially out-of-focus light could be detected. A model of this phenomenon suggests how a doublet may form when imaging only a single real fluorescent body in the vicinity of a plant cell wall using confocal microscopy. We suggest, therefore, that the appearance of doublets across cell boundaries is insufficient evidence for plasmodesmal localization due to the effects of the cell wall on the reflection and scattering of light.

  8. Active current-noise cancellation for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabbi, Lavish; Shoop, Conner; Banerjee, Riju; Dusch, Bill; Hudson, E. W.

    The high sensitivity of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) poses a barrier to its use in a noisy environment. Vibrational noise, whether structural or acoustic in source, manifests as relative motion between the probe tip and the sample, then appearing in the Z feedback that tries to cancel it. Here we describe an active noise cancellation process that nullifies this motion by adding a drive signal into the existing Z feedback loop. The drive is digitally calculated by actively monitoring vibrations measured by an accelerometer placed in-situ close to the STM head. By transferring the vibration cancellation effort to this drive signal, vibration-created noise in the Z-feedback (during topography) or current (during spectroscopy) is significantly reduced. This inexpensive and easy solution, requiring no major instrumental modifications, is ideal for those looking to place their STM in a noisier environment, for example in the presence of active refrigeration systems (e.g. pulse tube cryocoolers) or coupled to high-vibration instrumentation. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1229138.

  9. Comparison between optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy for turbid sample imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    U-Thainual, Paweena; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) in theory provides lateral resolution equivalent to the optical diffraction limit. Scattering media, such as biological turbid media, attenuates the optical signal and also alters the diffraction-limited spot size of the focused beam. The ORPAM signal is generated only from a small voxel in scattering media with dimensions equivalent to the laser spot size after passing through scattering layers and is detected by an acoustic transducer, which is not affected by optical scattering. Thus, both ORPAM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) reject scattered light. A multimodal optical microscopy platform that includes ORPAM and CLSM was constructed, and the lateral resolution of both modes was measured using patterned thin metal film with and without a scattering barrier. The effect of scattering media on the lateral resolution was studied using different scattering coefficients and was compared to computational results based on Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that degradation of lateral resolution due to optical scattering was not significant for either ORPAM or CLSM. The depth discrimination capability of ORPAM and CLSM was measured using microfiber embedded in a light scattering phantom material. ORPAM images demonstrated higher contrast compared to CLSM images partly due to reduced acoustic signal scattering.

  10. 3D correlative light and electron microscopy of cultured cells using serial blockface scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Burden, Jemima J.; Nkwe, David O.; Pelchen-Matthews, Annegret; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Durgan, Joanne; Weston, Anne; Jones, Martin L.; Peddie, Christopher J.; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Florey, Oliver; Marsh, Mark; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processes of life take place in multiple dimensions, but imaging these processes in even three dimensions is challenging. Here, we describe a workflow for 3D correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) of cell monolayers using fluorescence microscopy to identify and follow biological events, combined with serial blockface scanning electron microscopy to analyse the underlying ultrastructure. The workflow encompasses all steps from cell culture to sample processing, imaging strategy, and 3D image processing and analysis. We demonstrate successful application of the workflow to three studies, each aiming to better understand complex and dynamic biological processes, including bacterial and viral infections of cultured cells and formation of entotic cell-in-cell structures commonly observed in tumours. Our workflow revealed new insight into the replicative niche of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, HIV-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and the composition of the entotic vacuole. The broad application of this 3D CLEM technique will make it a useful addition to the correlative imaging toolbox for biomedical research. PMID:27445312

  11. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J., E-mail: manish.butte@stanford.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  12. Boosting the local anodic oxidation of silicon through carbon nanofiber atomic force microscopy probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Rius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many nanofabrication methods based on scanning probe microscopy have been developed during the last decades. Local anodic oxidation (LAO is one of such methods: Upon application of an electric field between tip and surface under ambient conditions, oxide patterning with nanometer-scale resolution can be performed with good control of dimensions and placement. LAO through the non-contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM has proven to yield a better resolution and tip preservation than the contact mode and it can be effectively performed in the dynamic mode of AFM. The tip plays a crucial role for the LAO-AFM, because it regulates the minimum feature size and the electric field. For instance, the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT-functionalized tips showed great promise for LAO-AFM, yet, the fabrication of CNT tips presents difficulties. Here, we explore the use of a carbon nanofiber (CNF as the tip apex of AFM probes for the application of LAO on silicon substrates in the AFM amplitude modulation dynamic mode of operation. We show the good performance of CNF-AFM probes in terms of resolution and reproducibility, as well as demonstration that the CNF apex provides enhanced conditions in terms of field-induced, chemical process efficiency.

  13. Scanning Probe Evaluation of Electronic, Mechanical and Structural Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virwani, Kumar

    2011-03-01

    We present atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of a range of properties from three different classes of materials: mixed ionic electronic conductors, low-k dielectrics, and polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles. (1) Mixed ionic electronic conductors are being investigated as novel diodes to drive phase-change memory elements. Their current-voltage characteristics are measured with direct-current and pulsed-mode conductive AFM (C-AFM). The challenges to reliability of the C-AFM method include the electrical integrity of the probe, the sample and the contacts, and the minimization of path capacitance. The role of C-AFM in the optimization of these electro-active materials will be presented. (2) Low dielectric constant (low-k) materials are used in microprocessors as interlayer insulators, a role directly affected by their mechanical performance. The mechanical properties of nanoporous silicate low-k thin films are investigated in a comparative study of nanomechanics measured by AFM and by traditional nanoindentation. Both methods are still undergoing refinement as reliable analytical tools for determining nanomechanical properties. We will focus on AFM, the faster of the two methods, and its developmental challenges of probe shape, cantilever force constant, machine compliance and calibration standards. (3) Magnetic nanoparticles are being explored for their use in patterned media for magnetic storage. Current methods for visualizing the core-shell structure of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles include dye-staining the polymer shell to provide contrast in transmission electron microscopy. AFM-based fast force-volume measurements provide direct visualization of the hard metal oxide core within the soft polymer shell based on structural property differences. In particular, the monitoring of adhesion and deformation between the AFM tip and the nanoparticle, particle-by-particle, provides a reliable qualitative tool to visualize core-shell contrast without the use

  14. Cryo-planing for cryo-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijsse, J; van Aelst, A C

    1999-01-01

    In the past decade, investigators of cryo-planing for low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) have developed techniques that enable observations of flat sample surfaces. This study reviews these sample preparation techniques, compares and contrasts their results, and introduces modifications that improve results from cryo-planing. A prerequisite for all successful cryo-planing required a stable attachment of the specimen to a holder. In most cases, clamping with a screw mechanism and using indium as space-filler sufficed. Once this problem was solved, any of three existing cryo-planing methods could be used to provide successful results: cryo-milling, microtomy in a cold room, and cryo-ultramicrotomy. This study introduces modifications to the cryo-planing technique that produces flat surfaces of any desired plane through a specimen. These flat surfaces of frozen, fully hydrated samples can be used to improve observations from cryo-SEM as well as to enhance results from x-ray microanalysis and (digital) image analysis. Cryo-planing results of chrysanthemum (Dendranthema x grandiflorum Tzvelev) stems, hazel (Corylus avelane L.) stems, and repeseed (Brassica napus L.) pistils are presented to illustrate the use of the planing method on fibrous, hard, and delicate materials, respectively.

  15. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K. [St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Syková, E. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Kubinová, Š. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic)

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  16. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue; Zhou, Yuan; Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  17. Scanning reflection ion microscopy in a helium ion microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri V. Petrov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reflection ion microscopy (RIM is a technique that uses a low angle of incidence and scattered ions to form an image of the specimen surface. This paper reports on the development of the instrumentation and the analysis of the capabilities and limitations of the scanning RIM in a helium ion microscope (HIM. The reflected ions were detected by their “conversion” to secondary electrons on a platinum surface. An angle of incidence in the range 5–10° was used in the experimental setup. It was shown that the RIM image contrast was determined mostly by surface morphology but not by the atomic composition. A simple geometrical analysis of the reflection process was performed together with a Monte Carlo simulation of the angular dependence of the reflected ion yield. An interpretation of the RIM image formation and a quantification of the height of the surface steps were performed. The minimum detectable step height was found to be approximately 5 nm. RIM imaging of an insulator surface without the need for charge compensation was successfully demonstrated.

  18. Breast tissue characterization with high-frequency scanning acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumon, R. E.; Bruno, I.; Heartwell, B.; Maeva, E.

    2004-05-01

    We have performed imaging of breast tissue using scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) in the range of 25-50 MHz with the goal of accurately and rapidly determining the structure and composition throughout the volume of the samples. In contrast to traditional histological slides, SAM images can be obtained without special preparation, sometimes even without sectioning, but with sufficiently high spatial resolution to give information comparable to surface optical images. As a result, the use of high-frequency SAM at the time of breast lumpectomy to identify disease-free margins has the potential to reduce reoperative rates, patient anxiety, and local recurrence. However, only limited work has been performed to characterize breast tissue in the frequency range above clinical ultrasound devices. The samples are 4-cm2-thick sections (2-3 mm) taken from mastectomies and preserved in formalin. They are placed between two plates and immersed in water during imaging. Attenuation images are acquired by focusing the acoustic beam at the top and bottom of the samples, although better results were obtained for bottom focusing. For purposes of comparison and identification of histological features, acoustical images will be presented along with optical images obtained from the same samples. [Work supported by CIHR.

  19. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmaack, K. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wittmaack@gsf.de; Wehnes, H. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Heinzmann, U. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Agerer, R. [Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Department Biology, Biodiversity Research: Mycology, Menzinger Stasse 67, 80638 Munich (Germany)

    2005-06-15

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 {mu}m. The collected particles, sampled for short periods ({approx}15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C{sub 60} or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of eggs of Sabethes cyaneus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Mallet, Jacenir; Sarmento, Juliana Soares; Alencar, Jeronimo; Müller, Gerson Azulim; Oliveira, Eliana Medeiros; Foster, Woodbridge A; Marcondes, Carlos Brisola

    2013-03-01

    Mosquitoes of the Neotropical genus Sabethes, some species of which are yellow fever vectors, most often develop through the immature stages in tree holes. Sabethes eggs have not been previously characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Eggs of Sabethes cyaneus (length: 349.6 +/- 2.7 microm; width: 172.6 +/- 1.14 microm; n = 10) are almost biconical when examined from the top. From a lateral perspective 2 surfaces can be seen. One surface is smooth and more convex, whereas the other is less convex and partially covered by a network from which many fungiform tubercles arise. The micropyle is situated on the smooth surface of the pointed anterior tip and is surrounded by an irregular row of tubercles, some of which are leaf shaped. No structures possibly involved in adhesion to surfaces are visible. When hatching, the egg splits dorsoventrally approximately two-thirds of the length from the anterior end. The tubercles appear to be water repellent, and the more convex/smoother surface is downturned, and this position on water was confirmed by direct observation. The eggs float free on the water surface.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy applied to seed-borne fungi examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marcelo de Carvalho; Pozza, Edson Ampélio

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the standard scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as a potential alternative to study seed-borne fungi in seeds, by two different conditions of blotter test and water restriction treatment. In the blotter test, seeds were subjected to conditions that enabled pathogen growth and expression, whereas the water restriction method consisted in preventing seed germination during the incubation period, resulting in the artificial inoculation of fungi. In the first condition, seeds of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), maize (Zea mays L.), and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) were submitted to the standard blotter test and then prepared and observed with SEM. In the second condition, seeds of cotton (G. hirsutum), soybean (Glycine max L.), and common bean (P. vulgaris L.) were, respectively, inoculated with Colletotrichum gossypii var. cephalosporioides, Colletotrichum truncatum, and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum by the water restriction technique, followed by preparation and observation with SEM. The standard SEM methodology was adopted to prepare the specimens. Considering the seeds submitted to the blotter test, it was possible to identify Fusarium sp. on maize, C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides, and Fusarium oxysporum on cotton, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium sp., Rhizopus sp., and Mucor sp. on common bean. Structures of C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides, C. truncatum, and C. lindemuthianum were observed in the surface of inoculated seeds. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. [Scanning electron microscopy findings in titanium middle ear prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwager, K

    2000-12-01

    Titanium as a biomaterial in ossicular replacement has widely spread within the last couple of years. 23 prostheses (12 PORPs, partial ossicular replacement prostheses and 11 TORPs total ossicular replacement prostheses) removed during revision surgery were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The average implantation time was 8 (range 3-15) months. The specimens were investigated regarding tissue growth, epithelialization, inflammation and cellular signs of rejection. Only few prostheses were totally covered by connective tissue or epithelium due to technical problems in removing the implant and the covering tissue as one specimen. But this offered the possibility to study the interface at the edges where the tissue was torn off. The connective tissue looked unremarkable. Polygonal squamous epithelium was detected on several implants. Respiratory epithelium with ciliated cells and mucus producing goblet cells was seen in two specimens. In cases of cholesteatoma or protrusion the explanted prostheses showed typical rosette-like formation of hornifying squamous epithelium. According to underlying disease a lymphocytic infiltration could be seen. There were no cellular signs of incompatibility noticed neither macrophages nor foreign body giant cells. From these investigations titanium seems to be a favorable biomaterial for ossicular replacement with good acceptance also in an implantation site showing chronic inflammation.

  3. Large area scanning probe microscope in ultra-high vacuum demonstrated for electrostatic force measurements on high-voltage devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Gysin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The resolution in electrostatic force microscopy (EFM, a descendant of atomic force microscopy (AFM, has reached nanometre dimensions, necessary to investigate integrated circuits in modern electronic devices. However, the characterization of conducting or semiconducting power devices with EFM methods requires an accurate and reliable technique from the nanometre up to the micrometre scale. For high force sensitivity it is indispensable to operate the microscope under high to ultra-high vacuum (UHV conditions to suppress viscous damping of the sensor. Furthermore, UHV environment allows for the analysis of clean surfaces under controlled environmental conditions. Because of these requirements we built a large area scanning probe microscope operating under UHV conditions at room temperature allowing to perform various electrical measurements, such as Kelvin probe force microscopy, scanning capacitance force microscopy, scanning spreading resistance microscopy, and also electrostatic force microscopy at higher harmonics. The instrument incorporates beside a standard beam deflection detection system a closed loop scanner with a scan range of 100 μm in lateral and 25 μm in vertical direction as well as an additional fibre optics. This enables the illumination of the tip–sample interface for optically excited measurements such as local surface photo voltage detection.Results: We present Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM measurements before and after sputtering of a copper alloy with chromium grains used as electrical contact surface in ultra-high power switches. In addition, we discuss KPFM measurements on cross sections of cleaved silicon carbide structures: a calibration layer sample and a power rectifier. To demonstrate the benefit of surface photo voltage measurements, we analysed the contact potential difference of a silicon carbide p/n-junction under illumination.

  4. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory.

  5. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    This thesis is concerned with fundamental research into electronic and magnetic interaction on the nanoscale. From small metallic and magnetic islands and layers to single atoms. The research revolves around magnetic interaction probed through the spectroscopic capabilities of the scanning....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...... coverage the silver preferably nucleates on top of the bilayer high cobalt islands compared to directly on the Cu(111) substrate. Furthermore, the silver forms a combination of a reconstruction and a Moire pattern which is investigated with low-energy electron diraction and spectroscopic STM mapping at 6...

  6. UHV-compatible spectroscopic scanning Kelvin probe for surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikie, I.; Petermann, U.; Lägel, B.

    1999-08-01

    We have developed an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) to measure local work function ( φ) differences between a conducting sample and a reference metal tip to less than 1 meV. The work function is an extremely sensitive indicator of surface condition and is affected by adsorption, evaporation, surface topography, etc. For example, the increase of φ due to oxidation of Si(111) and polycrystalline rhenium is 1.4 and 1.9 eV, respectively. We have performed SKP work function topographies of metal and semiconductor samples during various UHV cleaning processes to determine if changes in surface work function (Δ φ) can be attributed to chemical contamination, e.g., carbon, or surface structural changes due to thermal processing or ion sputtering. We can, for instance, see major changes in oxidation kinetics due to the type of cleaning mechanism, flash anneal or sputter-anneal, or through as little as 0.6% carbon contamination. The UHV SKP control loop utilises a novel tracking system to maintain constant tip-to-sample spacing during scanning. Combined with the in-house 'Off-Null' detection method we have developed this allows a significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio than alternative detection methods including the lock-in amplifier. Using this system we have performed in situ surface photovoltage spectroscopy during the oxidation of Si(111), illustrating the capability of this technique to probe the local density of states, and surface barrier height spectroscopy during surface processing.

  7. Heterobifunctional crosslinkers for tethering single ligand molecules to scanning probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riener, Christian K.; Kienberger, Ferry; Hahn, Christoph D.; Buchinger, Gerhard M.; Egwim, Innocent O.C.; Haselgruebler, Thomas; Ebner, Andreas; Romanin, Christoph; Klampfl, Christian; Lackner, Bernd; Prinz, Heino; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J

    2003-11-14

    Single molecule recognition force microscopy (SMRFM) is a versatile atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to probe specific interactions of cognitive molecules on the single molecule level. It allows insights to be gained into interaction potentials and kinetic barriers and is capable of mapping interaction sites with nm positional accuracy. These applications require a ligand to be attached to the AFM tip, preferably by a distensible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain between the measuring tip and the ligand molecule. The PEG chain greatly facilitates specific binding of the ligand to immobile receptor sites on the sample surface. The present study contributes to tip-PEG-ligand tethering in three ways: (i) a convenient synthetic route was found to prepare NH{sub 2}-PEG-COOH which is the key intermediate for long heterobifunctional crosslinkers; (ii) a variety of heterobifunctional PEG derivatives for tip-PEG-ligand linking were prepared from NH{sub 2}-PEG-COOH; (iii) in particular, a new PEG crosslinker with one thiol-reactive end and one terminal nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group was synthesized and successfully used to tether His{sub 6}-tagged protein molecules to AFM tips via noncovalent NTA-Ni{sup 2+}-His{sub 6} bridges. The new crosslinker was applied to link a recombinant His{sub 6}-tagged fragment of the very-low density lipoprotein receptor to the AFM tip whereupon specific docking to the capsid of human rhinovirus particles was observed by force microscopy. In a parallel study, the specific interaction of the small GTPase Ran with the nuclear import receptor importin {beta}1 was studied in detail by SMRFM, using the new crosslinker to link His{sub 6}-tagged Ran to the measuring tip [Nat. Struct. Biol. (2003), 10, 553-557].

  8. Experimental Route to Scanning Probe Hot Electron Nanoscopy (HENs) Applied to 2D Material

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2017-06-09

    This paper presents details on a new experimental apparatus implementing the hot electron nanoscopy (HENs) technique introduced for advanced spectroscopies on structure and chemistry in few molecules and interface problems. A detailed description of the architecture used for the laser excitation of surface plasmons at an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is provided. The photogenerated current from the tip to the sample is detected during the AFM scan. The technique is applied to innovative semiconductors for applications in electronics: 2D MoS2 single crystal and a p-type SnO layer. Results are supported by complementary scanning Kelvin probe microscopy, traditional conductive AFM, and Raman measurements. New features highlighted by HEN technique reveal details of local complexity in MoS2 and polycrystalline structure of SnO at nanometric scale otherwise undetected. The technique set in this paper is promising for future studies in nanojunctions and innovative multilayered materials, with new insight on interfaces.

  9. Improved Visualization of Vertebrate Nuclear Pore Complexes by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaulov, Lihi; Harel, Amnon

    2012-01-01

    Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) can provide high-resolution three-dimensional surface imaging of many biological structures, including nuclear envelopes and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs...

  10. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  11. Environmental scanning electron microscopy observation of the ultrastructure of Demodex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xu; Shuling, Guo; Ying, Liu

    2005-12-01

    In this study, numbers of Demodex of hair follicles and sebaceous glands were prepared and the ultrastructure (especially the mouthparts) of Demodex was observed firstly with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The most suitable treatment methods and optimal environmental condition for observing the genus samples were found. The samples were washed with detergent and rinsed with distilled water, and then were taken to the specimen stage, on which there was carbon adhesive tape, using special tools. When the temperature was at 5 degrees C and chamber pressure at 5 mbar respectively, the surface of the samples could be fully imaged without covering water or dehydration. The sample surfaces were plump and clear without postmortem changes and charging artifacts. Detailed information about each part of Demodex was observed by ESEM, and clear three-dimensional images were recorded. The mouthparts of D. folliculorum were composed of a complex set of structures, which included a round oral opening, a sharp oral needle, and a special hypostome that looked like a longitudinal spindle in the central position. On the end segment of palpus, there were seven strong palpal claws located on each side of the mouthparts. D. folliculorum had special piercing mouthparts, while the mouthparts of D. brevis were a simpler structure. We could not observe the oral needle of D. brevis, and there were only five pairs of palpal claws on the end segment of palpus. The offensive organs of Demodex resulted in its pathogenic effects. After studying hundreds of Demodex, we identified both female and male species of D. folliculorum, but only females of D. brevis in our sample. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Spectral analysis of irregular roughness artifacts measured by atomic force microscopy and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhang; Luo, Tingting; Ma, Chengfu; Huang, Wenhao; Gao, Sitian

    2014-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM) measurements on a series of specially designed roughness artifacts were performed and the results characterized by spectral analysis. As demonstrated by comparisons, both AFM and LSM can image the complex structures with high resolution and fidelity. When the surface autocorrelation length increases from 200 to 500 nm, the cumulative power spectral density spectra of the design, AFM and LSM data reach a better agreement with each other. The critical wavelength of AFM characterization is smaller than that of LSM, and the gap between the measured and designed critical wavelengths is reduced with an increase in the surface autocorrelation length. Topography measurements of surfaces with a near zero or negatively skewed height distribution were determined to be accurate. However, obvious discrepancies were found for surfaces with a positive skewness owing to more severe dilations of either the solid tip of the AFM or the laser tip of the LSM. Further surface parameter evaluation and template matching analysis verified that the main distortions in AFM measurements are tip dilations while those in LSM are generally larger and more complex.

  13. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  14. Development of scanning electrochemical microscopy for the investigation of photocatalysis at semiconductor surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, S M M C D

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development and application of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to investigate interfacial photoelectrochemical processes occurring at supported TiO sub 2 surfaces. The new SECM approach, involving both amperometric and potentiometric electrodes, was used to monitor interfacial photoprocesses with high spatial resolution. A new in situ photoelectrochemical approach to chemical actinometry has been developed and used to determine the light flux through a quartz fibre employed in the SECM system. In this system an ultramicroelectrode (UME) probe is positioned with high precision at a known distance close to a TiO sub 2 -coated fibre and used to detect reactants or products of the ongoing photodegradation process. The microelectrochemical actinometry approach was developed using the well-known liquid phase potassium ferrioxalate actinometer. The approach involved recording the steady-state current for Fe(lll) reduction at an SECM tip positioned close to the fibre. A st...

  15. Uncertainty assessment for measurements performed in the determination of thermal conductivity by scanning thermal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiandrisoa, Liana; Allard, Alexandre; Hay, Bruno; Gomés, Séverine

    2017-11-01

    Although its use has been restricted to relative studies, scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is presented today as a candidate technique for performing quantitative measurement of thermal properties at the nanoscale, thanks to the development of relevant calibration protocols. Based on the principle behind near-field microscopes, SThM uses a miniaturized probe to quantify heat transfers versus samples of various thermal conductivities: since the thermal conductivity of a sample cannot be directly estimated, a direct measurand related to the heat transfer must be defined and measured for each sample. That is the reason why the SThM technique applied to thermal conductivity determination belongs to the family of inverse methods. In this work we aim to qualify the technique from a metrological point of view. For the first time, assessment of uncertainty associated with the direct measurand Δ R is performed, yielding a result of less than 2%.

  16. Conductive-probe atomic force microscopy characterization of silicon nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Linwei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The electrical conduction properties of lateral and vertical silicon nanowires (SiNWs were investigated using a conductive-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM. Horizontal SiNWs, which were synthesized by the in-plane solid-liquid-solid technique, are randomly deployed into an undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer. Local current mapping shows that the wires have internal microstructures. The local current-voltage measurements on these horizontal wires reveal a power law behavior indicating several transport regimes based on space-charge limited conduction which can be assisted by traps in the high-bias regime (> 1 V. Vertical phosphorus-doped SiNWs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using a gold catalyst-driving vapor-liquid-solid process on higly n-type silicon substrates. The effect of phosphorus doping on the local contact resistance between the AFM tip and the SiNW was put in evidence, and the SiNWs resistivity was estimated.

  17. Weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy for quantitative dislocation density measurement in steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenta; Shimodaira, Masaki; Toyama, Takeshi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Milan, Konstantinovic J; Gerard, Robert; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate dislocations induced by neutron irradiation, we developed a weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy (WB-STEM) system by installing a novel beam selector, an annular detector, a high-speed CCD camera and an imaging filter in the camera chamber of a spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The capabilities of the WB-STEM with respect to wide-view imaging, real-time diffraction monitoring and multi-contrast imaging are demonstrated using typical reactor pressure vessel steel that had been used in an European nuclear reactor for 30 years as a surveillance test piece with a fluence of 1.09 × 1020 neutrons cm-2. The quantitatively measured size distribution (average loop size = 3.6 ± 2.1 nm), number density of the dislocation loops (3.6 × 1022 m-3) and dislocation density (7.8 × 1013 m m-3) were carefully compared with the values obtained via conventional weak-beam transmission electron microscopy studies. In addition, cluster analysis using atom probe tomography (APT) further demonstrated the potential of the WB-STEM for correlative electron tomography/APT experiments. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Plastic-to-Elastic Transition in Aggregated Emulsion Networks, Studied with Atomic Force Microscopy-Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy Microrheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filip, D.; Duits, Michael H.G.; Uricanu, V.I.; Mellema, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how the simultaneous application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) can be used to characterize the (local) rheological properties of soft condensed matter at micrometer length scales. Measurement of AFM force curves as a

  19. Scanning probe microscopes go video rate and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, M. J.; Crama, L.; Schakel, P.; van Tol, E.; van Velzen-Williams, G. B. E. M.; Overgauw, C. F.; ter Horst, H.; Dekker, H.; Okhuijsen, B.; Seynen, M.; Vijftigschild, A.; Han, P.; Katan, A. J.; Schoots, K.; Schumm, R.; van Loo, W.; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2005-05-01

    In this article we introduce a, video-rate, control system that can be used with any type of scanning probe microscope, and that allows frame rates up to 200images/s. These electronics are capable of measuring in a fast, completely analog mode as well as in the more conventional digital mode. The latter allows measurements at low speeds and options, such as, e.g., atom manipulation, current-voltage spectroscopy, or force-distance curves. For scanning tunneling microscope (STM) application we implemented a hybrid mode between the well-known constant-height and constant-current modes. This hybrid mode not only increases the maximum speed at which the surface can be imaged, but also improves the resolution at lower speeds. Acceptable image quality at high speeds could only be obtained by pushing the performance of each individual part of the electronics to its limit: we developed a preamplifier with a bandwidth of 600kHz, a feedback electronics with a bandwidth of 1MHz, a home-built bus structure for the fast data transfer, fast analog to digital converters, and low-noise drivers. Future improvements and extensions to the control electronics can be realized easily and quickly, because of its open architecture with its modular plug-in units. In the second part of this article we show our high-speed results. The ultrahigh vacuum application of these control electronics on our (UHV)-STM enabled imaging speeds up to 0.3mm/s, while still obtaining atomic step resolution. At high frame rates, the images suffered from noticeable distortions, which we have been able to analyze by virtue of the unique access to the error (dZ) signal. The distortions have all been associated with mechanical resonances in the scan head of the UHV-STM. In order to reduce such resonance effects, we have designed and built a scan head with high resonance frequencies (⩾64kHz), especially for the purpose of testing the fast electronics. Using this scanner we have reached video-rate imaging speeds

  20. The Observation of Martensite and Magnetic Domain Structures in Ni53Mn24Ga23 Shape Memory Alloys by Scanning Electron Acoustic Microscopy and Scanning Thermal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun-Yu; Zeng, Hua-Rong; Song, Hong-Zhang; Hui, Sen-Xing; Li, Guo-Rong; Yin, Qing-Rui

    2012-05-01

    We present observations of martensite variants and ferromagnetic domain structures of Ni53Mn24Ga23 ferromagnetic shape memory alloys with a pure tetragonal martensitic phase by using scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) and scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). Electron acoustic images show a polycrystalline morphology with martensite variants. Direct coincidence between crystallographic martensitic twin variants and magnetic domains is found. A domain-like structure, obtained by SThM, is firstly reported, and then confirmed by magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The experimental results will be helpful for investigating the local thermal properties of ferromagnets and understanding the relationship between martensite variants and magnetic domains.

  1. Observation of the sweating in lipstick by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, S Y; Lee, I S; Shin, H Y; Choi, K Y; Kang, S H; Ahn, H J

    1999-06-01

    The relationship between the wax matrix in lipstick and sweating has been investigated by observing the change of size and shape of the wax matrix due to sweating by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). For observation by SEM, a lipstick sample was frozen in liquid nitrogen. The oil in the lipstick was then extracted in cold isopropanol (-70 degrees C) for 1-3 days. After the isopropanol was evaporated, the sample was sputtered with gold and examined by SEM. The change of wax matrix underneath the surface from fine, uniform structure to coarse, nonuniform structure resulted from the caking of surrounding wax matrix. The oil underneath the surface migrated to the surface of lipstick with sweating; consequently the wax matrix in that region was rearranged into the coarse matrix. In case of flamed lipstick, sweating was delayed and the wax matrix was much coarser than that of the unflamed one. The larger wax matrix at the surface region was good for including oil. The effect of molding temperature on sweating was also studied. As the molding temperature rose, sweating was greatly reduced and the size of the wax matrix increased. It was found that sweating was influenced by the compatibility of wax and oil. A formula consisting of wax and oil that have good compatibility has a tendency to reduce sweating and increase the size of the wax matrix. When pigments were added to wax and oil, the size of the wax matrix was changed, but in all cases sweating was increased due to the weakening of the binding force between wax and oil. On observing the thick membrane of wax at the surface of lipstick a month after molding it was also found that sweating was influenced by ageing. In conclusion, the structure of the wax matrix at the surface region of lipstick was changed with the process of flaming, molding temperature, compatibility of wax and oil, addition of pigment, and ageing. In most cases, as the size of the wax matrix was increased, sweating was reduced and delayed.

  2. Adaptive Q control for Tapping-mode Nano-scanning Using a Piezo-actuated Bimorph Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Gunev, Ihsan; Karaman, Sertac; Basdogan, Cagatay

    2012-01-01

    A new approach, called Adaptive Q-control, for tapping-mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is introduced and implemented on a home-made AFM set-up utilizing a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and a piezo-actuated bimorph probe. In the standard Q-control, the effective Q-factor of the scanning probe is adjusted prior to the scanning depending on the application. However, there is a trade-off in setting the effective Q-factor of an AFM probe. The Q-factor is either increased to reduce the tapping forces or decreased to increase the maximum achievable scan speed. Realizing these two benefits simultaneously using the standard Q-control is not possible. In adaptive Q-control, the Q-factor of the probe is set to an initial value as in standard Q-control, but then modified on the fly during scanning when necessary to achieve this goal. In this paper, we present the basic theory behind the adaptive Q-control, the electronics enabling the on-line modification of the probe's effective Q-factor, and the results of the expe...

  3. Atomic resolution elemental mapping using energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy with chromatic aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, F F; Rosenauer, A; Barthel, J; Mayer, J; Urban, K; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Brown, H G; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses a novel approach to atomic resolution elemental mapping, demonstrating a method that produces elemental maps with a similar resolution to the established method of electron energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dubbed energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM) this mode of imaging is, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, equivalent to tilting the probe in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) through a cone and incoherently averaging the results. In this paper we present a proof-of-principle EFISTEM experimental study on strontium titanate. The present approach, made possible by chromatic aberration correction, has the advantage that it provides elemental maps which are immune to spatial incoherence in the electron source, coherent aberrations in the probe-forming lens and probe jitter. The veracity of the experiment is supported by quantum mechanical image simulations, which provide an insight into the image-forming process. Elemental maps obtained in EFTEM suffer from the effect known as preservation of elastic contrast, which, for example, can lead to a given atomic species appearing to be in atomic columns where it is not to be found. EFISTEM very substantially reduces the preservation of elastic contrast and yields images which show stability of contrast with changing thickness. The experimental application is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle study on strontium titanate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  5. Quantitative dopant profiling in semiconductors. A new approach to Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgart, Christine

    2012-07-01

    Failure analysis and optimization of semiconducting devices request knowledge of their electrical properties. To meet the demands of today's semiconductor industry, an electrical nanometrology technique is required which provides quantitative information about the doping profile and which enables scans with a lateral resolution in the sub-10 nm range. In the presented work it is shown that Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a very promising electrical nanometrology technique to face this challenge. The technical and physical aspects of KPFM measurements on semiconductors required for the correct interpretation of the detected KPFM bias are discussed. A new KPFM model is developed which enables the quantitative correlation between the probed KPFM bias and the dopant concentration in the investigated semiconducting sample. Quantitative dopant profiling by means of the new KPFM model is demonstrated by the example of differently structured, n- and p-type doped silicon. Additionally, the transport of charge carriers during KPFM measurements, in particular in the presence of intrinsic electric fields due to vertical and horizontal pn junctions as well as due to surface space charge regions, is discussed. Detailed investigations show that transport of charge carriers in the semiconducting sample is a crucial aspect and has to be taken into account when aiming for a quantitative evaluation of the probed KPFM bias.

  6. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    OpenAIRE

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called ?big-data? methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient ima...

  7. Fast, high-resolution surface potential measurements in air with heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-06-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) adapts an atomic force microscope to measure electric potential on surfaces at nanometer length scales. Here we demonstrate that Heterodyne-KPFM enables scan rates of several frames per minute in air, and concurrently maintains spatial resolution and voltage sensitivity comparable to frequency-modulation KPFM, the current spatial resolution standard. Two common classes of topography-coupled artifacts are shown to be avoidable with H-KPFM. A second implementation of H-KPFM is also introduced, in which the voltage signal is amplified by the first cantilever resonance for enhanced sensitivity. The enhanced temporal resolution of H-KPFM can enable the imaging of many dynamic processes, such as such as electrochromic switching, phase transitions, and device degredation (battery, solar, etc), which take place over seconds to minutes and involve changes in electric potential at nanometer lengths.

  8. Advanced electric-field scanning probe lithography on molecular resist using active cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Marcus; Aydogan, Cemal; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Ahmad, Ahmad; Angelov, Tihomir; Reum, Alexander; Ishchuk, Valentyn; Krivoshapkina, Yana; Hofer, Manuel; Lenk, Steve; Atanasov, Ivaylo; Holz, Mathias; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2015-07-01

    The routine "on demand" fabrication of features smaller than 10 nm opens up new possibilities for the realization of many devices. Driven by the thermally actuated piezoresistive cantilever technology, we have developed a prototype of a scanning probe lithography (SPL) platform which is able to image, inspect, align, and pattern features down to the single digit nanoregime. Here, we present examples of practical applications of the previously published electric-field based current-controlled scanning probe lithography. In particular, individual patterning tests are carried out on calixarene by using our developed table-top SPL system. We have demonstrated the application of a step-and-repeat SPL method including optical as well as atomic force microscopy-based navigation and alignment. The closed-loop lithography scheme was applied to sequentially write positive and negative tone features. Due to the integrated unique combination of read-write cycling, each single feature is aligned separately with the highest precision and inspected after patterning. This routine was applied to create a pattern step by step. Finally, we have demonstrated the patterning over larger areas, over existing topography, and the practical applicability of the SPL processes for lithography down to 13-nm pitch patterns. To enhance the throughput capability variable beam diameter electric field, current-controlled SPL is briefly discussed.

  9. Nanolithography by scanning probes on calixarene molecular glass resist using mix-and-match lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Marcus; Hofer, Manuel; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2013-07-01

    Going "beyond the CMOS information-processing era," taking advantage of quantum effects occurring at sub-10-nm level, requires novel device concepts and associated fabrication technologies able to produce promising features at acceptable cost levels. Herein, the challenge affecting the lithographic technologies comprises the marriage of down-scaling the device-relevant feature size towards single-nanometer resolution with a simultaneous increase of the throughput capabilities. Mix-and-match lithographic strategies are one promising path to break through this trade-off. Proof-of-concept combining electron beam lithography (EBL) with the outstanding capabilities of closed-loop electric field current-controlled scanning probe nanolithography (SPL) is demonstrated. This combination, whereby also extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is possible instead of EBL, enables more: improved patterning resolution and reproducibility in combination with excellent overlay and placement accuracy. Furthermore, the symbiosis between EBL (EUVL) and SPL expands the process window of EBL (EUVL) beyond the state of the art, allowing SPL-based pre- and post-patterning of EBL (EUVL) written features at critical dimension levels with scanning probe microscopy-based pattern overlay alignment capability. Moreover, we are able to modify the EBL (EUVL) pattern even after the development step. The ultra-high resolution mix-and-match lithography experiments are performed on the molecular glass resist calixarene using a Gaussian e-beam lithography system operating at 10 keV and a home-developed SPL setup.

  10. Harnessing tunable scanning probe techniques to measure shear enhanced adhesion of gecko-inspired fibrillar arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yasong; Zhou, James H-W; Zhang, Cheng; Menon, Carlo; Gates, Byron D

    2015-02-04

    The hierarchical arrays of mesoscale to nanoscale fibrillar structures on a gecko's foot enable the animal to climb surfaces of varying roughness. Adhesion force between the fibrillar structures and various surfaces is maximized after the gecko drags its foot in one direction, which has also been demonstrated to improve the adhesion forces of artificial fibrillar arrays. Essential conditions that influence the magnitude of these interactions include the lateral distance traveled and velocity between the contacting surfaces, as well as the velocity at which the two surfaces are subsequently separated. These parameters have, however, not been systematically investigated to assess the adhesion properties of artificial adhesives. We introduce a systematic study that investigates these conditions using a scanning probe microscope to measure the adhesion forces of artificial adhesives through a process that mimics the mechanism by which a gecko climbs. The measured adhesion response was different for arrays of shorter and longer fibrils. These results from 9000 independent measurements also provide further insight into the dynamics of the interactions between fibrillar arrays and contacting surfaces. These studies establish scanning probe microscopy techniques as a versatile approach for measuring a variety of adhesion properties of artificial fibrillar adhesives.

  11. A simplified model to estimate thermal resistance between carbon nanotube and sample in scanning thermal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Maxim; Rosamond, Mark C.; Gallant, Andrew J.; Kolosov, Oleg V.; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Zeze, Dagou A.

    2017-12-01

    Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is an attractive technique for nanoscale thermal measurements. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can be used to enhance a SThM probe in order to drastically increase spatial resolution while keeping required thermal sensitivity. However, an accurate prediction of the thermal resistance at the interface between the MWCNT-enhanced probe tip and a sample under study is essential for the accurate interpretation of experimental measurements. Unfortunately, there is very little literature on Kapitza interfacial resistance involving carbon nanotubes under SThM configuration. We propose a model for heat conductance through an interface between the MWCNT tip and the sample, which estimates the thermal resistance based on phonon and geometrical properties of the MWCNT and the sample, without neglecting the diamond-like carbon layer covering the MWCNT tip. The model considers acoustic phonons as the main heat carriers and account for their scattering at the interface based on a fundamental quantum mechanical approach. The predicted value of the thermal resistance is then compared with experimental data available in the literature. Theoretical predictions and experimental results are found to be of the same order of magnitude, suggesting a simplified, yet realistic model to approximate thermal resistance between carbon nanotube and sample in SThM, albeit low temperature measurements are needed to achieve a better match between theory and experiment. As a result, several possible avenues are outlined to achieve more accurate predictions and to generalize the model.

  12. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittmann, B. R. [Penn State; Xi, X. [Penn State

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property

  13. Scanning Capacitance Microscopy Imaging of State-of-the-Art MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, R. N.; Garno, J. P.; Hergenrother, J. M.; O'Malley, M. L.; Timp, G. L.

    2000-03-01

    We have used a scanning capacitance microscope (SCM) to study cross-sectioned n- and p-MOSFETs with gate lengths as short as 50 nm. The SCM is a contact AFM, coupled to a sensitive capacitance detector. The metallized AFM tip, native oxide and semiconductor form an MOS junction, upon which we perform c-v measurements. We have studied aggressively scaled CMOS transistors as part of an effort to understand and push the limits to CMOS. We have also studied the newly invented Vertical Replacement-Gate MOSFET, in which the gate dimension is defined by a non-lithographic process. In both cases SCM microscopy is beneficial in advancing and optimizing the design of novel device structures. The transistors provide the opportunity to study well-characterized dopant structures with very small dimensions. We describe some recent improvements we have made in SCM microscopy, in the area of modeling1 probe tips2 sample preparation, and instrumentation. 1 M. L. O'Malley, et al, Appl. Phys. Lett., 74, 272 (1999). 2 M. L. O'Malley, et al, Appl. Phys. Lett., 74, 3672 (1999).

  14. High-speed XYZ-nanopositioner for scanning ion conductance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Ando, Toshio

    2017-09-01

    We describe a tip-scan-type high-speed XYZ-nanopositioner designed for scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), with a special care being devoted to the way of nanopipette holding. The nanopipette probe is mounted in the center of a hollow piezoactuator, both ends of which are attached to identical diaphragm flexures, for Z-positioning. This design minimizes the generation of undesirable mechanical vibrations. Mechanical amplification is used to increase the XY-travel range of the nanopositioner. The first resonance frequencies of the nanopositioner are measured as ˜100 kHz and ˜2.3 kHz for the Z- and XY-displacements, respectively. The travel ranges are ˜6 μm and ˜34 μm for Z and XY, respectively. When this nanopositioner is used for hopping mode imaging of SICM with a ˜10-nm radius tip, the vertical tip velocity can be increased to 400 nm/ms; hence, the one-pixel acquisition time can be minimized to ˜1 ms.

  15. Electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic characterization of spontaneously adsorbed organothiolate monolayers at gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Sze-Shun Season [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-12-10

    This dissertation presented several results which add to the general knowledge base regarding organothiolates monolayer spontaneously adsorbed at gold films. Common to the body of this work is the use of voltammetric reductive resorption and variants of scanning probe microscopy to gain insight into the nature of the monolayer formation process as well as the resulting interface. The most significant result from this work is the success of using friction force microscopy to discriminate the end group orientation of monolayer chemisorbed at smooth gold surfaces with micrometer resolution (Chapter 4). The ability to detect the differences in the orientational disposition is demonstrated by the use PDMS polymer stamp to microcontact print an adlayer of n-alkanethiolate of length n in a predefine pattern onto a gold surface, followed by the solution deposition of a n-alkanethiol of n ± 1 to fill in the areas on the gold surface intentionally not coated by the stamping process. These two-component monolayers can be discriminated by using friction force microscopy which detects differences in friction contributed by the differences in the orientation of the terminal groups at surfaces. This success has recently led to the detection of the orientation differences at nanometer scale. Although the substrates examined in this work consisted entirely of smooth gold films, the same test can be performed on other smooth substrates and monolayer materials.

  16. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    Second-harmonic (SH) optical imaging of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate has been accomplished at room temperature by use of respectively a scanning far-field optical microscope in reflection mode and a scanning near-field optical microscope...... in transmission mode. In both cases the SH signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm in correspondence to the maximum in the photoluminescence spectrum of the QD sample. SH near-field optical images exhibit spatial signal variations on a subwavelength scale that depend on the pump wavelength. We...

  17. Mapping piezoelectric response in nanomaterials using a dedicated non-destructive scanning probe technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorra, Yonatan; Smith, Michael; Datta, Anuja; Benisty, Hadas; Kar-Narayan, Sohini

    2017-12-14

    There has been tremendous interest in piezoelectricity at the nanoscale, for example in nanowires and nanofibers where piezoelectric properties may be enhanced or controllably tuned, thus necessitating robust characterization techniques of piezoelectric response in nanomaterials. Piezo-response force microscopy (PFM) is a well-established scanning probe technique routinely used to image piezoelectric/ferroelectric domains in thin films, however, its applicability to nanoscale objects is limited due to the requirement for physical contact with an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip that may cause dislocation or damage, particularly to soft materials, during scanning. Here we report a non-destructive PFM (ND-PFM) technique wherein the tip is oscillated into "discontinuous" contact during scanning, while applying an AC bias between tip and sample and extracting the piezoelectric response for each contact point by monitoring the resulting localized deformation at the AC frequency. ND-PFM is successfully applied to soft polymeric (poly-l-lactic acid) nanowires, as well as hard ceramic (barium zirconate titanate-barium calcium titanate) nanowires, both previously inaccessible by conventional PFM. Our ND-PFM technique is versatile and compatible with commercial AFMs, and can be used to correlate piezoelectric properties of nanomaterials with their microstructural features thus overcoming key characterisation challenges in the field.

  18. Ultra-Compact Multitip Scanning Probe Microscope with an Outer Diameter of 50 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, Vasily; Zubkov, Evgeny; Junker, Hubertus; Korte, Stefan; Blab, Marcus; Coenen, Peter; Voigtländer, Bert

    We present a multitip scanning tunneling microscope (STM) where four independent STM units are integrated on a diameter of 50 mm. The coarse positioning of the tips is done under the control of an optical microscope or an SEM in vacuum. The heart of this STM is a new type of piezoelectric coarse approach called Koala Drive which can have a diameter greater than 2.5 mm and a length smaller than 10 mm. Alternating movements of springs move a central tube which holds the STM tip or AFM sensor. This new operating principle provides a smooth travel sequence and avoids shaking which is intrinsically present for nanopositioners based on inertial motion with saw tooth driving signals. Inserting the Koala Drive in a piezo tube for xyz-scanning integrates a complete STM inside a 4 mm outer diameter piezo tube of Koala Drive makes the scanning probe microscopy design ultra-compact and accordingly leads to a high mechanical stability. The drive is UHV, low temperature, and magnetic field compatible. The compactness of the Koala Drive allows building a four-tip STM as small as a single-tip STM with a drift of Koala Drive.

  19. Focusing and scanning microscopy with propagating surface plasmons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gjonaj, B.; Aulbach, Jochen; Johnson, P.M.; Mosk, Allard; Kuipers, L.; Lagendijk, Aart

    2013-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel surface plasmon polariton (SPP) microscope which is capable of imaging below the optical diffraction limit. A plasmonic lens, generated through phase-structured illumination, focuses SPPs down to their diffraction limit and scans the focus with steps as small as 10 nm.

  20. Apparent Barrier Height in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, L.; Brandbyge, Mads; Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt

    1996-01-01

    The apparent barrier height phi(ap), that is, the rate of change of the logarithm of the conductance with tip-sample separation in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), has been measured for Ni, Pt, and Au single crystal surfaces. The results show that phi(ap) is constant until point contact is ...

  1. Electrical characterization of dislocations in gallium nitride using advanced scanning probe techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Blake Shelley Ginsberg

    GaN-based materials are promising for high speed and power applications such as amplifier and communications circuits. Ga, In, and AIN-based alloys span a wide optical range (2--6.1 eV) and exhibit strong polarizations making them useful in many devices; however, films are highly defective (˜10 8 dislocations cm-2) due to lack of suitable substrates. Thus, nanoscale electronic characterization of these dislocations is critical for device and growth optimization. Scanning probe techniques enable characterization at length-scales unattainable by conventional techniques. First, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) was used to image surface potential variations due to charged dislocations in HVPE-grown GaN. The film's structural evolution "with thickness was monitored showing a decrease in dislocation density, likely through dislocation reaction. Numerical simulations were used to investigate tip-size effects when imaging highly localized (tens of nm) potential variations indicating that measured dislocation induced potential features in GaN can be much smaller (˜80%) than true variations. Next, capacitance variations in MBE-grown HFETs, due to dislocations-induced carrier depletion, were imaged with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). The distribution of these charged centers was correlated with buffer schemes showing that an AIN buffer leads to pseudomorphic (2D) nucleation and randomly distributed misfit dislocations while deposition directly on SiC results in island (3D) nucleation and a domain structure with dislocations grouped at domain boundaries. Hall measurements and numerical simulations were also carried out to further study the implications of these microstructures. Numerical results indicated that randomly distributed dislocations deplete a larger fraction of free carriers than the same density of grouped dislocations and correlated favorably with Hall results. Correlated SKPM and conductive AFM (C-AFM) measurements were then used to study

  2. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  3. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  4. Microtubule dynamics at the cell cortex probed by TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Ilya; Akhmanova, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a technique that allows selective excitation of fluorescence at a liquid/solid interface within a short distance from the boundary. The penetration depth of TIRF microscopy depends on the angle of illumination resulting in a range of depths, which typically vary from approximately similar 70-200 nm up to reverse approximately 500 nm. The advantages of TIRF microscopy include excellent signal-to-noise ratio, high sensitivity, low photobleaching, and low photodamage. TIRF microscopy is widely used for studying cell adhesion, exo- and endocytosis, and the dynamics of plasma membrane-associated molecules. TIRF microscopy can also be applied for selective visualization of any other cellular processes that occur near the basal membrane even if their localization is not restricted to this part of the cell. For example, microtubules are distributed throughout the cytoplasm, but the use of TIRF microscopy makes it possible to visualize specifically the microtubule subpopulation in the vicinity of the basal cortex and thus study cortical microtubule attachment and stabilization, interactions between microtubules and matrix adhesion structures, and the behavior of specific molecules involved in these processes. In this chapter we describe the application of a commercially available setup to analyze microtubule behavior in live mammalian cells using TIRF microscopy. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  6. Piezoelectric tuning fork probe for atomic force microscopy imaging and specific recognition force spectroscopy of an enzyme and its ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makky, Ali; Viel, Pascal; Chen, Shu-wen Wendy; Berthelot, Thomas; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    Piezoelectric quartz tuning fork has drawn the attention of many researchers for the development of new atomic force microscopy (AFM) self-sensing probes. However, only few works have been done for soft biological materials imaging in air or aqueous conditions. The aim of this work was to demonstrate the efficiency of the AFM tuning fork probe to perform high-resolution imaging of proteins and to study the specific interaction between a ligand and its receptor in aqueous media. Thus, a new kind of self-sensing AFM sensor was introduced to realize imaging and biochemical specific recognition spectroscopy of glucose oxidase enzyme using a new chemical functionalization procedure of the metallic tips based on the electrochemical reduction of diazonium salt. This scanning probe as well as the functionalization strategy proved to be efficient respectively for the topography and force spectroscopy of soft biological materials in buffer conditions. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A Filtering Method to Reveal Crystalline Patterns from Atom Probe Microscopy Desorption Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-26

    reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps Lan Yao Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann...reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. Themethod filters atoms based on the time difference...between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom . Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of

  8. Contribution of Metal Layer Thickness for Quantitative Backscattered Electron Imaging of Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Hyonchol; Takei, Hiroyuki; Negishi, Tsutomu; Kudo, Masato; Terazono, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    ...) imaging in field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were studied to evaluate the potential of using these particles as simultaneously distinguishable labels of target molecules in FE-SEM studies...

  9. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  10. A platform for time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy in the near-field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, Paul S; Loughran, Thomas H J; Hendry, Euan; Barnes, William L; Hicken, Robert J; Childress, Jeffrey R; Katine, Jordan A

    2017-12-01

    Time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM) is a powerful technique for the investigation of picosecond magnetization dynamics at sub-micron length scales by means of the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). The spatial resolution of conventional (focused) Kerr microscopy using a microscope objective lens is determined by the optical diffraction limit so that the nanoscale character of the magnetization dynamics is lost. Here we present a platform to overcome this limitation by means of a near-field TRSKM that incorporates an atomic force microscope (AFM) with optical access to a metallic AFM probe with a nanoscale aperture at its tip. We demonstrate the near-field capability of the instrument through the comparison of time-resolved polar Kerr images of magnetization dynamics within a microscale NiFe rectangle acquired using both near-field and focused TRSKM techniques at a wavelength of 800 nm. The flux-closure domain state of the in-plane equilibrium magnetization provided the maximum possible dynamic polar Kerr contrast across the central domain wall and enabled an assessment of the magneto-optical spatial resolution of each technique. Line profiles extracted from the Kerr images demonstrate that the near-field spatial resolution was enhanced with respect to that of the focused Kerr images. Furthermore, the near-field polar Kerr signal (∼1 mdeg) was more than half that of the focused Kerr signal, despite the potential loss of probe light due to internal reflections within the AFM tip. We have confirmed the near-field operation by exploring the influence of the tip-sample separation and have determined the spatial resolution to be ∼550 nm for an aperture with a sub-wavelength diameter of 400 nm. The spatial resolution of the near-field TRSKM was in good agreement with finite element modeling of the aperture. Large amplitude electric field along regions of the modeled aperture that lie perpendicular to the incident polarization indicate that the aperture can

  11. A platform for time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy in the near-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, Paul S.; Loughran, Thomas H. J.; Hendry, Euan; Barnes, William L.; Hicken, Robert J.; Childress, Jeffrey R.; Katine, Jordan A.

    2017-12-01

    Time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM) is a powerful technique for the investigation of picosecond magnetization dynamics at sub-micron length scales by means of the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). The spatial resolution of conventional (focused) Kerr microscopy using a microscope objective lens is determined by the optical diffraction limit so that the nanoscale character of the magnetization dynamics is lost. Here we present a platform to overcome this limitation by means of a near-field TRSKM that incorporates an atomic force microscope (AFM) with optical access to a metallic AFM probe with a nanoscale aperture at its tip. We demonstrate the near-field capability of the instrument through the comparison of time-resolved polar Kerr images of magnetization dynamics within a microscale NiFe rectangle acquired using both near-field and focused TRSKM techniques at a wavelength of 800 nm. The flux-closure domain state of the in-plane equilibrium magnetization provided the maximum possible dynamic polar Kerr contrast across the central domain wall and enabled an assessment of the magneto-optical spatial resolution of each technique. Line profiles extracted from the Kerr images demonstrate that the near-field spatial resolution was enhanced with respect to that of the focused Kerr images. Furthermore, the near-field polar Kerr signal (˜1 mdeg) was more than half that of the focused Kerr signal, despite the potential loss of probe light due to internal reflections within the AFM tip. We have confirmed the near-field operation by exploring the influence of the tip-sample separation and have determined the spatial resolution to be ˜550 nm for an aperture with a sub-wavelength diameter of 400 nm. The spatial resolution of the near-field TRSKM was in good agreement with finite element modeling of the aperture. Large amplitude electric field along regions of the modeled aperture that lie perpendicular to the incident polarization indicate that the aperture can

  12. Near-equilibrium measurement of quantum size effects using Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späth, Thomas; Popp, Matthias; Pérez León, Carmen; Marz, Michael; Hoffmann-Vogel, Regina

    2017-06-14

    In nano-structures such as thin films electron confinement results in the quantization of energy levels in the direction perpendicular to the film. The discretization of the energy levels leads to the oscillatory dependence of many properties on the film thickness due to quantum size effects. Pb on Si(111) is a specially interesting system because a particular relationship between the Pb atomic layer thickness and its Fermi wavelength leads to a periodicity of the oscillation of two atomic layers. Here, we demonstrate how the combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) provides a reliable method to monitor the quantum oscillations in the work function of Pb ultra-thin film nano-structures on Si(111). Unlike other techniques, with SFM/KPFM we directly address single Pb islands, determine their height while suppressing the influence of electrostatic forces, and, in addition, simultaneously evaluate their local work function by measurements close to equilibrium, without current-dependent and non-equilibrium effects. Our results evidence even-odd oscillations in the work function as a function of the film thickness that decay linearly with the film thickness, proving that this method provides direct and precise information on the quantum states.

  13. Encapsulated tips for reliable nanoscale conduction in scanning probe technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Harish; Sebastian, Abu; Drechsler, Ute; Despont, Michel

    2009-03-11

    Nanoscale tip apexes of conducting cantilever probes are important enablers for several conducting probe technologies that require reliable long-term operation, while preserving the nanoscale integrity of the tip apex. In this paper, the concept of an encapsulated tip with a nanoscale conducting core is presented. A method to fabricate such tips on conducting silicon microcantilevers is described. Long-term conduction and wear reliability of these nanoscale tips are evaluated systematically, and their ability to operate for sliding distances greater than 2 m in conduction and 11 m in wear on amorphous carbon is demonstrated. These results are expected to have an impact on the future of conducting probe-based technologies such as probe-based nanometrology, data storage and nanolithography.

  14. Time-resolved scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frömter, Robert, E-mail: rfroemte@physik.uni-hamburg.de; Oepen, Hans Peter [Institut für Nanostruktur-und Festkörperphysik, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kloodt, Fabian; Rößler, Stefan; Frauen, Axel; Staeck, Philipp; Cavicchia, Demetrio R. [Institut für Nanostruktur-und Festkörperphysik, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Bocklage, Lars [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Röbisch, Volker; Quandt, Eckhard [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-04-04

    We demonstrate the feasibility of investigating periodically driven magnetization dynamics in a scanning electron microscope with polarization analysis based on spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction. With the present setup, analyzing the time structure of the scattering events, we obtain a temporal resolution of 700 ps, which is demonstrated by means of imaging the field-driven 100 MHz gyration of the vortex in a soft-magnetic FeCoSiB square. Owing to the efficient intrinsic timing scheme, high-quality movies, giving two components of the magnetization simultaneously, can be recorded on the time scale of hours.

  15. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  16. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Scanning electron microscopy of heat-damaged bone tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsanyl, L

    1977-02-01

    Parts of diaphyses of bones were exposed to high temperature of 200-1300 degrees C. Damage to the bone tissue caused by the heat was investigated. The scanning electron microscopic picture seems to be characteristic of the temperature applied. When the bones heated to the high temperature of 700 degrees C characteristic changes appear on the periostal surface, higher temperatura on the other hand causes damage to the compact bone tissue and can be observed on the fracture-surface. Author stresses the importance of this technique in the legal medicine and anthropology.

  18. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning...... characteristic of an erosive process that took place on human enamel. Depression areas, including the formation of craters, and exposure of enamel rods could also be detected. Conclusion: Bleaching effects on enamel morphology were randomly distributed throughout enamel surface and various degrees of enamel...

  19. Special raster scanning for reduction of charging effects in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Oho, Eisaku

    2014-01-01

    A special raster scanning (SRS) method for reduction of charging effects is developed for the field of SEM. Both a conventional fast scan (horizontal direction) and an unusual scan (vertical direction) are adopted for acquiring raw data consisting of many sub-images. These data are converted to a proper SEM image using digital image processing techniques. About sharpness of the image and reduction of charging effects, the SRS is compared with the conventional fast scan (with frame-averaging) and the conventional slow scan. Experimental results show the effectiveness of SRS images. By a successful combination of the proposed scanning method and low accelerating voltage (LV)-SEMs, it is expected that higher-quality SEM images can be more easily acquired by the considerable reduction of charging effects, while maintaining the resolution. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Anticipating, measuring, and minimizing MEMS mirror scan error to improve laser scanning microscopy's speed and accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, John P; York, Andrew G; Shroff, Hari

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method to speed up microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror scanning by > 20x, while also improving scan accuracy. We use Landweber deconvolution to determine an input voltage which would produce a desired output, based on the measured MEMS impulse response. Since the MEMS is weakly nonlinear, the observed behavior deviates from expectations, and we iteratively improve our input to minimize this deviation. This allows customizable MEMS angle vs. time with <1% deviation from the desired scan pattern. We demonstrate our technique by optimizing a point scanning microscope's raster patterns to image mammal submandibular gland and pollen at ~10 frames/s.

  1. Advantages of environmental scanning electron microscopy in studies of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S P; Pope, R K; Scheetz, R W; Ray, R I; Wagner, P A; Little, B J

    1993-08-01

    Microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and microalgae, are composed predominantly of water which prohibits direct observation in a traditional scanning electron microscope (SEM). Preparation for SEM requires that microorganisms be fixed, frozen or dehydrated, and coated with a conductive film before observation in a high vacuum environment. Sample preparation may mechanically disturb delicate samples, compromise morphological information, and introduce other artifacts. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) provides a technology for imaging hydrated or dehydrated biological samples with minimal manipulation and without the need for conductive coatings. Sporulating cultures of three fungi, Aspergillus sp., Cunninghamella sp., and Mucor sp., were imaged in the ESEM to assess usefulness of the instrument in the direct observation of delicate, uncoated, biological specimens. Asexual sporophores showed no evidence of conidial displacement or disruption of sporangia. Uncoated algal cells of Euglena gracilis and Spirogyra sp. were examined using the backscatter electron detector (BSE) and the environmental secondary electron detector (ESD) of the ESEM. BSE images had more clearly defined intracellular structures, whereas ESD gave a clearer view of the surface E. gracilis cells fixed with potassium permanganate, Spirogyra sp. stained with Lugol's solution, and Saprolegnia sp. fixed with osmium tetroxide were compared using BSE and ESD to demonstrate that cellular details could be enhanced by the introduction of heavy metals. The effect of cellular water on signal quality was evaluated by comparing hydrated to critical point dried specimens.

  2. In-situ Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy of Catalytic Solids and Related Nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.; de Smit, E.; van Schooneveld, M.M.; Aramburo, L.R.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    The present status of in-situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) is reviewed, with an emphasis on the abilities of the STXM technique in comparison with electron microscopy. The experimental aspects and interpretation of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are briefly introduced and the

  3. Core/shell nanofiber characterization by Raman scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfakis, Lauren; Sharikova, Anna; Tuschel, David; Costa, Felipe Xavier; Larsen, Melinda; Khmaladze, Alexander; Castracane, James

    2017-01-01

    Core/shell nanofibers are becoming increasingly popular for applications in tissue engineering. Nanofibers alone provide surface topography and increased surface area that promote cellular attachment; however, core/shell nanofibers provide the versatility of incorporating two materials with different properties into one. Such synthetic materials can provide the mechanical and degradation properties required to make a construct that mimics in vivo tissue. Many variations of these fibers can be produced. The challenge lies in the ability to characterize and quantify these nanofibers post fabrication. We developed a non-invasive method for the composition characterization and quantification at the nanoscale level of fibers using Confocal Raman microscopy. The biodegradable/biocompatible nanofibers, Poly (glycerol-sebacate)/Poly (lactic-co-glycolic) (PGS/PLGA), were characterized as a part of a fiber scaffold to quickly and efficiently analyze the quality of the substrate used for tissue engineering. PMID:28271000

  4. Online correction of scanning probe microscopes with pixel accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirscherl, Kai

    2000-01-01

    -20% depending on the piezo material used and the scan range. The change in sensitivity is up to 20% as well, depending on the scan frequency. Current software controlled SPM are equipped with an algorithm that changes the shape of the control voltage online in a way to produce a linear piezo movement...

  5. Customized patterned substrates for highly versatile correlative light-scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Lorena; Sogne, Elisa; Rodighiero, Simona; Marchesi, Davide; Milani, Paolo; Francolini, Maura

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) combines the advantages of light and electron microscopy, thus making it possible to follow dynamic events in living cells at nanometre resolution. Various CLEM approaches and devices have been developed, each of which has its own advantages and technical challenges. We here describe our customized patterned glass substrates, which improve the feasibility of correlative fluorescence/confocal and scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25391455

  6. Laser terahertz emission microscopy with near-field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Using an AFM, an optical near-field image at 800 nm of a dipole antenna for THz emission is measured, and by simultaneously collecting the emitted THz radiation, the laser light confined under the AFM probe gives a THz emission resolution of less than 50 nm....

  7. The CantiClever: A Dedicated Probe for Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, A.G.; Heskamp, I.R.; Heskamp, Iwan; Siekman, Martin Herman; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    We present a new cantilever for magnetic-force microscopy (MFM), the CantiClever, which is not derived from atomic-force microscopy (AFM) probes but optimized for MFM. Our design integrates the cantilever and the magnetic tip in a single manufacturing process with the use of silicon microma-chining

  8. PSD microscopy: a new technique for adaptive local scanning of microscale objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehdi; Shen, Yantao

    2017-01-01

    A position-sensitive detector/device (PSD) is a sensor that is capable of tracking the location of a laser beam on its surface. PSDs are used in many scientific instruments and technical applications including but not limited to atomic force microscopy, human eye movement monitoring, mirrors or machine tool alignment, vibration analysis, beam position control and so on. This work intends to propose a new application using the PSD. That is a new microscopy system called scanning PSD microscopy. The working mechanism is about putting an object on the surface of the PSD and fast scanning its area with a laser beam. To achieve a high degree of accuracy and precision, a reliable framework was designed using the PSD. In this work, we first tried to improve the PSD reading and its measurement performance. This was done by minimizing the effects of noise, distortion and other disturbing parameters. After achieving a high degree of confidence, the microscopy system can be implemented based on the improved PSD measurement performance. Later to improve the scanning efficiency, we developed an adaptive local scanning system to scan the whole area of the PSD in a short matter of time. It was validated that our comprehensive and adaptive local scanning method can shorten the scanning time in order of hundreds of times in comparison with the traditional raster scanning without losing any important information about the scanned 2D objects. Methods are also introduced to scan very complicated objects with bifurcations and crossings. By incorporating all these methods, the new microscopy system is capable of scanning very complicated objects in the matter of a few seconds with a resolution that is in order of a few micrometers.

  9. Identification of sandstone core damage using scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Abdul Razak; Jaafar, Mohd Zaidi; Sulaiman, Wan Rosli Wan; Ismail, Issham; Shiunn, Ng Yinn

    2017-12-01

    Particles and fluids invasion into the pore spaces causes serious damage to the formation, resulting reduction in petroleum production. In order to prevent permeability damage for a well effectively, the damage mechanisms should be identified. In this study, water-based drilling fluid was compared to oil-based drilling fluids based on microscopic observation. The cores were damaged by several drilling fluid systems. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the damage mechanism caused by the drilling fluids. Results showed that the ester based drilling fluid system caused the most serious damage followed by synthetic oil based system and KCI-polymer system. Fine solids and filtrate migration and emulsion blockage are believed to be the major mechanisms controlling the changes in flow properties for the sandstone samples.

  10. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  11. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  12. Atom probe field-ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: field-ion microscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM), and liquid metal ion sources (LMIS). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles.

  13. Versatile variable temperature and magnetic field scanning probe microscope for advanced material research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin-Oh; Choi, Seokhwan; Lee, Yeonghoon; Kim, Jinwoo; Son, Donghyeon; Lee, Jhinhwan

    2017-10-01

    We have built a variable temperature scanning probe microscope (SPM) that covers 4.6 K-180 K and up to 7 T whose SPM head fits in a 52 mm bore magnet. It features a temperature-controlled sample stage thermally well isolated from the SPM body in good thermal contact with the liquid helium bath. It has a 7-sample-holder storage carousel at liquid helium temperature for systematic studies using multiple samples and field emission targets intended for spin-polarized spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study on samples with various compositions and doping conditions. The system is equipped with a UHV sample preparation chamber and mounted on a two-stage vibration isolation system made of a heavy concrete block and a granite table on pneumatic vibration isolators. A quartz resonator (qPlus)-based non-contact atomic force microscope (AFM) sensor is used for simultaneous STM/AFM operation for research on samples with highly insulating properties such as strongly underdoped cuprates and strongly correlated electron systems.

  14. Make them Blink : Probes for Super-Resolution Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelsang, Jan; Steinhauer, Christian; Forthmann, Carsten; Stein, Ingo H.; Person-Skegro, Britta; Cordes, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, a number of approaches have emerged that enable far-field fluorescence imaging beyond the diffraction limit of light, namely super-resolution microscopy. These techniques are beginning to profoundly alter our abilities to look at biological structures and dynamics and are bound to

  15. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@ua.ac.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Verbeeck, J. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Erni, R. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 72R0150, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bals, S. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Luysberg, M. [Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Center for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Helmholtz Research Center Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-09-15

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  16. Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Thomas; Simon, Georg H; Heinke, Lars; Lichtenstein, Leonid; Heyde, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Surfaces of thin oxide films were investigated by means of a dual mode NC-AFM/STM. Apart from imaging the surface termination by NC-AFM with atomic resolution, point defects in magnesium oxide on Ag(001) and line defects in aluminum oxide on NiAl(110), respectively, were thoroughly studied. The contact potential was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and the electronic structure by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). On magnesium oxide, different color centers, i.e., F(0), F(+), F(2+) and divacancies, have different effects on the contact potential. These differences enabled classification and unambiguous differentiation by KPFM. True atomic resolution shows the topography at line defects in aluminum oxide. At these domain boundaries, STS and KPFM verify F(2+)-like centers, which have been predicted by density functional theory calculations. Thus, by determining the contact potential and the electronic structure with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range, NC-AFM and STM can be successfully applied on thin oxide films beyond imaging the topography of the surface atoms.

  17. Access to residual carrier concentration in ZnO nanowires by calibrated scanning spreading resistance microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L., E-mail: lin.wang@insa-lyon.fr; Brémond, G. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL), Université de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5270, INSA Lyon, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Chauveau, J. M. [Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications (CRHEA), CNRS UPR10, rue Bernard Grégory 06560 Valbonne Sophia Antipolis (France); Physics Department, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis (UNS), Parc Valrose, 06103 Nice (France); Brenier, R. [Institut Lumière Matière (ILM), Université de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5306, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Sallet, V.; Jomard, F.; Sartel, C. [Groupe d' Étude de la Matière Condensée (GEMaC), CNRS-Université de Versailles St Quentin en Yvelines, Université Paris-Saclay, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France)

    2016-03-28

    Scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) was performed on non-intentionally doped (nid) ZnO nanowires (NWs) grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition in order to measure their residual carrier concentration. For this purpose, an SSRM calibration profile has been developed on homoepitaxial ZnO:Ga multilayer staircase structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The Ga density measured by SIMS varies in the 1.7 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} to 3 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} range. From measurements on such Ga doped multi-layers, a monotonic decrease in SSRM resistance with increasing Ga density was established, indicating SSRM being a well-adapted technique for two dimensional dopant/carrier profiling on ZnO at nanoscale. Finally, relevant SSRM signal contrasts were detected on nid ZnO NWs, and the residual carrier concentration is estimated in the 1–3 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} range, in agreement with the result from four-probe measurements.

  18. Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas König

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfaces of thin oxide films were investigated by means of a dual mode NC-AFM/STM. Apart from imaging the surface termination by NC-AFM with atomic resolution, point defects in magnesium oxide on Ag(001 and line defects in aluminum oxide on NiAl(110, respectively, were thoroughly studied. The contact potential was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM and the electronic structure by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS. On magnesium oxide, different color centers, i.e., F0, F+, F2+ and divacancies, have different effects on the contact potential. These differences enabled classification and unambiguous differentiation by KPFM. True atomic resolution shows the topography at line defects in aluminum oxide. At these domain boundaries, STS and KPFM verify F2+-like centers, which have been predicted by density functional theory calculations. Thus, by determining the contact potential and the electronic structure with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range, NC-AFM and STM can be successfully applied on thin oxide films beyond imaging the topography of the surface atoms.

  19. Dislocation imaging for orthopyroxene using an atom-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Akihito; Kogure, Toshihiro; Raimbourg, Hugues; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-11-01

    Dislocations, one-dimensional lattice defects, appear as a microscopic phenomenon while they are formed in silicate minerals by macroscopic dynamics of the earth crust such as shear stress. To understand ductile deformation mechanisms of silicates, atomic structures of the dislocations have been examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Among them, it has been proposed that {100} primary slip system of orthopyroxene (Opx) is dissociated into partial dislocations, and a stacking fault with the clinopyroxene (Cpx) structure is formed between the dislocations. This model, however, has not been determined completely due to the complex structures of silicates. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has a potential to determine the structure of dislocations with single-atomic column sensitivity, particularly by using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) and annular bright field (ABF) imaging with a probing aberration corrector.[1] Furthermore, successive analyses from light microscopy to atom-resolved STEM have been achieved by focused ion beam (FIB) sampling techniques.[2] In this study, we examined dislocation arrays at a low-angle grain boundary of ∼1° rotation about the b-axis in natural deformed Opx using a simultaneous acquisition of HAADF/ABF (JEM-ARM200F, JEOL) equipped with 100 mm2 silicon drift detector (SDD) for energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Figure 1 shows averaged STEM images viewed along the b- axis of Opx extracted from repeating units. HAADF provides the cation-site arrangement, and ABF distinguishes the difference of slightly rotated SiO4 tetrahedron around the a- axis. This is useful to distinguish the change of stacking sequence between the partial dislocations. Two types of stacking faults with Cpx and protopyroxene (Ppx) structures were identified between three partial dislocations. Furthermore, Ca accumulation in M2 (Fe) site around the stacking faults was detected by STEM-EDS. Interestingly, Ca is

  20. Topographical and electrochemical nanoscale imaging of living cells using voltage-switching mode scanning electrochemical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yasufumi; Shevchuk, Andrew I.; Novak, Pavel; Babakinejad, Babak; Macpherson, Julie; Unwin, Patrick R.; Shiku, Hitoshi; Gorelik, Julia; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E.; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2012-01-01

    We describe voltage-switching mode scanning electrochemical microscopy (VSM-SECM), in which a single SECM tip electrode was used to acquire high-quality topographical and electrochemical images of living cells simultaneously. This was achieved by switching the applied voltage so as to change the faradaic current from a hindered diffusion feedback signal (for distance control and topographical imaging) to the electrochemical flux measurement of interest. This imaging method is robust, and a single nanoscale SECM electrode, which is simple to produce, is used for both topography and activity measurements. In order to minimize the delay at voltage switching, we used pyrolytic carbon nanoelectrodes with 6.5–100 nm radii that rapidly reached a steady-state current, typically in less than 20 ms for the largest electrodes and faster for smaller electrodes. In addition, these carbon nanoelectrodes are suitable for convoluted cell topography imaging because the RG value (ratio of overall probe diameter to active electrode diameter) is typically in the range of 1.5–3.0. We first evaluated the resolution of constant-current mode topography imaging using carbon nanoelectrodes. Next, we performed VSM-SECM measurements to visualize membrane proteins on A431 cells and to detect neurotransmitters from a PC12 cells. We also combined VSM-SECM with surface confocal microscopy to allow simultaneous fluorescence and topographical imaging. VSM-SECM opens up new opportunities in nanoscale chemical mapping at interfaces, and should find wide application in the physical and biological sciences. PMID:22611191

  1. Atomic force microscopy probing in the measurement of cell mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Kirmizis, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    Dimitrios Kirmizis, Stergios LogothetidisDepartment of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, GreeceAbstract: Atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used incrementally over the last decade in cell biology. Beyond its usefulness in high resolution imaging, AFM also has unique capabilities for probing the viscoelastic properties of living cells in culture and, even more, mapping the spatial distribution of cell mechanical properties...

  2. Design of cantilever probes for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2000-01-01

    A cantilever beam used in an Atomic Force Microscope is optimized with respect to two different objectives. The first goal is to maximize the first eigenfrequency while keeping the stiffness of the probe constant. The second goal is to maximize the tip angle of the first eigenmode while again kee...... beam finite elements and the optimizations are carried through with either SLP (Sequential Linear Programming) or MMA (Method of Moving Asymptotes) and similar results are obtained....

  3. Quantitative three-dimensional ice roughness from scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Nicholas; Rowe, Penny M.; Stewart, Emily; Roesel, David; Neshyba, Steven

    2017-03-01

    We present a method for inferring surface morphology of ice from scanning electron microscope images. We first develop a novel functional form for the backscattered electron intensity as a function of ice facet orientation; this form is parameterized using smooth ice facets of known orientation. Three-dimensional representations of rough surfaces are retrieved at approximately micrometer resolution using Gauss-Newton inversion within a Bayesian framework. Statistical analysis of the resulting data sets permits characterization of ice surface roughness with a much higher statistical confidence than previously possible. A survey of results in the range -39°C to -29°C shows that characteristics of the roughness (e.g., Weibull parameters) are sensitive not only to the degree of roughening but also to the symmetry of the roughening. These results suggest that roughening characteristics obtained by remote sensing and in situ measurements of atmospheric ice clouds can potentially provide more facet-specific information than has previously been appreciated.

  4. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Samples in an Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Ludĕk; Hovorka, Miloš; Mikmeková, Šárka; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona; Pokorná, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    The high negative bias of a sample in a scanning electron microscope constitutes the “cathode lens” with a strong electric field just above the sample surface. This mode offers a convenient tool for controlling the landing energy of electrons down to units or even fractions of electronvolts with only slight readjustments of the column. Moreover, the field accelerates and collimates the signal electrons to earthed detectors above and below the sample, thereby assuring high collection efficiency and high amplification of the image signal. One important feature is the ability to acquire the complete emission of the backscattered electrons, including those emitted at high angles with respect to the surface normal. The cathode lens aberrations are proportional to the landing energy of electrons so the spot size becomes nearly constant throughout the full energy scale. At low energies and with their complete angular distribution acquired, the backscattered electron images offer enhanced information about crystalline and electronic structures thanks to contrast mechanisms that are otherwise unavailable. Examples from various areas of materials science are presented.

  5. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  6. Sequencing of adenine in DNA by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2017-08-01

    The development of DNA sequencing technology utilizing the detection of a tunnel current is important for next-generation sequencer technologies based on single-molecule analysis technology. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, we previously reported that dI/dV measurements and dI/dV mapping revealed that the guanine base (purine base) of DNA adsorbed onto the Cu(111) surface has a characteristic peak at V s = -1.6 V. If, in addition to guanine, the other purine base of DNA, namely, adenine, can be distinguished, then by reading all the purine bases of each single strand of a DNA double helix, the entire base sequence of the original double helix can be determined due to the complementarity of the DNA base pair. Therefore, the ability to read adenine is important from the viewpoint of sequencing. Here, we report on the identification of adenine by STM topographic and spectroscopic measurements using a synthetic DNA oligomer and viral DNA.

  7. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barnaby D. A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M. C.; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A.; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy investigations regarding Adonis vernalis L. flower morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Neta GOSTIN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The floral morphology of Adonis vernalis L. was observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM. The investigations are important to clarify some taxonomical problems and also could provide useful diagnostic elements for the identification of this medicinal plant in powdered materials. All floral organs are initiated spirally and centripetally and develop centripetally. The petals (8-12 are shorter than the sepals (5-6 in early developmental stages. The petals are disposed on spiral (with 3-4 whorls. The stamens (numerous are unbranched and reach maturity centripetally; they are free of the perianth. The anther walls consisting of a single layer epidermis in the anther wall surrounding the sporagenous tissue, one row of endothecium, two to four rows of middle layer and one row of tapetum layer. In the anther walls, the tapetal cells, by glandular type, persist later in ontogenesis. Pollen grains are tricolpate with echinate surface. The gynoecium is multiple, apocarpous with distinct carpels. The carpels are ascidiate from the beginning. At the base of each carpel, numerousness short, unicellular, trichomes are present. The stigma differentiates as two crests along the ventral slit of the ovary. Each carpel contains a single ovule inside the ovary cavity. The mature ovule is anatropous, with two integuments. It is almost parallel to the funicle.

  9. A mechanically tunable and efficient ceramic probe for MR-microscopy at 17 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdjumov, Sergei; Glybovski, Stanislav; Hurshkainen, Anna; Webb, Andrew; Abdeddaim, Redha; Ciobanu, Luisa; Melchakova, Irina; Belov, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    In this contribution we propose and study numerically a new probe (radiofrequency coil) for magnetic resonance mi-croscopy in the field of 17T. The probe is based on two coupled donut resonators made of a high-permittivity and low-loss ceramics excited by a non-resonant inductively coupled loop attached to a coaxial cable. By full-wave numerical simulation it was shown that the probe can be precisely tuned to the Larmor frequency of protons (723 MHz) by adjusting a gap between the two resonators. Moreover, the impedance of the probe can be matched by varying the distance from one of the resonators to the loop. As a result, a compact and mechanically tunable resonant probe was demonstrated for 17 Tesla applications using no lumped capacitors for tuning and matching. The new probe was numerically compared to a conventional solenoidal probe showing better efficiency.

  10. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy-magnetic force microscopy combination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria; Asenjo, Agustina

    2011-01-01

    .... In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures...

  11. [High-resolution patch-clamp technique based on feedback control of scanning ion conductance microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Xiao-Fan; Lu, Hu-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Jun

    2010-06-25

    The ion channels located on the cell fine structures play an important role in the physiological functions of cell membrane. However, it is impossible to achieve precise positioning on the nanometer scale cellular microstructures by conventional patch-clamp technique, due to the 200 nm resolution limit of optical microscope. To solve this problem, we have established a high-resolution patch-clamp technique, which combined commercial scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and patch-clamp recording through a nanopipette probe, based on SICM feedback control. MDCK cells were used as observation object to test the capability of the technique. Firstly, a feedback controlled SICM nanopipette (approximately 150 MOmega) non-contactly scanned over a selected area of living MDCK cells monolayer to obtain high-resolution topographic images of microvilli and tight-junction microstructures on the MDCK cells monolayer. Secondly, the same nanopipette was non-contactly moved and precisely positioned over the microvilli or tight-junction microstructure under SICM feedback control. Finally, the SICM feedback control was switched off, the nanopipette slowly contacted with the cell membrane to get a patch-clamp giga-ohm sealing in the cell-attached patch-clamp configuration, and then performed ion channel recording as a normal patch-clamp electrode. The ion channel recordings showed that ion channels of microvilli microstructure opened at pipette holding potential of -100, -60, -40, 0, +40, +60, +100 mV (n=11). However, the opening of ion channels of tight-junction microstructure was not detected at pipette holding potential of -100, -40, 0, +40, +100 mV (n=9). These results suggest that our high-resolution patch-clamp technique can achieve accurate nanopipette positioning and nanometer scale high-resolution patch-clamp recording, which may provide a powerful tool to study the spatial distribution and functions of ion channel in the nanometer scale microstructures of living

  12. Scanning Probe Investigation of Pitting Corrosion on Aluminum 5083 H131

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    solution, and a pit is subsequently formed. Dislocation of the particle may have been facilitated by the AFM tip, formation of corrosion products, or...Scanning Probe Investigation of Pitting Corrosion on Aluminum 5083 H131 by Joseph P. Labukas and Kenneth E. Strawhecker ARL-TR-6925 May...Scanning Probe Investigation of Pitting Corrosion on Aluminum 5083 H131 Joseph P. Labukas and Kenneth E. Strawhecker Weapons and Materials

  13. Candida albicans morphologies revealed by scanning electron microscopy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Staniszewska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscope (SEM observations were used to analyze particular morphologies of Candida albicans clinical isolate (strain 82 and mutants defective in hyphae-promoting genes EFG1 (strain HLC52 and/ or CPH1 (strains HLC54 and Can16. Transcription factors Efg1 and Cph1 play role in regulating filamentation and adhesion of C. albicans' morphologies. Comparative analysis of such mutants and clinical isolate showed that Efg1 is required for human serum-induced cell growth and morphological switching. In the study, distinct differences between ultrastructural patterns of clinical strain's and null mutants' morphologies were observed (spherical vs tube-like blastoconidia, or solid and fragile constricted septa vs only the latter observed in strains with EFG1 deleted. In addition, wild type strain displayed smooth colonies of cells in comparison to mutants which exhibited wrinkled phenotype. It was observed that blastoconidia of clinical strain exhibited either polarly or randomly located budding. Contrariwise, morphotypes of mutants showed either multiple polar budding or a centrally located single bud scar (mother-daughter cell junction distinguishing tube-like yeast/ pseudohyphal growth (the length-to-width ratios larger than 1.5. In their planktonic form of growth, blastoconidia of clinical bloodstream isolate formed constitutively true hyphae under undiluted human serum inducing conditions. It was found that true hyphae are essential elements for developing structural integrity of conglomerate, as mutants displaying defects in their flocculation and conglomerate-forming abilities in serum. While filamentation is an important virulence trait in C. albicans the true hyphae are the morphologies which may be expected to play a role in bloodstream infections.

  14. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  15. Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM)-in-SEM for Bio- and Organo-Mineral Interface Characterization in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Guillaume; Hellal, Jennifer; Ollivier, Patrick; Richard, Annie; Burel, Agnes; Jolly, Louis; Crampon, Marc; Michel, Caroline

    2017-11-16

    Understanding biofilm interactions with surrounding substratum and pollutants/particles can benefit from the application of existing microscopy tools. Using the example of biofilm interactions with zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI), this study aims to apply various approaches in biofilm preparation and labeling for fluorescent or electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) microanalysis for accurate observations. According to the targeted microscopy method, biofilms were sampled as flocs or attached biofilm, submitted to labeling using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindol, lectins PNA and ConA coupled to fluorescent dye or gold nanoparticles, and prepared for observation (fixation, cross-section, freezing, ultramicrotomy). Fluorescent microscopy revealed that nZVI were embedded in the biofilm structure as aggregates but the resolution was insufficient to observe individual nZVI. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showed nZVI aggregates close to bacteria, but it was not possible to confirm direct interactions between nZVI and cell membranes. Scanning transmission electron microscopy in the SEM (STEM-in-SEM) showed that nZVI aggregates could enter the biofilm to a depth of 7-11 µm. Bacteria were surrounded by a ring of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) preventing direct nZVI/membrane interactions. STEM/EDS mapping revealed a co-localization of nZVI aggregates with lectins suggesting a potential role of EPS in nZVI embedding. Thus, the combination of divergent microscopy approaches is a good approach to better understand and characterize biofilm/metal interactions.

  16. Breaking the Time Barrier in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Fast Free Force Reconstruction Using the G-Mode Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Ahmadi, Mahshid; Wu, Ting; Hu, Bin; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2017-09-26

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers unparalleled insight into structure and material functionality across nanometer length scales. However, the spatial resolution afforded by the AFM tip is counterpoised by slow detection speeds compared to other common microscopy techniques (e.g., optical, scanning electron microscopy, etc.). In this work, we develop an ultrafast AFM imaging approach allowing direct reconstruction of the tip-sample forces with ∼3 order of magnitude higher time resolution than is achievable using standard AFM detection methods. Fast free force recovery (F(3)R) overcomes the widely viewed temporal bottleneck in AFM, that is, the mechanical bandwidth of the cantilever, enabling time-resolved imaging at sub-bandwidth speeds. We demonstrate quantitative recovery of electrostatic forces with ∼10 μs temporal resolution, free from influences of the cantilever ring-down. We further apply the F(3)R method to Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements. F(3)R-KPFM is an open loop imaging approach (i.e., no bias feedback), allowing ultrafast surface potential measurements (e.g., work, we demonstrate quantitative F(3)R-KPFM measurements-however, we fully expect the F(3)R approach to be valid for all modes of noncontact AFM operation, including noninvasive probing of ultrafast electrical and magnetic dynamics.

  17. A carbon nanofibre scanning probe assembled using an electrothermal microgripper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Kenneth; Dyvelkov, Karin Nordström; Eicchorn, V.

    2007-01-01

    Functional devices can be directly assembled using microgrippers with an in situ electron microscope. Two simple and compact silicon microgripper designs are investigated here. These are operated by electrothermal actuation, and are used to transfer a catalytically grown multi-walled carbon...... nanofibre from a fixed position on a substrate to the tip of an atomic force microscope cantilever, inside a scanning electron microscope. Scanning of high aspect ratio trenches using the nanofibre supertip shows a significantly better performance than that with standard pyramidal silicon tips. Based...

  18. Discretization of electronic states in large InAsP/InP multilevel quantum dots probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, B; Robert-Philip, I; Beveratos, A; David, C; Wang, Z Z; Sagnes, I; Girard, J C

    2012-03-23

    The topography and the electronic structure of InAsP/InP quantum dots are probed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The study of the local density of states in such large quantum dots confirms the discrete nature of the electronic levels whose wave functions are measured by differential conductivity mapping. Because of their large dimensions, the energy separation between the discrete electronic levels is low, allowing for quantization in both the lateral and growth directions as well as the observation of the harmonicity of the dot lateral potential.

  19. Resonant Scanning with Large Field of View Reduces Photobleaching and Enhances Fluorescence Yield in STED Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Lu, Rong; Zhang, Jin; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Photobleaching is a major limitation of superresolution Stimulated Depletion Emission (STED) microscopy. Fast scanning has long been considered an effective means to reduce photobleaching in fluorescence microscopy, but a careful quantitative study of this issue is missing. In this paper, we show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy can be slowed down and the fluorescence yield be enhanced by scanning with high speed, enabled by using large field of view in a custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching and fluorescence yield is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance, and virtually disappears in conventional confocal microscopy. With ≥6 GW∙cm(-2) depletion irradiance, we were able to extend the fluorophore survival time of Atto 647N and Abberior STAR 635P by ~80% with 8-fold wider field of view. We confirm that STED Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing the linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy.

  20. Single molecule probing of SNARE proteins by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in force spectroscopy mode has recently emerged as a technique of choice for studying mechanical interactions between the proteins of the core Soluble N-ethylmalmeimide-sensitive fusion protein Attachment protein REceptor (SNARE) complex. In these experiments, the rupture force, extension, spontaneous dissociation times and interaction energy for SNARE protein-protein interactions can be obtained at the single molecule level. These measurements, which are complementary to results and conclusions drawn from other techniques, improve our understanding of the role of the SNARE complex in exocytosis. PMID:19161382

  1. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  2. Handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography: developments, applications, and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, V.-F.; Demian, D.; Sinescu, C.; Cernat, R.; Dobre, G.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Topala, F. I.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    We present the handheld scanning probes that we have recently developed in our current project for biomedical imaging in general and for Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in particular. OCT is an established, but dynamic imagistic technique based on laser interferometry, which offers micrometer resolutions and millimeters penetration depths. With regard to existing devices, the newly developed handheld probes are simple, light and relatively low cost. Their design is described in detail to allow for the reproduction in any lab, including for educational purposes. Two probes are constructed almost entirely from off-the-shelf components, while a third, final variant is constructed with dedicated components, in an ergonomic design. The handheld probes have uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer scanners therefore they achieve transversal sections through the biological sample investigated - in contrast to handheld probes equipped with bi-dimensional (2D) scanners that can also achieve volumetric (3D) reconstructions of the samples. These latter handheld probes are therefore also discussed, as well as the possibility to equip them with galvanometer 2D scanners or with Risley prisms. For galvanometer scanners the optimal scanning functions studied in a series of previous works are pointed out; these functions offer a higher temporal efficiency/duty cycle of the scanning process, as well as artifact-free OCT images. The testing of the handheld scanning probes in dental applications is presented, for metal ceramic prosthesis and for teeth.

  3. Topographic imaging of convoluted surface of live cells by scanning ion conductance microscopy in a standing approach mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yasufumi; Murakami, Yumi; Nagamine, Kuniaki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Aoyagi, Shigeo; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Kanzaki, Makoto; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2010-09-14

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) using a nanopipette as a probe and ionic current as a feedback signal was introduced as a novel technique to study live cells in a physiological environment. To avoid contact between the pipette tip and cells during the conventional lateral scanning mode, we adopted a standing approach (STA) mode in which the probe was moved vertically to first approach and then retracted from the cell surface at each measurement point on an XY plane. The STA mode ensured non-contact imaging of the topography of live cells and for a wide range of uneven substrates (500 x 300 microm to 5 x 5 microm). We also used a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board to enhance feedback distance regulation. FPGA dramatically increased the feedback speed and decreased the imaging time (450 s per image) with enhanced accuracy and quality of live cell images. To evaluate the potential of the STA mode for SICM, we carried out imaging of a convoluted surface of live cell in various scan ranges and estimated the spatial resolutions of these images.

  4. Adhesive properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis probed by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    2011-01-01

    Mapping of the surface properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis and of biofilm forming bacteria in general is a key to understand their functions, particularly their adhesive properties. To gain a comprehensive view of the structural and chemical properties of S. epidermidis, four different strains...... (biofilm positive and biofilm negative strains) were analyzed using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Force measurements performed using bare hydrophilic silicon nitride tips disclosed similar adhesive properties for each strain. However, use of hydrophobic tips showed that hydrophobic forces...... are not the driving forces for adhesion of the four strains. Rather, the observation of sawtooth force–distance patterns on the surface of biofilm positive strains documents the presence of modular proteins such as Aap that may mediate cell adhesion. Treatment of two biofilm positive strains with two chemical...

  5. Probing cell membrane dynamics using plasmon coupling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Guoxin

    The plasma membrane of mammalian cells is depicted as a two-dimensional hybrid material which is compartmentalized into submicron-sized domains. These membrane domains play a pivotal role in cellular signaling processes due to selective recruitment of specific cell surface receptors. The structural dynamics of the membrane domains and their exact biological functions are, however, still unclear, partially due to the wave nature of light, which limits the optical resolution in the visible light to approximately 400 nm in conventional optical microscopy. Here, we provide a non-fluorescence based approach for monitoring distance changes on subdiffraction limit length scales in a conventional far-field optical microscope. This approach, which is referred to as plasmon coupling microscopy (PCM), utilizes the distance dependent near-field coupling between noble metal nanoparticle (NP) labels to resolve close contacts on the length scale of approximately one NP diameter. We firstly utilize this PCM strategy to resolve interparticle separations during individual encounters of gold NP labeled fibronectin-integrin complexes in living HeLa cells. We then further refine this ratiometric detection methodology by augmenting it with a polarization-sensitive detection, which enables simultaneous monitoring of the distance and conformation changes in NP dimers and clusters. We apply this polarization resolved PCM approach to characterize the structural lateral heterogeneity of cell membranes on sub-micron length scales. Finally, we demonstrate that PCM can provide quantitative information about the structural dynamics of individual epidermal growth factor receptor (ErbB1)-enriched membrane domains in living cells.

  6. Emulation and design of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy based on virtual pinhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-fa; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    In the practical application of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy, the size of detector pinhole is an important factor that determines the performance of spatial resolution characteristic of the microscopic system. However, the use of physical pinhole brings some inconvenience to the experiment and the adjustment error has a great influence on the experiment result. Through reasonably selecting the parameter of matrix detector virtual pinhole (VPH), it can efficiently approximate the physical pinhole. By using this approach, the difficulty of experimental calibration is reduced significantly. In this article, an imaging scheme of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy that is based on the matrix detector VPH is put forward. The influence of detector pinhole size on the axial resolution of confocal scanning microscopy is emulated and analyzed. Then, the parameter of VPH is emulated when the best axial imaging performance is reached.

  7. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee

    2015-01-01

    of methods since they would allow rapid and relatively inexpensive detection of nucleic acids. Modern fluorescence microscopy is having a huge impact on detection of biomolecules at previously unachievable resolution. However, no straightforward methods to detect DNA in a non-enzymatic way using fluorescence......) and finally, detection by fluorescence microscopy. The LNA containing probes display high binding affinity and specificity to DNA containing mutations, which allows for the detection of mutation abundance with an intercalating EvaGreen dye. We used a second probe, which increases the overall number of base...... pairs in order to produce a higher fluorescence signal by incorporating more dye molecules. Indeed we show here that using EvaGreen dye and LNA probes, genomic DNA containing BRAF V600E mutation could be detected by fluorescence microscopy at low femtomolar concentrations. Notably, this was at least...

  8. Compact metal probes: a solution for atomic force microscopy based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R D; Sheremet, E; Müller, S; Gordan, O D; Villabona, A; Schulze, S; Hietschold, M; Zahn, D R T

    2012-12-01

    There are many challenges in accomplishing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and obtaining a proper tip is probably the greatest one. Since tip size, composition, and geometry are the ultimate parameters that determine enhancement of intensity and lateral resolution, the tip becomes the most critical component in a TERS experiment. However, since the discovery of TERS the cantilevers used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) have remained basically the same: commercial silicon (or silicon nitride) tips covered by a metallic coating. The main issues of using metal-coated silicon cantilevers, such as wearing off of the metal layer or increased tip radius, can be completely overcome by using all-metal cantilevers. Until now in TERS experiments such probes have only been used in a scanning tunneling microscope or in a tuning fork-based shear force microscope but not in AFM. In this work for the first time, we show the use of compact silver cantilevers that are fully compatible with contact and tapping modes in AFM demonstrating their superb performance in TERS experiments.

  9. Kelvin probe force microscopy for local characterisation of active nanoelectronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Wagner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Frequency modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KFM is the method of choice for high resolution measurements of local surface potentials, yet on coarse topographic structures most researchers revert to amplitude modulated lift-mode techniques for better stability. This approach inevitably translates into lower lateral resolution and pronounced capacitive averaging of the locally measured contact potential difference. Furthermore, local changes in the strength of the electrostatic interaction between tip and surface easily lead to topography crosstalk seen in the surface potential. To take full advantage of the superior resolution of FM-KFM while maintaining robust topography feedback and minimal crosstalk, we introduce a novel FM-KFM controller based on a Kalman filter and direct demodulation of sidebands. We discuss the origin of sidebands in FM-KFM irrespective of the cantilever quality factor and how direct sideband demodulation enables robust amplitude modulated topography feedback. Finally, we demonstrate our single-scan FM-KFM technique on an active nanoelectronic device consisting of a 70 nm diameter InAs nanowire contacted by a pair of 120 nm thick electrodes.

  10. Atomic and Electronic Structure of Quantum Dots Measured with Scanning Probe Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314075674

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (LT-STM/STS and AFM) studies on colloidal semiconductor and graphene quantum dots (g-QDs). These nanostructures are interesting because they show tunable electrical and optical properties

  11. Studying Dynamic Processes of Nano-sized Objects in Liquid using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hermannsd?rfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Samples fully embedded in liquid can be studied at a nanoscale spatial resolution with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) using a microfluidic chamber assembled in the specimen holder for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and STEM. The microfluidic system consists of two silicon microchips supporting thin Silicon Nitride (SiN) membrane windows. This article describes the basic steps of sample loading and data acquisition. Most important of all is to ensure that the liquid c...

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy I general principles and applications to clean and adsorbate-covered surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy I provides a unique introduction to a novel and fascinating technique that produces beautiful images of nature on an atomic scale. It is the first of three volumes that together offer a comprehensive treatment of scanning tunneling microscopy, its diverse applications, and its theoretical treatment. In this volume the reader will find a detailed description of the technique itself and of its applications to metals, semiconductors, layered materials, adsorbed molecules and superconductors. In addition to the many representative results reviewed, extensive references to original work will help to make accessible the vast body of knowledge already accumulated in this field.

  13. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence – scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  14. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis of daily disposable limbal ring contact lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, Kathrine Osborn; Kakkassery, Joseph; Boree, Danielle; Pinto, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Limbal ring (also known as ‘circle’) contact lenses are becoming increasingly popular, especially in Asian markets because of their eye-enhancing effects. The pigment particles that give the eye-enhancing effects of these lenses can be found on the front or back surface of the contact lens or ‘enclosed’ within the lens matrix. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pigment location and surface roughness of seven types of ‘circle’ contact lenses. Methods Scanning electron ...

  15. Reversible Hydrogenation and Bandgap Opening of Graphene and Graphite Surfaces Probed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Wojtaszek, Magdalena; Arramel, [No Value; Tombros, Nikolaos; van Wees, Bart J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of hydrogenation on the topography and electronic properties of graphene and graphite surfaces are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The surfaces are chemically modified using an Ar/H2 plasma. By analyzing thousands of scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements

  16. Superresolution upgrade for confocal spinning disk systems using image scanning microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbaner, Sebastian; Hähnel, Dirk; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Confocal Spinning Disk Systems are widely used for 3D cell imaging because they offer the advantage of optical sectioning at high framerates and are easy to use. However, as in confocal microscopy, the imaging resolution is diffraction limited, which can be theoretically improved by a factor of 2 using the principle of Image Scanning Microscopy (ISM) [1]. ISM with a Confocal Spinning Disk setup (CSDISM) has been shown to improve contrast as well as lateral resolution (FWHM) from 201 +/- 20 nm to 130 +/- 10 nm at 488 nm excitation. A minimum total acquisition time of one second per ISM image makes this method highly suitable for 3D live cell imaging [2]. Here, we present a multicolor implementation of CSDISM for the popular Micro-Manager Open Source Microscopy platform. Since changes in the optical path are not necessary, this will allow any researcher to easily upgrade their standard Confocal Spinning Disk system at remarkable low cost ( 5000 USD) with an ISM superresolution option. [1]. Müller, C.B. and Enderlein, J. Image Scanning Microscopy. Physical Review Letters 104, (2010). [2]. Schulz, O. et al. Resolution doubling in fluorescence microscopy with confocal spinning-disk image scanning microscopy. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110, 21000-5 (2013).

  17. Artifact characterization and reduction in scanning X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Holzner, Christian; Mohacsi, Istvan; Karvinen, Petri; Diaz, Ana; Pigino, Gaia; David, Christian

    2015-05-18

    Zernike phase contrast microscopy is a well-established method for imaging specimens with low absorption contrast. It has been successfully implemented in full-field microscopy using visible light and X-rays. In microscopy Cowley's reciprocity principle connects scanning and full-field imaging. Even though the reciprocity in Zernike phase contrast has been discussed by several authors over the past thirty years, only recently it was experimentally verified using scanning X-ray microscopy. In this paper, we investigate the image and contrast formation in scanning Zernike phase contrast microscopy with a particular and detailed focus on the origin of imaging artifacts that are typically associated with Zernike phase contrast. We demonstrate experimentally with X-rays the effect of the phase mask design on the contrast and halo artifacts and present an optimized design of the phase mask with respect to photon efficiency and artifact reduction. Similarly, due to the principle of reciprocity the observations and conclusions of this work have direct applicability to Zernike phase contrast in full-field microscopy as well.

  18. Magnetic force microscopy of atherosclerotic plaque

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T A Alexeeva; S V Gorobets; O Yu Gorobets; I V Demianenko; O M Lazarenko

    2014-01-01

    In this work by methods of scanning probe microscopy, namely by atomic force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy the fragments of atherosclerotic plaque section of different nature were investigated...

  19. Simultaneous Bright-Field and Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy in Scanning Electron Microscopy: A New Approach for Analyzing Polymer System Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Binay S.

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy in scanning electron microscopy (STEM-IN-SEM) is a convenient technique for polymer characterization. Utilizing the lower accelerating voltages, larger field of view and, exclusion of post-specimen projection lens in an SEM; STEM-IN-SEM has shown results comparable to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of polymer morphology. Various specimen-holder geometries and detector arrangements have been used for bright field (BF) STEM-IN-SEM imaging. To further the characterization potential of STEM-IN-SEM a new specimen holder has been developed to facilitate simultaneous BF and dark field (DF) STEM-IN-SEM imaging. A new specimen holder and a new microscope configuration were designed for this new imaging technique. BF and DF signals were maximized for optimal STEM-IN-SEM imaging. BF signal intensities were found to be twice as large as DF signal intensities. BF and DF STEM-IN-SEM imaging spatial resolutions are limited to 1.8 nm and approximately 5 nm, respectively. Simultaneous BF & DF STEM-IN-SEM imaging is applicable to both industrial and academic research environments. Examples of commodity and engineering polymer morphology characterization are provided. Results are comparable to TEM observation and may serve as a suitable precursor to STEM characterization of polymer systems. Finally, future developments of various accessories for this technique are discussed.

  20. Scattering compensation by focus scanning holographic aberration probing (F-SHARP) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Jouhanneau, Jean-Sébastien; Poulet, James; Judkewitz, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Optical microscopy is an indispensable tool for researchers, allowing them to closely investigate different organisms, revealing new features and phenomena in biomedical research. Although very useful, conventional imaging techniques that rely only on ballistic, unaffected photons to form images inside inhomogeneous media, like biological tissue, are eventually limited up to the diffusion regime of optical propagation where scattering becomes dominant and no ballistic light can be detected. Adaptive optics and nonlinear optimization methods that rely on so called guide stars have been employed to overcome this problem and image deeper inside biological tissue. These techniques attempt to recover the optimal wavefront that will enhance the image quality or that will render a focus spot inside the scattering biological tissue. In order to achieve that, they have to iterate through each correction mode (e.g. each pixel on a wavefront shaper) thus trading off measurement time with wavefront resolution. Here we present a new turbidity suppression approach, termed Focus Scanning Holographic Aberration Probing (F-SHARP or F♯) that allows us to directly measure the amplitude and phase of the scattered light distribution at the focal plane (scattered E-field PSF). Knowledge of the E-field enables rapid correction of both aberration and scattering with a high resolution. We demonstrate the power of F-SHARP by correcting for aberration and scattering and imaging neuronal structures through the larval zebrafish and mouse brain and through thinned mouse skull in vivo.

  1. Field programmable gate array based reconfigurable scanning probe/optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek B; Lawrence, A J; Dzegede, Zechariah K; Hiester, Justin C; Kim, Cliff; Sánchez, Erik J

    2011-10-01

    The increasing popularity of nanometrology and nanospectroscopy has pushed researchers to develop complex new analytical systems. This paper describes the development of a platform on which to build a microscopy tool that will allow for flexibility of customization to suit research needs. The novelty of the described system lies in its versatility of capabilities. So far, one version of this microscope has allowed for successful near-field and far-field fluorescence imaging with single molecule detection sensitivity. This system is easily adapted for reflection, polarization (Kerr magneto-optical (MO)), Raman, super-resolution techniques, and other novel scanning probe imaging and spectroscopic designs. While collecting a variety of forms of optical images, the system can simultaneously monitor topographic information of a sample with an integrated tuning fork based shear force system. The instrument has the ability to image at room temperature and atmospheric pressure or under liquid. The core of the design is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) data acquisition card and a single, low cost computer to control the microscope with analog control circuitry using off-the-shelf available components. A detailed description of electronics, mechanical requirements, and software algorithms as well as examples of some different forms of the microscope developed so far are discussed.

  2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy. Using new technology to answer old questions in forensic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Karch, Steven B; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2008-03-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a relatively new technique for microscopic imaging. It has found a wide field of application in the general sphere of biological sciences. It has completely changed the study of cells and tissues by allowing greater resolution, optical sectioning of the sample and three-dimensional sanoke reconstruction. Confocal microscopy represents a valid, precious and useful tool capable of providing data (images) of unrivalled clearness and definition. This review discusses the possible applications of confocal microscopy in specific fields of forensic investigation, with specific regard to ballistics, forensic histopathology and toxicological pathology.

  3. A fast spatial scanning combination emissive and Mach probe for edge plasma diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, R. D.; Labombard, B.; Conn, R. W.

    1989-04-01

    A fast spatially scanning emissive and Mach probe has been developed for the measurement of plasma profiles in the PISCES facility at UCLA. A pneumatic cylinder is used to drive a multiple tip probe along a 15 cm stroke in less than 400 msec, giving single shot profiles while limiting power deposition to the probe. A differentially pumped sliding O-ring seal allows the probe to be moved between shots to infer two and three dimensional profiles. The probe system has been used to investigate the plasma potential, density, and parallel Mach number profiles of the presheath induced by a wall surface and scrape-off-layer profile modifications in biased limiter simulation experiments. Details of the hardware, data acquisition electronics, and tests of probe reliability are discussed.

  4. Note: Production of stable colloidal probes for high-temperature atomic force microscopy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditscherlein, L; Peuker, U A

    2017-04-01

    For the application of colloidal probe atomic force microscopy at high temperatures (>500 K), stable colloidal probe cantilevers are essential. In this study, two new methods for gluing alumina particles onto temperature stable cantilevers are presented and compared with an existing method for borosilicate particles at elevated temperatures as well as with cp-cantilevers prepared with epoxy resin at room temperature. The durability of the fixing of the particle is quantified with a test method applying high shear forces. The force is calculated with a mechanical model considering both the bending as well as the torsion on the colloidal probe.

  5. Opportunities and limitations for combined fly-scan ptychography and fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray fluorescence offers unparalleled sensitivity for imaging the nanoscale distribution of trace elements in micrometer thick samples, while x-ray ptychography offers an approach to image weakly fluorescing lighter elements at a resolution beyond that of the x-ray lens used. These methods can be used in combination, and in continuous scan mode for rapid data acquisition when using multiple probe mode reconstruction methods. We discuss here the opportunities and limitations of making use of additional information provided by ptychography to improve x-ray fluorescence images in two ways: by using position-error-correction algorithms to correct for scan distortions in fluorescence scans, and by considering the signal-to-noise limits on previously-demonstrated ptychographic probe deconvolution methods. This highlights the advantages of using a combined approach.

  6. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiandong; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Li

    2015-12-01

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe's characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude's sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement.

  7. Ultrafast axial scanning for two-photon microscopy via a digital micromirror device and binary holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiyi; Gu, Chenglin; Zhang, Dapeng; Wang, Dien; Chen, Shih-Chi

    2016-04-01

    In this Letter, we present an ultrafast nonmechanical axial scanning method for two-photon excitation (TPE) microscopy based on binary holography using a digital micromirror device (DMD), achieving a scanning rate of 4.2 kHz, scanning range of ∼180  μm, and scanning resolution (minimum step size) of ∼270  nm. Axial scanning is achieved by projecting the femtosecond laser to a DMD programmed with binary holograms of spherical wavefronts of increasing/decreasing radii. To guide the scanner design, we have derived the parametric relationships between the DMD parameters (i.e., aperture and pixel size), and the axial scanning characteristics, including (1) maximum optical power, (2) minimum step size, and (3) scan range. To verify the results, the DMD scanner is integrated with a custom-built TPE microscope that operates at 60 frames per second. In the experiment, we scanned a pollen sample via both the DMD scanner and a precision z-stage. The results show the DMD scanner generates images of equal quality throughout the scanning range. The overall efficiency of the TPE system was measured to be ∼3%. With the high scanning rate, the DMD scanner may find important applications in random-access imaging or high-speed volumetric imaging that enables visualization of highly dynamic biological processes in 3D with submillisecond temporal resolution.

  8. Telocytes and putative stem cells in the lungs: electron microscopy, electron tomography and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Suciu, Laura C; Manole, Catalin G; Hinescu, Mihail E

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a novel type of interstitial (stromal) cell - telocytes (TCs) - in the human and mouse respiratory tree (terminal and respiratory bronchioles, as well as alveolar ducts). TCs have recently been described in pleura, epicardium, myocardium, endocardium, intestine, uterus, pancreas, mammary gland, etc. (see www.telocytes.com ). TCs are cells with specific prolongations called telopodes (Tp), frequently two to three per cell. Tp are very long prolongations (tens up to hundreds of μm) built of alternating thin segments known as podomers (≤ 200 nm, below the resolving power of light microscope) and dilated segments called podoms, which accommodate mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Tp ramify dichotomously, making a 3-dimensional network with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. Confocal microscopy reveals that TCs are c-kit- and CD34-positive. Tp release shed vesicles or exosomes, sending macromolecular signals to neighboring cells and eventually modifying their transcriptional activity. At bronchoalveolar junctions, TCs have been observed in close association with putative stem cells (SCs) in the subepithelial stroma. SCs are recognized by their ultrastructure and Sca-1 positivity. Tp surround SCs, forming complex TC-SC niches (TC-SCNs). Electron tomography allows the identification of bridging nanostructures, which connect Tp with SCs. In conclusion, this study shows the presence of TCs in lungs and identifies a TC-SC tandem in subepithelial niches of the bronchiolar tree. In TC-SCNs, the synergy of TCs and SCs may be based on nanocontacts and shed vesicles.

  9. Direct Visualization of Local Electromagnetic Field Structures by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Findlay, Scott D; Matsumoto, Takao; Kohno, Yuji; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-07-18

    The functional properties of materials and devices are critically determined by the electromagnetic field structures formed inside them, especially at nanointerface and surface regions, because such structures are strongly associated with the dynamics of electrons, holes and ions. To understand the fundamental origin of many exotic properties in modern materials and devices, it is essential to directly characterize local electromagnetic field structures at such defect regions, even down to atomic dimensions. In recent years, rapid progress in the development of high-speed area detectors for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub-angstrom spatial resolution has opened new possibilities to directly image such electromagnetic field structures at very high-resolution. In this Account, we give an overview of our recent development of differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy for aberration-corrected STEM and its application to many materials problems. In recent years, we have developed segmented-type STEM detectors which divide the detector plane into 16 segments and enable simultaneous imaging of 16 STEM images which are sensitive to the positions and angles of transmitted/scattered electrons on the detector plane. These detectors also have atomic-resolution imaging capability. Using these segmented-type STEM detectors, we show DPC STEM imaging to be a very powerful tool for directly imaging local electromagnetic field structures in materials and devices in real space. For example, DPC STEM can clearly visualize the local electric field variation due to the abrupt potential change across a p-n junction in a GaAs semiconductor, which cannot be observed by normal in-focus bright-field or annular type dark-field STEM imaging modes. DPC STEM is also very effective for imaging magnetic field structures in magnetic materials, such as magnetic domains and skyrmions. Moreover, real-time imaging of electromagnetic field structures can

  10. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent interest in monitoring and speciation of particulate matter has led to increased application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) to individual particle analysis. SEM/EDX provides information on the size, shape, co...

  11. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.

  12. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy of the internal cellular organization of fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, W.H.; Aelst, van A.C.; Humbel, B.M.; Krift, van der T.P.; Boekhout, T.

    2000-01-01

    Internal viewing of the cellular organization of hyphae by scanning electron microscopy is an alternative to observing sectioned fungal material with a transmission electron microscope. To study cytoplasmic organelles in the hyphal cells of fungi by SEM, colonies were chemically fixed with

  13. Morphologic differences observed by scanning electron microscopy according to the reason for pseudophakic IOL explantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Buenaga, Roberto; Alio, Jorge L.; Ramirez, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare variations in surface morphology, as studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), of explanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) concerning the cause leading to the explantation surgery. Methods In this prospective multicenter study, explanted IOLs were analyzed by SEM and energy-dis...

  14. Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis for multilayered chiral spin textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, Juriaan; Kloodt-Twesten, Fabian; Frömter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter; Duine, Rembert A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830127; Swagten, Henk J. M.; Koopmans, Bert; Lavrijsen, Reinoud

    We show that scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA) that is sensitive to both in-plane magnetization components can be used to image the out-of-plane magnetized multi-domain state in multilayered chiral spin textures. By depositing a thin layer of Fe on top of the multilayer

  15. Investigation of whispering gallery modes in microlasers by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polubavkina, Yu S.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Nadtochiy, A. M.; Mintairov, A. M.; Lipovsky, A. A.; Scherbak, S. A.; Kulagina, M. M.; Maximov, M. V.; Zhukov, A. E.

    2017-11-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) with a spatial resolution below the light diffraction limit was used to study intensity distributions of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in quantum dot-based microdisk and microring lasers on GaAs with different outer diameters. Room temperature microphotoluminescence study (μPL) reveal lasing in microlasers of both geometries.

  16. Preparation of Chemically Etched Tips for Ambient Instructional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccardi, Margot J.; Winkelmann, Kurt; Olson, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    A first-year laboratory experiment that utilizes concepts of electrochemical tip etching for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is described. This experiment can be used in conjunction with any STM experiment. Students electrochemically etch gold STM tips using a time-efficient method, which can then be used in an instructional grade STM that…

  17. RGB color coded images in scanning electron microscopy of biological surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 349-352 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biological surfaces * Color images * Scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  18. Imaging inclusion complex formation in starch granules using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria A.

    The tendency of amylose to form inclusion complexes with guest molecules has been an object of wide interest due to its fundamental role in food processing. Here we investigated the features of starch granules from several botanical sources using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and

  19. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a LEO 438VP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, Fowzia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2016-03-08

    This method describes the characterization of HE powders by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). HE particles are dispersed onto an aluminum standard SEM specimen mount. Electron micrographs are collected at various magnifications (150 to 10,000 X) depending on HE particle size.

  20. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a LEO 438VP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, Fowzia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2016-03-21

    This method describes the characterization of HE powders by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). HE particles are dispersed onto an aluminum standard SEM specimen mount. Electron micrographs are collected at various magnifications (150 to 10,000 X) depending on HE particle size.

  1. Covalently Immobilised Cytochrome C Imaged by In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Olesen, Klaus G.; Danilov, Alexey I.

    1997-01-01

    In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging of cytochrome c (cyt c) on polycrystalline Pt surfaces and on Au(lll) was achieved first by covalent immobilisation of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTS) brought to react with oxide present on the Pt surfaces. Covalently bound 3-APTS forms a...

  2. Elastic Changes of Capsule in a Rat Knee Contracture Model Assessed by Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Y.; Chimoto, E.; Ando, A.; Saijo, Y.; Itoi, E.

    Sound speed of a capsule in a rat knee contracture model was measured by scanning acoustic microscopy. There was no statistical significant difference in the anterior capsule compared with the control group. However, the sound speed of the posterior capsule was significantly greater compared with the control group after prolonged immobilization.

  3. Pollen grain surface in Vaccinium myrtillus as seen in scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Kocoń

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollen grain surface of Vaccinium myrtillus L. was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Pollen grains remain in tetrahedral tetrads. Grain surface is verrucose, consisting of thick, irregularly shaped muri, surrounding small, round or oval lumina. The surface of the muri is fissured, and minute papillae can also be noted.

  4. Carbon induced metal dusting of iron-nickel-chromium alloy surfaces : a scanning auger microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G; DeHosson, JTM

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we present an investigation on metal dusting of iron-nickel-chromium (Fe-Ni-Cr) alloy surfaces using scanning auger microscopy. It is shown that the formation of surface Cr-oxide and the surface finish condition can strongly influence and interrupt this catastrophic phenomenon. The

  5. Second-Harmonic Generation Scanning Microscopy on Domains in Al Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kjeld; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Scanning optical second-harmonic generation microscopy has been used to investigate domains in the surface of polycrystaline Al. Strong contrast among the crystalline grains is obtained due to variations in their crystallographic orientations and thus also nonlinear response. The origin of the co...

  6. THALLUS SURFACES IN COCCOCARPIACEAE AND PANNARIACEAE (LICHENIZED ASCOMYCETES) VIEWED WITH SCANNING ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUMBSCH, HT; KOTHE, HW

    1992-01-01

    The thallus surfaces of species belonging to the Coccocarpiaceae and Pannariaceae were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A pored epicortex was shown in Coccocarpia ssp., Degelia gayana and D. plumbea. In the other species studied no definite pores were found. The probable systematic

  7. Cold-induced imbibition damage of lettuce embryos: A study using cryo-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, J.; Walther, P.; Hoekstra, F.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of rehydration on a multicellular organism was studied in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) embryos, using cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). Naked embryos were sensitive to imbibitional stress, whereas embryos with an intact, thick-walled endosperm were not. Imbibitional injury to

  8. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Topological Insulators Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Qikun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We summarize our recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM study of topological insulator thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE, which includes the observation of electron standing waves on topological insulator surface and the Landau quantization of topological surface states. The work has provided valuable information to the understanding of intriguing properties of topological insulators, as predicted by theory.

  9. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy of Single Fluorescent Dendritic Molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Levi, S.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Reinhoudt, David; van Hulst, N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Individual dendritic molecules adsorbed o­n glass containing a single fluorescent rhodamine B core have been observed with near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM); height and fluorescence images were obtained simultaneously. The dendritic assemblies can be discriminated from free fluorescent

  10. Adsorption of Cu phthalocyanine on Pt modified Ge(001): A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, A.; Berkelaar, Robin P.; Kumar, Avijit; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption configurations of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on platinum-modified Ge(001) have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. After deposition at room temperature and cooling down to 77 K the CuPc molecules are still dynamic. However, after annealing at 550±50 K, the

  11. Using scanning near-field microscopy to study photo-induced mass motions in azobenzene containing thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, A. D.; Fabbri, F.; Desboeufs, N.; Boilot, J.-P.; Gacoin, T.; Lahlil, K.; Lassailly, Y.; Martinelli, L.; Peretti, J.

    2014-10-01

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) is used to study the photo-induced deformation of layered structures containing azobenzene derivatives. This approach is particularly relevant since it allows detecting in real-time, with the same probe the surface topography and the optical field distribution at the nanoscale. The correlation between the local light pattern and the ongoing photo-induced deformation in azobenzene-containing thin films is directly evidenced for different light polarization configurations. This unveils several fundamental photodeformation mechanisms, depending not only on the light field properties, but also on the nature of the material. Controlling the projected electromagnetic field distribution allows inscription of various patterns with a resolution at the diffraction limit, i.e. of a few hundreds of nm. Surface relief patterns with characteristic sizes beyond the diffraction limit can also be produced by using the nearfield probe to locally control the photo-mechanical process. Finally, the photo-mechanical properties of azo-materials are exploited to optically patterned metal/dielectric hybrid structures. Gratings are inscribed this way on thin gold films. The characteristic features (enhancement and localization) of the surface plasmons supported by these noble metal structures are studied by near-field optical microscopy.

  12. Near-field optical microscopy of localized excitations on rough surfaces: influence of a probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the general principles of near-field optical microscopy. I consider the influence of a probe when being used to image localized dipolar excitations and suggest a way of evaluating the perturbation thus introduced. Using the rigorous microscopic (electric) point-dipole description, I...

  13. Noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment with quartz tuning fork and carbon nanotube probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kageshima, M.; Jensenius, Henriette; Dienwiebel, M.

    2002-01-01

    A force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment was developed by combining a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) probe with a quartz tuning fork. Solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane surface were detected both in the frequency shift and dissipation. Due...

  14. High-contrast en bloc staining of neuronal tissue for field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Juan Carlos; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Hayworth, Kenneth J; Schalek, Richard; Lichtman, Jeff W; Smith, Stephen J; Buchanan, JoAnn

    2012-01-12

    Conventional heavy metal poststaining methods on thin sections lend contrast but often cause contamination. To avoid this problem, we tested several en bloc staining techniques to contrast tissue in serial sections mounted on solid substrates for examination by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Because FESEM section imaging requires that specimens have higher contrast and greater electrical conductivity than transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples, our technique uses osmium impregnation (OTO) to make the samples conductive while heavily staining membranes for segmentation studies. Combining this step with other classic heavy metal en bloc stains, including uranyl acetate (UA), lead aspartate, copper sulfate and lead citrate, produced clean, highly contrasted TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) samples of insect, fish and mammalian nervous systems. This protocol takes 7-15 d to prepare resin-embedded tissue, cut sections and produce serial section images.

  15. A compilation of cold cases using scanning electron microscopy at the University of Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Michael J.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2015-10-01

    Scanning electron microscopy combined with microchemical analysis has evolved into one of the most widely used instruments in forensic science today. In particular, the environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), has created unique opportunities in forensic science in regard to the examination of trace evidence; i.e. the examination of evidence without altering the evidence with conductive coatings, thereby enabling criminalists to solve cases that were previously considered unsolvable. Two cold cases were solved at URI using a JEOL 5900 LV SEM in conjunction with EDS. A cold case murder and a cold missing person case will be presented from the viewpoint of the microscopist and will include sample preparation, as well as image and chemical analysis of the trace evidence using electron microscopy and optical microscopy.

  16. In situ microspatial imaging using two-photon and confocal laser scanning microscopy of bacteria and extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS) within marine stromatolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Decho, Alan W

    2002-03-01

    The combination of a hydrophilic embedding resin, Nanoplast, with fluorescent probes, and subsequent imaging using two-photon and confocal laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM and CLSM) has allowed in imaging of the in situ microspatial arrangements of microbial cells and their extracellular polymeric secretion (EPS) within marine stromatolites. Optical sectioning by 2P-LSM and CLSM allowed imaging of endolithic cyanobacteria cells, Solentia sp., seen within carbonate sand grains. 2P-LSM allowed very clear imaging with a high resolution of bacteria using DAPI, which normally require UV excitation and reduced photo-bleaching of fluorescent probes.

  17. Transfected single-cell imaging by scanning electrochemical optical microscopy with shear force feedback regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yasufumi; Shiku, Hitoshi; Murata, Tatsuya; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2009-12-01

    Gene-transfected single HeLa cells were characterized using a scanning electrochemical/optical microscope (SECM/OM) system with shear-force-based probe-sample distance regulation to simultaneously capture electrochemical, fluorescent, and topographic images. The outer and inner states of single living cells were obtained as electrochemical and fluorescent signals, respectively, by using an optical fiber-nanoelectrode probe. A focused ion beam (FIB) was used to mill the optical aperture and the ring electrode at the probe apex (the inner and outer radii of the ring electrode were 37 and 112 nm, respectively). To apply an appropriate shear force between the probe tip and the living cell surface, we optimized the amplitude of oscillation of the tuning fork to which the probe was attached. Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) were adopted to drastically increase the feedback speed of the tip-sample distance regulation, shorten the scanning time for imaging, and enhance the accuracy and quality of the living cell images. In employing these improvements, we simultaneously measured the cellular expression activity of both secreted alkaline phosphatase outside and GFP inside by using the SECM/OM with shear force distance regulation.

  18. Wavelength-Dependent Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy: Selectively Imaging Nanoparticle Probes in Live Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning; and Yeung, Edward S.

    2009-11-15

    Gold and silver nanoparticles display extraordinarily large apparent refractive indices near their plasmon resonance (PR) wavelengths. These nanoparticles show good contrast in a narrow spectral band but are poorly resolved at other wavelengths in differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The wavelength dependence of DIC contrast of gold/silver nanoparticles is interpreted in terms of Mie's theory and DIC working principles. We further exploit this wavelength dependence by modifying a DIC microscope to enable simultaneous imaging at two wavelengths. We demonstrate that gold/silver nanoparticles immobilized on the same glass slides through hybridization can be differentiated and imaged separately. High-contrast, video-rate images of living cells can be recorded both with and without illuminating the gold nanoparticle probes, providing definitive probe identification. Dual-wavelength DIC microscopy thus presents a new approach to the simultaneous detection of multiple probes of interest for high-speed live-cell imaging.

  19. Quantitative thickness measurement of polarity-inverted piezoelectric thin-film layer by scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagawa, Hiroyuki; Terada, Koshiro; Tanaka, Yohei; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Yanagitani, Takahiko; Cho, Yasuo

    2017-10-01

    A quantitative measurement method for a polarity-inverted layer in ferroelectric or piezoelectric thin film is proposed. It is performed nondestructively by scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy (SNDM). In SNDM, linear and nonlinear dielectric constants are measured using a probe that converts the variation of capacitance related to these constants into the variation of electrical oscillation frequency. In this paper, we describe a principle for determining the layer thickness and some calculation results of the output signal, which are related to the radius of the probe tip and the thickness of the inverted layer. Moreover, we derive an equation that represents the relationship between the output signal and the oscillation frequency of the probe and explain how to determine the thickness from the measured frequency. Experimental results in Sc-doped AlN piezoelectric thin films that have a polarity-inverted layer with a thickness of 1.5 µm fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering showed a fairly good value of 1.38 µm for the thickness of the polarity-inverted layer.

  20. An endolithic microbial community in dolomite rock in central Switzerland: characterization by reflection spectroscopy, pigment analyses, scanning electron microscopy, and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horath, T; Neu, T R; Bachofen, R

    2006-04-01

    A community of endolithic microorganisms dominated by phototrophs was found as a distinct band a few millimeters below the surface of bare exposed dolomite rocks in the Piora Valley in the Alps. Using in situ reflectance spectroscopy, we detected chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycobilins, carotenoids, and an unknown type of bacteriochlorophyll-like pigment absorbing in vivo at about 720 nm. In cross sections, the data indicated a defined distribution of different groups of organisms perpendicular to the rock surface. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses of pigments extracted with organic solvents confirmed the presence of two types of bacteriochlorophylls besides chlorophylls and various carotenoids. Spherical organisms of varying sizes and small filaments were observed in situ with scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (one- and two-photon technique). The latter allowed visualization of the distribution of phototrophic microorganisms by the autofluorescence of their pigments within the rock. Coccoid cyanobacteria of various sizes predominated over filamentous ones. Application of fluorescence-labeled lectins demonstrated that most cyanobacteria were embedded in an exopolymeric matrix. Nucleic acid stains revealed a wide distribution of small heterotrophs. Some biological structures emitting a green autofluorescence remain to be identified.

  1. Apertureless scanning microscope probe as a detector of semiconductor laser emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunaevskiy, Mikhail, E-mail: Mike.Dunaeffsky@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute, Saint-Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO), Saint-Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Dontsov, Anton; Monakhov, Andrei [Ioffe Institute, Saint-Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Alekseev, Prokhor; Titkov, Alexander [Ioffe Institute, Saint-Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Saint Petersburg Electrotechnical University ' LETI,' Saint-Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation); Baranov, Alexei; Girard, Paul; Arinero, Richard; Teissier, Roland [Institut d' Electronique du Sud, UMR 5214 UM2-CNRS, CC082, Université Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2015-04-27

    An operating semiconductor laser has been studied using a scanning probe microscope. A shift of the resonance frequency of probe that is due to its heating by laser radiation has been analyzed. The observed shift is proportional to the absorbed radiation and can be used to measure the laser near field or its output power. A periodical dependence of the measured signal has been observed as a function of distance between the probe and the surface of the laser due to the interference of the outgoing and cantilever-reflected waves. Due to the multiple reflections resulting in the interference, the light absorption by the probe cantilever is greatly enhanced compared with a single pass case. Interaction of infrared emission of a diode laser with different probes has been studied.

  2. Using Scanning Microwave Impedance Microscopy (sMIM) to characterize defects in dopants and dielectrics in semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Stuart; Yang, Yongliang; Stanke, Fred; Amster, Oskar

    As semiconductor technologies adopt advanced designs and materials, it becomes critical to be able to characterize, at the nanoscale, dopant distributions, dielectric properties and interface and thin-film quality. Scanning Microwave Impedance Microscopy (sMIM) is an atomic force microscope (AFM) based electrical measurement technique that measures local permittivity and conductivity at nanoscale dimensions. It can also measure the capacitance of the tip-sample junction or nanostructures. Non-linear properties of samples and nano-structures can be probed by applying a bias to the sMIM tip and recording capacitance-voltage curves. This talk will present results of characterizing and imaging a number of materials and structures from advanced semiconductor technologies. Examples will include (1) quantifying the doping level and imaging the doping distributions of both Si and III-V devices, and (2) quantifying dielectric properties including the use of capacitance-voltage curves to characterize defects in buried gate oxides.

  3. Chain-like structure elements in Ni40Ta60 metallic glasses observed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Rémy; Marot, Laurent; Sadeghi, Ali; Kawai, Shigeki; Glatzel, Thilo; Reimann, Peter; Goedecker, Stefan; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-08-13

    The structure of metallic glasses is a long-standing question because the lack of long-range order makes diffraction based techniques difficult to be applied. Here, we used scanning tunneling microscopy with large tunneling resistance of 6 GΩ at low temperature in order to minimize forces between probe and sample and reduce thermal fluctuations of metastable structures. Under these extremely gentle conditions, atomic structures of Ni40Ta60 metallic glasses are revealed with unprecedented lateral resolution. In agreement with previous models and experiments, icosahedral-like clusters are observed. The clusters show a high degree of mobility, which explains the need of low temperatures for stable imaging. In addition to icosahedrons, chain-like structures are resolved and comparative density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirm that these structures are meta-stable. The co-existence of icosahedral and chain-like structures might be an key ingredient for the understanding of the mechanical properties of metallic glasses.

  4. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a quartz tuning fork and a micro-thermocouple in active mode (2ω method)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bontempi, Alexia; Nguyen, Tran Phong; Salut, Roland; Thiery, Laurent; Teyssieux, Damien; Vairac, Pascal [FEMTO-ST Institute UMR 6174, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 15B Avenue des Montboucons, F-25030 Besançon (France)

    2016-06-15

    A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread.

  5. Specialized probes based on hydroxyapatite calcium for heart tissues research by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, Mikhail, E-mail: cloudjyk@yandex.ru; Golubok, Alexander [St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University), Kronverkskii pr. 49, St. Petersburg, 197101 (Russian Federation); Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Rizhskii pr. 26, St. Petersburg, 190103 (Russian Federation); Gulyaev, Nikolai [Military Medical Academy named after S.M. Kirov, Academic Lebedev str. 6, St. Petersburg, 194044 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The new specialized AFM-probes with hydroxyapatite structures for atomic force microscopy of heart tissues calcification were created and studied. A process of probe fabrication is demonstrated. The adhesive forces between specialized hydroxyapatite probe and endothelium/subendothelial layers were investigated. It was found that the adhesion forces are significantly higher for the subendothelial layers. We consider that it is connected with the formation and localization of hydroxyapatite in the area of subendothelial layers of heart tissues. In addition, the roughness analysis and structure visualization of the endothelial surface of the heart tissue were carried out. The results show high efficiency of created specialized probes at study a calcinations process of the aortic heart tissues.

  6. Lateral spatial resolution of thermal lens microscopy during continuous scanning for nonstaining biofilm imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossteuscher, T. T. J.; Hibara, A.; Mawatari, K.; Kitamori, T.

    2009-05-01

    The possible application of continuous scanning thermal lens microscopy (TLM) as alternative online biofilm observation method is studied. As biofilm is a heterogeneous sample, the influence of spatially limited thermal flow at the sample heterogeneities and the biofilm-environment border has to be considered. The influence of the edges on the lateral resolution with respect to scanning velocity during continuous scanning TLM was therefore evaluated. Lateral scanning experiments on 100 nm thin gold stripes showed that the maximum scan speed can be predicted from a time constant of a lock-in amplifier and the beamwidth. Since three-dimensional mapping is needed to fully characterize the biofilm structure, depth scanning experiments with stained 4 μm thick polystyrene samples with the coaxial TLM setup were evaluated for signal width at full width at half maximum. Thus, a minimum step width for depth scanning of 10 μm for observation has been acquired. A three-dimensional image of unstained biofilm grown in a flow chamber was acquired using continuous scanning TLM.

  7. Scanning nuclear electric resonance microscopy using quantum-Hall-effect breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, K., E-mail: hashi@m.tohoku.ac.jp; Tomimatsu, T.; Shirai, S.; Taninaka, S.; Nagase, K.; Sato, K.; Hirayama, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    We present a scanning nuclear-spin resonance (NSR) method that incorporates resistive detection with electric-field induced NSR locally excited by a scanning metallic probe. In the quantum-Hall effect breakdown regime, NSR intensity mapping at both the fundamental NSR frequency f{sub 75As} and twice the frequency 2f{sub 75As} demonstrates the capability to probe the distribution of nuclear polarization, particularly in a semiconductor quantum well. We find that f{sub 75As} NSR excitation drives not only local NSR but also spatially overlapped nonlocal NSR, which suppresses the maximum intensity of local NSR, while the 2f{sub 75As} NSR yields purely local excitation conferring a larger intensity.

  8. Image scanning fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on a detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Liu, S; Liu, D; Sun, S; Kuang, C; Ding, Z; Liu, X

    2017-06-01

    We propose a novel imaging method that enables the enhancement of three-dimensional resolution of confocal microscopy significantly and achieve experimentally a new fluorescence emission difference method for the first time, based on the parallel detection with a detector array. Following the principles of photon reassignment in image scanning microscopy, images captured by the detector array were arranged. And by selecting appropriate reassign patterns, the imaging result with enhanced resolution can be achieved with the method of fluorescence emission difference. Two specific methods are proposed in this paper, showing that the difference between an image scanning microscopy image and a confocal image will achieve an improvement of transverse resolution by approximately 43% compared with that in confocal microscopy, and the axial resolution can also be enhanced by at least 22% experimentally and 35% theoretically. Moreover, the methods presented in this paper can improve the lateral resolution by around 10% than fluorescence emission difference and 15% than Airyscan. The mechanism of our methods is verified by numerical simulations and experimental results, and it has significant potential in biomedical applications. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. The tip-sample water bridge and light emission from scanning tunnelling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Michael G; Mitra, J; Dawson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Light emission spectrum from a scanning tunnelling microscope (LESTM) is investigated as a function of relative humidity and shown to be a novel and sensitive means for probing the growth and properties of a water meniscus in the nm-scale. An empirical model of the light emission process is formulated and applied successfully to replicate the decay in light intensity and spectral changes observed with increasing relative humidity. The modelling indicates a progressive water filling of the tip...

  10. Application of atomic force microscopy in morphological observation of antisense probe labeled with magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Bai, Wei; Yang, Xueheng

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To explore the possibility of the c-erbB2 oncogene antisense probe labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles as a target contrast agent for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging whose morphology was observed with atomic force microscopy (AFM), and its efficiency was examined by MR imaging. Methods The c-erbB2 oncogene antisense probe labeled with SPIO was synthesized by a chemical cross-linking approach. Its morphology was observed with AFM. Results The chemical constitution of c-erbB2 oncogene antisense probes can be observed with AFM. The molecular structure of probes is easily visualized under AFM. Probes with diameters of 25–40 nm are in order, follow uniformity and the arrangement rule, can be separated from each other, and appear as cubes with a rugged surface morphology. Strong, low signals of the probes in transfected cells were observed by MR cellular imaging. Conclusions AFM is ideal for morphological observation and for analyzing the molecular structure of synthesized c-erbB2 oncogene antisense probes. PMID:18253092

  11. Apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy of sparsely labeled tobacco mosaic viruses and the intermediate filament desmin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Harder

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Both fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM are highly versatile and extensively used in applications ranging from nanotechnology to life sciences. In fluorescence microscopy luminescent dyes serve as position markers. Moreover, they can be used as active reporters of their local vicinity. The dipolar coupling of the tip with the incident light and the fluorophore give rise to a local field and fluorescence enhancement. AFM topographic imaging allows for resolutions down to the atomic scale. It can be operated in vacuum, under ambient conditions and in liquids. This makes it ideal for the investigation of a wide range of different samples. Furthermore an illuminated AFM cantilever tip apex exposes strongly confined non-propagating electromagnetic fields that can serve as a coupling agent for single dye molecules. Thus, combining both techniques by means of apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (aSNOM enables concurrent high resolution topography and fluorescence imaging. Commonly, among the various (apertureless SNOM approaches metallic or metallized probes are used. Here, we report on our custom-built aSNOM setup, which uses commercially available monolithic silicon AFM cantilevers. The field enhancement confined to the tip apex facilitates an optical resolution down to 20 nm. Furthermore, the use of standard mass-produced AFM cantilevers spares elaborate probe production or modification processes. We investigated tobacco mosaic viruses and the intermediate filament protein desmin. Both are mixed complexes of building blocks, which are fluorescently labeled to a low degree. The simultaneous recording of topography and fluorescence data allows for the exact localization of distinct building blocks within the superordinate structures.

  12. Imaging metazoan nuclear pore complexes by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtman, Boris; Shaulov, Lihi; Harel, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    High resolution three-dimensional surface images of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) can be obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy. We present a short retrospective view starting from the early roots of microscopy, through the discovery of the cell nucleus and the development of some modern techniques for sample preparation and imaging. Detailed protocols are presented for assembling anchored nuclei in a Xenopus cell-free reconstitution system and for the exposure of the nuclear surface in mammalian cell nuclei. Immunogold labeling of metazoan NPCs and a promising new technique for delicate coating with iridium are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Line scan--structured illumination microscopy super-resolution imaging in thick fluorescent samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandula, Ondrej; Kielhorn, Martin; Wicker, Kai; Krampert, Gerhard; Kleppe, Ingo; Heintzmann, Rainer

    2012-10-22

    Structured illumination microscopy in thick fluorescent samples is a challenging task. The out-of-focus fluorescence background deteriorates the illumination pattern and the reconstructed images suffer from influence of noise. We present a combination of structured illumination microscopy with line scanning. This technique reduces the out-of-focus fluorescence background, which improves the modulation and the quality of the illumination pattern and therefore facilitates the reconstruction. We present super-resolution, optically sectioned images of a thick fluorescent sample, revealing details of the specimen's inner structure.

  14. Optical microscope illumination analysis using through-focus scanning optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Park, Haesung

    2017-06-15

    Misalignment of the aperture diaphragm present in optical microscopes results in angular illumination asymmetry (ANILAS) at the sample plane. Here we show that through-focus propagation of ANILAS results in a lateral image shift with a focus position. This could lead to substantial errors in quantitative results for optical methods that use through-focus images such as three-dimensional nanoparticle tracking, confocal microscopy, and through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM). A correlation exists between ANILAS and the slant in TSOM images. Hence, the slant in the TSOM image can be used to detect, analyze, and rectify the presence of ANILAS.

  15. Comparing in vivo pump-probe and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy of melanoma and pigmented lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Gainey, Christina S.; Mitropoulos, Tanya; Simpson, Mary Jane; Zhang, Jennifer Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate a multimodal approach that combines a pump-probe with confocal reflectance and multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy. Pump-probe microscopy has been proven to be of great value in analyzing thin tissue sections of pigmented lesions, as it produces molecular contrast which is inaccessible by other means. However, the higher optical intensity required to overcome scattering in thick tissue leads to higher-order nonlinearities in the optical response of melanin (e.g., two-photon pump and one-photon probe) that present additional challenges for interpreting the data. We show that analysis of pigment composition in vivo must carefully account for signal terms that are nonlinear with respect to the pump and probe intensities. We find that pump-probe imaging gives useful contrast for pigmented structures over a large range of spatial scales (100 μm to 1 cm), making it a potentially useful tool for tracking the progression of pigmented lesions without the need to introduce exogenous contrast agents.

  16. Comparing in vivo pump–probe and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy of melanoma and pigmented lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Gainey, Christina S.; Mitropoulos, Tanya; Simpson, Mary Jane; Zhang, Jennifer Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We demonstrate a multimodal approach that combines a pump–probe with confocal reflectance and multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy. Pump–probe microscopy has been proven to be of great value in analyzing thin tissue sections of pigmented lesions, as it produces molecular contrast which is inaccessible by other means. However, the higher optical intensity required to overcome scattering in thick tissue leads to higher-order nonlinearities in the optical response of melanin (e.g., two-photon pump and one-photon probe) that present additional challenges for interpreting the data. We show that analysis of pigment composition in vivo must carefully account for signal terms that are nonlinear with respect to the pump and probe intensities. We find that pump–probe imaging gives useful contrast for pigmented structures over a large range of spatial scales (100  μm to 1 cm), making it a potentially useful tool for tracking the progression of pigmented lesions without the need to introduce exogenous contrast agents. PMID:25415567

  17. Development of an add-on kit for scanning confocal microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaikai; Zheng, Guoan

    2017-03-01

    Scanning confocal microscopy is a standard choice for many fluorescence imaging applications in basic biomedical research. It is able to produce optically sectioned images and provide acquisition versatility to address many samples and application demands. However, scanning a focused point across the specimen limits the speed of image acquisition. As a result, scanning confocal microscope only works well with stationary samples. Researchers have performed parallel confocal scanning using digital-micromirror-device (DMD), which was used to project a scanning multi-point pattern across the sample. The DMD based parallel confocal systems increase the imaging speed while maintaining the optical sectioning ability. In this paper, we report the development of an add-on kit for high-speed and low-cost confocal microscopy. By adapting this add-on kit to an existing regular microscope, one can convert it into a confocal microscope without significant hardware modifications. Compared with current DMD-based implementations, the reported approach is able to recover multiple layers along the z axis simultaneously. It may find applications in wafer inspection and 3D metrology of semiconductor circuit. The dissemination of the proposed add-on kit under $1000 budget could also lead to new types of experimental designs for biological research labs, e.g., cytology analysis in cell culture experiments, genetic studies on multicellular organisms, pharmaceutical drug profiling, RNA interference studies, investigation of microbial communities in environmental systems, and etc.

  18. Observation of nanostructure by scanning near-field optical microscope with small sphere probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Oshikane, Toshihiko Kataoka, Mitsuru Okuda, Seiji Hara, Haruyuki Inoue and Motohiro Nakano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Step and terrace structure has been observed in an area of 1 μm×1 μm on the cleaved surface of KCl–KBr solid-solution single crystal by scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM with a small sphere probe of 500 nm diameter. Lateral spatial resolution of the SNOM system was estimated to be 20 nm from the observation of step width and the scanning-step interval. Vertical spatial resolution was estimated to be 5–2 nm from the observation of step height and noise level of photomultiplier tube (PMT. With applying a dielectric dipole radiation model to the probe surface, the reason why such a high spatial resolution was obtained in spite of the 500 nm sphere probe, was understood as the effect of the near-field term appeared in the radiation field equations.

  19. Development of a scanning nanopipette probe microscope for fine processing using atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimatsu, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Hiromitsu; Nakamura, Atsushi; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Iwata, Futoshi

    2016-08-01

    We developed a novel technique for fine material processing based on a localized atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using a scanning probe microscope equipped with a nanopipette. Using a nanopipette — a tapered glass capillary with an aperture of sub-micrometer diameter — as a nozzle makes it possible to localize the discharge area of the APPJ for fine surface processing. The nanopipette can also be used as a probe for a scanning probe microscope operated with shear-force feedback control, which is capable of positioning the pipette edge in the vicinity of material surfaces for APPJ processing and imaging of the processed surface. Sub-micrometer holes and line patterns were successfully processed on a photoresist film. It was possible to control the size of the processed patterns by varying the applied pulse voltage and the distance between the pipette and the surface.

  20. Single-body lensed-fiber scanning probe actuated by magnetic force for optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Eun Jung; Na, Jihoon; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2009-06-15

    We propose a fiber-based hand-held scanning probe suitable for the sample arm of an optical imaging system including optical coherence tomography. To achieve compactness, a single-body lensed-fiber and a solenoid actuator were utilized. The focusing lens of the probe was directly formed onto the distal end of a fiber, which eliminated the need for additional optical components and optical alignment. A ferromagnetic iron bead was glued onto the middle of the fiber to enable actuation by magnetic force, which allowed easy fabrication and good practicality. The fiber piece having the built-in fiber lens was forced to oscillate in its resonant frequency. With the implemented probe, optical coherence tomography images of a human fingertip and a pearl were obtained at an imaging speed of 30 frames/s over a scanning range of 4 mm.