WorldWideScience

Sample records for scanning laser microscope

  1. Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eric W.; Zelten, J. Peter; Wiseman, Benjamin A.

    1988-06-01

    We report on the development of a laser scanning fluorescence microscope possessing several features which facilitate its application to biological and biophysical analyses in living cells. It is built around a standard inverted microscope stand, enabling the use of standard optics, micromanipulation apparatus, and conventional (including video) microscopy in conjunction with laser scanning. The beam is scanned across the specimen by a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors, driven by a programmable controller which can operate in three modes: full raster scan, region of interest, and random-access. A full 512x512 pixel image can be acquired in one second. In region of interest mode, several subareas of the field can be selected for more rapid or detailed analysis. For those cases where the time scale of the observed phenomenon precludes full-field imaging, or where a full-field image is unnecessary, the random access mode enables an arbitrary pattern of isolated points to be selected and rapidly sequenced through. Via a graphical user interface implemented on the system's host computer, a user will be able to take a scout image either with video or a full-field laser scan, select regions or points on the scout image with a mouse, and set up experimental parameters such as detector integration times with a window-style menu. The instrument is designed to be a flexible testbed for investigating new techniques, without compromising its utility as a tool for biological research.

  2. Scanning laser video camera/ microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. P.; Bow, R. T.

    1984-10-01

    A laser scanning system capable of scanning at standard video rate has been developed. The scanning mirrors, circuit design and system performance, as well as its applications to video cameras and ultra-violet microscopes, are discussed.

  3. Scanning laser microscope for biological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, P; Egger, M D

    1971-07-01

    The theory and design of a special purpose scanning laser microscope are described. This microscope, particularly suited for biological investigations, is intended for the observation of objects embedded within transparent or translucent bodies, such as nerve cells in an intact brain. Some photographs made with a prototype are shown.

  4. A video rate laser scanning confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongzhou; Jiang, James; Ren, Hongwu; Cable, Alex E.

    2008-02-01

    A video-rate laser scanning microscope was developed as an imaging engine to integrate with other photonic building blocks to fulfill various microscopic imaging applications. The system is quipped with diode laser source, resonant scanner, galvo scanner, control electronic and computer loaded with data acquisition boards and imaging software. Based on an open frame design, the system can be combined with varies optics to perform the functions of fluorescence confocal microscopy, multi-photon microscopy and backscattering confocal microscopy. Mounted to the camera port, it allows a traditional microscope to obtain confocal images at video rate. In this paper, we will describe the design principle and demonstrate examples of applications.

  5. A confocal laser scanning microscopic study on thermoresponsive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CdTe QDs composites using a fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope. These composites have potential applications both in material science and biology. Keywords. Confocal ... of binary colloidal alloys and other soft matter systems.

  6. A New Multichannel Spectral Imaging Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhai Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multichannel spectral imaging laser scanning confocal microscope for effective detection of multiple fluorescent labeling in the research of biological tissues. In this paper, the design and key technologies of the system are introduced. Representative results on confocal imaging, 3-dimensional sectioning imaging, and spectral imaging are demonstrated. The results indicated that the system is applicable to multiple fluorescent labeling in biological experiments.

  7. Computer-Controlled 3D Laser Scanning Microscope Based On Optical Disk Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, P.; Neveux, L.; Chiaramello, M.; Monteil, P.; Ostrowsky, D. B...

    1987-08-01

    We describe RASCALS* (RAster SCAn Laser System) a 2D and 3D scanning laser microscope and outline it's performance. This system, based on optical disk technology and a PC compatible computer offers an interesting cost/performance ratio compared to existing laser scanning microscopes.

  8. Improved axial point spread function in a two-frequency laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jheng-Syong; Chung, Yung-Chin; Chien, Jun-Jei; Chou, Chien

    2018-01-01

    A two-frequency laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope (TF-LSCFM) based on intensity modulated fluorescence signal detection was proposed. The specimen-induced spherical aberration and scattering effect were suppressed intrinsically, and high image contrast was presented due to heterodyne interference. An improved axial point spread function in a TF-LSCFM compared with a conventional laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope was demonstrated and discussed. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  9. [Current application of confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) in stomatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-sen; Li, Ning-yi

    2007-04-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy is one kind of modern Hi-tech on the basis of confocal imaging which is characterized by depth discrimination capability. It has been widely used in the field of stomatology due to its great advantages of non-destructive and non-invasive optical sectioning and three-dimensional reconstruction of the vital objects, in situ and dynamic real-time observation of the tissues and cells can be performed at high resolution. This paper reviews the fundamentals of confocal imaging and the application of CLSM in the fields of dental material, caries, dentin bonding interface and other basic researches in stomatology in recent years.

  10. A Video Rate Confocal Laser Beam Scanning Light Microscope Using An Image Dissector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Seth R.; Hubin, Thomas; Rosenthal, Scott; Washburn, Clayton

    1989-12-01

    A video rate confocal reflected light microscope with no moving parts has been developed. Return light from an acousto-optically raster scanned laser beam is imaged from the microscope stage onto the photocathode of an Image Dissector Tube (IDT). Confocal operation is achieved by appropriately raster scanning with the IDT x and y deflection coils so as to continuously "sample" that portion of the photocathode that is being instantaneously illuminated by the return image of the scanning laser spot. Optimum IDT scan parameters and geometric distortion correction parameters are determined under computer control within seconds and are then continuously applied to insure system alignment. The system is operational and reflected light images from a variety of objects have been obtained. The operating principle can be extended to fluorescence and transmission microscopy.

  11. Time Dependent Tunneling in Laser Irradiated Scanning Tunneling Microscope Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sookyung Hur

    A principal motivation for the studies reported in this thesis was to obtain a theoretical explanation for the experimental results obtained by Nguyen et al. (1989) to determine the traversal time of an electron tunneling through a quantum mechanical barrier in a laser irradiated STM junction. The work therefore focused on the calculation of tunneling in a time-dependent oscillating barrier, and more specifically on the inelastic contributions to the tunneling current. To do so the kinetic formalism for tunneling was modified and extended to calculate inelastic processes in an irradiated tunneling junction. Furthermore, there is significant absorption of power from the laser beam in the junction electrodes resulting in thermal effects which can influence the tunneling. Extensive analysis of the spatial and temporal temperature distributions was first done for a realistic model of the diode emitter and anode using the Green function method. Specifically we considered (i) thermal effects due to surface heating of the absorbed laser radiation, (ii) the thermoelectric emf produced in the junction due to differential heating, and (iii) resistive and Thomson heat produced in the junction by laser induced currents. Using first-order time-dependent perturbation theory we also (iv) calculated the inelastic tunneling current due to a time dependent oscillating barrier produced by the antenna geometry of the STM junction. Lastly, we (v) formulated photo-assisted tunneling due to the electron -photon interaction in the junction using the second-quantization formalism. Although quite significant results were obtained for the tunneling current density as a function of frequency, gap distance and other junction parameters which gave insights into important features of the Nguyen et al. experiment (and tunneling characteristics of an irradiated STM in general), no single expression was derived or calculated results obtained which explains or fits all their observed data, or

  12. A novel cryogenic scanning laser microscope tested on Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper; Mygind, Jesper

    1995-01-01

    A novel cryogenic scanning laser microscope with a spatial resolution of less than 5 µm has been designed for on-chip in situ investigations of the working properties of normal and superconducting circuits and devices. The instrument relies on the detection of the electrical response of the circuit...... to a very localized heating induced by irradiation with 675 nm wavelength light from a semiconductor laser. The hot spot is moved by a specially designed piezoelectric scanner sweeping the tip of a single-mode optical fiber a few µm above the circuit. Depending on the scanner design the scanning area can...... be as large as 50×500 µm2 at 4.2 K. The microscope can be operated in the temperature range 2–300 K using a standard temperature controller. The central microscope body is mounted inside the vacuum can of a dip-stick-type cryoprobe. A damped spring system is used to reduce interference from extraneous...

  13. Apertureless scanning microscope probe as a detector of semiconductor laser emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunaevskiy, Mikhail, E-mail: Mike.Dunaeffsky@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute, Saint-Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO), Saint-Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Dontsov, Anton; Monakhov, Andrei [Ioffe Institute, Saint-Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Alekseev, Prokhor; Titkov, Alexander [Ioffe Institute, Saint-Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Saint Petersburg Electrotechnical University ' LETI,' Saint-Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation); Baranov, Alexei; Girard, Paul; Arinero, Richard; Teissier, Roland [Institut d' Electronique du Sud, UMR 5214 UM2-CNRS, CC082, Université Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2015-04-27

    An operating semiconductor laser has been studied using a scanning probe microscope. A shift of the resonance frequency of probe that is due to its heating by laser radiation has been analyzed. The observed shift is proportional to the absorbed radiation and can be used to measure the laser near field or its output power. A periodical dependence of the measured signal has been observed as a function of distance between the probe and the surface of the laser due to the interference of the outgoing and cantilever-reflected waves. Due to the multiple reflections resulting in the interference, the light absorption by the probe cantilever is greatly enhanced compared with a single pass case. Interaction of infrared emission of a diode laser with different probes has been studied.

  14. [Observation and analysis of microstructure of dentin caries lesions through 3D laser scanning microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lixia, Xu; Hongmei, Xu; Xiaoying, Zhu; Limei, Sun

    2016-10-01

    Microstructural changes in dentin carious lesions were investigated using a 3D laser scanning microscope, which has a morphological theoretical foundation in the further study of clinical caries disease prevention and treatments. Six fresh extracted caries molars were prepared into cross-section specimens. The sections were examined by 3D and laser measuring morphology. Zones were identified in the lesions on the basis of their optical appearance. Two zones were identified in the lesions on the basis of their laser appearance. The microstructure showed that the tubular was partly closed in transparent dentin; peritubular and intertubular dentin were reduced in the zone of demineralization; peritubular and intertubular dentin were damaged and fused; a beaded sample and oval lesions formed in the zone of bacterial invasion; and abnormal dentin structure was present in the zone of destruction on the basis of their laser appearance. Four zones were iden-tified in the lesions according to their colors, as determined from their 3D appearance. 3D laser scanning micros-cope may be a powerful, accessible, and non-destructive technique, as it identified the lesion and tubular zones, as well as peritubular and intertubular dentin in the four zones' lesions. The microstructure of dentin caries lesions may have significant merit in the evaluation of clinical prevention and treatment.

  15. Frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser for use in periodontology: a scanning electron microscopic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas

    1996-12-01

    During prior studies it could be demonstrated that engaging a frequency double Alexandrite-laser allows a fast and strictly selective ablation of supra- and subgingival calculus. Furthermore, the removal of unstained microbial plaque was observed. First conclusions were drawn following light microscopic investigations on undecalcified sections of irradiated teeth. In the present study the cementum surface after irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite-laser was observed by means of a scanning electron microscope. After irradiation sections of teeth were dried in alcohol and sputtered with gold. In comparison irradiated cementum surfaces of unerupted operatively removed wisdom teeth and tooth surfaces after the selective removal of calculus were investigated. A complete removal of calculus was observed as well as a remaining smooth surface of irradiated cementum.

  16. A cryogenic scanning laser microscope for investigation of dynamical states in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper; Mygind, Jesper

    1995-01-01

    The first local oscillators based on moving magnetic flux quanta in long Josephson junctions are being developed for superconducting integrated quasi-optical SIS receivers. In order to further refine these oscillators one has to understand the complex dynamics of these devices. Since the local...... on measurements on different oscillator samples, performed with a novel Cryogenic Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM) having a spatial resolution of less than ±2.5 μm over a 500 μm×50 μm wide scanning area in the temperature range 2 K-300 K. Even though the dynamical states are extremely sensitive to external noise...... this microscope enables us to make stable in-situ measurements on operating Josephson junctions. Recent results are presented and discussed....

  17. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  18. SLAM examination of solar cells and solar cell welds. [Scanning Laser Acoustic Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, P. M.; Vorres, C. L.; Yuhas, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    The scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) has been evaluated for non-destructive examination of solar cells and interconnector bonds. Using this technique, it is possible to view through materials in order to reveal regions of discontinuity such as microcracks and voids. Of particular interest is the ability to evaluate, in a unique manner, the bonds produced by parallel gap welding. It is possible to not only determine the area and geometry of the bond between the tab and cell, but also to reveal any microcracks incurred during the welding. By correlating the SLAM results with conventional techniques of weld evaluation a more confident weld parameter optimization can be obtained.

  19. QUANTIFICATION OF BIOFILMS IN MULTI-SPECTRAL DIGITAL1 VOLUMES FROM CONFOCAL LASER-SCANNING MICROSCOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Rodenacker

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Populations of bacteria in sludge flocs and biofilm marked by fluorescence marked with fluorescent probes are digitised with a confocal laser scanning microscope. These data are used to analyse the microbial community structure, to obtain information on the localisation of specific bacterial groups and to examine gene expression. This information is urgently required for an in-depth understanding of the function and, more generally, the microbial ecology of biofilms. Methods derived from quantitative image analysis are applied to digitised data from confocal laser scanning microscopes to obtain quantitative descriptions of volumetric, topological (and topographical properties of different compartments of the components under research. In addition to free-moving flocs, also biofilms attached to a substratum in an experimental environment are analysed. Growth form as well as interaction of components are quantitatively described. Classical measurements of volume and intensity (shape, distribution and distance dependent interaction measurements using methods from mathematical morphology are performed. Mainly image (volume processing methods are outlined. Segmented volumes are globally and individually (in terms of 3Dconnected components measured and used for distance mapping transform as well as for estimation of geodesic distances from the substrate. All transformations are applied on the 3D data set. Resulting distance distributions are quantified and related to information on the identity and activity of the probe-identified bacteria.

  20. Flexible polygon-mirror based laser scanning microscope platform for multiphoton in-vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y X; Gautam, V; Brüstle, A; Cockburn, I A; Daria, V R; Gillespie, C; Gaus, K; Alt, C; Lee, W M

    2017-11-01

    Commercial microscopy systems make use of tandem scanning i.e. either slow or fast scanning. We constructed, for the first time, an advanced control system capable of delivering a dynamic line scanning speed ranging from 2.7 kHz to 27 kHz and achieve variable frame rates from 5 Hz to 50 Hz (512 × 512). The dynamic scanning ability is digitally controlled by a new customized open-source software named PScan1.0. This permits manipulation of scanning rates either to gain higher fluorescence signal at slow frame rate without increasing laser power or increase frame rates to capture high speed events. By adjusting imaging speed from 40 Hz to 160 Hz, we capture a range of calcium waves and transient peaks from soma and dendrite of single fluorescence neuron (CAL-520AM). Motion artifacts arising from respiratory and cardiac motion in small animal imaging reduce quality of real-time images of single cells in-vivo. An image registration algorithm, integrated with PScan1.0, was shown to perform both real time and post-processed motion correction. The improvement is verified by quantification of blood flow rates. This work describes all the steps necessary to develop a high performance and flexible polygon-mirror based multiphoton microscope system for in-vivo biological imaging. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  2. Evaluation of Enterococcus faecalis adhesion, penetration, and method to prevent the penetration of Enterococcus faecalis into root cementum: Confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkai, Rahul S; Hegde, Mithra N; Halkai, Kiran R

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the role of Enterococcus faecalis in persistent infection and a possible method to prevent the penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum. One hundred and twenty human single-rooted extracted teeth divided into five groups. Group I (control): intact teeth, Group II: no apical treatment done, Group III divided into two subgroups. In Groups IIIa and IIIb, root apex treated with lactic acid of acidic and neutral pH, respectively. Group IV: apical root cementum exposed to lactic acid and roughened to mimic the apical resorption. Group V: apical treatment done same as Group IV and root-end filling done using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Apical one-third of all samples immersed in E. faecalis broth for 8 weeks followed by bone morphogenetic protein and obturation and again immersed into broth for 8 weeks. Teeth split into two halves and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope, organism identified by culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques. Adhesion and penetration was observed in Group IIIa and Group IV. Only adhesion in Group II and IIIB and no adhesion and penetration in Group I and V. Adhesion and penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum providing a long-term nidus for subsequent infection are the possible reason for persistent infection and root-end filling with MTA prevents the adhesion and penetration.

  3. Evaluation of Enterococcus faecalis adhesion, penetration, and method to prevent the penetration of Enterococcus faecalis into root cementum: Confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkai, Rahul S.; Hegde, Mithra N.; Halkai, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To ascertain the role of Enterococcus faecalis in persistent infection and a possible method to prevent the penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum. Methodology: One hundred and twenty human single-rooted extracted teeth divided into five groups. Group I (control): intact teeth, Group II: no apical treatment done, Group III divided into two subgroups. In Groups IIIa and IIIb, root apex treated with lactic acid of acidic and neutral pH, respectively. Group IV: apical root cementum exposed to lactic acid and roughened to mimic the apical resorption. Group V: apical treatment done same as Group IV and root-end filling done using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Apical one-third of all samples immersed in E. faecalis broth for 8 weeks followed by bone morphogenetic protein and obturation and again immersed into broth for 8 weeks. Teeth split into two halves and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope, organism identified by culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques. Results: Adhesion and penetration was observed in Group IIIa and Group IV. Only adhesion in Group II and IIIB and no adhesion and penetration in Group I and V. Conclusion: Adhesion and penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum providing a long-term nidus for subsequent infection are the possible reason for persistent infection and root-end filling with MTA prevents the adhesion and penetration. PMID:27994316

  4. A simple but precise method for quantitative measurement of the quality of the laser focus in a scanning optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trägårdh, J; Macrae, K; Travis, C; Amor, R; Norris, G; Wilson, S H; Oppo, G-L; McConnell, G

    2015-07-01

    We report a method for characterizing the focussing laser beam exiting the objective in a laser scanning microscope. This method provides the size of the optical focus, the divergence of the beam, the ellipticity and the astigmatism. We use a microscopic-scale knife edge in the form of a simple transmission electron microscopy grid attached to a glass microscope slide, and a light-collecting optical fibre and photodiode underneath the specimen. By scanning the laser spot from a reflective to a transmitting part of the grid, a beam profile in the form of an error function can be obtained and by repeating this with the knife edge at different axial positions relative to the beam waist, the divergence and astigmatism of the postobjective laser beam can be obtained. The measured divergence can be used to quantify how much of the full numerical aperture of the lens is used in practice. We present data of the beam radius, beam divergence, ellipticity and astigmatism obtained with low (0.15, 0.7) and high (1.3) numerical aperture lenses and lasers commonly used in confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy. Our knife-edge method has several advantages over alternative knife-edge methods used in microscopy including that the knife edge is easy to prepare, that the beam can be characterized also directly under a cover slip, as necessary to reduce spherical aberrations for objectives designed to be used with a cover slip, and it is suitable for use with commercial laser scanning microscopes where access to the laser beam can be limited. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the

  6. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  7. SPM: Scanning positron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Dickmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Munich scanning positron microscope, operated by the Universität der Bundeswehr München and the Technische Universität München, located at NEPOMUC, permits positron lifetime measurements with a lateral resolution in the µm range and within an energy range of 1 – 20 keV.

  8. Confocal laser scanning microscopic investigation of ultrasonic, sonic, and rotary sealer placement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Singh, Renuka

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sealers are used to attain an impervious seal between the core material and root canal walls. Aim: To compare the depth and percentage of sealer penetration with three different placement techniques using confocal laser scanning microscopy as the evaluative tool. Materials and Methods: Root canals of 30 single-rooted teeth were prepared to a size of F3 and AH plus sealer with Rhodamine B was applied with Ultlrasonic file (Gr-1), lentulospiral (Gr-2), and Endoactivator (Gr-3). Canals were obturated with gutta-percha. The roots were sectioned at the 3 and 6-mm levels from the apical foramen and were examined on a confocal microscope. Results: A statistical significant differences among Gr-1, Gr-2, and Gr-3 were found at the 3 and 6-mm level (P < 0.05; ANOVA-Tukey tests) for the depth and percentage of sealer penetration except for Gr-1 and Gr-2 at 3-mm level. Gr-1 showed maximum mean depth of penetration (810 μm) and maximum mean percentage of sealer penetration (64.5) while Gr-3 showed minimum mean depth of penetration (112.7 μm) and minimum mean percentage of sealer penetration (26.7). Conclusion: Depth and percentage of penetration of sealer is influenced by the type of placement technique and by the root canal level with penetration decreasing apically. PMID:23956528

  9. Subcellular localization of flavonol aglycone in hepatocytes visualized by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Rie; Shirai, Yasuhito; Saito, Naoaki; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2009-04-01

    Flavonoids are widely distributed in the plant kingdom and show various biological activities. The bioavailability of flavonoids in biological samples has conventionally been quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, but with these analytical techniques it is difficult to estimate the subcellular localization of flavonoids in intact cells. In this study, we attempted to examine the localization of flavonoids in cultured cells using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope and mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Five flavonol aglycones showed autofluorescence in the cells under the conditions (Ex. 488 nm to Em. 515-535 nm), whereas three flavonol glycosides and eight compounds belonging to other flavonoid subclasses, i.e., flavones, flavanones, and catechins, did not. The autofluorescence of galangin and kaempferol appeared stronger in the nucleus than cytoplasm, suggesting that they are incorporated into the cells and accumulated in the nucleus. The proposed method provided evidence that flavonol aglycones are incorporated into, and accumulated in the nucleus of, hepatocytes.

  10. Sarcoglycan immunoreactivity is lacking in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. A confocal laser scanning microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, C; Santoro, G; Impellizzeri, P; Manganaro, A; Cutroneo, G; Trimarchi, E; Antonuccio, P; Anastasi, G; Zuccarello, B

    2007-01-01

    The Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex (DGC) is a large multisubunit complex that plays a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and physiology of muscle fibers. Dystrophin has been reported to be absent in the pyloric muscle of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) patients. The present study was designed to investigate the other two patterns of DGC (dystroglycan and sarcoglycan complexes) in normal pyloric muscle and their possible modifications in IHPS patients. Ten pyloric muscle biopsies were obtained from babies operated for IHPS and five control pylorus biopsy taken at autopsy from cases without gastrointestinal disease. The DGC sub-complexes (beta-dystroglican and beta, delta- sarcoglycans) were localized immunohistochemically using specific monoclonal antibodies. The results were evaluated using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Positive immunolocalization of the two DGC sub complexes was demonstrated in the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the pyloric region of control patients. Similarly, a positive immune expression of beta-dystroglican was observed in the pyloric SMCs of IHPS patients. On the other hand a negative immunoreaction for sarcoglycans was recorded within the full thickness of the pyloric SMCs of these patients. The absence of sarcoglycans within the hypertrophied pyloric muscle may be a predisposing factor in the pathogenesis of IHPS since it could alter the normal physiology of SMCs through the modifications of structural integrity of sarcolemma and signaling between the extracellular and intracellular compartment.

  11. Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1987-04-01

    A color laser microscope utilizing a new color laser imaging system has been developed for the visual inspection of semiconductors. The light source, produced by three lasers (Red; He-Ne, Green; Ar, Blue; He-Cd), is deflected horizontally by an AOD (Acoustic Optical Deflector) and vertically by a vibration mirror. The laser beam is focused in a small spot which is scanned over the sample at high speed. The light reflected back from the sample is reformed to contain linear information by returning to the original vibration mirror. The linear light is guided to the CCD image sensor where it is converted into a video signal. Individual CCD image sensors are used for each of the three R, G, or B color image signals. The confocal optical system with its laser light source yields a color TV monitor image with no flaring and a much sharper resolution than that of the conventional optical microscope. The AOD makes possible a high speed laser scan and a NTSC or PAL TV video signal is produced in real time without any video memory. Since the light source is composed of R, G, and B laser beams, color separation superior to that of white light illumination is achieved. Because of the photometric linearity of the image detector, the R, G, and B outputs of the system are most suitably used for hue analysis. The CCD linear image sensors in the optical system produce no geometrical distortion, and good color registration is available principally. The output signal can be used for high accuracy line width measuring. The many features of the color laser microscope make it ideally suited for the visual inspection of semiconductor processing. A number of these systems have already been installed in such a capacity. The Color Laser Microscope can also be a very useful tool for the fields of material engineering and biotechnology.

  12. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the object and, connected to the detector, a device for processing the detected electrons so as to form an object image, wherein a beam splitter is provided for dividing the electron beam from the electron...

  13. In-situ investigation of laser surface modifications of WC-Co hard metals inside a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H.; Wetzig, K.; Schultrich, B.; Pompe, Wolfgang; Chapliev, N. I.; Konov, Vitaly I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.

    1989-05-01

    The investigation of laser interaction with solid surfaces and of the resulting mechanism of surface modification are of technical interest to optimize technological processes, and they are also of fundamental scientific importance. Most instructive indormation is available with the ail of the in-situ techniques. For instance, measuring of the photon emission of the irradiated surface ane the plasma torch (if it is produced) simultaneously to laser action, makes it possible to gain a global characterization of the laser-solid interaction. In order to obtain additional information about surface and structure modifications in microscopic detail , a laser and scanning electron microscope were combined in to a tandem equipment (LASEM). Inside this eqiipment the microscopic observation is carried out directly at the laser irradiated area without any displacement of the sample. In this way, the stepwise development of surface modification during multipulse irradiation is visible in microscopic details and much more reliable information about the surface modification process is obtainable in comparison to an external laser irradiation. Such kind of equipments were realized simultaneously and independently in the Institut of General Physics (Moscow) and the Central Institute of Solid State Physics and Material Research (Dresden) using a CO2 and a LTd-glass-laser, respectively. In the following the advantages and possibilities of a LASEM shall be demonstrated by some selected investigations of WC-CO hardmeta. The results were obtained in collaboration by both groups with the aid of the pulsed CO2-laser. The TEA CO2 laser was transmitted through a ZnSe-window into the sample chamber of the SEM and focused ofAo tfte sample surface. It was operated in TEM - oo mode with a repetition rate of about 1 pulse per second. A peak power density of about 160 MW/cm2 was achieved in front of the sample surface.

  14. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    CERN Document Server

    Amor, Rumelo; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report that the relative intensities in each plane of excitation depend on the Stokes shift of the fluorochrome. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  15. Dynamic experimentation on the confocal laser scanning microscope : application to soft-solid, composite food materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Pomfret, S.J.; Normand, V.; Ferdinando, D.; Veerman, C.; Frith, W.J.; Norton, I.T.

    2001-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is used to follow the dynamic structural evolution of several phase-separated mixed biopolymer gel composites. Two protein/polysaccharide mixed gel systems were examined: gelatin/maltodextrin and gelatin/agarose. These materials exhibit 'emulsion-like'

  16. Surface observation by scanning laser microscope. 1. Application to materials testing; Laser kenbikyo ni yoru hyomen kansatsu. 1. Sozai shiken eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, A. [Toyota Technological Institute, Aichi (Japan)

    1994-03-20

    This paper introduces examples of applications of a laser microscope to material testing, and describes superiority of the laser microscope to the conventional measuring means. A scanning electron microscope has such problems as the only availability for observation in vacuum, necessity of gold plating onto non-electrically conductive materials, and electron beams damaging non-heat resistant materials. The laser microscope eliminates all of these problems, and is capable of observation with higher magnification and focal depths. The in-situ observation system using the prototype laser microscope has such a construction that a material tester is installed beneath an object lens of the microscope, and the test piece surface acted with tensile stress is observed by inserting the object lens into an observation window. In a TiAl bending test, changes on the test piece surface were observed of generation of a large number of micro cracks and fractures as a result of combination of these cracks. A three-dimensional bird`s eye view chart reproducing fine irregularities of smaller than 1 {mu}m was obtained in observation of the fatigue fractured wave faces of alumina ceramics by using the focus movement memorizing function of the laser microscope. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Effects of Naphthalene on DNA and RNA quantity in Amoeba proteus by using confocal laser scanning microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwanmuni, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of Naphthalene which is a carcinogen on changes of DNA and RNA quantities were studied with acridine orange stained cells under a confocal laser scanning microscope. It was found that DNA and RNA in amoebae nucleus and cytoplasm, reared in 0 (control, 3 and 8.85 mg/l (24h-LD50 at 0 and 12 h. showed a statistically significant difference (p<0.05. The more naphthalene concentrations and larger incubation periods had greater effects on DNA and RNA decreases in amoebae nucleus and cytoplasm.

  18. A rapid method for combined laser scanning confocal microscopic and electron microscopic visualization of biocytin or neurobiotin-labeled neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X J; Tolbert, L P; Hildebrand, J G; Meinertzhagen, I A

    1998-02-01

    Intracellular recording and dye filling are widely used to correlate the morphology of a neuron with its physiology. With laser scanning confocal microscopy, the complex shapes of labeled neurons in three dimensions can be reconstructed rapidly, but this requires fluorescent dyes. These dyes are neither permanent nor electron dense and therefore do not allow investigation by electron microscopy. Here we report a technique that quickly and easily converts a fluorescent label into a more stable and electron-dense stain. With this technique, a neuron is filled with Neurobiotin or biocytin, reacted with fluorophore-conjugated avidin, and imaged by confocal microscopy. To permit long-term storage or EM study, the fluorescent label is then converted to a stable electron-dense material by a single-step conversion using a commercially available ABC kit. We find that the method, which apparently relies on recognition of avidin's excess biotin binding sites by the biotin-peroxidase conjugate, is both faster and less labor intensive than photo-oxidation procedures in common use. The technique is readily adaptable to immunocytochemistry with biotinylated probes, as we demonstrate using anti-serotonin as an example.

  19. Extracting the ridge set as a graph for actin filament length estimation from confocal laser scanning microscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Harald

    2012-04-01

    The progress in image acquisition techniques provides life sciences with an abundance of data. Image analysis facilitates the assessment. The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in understanding the behavior of osteoblastic cells on biomaterials. In the flat basal part of the cells, it can be visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In the microscopic images, the stained cytoskeleton appears as a dense network of bright ridges which is so far only qualitatively assessed. For its quantification, there is a need for ridge detection techniques that provide a geometrical description of this graph feature. The state of the art methods do not cope with the systematical degradation by noise, unspecific luminance, and uneven dye uptake. This work presents the key part of a ridge-tracking technique, which makes more efficient use of context information, and evaluate it by its length measurement accuracy. Two random models illustrate the performance against ground truth. Representative microscopic images confirm the applicability.

  20. Comparative scanning electron microscope analysis of diode laser and desensitizing toothpastes for evaluation of efficacy of dentinal tubular occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guntakala Vikram Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study aims to evaluate the efficacy of diode laser alone and in combination with desensitizing toothpastes in occluding dentinal tubules (both partially occluded and completely occluded tubules by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Materials and Methods: Fifty human teeth were extracted, cervical cavities were prepared and etched with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and smear layer was removed to expose the tubules. The teeth were divided into five groups: Group I – Application of NovaMin-formulated toothpaste, Group II – Application of Pro-Argin™-formulated toothpaste, Group III – Application of diode laser in noncontact mode, Group IV – NovaMin-formulated toothpaste followed by laser irradiation, and Group V – Pro-Argin™-formulated toothpaste followed by laser irradiation. After treatment, quantitative analysis of occluded dentinal tubules was done by SEM analysis. Results: The mean values of percentages of total occlusion of dentinal tubules in Groups I, II, III, IV, and V were 92.73% ± 1.38, 90.67% ± 1.86, 96.57% ± 0.64, 97.3% ± 0.68, and 96.9% ± 6.08, respectively. Addition of diode laser (Groups III, IV, and V yielded a significant occlusion of the dentinal tubules when compared to desensitizing toothpastes alone (Groups I and II. Conclusion: Diode laser (Group III has shown more efficacy in occluding dentinal tubules when compared with desensitizing toothpastes which was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Among the five groups, NovaMin + diode laser (Group IV showed the highest percentage of occluded dentinal tubules.

  1. In vivo laser scanning microscopic investigation of the decontamination of hazardous substances from the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Schanzer, S.; Richter, H.; Gross, I.; Menting, K. H.; Frazier, L.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stimulation of the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin is a topic of intensive dermatological and pharmacological research. In this context, it was found that in addition to the intercellular penetration, the follicular penetration also represents an efficient penetration pathway. The hair follicles act as a long-term reservoir for topically applied substances. They are surrounded by all important target structures, such as blood capillaries, stem and dendritic cells. Therefore, the hair follicles, as well as the skin, need to be protected from hazardous substances. The traditional method of decontamination after respective accidental contacts consists of an intensive washing of the skin. However, during this mechanical procedure, the substances can be pushed even deeper into the hair follicles. In the present study, absorbent materials were applied to remove a fluorescent model substance from the skin without inducing mechanical stress. The results were compared to the decontamination effects obtained by intensive washing. Investigations were performed by means of in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The comparison revealed that decontamination with absorbent materials is more effective than decontamination with washing processes.

  2. In Vitro Laser Fenestration of Aortic Stent-Grafts: A Qualitative Analysis Under Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Udgiri, Naval; Guidoin, Robert; Panneton, Jean; Guan, Xiaoning; Guillemette, Maxime; Wang, Lu; Du, Jia; Zhu, Dajie; Nutley, Mark; Zhang, Ze

    2016-11-01

    In situ fenestration of stent-grafts allows patients with life threatening aortic pathologies to be amenable to emergent "off the shelf indications for use" percutaneous treatments as a bail out technique. Three types of aortic stent-grafts were subjected to laser fenestration in a physiological saline solution followed by balloon angioplasty using 8, 10 or 12 mm in diameter noncompliant balloons. The morphology and the size of fenestrations were observed under optical and scanning electron microscopy. The damage to the fabrics was analyzed and quantified. The creation of fenestrations was feasible in all devices, with varying degrees of fraying and/or tearing. The monofilament twill weave (Medtronic Valiant) tore in two directions (warp and weft) while the multifilament weave fenestrations showed more fraying (Anaconda Vascutek and Zenith TX2 Cook). The size and directions of tearing were more predictable with the 8 mm diameter balloon whereas the results obtained with the 10 and 12 mm diameter balloons were more unpredictable. The fenestrations were free of melting of the yarns and blackening of the filaments. The in situ fenestration is feasible but the observed damage to the fabric constructions must be carefully considered. This procedure must currently be limited to urgent and emergent life threatening cases because it is off indications for use for approved devices. Copyright © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Modular multimodal swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography scan-head for surgical microscope-integrated and slit-lamp imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Joseph D.; Li, Jianwei D.; El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2017-02-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) enable noninvasive in vivo diagnostic imaging and provide complementary en face and depth-resolved visualization of ophthalmic structures, respectively. We previously demonstrated concurrent multimodal swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and OCT (SS-SESLO-OCT) at 1060 nm using a swept-source and double clad fiber coupler. Here, we present system enhancements and novel designs for a modular SS-SESLO-OCT scan-head that can be coupled to ophthalmic surgical microscope-integrated and slit-lamp imaging optics. Multimodal SS-SESLO-OCT was demonstrated using a custom-built swept-source OCT engine with a 200 kHz 1060 nm source that was optically buffered for concurrent SESLO and OCT imaging at 100% duty cycle and 400 kHz sweep-rate. A shared optical relay and fast-axis galvanometer ensured inherent co-registration between SESLO and OCT field-of-views and concurrent acquisition of an en face SESLO image with each OCT cross-section. SESLO and OCT frames were acquired at 200 fps with 2560 x 2000 pix. (spectral x lateral). We show in vivo human ophthalmic imaging data using surgical microscope-integrated and slit-lamp imaging relays to demonstrate the utility of our SS-SESLO-OCT design. Our self-contained modular scan-head can be used for either intraoperative guidance or clinical diagnostics and reduces the complexity, cost, and maintenance required for clinical translation of these technologies. We believe concurrent multimodal SS-SESLO-OCT may benefit 1) intraoperative imaging by allowing for real-time surgical feedback, instrument tracking, and overlays of computationally extracted image-based surrogate biomarkers of disease, and 2) slit-lamp imaging by enabling aiming, image registration, and multi-field mosaicking.

  4. Effect of calcium on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm architecture: a confocal laser scanning microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sudhir K; Rao, T Subba

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial adhesion is a threshold event in the formation of biofilms. Several studies on molecular and biochemical aspects have highlighted that the protein matrix of the biofilm is of interest in developing strategies to combat biofouling. The prevalent role of biofilm associated protein (Bap) of Staphylococcus aureus in early adhesion and the putative presence of Ca(2+) binding EF hand motif in Bap was the motivation for this study. Biofilm assays (S. aureus strains V329 and M556) were done in micro-titer plates and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to study the biofilm architecture. The results showed that Ca(2+) did not influence planktonic growth of the cultures; however, it modulated the biofilm architecture of S. aureus V329 in a dose dependent manner. Strain M556 was found to be a weak biofilm former and showed no significant change in the presence of Ca(2+). When tested with increasing NaCl concentration, there was no reversal of the Bap-dependent Ca(2+) inhibition of S. aureus V329 biofilm. This indicates that the interaction of Bap and Ca(2+) is not mere electrostatic. CLSM images of V329 biofilm showed reduction in biofilm thickness as well as altered biofilm topography with varying Ca(2+) concentrations. The inhibition effect of Ca(2+) on strain V329 biofilm disappeared in the presence of chelating agent EDTA at a non-inhibiting concentration (0.15 mM). The paper elaborates the role of Ca(2+) in biofilm architecture of S. aureus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A sensitive and versatile laser scanning confocal optical microscope for single-molecule fluorescence at 77 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, V; Hübner, C G

    2010-11-01

    We developed a cryostat suitable for a laser scanning confocal microscope which allows for a short working distance and thus the usage of an objective with a high numerical aperture ensuring high collection efficiency. The in situ preparation of a thin layer of amorphous water is realized in a part of the cryostat, a Dewar vessel, which is put onto a custom-made, liquid-nitrogen immersed spin-coater. First tests on the setup are performed on a perylenemonoimide/polymethyl methacrylate model system using a standard oil objective and a dry objective at ambient temperature as well as a dry objective at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements on doubly labeled, freeze-quenched polyproline chains show the applicability of the new method on biomolecules. The alternating laser excitation (ALEX) is modified to a line-scanning process (slow ALEX) to optimize the sorting of the labeled molecules. Photophysics and photochemistry at liquid nitrogen temperature are investigated.

  6. Morphological confocal laser scanning microscope evaluation of four different "etch and rinse" adhesives in post endodontic restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigo, Luca; Lajolo, Carlo; Castagnola, Raffaella; Angerame, Daniele; Somma, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a morphometric evaluation of the resin-root canal dentine interface of four "etch and rinse" adhesive systems. Forty human teeth were restored through a fiber post insertion using: Group 1: XP Bond adhesive; Group 2: Prime & Bond NT; Group 3: Surgi Prime Bond adhesive; Group 4: Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus. Two cross-sections (apical and coronal) were obtained and analyzed in morphological confocal laser scanning microscope. The numbers of resin tags (RT) and the thickness of the hybrid layer (HL) were evaluated. Quantitative variables were tested by a Shapiro-Wilk test. Parametric variables by an Anova test. Group 4 produced the thickest HL and Group 1 showed the thinnest. Considering RT, Group 1 produced the highest density, while Group 3 the lowest density. All the adhesives produced good results in terms of HL thickness and RT density.

  7. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital c...

  8. Implementation of a Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) System on a Ti:Sapphire and OPO Laser Based Standard Laser Scanning Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytskaniuk, Vasyl; Bardin, Fabrice; Boukhaddaoui, Hassan; Rigneault, Herve; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-07-17

    Laser scanning microscopes combining a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to duplicate the laser line have become available for biologists. These systems are primarily designed for multi-channel two-photon fluorescence microscopy. However, without any modification, complementary non-linear optical microscopy such as second-harmonic generation (SHG) or third harmonic generation (THG) can also be performed with this set-up, allowing label-free imaging of structured molecules or aqueous medium-lipid interfaces. These techniques are well suited for in-vivo observation, but are limited in chemical specificity. Chemically selective imaging can be obtained from inherent vibration signals based on Raman scattering. Confocal Raman microscopy provides 3D spatial resolution, but it requires high average power and long acquisition time. To overcome these difficulties, recent advances in laser technology have permitted the development of nonlinear optical vibrational microscopy, in particular coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). CARS microscopy has therefore emerged as a powerful tool for biological and live cell imaging, by chemically mapping lipids (via C-H stretch vibration), water (via O-H stretch vibrations), proteins or DNA. In this work, we describe the implementation of the CARS technique on a standard OPO-coupled multiphoton laser scanning microscope. It is based on the in-time synchronization of the two laser lines by adjusting the length of one of the laser beam path. We present a step-by-step implementation of this technique on an existing multiphoton system. A basic background in experimental optics is helpful and the presented system does not require expensive supplementary equipment. We also illustrate CARS imaging obtained on myelin sheaths of sciatic nerve of rodent, and we show that this imaging can be performed simultaneously with other nonlinear optical imaging, such as standard two-photon fluorescence technique

  9. Design of an affordable fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope for medical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Christin; Knobbe, Jens; Grüger, Heinrich; Lakner, Hubert

    2012-12-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopes are a promising imaging tool in medical diagnostics due to their capability to selectively survey cross-sections of individual layers from `thick' samples. Non-invasive depth resolved investigation of neoplastic skin disorders is one example among other applications. However these microscopes are at present uncommon in medical practice. This is due to their main application area in research. The instruments dealt with here are generally complex, stationary units and are accordingly cost-intensive. It is for this reason, that we have designed a robust and portable MEMS based confocal fluorescence microscope with a field of view of 0.6mm x 0.6mm. This has been made possible by the integration of a 2D micro scanner mirror developed at Fraunhofer IPMS. A variable acquisition depth of cross-sectional images of the fluorescence specimen is enabled by an integrated z-shifter. With the use of commercially available optics an optical demonstrator set up has been realized. To characterize and to demonstrate the ability of this system test measurements were performed. The resolution of the microscope is better than 228 lp/mm determined by 1951 USAF resolution test target. Images of various biological samples are presented and optical sectioning capabilities are shown. A comparison of the measured with the predicted system performance will be given.

  10. Plasmon resonance and the imaging of metal-impregnated neurons with the laser scanning confocal microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Karen J; Harley, Cynthia M.; Barthel, Grant M; Sanders, Mark A.; Mesce, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    eLife digest A fresh slice of brain tissue has a fairly uniform appearance, even when viewed under a microscope. To study the neurons and other cells in the brain, scientists must therefore first prepare tissue samples using methods that make it easier to see certain kinds of cells, or particular features of them. One method that has been available for over a century is to use metal particles to stain some of the cells. For example, when the Spanish anatomist Santiago Ram?n y Cajal investigat...

  11. Evaluation of the presence of Enterococcus Faecalis in root cementum: A confocal laser scanning microscope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkai, Rahul; Hegde, Mithra N; Halkai, Kiran

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to address the cause of persistent infection of root cementum by Enterococcus faecalis. A sample of 60 human single-rooted teeth were divided into three groups. Group I (control group) had no access opening and one-third of the apical root cementum was sealed using varnish. Group II had no preparation of teeth samples. In group III, apical root cementum was exposed to organic acid and roughened using diamond point to mimic apical resorption. After access opening in groups II and III, all teeth samples were sterilized using gamma irradiation (25 kGy). E. faecalis broth was placed in the root canal and apical one-third of the tooth was immersed in the broth for 8 weeks with alternate day refreshment followed by biomechanical preparation, obturation and coronal seal. Apical one-third of all teeth samples were again immersed in the broth for 8 weeks with alternate day refreshment to mimic secondary infection. The samples were observed under a confocal microscope after splitting the teeth into two halves. E. faecalis penetrated 160 μm deep into the root cementum in group III samples and only showed adhesion in group II samples. Penetration and survival of E. faecalis deep inside the cementum in extreme conditions could be the reason for persistent infection.

  12. Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis of ectopic sublingual gland-like tissue inside the hamster submandibular gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Keiichi; Utsumi, Michiya; Ohno, Norikazu

    2013-12-01

    Based on its histochemical properties, the secretory portion of the hamster submandibular gland has been classified as seromucous cells. The presence of endogenous peroxidase (PO) reaction was shown in the nuclear envelope, cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. The 3,3'-diaminobenzidene, tetrahydrochloride (DAB) method revealed bipartite secretory granules containing a PO-positive dense core surrounded by a less dense halo in these cells. In the present investigation, serous and mucous-like cells were found in resin-embedded semi-thin sections of the DAB-reacted hamster submandibular gland. These sections were already on glass slides for routine light microscopic observations, therefore electron microscopic analysis could be unrealizable. We then used reflectance-mode confocal laser scanning microscopy to visualize additional sites of PO activity as detected in these sections. Using this approach, we found mucous cells with PO activity-negative secretory granules and seromucous cells with PO activity-positive spot-like secretory granules of the regular sublingual gland most frequently adjacent to the serous cells with typical electron-dense secretory granules. These cells clearly differ from the seromucous cells with bipartite secretory granules and the granular duct cells with typical electron-dense secretory granules of the hamster submandibular gland. Additionally, secretory endpieces of the ectopic sublingual gland-like tissue empty into the duct of the hamster submandibular gland lobule. Thus, our findings suggest that a mass of sublingual gland tissue extends into the hamster submandibular gland during its development, and PO may be synthesized and secreted into the same duct. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Phase sensitive scanning optical microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungerman, R.L.; Hobbs, P.C.D.; Kino, G.S.

    1984-10-15

    An electronically scanned optical microscope which quantitatively measures amplitude and phase is described. The system is insenstive to mechanical vibrations. The phase infromation makes it possible to measure surface height variations with an accuracy of better than 100 A and can also be used to improve the lateral resolution.

  14. In Vitro Assessment of Enamel Permeability in Primary Teeth with and without Early Childhood Caries Using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niviethitha, Sabarinathan; Muthu, Murugan Satta; Kavitha, Swaminathan

    To compare the permeability of the enamel of primary teeth from individuals free of Early Childhood Caries (ECC) with that from individuals affected with ECC by assessment of dye penetration using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope (LSCM). Experimental in vitro study. Exfoliated primary maxillary anterior teeth (n = 44) were collected and divided into two groups (n=22 per group): samples with ECC (Group 1) and without ECC (Group 2). The samples were immersed in Rhodamine B dye solution for 1 day, cut longitudinally into 3 sections, observed using LSCM. Dye penetration depths in the incisal, middle, cervical thirds and on labial, lingual surfaces were recorded. Data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney test (α = 5%, p < .005). The overall mean penetration depth for group 1 (100.6 μm ± 58.48 μm) was significantly higher than that of group 2 (31.55 μm ± 23.40 μm, p < .000). Mean penetration depth in the incisal, middle, and cervical thirds and on the labial and lingual surfaces of group 1 also presented significantly higher scores than in group 2 (p < .005). There was significantly more dye penetration in the ECC group than in the non-ECC group. This could be related to a higher level of enamel permeability in teeth affected with ECC.

  15. Evaluation of penetration depth of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate into root dentinal tubules using confocal laser scanning microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadhana, Sekar; Latha, Jothi; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the penetration depth of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) into root dentinal tubules and the influence of passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Twenty freshly extracted anterior teeth were decoronated and instrumented using Mtwo rotary files up to size 40, 4% taper. The samples were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10), that is, conventional syringe irrigation (CSI) and PUI. CHX was mixed with Rhodamine B dye and was used as the final irrigant. The teeth were sectioned at coronal, middle and apical levels and viewed under CLSM to record the penetration depth of CHX. The data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The mean penetration depths of 2% CHX in coronal, middle and apical thirds were 138 µm, 80 µm and 44 µm in CSI group, respectively, whereas the mean penetration depths were 209 µm, 138 µm and 72 µm respectively in PUI group. Statistically significant difference was present between CSI group and PUI group at all three levels (p Penetration depth of 2% CHX into root dentinal tubules is deeper in coronal third when compared to middle and apical third. PUI aided in deeper penetration of 2% CHX into dentinal tubules when compared to conventional syringe irrigation at all three levels.

  16. Comparison of bacterial leakage resistance of various root canal filling materials and methods: Confocal laser-scanning microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji Hee; Chung, Jin; Na, Hee-Sam; Park, Eunjoo; Kwak, Sangwon; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the bacterial leakage resistance and root canal lining efficacy of various root canal filling materials and methods by using confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM). Sixty extracted human premolars with mature apex and single root canal were randomly divided into 2 control groups and 4 experimental groups. Group CW was filled with continuous wave technique using gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. Group GC was coated with AH-Plus sealer and then obturated with soften GuttaCore. Group GF was obturated using GuttaFlow and gutta-percha. Group EM was filled with EndoSeal MTA and gutta-percha using ultrasonic vibration. The AH-Plus, GuttaFlow, and EndoSeal were labeled with Hoechst 33342 to facilitate fluorescence. The obturated root tip was incubated with Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-stained E. faecalis for 14 days. CLSM was performed to evaluate the sealer distribution and bacterial leakage for the apical 1-, 2-, 3-mm specimens. Statistically significant differences were determined by 1-way ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc test and Pearson's correlation analysis. Group EM showed the better sealer distribution score than the other groups (p  0.05). Under the conditions of this study, different root canal filling materials and methods showed different efficacy for canal distribution and bacterial leakage resistance. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Particle Formation from Pulsed Laser Irradiation of SootAggregates studied with scanning mobility particle sizer, transmissionelectron microscope and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelsen, Hope A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; vanPoppel, Laura H.; Dansson, Mark A.; Buseck, Peter R.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2007-02-20

    We investigated the physical and chemical changes induced in soot aggregates exposed to laser radiation using a scanning mobility particle sizer, a transmission electron microscope, and a scanning transmission x-ray microscope to perform near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Laser-induced nanoparticle production was observed at fluences above 0.12 J/cm(2) at 532 nm and 0.22 J/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Our results indicate that new particle formation proceeds via (1) vaporization of small carbon clusters by thermal or photolytic mechanisms, followed by homogeneous nucleation, (2) heterogeneous nucleation of vaporized carbon clusters onto material ablated from primary particles, or (3) both processes.

  18. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  19. Effect of the Femtosecond Laser on an Intracorneal Inlay for Surgical Compensation of Presbyopia during Cataract Surgery: Scanning Electron Microscope Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarz, Marta; Rodríguez-Prats, Jose Luis; Hernández-Verdejo, Jose Luis; Tañá, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of the femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) on porcine eyes implanted with a Kamra corneal inlay and to describe how the inlay may change the effect of the femtosecond laser on the lens. FLACS was performed on six porcine eyes and a Kamra corneal inlay had been implanted, exploring the lens under the surgical microscope. Another Kamra corneal inlay was attached to the upper part of the transparent hemisphere used for calibration of the femtosecond laser. Capsulorhexis, arcuate incisions, and phacofragmentation were carried out. The Kamra corneal inlay was compared with a nontreated one using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the hemisphere was analyzed with a surgical microscope. Capsulorhexis and phacofragmentation were completed in all the porcine eyes, although accuracy to determine the exact effect on the lens was not possible to achieve. The effect of the femtosecond laser on the PMMA hemisphere through the Kamra corneal inlay showed the capsulorhexis was placed outside the outer margin of the inlay and a sharply sculpted fragmentation pattern with a three-dimensional (donut-shaped) annulus untreated beneath it. SEM images of the nontreated and the treated inlays were comparable. No ultrastructural changes were found in the treated Kamra corneal inlay. FLACS can be performed with a Kamra corneal inlay for surgical compensation of presbyopia without the risk of damaging the inlay. The Kamra corneal inlay acts as a screen that avoids the laser to reach the areas beneath its shadow, but not the exposed areas of the lens.

  20. Feedback-induced voltage change of a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser as an active detection system for miniature optical scanning probe microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinis, Dominique; Gorecki, Christophe; Bargiel, Sylwester; Cretin, Bernard

    2006-04-17

    We propose a novel detection technique for scanning probe microscopy based on the measuring of the feedback-induced voltage change of 780-nm VCSEL operating at constant current in far-field regime when we modulate mechanically the length of a coupled-cavity generating the feedback conditions. The voltage change of the VCSEL is produced by light back reflected from the sample to the laser cavity. Two-dimensional image probing is successfully demonstrated with high temporal resolution, offering a viable solution for miniature parallel scanning probe optical microscopes, such as confocal microscope, where the use of a photodetector is avoided. This approach opens the possibility to perform imaging tasks in a low cost and hand-held miniature device with much improved effective-space.

  1. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  2. A high-resolution combined scanning laser and widefield polarizing microscope for imaging at temperatures from 4 K to 300 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M; Guénon, S; Lever, F; Kleiner, R; Koelle, D

    2017-12-01

    Polarized light microscopy, as a contrast-enhancing technique for optically anisotropic materials, is a method well suited for the investigation of a wide variety of effects in solid-state physics, as, for example, birefringence in crystals or the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). We present a microscopy setup that combines a widefield microscope and a confocal scanning laser microscope with polarization-sensitive detectors. By using a high numerical aperture objective, a spatial resolution of about 240 nm at a wavelength of 405 nm is achieved. The sample is mounted on a 4He continuous flow cryostat providing a temperature range between 4 K and 300 K, and electromagnets are used to apply magnetic fields of up to 800 mT with variable in-plane orientation and 20 mT with out-of-plane orientation. Typical applications of the polarizing microscope are the imaging of the in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization via the longitudinal and polar MOKE, imaging of magnetic flux structures in superconductors covered with a magneto-optical indicator film via the Faraday effect, or imaging of structural features, such as twin-walls in tetragonal SrTiO3. The scanning laser microscope furthermore offers the possibility to gain local information on electric transport properties of a sample by detecting the beam-induced voltage change across a current-biased sample. This combination of magnetic, structural, and electric imaging capabilities makes the microscope a viable tool for research in the fields of oxide electronics, spintronics, magnetism, and superconductivity.

  3. A high-resolution combined scanning laser and widefield polarizing microscope for imaging at temperatures from 4 K to 300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M.; Guénon, S.; Lever, F.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.

    2017-12-01

    Polarized light microscopy, as a contrast-enhancing technique for optically anisotropic materials, is a method well suited for the investigation of a wide variety of effects in solid-state physics, as, for example, birefringence in crystals or the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). We present a microscopy setup that combines a widefield microscope and a confocal scanning laser microscope with polarization-sensitive detectors. By using a high numerical aperture objective, a spatial resolution of about 240 nm at a wavelength of 405 nm is achieved. The sample is mounted on a 4He continuous flow cryostat providing a temperature range between 4 K and 300 K, and electromagnets are used to apply magnetic fields of up to 800 mT with variable in-plane orientation and 20 mT with out-of-plane orientation. Typical applications of the polarizing microscope are the imaging of the in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization via the longitudinal and polar MOKE, imaging of magnetic flux structures in superconductors covered with a magneto-optical indicator film via the Faraday effect, or imaging of structural features, such as twin-walls in tetragonal SrTiO3. The scanning laser microscope furthermore offers the possibility to gain local information on electric transport properties of a sample by detecting the beam-induced voltage change across a current-biased sample. This combination of magnetic, structural, and electric imaging capabilities makes the microscope a viable tool for research in the fields of oxide electronics, spintronics, magnetism, and superconductivity.

  4. Development and design of up-to-date laser scanning two-photon microscope using in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Maxim; Popov, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Today one of the main areas of application of two-photon microscopy is biology. This is due to the fact that this technique allows to obtain 3D images of tissues due to laser focus change, that is possible due to substantially greater penetration depth on the main wavelength into biological tissues. Self-developed microscopy system provides possibility to service it and modify the structure of microscope depending on highly specialized experimental design and scientific goals. This article may be regarded as a quick reference to laboratory staff who are wishing to develop their own microscopy system for self-service and modernization of the system and in order to save the lab budget.

  5. Scanning electron microscope comparative surface evaluation of glazed-lithium disilicate ceramics under different irradiation settings of Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskic, Josko; Jokic, Drazen; Jakovljevic, Suzana; Bergman, Lana; Ortolan, Sladana Milardovic; Mestrovic, Senka; Mehulic, Ketij

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the surface of glazed lithium disilicate dental ceramics after irradiation under different irradiation settings of Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Three glazed-press lithium disilicate ceramic discs were treated with HF, Er:YAG, and Nd:YAG, respectively. The laser-setting variables tested were laser mode, repetition rate (Hz), power (W), time of exposure (seconds), and laser energy (mJ). Sixteen different variable settings were tested for each laser type, and all the samples were analyzed by SEM at 500× and 1000× magnification. Surface analysis of the HF-treated sample showed a typical surface texture with a homogenously rough pattern and exposed ceramic crystals. Er:YAG showed no effect on the surface under any irradiation setting. The surface of Nd:YAG-irradiated samples showed cracking, melting, and resolidifying of the ceramic glaze. These changes became more pronounced as the power increased. At the highest power setting (2.25 W), craters on the surface with large areas of melted or resolidified glaze surrounded by globules were visible. However, there was little to no exposure of ceramic crystals or visible regular surface roughening. Neither Er:YAG nor Nd:YAG dental lasers exhibited adequate surface modification for bonding of orthodontic brackets on glazed lithium disilicate ceramics compared with the control treated with 9.5% HF.

  6. Scanning Electron Microscope Analysis System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides the capability to examine surfaces microscopically with high resolution (5 nanometers), perform micro chemical analyses of these surfaces, and...

  7. The determination of firing distance applying a microscopic quantitative method and confocal laser scanning microscopy for detection of gunshot residue particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Margherita; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we applied a microscopic quantitative method based on the use of sodium rhodizonate to verify the presence of residues and their distribution on the cutis of gunshot wounds. A total of 250 skin samples were selected from cases in which the manner of death (accidental, suicide, and homicide) and the shooting distance could be reliably determined. The samples were examined under a light microscope, in transmitted bright field illumination and phase contrast mode, and with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In all skin specimens the area of each histological section was directly measured by an image analysis system. Both the number and the size of powder particles were measured. The distribution of gunshot residues (GSR) in the epidermal and subepidermal layers was also analyzed. The evaluation of the microscopic entrance wounds demonstrated different findings related to the range of fire. The data derived from the evaluation of both macroscopic and microscopic features demonstrated that the amount and the spatial distribution of GSR deposits in the skin surrounding entrance wounds strictly correlate with shooting distance.

  8. Effect of Different Powers of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Treatment on Surface Morphology of Microhybride Composite Resin: Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Mansore; Yasini, Esmaeil; Tavakoli, Atefeh; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare microhybride composite treated by bur and different power of Erbium, Chromium doped Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). 21 microhybride composite blocks (DiaFil TM, DiaDent, Korea) with 2 × 4 × 4 mm dimensions were made. The bonding surface of these blocks were polished, The samples were put into 6 groups for laser irradiation as follows: Group 1 (power: 1W, Energy: 50 mJ); Group 2(power: 2 W, Energy: 100mJ); Group 3 (power: 3W, Energy: 150mJ); Group 4 (power: 4W, Energy: 200mJ); Group 5 (power: 5W, Energy: 250mJ) and Group 6(power:6 W, Energy:300mJ). One group prepared by bur- treated. All samples were prepared by repetition rate of 20 Hz. Then, the samples were prepared for SEM examination. Some irregularities were seen in Er,Cr:YSGG laser samples in comparison to Bur group that produced favorable surface for adhesion of repair composite. Among different lasers, Er;Cr:YSGG laser can be chosen as a suitable technique for surface treatment of unsatisfactory composites.

  9. Multibeam scanning electron microscope : Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the first results obtained with their multibeam scanning electron microscope. For the first time, they were able to image 196 (array of 14×14) focused beams of a multielectron beam source on a specimen using single beam scanning electron microscope (SEM) optics. The system

  10. SU-E-T-98: Towards Cell Nucleus Microdosimetry: Construction of a Confocal Laser-Scanning Fluorescence Microscope to Readout Fluorescence Nuclear Track Detectors (FNTDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, C; Bartz, J; Akselrod, M; Sawakuchi, G

    2012-06-01

    To construct a custom confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) capable of resolving individual proton tracks in the volume of an Al2 O3 :C,Mg fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD). The spatial resolution of the FNTD technique is at the sub-micrometer scale. Therefore the FNTD technique has the potential to perform radiation measurements at the cell nucleus scale. The crystal volume of an FNTD contains defects which become fluorescent F2+ centers after trapping delta electrons from ionizing radiation. These centers have an absorption band centered at 620 nm and an emission band in the near infrared. Events of energy deposition in the crystal are read-out using a CLSM with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. Excitation light from a 635 nm laser is focused in the crystal volume by an objective lens. Fluorescence is collected back through the same path, filtered through a dichroic mirror, and focused through a small pinhole onto an avalanche photodiode. Lateral scanning of the focal point is performed with a scanning mirror galvanometer, and axial scanning is performed using a stepper-motor stage. Control of electronics and image acquisition was performed using a custom built LabVIEW VI and further image processing was done using Java. The system was used to scan FNTDs exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam and an unexposed FNTD. Fluorescence images above the unexposed background were obtained at scan depths ranging from 5 - 10 micrometer below the crystal surface using a 100 micrometer pinhole size. Further work needs to be done to increase the resolution and the signal to noise ratio of the images so that energy deposition events may be identified more easily. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Photon scanning tunneling microscope in combination with a force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Tack, R.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous operation of a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an atomic force microscope is presented. The use of standard atomic force silicon nitride cantilevers as near-field optical probes offers the possibility to combine the two methods. Vertical forces and torsion are detected

  12. Effect of diode laser and ultrasonics with and without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on smear layer removal from the root canals: A scanning electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Khalid; Masoodi, Ajaz; Nabi, Shahnaz; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Farooq, Riyaz; Purra, Aamir Rashid; Ahangar, Fayaz Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of diode laser and ultrasonics with and without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the smear layer removal from root canals. A total of 120 mandibular premolars were decoronated to working the length of 12 mm and prepared with protaper rotary files up to size F3. Group A canals irrigated with 1 ml of 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Group B canals irrigated with 1 ml of 17% EDTA followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Group C canals lased with a diode laser. Group D canals were initially irrigated with 0.8 ml of 17% EDTA the remaining 0.2 ml was used to fill the root canals, and diode laser application was done. Group E canals were irrigated with 1 ml distilled water with passive ultrasonic activation, followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Group F canals were irrigated with 1 ml EDTA with passive ultrasonic activation, followed by 3 ml of 3% NaOCl. Scanning electron microscope examination of canals was done for remaining smear layer at coronal middle and apical third levels. Ultrasonics with EDTA had the least smear layer scores. Diode laser alone performed significantly better than ultrasonics.

  13. Molecular characterization and confocal laser scanning microscopic study of Pygidiopsis macrostomum (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) parasites of guppies Poecilia vivipara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, J N; Costa, V S; Mantovani, C; Barros, E; Santos, E G N; Mafra, C L; Santos, C P

    2017-02-01

    Pygidiopsis macrostomum and Ascocotyle (Phagicola) pindoramensis (Digenea: Heterophyidae) parasitize guppies as intermediate hosts and, respectively, fish-eating mammals or birds as definitive hosts. Heterophyids have zoonotic potential, and molecular studies associated with morphological and ecological aspects have helped to clarify their taxonomy and phylogeny. Poecilia vivipara naturally parasitized by metacercariae of both species (100% prevalence) exhibit no external signs of parasitism. In this work, four new sequences of P. macrostomum (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA and ITS2 rDNA) and one new sequence of A. (P.) pindoramensis (mtDNA cox-1) are presented. Phylogeny reconstructions linked P. macrostomum to other heterophyids, but the separation of the Heterophyidae and Opisthorchiidae remains unclear. Additionally, we used indirect immunocytochemistry and the phalloidin-fluorescence techniques allied with confocal laser scanning microscopy to describe muscular and neuronal structures of P. macrostomum. A complex arrangement of muscular fibres is associated with the tegument, suckers, gut and reproductive system. Radial fibres around the ventral sucker are thick, branched and extend to the body wall. High-resolution confocal imaging revealed a typical digenean muscular arrangement and important heterophyid morphological traits. These data will support future control measures to reduce the parasitism in guppies reared in fish farming systems, especially for aquarium and experimental purposes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Scanning electron microscopic investigations of cutting edge quality in lamellar keratotomy using the Wavelight femtosecond laser (FS-200) : What influence do spot distance and an additional tunnel have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, T; Höche, T; Heichel, J

    2018-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers (fs-lasers) are established cutting instruments for the creation of LASIK flaps. Previous studies often showed even rougher surfaces after application of fs-laser systems compared to lamellar keratotomy with mechanical microkeratomes. When cutting the cornea with fs-lasers, an intrastromal gas development occurs, which has a potentially negative influence on the cutting quality if the gas cannot be dissipated; therefore, manufacturers have chosen the way of gas assimilation in so-called pockets. The investigated system creates a tunnel which opens under the conjunctiva. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a tunnel as well as the influence of different spot distances on the quality of cut surfaces and edges. In this experimental study on freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 15), the following cuts were carried out with the FS-200 (Wavelight, Erlangen, Germany): 1. standard setting (spot and line separation 8 µm), 2. with tunnel for gas drainage, 3. without gas-conducting tunnel, 4. with increased spot spacing (spot and line separation 9 μm instead of 8 μm) and 5. with reduced spot spacing (spot and line separation 7 μm instead of 8 μm). Subsequently, scanning electron microscopy (FEI Quanta 650, Hillsboro, OR) of the cut edges and surfaces as well as the gas drain tunnel were performed. The evaluation was based on an established score. The current fs-laser system (200 Hz) is able to create smooth cutting surfaces and sharp edges. The changed density of laser pulses compared to the standard settings with a reduced or increased distance between the pulses, did not achieve any further improvement in the surface quality. The gas-conducting tunnel could be detected by scanning electron microscope. In the case of cutting without a tunnel, roughened surfaces and irregularities on the cutting edges were found. When the FS-200 fs-laser is used, LASIK cuts with very smooth cut surfaces and sharp cutting

  15. Laser Scanning in Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Olsson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS to forests has been revolutionary during the last decade. This development was facilitated by combining earlier ranging lidar discoveries [1–5], with experience obtained from full-waveform ranging radar [6,7] to new airborne laser scanning systems which had components such as a GNSS receiver (Global Navigation Satellite System, IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit and a scanning mechanism. Since the first commercial ALS in 1994, new ALS-based forest inventory approaches have been reported feasible for operational activities [8–12]. ALS is currently operationally applied for stand level forest inventories, for example, in Nordic countries. In Finland alone, the adoption of ALS for forest data collection has led to an annual savings of around 20 M€/year, and the work is mainly done by companies instead of governmental organizations. In spite of the long implementation times and there being a limited tradition of making changes in the forest sector, laser scanning was commercially and operationally applied after about only one decade of research. When analyzing high-ranked journal papers from ISI Web of Science, the topic of laser scanning of forests has been the driving force for the whole laser scanning research society over the last decade. Thus, the topic “laser scanning in forests” has provided a significant industrial, societal and scientific impact. [...

  16. Scanning laser Doppler vibrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Marie; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    With a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) a vibrating surface is automatically scanned over predefined grid points, and data processed for displaying vibration properties like mode shapes, natural frequencies, damping ratios, and operational deflection shapes. Our SLDV – a PSV-500H from...

  17. Hyperchromatic laser scanning cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja

    2007-02-01

    In the emerging fields of high-content and high-throughput single cell analysis for Systems Biology and Cytomics multi- and polychromatic analysis of biological specimens has become increasingly important. Combining different technologies and staining methods polychromatic analysis (i.e. using 8 or more fluorescent colors at a time) can be pushed forward to measure anything stainable in a cell, an approach termed hyperchromatic cytometry. For cytometric cell analysis microscope based Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) technologies are ideal as, unlike flow cytometry, they are non-consumptive, i.e. the analyzed sample is fixed on the slide. Based on the feature of relocation identical cells can be subsequently reanalyzed. In this manner data on the single cell level after manipulation steps can be collected. In this overview various components for hyperchromatic cytometry are demonstrated for a SBC instrument, the Laser Scanning Cytometer (Compucyte Corp., Cambridge, MA): 1) polychromatic cytometry, 2) iterative restaining (using the same fluorochrome for restaining and subsequent reanalysis), 3) differential photobleaching (differentiating fluorochromes by their different photostability), 4) photoactivation (activating fluorescent nanoparticles or photocaged dyes), and 5) photodestruction (destruction of FRET dyes). With the intelligent combination of several of these techniques hyperchromatic cytometry allows to quantify and analyze virtually all components of relevance on the identical cell. The combination of high-throughput and high-content SBC analysis with high-resolution confocal imaging allows clear verification of phenotypically distinct subpopulations of cells with structural information. The information gained per specimen is only limited by the number of available antibodies and by sterical hindrance.

  18. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  19. Laser Beam Scanning Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    metal mirror. Multiple thermocouple wires attached to the rear of the mirror provide temperature (and hence beam power) information at various points...on the mirror. Scanning is achieved by means of a selector switch which sequentially samples the thermocouple outputs. The thermocouple output voltages are measured and recorded as a function of laser beam power.

  20. A Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fan; Taylor, Stephen F; Turner, Richard W; Lev, Benjamin L

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides a 100x improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity over previous atomic scanning probe magnetometers. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnet...

  1. Influence of various herbal irrigants as a final rinse on the adherence of Enterococcus faecalis by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosaline, Hannah; Kandaswamy, D; Gogulnath, D; Rubin, MI

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the antibacterial efficacy of three different herbal irrigants against Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods: Single rooted teeth were extracted due to orthodontic and periodontal reasons. The teeth were then inoculated with E. faecalis. The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups and two control groups of six samples each. Group 1 specimens were treated with 5.2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) for 30 min followed by 5 mmol/L Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for 5 min and saline as final irrigant. Group 2 specimens were treated with and 5.2% NaOCl for 30 min as final irrigant. Group 3 were treated with Morinda citrifolia (MC) for 30 min as final irrigant. Group 4 were treated with Azadiracta indica (AI) as final irrigant. Group 5 were treated with green tea (GT) for 30 min as final irrigant. The dentin specimens were carefully spread onto a microscope slide and stained with BacLight and examined in a confocal laser scanning microscope set to monitor fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide. A total of nine fields were examined for each treatment and the bacteria presented were counted. Statistical Analysis: Using the one-way ANOVA with multiple comparison, significantly less bacteria were found adhering to the samples treated with Neem followed by NaOCL, GT, MC, Saline. Results: AI treatment produced the maximum reduction in adherence of E. faecalis to dentin (9.30%) followed by NaOCl (12.50%), GT (27.30%), MC (44.20%) and saline (86.70%). Conclusion: Neem is effective in preventing adhesion of E. faecalis to dentin. PMID:23956540

  2. Benford's Law based detection of latent fingerprint forgeries on the example of artificial sweat printed fingerprints captured by confocal laser scanning microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Mario; Dittmann, Jana

    2015-03-01

    The possibility of forging latent fingerprints at crime scenes is known for a long time. Ever since it has been stated that an expert is capable of recognizing the presence of multiple identical latent prints as an indicator towards forgeries. With the possibility of printing fingerprint patterns to arbitrary surfaces using affordable ink- jet printers equipped with artificial sweat, it is rather simple to create a multitude of fingerprints with slight variations to avoid raising any suspicion. Such artificially printed fingerprints are often hard to detect during the analysis procedure. Moreover, the visibility of particular detection properties might be decreased depending on the utilized enhancement and acquisition technique. In previous work primarily such detection properties are used in combination with non-destructive high resolution sensory and pattern recognition techniques to detect fingerprint forgeries. In this paper we apply Benford's Law in the spatial domain to differentiate between real latent fingerprints and printed fingerprints. This technique has been successfully applied in media forensics to detect image manipulations. We use the differences between Benford's Law and the distribution of the most significant digit of the intensity and topography data from a confocal laser scanning microscope as features for a pattern recognition based detection of printed fingerprints. Our evaluation based on 3000 printed and 3000 latent print samples shows a very good detection performance of up to 98.85% using WEKA's Bagging classifier in a 10-fold stratified cross-validation.

  3. Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch...

  4. Modular Scanning Confocal Microscope with Digital Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xianjun; McCluskey, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    In conventional confocal microscopy, a physical pinhole is placed at the image plane prior to the detector to limit the observation volume. In this work, we present a modular design of a scanning confocal microscope which uses a CCD camera to replace the physical pinhole for materials science applications. Experimental scans were performed on a microscope resolution target, a semiconductor chip carrier, and a piece of etched silicon wafer. The data collected by the CCD were processed to yield images of the specimen. By selecting effective pixels in the recorded CCD images, a virtual pinhole is created. By analyzing the image moments of the imaging data, a lateral resolution enhancement is achieved by using a 20 × / NA = 0.4 microscope objective at 532 nm laser wavelength.

  5. Performance of the SRRC scanning photoelectron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, I H; Yin, G C; Wei, D H; Juang, J M; Dann, T E; Klauser, R; Chuang, T J; Chen, C T; Tsang, K L

    2001-01-01

    A scanning photoelectron microscope has been constructed at SRRC. This SPEM system consists primarily of a Fresnel zone plate (ZP) with an order-selection aperture, a flexure scanning stage, a hemispherical electron analyzer, and sample/ZP insertion system. The flexure stage is used to scan the sample. A hemispherical analyzer with Omni V lens and a 16-channel multichannel detector (MCD) is used to collect photoelectrons. A set of 16 photoelectron images at different kinetic energies can be simultaneously acquired in one single scan. The data acquisition system is designed to collect up to 32 images concurrently, including 16 MCD signals, total electron yield and transmitted photon flux. The design and some initial test results of this SPEM station are presented and discussed.

  6. Development of Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscope Capability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Kimberlee Chiyoko [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Talin, Albert Alec [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandler, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Michael, Joseph R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Modern semiconductor devices rely on the transport of minority charge carriers. Direct examination of minority carrier lifetimes in real devices with nanometer-scale features requires a measurement method with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Achieving nanometer spatial resolutions at sub-nanosecond temporal resolution is possible with pump-probe methods that utilize electrons as probes. Recently, a stroboscopic scanning electron microscope was developed at Caltech, and used to study carrier transport across a Si p-n junction [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] . In this report, we detail our development of a prototype scanning ultrafast electron microscope system at Sandia National Laboratories based on the original Caltech design. This effort represents Sandia's first exploration into ultrafast electron microscopy.

  7. Scanning electron microscopic observations on bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C; Danylchuk, K D

    1977-01-01

    The maceration technique employed in the preparation of specimens of bone for museum purposes has also been found to be of use in the preparation of fresh specimens for study with the scanning electron microscope. The technique requires less technical supervision, permits a greater underprocessing to overprocessing margin, and allows comparability of recent biopsy material with previously macerated bone specimens with no less detail than that found by other authors using other techniques on biopsy material.

  8. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, T; Kiessling, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

    2013-12-01

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast "white light" supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  9. A Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Benjamin

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (2 um), or 6 nT / Hz1 / 2 per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly one-hundred points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT / Hz1 / 2 each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner would measure these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly two orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10- 6 Phi0 / Hz1 / 2) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are for the first time carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns and done so using samples that may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge transport images at temperatures from room to \\x9D4K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  10. Effects of erbium-and chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet and diode lasers on the surfaces of restorative dental materials: a scanning electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, M; Barutcigil, C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential effects of laser irradiation, which is commonly performed in periodontal surgery, on the surfaces of restorative materials. Five different restorative dental materials were used in this study, as follows: (1) Resin composite, (2) poly acid-modified resin composite (compomer), (3) conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC), (4) resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), and (5) amalgam. Four cylindrical samples (8 mm diameter, 2 mm height) were prepared for each restorative material. In addition, four freshly extracted, sound human incisors teeth were selected. Two different laser systems commonly used in periodontal surgery were examined in this study: A 810 nm diode laser at a setting of 1 W with continuous-phase laser irradiation for 10 s, and an erbium-and chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er, Cr: YSGG) laser at settings of 2.5 W, 3.25 W, and 4 W with 25 Hz laser irradiation for 10 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed to evaluate the morphology and surface deformation of the restorative materials and tooth surfaces. According to the SEM images, the Er, Cr: YSGG laser causes irradiation markings that appear as demineralized surfaces on tooth samples. The Er, Cr: YSGG laser also caused deep defects on composite, compomer, and RMGIC surfaces because of its high power, and the ablation was deeper for these samples. High-magnification SEM images of GIC samples showed the melting and combustion effects of the Er, Cr: YSGG laser, which increased as the laser power was increased. In amalgam samples, neither laser left significant harmful effects at the lowest power setting. The diode laser did cause irradiation markings, but they were insignificant compared with those left by the Er, Cr: YSGG laser on the surfaces of the different materials and teeth. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that Er, Cr: YSGG laser irradiation could cause distortions of the surfaces

  11. Dopant profiling with the scanning electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, S L

    2001-01-01

    This dissertation is a detailed study of dopant profiling with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) using secondary electrons. The technique has been applied to a wide variety of doped silicon, gallium arsenide and gallium nitride semiconductor test structures as well as a metal-oxide field effect transistor and several light emitting diodes. A concise set of guide-lines are provided for users of this technique, including the optimum SEM operating conditions that should be used for maximum contrast, an image manipulation procedure, and the resolution and sensitivity limits that can be expected. Dopant contrast observed with the SEM has been studied over the past few years by a number of researchers, and a theory for the contrast has evolved. This theory considers the patch fields outside the specimen to be the dominant factor determining the secondary electron intensity. In this dissertation the contrast mechanism has been further investigated by examining the contrast at different temperatures and after su...

  12. Scanning tunneling microscope spectroscopy of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zypman, Fredy R

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents theoretical results on the relationship between density of states (DOS) and scanning tunneling microscope current-voltage curves in polymers. We considered samples of linear hydrocarbons electrically grounded at one of their extremes. The other extreme is electrically connected to the microscope tip via electron tunneling through vacuum. When a voltage, V, is applied to the tip, electric current, I, flows in the tip-sample circuit. This current varies as the voltage varies and depends on the DOS to the extent that no current would flow if no electron states exist at a certain energy (or voltage). The detailed relationship between DOS and the current-voltage (I-V) curve is not known a priori. We solve the corresponding quantum problem in the context of tight binding and find that I-V reproduces accurately the resonant energy peaks of the DOS. We apply the results to 100 atom-long alkane and alkene chains and found that there is a significant voltage shift in the corresponding curves as to discriminate one structure from the other.

  13. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kociak, M., E-mail: mathieu.kociak@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-SudParis-Sud, CNRS-UMR 8502, Orsay 91405 (France); Zagonel, L.F. [“Gleb Wataghin” Institute of Physics University of Campinas - UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. - Highlights: • Reviews the field of STEM-CL. • Introduces the technical requirements and challenges for STEM-CL. • Introduces the different types of excitations probed by STEM-CL. • Gives comprehensive overview of the last fifteenth years in the field.

  14. An in-vitro evaluation of the effect of 980 nm diode laser irradiation on intra-canal dentin surface and dentinal tubule openings after biomechanical preparation: Scanning electron microscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhingan, Pulkit; Sandhu, Meera; Jindal, Garima; Goel, Deepti; Sachdev, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Context: Very recently, diode laser has been used for disinfecting the root canals in endodontic treatment and increasing its success rate and longevity utilizing the thermal effect of laser on surrounding tissues. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of 980 nm laser irradiation on intra-canal dentin surface – scanning electron microscopic (SEM) - in-vitro study. Methods: A total of 40 single-rooted freshly extracted permanent teeth were collected. Teeth were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction using diamond disc. Root canals of all samples were prepared using hand ProTaper, which were randomly assigned into two groups (n = 20 each). Group 1: Receiving no treatment after biomechanical preparation; Group 2: 980 nm diode laser-treated root canals. Teeth were prepared for SEM analysis to check the size of intra-canal dentinal tubule openings. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using SPSS V.16 software and compared using Levene's and independent t-test. Results: On statistical analysis, width of intracanal dentinal tubule openings in Group 1 (control) was significantly higher than those observed in Group 2 (diode laser-treated) (P diode laser on intra-radicular dentin resulted in ultrastructural alterations resulting in melting of dentin. PMID:26097338

  15. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  16. Operation of a scanning near field optical microscope in reflection in combination with a scanning force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Faulkner, T.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1992-01-01

    Images obtained with a scanning near field optical microscope (SNOM) operating in reflection are presented. We have obtained the first results with a SiN tip as optical probe. The instrument is simultaneously operated as a scanning force microscope (SFM). Moreover, the instrument incorporates an

  17. Laser scanning laser diode photoacoustic microscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Kumavor, Patrick D; Zhu, Quing

    2018-03-01

    The development of low-cost and fast photoacoustic microscopy systems enhances the clinical applicability of photoacoustic imaging systems. To this end, we present a laser scanning laser diode-based photoacoustic microscopy system. In this system, a 905 nm, 325 W maximum output peak power pulsed laser diode with 50 ns pulsewidth is utilized as the light source. A combination of aspheric and cylindrical lenses is used for collimation of the laser diode beam. Two galvanometer scanning mirrors steer the beam across a focusing aspheric lens. The lateral resolution of the system was measured to be ∼21 μm using edge spread function estimation. No averaging was performed during data acquisition. The imaging speed is ∼370 A-lines per second. Photoacoustic microscopy images of human hairs, ex vivo mouse ear, and ex vivo porcine ovary are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and potentials of the proposed system.

  18. Scanning microscopic four-point conductivity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Leth; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Bøggild, Peter

    2002-01-01

    the conducting material either for a silicon wafer or a single probe unit. Using shadow masking photolithography an electrode spacing (pitch) down to 1.1 mum was obtained, with cantilever separation down to 200 run. Characterisation measurements have shown the microscopic probes to be mechanically very flexible......A method for fabricating microscopic four-point probes is presented. The method uses silicon-based microfabrication technology involving only two patterning steps. The last step in the fabrication process is an unmasked deposition of the conducting probe material, and it is thus possible to select...

  19. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga+ -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga+ density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of Er:YAG laser and desensitizing paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate, and their combinations on human dentine tubules: a scanning electron microscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunar, Ogul L; Gürsoy, Hare; Çakar, Gökser; Kuru, Bahar; Ipci, Sebnem Dirikan; Yılmaz, Selçuk

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effects of Er:YAG laser and an in-office desensitizing paste alone or in combination by using scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. Various treatment modalities have been proposed for dentin hypersensitivity, but to date, no single agent or form of treatment has been found effective. Forty dentine specimens obtained from freshly extracted impacted third molars were included and divided into four groups. Group I served as the control, whereas Group II, Group III, and Group IV recieved Er:YAG laser (30 Hz, 60 mJ/pulse, 10 sec), a desensitizing paste (DP) containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate, and DP+Er:YAG laser in combination, respectively, evaluated under SEM. SEM analysis presented occlusion and narrowing of dentinal tubules in all treatment groups, but more prominent occlusion was observed in the combined treatment group. Intergroup comparisons regarding the tubule diameters and the number of the open dentinal tubules per 100 μm2 revealed statistically significant difference in favor of combined group (ptreatment procedures are effective in dentinal tubule occlusion. However, more prominent occlusion is observed in the combined treatment group.

  1. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-15

    50. How to cite this article: Hema BS, Chandu GS, Shiraguppi VL. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces prepared with three rotary endodontic systems: Lightspeed, ProTaper and EndoWave. Niger J.

  2. Manipulation of magnetic skyrmions with a scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, R.; Shindou, R.; Xie, X. C.

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of a single magnetic skyrmion in an atomic spin system under the influence of a scanning tunneling microscope is investigated by computer simulations solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. Two possible scenarios are described: manipulation with aid of a spin-polarized tunneling current and by an electric field created by the scanning tunneling microscope. The dynamics during the creation and annihilation process is studied and the possibility to move single skyrmions is showed.

  3. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  4. Feedback-induced voltage change of a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser as an active detection system for miniature optical scanning probe microscopes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dominique Heinis; Christophe Gorecki; Sylwester Bargiel; Bernard Cretin

    2006-01-01

    ... when we modulate mechanically the length of a coupled-cavity generating the feedback conditions. The voltage change of the VCSEL is produced by light back reflected from the sample to the laser cavity...

  5. Measurements with an ultrafast scanning tunnelling microscope on photoexcited semiconductor layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    Summary form only given. We demonstrate the use of a ultrafast scanning tunnelling microscopes (USTM) for detecting laser-induced field transients on semiconductor layers. In principle, the instrument can detect transient field changes thus far observed as far-field THz radiation in the near-fiel...

  6. Evaluation of the Effects of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser, Ultrasonic Scaler and Curette on Root Surface Profile Using Surface Analyser and Scanning Electron Microscope: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Shipra; Lamba, Arundeep Kaur; Faraz, Farrukh; Tandon, Shruti; Ahad, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The periodontal therapy is primarily targeted at removal of dental plaque and plaque retentive factors. Although the thorough removal of adherent plaque, calculus and infected root cementum is desirable, it is not always achieved by conventional modalities. To accomplish more efficient results several alternative devices have been used. Lasers are one of the most promising modalities for nonsurgical periodontal treatment as they can achieve excellent tissue ablation with strong bactericidal and detoxification effects. Methods: Thirty freshly extracted premolars were selected and decoronated. The mesial surface of each root was divided vertically into four approximately equal parts. These were distributed into four group based on the root surface treatment. Part A (n = 30) was taken as control and no instrumentation was performed. Part B (n = 30) was irradiated by Erbium, Chromium doped Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser. Part C (n = 30) was treated by piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler. Part D (n = 30) was treated by Gracey curette. The surface roughness was quantitatively analyzed by profilometer using roughness average (Ra) value, while presence of smear layer, cracks, craters and melting of surface were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The means across the groups were statistically compared with control using Dunnett test. Results: Among the test groups, Er,Cr:YSGG laser group showed maximum surface roughness (mean Ra value of 4.14 μm) as compared to ultrasonic scaler (1.727 μm) and curette group (1.22 μm). However, surface with smear layer were found to be maximum (50%) in curette treated samples and minimum (20%) in laser treated ones. Maximum cracks (83.34%) were produced by ultrasonic scaler, and minimum (43.33%) by curettes. Crater formation was maximum (50%) in laser treated samples and minimum (3.33%) in curette treated ones. 63.33% samples treated by laser demonstrated melting of root surface, followed by

  7. Collection of trace evidence of explosive residues from the skin in a death due to a disguised letter bomb. The synergy between confocal laser scanning microscope and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Monaci, Fabrizio; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Baroni, Davide; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2010-04-15

    In most deaths caused by explosive, the victim's body becomes a depot for fragments of explosive materials, so contributing to the collection of trace evidence which may provide clues about the specific type of device used with explosion. Improvised explosive devices are used which contain "homemade" explosives rather than high explosives because of the relative ease with which such components can be procured. Many methods such as chromatography-mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, stereomicroscopy, capillary electrophoresis are available for use in the identification of explosive residues on objects and bomb fragments. Identification and reconstruction of the distribution of explosive residues on the decedent's body may give additional hints in assessing the position of the victim in relation to the device. Traditionally these residues are retrieved by swabbing the body and clothing during the early phase, at autopsy. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and other analytical methods may be used to analyze the material swabbed from the victim body. The histological examination of explosive residues on skin samples collected during the autopsy may reveal significant details. The information about type, quantity and particularly about anatomical distribution of explosive residues obtained utilizing confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) together with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), may provide very significant evidence in the clarification and reconstruction of the explosive-related events. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Masked illumination scheme for a galvanometer scanning high-speed confocal fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Uk; Moon, Sucbei; Song, Hoseong; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2011-01-01

    High-speed beam scanning and data acquisition in a laser scanning confocal microscope system are normally implemented with a resonant galvanometer scanner and a frame grabber. However, the nonlinear scanning speed of a resonant galvanometer can generate nonuniform photobleaching in a fluorescence sample as well as image distortion near the edges of a galvanometer scanned fluorescence image. Besides, incompatibility of signal format between a frame grabber and a point detector can lead to digitization error during data acquisition. In this article, we introduce a masked illumination scheme which can effectively decrease drawbacks in fluorescence images taken by a laser scanning confocal microscope with a resonant galvanometer and a frame grabber. We have demonstrated that the difference of photobleaching between the center and the edge of a fluorescence image can be reduced from 26 to 5% in our confocal laser scanning microscope with a square illumination mask. Another advantage of our masked illumination scheme is that the zero level or the lowest input level of an analog signal in a frame grabber can be accurately set by the dark area of a mask in our masked illumination scheme. We have experimentally demonstrated the advantages of our masked illumination method in detail. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp, to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders. It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  10. Wettability study using transmitted electrons in environmental scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkay, Z.

    2010-05-01

    A method for quantitative wettability study at nanoscale is presented. It is based on measuring transmitted electrons through nanodroplets using wet scanning transmission electron microscope (wet-STEM) detector in environmental scanning electron microscope. The quantitative information of the nanodroplet shape and contact angle is obtained by fitting Monte Carlo simulation results for transmitted electrons through spherical cap geometry with the experimental wet-STEM results. The characterization is demonstrated for particles and for initial stages of water droplet condensation over a nonhomogeneous holey carbon grid. The method is suggested for application in thin polymer and biological films.

  11. Closed-Loop Autofocus Scheme for Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Le

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a full scale autofocus approach for scanning electron microscope (SEM. The optimal focus (in-focus position of the microscope is achieved by maximizing the image sharpness using a vision-based closed-loop control scheme. An iterative optimization algorithm has been designed using the sharpness score derived from image gradient information. The proposed method has been implemented and validated using a tungsten gun SEM at various experimental conditions like varying raster scan speed, magnification at real-time. We demonstrate that the proposed autofocus technique is accurate, robust and fast.

  12. New scanning technique for the optical vortex microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Ireneusz; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Masajada, Jan; Drobczyński, Sławomir

    2012-04-01

    In the optical vortex microscopy the focused Gaussian beam with optical vortex scans a sample. An optical vortex can be introduced into a laser beam with the use of a special optical element--a vortex lens. When moving the vortex lens, the optical vortex changes its position inside the spot formed by a focused laser beam. This effect can be used as a new precise scanning technique. In this paper, we study the optical vortex behavior at the sample plane. We also estimate if the new scanning technique results in observable effects that could be used for a phase object detection.

  13. Measuring voltage transients with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    We use an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope to resolve propagating voltage transients in space and time. We demonstrate that the previously observed dependence of the transient signal amplitude on the tunneling resistance was only caused by the electrical sampling circuit. With a modified......-gating photoconductive switch with a rigidly attached fiber, the probe is scanned without changing the probe characteristics. (C) 1997 American Institute of Physics....

  14. Modeling the hysteresis of a scanning probe microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirscherl, Kai; Garnæs, Jørgen; Nielsen, L.

    2000-01-01

    Most scanning probe microscopes use piezoelectric actuators in open loop configurations. Therefore a major problem related to these instruments is the image distortion due to the hysteresis effect of the piezo. In order to eliminate the distortions, cost effective software control based on a model...

  15. Electric field effects in scanning tunneling microscope imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Quaade, Ulrich; Grey, Francois

    1998-01-01

    We present a high-voltage extension of the Tersoff-Hamann theory of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images, which includes the effect of the electric field between the tip and the sample. The theoretical model is based on first-principles electronic structure calculations and has no adjustable...

  16. New Scanning Electron Microscope Used for Cryogenic Tensile Testing

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    At CERN engineering department's installation for cryogenic tensile testing, the new scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for detailed optical observations to be carried out. Using the SEM, surface coatings and tensile properties of materials can investigated in order to better understand how they behave under different conditions.

  17. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces prepared with three rotary endodontic systems: Lightspeed, ProTaper and EndoWave. ... presence or absence of debris and smear layer and the photographs were taken at coronal, middle and apical 1/3 with a magnification of ~200 and ~1000 respectively.

  18. Improved controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Wu, Yuehua; Jacobsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    ) is monitored by an oxygen sensor. We present here some examples of its capabilities demonstrated by high temperature topography with simultaneously ac electrical conductance measurements during atmosphere changes, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at various temperatures, and measurements of the surface......To locally access electrochemical active surfaces and interfaces in operando at the sub-micron scale at high temperatures in a reactive gas atmosphere is of great importance to understand the basic mechanisms in new functional materials, for instance, for energy technologies, such as solid oxide...... fuel cells and electrolyzer cells. Here, we report on advanced improvements of our original controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope, CAHT-SPM. The new microscope can employ a broad range of the scanning probe techniques including tapping mode, scanning tunneling microscopy...

  19. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  20. Scanning laser polarimetry in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Tanuj; Sharma, Reetika; Angmo, Dewang; Sinha, Gautam; Bhartiya, Shibal; Mishra, Sanjay K; Panda, Anita; Sihota, Ramanjit

    2014-11-01

    Glaucoma is an acquired progressive optic neuropathy which is characterized by changes in the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). White-on-white perimetry is the gold standard for the diagnosis of glaucoma. However, it can detect defects in the visual field only after the loss of as many as 40% of the ganglion cells. Hence, the measurement of RNFL thickness has come up. Optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) are the techniques that utilize the evaluation of RNFL for the evaluation of glaucoma. SLP provides RNFL thickness measurements based upon the birefringence of the retinal ganglion cell axons. We have reviewed the published literature on the use of SLP in glaucoma. This review elucidates the technological principles, recent developments and the role of SLP in the diagnosis and monitoring of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, in the light of scientific evidence so far.

  1. Scanning laser polarimetry in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuj Dada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is an acquired progressive optic neuropathy which is characterized by changes in the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL. White-on-white perimetry is the gold standard for the diagnosis of glaucoma. However, it can detect defects in the visual field only after the loss of as many as 40% of the ganglion cells. Hence, the measurement of RNFL thickness has come up. Optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP are the techniques that utilize the evaluation of RNFL for the evaluation of glaucoma. SLP provides RNFL thickness measurements based upon the birefringence of the retinal ganglion cell axons. We have reviewed the published literature on the use of SLP in glaucoma. This review elucidates the technological principles, recent developments and the role of SLP in the diagnosis and monitoring of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, in the light of scientific evidence so far.

  2. The scanning ion conductance microscope for cellular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lab, Max J; Bhargava, Anamika; Wright, Peter T; Gorelik, Julia

    2013-01-01

    The quest for nonoptical imaging methods that can surmount light diffraction limits resulted in the development of scanning probe microscopes. However, most of the existing methods are not quite suitable for studying biological samples. The scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM) bridges the gap between the resolution capabilities of atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope and functional capabilities of conventional light microscope. A nanopipette mounted on a three-axis piezo-actuator, scans a sample of interest and ion current is measured between the pipette tip and the sample. The feedback control system always keeps a certain distance between the sample and the pipette so the pipette never touches the sample. At the same time pipette movement is recorded and this generates a three-dimensional topographical image of the sample surface. SICM represents an alternative to conventional high-resolution microscopy, especially in imaging topography of live biological samples. In addition, the nanopipette probe provides a host of added modalities, for example using the same pipette and feedback control for efficient approach and seal with the cell membrane for ion channel recording. SICM can be combined in one instrument with optical and fluorescent methods and allows drawing structure-function correlations. It can also be used for precise mechanical force measurements as well as vehicle to apply pressure with precision. This can be done on living cells and tissues for prolonged periods of time without them loosing viability. The SICM is a multifunctional instrument, and it is maturing rapidly and will open even more possibilities in the near future.

  3. The Scanning Theremin Microscope: A Model Scanning Probe Instrument for Hands-On Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Wasio, Natalie A.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2014-01-01

    A model scanning probe microscope, designed using similar principles of operation to research instruments, is described. Proximity sensing is done using a capacitance probe, and a mechanical linkage is used to scan this probe across surfaces. The signal is transduced as an audio tone using a heterodyne detection circuit analogous to that used in…

  4. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilatos, Gerasimos, E-mail: gerry@danilatos.com [ESEM Research Laboratory, 28 Wallis Parade, North Bondi, NSW 2026 (Australia); Kollia, Mary [Laboratory of Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis, School of Natural Sciences, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Dracopoulos, Vassileios [Foundation for Research & Technology-Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani P.O.Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-03-15

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. - Highlights: • Novel scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) called TESEM. • Use of the gaseous detection device (GDD) in scintillation mode that allows high resolution bright and dark field imaging in the TESEM. • Novel approach towards a unification of both vacuum and environmental conditions in both bulk/surface and transmission mode of electron microscopy.

  5. The Development of a Scanning Soft X-Ray Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rarback, Harvey Miles

    We have developed a scanning soft X-ray microscope, which can be used to image natural biological specimens at high resolution and with less damage than electron microscopy. The microscope focuses a monochromatic beam of synchrotron radiation to a nearly diffraction limited spot with the aid of a high resolution Fresnel zone plate, specially fabricated for us at the IBM Watson Research Center. The specimen at one atmosphere is mechanically scanned through the spot and the transmitted radiation is efficiently detected with a flow proportional counter. A computer forms a realtime transmission image of the specimen which is displayed on a color monitor. Our first generation optics have produced images of natural wet specimens at a resolution of 300 nm.

  6. Experiments on terahertz 3D scanning microscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Li, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Compared with the visible light and infrared, terahertz (THz) radiation can penetrate nonpolar and nonmetallic materials. There are many studies on the THz coaxial transmission confocal microscopy currently. But few researches on the THz dual-axis reflective confocal microscopy were reported. In this paper, we utilized a dual-axis reflective confocal scanning microscope working at 2.52 THz. In contrast with the THz coaxial transmission confocal microscope, the microscope adopted in this paper can attain higher axial resolution at the expense of reduced lateral resolution, revealing more satisfying 3D imaging capability. Objects such as Chinese characters "Zhong-Hua" written in paper with a pencil and a combined sheet metal which has three layers were scanned. The experimental results indicate that the system can extract two Chinese characters "Zhong," "Hua" or three layers of the combined sheet metal. It can be predicted that the microscope can be applied to biology, medicine and other fields in the future due to its favorable 3D imaging capability.

  7. Black hairy tongue. A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y; Gaafar, H

    1977-01-01

    A patient with tongue malignancy associated with a black hairy tongue is presented. Specimens from e area fo the black hairy tongue and from a normally appearing part were studied with the scanning electron microscope. The "hairs" consisted of elongated filiform papillae due to accumulated keratinized layers. In-between these layers, fungi and bacteria were found. The aetiology of the blck hairy tongue in this patient is discussed.

  8. Galvanometer scanning technology for laser additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi; Li, Jin; Lucas, Mark

    2017-02-01

    A galvanometer laser beam scanning system is an essential element in many laser additive manufacturing (LAM) technologies including Stereolithography (SLA), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Selective Laser Melting (SLM). Understanding the laser beam scanning techniques and recent innovations in this field will greatly benefit the 3D laser printing system integration and technology advance. One of the challenges to achieve high quality 3D printed parts is due to the non-uniform laser power density delivered on the materials caused by the acceleration and deceleration movements of the galvanometer at ends of the hatching and outlining patterns. One way to solve this problem is to modulate the laser power as the function of the scanning speed during the acceleration or deceleration periods. Another strategy is to maintain the constant scanning speed while accurately coordinating the laser on and off operation throughout the job. In this paper, we demonstrate the high speed, high accuracy and low drift digital scanning technology that incorporates both techniques to achieve uniform laser density with minimal additional process development. With the constant scanning speed method, the scanner not only delivers high quality and uniform results, but also a throughput increase of 23% on a typical LAM job, compared to that of the conventional control method that requires galvanometer acceleration and deceleration movements.

  9. Laser line scan performance prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Kevin L.; Schofield, Oscar; Kerfoot, John; Giddings, Tom; Shirron, Joe; Twardowski, Mike

    2007-09-01

    The effectiveness of sensors that use optical measurements for the laser detection and identification of subsurface mines is directly related to water clarity. The primary objective of the work presented here was to use the optical data collected by UUV (Slocum Glider) surveys of an operational areas to estimate the performance of an electro-optical identification (EOID) Laser Line Scan (LLS) system during RIMPAC 06, an international naval exercise off the coast of Hawaii. Measurements of optical backscattering and beam attenuation were made with a Wet Labs, Inc. Scattering Absorption Meter (SAM), mounted on a Rutgers University/Webb Research Slocum glider. The optical data universally indicated extremely clear water in the operational area, except very close to shore. The beam-c values from the SAM sensor were integrated to three attenuation lengths to provide an estimate of how well the LLS would perform in detecting and identifying mines in the operational areas. Additionally, the processed in situ optical data served as near-real-time input to the Electro-Optic Detection Simulator, ver. 3 (EODES-3; Metron, Inc.) model for EOID performance prediction. Both methods of predicting LLS performance suggested a high probability of detection and probability of identification. These predictions were validated by the actual performance of the LLS as the EOID system yielded imagery from which reliable mine identification could be made. Future plans include repeating this work in more optically challenging water types to demonstrate the utility of pre-mission UUV surveys of operational areas as a tactical decision aid for planning EOID missions.

  10. Investigations in optoelectronic image processing in scanning laser microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaliha, Hiranya Kumar

    A considerable amount of work has been done on scann-ing laser microscopy since its applications were first pointed out by Roberts and Young[1], Minsky [2] and Davidovits et al [3]. The advent of laser has made it possible to focus an intense beam of laser light in a scanning optical microscope (SOM) [4, 5] and hence explore regions of microscopy[6] uncovered by conven-tional microscopy. In the simple SOM [7, 8, 9], the upper spatial frequency in amplitude transmittance or reflectance of an object for which transfer function is nonzero is same as that in a conventional optical microscope. However, in Type II SOM [7] or confocal SOM that employs a coherent or a point detector, the spatial frequency bandwidth is twice that obtained in a conventional microscope. Besides this confocal set-up is found to be very useful in optical sectioning and consequently in 3-D image processing[10, 11, 12] specially of biological specimens. Such systems are also suitable for studies of semiconductor materials [13], super-resolution [14] and various imaginative ways of image processing[15, 16, 17] including phase imaging[18]. A brief survey of related advances in scanning optical microscopy has been covered in the chapter 1 of the thesis. The performance of SOM may be investigated by concent-rating also on signal derived by one dimensional scan of the object specimen. This simplified mode may also be adapted to give wealth of information for biological and semiconductor specimens. Hence we have investigated the design of a scanning laser system suited specifically for studies of line scan image signals of microscopic specimens when probed through a focused laser spot. An electro-mechanical method of scanning of the object specimen has been designed with this aim in mind. Chapter 2, Part A of the thesis deals with the design consider-ations of such a system. For analysis of scan signals at a later instant of time so as to facilitate further processing, an arrangement of microprocessor

  11. Characterization of Line Nanopatterns on Positive Photoresist Produced by Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Mehdi Aghaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Line nanopatterns are produced on the positive photoresist by scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM. A laser diode with a wavelength of 450 nm and a power of 250 mW as the light source and an aluminum coated nanoprobe with a 70 nm aperture at the tip apex have been employed. A neutral density filter has been used to control the exposure power of the photoresist. It is found that the changes induced by light in the photoresist can be detected by in situ shear force microscopy (ShFM, before the development of the photoresist. Scanning electron microscope (SEM images of the developed photoresist have been used to optimize the scanning speed and the power required for exposure, in order to minimize the final line width. It is shown that nanometric lines with a minimum width of 33 nm can be achieved with a scanning speed of 75 µm/s and a laser power of 113 mW. It is also revealed that the overexposure of the photoresist by continuous wave laser generated heat can be prevented by means of proper photoresist selection. In addition, the effects of multiple exposures of nanopatterns on their width and depth are investigated.

  12. Analytical scanning evanescent microwave microscope and control stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Duewer, Fred; Yang, Hai Tao; Lu, Yalin

    2009-06-23

    A scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM) that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties is disclosed. The SEMM is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The SEMM has the ability to map dielectric constant, loss tangent, conductivity, electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. Such properties are then used to provide distance control over a wide range, from to microns to nanometers, over dielectric and conductive samples for a scanned evanescent microwave probe, which enable quantitative non-contact and submicron spatial resolution topographic and electrical impedance profiling of dielectric, nonlinear dielectric and conductive materials. The invention also allows quantitative estimation of microwave impedance using signals obtained by the scanned evanescent microwave probe and quasistatic approximation modeling. The SEMM can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  13. Scanning optical microscope with long working distance objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2010-10-19

    A scanning optical microscope, including: a light source to generate a beam of probe light; collimation optics to substantially collimate the probe beam; a probe-result beamsplitter; a long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective; scanning means to scan a beam spot of the focused probe beam on or within a sample; relay optics; and a detector. The collimation optics are disposed in the probe beam. The probe-result beamsplitter is arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light from the sample. The beamsplitter reflects the probe beam into the objective and transmits resultant light. The long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective is also arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light. It focuses the reflected probe beam onto the sample, and collects and substantially collimates the resultant light. The relay optics are arranged to relay the transmitted resultant light from the beamsplitter to the detector.

  14. Pupil engineering for a confocal reflectance line-scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yogesh G.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2011-03-01

    Confocal reflectance microscopy may enable screening and diagnosis of skin cancers noninvasively and in real-time, as an adjunct to biopsy and pathology. Current confocal point-scanning systems are large, complex, and expensive. A confocal line-scanning microscope, utilizing a of linear array detector can be simpler, smaller, less expensive, and may accelerate the translation of confocal microscopy in clinical and surgical dermatology. A line scanner may be implemented with a divided-pupil, half used for transmission and half for detection, or with a full-pupil using a beamsplitter. The premise is that a confocal line-scanner with either a divided-pupil or a full-pupil will provide high resolution and optical sectioning that would be competitive to that of the standard confocal point-scanner. We have developed a confocal line-scanner that combines both divided-pupil and full-pupil configurations. This combined-pupil prototype is being evaluated to determine the advantages and limitations of each configuration for imaging skin, and comparison of performance to that of commercially available standard confocal point-scanning microscopes. With the combined configuration, experimental evaluation of line spread functions (LSFs), contrast, signal-to-noise ratio, and imaging performance is in progress under identical optical and skin conditions. Experimental comparisons between divided-pupil and full-pupil LSFs will be used to determine imaging performance. Both results will be compared to theoretical calculations using our previously reported Fourier analysis model and to the confocal point spread function (PSF). These results may lead to a simpler class of confocal reflectance scanning microscopes for clinical and surgical dermatology.

  15. Nanofabrication of magnetic scanned-probe microscope sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Chong, B K

    2001-01-01

    experiments were carried out under ambient conditions. The experiments required no extra preparation to be done to the specimen before imaging and measurements were carried out under ambient conditions. These probes offer the prospect of direct magnetic field measurement, non- invasiveness, very close proximity, possible local manipulation, better control over the tip- specimen interaction distance and topographic imaging. It is hoped that these magnetic microscope probes will be of great interest and general utility for academic and industrial magneticians. This thesis presents the development of novel magnetic sensor combined with Atomic Force Microscope probe (AFM) using conventional semiconductor processing techniques and Electron Beam Lithography (EBL). The fabrication of these magnetic sensors was performed on a common micromachined silicon substrate using a generic batch fabrication technique. Sub-micron Hall bar for Scanning Hall probe Microscopy (SHPM) and electromagnetic force coil magnet for Scanni...

  16. Simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope images on desktop computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: christian.dwyer@mcem.monash.edu.au [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Two independent strategies are presented for reducing the computation time of multislice simulations of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images: (1) optimal probe sampling, and (2) the use of desktop graphics processing units. The first strategy is applicable to STEM images generated by elastic and/or inelastic scattering, and requires minimal effort for its implementation. Used together, these two strategies can reduce typical computation times from days to hours, allowing practical simulation of STEM images of general atomic structures on a desktop computer.

  17. [Enamel bundles and lamellae under the scanning electron microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bures, H; Svejda, J

    1976-01-01

    Lamellae, tufts and cracks were found in the enamel near the dentionenamel junction. When investigated by the scanning electron microscop, lamellae and tufts were very similar to each other as to their structure. Lamellae appeared in two kinds: 1. Organic material originating in the dentionenamel membrane filled the whole space. 2. The space was empty, yet an organic membrane was covering the walls of adjacent prisms. Tufts and lamellae differed merely in their lenght. The walls of the cracks lacked organic material, the prisms being damaged or their course interrupted.

  18. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, K. S., E-mail: kssim@mmu.edu.my; Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  19. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-01-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A High Rigidity and Precision Scanning Tunneling Microscope with Decoupled XY and Z Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new scan-head structure for the scanning tunneling microscope (STM is proposed, featuring high scan precision and rigidity. The core structure consists of a piezoelectric tube scanner of quadrant type (for XY scans coaxially housed in a piezoelectric tube with single inner and outer electrodes (for Z scan. They are fixed at one end (called common end. A hollow tantalum shaft is coaxially housed in the XY-scan tube and they are mutually fixed at both ends. When the XY scanner scans, its free end will bring the shaft to scan and the tip which is coaxially inserted in the shaft at the common end will scan a smaller area if the tip protrudes short enough from the common end. The decoupled XY and Z scans are desired for less image distortion and the mechanically reduced scan range has the superiority of reducing the impact of the background electronic noise on the scanner and enhancing the tip positioning precision. High quality atomic resolution images are also shown.

  1. A High Rigidity and Precision Scanning Tunneling Microscope with Decoupled XY and Z Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Guo, Tengfei; Hou, Yubin; Zhang, Jing; Meng, Wenjie; Lu, Qingyou

    2017-01-01

    A new scan-head structure for the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is proposed, featuring high scan precision and rigidity. The core structure consists of a piezoelectric tube scanner of quadrant type (for XY scans) coaxially housed in a piezoelectric tube with single inner and outer electrodes (for Z scan). They are fixed at one end (called common end). A hollow tantalum shaft is coaxially housed in the XY-scan tube and they are mutually fixed at both ends. When the XY scanner scans, its free end will bring the shaft to scan and the tip which is coaxially inserted in the shaft at the common end will scan a smaller area if the tip protrudes short enough from the common end. The decoupled XY and Z scans are desired for less image distortion and the mechanically reduced scan range has the superiority of reducing the impact of the background electronic noise on the scanner and enhancing the tip positioning precision. High quality atomic resolution images are also shown.

  2. Simulation of channeling contrast in scanning ion microscope images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Kaoru

    2018-01-01

    The scanning ion microscope (SIM) provides a distinct channeling contrast in backscattered ion (BSI) and secondary electron (SE) images owing to its wide critical angle for ion channeling. In this report, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a crystalline sample's channeling contrast that has been scanned by ion beams of 30 keV He, Ne, and Ga in the SIM. A middle portion of the sample surface inclined at different angles against neighboring sides oriented toward the ions' channeling direction. Line profiles of the BSI and SE yields along the surface reproduced crystalline-oriented changes that are expected for a transparency model. Nevertheless, a trajectory simulation of the ions in the sample according to the MD technique suggests some contrast differences from that of the model for the BSI and SE images and for different ion species.

  3. Multicolor Scanning Laser Imaging in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad S Z; Carrim, Zia Iqbal

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common cause of blindness in individuals younger than 60 years. Screening for retinopathy is undertaken using conventional color fundus photography and relies on the identification of hemorrhages, vascular abnormalities, exudates, and cotton-wool spots. These can sometimes be difficult to identify. Multicolor scanning laser imaging, a new imaging modality, may have a role in improving screening outcomes, as well as facilitating treatment decisions. Observational case series comprising two patients with known diabetes who were referred for further examination after color fundus photography revealed abnormal findings. Multicolor scanning laser imaging was undertaken. Features of retinal disease from each modality were compared. Multicolor scanning laser imaging provides superior visualization of retinal anatomy and pathology, thereby facilitating risk stratification and treatment decisions. Multicolor scanning laser imaging is a novel imaging technique offering the potential for improving the reliability of screening for diabetic retinopathy. Validation studies are warranted.

  4. 3-D Reconstruction of Neurons from Multichannel Confocal Laser Scanning Image Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterlood, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used

  5. Microsphere-based super-resolution scanning optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszka, Gergely; Yang, Hui; Gijs, Martin A M

    2017-06-26

    High-refractive index dielectric microspheres positioned within the field of view of a microscope objective in a dielectric medium can focus the light into a so-called photonic nanojet. A sample placed in such nanojet can be imaged by the objective with super-resolution, i.e. with a resolution beyond the classical diffraction limit. However, when imaging nanostructures on a substrate, the propagation distance of a light wave in the dielectric medium in between the substrate and the microsphere must be small enough to reveal the sample's nanometric features. Therefore, only the central part of an image obtained through a microsphere shows super-resolution details, which are typically ∼100 nm using white light (peak at λ = 600 nm). We have performed finite element simulations of the role of this critical distance in the super-resolution effect. Super-resolution imaging of a sample placed beneath the microsphere is only possible within a very restricted central area of ∼10 μm2, where the separation distance between the substrate and the microsphere surface is very small (∼1 μm). To generate super-resolution images over larger areas of the sample, we have fixed a microsphere on a frame attached to the microscope objective, which is automatically scanned over the sample in a step-by-step fashion. This generates a set of image tiles, which are subsequently stitched into a single super-resolution image (with resolution of λ/4-λ/5) of a sample area of up to ∼104 μm2. Scanning a standard optical microscope objective with microsphere therefore enables super-resolution microscopy over the complete field-of-view of the objective.

  6. Postprocessing Algorithm for Driving Conventional Scanning Tunneling Microscope at Fast Scan Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an image postprocessing framework for Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM to reduce the strong spurious oscillations and scan line noise at fast scan rates and preserve the features, allowing an order of magnitude increase in the scan rate without upgrading the hardware. The proposed method consists of two steps for large scale images and four steps for atomic scale images. For large scale images, we first apply for each line an image registration method to align the forward and backward scans of the same line. In the second step we apply a “rubber band” model which is solved by a novel Constrained Adaptive and Iterative Filtering Algorithm (CIAFA. The numerical results on measurement from copper(111 surface indicate the processed images are comparable in accuracy to data obtained with a slow scan rate, but are free of the scan drift error commonly seen in slow scan data. For atomic scale images, an additional first step to remove line-by-line strong background fluctuations and a fourth step of replacing the postprocessed image by its ranking map as the final atomic resolution image are required. The resulting image restores the lattice image that is nearly undetectable in the original fast scan data.

  7. A versatile atomic force microscope integrated with a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreith, J.; Strunz, T.; Fantner, E. J.; Fantner, G. E.; Cordill, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    A versatile atomic force microscope (AFM), which can be installed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), is introduced. The flexible design of the instrument enables correlated analysis for different experimental configurations, such as AFM imaging directly after nanoindentation in vacuum. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the specially designed AFM installed inside a SEM, slip steps emanating around nanoindents in single crystalline brass were examined. This example showcases how the combination of AFM and SEM imaging can be utilized for quantitative dislocation analysis through the measurement of the slip step heights without the hindrance of oxide formation. Finally, an in situ nanoindentation technique is introduced, illustrating the use of AFM imaging during indentation experiments to examine plastic deformation occurring under the indenter tip. The mechanical indentation data are correlated to the SEM and AFM images to estimate the number of dislocations emitted to the surface.

  8. Root planing with Er:YAG laser X Gracey curette, a study in vitro in scanning electron microscopic study; Avaliacao em microscopia eletronica de varredura da superficie radicular, raspada e alisada com Er: YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Fabiano Augusto Sfier de

    2000-07-01

    The Er:YAG laser has been studied as a periodontal therapies, used to remove subgingival calculus and its bactericidal effects. The proposal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Er:YAG laser in root planing in comparison to the traditional method, not surgical. Six recently extracted due to the disease periodontal, were cut longitudinally, tends like this two half of the root. These half were separate in four groups. The first group is the natural tooth (group controls negative), the second group (group controls) was accomplished to root planing with Gracey curette. And in the third to Er:YAG laser with a contact tip, using a 45 deg angle in relation to the root; in the fourth group was scraped and planned with Er:YAG laser and complemented root planing with Gracey curette. The used energy was of 100 mJ (out put) and the frequency of 10 Hz accomplished with irrigation. The obtained results were similar in the groups 2 and 3 in comparison to the amount of smear-layer. In group 4 however, better result was obtained, because the image (SEM) was much more regular and with less amount of smear-layer. The conclusion of the work is that with the association of the laser technique and Gracey curette the results are superior to the conventional treatment. (author)

  9. Scanned Laser Illuminator/Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    velocity (i.e., R = -Vc). then the LOS rate beconas: MVc a = 2 2 R + M This equation is plotted as a function of range in Figure 3 for an aircraft...exp IŖ ^ W 2 + 4a2 ^ ) (2) J. E. Negro, "Pointing Variance and Beam Degradation Calculations", Laser Digest, AFWL-TR-74-100, . Spring 1974...AFWL-TR-74-100, Spring 1974. 4. A. E’.-Siegman, "Stabilizing todtput^ith Unstabüj Resonators", Laser Focus, May 1971. 6. A. J. Steckl, "Injection

  10. Transient measurements with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope on semiconductor surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate: the use of an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope on a semiconductor surface. Laser-induced transient signals with 1.8 ps rise time are detected, The investigated sample is a low-temperature grown GaAs layer plated on a sapphire substrate with a thin gold layer that serves as st...... by the nonuniform carrier density created by the absorption of the light (photo Dember effect). The transient depends in sign and in shape on the direction of optical excitation. This signal is the dominating transient in tunneling mode. The signals are explained by a capacitive coupling across the tunneling gap...

  11. Lagrange time delay estimation for scanning electron microscope image magnification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K-S; Thong, L W; Ting, H Y; Tso, C P

    2010-02-01

    Interpolation techniques that are used for image magnification to obtain more useful details of the surface such as morphology and mechanical contrast usually rely on the signal information distributed around edges and areas of sharp changes and these signal information can also be used to predict missing details from the sample image. However, many of these interpolation methods tend to smooth or blur out image details around the edges. In the present study, a Lagrange time delay estimation interpolator method is proposed and this method only requires a small filter order and has no noticeable estimation bias. Comparing results with the original scanning electron microscope magnification and results of various other interpolation methods, the Lagrange time delay estimation interpolator is found to be more efficient, more robust and easier to execute.

  12. A high stability and repeatability electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Zhigang; Wang, Jihao; Lu, Qingyou, E-mail: qxl@ustc.edu.cn [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hou, Yubin [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-12-15

    We present a home built electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ECSTM) with very high stability and repeatability. Its coarse approach is driven by a closely stacked piezo motor of GeckoDrive type with four rigid clamping points, which enhances the rigidity, compactness, and stability greatly. It can give high clarity atomic resolution images without sound and vibration isolations. Its drifting rates in XY and Z directions in solution are as low as 84 pm/min and 59 pm/min, respectively. In addition, repeatable coarse approaches in solution within 2 mm travel distance show a lateral deviation less than 50 nm. The gas environment can be well controlled to lower the evaporation rate of the cell, thus reducing the contamination and elongating the measurement time. Atomically resolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} image on Au (111) work electrode is demonstrated to show the performance of the ECSTM.

  13. Trichomes of Cannabis sativa as viewed with scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledbetter, M.C.; Krikorian, A.D.

    1975-06-01

    Direct examination of fresh, unfixed and uncoated specimens from vegetative and floral parts of Cannabis sativa with the scanning electron microscope enables one to obtain a faithful representation of their surface morphology. The presence of two major types of trichomes has been confirmed: a glandular type comprising or terminating in a globoid structure, and a conically-shaped nonglandular type. Moreover, three or possibly four distinct glandular types can be distinguished: sessile globoid, small-stalked and large-stalked globoid, and a peltate type. The nonglandular trichomes can be distinguished by the nature of their surfaces: those with a warty surface, and those which are relatively smooth. The range of size and distribution, and the special features of all these types of trichomes are also provided.

  14. [Scanning electron microscopic study on newborn middle ear mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y

    1992-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopic studies were made on the mucosa of newborn middle ear. The results were: 1. The epithelial surface was found to contain four types of cell: the ciliated cell, the nonciliated cell without secretory granules (SG), the nonciliated cell with secretory granules (SG) and the flat cell. 2. The ciliated cell population appeared in the following order (from dense to sparse): eustachian tube, hypotympanum, antetympanum, epitympanum, promontory and post-tympanum. 3. The density of nonciliated cell without SG population was gradually increasing from anterior to posterior part of middle ear. 4. The population of nonciliated cell with SG was fewer and they were always found near the ciliated cells. 5. The flat cells were only seen on the flaccid part of tympanic membrane. This paper suggests that the ciliary system is basically mature and the development of mucus secreting members still is not perfect in newborn middle ear mucosa.

  15. Scanning tunneling microscope with continuous flow cryostat sample cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, S.; Rose, M.K.; Dunphy, J.C.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chapelier, C. [Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA/Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    1997-06-01

    We have constructed an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM) for operation in the temperature range 20{endash}300 K. The design consists of a vibration isolated sample holder mounted on a continuous flow cryostat. By rotation and linear motion of the cryostat, the sample can be positioned in front of various surface preparation and analysis instruments contained in a single vacuum chamber. A lightweight beetle-type STM head is lowered from the top onto the sample by a linear manipulator. To minimize helium convection in the cryostat, the entire vacuum system, including a liquid helium storage Dewar, can be tilted by a few degrees perpendicular to the cryostat axis, which improves the operation. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of the Pd(111) surface and adsorbed CO molecules. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Scanning probe microscopes go video rate and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, M. J.; Crama, L.; Schakel, P.; van Tol, E.; van Velzen-Williams, G. B. E. M.; Overgauw, C. F.; ter Horst, H.; Dekker, H.; Okhuijsen, B.; Seynen, M.; Vijftigschild, A.; Han, P.; Katan, A. J.; Schoots, K.; Schumm, R.; van Loo, W.; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2005-05-01

    In this article we introduce a, video-rate, control system that can be used with any type of scanning probe microscope, and that allows frame rates up to 200images/s. These electronics are capable of measuring in a fast, completely analog mode as well as in the more conventional digital mode. The latter allows measurements at low speeds and options, such as, e.g., atom manipulation, current-voltage spectroscopy, or force-distance curves. For scanning tunneling microscope (STM) application we implemented a hybrid mode between the well-known constant-height and constant-current modes. This hybrid mode not only increases the maximum speed at which the surface can be imaged, but also improves the resolution at lower speeds. Acceptable image quality at high speeds could only be obtained by pushing the performance of each individual part of the electronics to its limit: we developed a preamplifier with a bandwidth of 600kHz, a feedback electronics with a bandwidth of 1MHz, a home-built bus structure for the fast data transfer, fast analog to digital converters, and low-noise drivers. Future improvements and extensions to the control electronics can be realized easily and quickly, because of its open architecture with its modular plug-in units. In the second part of this article we show our high-speed results. The ultrahigh vacuum application of these control electronics on our (UHV)-STM enabled imaging speeds up to 0.3mm/s, while still obtaining atomic step resolution. At high frame rates, the images suffered from noticeable distortions, which we have been able to analyze by virtue of the unique access to the error (dZ) signal. The distortions have all been associated with mechanical resonances in the scan head of the UHV-STM. In order to reduce such resonance effects, we have designed and built a scan head with high resonance frequencies (⩾64kHz), especially for the purpose of testing the fast electronics. Using this scanner we have reached video-rate imaging speeds

  17. Standard practice for scanning electron microscope beam Size characterization

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides a reproducible means by which one aspect of the performance of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) may be characterized. The resolution of an SEM depends on many factors, some of which are electron beam voltage and current, lens aberrations, contrast in the specimen, and operator-instrument-material interaction. However, the resolution for any set of conditions is limited by the size of the electron beam. This size can be quantified through the measurement of an effective apparent edge sharpness for a number of materials, two of which are suggested. This practice requires an SEM with the capability to perform line-scan traces, for example, Y-deflection waveform generation, for the suggested materials. The range of SEM magnification at which this practice is of utility is from 1000 to 50 000 × . Higher magnifications may be attempted, but difficulty in making precise measurements can be expected. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ass...

  18. Simulation and Characterization of a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Abbott, Terry O.; Sampson, Allen R.

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mSEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This effort focuses on the characterization of individual components of the mSEM and simulation of the complete system. SEMs can provide information on the size, shape, morphology and chemical composition of lunar regolith. Understanding these basic properties will allow us to better estimate the challenges associated with In-Situ Resource Utilization and to improve our basic science knowledge of the lunar surface (either precluding the need for sample return or allowing differentiation of unique samples to be returned to Earth.) The main components of the mSEM prototype includes: a cold field emission electron gun (CFEG), focusing lens, deflection/scanning system and backscatter electron detector. Of these, the electron gun development is of particular importance as it dictates much of the design of the remaining components. A CFEG was chosen for use with the lunar mSEM as its emission does not depend on heating of the tungsten emitter (lower power), it offers a long operation lifetime, is orders of magnitude brighter than tungsten hairpin guns, has a small source size and exhibits low beam energy spread.

  19. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  20. A landmark-based method for the geometrical 3D calibration of scanning microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, M.

    2007-04-27

    This thesis presents a new strategy and a spatial method for the geometric calibration of 3D measurement devices at the micro-range, based on spatial reference structures with nanometersized landmarks (nanomarkers). The new method was successfully applied for the 3D calibration of scanning probe microscopes (SPM) and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). Moreover, the spatial method was also used for the photogrammetric self-calibration of scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In order to implement the calibration strategy to all scanning microscopes used, the landmark-based principle of reference points often applied at land survey or at close-range applications has been transferred to the nano- and micro-range in the form of nanomarker. In order to function as a support to the nanomarkers, slope-shaped step pyramids have been developed and fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) induced metal deposition. These FIB produced 3D microstructures have been sized to embrace most of the measurement volume of the scanning microscopes. Additionally, their special design allows the homogenous distribution of the nanomarkers. The nanomarkers were applied onto the support and the plateaus of the slope-step pyramids by FIB etching (milling) as landmarks with as little as several hundreds of nanometers in diameter. The nanomarkers are either of point-, or ring-shaped design. They are optimized so that they can be spatially measured by SPM and CLSM, and, imaged and photogrammetrically analyzed on the basis of SEM data. The centre of the each nanomarker serves as reference point in the measurement data or images. By applying image processing routines, the image (2D) or object (3D) coordinates of each nanomarker has been determined with subpixel accuracy. The correlative analysis of the SPM, CLSM and photogrammetric SEM measurement data after 3D calibration resulted in mean residues in the measured coordinates of as little as 13 nm. Without the coupling factors the mean

  1. Scanning electron microscope automatic defect classification of process induced defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott; McGarvey, Steve

    2017-03-01

    With the integration of high speed Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) based Automated Defect Redetection (ADR) in both high volume semiconductor manufacturing and Research and Development (R and D), the need for reliable SEM Automated Defect Classification (ADC) has grown tremendously in the past few years. In many high volume manufacturing facilities and R and D operations, defect inspection is performed on EBeam (EB), Bright Field (BF) or Dark Field (DF) defect inspection equipment. A comma separated value (CSV) file is created by both the patterned and non-patterned defect inspection tools. The defect inspection result file contains a list of the inspection anomalies detected during the inspection tools' examination of each structure, or the examination of an entire wafers surface for non-patterned applications. This file is imported into the Defect Review Scanning Electron Microscope (DRSEM). Following the defect inspection result file import, the DRSEM automatically moves the wafer to each defect coordinate and performs ADR. During ADR the DRSEM operates in a reference mode, capturing a SEM image at the exact position of the anomalies coordinates and capturing a SEM image of a reference location in the center of the wafer. A Defect reference image is created based on the Reference image minus the Defect image. The exact coordinates of the defect is calculated based on the calculated defect position and the anomalies stage coordinate calculated when the high magnification SEM defect image is captured. The captured SEM image is processed through either DRSEM ADC binning, exporting to a Yield Analysis System (YAS), or a combination of both. Process Engineers, Yield Analysis Engineers or Failure Analysis Engineers will manually review the captured images to insure that either the YAS defect binning is accurately classifying the defects or that the DRSEM defect binning is accurately classifying the defects. This paper is an exploration of the feasibility of the

  2. Development of a shear force scanning near-field fluorescence microscope for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, G Y; Qiao, W H; Lei, F H; Angiboust, J-F; Troyon, M; Manfait, M

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, a shear force scanning near-field fluorescence microscope combined with a confocal laser microspectrofluorometer is described. The shear force detection is realized based on a bimorph cantilever, which provides a very sensitive, reliable, and easy to use method to control the probe-sample distance during scanning. With the system, high-quality shear force imaging of various samples has been carried out. Furthermore, simultaneous shear force and near-field fluorescence imaging of biological cells has also been realized. As an example, we especially present the result on the distribution of P-glycoprotein in the plasma membrane of human small cell lung cancer cells, suggesting that the system would be a promising tool for biological applications.

  3. Confocal scanning electroluminescence spectro-microscope for multidimensional light-emitting property analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S.; Onushkin, G.; Park, J. S.; Kim, B. K.; Lee, D.-Y.; Fomin, A.; Ko, K.; Kim, J. W.

    2007-02-01

    We report new type of micro-EL instrument and its applications for light emitting devices. Our new micro-EL, so-called confocal scanning electroluminescence sprctro-microscope (CSESM) has not only fast image acquisition time but also high image resolution. The newly developed CSESM is combined with confocal laser scanning photoluminescence micsoscope, i.e. micro-PL. Therefore, micro-EL distribution can be directly matched with micro-PL and mechanical chip structure of LED. It is fruitful for providing a fast and non-destructive method to analyze the homogeneity of LEDs in its completely proceeded form. Using this apparatus, we study local intensity and wavelength distribution of electroluminescence for InGaN/GaN blue LED chip. Our results represent that local fluctuations of electroluminescence intensity and wavelength position are closely connected with the fluctuation of local current density, i.e. current spreading features on LED chips.

  4. Laser scan with upstream crystal #1

    CERN Document Server

    Gyr, Marcel

    1996-01-01

    A laser scan was performed with the new U-shaped crystal G5, which has a known miscut of +1 mrad and is installed at the upstream position #1 in the TEC. The aim was to cross-check the angular sensitivity of the stepping motor of the goniometer, which theoretically should be 1.98 µrad/step.

  5. Multiplatform Mobile Laser Scanning: Usability and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning is an emerging technology capable of capturing three-dimensional data from surrounding objects. With state-of-the-art sensors, the achieved point clouds capture object details with good accuracy and precision. Many of the applications involve civil engineering in urban areas, as well as traffic and other urban planning, all of which serve to make 3D city modeling probably the fastest growing market segment in this field. This article outlines multiplatform mobile laser scanning solutions such as vehicle- and trolley-operated urban area data acquisition, and boat-mounted equipment for fluvial environments. Moreover, we introduce a novel backpack version of mobile laser scanning equipment for surveying applications in the field of natural sciences where the requirements include precision and mobility in variable terrain conditions. In addition to presenting a technical description of the systems, we discuss the performance of the solutions in the light of various applications in the fields of urban mapping and modeling, fluvial geomorphology, snow-cover characterization, precision agriculture, and in monitoring the effects of climate change on permafrost landforms. The data performance of the mobile laser scanning approach is described by the results of an evaluation of the ROAMER on a permanent MLS test field. Furthermore, an in situ accuracy assessment using a field of spherical 3D targets for the newly-introduced Akhka backpack system is conducted and reported on.

  6. Two-color two-photon fluorescence laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentmeier, S; Denicke, S; Gericke, K-H

    2009-11-01

    We present the first realization of a Two-Color Two-Photon Laser-Scanning Microscope (2c2pLSM) and UV fluorescence images of cells acquired with this technique. Fluorescence is induced by two-color two-photon absorption using the fundamental and the second harmonic of a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser. Simultaneous absorption of an 800 nm photon and a 400 nm photon energetically corresponds to one-photon absorption at 266 nm. This technique for Laser-Scanning Microscopy extends the excitation wavelength range of a Ti:Sa powered fluorescence microscope to the UV. In addition to the known advantages of multi-photon microscopy like intrinsic 3D resolution, reduced photo damage and high penetration depth 2c2pLSM offers the possibility of using standard high numeric aperture objectives for UV fluorescence imaging. The effective excitation wavelength of 266 nm corresponds especially well to the excitation spectrum of tryptophan. Hence, it is an ideal tool for label free fluorescence studies and imaging of intrinsic protein fluorescence which originates mainly from tryptophan. Thus a very sensitive natural lifetime probe can be used for monitoring protein reactions or changes in conformation. First measurements of living MIN-6 cells reveal differences between the UV fluorescence lifetimes of the nucleus and cytoplasm. The significance of this method was further demonstrated by monitoring the binding of biotin to avidin.

  7. Somatic Embryos in Catharanthus roseus: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid ASLAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don is an important medicinal plant as it contains several anti-cancerous compounds, like vinblastine and vincristine. Plant tissue culture technology (organogenesis and embryogenesis has currently been used in fast mass propagating raw materials for secondary metabolite synthesis. In this present communication, scanning electron microscopic (SEM study of somatic embryos was conducted and discussed. The embryogenic callus was first induced from hypocotyls of in vitro germinated seeds on which somatic embryos, differentiated in numbers, particularly on 2,4-D (1.0 mg/L Murashige and Skoog (MS was medium. To understand more about the regeneration method and in vitro formed embryos SEM was performed. The SEM study revealed normal somatic embryo origin and development from globular to heart-, torpedo- and then into cotyledonary-stage of embryos. At early stage, the embryos were clustered together in a callus mass and could not easily be detached from the parental tissue. The embryos were often long cylindrical structure with or without typical notch at the tip. Secondary embryos were also formed on primary embryo structure. The advanced cotyledonary embryos showed prominent roots and shoot axis, which germinated into plantlets. The morphology, structure and other details of somatic embryos at various stages were presented.

  8. Scanning reflection ion microscopy in a helium ion microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri V. Petrov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reflection ion microscopy (RIM is a technique that uses a low angle of incidence and scattered ions to form an image of the specimen surface. This paper reports on the development of the instrumentation and the analysis of the capabilities and limitations of the scanning RIM in a helium ion microscope (HIM. The reflected ions were detected by their “conversion” to secondary electrons on a platinum surface. An angle of incidence in the range 5–10° was used in the experimental setup. It was shown that the RIM image contrast was determined mostly by surface morphology but not by the atomic composition. A simple geometrical analysis of the reflection process was performed together with a Monte Carlo simulation of the angular dependence of the reflected ion yield. An interpretation of the RIM image formation and a quantification of the height of the surface steps were performed. The minimum detectable step height was found to be approximately 5 nm. RIM imaging of an insulator surface without the need for charge compensation was successfully demonstrated.

  9. Investigating Single Molecule Physics with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Calvin Jay

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has given the scientific community a method to view, characterize, and manipulate the world at the atomic scale. Thirty years after the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for its invention, the remarkable instrument is still being used to deepen our understanding of physical and chemical processes. Tantamount to this has been the development of new techniques to expand its capabilities allowing STMs to answer increasingly more difficult scientific questions. This dissertation describes three technological thrusts in expanding the STMs capabilities in studying physics at the single molecule level. First, I have helped developed a new technique called the RF-STM which has the potential to snapshot femtosecond and picosecond processes by locking into the high frequency tunneling component generated from the 80MHz laser pulse train. This technique solves the problem of low frequency thermal oscillations when choppers are used in the beam line and if only tunneling signal is monitored, sub-angstrom spatial resolution should be simultaneously possible. Second, I have helped develop the itProbe technique by increasing its ability to map out the interaction potential energy surface (iPES) between a tip-CO molecule and a surface adsorbed molecule. I present a study conducted on the bridge-like 1,4 phenylene diisocyanide molecule where the iPES is probed at different heights and different energies. The result is an ability to 3-dimensionally map out the iPES and provide reliable insight into developing itProbe simulations. Third, I have developed a new technique called Energy Resolved Laser Action STM (ERLA-STM) where we can observe the change in molecular dynamics as a function of the illumination wavelength. In our pyrrolidine study, we demonstrated the kinetic changes that occur when an overtone of the CH stretch mode is excited by a near-IR laser pulse. By sweeping the excitation energy, we can characterize and control single molecule

  10. Upgrade of a Scanning Confocal Microscope to a Single-Beam Path STED Microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Klauss

    Full Text Available By overcoming the diffraction limit in light microscopy, super-resolution techniques, such as stimulated emission depletion (STED microscopy, are experiencing an increasing impact on life sciences. High costs and technically demanding setups, however, may still hinder a wider distribution of this innovation in biomedical research laboratories. As far-field microscopy is the most widely employed microscopy modality in the life sciences, upgrading already existing systems seems to be an attractive option for achieving diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy in a cost-effective manner. Here, we demonstrate the successful upgrade of a commercial time-resolved confocal fluorescence microscope to an easy-to-align STED microscope in the single-beam path layout, previously proposed as "easy-STED", achieving lateral resolution < λ/10 corresponding to a five-fold improvement over a confocal modality. For this purpose, both the excitation and depletion laser beams pass through a commercially available segmented phase plate that creates the STED-doughnut light distribution in the focal plane, while leaving the excitation beam unaltered when implemented into the joint beam path. Diffraction-unlimited imaging of 20 nm-sized fluorescent beads as reference were achieved with the wavelength combination of 635 nm excitation and 766 nm depletion. To evaluate the STED performance in biological systems, we compared the popular phalloidin-coupled fluorescent dyes Atto647N and Abberior STAR635 by labeling F-actin filaments in vitro as well as through immunofluorescence recordings of microtubules in a complex epithelial tissue. Here, we applied a recently proposed deconvolution approach and showed that images obtained from time-gated pulsed STED microscopy may benefit concerning the signal-to-background ratio, from the joint deconvolution of sub-images with different spatial information which were extracted from offline time gating.

  11. Conversion of biocytin labelled cells and structures for the confocal laser-scanning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, H; Müller, A

    1997-05-23

    The method for converting biocytin preparations of brain sections fills a gap in the application of confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Both neuronal and non-neuronal structures are converted. The background remains free of staining. The protocol can be applied to old and already existing biocytin-(diaminobenzidine)-nickel preparations which are then made accessible to evaluation with the laser-scanning microscope by the substitution of nickel with silver-gold. Sodium thiosulphate is used to remove the unbound silver. The reflection image of the laser-scanning microscopy provides more information than the transmission image.

  12. Studies of Paramecium caudatum by means of scanning electron microscope and projection X-ray microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Keiji; Abe, Taiki; Haga, Nobuyuki

    2009-01-01

    Samples of Paramecium caudatum are observed by means of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a projection X-ray microscope (XRM) with computer tomography (CT) function. The samples are fixed with two kinds of fixatives, glutaraldehyde and osmium-tetra oxide acid. After the fixation and replacement procedure with t-buthyl alcohol, the samples followed by a freeze drying, well retain their structures. Surface structures, cilia and microfibrillar systems including infraciliary lattice structures, are clearly depicted by SEM observation. On the other hand, XRM images give quite different information, namely, in the case of osmium oxide fixation, the structures of internal organelles like the macronucleus placed in the central part of cell body and trichocysts located under the cell membrane of a whole body are visible. In the case of glutaraldehyde fixation, the surface structures and internal structures are both visible but their image contrast is fairly weak. In order to examine toxicological effect, Paramecium caudatum samples treated in the environmental condition containing nano-particles of Ag (17 nm across) and Co-ferrite (300 nm across) are observed with results of certain morphological differences, namely, inner vacuoles increase in number and in volume in Co-ferrite treated cells as compared with Ag treated ones. But then, cilia-less areas increase on the surface of the body of Ag treated cells. In the case of Co-ferrite treated cells, cilia-less areas are not clearly detected. Whether these morphological differences observed in Ag and Co-ferrite treated cells are caused by the differences of materials or particle sizes remain to be examined in future.

  13. Autofocus on moving object in scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Andrey V; Dembélé, Sounkalo; Piat, Nadine

    2017-11-01

    The sharpness of the images coming from a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is a very important property for many computer vision applications at micro- and nanoscale. It represents how much object details are distinctive in the images: the object may be perceived sharp or blurred. Image sharpness highly depends on the value of focal distance, or working distance in the case of the SEM. Autofocus is the technique allowing to automatically adjust the working distance to maximize the sharpness. Most of the existing algorithms allows working only with a static object which is enough for the tasks of visualization, manual microanalysis or microcharacterization. These applications work with a low frame rate, less than 1 Hz, that guarantees a low level of noise. However, static autofocus can not be used for samples performing continuous 3D motion, which is the case of robotic applications where it is required to carry out a continuous 3D position measurement, e.g., nano-assembly or nanomanipulation. Moreover, in addition to constantly keeping object in focus while it is moving, it is required to perform the operation at high frame rate. The approach offering both these possibilities is presented in this paper and is referred as dynamic autofocus. The presented solution is based on stochastic optimization techniques. It allows tracking the maximum of the sharpness of the images without sweep and without training. It works under uncertainty conditions: presence of noise in images, unknown maximal sharpness and unknown 3D motion of the specimen. The experiments, that were performed with noisy images at high frame rate (5 Hz), were conducted on a Carl Zeiss Auriga 60 FE-SEM. They prove the robustness of the algorithm with respect to the variation of optimization parameters, object speed and magnification. Moreover, it is invariant to the object structure and its variation in time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Visualizing bone porosities using a tabletop scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, D.; DaPonte, J.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Daniel, D.; Alter, L.

    2010-04-01

    Pores are naturally occurring entities in bone. Changes in pore size and number are often associated with diseases such as Osteoporosis and even microgravity during spaceflight. Studying bone perforations may yield great insight into bone's material properties, including bone density and may contribute to identifying therapies to halt or potentially reverse bone loss. Current technologies used in this field include nuclear magnetic resonance, micro-computed tomography and the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) 2, 5. However, limitations in each method limit further advancement. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using a new generation of analytical instruments, the TM-1000 tabletop, SEM with back-scatter electron (BSE) detector, to analyze cortical bone porosities. Hind limb unloaded and age-based controlled mouse femurs were extracted and tested in vitro for changes in pores on the periosteal surface. An important advantage of using the tabletop is the simplified sample preparation that excludes extra coatings, dehydration and fixation steps that are otherwise required for conventional SEM. For quantitative data, pores were treated as particles in order to use an analyze particles feature in the NIH ImageJ software. Several image-processing techniques for background smoothing, thresholding and filtering were employed to produce a binary image suitable for particle analysis. It was hypothesized that the unloaded bones would show an increase in pore area, as the lack of mechanical loading would affect bone-remodeling processes taking place in and around pores. Preliminary results suggest only a slight different in frequency but not in size of pores between unloaded and control femurs.

  15. Neural Network for Nanoscience Scanning Electron Microscope Image Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, Mohammad Hadi; Aversa, Rossella; Cozzini, Stefano; Ciancio, Regina; Leto, Angelo; Brandino, Giuseppe Piero

    2017-10-16

    In this paper we applied transfer learning techniques for image recognition, automatic categorization, and labeling of nanoscience images obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Roughly 20,000 SEM images were manually classified into 10 categories to form a labeled training set, which can be used as a reference set for future applications of deep learning enhanced algorithms in the nanoscience domain. The categories chosen spanned the range of 0-Dimensional (0D) objects such as particles, 1D nanowires and fibres, 2D films and coated surfaces, and 3D patterned surfaces such as pillars. The training set was used to retrain on the SEM dataset and to compare many convolutional neural network models (Inception-v3, Inception-v4, ResNet). We obtained compatible results by performing a feature extraction of the different models on the same dataset. We performed additional analysis of the classifier on a second test set to further investigate the results both on particular cases and from a statistical point of view. Our algorithm was able to successfully classify around 90% of a test dataset consisting of SEM images, while reduced accuracy was found in the case of images at the boundary between two categories or containing elements of multiple categories. In these cases, the image classification did not identify a predominant category with a high score. We used the statistical outcomes from testing to deploy a semi-automatic workflow able to classify and label images generated by the SEM. Finally, a separate training was performed to determine the volume fraction of coherently aligned nanowires in SEM images. The results were compared with what was obtained using the Local Gradient Orientation method. This example demonstrates the versatility and the potential of transfer learning to address specific tasks of interest in nanoscience applications.

  16. Measuring Spatial Vibration Using Continuous Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izhak Bucher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method, which allows one to use a single point laser vibrometer as a continuous sensor measuring along a line or a 2D surface. The mathematical background of the curve-fitting procedure and the necessary signal processing allowing one to extract the amplitude of sinusoidal vibration are discussed. In the current work, use has been made with an ordinary laser interferometer equipped with glavanometer-based x, y mirros. This system is not designed for continuous scanning therefore some effort needs to be spent in order to overcome the dynamical characteristics of this system. The potential of such an instrument, as demonstrated in this work, may encourage the development of mechanically better scanning devices.

  17. Analysis of a copper sample for the CLIC ACS study in a field emission scanning microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Muranaka, Tomoko; Leifer, Klaus; Ziemann, Volker; Navitski, Aliaksandr; Müller, Günter

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements on a diamond turned Copper sample of material intended for the CLIC accelerating structures. The first part of the measurements was performed at Bergische Universität Wuppertal using a field emission scanning microscope to localize and characterize strong emission sites. In a second part the sample was investigated in an optical microscope, a white-light profilometer and scanning electron microscope in the microstructure laboratory in Uppsala to attempt to identify the features responsible for the field emission.

  18. Sagebrush Biomass Estimation Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsoy, P.; Glenn, N. F.; Clark, P. E.; Spaete, L.; Mitchell, J.; Shrestha, R.

    2012-12-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) is a proven tool for inventory of many vegetation types. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) has been demonstrated for estimation of biomass of trees, but the relatively low number of laser points (1-10 m-2) typical of ALS datasets makes estimating biomass of shrubs and small stature vegetation challenging. This study uses terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to estimate sagebrush biomass (Artemisia tridentata subsp. wyomingensis) by relating destructively sampled estimates to TLS-derived volumetric estimates. At close range, TLS can commonly provide in excess of 100,000 3-D points for a single sagebrush of approximately 1 m3 in volume. In this study, thirty sagebrush were scanned and destructively sampled at 6 sites within Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southwestern Idaho, USA. The 3-D point cloud data are converted into 1-cm voxels to give quantitative estimates of shrub volume. The accuracy of the TLS-based metrics for estimating biomass are then compared to several traditional plot sampling methods including point-intercept and simple crown dimension measurements. The findings of this study are expected to provide guidance on methods for data collection and analysis such that biomass can be accurately estimated across plot-scales (e.g., 100 m x 100 m).

  19. Measurement Uncertainty of Microscopic Laser Triangulation on Technical Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas; Poesch, Andreas; Reithmeier, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    Laser triangulation is widely used to measure three-dimensional structure of surfaces. The technique is suitable for macroscopic and microscopic surface measurements. In this paper, the measurement uncertainty of laser triangulation is investigated on technical surfaces for microscopic measurement applications. Properties of technical surfaces are, for example, reflectivity, surface roughness, and the presence of scratches and pores. These properties are more influential in the microscopic laser triangulation than in the macroscopic one. In the Introduction section of this paper, the measurement uncertainty of laser triangulation is experimentally investigated for 13 different specimens. The measurements were carried out with and without a laser speckle reducer. In the Materials and Methods section of this paper, the surfaces of the 13 specimens are characterized in order to be able to find correlations between the surface properties and the measurement uncertainty. The last section of this paper describes simulations of the measurement uncertainty, which allow for the calculation of the measurement uncertainty with only one source of uncertainty present. The considerations in this paper allow for the assessment of the measurement uncertainty of laser triangulation on any technical surface when some surface properties, such as roughness, are known.

  20. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudge, J; Xu, H; Kolthammer, J; Hong, Y K; Choi, B C

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development of a new magnetic microscope, time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope, which combines a near-field scanning optical microscope and magneto-optical contrast. By taking advantage of the high temporal resolution of time-resolved Kerr microscope and the sub-wavelength spatial resolution of a near-field microscope, we achieved a temporal resolution of ∼50 ps and a spatial resolution of microscope, the magnetic field pulse induced gyrotropic vortex dynamics occurring in 1 μm diameter, 20 nm thick CoFeB circular disks has been investigated. The microscope provides sub-wavelength resolution magnetic images of the gyrotropic motion of the vortex core at a resonance frequency of ∼240 MHz.

  1. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture. Laser tweezers and multiphoton microscopes in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, K

    2000-08-01

    Near infrared (NIR) laser microscopy enables optical micromanipulation, piconewton force determination, and sensitive fluorescence studies by laser tweezers. Otherwise, fluorescence images with high spatial and temporal resolution of living cells and tissues can be obtained via non-resonant fluorophore excitation with multiphoton NIR laser scanning microscopes. Furthermore, NIR femtosecond laser pulses at TW/cm2 intensities can be used to realize non-invasive contact-free surgery of nanometer-sized structures within living cells and tissues. Applications of these novel versatile NIR laser-based tools for the determination of motility forces, coenzyme and chlorophyll imaging, three-dimensional multigene detection, non-invasive optical sectioning of tissues ("optical biopsy"), functional protein imaging, and nanosurgery of chromosomes are described.

  2. Patterned retinal coagulation with a scanning laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, Daniel; Jain, ATul; Paulus, Yannis; Andersen, Dan; Blumenkranz, Mark S.

    2007-02-01

    Pan-retinal photocoagulation in patients with diabetic retinopathy typically involves application of more than 1000 laser spots; often resulting in physician fatigue and patient discomfort. We present a semi-automated patterned scanning laser photocoagulator that rapidly applies predetermined patterns of lesions; thus, greatly improving the comfort, efficiency and precision of the treatment. Patterns selected from a graphical user interface are displayed on the retina with an aiming beam, and treatment can be initiated and interrupted by depressing a foot pedal. To deliver a significant number of burns during the eye's fixation time, each pulse should be considerably shorter than conventional 100ms pulse duration. We measured coagulation thresholds and studied clinical and histological outcomes of the application of laser pulses in the range of 1-200ms in pigmented rabbits. Laser power required for producing ophthalmoscopically visible lesions with a laser spot of 132μm decreased from 360 to 37mW with pulse durations increasing from 1 to 100ms. In the range of 10-100ms clinically and histologically equivalent light burns could be produced. The safe therapeutic range of coagulation (ratio of the laser power required to produce a rupture to that for a light burn) decreased with decreasing pulse duration: from 3.8 at 100ms, to 3.0 at 20ms, to 2.5 at 10ms, and to 1.1 at 1ms. Histology demonstrated increased confinement of the thermal damage with shorter pulses, with coagulation zone limited to the photoreceptor layer at pulses shorter than 10ms. Durations of 10-20ms appear to be a good compromise between the speed and safety of retinal coagulation. Rapid application of multiple lesions greatly improves the speed, precision, and reduces pain in retinal photocoagulation.

  3. Online correction of scanning probe microscopes with pixel accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirscherl, Kai

    2000-01-01

    -20% depending on the piezo material used and the scan range. The change in sensitivity is up to 20% as well, depending on the scan frequency. Current software controlled SPM are equipped with an algorithm that changes the shape of the control voltage online in a way to produce a linear piezo movement...

  4. Numerical restoration of surface vortices in Nb films measured by a scanning SQUID microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Atsuki; Thanh Huy, Ho; Dang, Vu The; Miyoshi, Hiroki; Hayashi, Masahiko; Ishida, Takekazu

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated a vortex profile appeared on a pure Nb film (500 nm in thickness, 10 mm x 10 mm) by using a scanning SQUID microscope. We found that the local magnetic distribution thus observed is broadened compared to a true vortex profile in the superconducting film. We therefore applied the numerical method to improve a spatial resolution of the scanning SQUID microscope. The method is based on the inverse Biot-Savart law and the Fourier transformation to recover a real-space image. We found that the numerical analyses give a smaller vortex than the raw vortex profile observed by the scanning microscope.

  5. An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope. Scanning probe Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    1991-01-01

    An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope (EFOM) is presented, which employs frustrated total internal reflection on a highly localized scale by means of a sharp dielectric tip. The coupling of the evanescent field to the sub-micrometer probe as a function of probe-sample distance, angle of incidence

  6. Microscopic description of a spin laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria Junior, Paulo E.; Xu, Gaofeng; Lee, Jeongsu; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Sipahi, Guilherme M.; Zutic, Igor

    Spin lasers provide interesting possibilities for spintronic applications at room temperature. They have the same elements of a conventional laser, but the injected carriers are spin polarized which allows the output light polarization to have either positive or negative helicity. These devices are commonly implemented as VCSELs, which have the advantage of tuning the photon energy by the cavity design. We investigate a spin VCSEL with a AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well active region using band structure calculations and spin-dependent optical gain. In addition to the desirable properties for steady-state operation and cavity designs, we also show that by applying a uniaxial strain, large values of birefringence > 200 GHz can be achieved. Combined with spin injected carriers, the birefringence in the device allows polarization dynamics much faster than photon intensity dynamics. Our theoretical prediction for high-frequency birefringence was experimentally demonstrated in similar spin VCSELs. FAPESP (2011/19333-4, 2012/05618-0 and 2013/23393-8), CNPq (246549/2012-2), DFG (GE 1231/2-1), NSF-ECCS, DOE-BES and US ONR.

  7. DTAF: an efficient probe to study cyanobacterial-plant interaction using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of microscopic techniques have been utilized to study cyanobacterial associations with plant roots, but confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the least used due to the unavailability of a suitable fluorescent dye. Commonly used lectins have problems with their binding ability with

  8. DTAF: an efficient probe to study cyanobacterial-plant interaction using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of microscopic techniques have been utilized to study cyanobacterial associations with plant roots, but confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the least used due to the unavailability of a suitable fluorescent dye. Commonly used lectins have problems with their binding ability with

  9. A scanning force microscope for simultaneous force and patch-clamp measurements on living cell tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, M. G.; Öffner, W.; Wittmann, H.; Flösser, H.; Schaar, H.; Häberle, W.; Pralle, A.; Ruppersberg, J. P.; Hörber, J. K. H.

    1997-06-01

    For the investigation of mechanosensitive ion channels of living cells it is of great interest to apply very local forces in the piconewton range and to measure, simultaneously, ion currents down to 1 pA. Scanning force microscopy (SFM) is a suitable technique, that allows the application of such small forces with a lateral resolution in the range of 10 nm. We developed a novel type of experimental setup, because no existing SFM, home built or commercial, allows a simultaneous investigation of ion currents and mechanical properties of living cells. The construction consists of a SFM that is combined with an upright infrared differential interference contrast (DIC) video microscope and a conventional patch-clamp setup. Instead of the object, the force sensor is scanned to prevent relative movements between the patch pipette and the patched cell. The deflection of the SFM cantilever is detected with the so-called optical deflection method through the objective of the optical microscope. In opposite to common optical setups the laser beam was not focused on the force sensor. The presented optic creates a parallel laser beam between the objective and the SFM cantilever, which allows a vertical displacement of the sensor without any changes of the detector signal. For the three-dimensional positioning of the specimen chamber a two-axis translation stage including a vertical piezoelectric translation device was developed. The SFM tip is fixed on a combined lateral and vertical translation stage including a piezoelectric tube scanner for three-dimensional fine positioning. Thus the instrument enables an easy approach of the SFM tip to any optically identified cell structure. The head stage of the patch-clamp electronics and the patch pipette are directly fixed on the specimen stage. This prevents relative movements between patched cells and patch pipette during the approach to the SFM tip. The three-axis positioning of the patch pipette is done by a compact hydraulic

  10. A portable confocal hyperspectral microscope without any scan or tube lens and its application in fluorescence and Raman spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwei; Cai, Fuhong; Dong, Yongjiang; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Sun, Xianhe; Zhang, Hequn; He, Sailing

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a portable confocal hyperspectral microscope is developed. In traditional confocal laser scanning microscopes, scan lens and tube lens are utilized to achieve a conjugate relationship between the galvanometer and the back focal plane of the objective, in order to achieve a better resolution. However, these lenses make it difficult to scale down the volume of the system. In our portable confocal hyperspectral microscope (PCHM), the objective is placed directly next to the galvomirror. Thus, scan lens and tube lens are not included in our system and the size of this system is greatly reduced. Furthermore, the resolution is also acceptable in many biomedical and food-safety applications. Through reducing the optical length of the system, the signal detection efficiency is enhanced. This is conducive to realizing both the fluorescence and Raman hyperspectral imaging. With a multimode fiber as a pinhole, an improved image contrast is also achieved. Fluorescent spectral images for HeLa cells/fingers and Raman spectral images of kumquat pericarp are present. The spectral resolution and spatial resolutions are about 0.4 nm and 2.19 μm, respectively. These results demonstrate that this portable hyperspectral microscope can be used in in-vivo fluorescence imaging and in situ Raman spectral imaging.

  11. Laser scanning of experimental solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plunkett, B.C.; Lasswell, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    An instrument is described which measures and displays the response of the solar cell to a precisely positioned spot of HeNe laser light. By scanning the spot across the cell surface, one can create a map of the spatial variation in response of the cell. This map allows one to isolate flaws in cell contact integrity, locate open top surface grid lines, and evaluate fundamental junction performance. The system is useful for identifying and locating changes in the cell as it progresses through various experiments (e.g. stability studies). The laser scanner system is designed to be flexible and can accommodate different types of solar cell materials and a wide range of spot and scan sizes. Several modes of operation of the equipment are described, and results from two photovoltaic materials (CdS/Cu/sub 2/S and Zn/sub 3/P/sub 2/) are presented which demonstrate the capabilities of the system. Finally some of the proposed future uses of the system are discussed. 6 refs.

  12. Depth Sectioning with the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Albina Y. Borisevich; Andrew R. Lupini; Stephen J. Pennycook

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition...

  13. MEMS scanned laser head-up display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Mark O.

    2011-03-01

    Head-up displays (HUD) in automobiles and other vehicles have been shown to significantly reduce accident rates by keeping the driver's eyes on the road. The requirements for automotive HUDs are quite demanding especially in terms of brightness, dimming range, supplied power, and size. Scanned laser display technology is particularly well-suited to this application since the lasers can be very efficiently relayed to the driver's eyes. Additionally, the lasers are only turned on where the light is needed in the image. This helps to provide the required brightness while minimizing power and avoiding a background glow that disturbs the see-through experience. Microvision has developed a couple of HUD architectures that are presented herein. One design uses an exit pupil expander and relay optics to produce a high quality virtual image for built-in systems where the image appears to float above the hood of the auto. A second design uses a patented see-through screen technology and pico projector to make automotive HUDs available to anyone with a projector. The presentation will go over the basic designs for the two types of HUD and discuss design tradeoffs.

  14. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merino D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available David Merino, Pablo Loza-Alvarez The Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Castelldefels, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Adaptive optics (AO retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. Keywords: high-resolution, in vivo retinal imaging, AOSLO

  15. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made.

  16. Restoration of images from the scanning-tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaram, A. C.; Persad, N.; Lasenby, J.; Fitzgerald, W. J.; McKinnon, A.; Welland, M.

    1995-08-01

    During the acquisition of an image from any probe microscope instrument, various noise sources cause distortion in the observed image. It is often the case that impulsive disturbances cause bright groups of pixels to replace the actual image data in these locations. Furthermore, the images from a probe microscope show some amount of blurring caused both by the instrument function and the material properties. In almost all image-processing applications it is important to remove any impulsive distortion that may be present before deblurring can be attempted. We give a technique for detecting these impulses and reconstructing the image. This technique is superior to the standard global application of median filters for the case considered. The reconstruction is limited only to the affected regions and therefore results in a much sharper and more meaningful image. With the assumption of Gaussian blur it is then possible to propose several different deblurring methodologies. We present a novel Wiener-filter deblurring implementation and compare it to both maximum-entropy and Richardson-Lucy deblurring.

  17. Multimodal nonlinear microscope based on a compact fiber-format laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafi, Francesco; Kumar, Vikas; Perri, Antonio; Marangoni, Marco; Cerullo, Giulio; Polli, Dario

    2018-01-01

    We present a multimodal non-linear optical (NLO) laser-scanning microscope, based on a compact fiber-format excitation laser and integrating coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and two-photon-excitation fluorescence (TPEF) on a single platform. We demonstrate its capabilities in simultaneously acquiring CARS and SRS images of a blend of 6-μm poly(methyl methacrylate) beads and 3-μm polystyrene beads. We then apply it to visualize cell walls and chloroplast of an unprocessed fresh leaf of Elodea aquatic plant via SRS and TPEF modalities, respectively. The presented NLO microscope, developed in house using off-the-shelf components, offers full accessibility to the optical path and ensures its easy re-configurability and flexibility.

  18. Compact scanning transmission x-ray microscope at the photon factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeichi, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo.takeichi@kek.jp; Inami, Nobuhito; Ono, Kanta [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Suga, Hiroki [Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Takahashi, Yoshio [Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    We report the design and performance of a compact scanning transmission X-ray microscope developed at the Photon Factory. Piezo-driven linear stages are used as coarse stages of the microscope to realize excellent compactness, mobility, and vibrational and thermal stability. An X-ray beam with an intensity of ∼10{sup 7} photons/s was focused to a diameter of ∼40 nm at the sample. At the soft X-ray undulator beamline used with the microscope, a wide range of photon energies (250–1600 eV) is available. The microscope has been used to research energy materials and in environmental sciences.

  19. Method to characterize the vibrational response of a beetle type scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, S.; Rose, M.K.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We describe a method for analyzing the external vibrations and intrinsic mechanical resonances affecting scanning probe microscopes by using the microscope as an accelerometer. We show that clear correlations can be established between the frequencies of mechanical vibrational modes and the frequencies of peaks in the tunnel current noise power spectrum. When this method is applied to our {open_quotes}beetle{close_quotes} type scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we find unexpected low frequency {open_quotes}rattling resonances{close_quotes} in the 500{endash}1700 Hz range that depend on the exact lateral position of the STM, in addition to the expected mechanical resonances of the STM above 4 kHz which are in good agreement with theoretical estimates. We believe that these rattling resonances may be a general problem for scanning probe microscopes that use some type of kinetic motion for coarse positioning. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Automatic change detection using mobile laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebel, M.; Hammer, M.; Gordon, M.; Arens, M.

    2014-10-01

    Automatic change detection in 3D environments requires the comparison of multi-temporal data. By comparing current data with past data of the same area, changes can be automatically detected and identified. Volumetric changes in the scene hint at suspicious activities like the movement of military vehicles, the application of camouflage nets, or the placement of IEDs, etc. In contrast to broad research activities in remote sensing with optical cameras, this paper addresses the topic using 3D data acquired by mobile laser scanning (MLS). We present a framework for immediate comparison of current MLS data to given 3D reference data. Our method extends the concept of occupancy grids known from robot mapping, which incorporates the sensor positions in the processing of the 3D point clouds. This allows extracting the information that is included in the data acquisition geometry. For each single range measurement, it becomes apparent that an object reflects laser pulses in the measured range distance, i.e., space is occupied at that 3D position. In addition, it is obvious that space is empty along the line of sight between sensor and the reflecting object. Everywhere else, the occupancy of space remains unknown. This approach handles occlusions and changes implicitly, such that the latter are identifiable by conflicts of empty space and occupied space. The presented concept of change detection has been successfully validated in experiments with recorded MLS data streams. Results are shown for test sites at which MLS data were acquired at different time intervals.

  1. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. SPATIAL REPARTITION OF CURRENT FLUCTUATIONS IN A SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Lagoute

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM is a technique where the surface topography of a conducting sample is probed by a scanning metallic tip. The tip-to-surface distance is controlled by monitoring the electronic tunneling current between the two metals. The aim of this work is to extend the temporal range of this instrument by characterising the time fluctuations of this current on different surfaces. The current noise power spectral density is dominated by a characteristic 1/f component, the physical origin of which is not yet clearly identified, despite a number of investigations. A new I-V preamplifier was developed in order to characterise these fluctuations of the tunnelling current and to obtain images of their spatial repartition. It is observed that their intensity is correlated with some topographical features. This information can be used to get insights on the physical phenomena involved that are not accessible by the usual STM set-up, which is limited to low frequencies.

  3. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Jason, E-mail: jason.holm@nist.gov; Keller, Robert R.

    2016-08-15

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. - Highlights: • A modular aperture system for STEM-in-SEM imaging is described. • A flexible cantilever sample holder that can maximize camera length is described. • The aperture system and sample holder enable complete acceptance angle control. • Most STEM imaging modes can be implemented without multi-segment detectors.

  4. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  5. Local potentiometry using a multiprobe scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannani, A; Bobisch, C A; Möller, R

    2008-08-01

    Scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP) is a powerful tool to analyze the conductance through thin conducting layers with lateral resolution in the nanometer range. In this work, we show how a commercial ultrahigh vacuum multiprobe system, equipped with four independent tips, can be used to perform STP experiments. Two tips are gently pushed into the surface applying a lateral current through the layer of interest. Simultaneously, the topography and the potential distribution across the metal film are measured with a third tip. The signal-to-noise ratio of the potentiometry signal may be enhanced by using a fourth tip, providing a reference potential in close vicinity of the studied area. Two different examples are presented. For epitaxial (111) oriented Bi films, grown on a Si(100)-(2 x 1) surface, an almost constant gradient of the potential as well as potential drops at individual Bi-domain boundaries were observed. On the surface of the Si(111)(3 x 3)-Ag superstructure the potential variation at individual monoatomic steps could be precisely resolved.

  6. Electron beam detection of a Nanotube Scanning Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Alessandro; Niguès, Antoine

    2017-09-14

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to probe matter at atomic scale by measuring the perturbation of a nanomechanical oscillator induced by near-field interaction forces. The quest to improve sensitivity and resolution of AFM forced the introduction of a new class of resonators with dimensions at the nanometer scale. In this context, nanotubes are the ultimate mechanical oscillators because of their one dimensional nature, small mass and almost perfect crystallinity. Coupled to the possibility of functionalisation, these properties make them the perfect candidates as ultra sensitive, on-demand force sensors. However their dimensions make the measurement of the mechanical properties a challenging task in particular when working in cavity free geometry at ambient temperature. By using a focused electron beam, we show that the mechanical response of nanotubes can be quantitatively measured while approaching to a surface sample. By coupling electron beam detection of individual nanotubes with a custom AFM we image the surface topography of a sample by continuously measuring the mechanical properties of the nanoresonators. The combination of very small size and mass together with the high resolution of the electron beam detection method offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of a new class of nanotube-based scanning force microscopy.

  7. Parametric modeling and optimization of laser scanning parameters during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, K.; Ramanujam, R.; Kuppan, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parametric effect, microstructure, micro-hardness and optimization of laser scanning parameters (LSP) on heating experiments during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718 alloy. The laser source used for experiments is a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser with maximum power of 2 kW. The experimental parameters in the present study are cutting speed in the range of 50-100 m/min, feed rate of 0.05-0.1 mm/rev, laser power of 1.25-1.75 kW and approach angle of 60-90°of laser beam axis to tool. The plan of experiments are based on central composite rotatable design L31 (43) orthogonal array. The surface temperature is measured via on-line measurement using infrared pyrometer. Parametric significance on surface temperature is analysed using response surface methodology (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 3D surface graphs. The structural change of the material surface is observed using optical microscope and quantitative measurement of heat affected depth that are analysed by Vicker's hardness test. The results indicate that the laser power and approach angle are the most significant parameters to affect the surface temperature. The optimum ranges of laser power and approach angle was identified as 1.25-1.5 kW and 60-65° using overlaid contour plot. The developed second order regression model is found to be in good agreement with experimental values with R2 values of 0.96 and 0.94 respectively for surface temperature and heat affected depth.

  8. Evaluation of 3-D laser scanning equipment : 2016 interim report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    As a follow-up to ICT Project R27-030, Evaluation of 3-D Laser Scanning, this report provides findings of an evaluation of 3-D laser : scanning equipment to determine the tangible costs versus benefits and the manpower savings realized by using the e...

  9. Automatic classification of trees from laser scanning point clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sirmacek, B.; Lindenbergh, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Development of laser scanning technologies has promoted tree monitoring studies to a new level, as the laser scanning point clouds enable accurate 3D measurements in a fast and environmental friendly manner. In this paper, we introduce a probability matrix computation based algorithm for

  10. Light propagation studies on laser modified waveguides using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrise, X.; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Jimenez, D.

    2001-01-01

    microscope (SNOM) has been used. The laser modifications locally changes the optical properties of the waveguide. The change in the effective refractive index is attributed to a TE to TM mode conversion, Thus, the laser modification might be a new way to fabricate optical mode converters.......By means of direct laser writing on Al, a new method to locally modify optical waveguides is proposed. This technique has been applied to silicon nitride waveguides, allowing modifications of the optical propagation along the guide. To study the formed structures, a scanning near-held optical...

  11. Simultaneous imaging of multiple focal planes in scanning two-photon absorption microscope by photon counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriles, Ramón; Hoover, Erich E.; Amir, Wafa; Squier, Jeffery A.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate a two-photon absorption scanning microscope capable of imaging two focal planes simultaneously. The 23MHz fundamental laser is split in two, one part delayed in time while the other is focused with a deformable mirror to change its divergence. Both parts are then recombined to form a 46MHz pulse train consisting of two interlaced trains with different divergences that after the objective are focused at different sample depths. At the detection path, photon counting techniques allow photons coming from each depth to be separated based on their relative timing with respect to the 46MHz train. The separation is accomplished using a field-programmable gate array that has been programmed to switch back and forth between two counters at a rate provided by a master clock generated by the 46MHz pulse train. The computer that controls the scanners reads and resets the counters before moving to a new pixel. The scheme is demonstrated for two depths but can be extended to a larger number, the ultimate limit being the fluorescence lifetime. This technique could also be implemented for second or third harmonic generation microscopy, in this case the ultimate achievable number of focal planes would be determined by the electronics speed.

  12. Tree Height Growth Measurement with Single-Scan Airborne, Static Terrestrial and Mobile Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the feasibility of applying single-scan airborne, static terrestrial and mobile laser scanning for improving the accuracy of tree height growth measurement. Specifically, compared to the traditional works on forest growth inventory with airborne laser scanning, two issues are regarded: “Can the new technique characterize the height growth for each individual tree?” and “Can this technique refine the minimum growth-discernable temporal interval further?” To solve these two puzzles, the sampling principles of the three laser scanning modes were first examined, and their error sources against the task of tree-top capturing were also analyzed. Next, the three-year growths of 58 Nordic maple trees (Crimson King for test were intermittently surveyed with one type of laser scanning each time and then analyzed by statistics. The evaluations show that the height growth of each individual tree still cannot be reliably characterized even by single-scan terrestrial laser scanning, and statistical analysis is necessary in this scenario. After Gaussian regression, it is found that the minimum temporal interval with distinguishable tree height growths can be refined into one month based on terrestrial laser scanning, far better than the two years deduced in the previous works based on airborne laser scanning. The associated mean growth was detected to be about 0.12 m. Moreover, the parameter of tree height generally under-estimated by airborne and even mobile laser scanning can be relatively revised by means of introducing static terrestrial laser scanning data. Overall, the effectiveness of the proposed technique is primarily validated.

  13. Optimal lens design and use in laser-scanning microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negrean, A.; Mansvelder, H.D.

    2014-01-01

    In laser-scanning microscopy often an off-the-shelf achromatic doublet is used as a scan lens which can reduce the available diffraction-limited field-of-view (FOV) by a factor of 3 and introduce chromatic aberrations that are scan angle dependent. Here we present several simple lens designs of

  14. Examination of mycological samples by means of the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species of Siphomycetes: Rhizopus arhizus, Rhizopus equinus and Rhizopus nigricans, as well as a Septomycete: Emericella nidulans, have been examined by means of a scanning electron microscope. Among the difjerent Rhizopus, this technique showed differences in the appearance of the sporangia. In Emericella nidulans, scanning microscopy enábled one to ascertain that the "Hull cells" were completely hollow and also demonstrated the ornemented aspect of the ascospores.

  15. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario, E-mail: mlanza@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nanoscience and Technology, Soochow University, 199 Ren-Ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Iglesias, Vanessa [International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Lewis, David [Nanonics Imaging, Har Hotzvim, Jerusalem 91487 (Israel); Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming [Laboratory of Nanofabrication and Novel Device Integration, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther [Deggendorf Institute of Technology, Edlmairstr. 6+8, 94469 Deggendorf (Germany); Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  16. Parallel electron-beam-induced deposition using a multi-beam scanning electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, P.C.; Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2011-01-01

    Lithography techniques based on electron-beam-induced processes are inherently slow compared to light lithography techniques. The authors demonstrate here that the throughput can be enhanced by a factor of 196 by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a multibeam electron source. Using

  17. Imaging systems in the Delft Multi-Beam Scanning Electron Microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this Ph.D. research is to develop imaging systems for the multiple beam scanning electron microscope (MBSEM) built in Delft University of Technology. This thesis includes two imaging systems, transmission electron (TE) imaging system, and secondary electron (SE) imaging system. The major

  18. Imaging of surface plasmon polariton interference using phase-sensitive scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2011-01-01

    We report the surface plasmon polariton interference, generated via a ‘buried’ gold grating, and imaged using a phase-sensitive Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope (PSTM). The phase-resolved PSTM measurement unravels the complex surface plasmon polariton interference fields at the gold-air

  19. Transmission electron imaging in the Delft multibeam scanning electron microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.; Kruit, P.

    2016-01-01

    Our group is developing a multibeam scanning electron microscope (SEM) with 196 beams in order to increase the throughput of SEM. Three imaging systems using, respectively, transmission electron detection, secondary electron detection, and backscatter electron detection are designed in order to

  20. Scanning electron microscopic observation of the brown tumor of the head of mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunali, Selcuk; Celik, Hamdi H; Uslu, Sabri S; Aldur, Mustafa M

    2005-05-01

    Brown tumors are tumor-like, expansile osteolytic lesions of bone which are seen in both primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. They generally resolve after surgical treatment of the parathyroid adenoma. Here, we report a case of brown tumor of the mandible of a cadaver with its scanning electron microscopic observation and review of literature.

  1. Observation of magnetic domains using a reflection mode scanning near-field optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durkam, C.; Shvets, I.V.; Lodder, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    It is demonstrated that it is possible to image magnetic domains with a resolution of better than 60 nm with the Kerr effect in a reflection-mode scanning near-field optical microscope. Images taken of tracks of thermomagnetically prewritten bits in a Co/Pt multilayer structure magnetized out-of

  2. Quantitative phase tomography by using x-ray microscope with Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Norio; Tsuburaya, Yuji; Shimada, Akihiro; Aoki, Sadao

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative phase tomography was evaluated by using a differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter. A 3D x-ray phase image of polystyrene beads was obtained at 5.4 keV. The reconstructed refractive index was fairly good agreement with the Henke's tabulated data.

  3. Quantitative phase tomography by using x-ray microscope with Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Norio; Tsuburaya, Yuji; Shimada, Akihiro; Aoki, Sadao [Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8573 (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    Quantitative phase tomography was evaluated by using a differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter. A 3D x-ray phase image of polystyrene beads was obtained at 5.4 keV. The reconstructed refractive index was fairly good agreement with the Henke’s tabulated data.

  4. Quasi interference of perpendicularly polarized guided modes observed with a photon scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balistreri, M.L.M.; Driessen, A.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2000-01-01

    The simultaneous detection of TE- as well as TM-polarized light with a photon scanning tunneling microscope leads to a quasi- interference pattern of these mutually perpendicular polarized fields. This interference pattern has been observed in the optical field distribution as a function of both

  5. Three-dimensional optical transfer functions in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L; Nellist, P D

    2014-05-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, hardware aberration correctors can now correct for the positive spherical aberration of round electron lenses. These correctors make use of nonround optics such as hexapoles or octupoles, leading to the limiting aberrations often being of a nonround type. Here we explore the effect of a number of potential limiting aberrations on the imaging performance of the scanning transmission electron microscope through their resulting optical transfer functions. In particular, the response of the optical transfer function to changes in defocus are examined, given that this is the final aberration to be tuned just before image acquisition. The resulting three-dimensional optical transfer functions also allow an assessment of the performance of a system for focal-series experiments or optical sectioning applications. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Experimental verification of subthreshold laser therapy using conventional pattern scan laser.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyasu Shiraya

    Full Text Available Leading-edge therapeutic laser technologies are not available at every medical facility; therefore, alternative approaches incorporating novel advances in digital and laser technology into more readily available conventional methods have generated significant research interest. Using a rabbit model, this study investigated whether the algorithm used in the Endpoint Management (EM software system of the latest devices could enable subthreshold laser treatment in conventional retinal tissue laser therapy systems.Two types of devices were used, the PASCAL Streamline 577 and the MC 500-Vixi™, and the laser method was classified into three categories: EM; single-shot using PASCAL with arbitrary energy settings (PSS-SDM; and MC500-VixiTM (VX-SDM, which were performed in eight eyes from four Dutch-Belted rabbits. In EM, 100 mW (100% was set as a landmark, and the laser energy parameters were gradually decreased to 80%, 60%, 50%, 40%, 30%, 20%, and 10%, using a 2 × 3 square pattern. In PSS-SDM and VX-SDM, as control, the laser energy was gradually decreased to 100, 80, 60, 50, 40, 30, 20, and 10 mW. The laser settings were fixed at 200 μm, 20 ms, and a wavelength of 577 μm. To identify and compare the extent of tissue damage at each spot size, optical coherence tomography (OCT and histological findings were used to construct a three-dimensional histopathology image using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope.The spot size at 50% setting on EM was 7183 μm2; PSS-SDM required 50 mW (5503 μm2 to 60 mW (10279 μm2 and VX-SDM required 50 mW (7423 μm2 to create the approximate spot size. Furthermore, at 50 mW of PSS-SDM and VX-SDM, the extent of tissue damage in all three methods was generally in accord with the outer nuclear layer by OCT and inner nuclear layer by histopathological imaging.These findings suggest that it may be possible to perform subthreshold laser therapy using approximations from the EM algorithm.

  7. Maritime Laser Scanning as the Source for Spatial Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szulwic Jakub

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of scanning technology, especially mobile scanning, gives the possibility to collect spatial data coming from maritime measurement platforms and autonomous manned or unmanned vehicles. Presented solution is derived from the mobile scanning. However we should keep in mind that the specificity of laser scanning at sea and processing collected data should be in the form acceptable in Geographical Information Systems, especially typical for the maritime needs. At the same time we should be aware that data coming from maritime mobile scanning constitutes a new approach to the describing of maritime environment and brings a new perspective that is completely different than air and terrestrial scanning.

  8. Confocal fluorescence microscope with dual-axis architecture and biaxial postobjective scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Thomas D; Contag, Christopher H; Mandella, Michael J; Chan, Ning Y; Kino, Gordon S

    2004-01-01

    We present a novel confocal microscope that has dual-axis architecture and biaxial postobjective scanning for the collection of fluorescence images from biological specimens. This design uses two low-numerical-aperture lenses to achieve high axial resolution and long working distance, and the scanning mirror located distal to the lenses rotates along the orthogonal axes to produce arc-surface images over a large field of view (FOV). With fiber optic coupling, this microscope can potentially be scaled down to millimeter dimensions via microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We demonstrate a benchtop prototype with a spatial resolution < or =4.4 microm that collects fluorescence images with a high SNR and a good contrast ratio from specimens expressing GFP. Furthermore, the scanning mechanism produces only small differences in aberrations over the image FOV. These results demonstrate proof of concept of the dual-axis confocal architecture for in vivo molecular and cellular imaging.

  9. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari, E-mail: tetsu-n@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Imai, Koichi [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Akio [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 {mu}m/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  10. Power Measurements for Microvision, Inc., Aircrew Integrated Helmet System Scanning Laser Helmet-Mounted Display

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rash, Clarence

    2002-01-01

    ...) technology based on scanning lasers. Under this program, Microvision, Inc., Bothell, Washington, has developed a scanning laser HMD prototype for use with the Aircrew Integrated Helmet System (AIHS...

  11. An edge sensitive 3D measurement using two directional laser stripes scanning with a laser projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zhou, Xiang; Xu, Changda; Wang, Chao; Guo, Jiayu

    2017-09-01

    Laser scanning is widely used in on-line industrial 3D inspection, cultural heritage conservation and reverse engineering. However, in the traditional laser scanning, the most widely-used approach is based on the projection of a single directional laser stripe over an object. Because the width of the laser stripe is physically difficult to compress enough to be fine at the edge of the object, the traditional measurement method is not accurate for edge measurements. This paper proposes an edge sensitive 3D measurement system which is fast and accurate, using two directional laser stripes scanning with a laser projector. Scanning metal edge steps and complex surface edge with this system only require a single scanning to perform 3D reconstruction. So this scanning method has the advantages of high efficiency, high speed and edges with high precision.

  12. Laser scanning cytometry: principles and applications-an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozarowski, Piotr; Holden, Elena; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Laser scanning cytometer (LSC) is the microscope-based cytofluorometer that offers a plethora of unique analytical capabilities, not provided by flow cytometry (FCM). This review describes attributes of LSC and covers its numerous applications derived from plentitude of the parameters that can be measured. Among many LSC applications the following are emphasized: (a) assessment of chromatin condensation to identify mitotic, apoptotic cells, or senescent cells; (b) detection of nuclear or mitochondrial translocation of critical factors such as NF-κB, p53, or Bax; (c) semi-automatic scoring of micronuclei in mutagenicity assays; (d) analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and use of the FISH analysis attribute to measure other punctuate fluorescence patterns such as γH2AX foci or receptor clustering; (e) enumeration and morphometry of nucleoli and other cell organelles; (f) analysis of progeny of individual cells in clonogenicity assay; (g) cell immunophenotyping; (h) imaging, visual examination, or sequential analysis using different probes of the same cells upon their relocation; (i) in situ enzyme kinetics, drug uptake, and other time-resolved processes; (j) analysis of tissue section architecture using fluorescent and chromogenic probes; (k) application for hypocellular samples (needle aspirate, spinal fluid, etc.); and (l) other clinical applications. Advantages and limitations of LSC are discussed and compared with FCM.

  13. Phase-gradient contrast in thick tissue with a scanning microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, J; Gasecka, A; Daradich, A; Davison, I; Coté, D

    2014-02-01

    It is well known that the principle of reciprocity is valid for light traveling even through scattering or absorptive media. This principle has been used to establish an equivalence between conventional widefield microscopes and scanning microscopes. We make use of this principle to introduce a scanning version of oblique back-illumination microscopy, or sOBM. This technique provides sub-surface phase-gradient and amplitude images from unlabeled tissue, in an epi-detection geometry. That is, it may be applied to arbitrarily thick tissue. sOBM may be implemented as a simple, cost-effective add-on with any scanning microscope, requiring only the availability of an extra input channel in the microscope electronics. We demonstrate here its implementation in combination with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy and with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, applied to brain or spinal cord tissue imaging. In both cases, sOBM provides information on tissue morphology complementary to TPEF or CARS contrast. This information is obtained simultaneously and is automatically co-registered. Finally, we show that sOBM can be operated at video rate.

  14. Laser-scanning velocimetry: A confocal microscopy method for quantitative measurement of cardiovascular performance in zebrafish embryos and larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linney Elwood

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebrafish Danio rerio is an important model system for drug discovery and to study cardiovascular development. Using a laser-scanning confocal microscope, we have developed a non-invasive method of measuring cardiac performance in zebrafish embryos and larvae that obtains cardiovascular parameters similar to those obtained using Doppler echocardiography in mammals. A laser scan line placed parallel to the path of blood in the dorsal aorta measures blood cell velocity, from which cardiac output and indices of vascular resistance and contractility are calculated. Results This technique, called laser-scanning velocimetry, was used to quantify the effects of pharmacological, developmental, and genetic modifiers of cardiac function. Laser-scanning velocimetry was applied to analyze the cardiovascular effects of morpholino knockdown of osmosensing scaffold for MEKK3 (OSM, which when mutated causes the human vascular disease cerebral cavernous malformations. OSM-deficient embryos had a constricted aortic arch and markedly increased peak cell velocity, a characteristic indicator of aortic stenosis. Conclusion These data validate laser-scanning velocimetry as a quantitative tool to measure cardiovascular performance for pharmacological and genetic analysis in zebrafish, which requires no specialized equipment other than a laser-scanning confocal microscope.

  15. Visualizing Morphological Changes of Abscission Zone Cells in Arabidopsis by Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chun-Lin; Butenko, Melinka A

    2018-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope which produces detailed images of surface structures. It has been widely used in plants and animals to study cellular structures. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to prepare samples of floral abscission zones (AZs) for SEM, as well as further image analysis. We show that it is a powerful tool to detect morphologic changes at the cellular level during the course of abscission in wild-type plants and to establish the details of phenotypic alteration in abscission mutants.

  16. Development of a backscattering type ultraviolet apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sangjin; Jeong, Hyun; Jeong, Mun Seok; Jeong, Sungho

    2011-08-01

    A backscattering type ultraviolet apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope (ANSOM) for the correlated measurement of topographical and optical characteristics of photonic materials with high optical resolution was developed. The near-field Rayleigh scattering image of GaN covered with periodic submicron Cr dots showed that optical resolution around 40 nm was achievable. By measuring the tip scattered photoluminescence of InGaN/GaN multi quantum wells, the applicability of the developed microscope for high resolution fluorescence measurement was also demonstrated.

  17. A confocal laser scanning microscopic study on thermoresponsive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monodisperse poly(N -isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) particles loaded with cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) of two different sizes (4.7 nm and 5.6 nm) were synthesized in aqueous medium by bonding the capping agent on the quantum dots to the amide groups of PNIPAM and incubating the samples at 45° ...

  18. Speckle suppression in scanning laser display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurlov, Victor; Lapchuk, Anatoly; Yun, Sangkyeong; Song, Jonghyeong; Yang, Haengseok

    2008-01-10

    The theory of speckle noise in a scanning beam is presented. The general formulas for the calculation of speckle contrast, which apply to any scanning display, are obtained. It is shown that the main requirement for successful speckle suppression in a scanning display is a narrow autocorrelation peak and low sidelobe level in the autocorrelation function of the complex amplitude distribution across a scanning light beam. The simple formulas for speckle contrast for a beam with a narrow autocorrelation function peak were obtained. It was shown that application of a diffractive optical element (DOE) with a Barker code phase shape could use only natural display scanning motion for speckle suppression. DOE with a Barker code phase shape has a small size and may be deposited on the light modulator inside the depth of the focus of the reflected beam area, and therefore, it does not need an additional image plane and complicated relay optics.

  19. Automated pressure scanning of tunable dye lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottscho, R. A.

    1985-04-01

    A method for the remote control of tunable laser frequency tuning is proposed in the framework of real-time monitoring of the chemistry and physics of plasma, combustion, and chemical vapor deposition reactions. The technique presented involves indirect frequency tuning and stabilization by direct control of the laser cavity pressure. The long-term drift in power, resulting from the grating and etalon misalignment is suggested to be correctable by using a second feedback circuit which would optimize laser power by finely tuning the etalon or grating. Experimental results obtained with a dye laser of Hansch type are included; a maximum variation in LIF signal of + or - 7 percent, which corresponds to a frequency drift of + or - 0.005/cm, over a 30-min interval was achieved. A block diagram of the feedback loop and the LIF apparatus are included.

  20. Spatial-spectral analysis of a laser scanning video system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapustin, A. A.; Razumovskii, V. N.; Iatsevich, G. B.

    1980-06-01

    A spatial-spectral analysis method is considered for a laser scanning video system with the phase processing of a received signal, on a modulation frequency. Distortions caused by the system are analyzed, and a general problem is reduced for the case of a cylindrical surface. The approach suggested can also be used for scanning microwave systems.

  1. Anticipating, measuring, and minimizing MEMS mirror scan error to improve laser scanning microscopy's speed and accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, John P; York, Andrew G; Shroff, Hari

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method to speed up microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror scanning by > 20x, while also improving scan accuracy. We use Landweber deconvolution to determine an input voltage which would produce a desired output, based on the measured MEMS impulse response. Since the MEMS is weakly nonlinear, the observed behavior deviates from expectations, and we iteratively improve our input to minimize this deviation. This allows customizable MEMS angle vs. time with <1% deviation from the desired scan pattern. We demonstrate our technique by optimizing a point scanning microscope's raster patterns to image mammal submandibular gland and pollen at ~10 frames/s.

  2. Scanning Electron Microscope Calibration Using a Multi-Image Non-Linear Minimization Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Le; Marchand, Éric

    2015-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) calibrating approach based on non-linear minimization procedure is presented in this article. A part of this article has been published in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2014. . Both the intrinsic parameters and the extrinsic parameters estimations are achieved simultaneously by minimizing the registration error. The proposed approach considers multi-images of a multi-scale calibration pattern view from different positions and orientations. Since the projection geometry of the scanning electron microscope is different from that of a classical optical sensor, the perspective projection model and the parallel projection model are considered and compared with distortion models. Experiments are realized by varying the position and the orientation of a multi-scale chessboard calibration pattern from 300× to 10,000×. The experimental results show the efficiency and the accuracy of this approach.

  3. Depth sectioning with the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, Albina Y.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition brings depth resolution at the nanometer scale. Aberration correction therefore opens up the possibility of 3D imaging by optical sectioning. Here we develop a definition for the depth resolution for scanning transmission electron microscope depth sectioning and present initial results from this method. Objects such as catalytic metal clusters and single atoms on various support materials are imaged in three dimensions with a resolution of several nanometers. Effective focal depth is determined by statistical analysis and the contributing factors are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future capabilities available through new instruments are discussed. PMID:16492746

  4. Corrections of magnification and focusing in a cathode lens-equipped scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobacová, J; Zobac, M; Oral, M; Müllerová, I; Frank, L

    2006-01-01

    One of the well-proven and efficient methods of obtaining a very low-energy impact of primary electrons in the scanning electron microscope is to introduce a retarding field element below the pole piece of the objective lens (OL). It is advantageous to use the specimen alone as the negatively biased electrode (i.e., cathode of the cathode lens). The optical power of the cathode lens modifies some of the standard parameters of the image formation such as relation of working distance to OL excitation or magnification to the scanning coils current, the impact angle of primary electrons, and so forth. In computer-controlled electron microscopes these parameters, particularly with regard to focusing and magnification, can be corrected automatically. Derivation of algorithms for such corrections and their experimental verifications are presented in this paper. Furthermore, a more accurate analytical expression for the focal length of an aperture lens is derived.

  5. Development of a scanning nanopipette probe microscope for fine processing using atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimatsu, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Hiromitsu; Nakamura, Atsushi; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Iwata, Futoshi

    2016-08-01

    We developed a novel technique for fine material processing based on a localized atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using a scanning probe microscope equipped with a nanopipette. Using a nanopipette — a tapered glass capillary with an aperture of sub-micrometer diameter — as a nozzle makes it possible to localize the discharge area of the APPJ for fine surface processing. The nanopipette can also be used as a probe for a scanning probe microscope operated with shear-force feedback control, which is capable of positioning the pipette edge in the vicinity of material surfaces for APPJ processing and imaging of the processed surface. Sub-micrometer holes and line patterns were successfully processed on a photoresist film. It was possible to control the size of the processed patterns by varying the applied pulse voltage and the distance between the pipette and the surface.

  6. Application of nuclear particle tracks: A scanning x-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, P.J.

    1991-09-30

    The scanning x-ray microscope (SXM) is a short-wavelength analog of a near-field optical-scanning microscope, promising spatial resolution of {approximately}100{angstrom} up to {approximately}5 keV x-ray energy. A portion of a synchrotron x-ray beam streams through an etched nuclear particle track in an opaque membrane and impinges on an object within the narrow stream. Scattered or transmitted x-rays are detected with a photon counter. The SXM is feasible because a useful number of synchrotron x-rays, even from a bend magnet, will stream through a small diameter pore. The properties and limitations of the SXM are discussed together with other submicroscopic applications of nuclear particle tracks. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Optimal imaging techniques in the scanning transmission electron microscope: applications to biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, M; Crewe, A V

    1980-01-01

    We show applications of the optimal imaging method to stained biological macromolecules. This optimal imaging method involves the following basic procedures: (i) for any given resolution, which is represented by the electron probe size in the scanning transmission electron microscope, a preferred magnification is used; (ii) the micrographs taken at the condition described above are then spatially filtered by using a low-pass filter (nu < 1/2d, in which d is the space between scan lines) to optically reconstruct the final optimal image. It is found that the micrographs obtained by using the optimal imaging method clearly show an improvement in contrast. Images PMID:6933454

  8. Second-harmonic interference imaging of ferroelectric domains through a scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyang; Wei, Dunzhao; Wang, Yongmei; Zhu, Yunzhi; Zhang, Yong; Hu, X. P.; Zhu, S. N.; Xiao, Min

    2017-12-01

    We report a second-harmonic (SH) interference imaging technique to observe the ferroelectric domains of a periodically poled LiTaO3 crystal through a scanning microscope. By interfering with the reference SH field, which is produced in an un-poled LiTaO3 crystal, the SH imaging of the positive and negative domains can be easily distinguished. The image quality can be tuned by rotating the reference crystal or moving the focal plane. Our SH interference configuration is compatible with commercial scanning microscopy and has potential applications in fast examination of the ferroelectric structures in waveguide, film, and integrated devices.

  9. Magnification-continuous static calibration model of a scanning-electron microscope.

    OpenAIRE

    Malti, Abed Choaib; Dembélé, Sounkalo; Piat, Nadine; Rougeot, Patrick; Salut, Roland

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We present a new calibration model of both static distortion and projection for a scanning-electron microscope (SEM). The proposed calibration model depends continuously on the magnification factor. State-of-the-art methods have proposed models to solve the static distortion and projection model but for a discrete set of low and high magnifications: at low magnifications, existing models assume static distortion and perspective projection. At high magnifications, exist...

  10. Solving Research Tasks Using Desk top Scanning Electron Microscope Phenom ProX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vertsanova, O.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenom ProX — morden effective universal desktop Scanning Electron Microscope with integrated EDS system. Phenom-World helps customers to stay competitive in a world where critical dimensions are continuously getting smaller. All Phenom desktop systems give direct access to the high resolution and high-quality imaging and analysis required in a large variety of applications. They are affordable, flexible and a fast tool enabling engineers, technicians, researchers and educational professionals to investigate micron and submicron structures.

  11. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...... a quasipoint source with a spatial extension similar to the size of a dangling bond. [S0031-9007(98)08376-8]....

  12. Clinical and scanning electron microscopic assessments of porcelain and ceromer resin veneers.

    OpenAIRE

    Dhawan P; Prakash H; Shah N

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently available Ceromer resin materials are promising for fabrication of esthetic anterior laminates and provices an alternative, cost effective treament modality to porcelain laminates for discolored anterior anterior teeth. It was proposed to study the esthetic quality and surface finish of veneers fbricated from ceromer resin and compare it with the standard porcelain veneers, both clinically as well as by scanning electron microscope (SEM) at baseline and at 12 months. If foun...

  13. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Root Canal Irrigation with Saline, Sodium Hypochlorite, and Citric Acid,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    endodontic techniques; citric acid for root canal irrigation 4410,ABSTACgmf --,-,m- ,-rms n roc"---’This Study used a scanning electron microscope and a...wall is instrumented during canal preparation and that the smeared layer seems to be found only where endodontic instruments have scraped the surface...between the extremes. It was also decided to use a magnification of 75X to evaluate the superficial debris and 800X to evaluate the smeared layer

  14. Differential phase microscope and micro-tomography with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, N.; Hashizume, J.; Goto, M.; Yamaguchi, M.; Tsujimura, T.; Aoki, S.

    2013-10-01

    An x-ray differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter was set up at the bending magnet source BL3C, Photon Factory. A reconstructed phase profile from the differential phase image of an aluminium wire at 5.36 keV was fairly good agreement with the numerical simulation. Phase tomography of a biological specimen, such as an Artemia cyst, could be successfully demonstrated.

  15. Intensity interferometry experiments in a scanning transmission electron microscope : physics and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Meuret, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Quantum optics performed at the nanometer scale is an important challenge, especially for quantum emitters characterization. They can be point defects in material (few ang- ströms) or confined structures of a few nanometers. A way to reach this scale is by using cathodoluminescence (CL) performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (CL- STEM), which has only recently been done [1]. However, when aiming at studying the statistical properties of the light coming out of a CL experimen...

  16. Vison and visual servoing for nanomanipulation and nanocharacterization using scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Marturi, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    With the latest advances in nanotechnology, it became possible to design novel nanoscale devicesand systems with increasing efficiency. The consequence of this fact is an increase in the need for developing reliable and cutting edge processes for nanomanipulation and nanocharacterization. Since the human direct sensing is not a feasible option at this particular scale, the tasks are usually performedby an expert human operator using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped withmicro-nano...

  17. Influence of laser frequency noise on scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    n this work, we study the performance of a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimeter (sFPILDV) and compare two candidate 1.5 um single-frequency laser sources for the system – a fiber laser (FL) and a semiconductor laser (SL). We describe a straightforward calibration...... procedure for the sFPI-LDV and investigate the effect of different degrees of laser frequency noise between the FL and the SL on the velocimeter’s performance...

  18. Applying Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Soil Surface Roughness Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milutin Milenković

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning can provide high-resolution, two-dimensional sampling of soil surface roughness. While previous studies demonstrated the usefulness of these roughness measurements in geophysical applications, questions about the number of required scans and their resolution were not investigated thoroughly. Here, we suggest a method to generate digital elevation models, while preserving the surface’s stochastic properties at high frequencies and additionally providing an estimate of their spatial resolution. We also study the impact of the number and positions of scans on roughness indices’ estimates. An experiment over a smooth and isotropic soil plot accompanies the analysis, where scanning results are compared to results from active triangulation. The roughness measurement conditions for ideal sampling are revisited and updated for diffraction-limited sampling valid for close-range laser scanning over smooth and isotropic soil roughness. Our results show that terrestrial laser scanning can be readily used for roughness assessment on scales larger than 5 cm, while for smaller scales, special processing is required to mitigate the effect of the laser beam footprint. Interestingly, classical roughness parametrization (correlation length, root mean square height (RMSh was not sensitive to these effects. Furthermore, comparing the classical roughness parametrization between one- and four-scan setups shows that the one-scan data can replace the four-scan setup with a relative loss of accuracy below 1% for ranges up to 3 m and incidence angles no larger than 50°, while two opposite scans can replace it over the whole plot. The incidence angle limit for the spectral slope is even stronger and is 40°. These findings are valid for scanning over smooth and isotropic soil roughness.

  19. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF DENTINAL TUBULES IN MONKEY DENTIN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF DENTINAL TUBULES IN Cebus apella DENTIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Humberto Antoniazzi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of the study was to investigate the number and diameter of the Cebus apella dentinal tubules. The roots of the Cebus apella teeth were examined in specific tooth locations: the apical, middle and cervical dentin. The calculations were based on the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fractured surfaces. The results showed that the average number of dentinal tubules for each location was: 74,800 tubules/mm2 for apical root dentin, 90,000 tubules/mm2 for mid-root dentin, 91,600 tubules/mm2 for cervical root dentin. The average diameter was the following: apical root dentin, 4,30µm; mid-root dentin, 4,37µm; cervical root dentin,  5,23µm. These findings demonstrate that the Cebus apella teeth are a suitable substitute for human in endodontics studies. 

    KEY WORDS: Dentin, dentinal tubules, teeth.
    The aim of the study was to investigate the number and diameter of the Cebus apella dentinal tubules. The roots of the Cebus apella teeth were examined in specific tooth locations: the apical, middle and cervical dentin. The calculations were based on the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fractured surfaces. The results showed that the average number of dentinal tubules for each location was: 74,800 tubules/mm2 for apical root dentin, 90,000 tubules/mm2 for mid-root dentin, 91,600 tubules/mm2 for cervical root dentin. The average diameter was the following: apical root dentin, 4,30µm; mid-root dentin, 4,37µm; cervical root dentin,  5,23µm. These findings demonstrate that the Cebus apella teeth are a suitable substitute for human in endodontics studies. 

    KEY WORDS: Dentin, dentinal tubules, teeth.

  20. HOVE-Wedge-Filtering of Geomorphologic Terrestrial Laser Scan Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Panholzer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning has become an important surveying technique in many fields such as natural hazard assessment. To analyse earth surface processes, it is useful to generate a digital terrain model originated from laser scan point cloud data. To determine the terrain surface as precisely as possible, it is often necessary to filter out points that do not represent the terrain surface. Examples are vegetation, vehicles, and animals. In mountainous terrain with a small-structured topography, filtering is very difficult. Here, automatic filtering solutions usually designed for airborne laser scan data often lead to unsatisfactory results. In this work, we further develop an existing approach for automated filtering of terrestrial laser scan data, which is based on the assumption that no other surface point can be located in the area above a direct line of sight between scanner and another measured point. By taking into account several environmental variables and a repetitive calculation method, the modified method leads to significantly better results. The root-mean-square-error (RSME for the same test measurement area could be reduced from 5.284 to 1.610. In addition, a new approach for filtering and interpolation of terrestrial laser scanning data is presented using a grid with horizontal and vertical angular data and the measurement length.

  1. Comparison of Three Different Sealer Placement Techniques: An In vitro Confocal Laser Microscopic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Avoy Kumar; Farista, Shanin; Dash, Abhilasha; Bendre, Ajinkya; Farista, Sana

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Three-dimensional obturation of the root canal system is the final objective of root canal therapy. Greater penetration of sealer in root dentine lesser will be the voids at the dentine–sealer interface. Hence, analysis of the dentin/sealer interface allows the determination of a filling technique which could obturate the root canals with least gaps and voids. Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare the depth and percentage of sealer penetration into root dentin using three different root canal sealer placement techniques under confocal laser scanning microscope. Materials and Methods: Thirty single-rooted teeth were selected and prepared. Adseal sealer (Meta Biomed, South Korea) was mixed with Rhodamine B dye and applied using lentulo spiral (Dentsply Maillefer, USA) as Group 1, bidirectional spiral (EZ-Fill– EDS, USA) as Group 2, and ultrasonic endodontic tip (Sonofile– Dentsply Tulsa, USA) as Group 3. Canals were then obturated with gutta-percha. The roots were sectioned at the 3 and 6-mm levels from the apical foramen and examined under confocal laser microscope. Results: Maximum mean depth and percentage of sealer penetration were observed for Group 1 and minimum for Group 3. Furthermore, statistical significant differences among Group 1 and Group 3 were found at 6-mm level and among Group 2 and Group 3 were found at 3-mm level (P ultrasonics. PMID:28839420

  2. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  3. Reflection across plant cell boundaries in confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D Y T; Kuhlmey, B T; Smith, P M C; Day, D A; Faulkner, C R; Overall, R L

    2008-08-01

    The fluorescence patterns of proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its derivatives are routinely used in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy to identify their sub-cellular localization in plant cells. GFP-tagged proteins localized to plasmodesmata, the intercellular junctions of plants, are often identified by single or paired punctate labelling across the cell wall. The observation of paired puncta, or 'doublets', across cell boundaries in tissues that have been transformed through biolistic bombardment is unexpected if there is no intercellular movement of the GFP-tagged protein, since bombardment usually leads to the transformation of single, isolated cells. We expressed a putative plasmodesmal protein tagged with GFP by bombarding Allium porrum epidermal cells and assessed the nature of the doublets observed at the cell boundaries. Doublets were formed when fluorescent spots were abutting a cell boundary and were only observable at certain focal planes. Fluorescence emitted from the half of a doublet lying outside the transformed cells was polarized. Optical simulations performed using finite-difference time-domain computations showed a dramatic distortion of the confocal microscope's point spread function when imaging voxels close to the plant cell wall due to refractive index differences between the wall and the cytosol. Consequently, axially and radially out-of-focus light could be detected. A model of this phenomenon suggests how a doublet may form when imaging only a single real fluorescent body in the vicinity of a plant cell wall using confocal microscopy. We suggest, therefore, that the appearance of doublets across cell boundaries is insufficient evidence for plasmodesmal localization due to the effects of the cell wall on the reflection and scattering of light.

  4. All-optical histology using two photon laser scanning microscopy and ablation with ultrashort pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Philbert S.

    This dissertation discusses the use of ultrashort laser pulses to image and manipulate tissue for the purpose of three-dimensional histological reconstruction of extended brain structures. Two photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) and ultrashort pulsed laser ablation are used to provide in situ three-dimensional imaging through thick preparations of fixed tissue. Surface regions of fixed tissue are first imaged using TPLSM. The imaged regions are then removed by ablation with amplified, ultrashort laser pulses, thereby exposing a previously underlying tissue region for imaging. This process of imaging and ablation proceeds iteratively until the desired tissue volume has been processed. First, the principles, design, and construction of a two photon laser scanning microscope are discussed, followed by a discussion of the physical mechanisms of tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses. The compatibility of tissue ablation using ultrashort pulses with subsequent histological analysis, particularly with fluorescent microscopy, is evaluated. Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses is found to produce ablated tissue surfaces that are smooth to within a micrometer. Intrinsic fluorescence as well as immunoreactivity are found to be resilient to the ablation process. The all-optical histological technique is demonstrated on brain tissue from rats and mice, including tissue from embryonic mouse as early at E15. The ablation process is shown to preserve both macroscopic and microscopic structures within tissue. To facilitate the all-optical histological analysis of neuronal vasculature and its relative distribution to surrounding neuronal tissue, a fluorescent gel perfusion technique is developed that provides a temperature-stabilized fluorescent label of the neuronal vasculature. The use of immunohistochemistry to label specific cell populations throughout an 800 micrometer-thick tissue section is demonstrated. Additionally, the immersion of fixed tissue in high

  5. Scanning transmission x-ray microscope for materials science spectromicroscopy at the ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, T.; Seal, S.; Shin, H. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The brightness of the Advanced Light Source will be exploited by several new instruments for materials science spectromicroscopy over the next year or so. The first of these to become operational is a scanning transmission x-ray microscope with which near edge x-ray absorption spectra (NEXAFS) can be measured on spatial features of sub-micron size. Here the authors describe the instrument as it is presently implemented, its capabilities, some studies made to date and the developments to come. The Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope makes use of a zone plate lens to produce a small x-ray spot with which to perform absorption spectroscopy through thin samples. The x-ray beam from ALS undulator beamline 7.0 emerges into the microscope vessel through a silicon nitride vacuum window 160nm thick and 300{mu}m square. The vessel is filled with helium at atmospheric pressure. The zone plate lens is illuminated 1mm downstream from the vacuum window and forms an image in first order of a pinhole which is 3m upstream in the beamline. An order sorting aperture passes the first order converging light and blocks the unfocused zero order. The sample is at the focus a few mm downstream of the zone plate and mounted from a scanning piezo stage which rasters in x and y so that an image is formed, pixel by pixel, by an intensity detector behind the sample. Absorption spectra are measured point-by-point as the photon energy is scanned by rotating the diffraction grating in the monochromator and changing the undulator gap.

  6. STREET-SCENE TREE SEGMENTATION FROM MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Our work addresses the problem of extracting trees from mobile laser scanning data. The work is a two step-wise strategy, including terrain point removal and tree segmentation. First, a voxel-based upward growing filtering is proposed to remove terrain points from the mobile laser scanning data. Then, a tree segmentation is presented to extract individual trees via a Euclidean distance clustering approach and Voxel-based Normalized Cut (VNCut segmentation approach. A road section data acquired by a RIEGL VMX-450 system are selected for evaluating the proposed tree segmentation method. Qualitative analysis shows that our algorithm achieves a good performance.

  7. Holographic Video Disc And Laser Scanning Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartner, I.; Rosenbruch, K. J.

    1983-10-01

    Holographic optical elements or systems of holographic elements may replace glass optical imaging systems or may be used for the correction of glass optics. The main advantages of such systems are their low weight, small and compact construction, and their simple and inexpensive manufacture. The disadvantages to be overcome are mainly the low light through-put and chromatic aberrations. In the special case of optics for video discs we present an optical imaging system which is capable of giving the required high resolution for illumination with polychromatic radiation of limited bandwidth in the case of semiconductor laser diodes. Optimization programs based on ray tracing yield highly corrected imaging systems by comparably simple holographic means. The use of only two surfaces gives very compact and lightweight systems, the image quality of which is described for monochromatic and polychro-matic irradiance by means of optical transfer functions. The holograms are recorded on photo-resist material with short wavelength laser radiation. Such holograms have almost no scatter light and do not alter their properties with time or under radiation. These holograms generate wavefronts for the correction of aberrations which, in the case of glass optics, could only be achieved by aspherical surfaces.

  8. Microscopical characterization of known postmortem root bands using light and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietpas, Jack; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Richard, Adam H; Shaw, Stephen; Castillo, Hilda S; Donfack, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    A postmortem root band (PMRB) is a distinct microscopic feature that is postulated to occur in hair remaining in the follicle during the postmortem interval [1] (Petraco et al., 1998). The scientific validity of this premise has been highlighted in two recent high-profile criminal cases involving PMRBs [2,3] (State of Florida v. Casey Marie Anthony, 2008; People v. Kogut, 2005). To better understand the fundamental aspects of postmortem root banding, the microscopical properties of known PMRBs(1) were characterized by light microscopy, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of microtomed sections of hairs showing root banding. The results from this study show that the appearance of the PMRB may be due to the degradation of the chemically labile, non-keratin intermacrofibrillar matrix (IMM) in the pre-keratin/keratogenous region of anagen hairs. In addition, this degradation is confined to the cortex of the hair, with no apparent damage to the layers of the cuticle. These results could provide valuable information for determining the mechanism of band formation, as well as identify a set of microscopic features that could be used to distinguish hairs with known PMRBs from similarly looking environmentally degraded hairs. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Identification of mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum smear slide using automatic scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulaningtyas, Riries; Suksmono, Andriyan B.; Mengko, Tati L. R.; Saptawati, Putri

    2015-04-01

    Sputum smear observation has an important role in tuberculosis (TB) disease diagnosis, because it needs accurate identification to avoid high errors diagnosis. In development countries, sputum smear slide observation is commonly done with conventional light microscope from Ziehl-Neelsen stained tissue and it doesn't need high cost to maintain the microscope. The clinicians do manual screening process for sputum smear slide which is time consuming and needs highly training to detect the presence of TB bacilli (mycobacterium tuberculosis) accurately, especially for negative slide and slide with less number of TB bacilli. For helping the clinicians, we propose automatic scanning microscope with automatic identification of TB bacilli. The designed system modified the field movement of light microscope with stepper motor which was controlled by microcontroller. Every sputum smear field was captured by camera. After that some image processing techniques were done for the sputum smear images. The color threshold was used for background subtraction with hue canal in HSV color space. Sobel edge detection algorithm was used for TB bacilli image segmentation. We used feature extraction based on shape for bacilli analyzing and then neural network classified TB bacilli or not. The results indicated identification of TB bacilli that we have done worked well and detected TB bacilli accurately in sputum smear slide with normal staining, but not worked well in over staining and less staining tissue slide. However, overall the designed system can help the clinicians in sputum smear observation becomes more easily.

  10. Control and analysis software for a laser scanning microdensitometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    improve the beam quality of the laser. Light transmitted through the film falls on a photocell and output of the photocell is given to a voltage amplifier. The film to be scanned is placed on a glass slide and its movement is controlled by a translational stage driven by a stepper motor. It can scan in both X and Y directions up to ...

  11. Revealing the 1 nm/s Extensibility of Nanoscale Amorphous Carbon in a Scanning Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformati...... positive implications to explore some amorphous carbon as electron field emission device. SCANNING 35: 261-264, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.......In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformation...... promoted by the electric field, which resulted from an inner secondary electron potential difference from the main trunk of carbon film to the tip end of branches under electron beam. This result demonstrates importance of applying electrical effects to modify properties of carbon materials. It may have...

  12. Ultra-Compact Multitip Scanning Probe Microscope with an Outer Diameter of 50 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, Vasily; Zubkov, Evgeny; Junker, Hubertus; Korte, Stefan; Blab, Marcus; Coenen, Peter; Voigtländer, Bert

    We present a multitip scanning tunneling microscope (STM) where four independent STM units are integrated on a diameter of 50 mm. The coarse positioning of the tips is done under the control of an optical microscope or an SEM in vacuum. The heart of this STM is a new type of piezoelectric coarse approach called Koala Drive which can have a diameter greater than 2.5 mm and a length smaller than 10 mm. Alternating movements of springs move a central tube which holds the STM tip or AFM sensor. This new operating principle provides a smooth travel sequence and avoids shaking which is intrinsically present for nanopositioners based on inertial motion with saw tooth driving signals. Inserting the Koala Drive in a piezo tube for xyz-scanning integrates a complete STM inside a 4 mm outer diameter piezo tube of Koala Drive makes the scanning probe microscopy design ultra-compact and accordingly leads to a high mechanical stability. The drive is UHV, low temperature, and magnetic field compatible. The compactness of the Koala Drive allows building a four-tip STM as small as a single-tip STM with a drift of Koala Drive.

  13. Performance and characterization of the prototype nm-scale spatial resolution scanning multilayer Laue lenses microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaretski, E.; Kim, Jungdae; Yan, H.; Lauer, K.; Eom, D.; Shu, D.; Maser, J.; Pešić, Z.; Wagner, U.; Rau, C.; Chu, Y. S.

    2013-03-01

    Synchrotron based x-ray microscopy established itself as a prominent tool for noninvasive investigations in many areas of science and technology. Many facilities around the world routinely achieve sub-micrometer resolution with a few instruments capable of imaging with the spatial resolution better than 100 nm. With an ongoing effort to push the 2D/3D resolution down to 10 nm in the hard x-ray regime both fabrication of the nano-focusing optics and stability of a microscope become extremely challenging. In this work we present our approach to overcome technical challenges on the path towards high spatial resolution hard x-ray microscopy and demonstrate the performance of a scanning fluorescence microscope equipped with the multilayer Laue lenses focusing optics.

  14. RIGOROUS POINT-TO-PLANE REGISTRATION OF TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Grant

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning data that are acquired from multiple scan locations need to be registered before any 3D modeling and/or analysis is conducted. This paper presents a rigorous point-to-plane registration approach that minimizes the distances between two overlapping laser scans, using the General Least Squares adjustment model. The proposed approach falls under the class of fine registration and does not require any targets or tie points. Given some initial registration parameters, the proposed approach utilizes the scanned points and estimated planar features on both scans to determine the optimum parameters in the least squares sense. Both the uncertainty of the points due to the incidence angle, and the uncertainty of the local normal vectors of the planar features are taken into account in the stochastic model of the adjustment. The impact that these considerations with the stochastic model have on the registration is then demonstrated with comparisons on real terrestrial laser scanning data, and on smaller simulated data.

  15. Construction of a Dual-Tip Scanning Tunneling Microscope: a Prototype Nanotechnology Workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Mark Alan

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation describes the construction and performance of a dual-tip scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The microscope was built as a prototype nanotechnology workstation, a general purpose instrument designed to give a researcher the ability to investigate and manipulate nanometer scale structures. Chapter One describes the genesis and development of the concept of nanotechnology, from the atomic hypothesis of Democritus to modern developments in synthetic chemistry. Nanometer scale electronics (molecular electronics) is introduced and the state of the art in this field is described. The dual-tip scanning probe microscope is proposed as a way to address individual molecular electronic devices, a key goal in realizing nanometer scale electronic technology. Investigation of microtubules, a proposed nanometer scale intracellular biological information processing system, is also discussed. Chapter Two reviews the history and fundamental physics of STM, along with the related techniques of Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Ballistic Electon Emission Microscopy (BEEM). BEEM is used to introduce the physics of the dual -tip STM. Other dual-probe systems are also described. Chapter Three covers the design and construction of the dual-tip STM. Both hardware and software are described in detail. Chapter Four presents the results obtained with the dual-tip STM, including dual-tip images and noise measurements for the electronic circuitry. The last chapter, Chapter Five, contains suggested design changes for improving the performance of the dual -tip microscope and descriptions of experiments that can be performed with an improved instrument. Design and use of a nanotechnology workstation in the fields of semiconductor electronics, molecular electronics and cellular biology is discussed. Investigation of neurons grown on a silicon chip with a dual-tip STM system is proposed. Four Appendices present a noise model of the STM tunneling gap and preamplifier, describe

  16. A polygon laser scanning micrometer for magnet size measurement studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khullar, R.; Mishra, G.; Sharma, G.; Prakash, B.; Gehlot, M.; Huse, V.; Mishra, S.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and development of a polygon laser scanner for undulator magnet size measurement studies. In the laser scan micrometer, a laser light source is focused on to the facets of a rotating polygon mirror that reflects the laser beam. The parallel light emerging from the polygon surface falls on the object through a F-theta lens. The object obstructs the light. A lens at the opposite side of the object collects and focuses the light onto a detector. The shadow caused by the obstruction results in an output voltage for a period of time that is proportional to the size of the object. The method is used for undulator magnet size measurements for free electron laser applications.

  17. Adaptive phase compensation for ultracompact laser scanning endomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alex J; Paterson, Carl; Neil, Mark A A; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M W

    2011-05-01

    We present an approach to laser scanning endomicroscopy that requires no moving parts and can be implemented with no distal scanners or optics, permitting extremely compact endoscopic probes to be developed. Our approach utilizes a spatial light modulator to correct for phase variations across a fiber imaging bundle and to encode for arbitrary wavefronts at the distal end of the fiber bundle. Thus, it is possible to realize both focusing and beam scanning at the output of the fiber bundle with no distal components. We present proof of principle results to illustrate three-dimensional scanning of the focal spot and exemplar images of a United States Air Force resolution test chart.

  18. [Scanning electron microscopic observations on the copulatory spicules of the male Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S E; Lu, X J; Xie, L C; Zhang, D P

    1993-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopic observations were made on the morphological structures of the two copulatory spicules of the male Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. In both species, one of the two copulatory spicules was in the shape of a concave groove and the other, in the shape of an oblate tube. Owing to the difference in the concavity of the groove shaped copulatory spicule between the two species as shown by the cross sections, Necator americanus usually appear to have only one copulatory spicule whereas Ancylostoma duodenale usually show two separate copulatory spicules in appearance (Figs 1-10).

  19. Unveiling the Mysteries of Mars with a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunson, J.; Gaskin, J. A.; Doloboff, I. J.; Jerman, G.

    2017-01-01

    Development of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope that will utilize the martian atmosphere to dissipate charge during analysis continues. This instrument is expected to be used on a future rover or lander to answer fundamental Mars science questions. To identify the most important questions, a survey was taken at the 47th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC). From the gathered information initial topics were identified for a SEM on the martian surface. These priorities are identified and discussed below. Additionally, a concept of operations is provided with the goal of maximizing the science obtained with the minimum amount of communication with the instrument.

  20. PRISMLESS ENAMEL IN HUMAN NON-ERUPTED DECIDUOUS MOLAR TEETH: A SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAVA Marcelo

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency, structure and thickness of the prismless enamel layer in the buccal and lingual surfaces of non-erupted deciduous molar teeth were described. The teeth were extracted, kept in a 70% ethanol solution, dried, coated with gold and examined in a scanning electron microscope JEOL, JSM-6.100. The aprismatic layer was observed in the occlusal, middle and cervical thirds of all buccal and lingual surfaces. The hydroxyapatite crystals were arranged parallel to each other and perpendicular to the enamel surface. No statistically significant differences were observed between the occlusal, middle and cervical thirds, which had 7.257 m m of average thickness.

  1. Optical microscope illumination analysis using through-focus scanning optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Park, Haesung

    2017-06-15

    Misalignment of the aperture diaphragm present in optical microscopes results in angular illumination asymmetry (ANILAS) at the sample plane. Here we show that through-focus propagation of ANILAS results in a lateral image shift with a focus position. This could lead to substantial errors in quantitative results for optical methods that use through-focus images such as three-dimensional nanoparticle tracking, confocal microscopy, and through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM). A correlation exists between ANILAS and the slant in TSOM images. Hence, the slant in the TSOM image can be used to detect, analyze, and rectify the presence of ANILAS.

  2. Note: Automated electrochemical etching and polishing of silver scanning tunneling microscope tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Stephen S; Perdue, Shawn M; Rodriguez Perez, Alejandro; Tallarida, Nicholas; Majors, Julia H; Apkarian, V Ara; Lee, Joonhee

    2013-09-01

    Fabrication of sharp and smooth Ag tips is crucial in optical scanning probe microscope experiments. To ensure reproducible tip profiles, the polishing process is fully automated using a closed-loop laminar flow system to deliver the electrolytic solution to moving electrodes mounted on a motorized translational stage. The repetitive translational motion is controlled precisely on the μm scale with a stepper motor and screw-thread mechanism. The automated setup allows reproducible control over the tip profile and improves smoothness and sharpness of tips (radius 27 ± 18 nm), as measured by ultrafast field emission.

  3. Manipulation of nanoparticles of different shapes inside a scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Polyakov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work polyhedron-like gold and sphere-like silver nanoparticles (NPs were manipulated on an oxidized Si substrate to study the dependence of the static friction and the contact area on the particle geometry. Measurements were performed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM that was equipped with a high-precision XYZ-nanomanipulator. To register the occurring forces a quartz tuning fork (QTF with a glued sharp probe was used. Contact areas and static friction forces were calculated by using different models and compared with the experimentally measured force. The effect of NP morphology on the nanoscale friction is discussed.

  4. A scanning tunneling microscope break junction method with continuous bias modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Edward; Yin, Xing; Waldeck, David H; Wierzbinski, Emil

    2015-09-28

    Single molecule conductance measurements on 1,8-octanedithiol were performed using the scanning tunneling microscope break junction method with an externally controlled modulation of the bias voltage. Application of an AC voltage is shown to improve the signal to noise ratio of low current (low conductance) measurements as compared to the DC bias method. The experimental results show that the current response of the molecule(s) trapped in the junction and the solvent media to the bias modulation can be qualitatively different. A model RC circuit which accommodates both the molecule and the solvent is proposed to analyze the data and extract a conductance for the molecule.

  5. Molecular images and vibrational spectroscopy of sorbic acid with the scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas P. E.; Kirk, Michael D.; Quate, Calvin F.

    1987-06-01

    Images of sorbic acid molecules absorbed onto graphite have been taken with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in liquid helium. Molecular clusters were clearly observed, as was the atomic structure of the graphite substrate. The molecules were seen to diffuse across the substrate at a rate of about 1 Å/min. When dI/dV vs V was measured with the STM probe directly over a sorbic acid molecule, a well-defined spectrum of peaks was obtained whose energies corresponded to the vibrational resonances of the molecule. Large changes in the spectra occurred if the tip was moved a lateral distance of 5 Å.

  6. Reduction of the pulse duration of the ultrafast laser pulses of the Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (2PLSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshak Ali

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We provide an update of our two-photon laser scanning microscope by compressing or reducing the broadening of the pulse width of ultrafast laser pulses for dispersion precompensation, to enable the pulses to penetrate deeply inside the sample. Findings The broadening comes as the pulses pass through the optical elements. We enhanced and modified the quality and the sharpness of images by enhancing the resolution using special polarizer namely Glan Laser polarizer GL10. This polarizer consists of two prisms separated by air space. This air separation between the two prisms uses to delay the red wavelength when the light leaves the first prism to the air then to second prism. We note a considerable enhancing with using the GL polarizer, and we can see the details of the leaf structure in early stages when we trying to get focus through z-stacks of images in comparison to exactly the same measurements without using GL polarizer. Hence, with this modification we able to reduce the time of exposure the sample to the laser radiation thereby we will reduce the probability of photobleaching and phototoxicity. When the pulse width reduced, the average power of the laser pulses maintained at a constant level. Significant enhancement is found between the two kinds of images of the Two-Photon Excitation Fluorescence (TPEF. Conclusion In summary reduction the laser pulse width allowed to collect more diffraction orders which will used to form the images. The more diffraction orders the higher resolution images.

  7. Classification of mobile laser scanning point clouds from height features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, M.; Lemmens, M.J.P.M.; van Oosterom, P.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The demand for 3D maps of cities and road networks is steadily growing and mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems are often the preferred geo-data acquisition method for capturing such scenes. Because MLS systems are mounted on cars or vans they can acquire billions of points of road scenes within a

  8. From Point Cloud to Textured Model, the Zamani Laser Scanning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper describes the stages of the laser scanning pipeline from data acquisition to the final 3D computer model based on experiences gained during the ongoing creation of data for the African Cultural Heritage Sites and Landscapes database. The various processes are briefly discussed and challenges are highlighted ...

  9. From Point Cloud to Textured Model, the Zamani Laser Scanning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    roshan

    Abstract. The paper describes the stages of the laser scanning pipeline from data acquisition to the final. 3D computer model based on experiences gained during the ongoing creation of data for the. African Cultural Heritage Sites and Landscapes database. The various processes are briefly discussed and challenges are ...

  10. Single scan vector prediction in selective laser melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Bruins, R.; Terpstra, L.; Huls, R.A.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In selective laser melting (SLM) products are built by melting layers of metal powder successively. Optimal process parameters are usually obtained by scanning single vectors and subsequently determining which settings lead to a good compromise between product density and build speed. This paper

  11. Optomechatronics Design and Control for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is considered as one of the major advancements in microscopy in the last century and is widely accepted as a 3D fluorescence imaging tool for biological studies. For the emerging biological questions CLSM requires fast imaging to detect rapid biological

  12. Micro-scanning mirrors for high-power laser applications in laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandner, Thilo; Kimme, Simon; Grasshoff, Thomas; Todt, Ulrich; Graf, Alexander; Tulea, Cristian; Lenenbach, Achim; Schenk, Harald

    2014-03-01

    We present two novel micro scanning mirrors with large aperture and HR dielectric coatings suitable for high power laser applications in a miniaturized laser-surgical instrument for neurosurgery to cut skull tissue. An electrostatic driven 2D-raster scanning mirror with 5x7.1mm aperture is used for dynamic steering of a ps-laser beam of the laser cutting process. A second magnetic 2D-beam steering mirror enables a static beam correction of a hand guided laser instrument. Optimizations of a magnetic gimbal micro mirror with 6 mm x 8 mm mirror plate are presented; here static deflections of 3° were reached. Both MEMS devices were successfully tested with a high power ps-laser at 532nm up to 20W average laser power.

  13. Airborne laser scanning and usefulness for hydrological models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hollaus

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital terrain models form the basis for distributed hydrologic models as well as for two-dimensional hydraulic river flood models. The technique used for generating high accuracy digital terrain models has shifted from stereoscopic aerial-photography to airborne laser scanning during the last years. Since the disastrous floods 2002 in Austria, large airborne laser-scanning flight campaigns have been carried out for several river basins. Additionally to the topographic information, laser scanner data offer also the possibility to estimate object heights (vegetation, buildings. Detailed land cover maps can be derived in conjunction with the complementary information provided by high-resolution colour-infrared orthophotos. As already shown in several studies, the potential of airborne laser scanning to provide data for hydrologic/hydraulic applications is high. These studies were mostly constraint to small test sites. To overcome this spatial limitation, the current paper summarises the experiences to process airborne laser scanner data for large mountainous regions, thereby demonstrating the applicability of this technique in real-world hydrological applications.

  14. Nanotubular Structure on the Ti-29Nb-5Zr Alloy by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ju; Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Kang, Bo-An; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we reported the observation of highly ordered nanotubular structure on the Ti-29Nb-5Zr alloy in various potentials and electrolytes by field emission scanning electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscope. From the X-ray diffraction results and microstructure analysis, Ti-29Nb-5Zr alloy had β phase. The nanotube morphologies of Ti-29Nb-5Zr alloy were transformed from nano-porous structure to nanotube structure as NaF concentration and voltage increased. Nanotube diameter and layer changed with different concentration of NaF in 1 M H3PO4 at the same voltage. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results, nanotube was formed by Nb, Zr, and Ti oxide. Also, barrier layer of large tube was about 50 nm thickness, small one was 60 nm thickness. The nanotube size and crystallinity on the β Ti alloy was controlled by fluoride concentration, applied potential, anodization time, and tube layer.

  15. Observation of nanostructure by scanning near-field optical microscope with small sphere probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Oshikane, Toshihiko Kataoka, Mitsuru Okuda, Seiji Hara, Haruyuki Inoue and Motohiro Nakano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Step and terrace structure has been observed in an area of 1 μm×1 μm on the cleaved surface of KCl–KBr solid-solution single crystal by scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM with a small sphere probe of 500 nm diameter. Lateral spatial resolution of the SNOM system was estimated to be 20 nm from the observation of step width and the scanning-step interval. Vertical spatial resolution was estimated to be 5–2 nm from the observation of step height and noise level of photomultiplier tube (PMT. With applying a dielectric dipole radiation model to the probe surface, the reason why such a high spatial resolution was obtained in spite of the 500 nm sphere probe, was understood as the effect of the near-field term appeared in the radiation field equations.

  16. Examination of mycological samples by means of the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species of Siphomycetes: Rhizopus arhizus, Rhizopus equinus and Rhizopus nigricans, as well as a Septomycete: Emericella nidulans, have been examined by means of a scanning electron microscope. Among the difjerent Rhizopus, this technique showed differences in the appearance of the sporangia. In Emericella nidulans, scanning microscopy enábled one to ascertain that the "Hull cells" were completely hollow and also demonstrated the ornemented aspect of the ascospores.Três espécies de Sifomicetas: Rhizopus arhizus, Rhizopus equinus, Rhizopus nigricans e um Septomiceta: Emericella nidulans foram examinados em microscopia de exploração. Esta técnica mostrou detalhes não evidenciáveis ao poder de resolução do microscópio óptico, demonstrando ser útil para o diagnóstico em micologia.

  17. Imaging and identifying defects in nitride semiconductor thin films using a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Ruterana, P. [CIMAP UMR 6252 CNRS-ENSICAEN-CEA-UCBN, 6, Caen (France); Gamarra, P.; Lacam, C.; Tordjman, M.; Di Forte-Poisson, M.A. [Thales Research and Technology, III-V Lab, Marcoussis (France); Parbrook, P.J. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Claremont House, High St, Lydney (United Kingdom); England, G. [K. E. Developments Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    We describe the use of electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) - in a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) - to reveal and identify defects in nitride semiconductor thin films. In ECCI changes in crystallographic orientation, or changes in lattice constant due to local strain, are revealed by changes in grey scale in an image constructed by monitoring the intensity of backscattered electrons (BSEs) as an electron beam is scanned over a suitably oriented sample. Extremely small orientation changes are detectable, enabling small angle tilt and rotation boundaries and dislocations to be imaged. Images with a resolution of tens of nanometres are obtainable with ECCI. In this paper, we describe the use of ECCI with TEM to determine threading dislocation densities and types in InAlN/GaN heterostructures grown on SiC and sapphire substrates. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Comparing laser printing and barcode scanning designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Thomas D.

    1991-02-01

    A comparison of requirements and designs for barcode and non-impact printer scanners reveals similarities and differences that may be useful in leading to new solutions for barcode scanner problems. The non-impact printer scanner has been in volume production for over 10 years successfully achieving low cost high performance and high quality targets. Where requirements are found to overlap solutions already implemented and proven for printer applications may fmd further application in bar code scanners. Typical technologies used for printing include flying spot scanners liquid crystal shutters scophony scanners and LED arrays. Of primary concern in measuring figure of merit are such critical parameters as cost lifetime reliability conformance to regulatory standards environmental ruggedness power consumption compactness insensitivity to orientation acoustic noise produced modularity spot size depth of field exposure level and uniformity data rate scan length and uniformity and many more. A comparison of printing technologies their capabilities and their limitations with those used in barcode scanners may reveal common problems where we can take advantage of work already completed in similar application where requirements are found to overlap.

  19. Control Measurements of Crane Rails Performed by Terrestrial Laser Scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregar, Klemen; Možina, Jan; Ambrožič, Tomaž; Kogoj, Dušan; Marjetič, Aleš; Štebe, Gašper; Savšek, Simona

    2017-07-20

    This article presents a method for measuring the geometry of crane rails with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Two sets of crane rails were divided into segments, their planes were adjusted, and the characteristic rail lines were defined. We used their profiles to define the positional and altitude deviations of the rails, the span and height difference between the two rails, and we also verified that they complied with the Eurocode 3 standard. We tested the method on crane rails at the hydroelectric power plant in Krško and the thermal power plant in Brestanica. We used two scanning techniques: "pure" TLS (Riegel VZ-400) and "hybrid" TLS (Leica MS50) scanning. This article's original contribution lies in the detailed presentation of the computations used to define the characteristic lines of the rails without using the numeric procedures from existing software packages. We also analysed the influence of segment length and point density on the rail geometry results, and compared the two laser scanning techniques. We also compared the results obtained by terrestrial laser scanning with the results obtained from the classic polar method, which served as a reference point for its precision.

  20. Confocal laser scanning microscopy. Using new technology to answer old questions in forensic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Karch, Steven B; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2008-03-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a relatively new technique for microscopic imaging. It has found a wide field of application in the general sphere of biological sciences. It has completely changed the study of cells and tissues by allowing greater resolution, optical sectioning of the sample and three-dimensional sanoke reconstruction. Confocal microscopy represents a valid, precious and useful tool capable of providing data (images) of unrivalled clearness and definition. This review discusses the possible applications of confocal microscopy in specific fields of forensic investigation, with specific regard to ballistics, forensic histopathology and toxicological pathology.

  1. Handheld nonlinear microscope system comprising a 2 MHz repetition rate, mode-locked Yb-fiber laser for in vivo biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolopp, Ádám; Csákányi, Attila; Haluszka, Dóra; Csáti, Dániel; Vass, Lajos; Kolonics, Attila; Wikonkál, Norbert; Szipőcs, Róbert

    2016-01-01

    A novel, Yb-fiber laser based, handheld 2PEF/SHG microscope imaging system is introduced. It is suitable for in vivo imaging of murine skin at an average power level as low as 5 mW at 200 kHz sampling rate. Amplified and compressed laser pulses having a spectral bandwidth of 8 to 12 nm at around 1030 nm excite the biological samples at a ~1.89 MHz repetition rate, which explains how the high quality two-photon excitation fluorescence (2PEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) images are obtained at the average power level of a laser pointer. The scanning, imaging and detection head, which comprises a conventional microscope objective for beam focusing, has a physical length of ~180 mm owing to the custom designed imaging telescope system between the laser scanner mirrors and the entrance aperture of the microscope objective. Operation of the all-fiber, all-normal dispersion Yb-fiber ring laser oscillator is electronically controlled by a two-channel polarization controller for Q-switching free mode-locked operation. The whole nonlinear microscope imaging system has the main advantages of the low price of the fs laser applied, fiber optics flexibility, a relatively small, light-weight scanning and detection head, and a very low risk of thermal or photochemical damage of the skin samples. PMID:27699118

  2. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D., E-mail: peter.nellist@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Cosgriff, Eireann C.; D' Alfonso, Adrian J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Allen, Leslie J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hashimoto, Ayako [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Quantum Dot Research Center, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. -- Research Highlights: {yields} The confocal probe image in a scanning confocal electron microscopy image reveals information about the thickness and height of the crystalline layer. {yields} The form of the contrast in a three-dimensional bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy image can be explained in terms of the confocal probe image. {yields} Despite the complicated form of the contrast in bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy, we see that depth information is transferred on a 10 nm scale.

  3. Imaging inflammation in mouse colon using a rapid stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldua, Meagan A; Olsovsky, Cory A; Callaway, Evelyn S; Chapkin, Robert S; Maitland, Kristen C

    2012-01-01

    Large area confocal microscopy may provide fast, high-resolution image acquisition for evaluation of tissue in pre-clinical studies with reduced tissue processing in comparison to histology. We present a rapid beam and stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope to image cellular and tissue features along the length of the entire excised mouse colon. The beam is scanned at 8,333 lines/sec by a polygon scanning mirror while the specimen is scanned in the orthogonal axis by a motorized translation stage with a maximum speed of 7 mm/sec. A single 1 × 60 mm(2) field of view image spanning the length of the mouse colon is acquired in 10 s. Z-projection images generated from axial image stacks allow high resolution imaging of the surface of non-flat specimens. In contrast to the uniform size, shape, and distribution of colon crypts in confocal images of normal colon, confocal images of chronic bowel inflammation exhibit heterogeneous tissue structure with localized severe crypt distortion.

  4. Field programmable gate array based reconfigurable scanning probe/optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek B; Lawrence, A J; Dzegede, Zechariah K; Hiester, Justin C; Kim, Cliff; Sánchez, Erik J

    2011-10-01

    The increasing popularity of nanometrology and nanospectroscopy has pushed researchers to develop complex new analytical systems. This paper describes the development of a platform on which to build a microscopy tool that will allow for flexibility of customization to suit research needs. The novelty of the described system lies in its versatility of capabilities. So far, one version of this microscope has allowed for successful near-field and far-field fluorescence imaging with single molecule detection sensitivity. This system is easily adapted for reflection, polarization (Kerr magneto-optical (MO)), Raman, super-resolution techniques, and other novel scanning probe imaging and spectroscopic designs. While collecting a variety of forms of optical images, the system can simultaneously monitor topographic information of a sample with an integrated tuning fork based shear force system. The instrument has the ability to image at room temperature and atmospheric pressure or under liquid. The core of the design is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) data acquisition card and a single, low cost computer to control the microscope with analog control circuitry using off-the-shelf available components. A detailed description of electronics, mechanical requirements, and software algorithms as well as examples of some different forms of the microscope developed so far are discussed.

  5. Study of skin of an Egyptian mummy using a scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mańkowska-Pliszka Hanna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The first study of modified human remains using an electron microscope was carried out at the end of the 1950 and in 1979 the first result of the study involving a scanning electron microscope (SEM was published for the first time. The study was mainly focused on the structure of tissues and cells. With the help of this technique cell and tissue elements, viruses and bacterial endospores as well as the structure of epithelium and the collagen contents of dermis were identified and described. In the above-mentioned case the object of the study using a SEM was a free part of the right hand (forearm with the dorsal and palmar parts of hand of unknown origin, with signs of mummification revealed during microscopic analysis. Our study was aimed at finding the answer to the question if the mummification of the studied limb was natural or intentional, and if the study using a SEM could link the anonymous remains with ancient Egypt.

  6. Versatile variable temperature and magnetic field scanning probe microscope for advanced material research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin-Oh; Choi, Seokhwan; Lee, Yeonghoon; Kim, Jinwoo; Son, Donghyeon; Lee, Jhinhwan

    2017-10-01

    We have built a variable temperature scanning probe microscope (SPM) that covers 4.6 K-180 K and up to 7 T whose SPM head fits in a 52 mm bore magnet. It features a temperature-controlled sample stage thermally well isolated from the SPM body in good thermal contact with the liquid helium bath. It has a 7-sample-holder storage carousel at liquid helium temperature for systematic studies using multiple samples and field emission targets intended for spin-polarized spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study on samples with various compositions and doping conditions. The system is equipped with a UHV sample preparation chamber and mounted on a two-stage vibration isolation system made of a heavy concrete block and a granite table on pneumatic vibration isolators. A quartz resonator (qPlus)-based non-contact atomic force microscope (AFM) sensor is used for simultaneous STM/AFM operation for research on samples with highly insulating properties such as strongly underdoped cuprates and strongly correlated electron systems.

  7. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopic investigation of enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina; Klingberg, Gunilla; Dietz, Wolfram; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental disturbance during enamel formation, defined as a macroscopic defect in the enamel, with a reduction of the enamel thickness with rounded, smooth borders. Information on the microstructural level is still limited, therefore further studies are of importance to better understand the mechanisms behind enamel hypoplasia. To study enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth by means of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Nineteen primary teeth with enamel hypoplasia were examined in a polarized light microscope and in a scanning electron microscope. The cervical and incisal borders of the enamel hypoplasia had a rounded appearance, as the prisms in the rounded cervical area of the hypoplasia were bent. The rounded borders had a normal surface structure whereas the base of the defects appeared rough and porous. Morphological findings in this study indicate that the aetiological factor has a short duration and affects only certain ameloblasts. The bottom of the enamel hypoplasia is porous and constitutes possible pathways for bacteria into the dentin.

  8. Development of apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, T; Umezawa, T; Watanabe, S; Ohtani, H

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we suggested two types of novel metallized tip for the apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope probe. The first is a silver nanorod immobilized tip and the other is a double metallized probe. We calculated the electric field enhancement factor and the electric field distribution of a single sphere, aggregated spheres, an ellipse and a nanorod by the finite-differential time-domain method to improve the silver nanosphere immobilized tip developed in our previous studies. The enhanced field of the nanorod is localized at the external surfaces. The simulation results of the nanorod revealed that the position of the maximum peak is shifted to a longer wavelength and that its electric field enhancement factor increases as the aspect ratio increases. Thus, we developed the silver nanorod immobilized tip, and the tip-enhanced Raman spectrum of rhodamine 6G molecule on the substrate could be measured by the tip though it could not be detected by the previous nanosphere immobilized tip. Further, the finite-differential time-domain calculation predicted that the double metallized tips considerably enhance the electric field and that its enhancement factor in the longer wavelength region (500-600 nm) does not decrease when the tip is rounded. The results show that the proposed metallized tips were useful for the apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope system.

  9. Fibrous architecture of cementodentinal junction in disease: A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, R; Pratebha, B

    2015-01-01

    The cementodentinal junction (CDJ) forms a biological and structural link between cementum and dentin. This biological link is regarded as a distinct tissue in its own right. Certain important proteins responsible for periodontal regeneration are said to be present in this tissue. Few studies have described the structure and composition of this layer by light and electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopic studies pertaining to CDJ in health and disease are few and documentation of periodontal pathological changes of CDJ is unclear. In the first phase of our study, the collagenous architecture of CDJ of healthy teeth has been reported. The objective of this study is to observe and report periodontal pathological changes in the fibrous or collagenous architecture of CDJ of periodontitis-affected teeth and discuss the probable clinical implications of CDJ in disease. Twenty periodontitis-affected teeth were collected and processed for observing under a scanning electron microscope. The results are as follows: Increased width of interface at CDJ in periodontitis samples (7.1 μ) compared to that of healthy samples; fewer areas of fiber intermingling at CDJ in periodontitis samples as compared to healthy samples; frequent detachment of cementum from dentin during sodium hydroxide maceration of samples. It may be inferred from results that there is a possibility of a definite weakening of CDJ in periodontally affected root surfaces and we believe that clinical procedures such as scaling and root planning may have a detrimental effect on the cementodentinal attachment of periodontally involved root surfaces.

  10. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system for microscopic and endoscopic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Sam A.; Leavesley, Silas J.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2016-04-01

    Current microscopic and endoscopic technologies for cancer screening utilize white-light illumination sources. Hyper-spectral imaging has been shown to improve sensitivity while retaining specificity when compared to white-light imaging in both microscopy and in vivo imaging. However, hyperspectral imaging methods have historically suffered from slow acquisition times due to the narrow bandwidth of spectral filters. Often minutes are required to gather a full image stack. We have developed a novel approach called excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging that provides 2-3 orders of magnitude increased signal strength. This reduces acquisition times significantly, allowing for live video acquisition. Here, we describe a preliminary prototype excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system that can be coupled with endoscopes or microscopes for hyperspectral imaging of tissues and cells. Our system is comprised of three subsystems: illumination, transmission, and imaging. The illumination subsystem employs light-emitting diode arrays to illuminate at different wavelengths. The transmission subsystem utilizes a unique geometry of optics and a liquid light guide. Software controls allow us to interface with and control the subsystems and components. Digital and analog signals are used to coordinate wavelength intensity, cycling and camera triggering. Testing of the system shows it can cycle 16 wavelengths at as fast as 1 ms per cycle. Additionally, more than 18% of the light transmits through the system. Our setup should allow for hyperspectral imaging of tissue and cells in real time.

  11. Registration Procedures for Terrestrial Laser Scanning in Geomorphologic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B. D.; Kayen, R.; Minasian, D.

    2006-12-01

    Terrestrial based laser scanning, from either vehicle or tripod mounts allows the collection of geomorphologic data at previously unprecedented detail and volume. However, despite the ease of collecting this data in many settings, post-processing datasets collected without laser-visible reflectors within individual scans can lead to difficulties in both registration and georeferencing procedures. We have been actively involved in gathering data sets from a number of different environments and have been developing various techniques to post-process the data using surface registration methods. These methods use the point cloud or model surface to find a best-fit of the three-dimensional terrain. Recently, we have collected laser scan data of levee breaches in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, a glacial cirque basin in the Canadian Rockies, a deep-seated landslide mass in Ventura County, California, rapidly evolving coastal bluffs in Central California, and sand bars and archeological sites in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. In each of these projects, setting up accurately surveyed reflectors was impractical due to the locations dynamic and fairly inaccessible setting. Robust surface registration procedures were therefore needed to provide accurate terrain models. We have used laser scanning results from these projects to assess the efficiency of the various post- processing methodologies for obtaining final registered and georeferenced point clouds and surface models. We compared registration results obtained both with and without accurate GPS coordinates for the laser scanner origin (Ventura and coastal landslides), use of a supporting total station unit (Grand Canyon), and collection of DGPS data on targets imaged in the LIDAR data after the scanning process (Katrina Levees). In many of these settings, the model fit improved by four times, from a root mean square error of 20 cm to 5cm when accurately surveyed coordinates were utilized for the laser scan

  12. A design for a subminiature, low energy scanning electron microscope with atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, D. A.; Edmondson, P.; Greene, S.; Donnelly, S.; Olsson, E.; Svensson, K.; Bleloch, A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a type of scanning electron microscope that works by directly imaging the electron field-emission sites on a nanotip. Electrons are extracted from the nanotip through a nanoscale aperture, accelerated in a high electric field, and focused to a spot using a microscale Einzel lens. If the whole microscope (accelerating section and lens) and the focal length are both restricted in size to below 10 μm, then computer simulations show that the effects of aberration are extremely small and it is possible to have a system with approximately unit magnification at electron energies as low as 300 eV. Thus a typical emission site of 1 nm diameter will produce an image of the same size, and an atomic emission site will give a resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm (1-2 Å). Also, because the beam is not allowed to expand beyond 100 nm in diameter, the depth of field is large and the contribution to the beam spot size from chromatic aberrations is less than 0.02 nm (0.2 Å) for 500 eV electrons. Since it is now entirely possible to make stable atomic sized emitters (nanopyramids), it is expected that this instrument will have atomic resolution. Furthermore the brightness of the beam is determined only by the field emission and can be up to 1×106 times larger than in a typical (high energy) electron microscope. The advantages of this low energy, bright-beam electron microscope with atomic resolution are described and include the possibility of it being used to rapidly sequence the human genome from a single strand of DNA as well as being able to identify atomic species directly from the elastic scattering of electrons.

  13. A High Performance, Cost-Effective, Open-Source Microscope for Scanning Two-Photon Microscopy that Is Modular and Readily Adaptable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenegger, David G.; Tran, Cam Ha T.; LeDue, Jeffery; Zhou, Ning; Gordon, Grant R.

    2014-01-01

    Two-photon laser scanning microscopy has revolutionized the ability to delineate cellular and physiological function in acutely isolated tissue and in vivo. However, there exist barriers for many laboratories to acquire two-photon microscopes. Additionally, if owned, typical systems are difficult to modify to rapidly evolving methodologies. A potential solution to these problems is to enable scientists to build their own high-performance and adaptable system by overcoming a resource insufficiency. Here we present a detailed hardware resource and protocol for building an upright, highly modular and adaptable two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscope that can be used for in vitro or in vivo applications. The microscope is comprised of high-end componentry on a skeleton of off-the-shelf compatible opto-mechanical parts. The dedicated design enabled imaging depths close to 1 mm into mouse brain tissue and a signal-to-noise ratio that exceeded all commercial two-photon systems tested. In addition to a detailed parts list, instructions for assembly, testing and troubleshooting, our plan includes complete three dimensional computer models that greatly reduce the knowledge base required for the non-expert user. This open-source resource lowers barriers in order to equip more laboratories with high-performance two-photon imaging and to help progress our understanding of the cellular and physiological function of living systems. PMID:25333934

  14. A high performance, cost-effective, open-source microscope for scanning two-photon microscopy that is modular and readily adaptable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Rosenegger

    Full Text Available Two-photon laser scanning microscopy has revolutionized the ability to delineate cellular and physiological function in acutely isolated tissue and in vivo. However, there exist barriers for many laboratories to acquire two-photon microscopes. Additionally, if owned, typical systems are difficult to modify to rapidly evolving methodologies. A potential solution to these problems is to enable scientists to build their own high-performance and adaptable system by overcoming a resource insufficiency. Here we present a detailed hardware resource and protocol for building an upright, highly modular and adaptable two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscope that can be used for in vitro or in vivo applications. The microscope is comprised of high-end componentry on a skeleton of off-the-shelf compatible opto-mechanical parts. The dedicated design enabled imaging depths close to 1 mm into mouse brain tissue and a signal-to-noise ratio that exceeded all commercial two-photon systems tested. In addition to a detailed parts list, instructions for assembly, testing and troubleshooting, our plan includes complete three dimensional computer models that greatly reduce the knowledge base required for the non-expert user. This open-source resource lowers barriers in order to equip more laboratories with high-performance two-photon imaging and to help progress our understanding of the cellular and physiological function of living systems.

  15. High-resolution photon-scanning tunneling microscope measurements of the whispering gallery modes in a cylindrical microresonator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, D.J.W.; Balistreri, M.L.M.; Blom, F.C.; Driessen, A.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed analysis of spatio-spectral photon scanning tunneling microscope scans of the light intensity inside a cylindrical microresonator has been carried out. By comparing the experimental results with theory, it is shown that the inclusion of spectral mode-beat phenomena is crucial for an

  16. Laser Ultrasound Spectroscopy Scanning for 3D Printed Parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, Guendalyn Kendra [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-04

    One of the challenges of additive manufacturing is quality control due to the possibility of unseen flaws in the final product. The current methods of inspection are lacking in detail, too slow for practical use, or unable to validate internal structure. This report examines the use of laser ultrasound spectroscopy in layer by layer scans of 3D printed parts as they are created. The result is fast and detailed quality control. An additional advantage of this method is the ability to cancel a print as soon as a defect is detected, therefore saving materials and time. This technique, though simple in concept, has been a challenge to implement. I discuss tweaking the 3D printer configuration, and finding the optimal settings for laser scanning small parts made of ABS plastic, as well as the limits of how small of a detail the laser can detect. These settings include the frequency of the ultrasonic transducer, the speed of the laser, and the distance from the laser to the part.

  17. Novel low-dose imaging technique for characterizing atomic structures through scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Ping; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chen, Chien-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To investigate dislocations or heterostructures across interfaces is now of great interest to condensed matter and materials scientists. With the advances in aberration-corrected electron optics, the scanning transmission electron microscope has demonstrated its excellent capability of characterizing atomic structures within nanomaterials, and well-resolved atomic-resolution images can be obtained through long-exposure data acquisition. However, the sample drifting, carbon contamination, and radiation damage hinder further analysis, such as deriving three-dimensional (3D) structures from a series of images. In this study, a method for obtaining atomic-resolution images with significantly reduced exposure time was developed, using which an original high-resolution image with approximately one tenth the electron dose can be obtained by combining a fast-scan high-magnification image and a slow-scan low-magnification image. The feasibility of obtaining 3D atomic structures using the proposed approach was demonstrated through multislice simulation. Finally, the feasibility and accuracy of image restoration were experimentally verified. This general method cannot only apply to electron microscopy but also benefit to image radiation-sensitive materials using various light sources.

  18. Binocular eye tracking with the Tracking Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, S B; Sheehy, C K; Roorda, A

    2016-01-01

    The development of high magnification retinal imaging has brought with it the ability to track eye motion with a precision of less than an arc minute. Previously these systems have provided only monocular records. Here we describe a modification to the Tracking Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (Sheehy et al., 2012) that splits the optical path in a way that slows the left and right retinas to be scanned almost simultaneously by a single system. A mirror placed at a retinal conjugate point redirects half of each horizontal scan line to the fellow eye. The collected video is a split image with left and right retinas appearing side by side in each frame. Analysis of the retinal motion in the recorded video provides an eye movement trace with very high temporal and spatial resolution. Results are presented from scans of subjects with normal ocular motility that fixated steadily on a green laser dot. The retinas were scanned at 4° eccentricity with a 2° square field. Eye position was extracted offline from recorded videos with an FFT based image analysis program written in Matlab. The noise level of the tracking was estimated to range from 0.25 to 0.5arcmin SD for three subjects. In the binocular recordings, the left eye/right eye difference was 1-2arcmin SD for vertical motion and 10-15arcmin SD for horizontal motion, in agreement with published values from other tracking techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optics designs and system MTF for laser scanning displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, Hakan; Nestorovic, Ned; Ng, Baldwin S.; Gross, Abraham A.

    1999-07-01

    The Virtual Retinal DisplayTM (VRDTM) technology is a new display technology being developed at Microvision Inc. The displayed image is scanned onto the viewer's retina using low- power red, green, and blue light sources. Microvision's proprietary miniaturized scanner designs make VRD system very well suited for head-mounted displays. In this paper we discuss some of the advantages of the VRD technology, various ocular designs for HMD and other applications, and details of constructing a system MTF budget for laser scanning systems that includes electronics, modulators, scanners, and optics.

  20. Differential diagnosis of choroidal melanomas and nervi using scanning laser ophthalmoscopical indocyanine green angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads V. Nis; Scherfig, Erik; Prause, J.U.

    1995-01-01

    Ophthalmology, choroidal melanoma, choroidal nevus, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green (ICG), scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), angiography......Ophthalmology, choroidal melanoma, choroidal nevus, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green (ICG), scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), angiography...

  1. SEMANTIC LABELLING OF ROAD FURNITURE IN MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Road furniture semantic labelling is vital for large scale mapping and autonomous driving systems. Much research has been investigated on road furniture interpretation in both 2D images and 3D point clouds. Precise interpretation of road furniture in mobile laser scanning data still remains unexplored. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to interpret road furniture based on their logical relations and functionalities. Our work represents the most detailed interpretation of road furniture in mobile laser scanning data. 93.3 % of poles are correctly extracted and all of them are correctly recognised. 94.3 % of street light heads are detected and 76.9 % of them are correctly identified. Despite errors arising from the recognition of other components, our framework provides a promising solution to automatically map road furniture at a detailed level in urban environments.

  2. Semantic Labelling of Road Furniture in Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Oude Elberink, S.; Vosselman, G.

    2017-09-01

    Road furniture semantic labelling is vital for large scale mapping and autonomous driving systems. Much research has been investigated on road furniture interpretation in both 2D images and 3D point clouds. Precise interpretation of road furniture in mobile laser scanning data still remains unexplored. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to interpret road furniture based on their logical relations and functionalities. Our work represents the most detailed interpretation of road furniture in mobile laser scanning data. 93.3 % of poles are correctly extracted and all of them are correctly recognised. 94.3 % of street light heads are detected and 76.9 % of them are correctly identified. Despite errors arising from the recognition of other components, our framework provides a promising solution to automatically map road furniture at a detailed level in urban environments.

  3. Evaluation of microvision SD2500 scanning laser display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Thomas H.; Rash, Clarence E.; Dennis, Scott J.

    2006-05-01

    Microvision's Spectrum TM SD2500 is a candidate technology for the Modular Integrated Helmet Display System (MIHDS)program. This HMD design is intended to provide a full-color, see-through, daylight and night-readable, moderate-resolution (800X600 pixels) display. The employed technology is that of scanning lasers. This paper presents the testing results for the latest version of this prototype system.

  4. [Advances of in vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ke-bin; Zhou, Guo-yu

    2006-02-01

    In vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy is being widely established as a time-saving, non-invasive, investigative methods in the study of body surfaces. Skin can be observed in its native state in vivo without the fixing, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. It is a new technology that can provide detailed images of tissue architecture and cellular morphology of living tissue. This paper reviews the fundamentals of in vivo confocal imaging and its clinical applications.

  5. Estimation of random bending strain using a scanning laser vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, R. N.; Xu, Y.; Bao, W.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented which were obtained from vibration measurements at discrete locations on a randomly excited structure to estimate the power spectral density of bending strain. The technique is intended to be applied using a scanning laser vibrometer to allow a non-contacting measurement of random bending strain over the surface of a structure. The experimental setup is described along with the data analysis procedure. The results presented here indicate that the method is practical and can lead to reliable estimates.

  6. Modeling 3D Objects for Navigation Purposes Using Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Specht

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the creation of 3d models and their applications in navigation. It contains a review of available methods and geometric data sources, focusing mostly on terrestrial laser scanning. It presents detailed description, from field survey to numerical elaboration, how to construct accurate model of a typical few storey building as a hypothetical reference in complex building navigation. Hence, the paper presents fields where 3d models are being used and their potential new applications.

  7. Selective retinal therapy with a continuous line scanning laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Yannis M.; Jain, ATul; Gariano, Ray F.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Schuele, Georg; Sramek, Christopher; Charalel, Resmi; Palanker, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluates the effects of exposure duration, beam diameter, and power on the safety, selectivity, and healing of retinal lesions created using a continuous line scanning laser. A 532 nm laser (PASCALTM) with retinal beam diameters of 40 and 66 μm was applied to 60 eyes of 30 Dutch-Belted rabbits. Retinal exposure duration varied from 15 to 60 μs. Lesions were acutely assessed by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography (FA). RPE flatmounts were evaluated with live-dead fluorescent assay (LD). Histological analysis was performed at 1 hour, 1 and 3 days, 1 and 2 weeks, and 1 and 2 months following laser treatment. Ophthalmoscopic visibility (OV) of the lesions corresponded to photoreceptor damage on histological analysis at 1 hour. In subvisible lesions, FA and LD yielded similar thresholds of RPE damage. The ratios of the threshold of rupture and of OV to FA visibility (measures of safety and selectivity) increased with decreasing duration and beam diameter. Above the threshold of OV, histology showed focal RPE damage and photoreceptor loss at one day without inner retinal effects. By one week, continuity of photoreceptor and RPE layers was restored. By 1 month, photoreceptors appeared normal while hypertrophy and hyperpigmentation of the RPE persisted. Retinal therapy with a fast scanning continuous laser achieves selective targeting of the RPE and, at higher power, of the photoreceptors. The damage zone in the photoreceptor layer is quickly filled-in, likely due to photoreceptor migration from adjacent zones. Continuous scanning laser can treat large retinal areas within standard eye fixation time.

  8. Placing single atoms in graphene with a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Ondrej; Kim, Songkil; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    We employ the sub-atomically focused beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to introduce and controllably manipulate individual dopant atoms in a 2D graphene lattice. The electron beam is used to create defects and subsequently sputter adsorbed source materials into the graphene lattice such that individual vacancy defects are controllably passivated by Si substitutional atoms. We further document that Si point defects may be directed through the lattice via e-beam control or modified (as yet, uncontrollably) to form new defects which can incorporate new atoms into the graphene lattice. These studies demonstrate the potential of STEM for atom-by-atom nanofabrication and fundamental studies of chemical reactions in 2D materials on the atomic level.

  9. Scanning Electron Microscopic Studies of the Pecten Oculi in the Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris F. Pourlis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to extend the microscopic investigations of the pecten oculi in the quail in order to add some information on the unresolved functional anatomy of this unique avian organ. The pecten oculi of the quail was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Eighteen- to-twenty two highly vascularised accordion-like folds were joined apically by a heavily pigmented bridge of tissue, which holds the pecten in a fanlike shape, widest at the base. The structure of the double layered limiting membrane was recorded. The presence of hyalocytes with macrophage-like appearance was illustrated. It is assumed that the pecten oculi of the quail resembles that of the chicken. Illustrated morphological features of this species may add information on the active physiological role of the pecten. But still, the functional significance of this organ is a matter of controversies.

  10. Standard practice for calibrating the magnification of a scanning electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers general procedures necessary for the calibration of magnification of scanning electron microscopes. The relationship between true magnification and indicated magnification is a complicated function of operating conditions. Therefore, this practice must be applied to each set of standard operating conditions to be used. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. In situ scanning tunneling microscope tip treatment device for spin polarization imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-Ping [Oak Ridge, TN; Jianxing, Ma [Oak Ridge, TN; Shen, Jian [Knoxville, TN

    2008-04-22

    A tip treatment device for use in an ultrahigh vacuum in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The device provides spin polarization functionality to new or existing variable temperature STM systems. The tip treatment device readily converts a conventional STM to a spin-polarized tip, and thereby converts a standard STM system into a spin-polarized STM system. The tip treatment device also has functions of tip cleaning and tip flashing a STM tip to high temperature (>2000.degree. C.) in an extremely localized fashion. Tip coating functions can also be carried out, providing the tip sharp end with monolayers of coating materials including magnetic films. The device is also fully compatible with ultrahigh vacuum sample transfer setups.

  12. In situ study of live specimens in an environmental scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Shiojiri, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we introduce new methodology for the observation of living biological samples in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The methodology is based on an unconventional initiation procedure for ESEM chamber pumping, free from purge-flood cycles, and on the ability to control thermodynamic processes close to the sample. The gradual and gentle change of the working environment from air to water vapor enables the study of not only living samples in dynamic in situ experiments and their manifestation of life (sample walking) but also its experimentally stimulated physiological reactions. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations of primary electron beam energy losses in a water layer on the sample surface were studied; consequently, the influence of the water thickness on radiation, temperature, or chemical damage of the sample was considered.

  13. Scanning electron microscopic observations of fibrous structure of cemento-dentinal junction in healthy teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratebha, B; Jaikumar, N D; Sudhakar, R

    2014-01-01

    The cemento-dentinal junction (CDJ) is a structural and biologic link between cementum and dentin present in the roots of teeth. Conflicting reports about the origin, structure and composition of this layer are present in literature. The width of this junctional tissue is reported to be about 2-4 μm with adhesion of cementum and dentin by proteoglycans and by collagen fiber intermingling. The objective of this study is to observe and report the fibrous architecture of the CDJ of healthy tooth roots. A total of 15 healthy teeth samples were collected, sectioned into halves, demineralized in 5% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, processed using NaOH maceration technique and observed under a scanning electron microscope. The CDJ appeared to be a fibril poor groove with a width of 2-4 µm. Few areas of collagen fiber intermingling could be appreciated. A detailed observation of these tissues has been presented.

  14. The migration of lymphocytes across the vascular endothelium in lymph nodes: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, M; Hamada, N; Nomura, H; Mastueda, M; Aiko, T

    1979-03-01

    Endothelial cells of Postcapillary Venules (PCV) and the passage of lymphocytes through the wall of PCV were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) in mesenteric lymph nodes of rats. Individual endothelial cells of PCV in the lymph node did not have flat surface or were not typically cubic, but swelled at the central part assuming a foot ball-like shape. Circulating lymphocytes are considered to migrate into lymphatic tissues through the wall of PCV from the blood stream. Two hypotheses, inter-endothelial cell passage and intra-endothelial cell passage, have been proposed. The three-dimensional studies on lymphocytes passing the wall with SEM confirmed that migrating lymphocytes pushes their way through the intercellular space with pressing the adjoining endothelial cells from beginning to end, supporting the former hypothesis. Invasion of lymphocytes into endothelial cells were not observed.

  15. Determination of the sequence of intersecting lines using Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiye; Kim, MinJung; An, JinWook; Kim, Yunje

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to verify that the combination of focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) could be applied to determine the sequence of line crossings. The samples were transferred into FIB/SEM for FIB milling and an imaging operation. EDX was able to explore the chemical components and the corresponding elemental distribution in the intersection. The technique was successful in determining the sequence of heterogeneous line intersections produced using gel pens and red sealing ink with highest success rate (100% correctness). These observations show that the FIB/SEM was the appropriate instrument for an overall examination of document. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Weber, Charles F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bekar, Kursat B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  17. Advances in imaging and electron physics the scanning transmission electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.  This particular volume presents several timely articles on the scanning transmission electron microscope. Updated with contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts Discusses hot topic areas and presents current and future research trends Provides an invaluable reference and guide for physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

  18. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  19. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E.; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  20. A novel and compact nanoindentation device for in situ nanoindentation tests inside the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In situ nanomechanical tests provide a unique insight into mechanical behaviors of materials, such as fracture onset and crack propagation, shear band formation and so on. This paper presents a novel in situ nanoindentation device with dimensions of 103mm×74mm×60mm. Integrating the stepper motor, the piezoelectric actuator and the flexure hinge, the device can realize coarse adjustment of the specimen and precision loading and unloading of the indenter automatically. A novel indenter holder was designed to guarantee that the indenter penetrates into and withdraws from the specimen surface vertically. Closed-loop control of the indentation process was established to solve the problem of nonlinearity of the piezoelectric actuator and to enrich the loading modes. The in situ indentation test of Indium Phosphide (InP inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM was carried out and the experimental result indicates the feasibility of the developed device.

  1. Local electroporation of a single cell using a scanning ion conductance microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Futoshi; Yamazaki, Koji; Ishizaki, Kimihiro; Ushiki, Tatuo

    2014-03-01

    We developed a novel electroporation technique for molecular delivery into a single cell. A nanopipette, a thermally pulled glass capillary, is prepared as to act as a pair of tiny electrodes for single-cell electroporation. An Ag/AgCl wire is inserted into the nanopipette, and the outside edge of the nanopipette is coated by Ag sputtering. Electric pulses are applied between the outside and inside electrodes to form a local electric field at the edge of the nanopipette. To position the pipette edge in the vicinity of the cell membrane, we control the probe-surface distance using a scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM). The SICM technique achieves non-contact approach of the nanopipette edge on the cell membrane, which allows low-invasive electroporation of a single cell. As a demonstration of this technique, a fluorescent molecule of propidium iodide was successfully delivered into a single HeLa cell.

  2. Dose-rate-dependent damage of cerium dioxide in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C., E-mail: aaron.johnston-peck@nist.gov [Materials Measurement Lab, National Institute of Standards Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); DuChene, Joseph S.; Roberts, Alan D.; Wei, Wei David [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nanostructured Electronic Materials, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Herzing, Andrew A. [Materials Measurement Lab, National Institute of Standards Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Beam damage caused by energetic electrons in the transmission electron microscope is a fundamental constraint limiting the collection of artifact-free information. Through understanding the influence of the electron beam, experimental routines may be adjusted to improve the data collection process. Investigations of CeO{sub 2} indicate that there is not a critical dose required for the accumulation of electron beam damage. Instead, measurements using annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy demonstrate that the onset of measurable damage occurs when a critical dose rate is exceeded. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is that oxygen vacancies created by exposure to a 300 keV electron beam are actively annihilated as the sample re-oxidizes in the microscope environment. As a result, only when the rate of vacancy creation exceeds the recovery rate will beam damage begin to accumulate. This observation suggests that dose-intensive experiments can be accomplished without disrupting the native structure of the sample when executed using dose rates below the appropriate threshold. Furthermore, the presence of an encapsulating carbonaceous layer inhibits processes that cause beam damage, markedly increasing the dose rate threshold for the accumulation of damage. - Highlights: • Electron beam interactions introduce oxygen vacancies in CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. • ADF-STEM and EELS can track the reduction of CeO{sub 2}. • The reduced nanoparticles will oxidize in the microscope environment. • There is no critical dose for the accumulation of detectable damage. • The accumulation of detectable damage is dose rate dependent.

  3. Experimental evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopes at high chamber pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzek, H; Schroettner, H; Wagner, J; Hofer, F; Rattenberger, J

    2015-11-01

    In environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) high pressure applications have become increasingly important. Wet or biological samples can be investigated without time-consuming sample preparation and potential artefacts from this preparation can be neglected. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio strongly decreases with increasing chamber pressure. To evaluate the high pressure performance of ESEM and to compare different electron microscopes, information about spatial resolution and detector type is not enough. On the one hand, the scattering of the primary electron beam increases, which vanishes the contrast in images; and on the other hand, the secondary electrons (SE) signal amplification decreases. The stagnation gas thickness (effective distance the beam has to travel through the imaging gas) as well as the SE detection system depend on the microscope and for a complete and serious evaluation of an ESEM or low vacuum SEM it is necessary to specify these two parameters. A method is presented to determine the fraction of scattered and unscattered electrons and to calculate the stagnation gas thickness (θ). To evaluate the high pressure performance of the SE detection system, a method is presented that allows for an analysis of a single image and the calculation of the signal-to-noise ratio of this image. All investigations are performed on an FEI ESEM Quanta 600 (field emission gun) and an FEI ESEM Quanta 200 (thermionic gun). These methods and measurements should represent opportunities for evaluating the high pressure performance of an ESEM. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi, E-mail: hinishiy@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Koizumi, Mitsuru, E-mail: koizumi@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Ogawa, Koji, E-mail: kogawa@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Kitamura, Shinich, E-mail: kitamura@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Konyuba, Yuji, E-mail: ykonyuub@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: watanabeyoshiy@pref.yamagata.jp [Yamagata Research Institute of Technology, 2-2-1, Matsuei, Yamagata 990-2473 (Japan); Ohbayashi, Norihiko, E-mail: n.ohbayashi@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsunori, E-mail: nori@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo, E-mail: msuga@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-4, Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control.

  5. Terrestrial laser scanning in monitoring of anthropogenic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaczek-Peplinska, Janina; Kowalska, Maria

    2017-12-01

    The registered xyz coordinates in the form of a point cloud captured by terrestrial laser scanner and the intensity values (I) assigned to them make it possible to perform geometric and spectral analyses. Comparison of point clouds registered in different time periods requires conversion of the data to a common coordinate system and proper data selection is necessary. Factors like point distribution dependant on the distance between the scanner and the surveyed surface, angle of incidence, tasked scan's density and intensity value have to be taken into consideration. A prerequisite for running a correct analysis of the obtained point clouds registered during periodic measurements using a laser scanner is the ability to determine the quality and accuracy of the analysed data. The article presents a concept of spectral data adjustment based on geometric analysis of a surface as well as examples of geometric analyses integrating geometric and physical data in one cloud of points: cloud point coordinates, recorded intensity values, and thermal images of an object. The experiments described here show multiple possibilities of usage of terrestrial laser scanning data and display the necessity of using multi-aspect and multi-source analyses in anthropogenic object monitoring. The article presents examples of multisource data analyses with regard to Intensity value correction due to the beam's incidence angle. The measurements were performed using a Leica Nova MS50 scanning total station, Z+F Imager 5010 scanner and the integrated Z+F T-Cam thermal camera.

  6. Interferometer-controlled soft X-ray scanning photoemission microscope at SOLEIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, José; Razado-Colambo, Ivy; Lorcy, Stephane; Giorgetta, Jean-Luc; Polack, François; Asensio, Maria C.

    2013-03-01

    ANTARES beamline (BL), a new soft X-ray scanning photoemission microscope located at the SOLEIL synchrotron storage ring has been recently designed, built and commissioned. The implemented interferometer control allows the accurate measurement of the transverse position of the Fresnel zone plate (FZP) relative to the sample. An effective sample position feedback has been achieved during experiments in static mode, with a fixed FZP position required to perform nano Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (Nano-ARPES) measurements. Likewise, long-term stability has been attained for the FZP position relative to the sample during the translation of the FZP when performing typical X-ray absorption experiments around the absorption edges of light elements. Moreover, a fully automatic feedback digital control of the interferometric system provides extremely low orthogonal distortion of the recorded two-dimensional images. The microscope is diffraction limited with the resolution set to several tens of nanometers by the quality of the zone plates. Details on the design of the interferometric system and a brief description of the first commissioning results are presented here.

  7. TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING IN MONITORING OF HYDROTECHNICAL OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Zaczek-Peplinska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing Terrestrial Laser Scanning technology is provided by modern measuring instruments, i.e. total stations and laser scanners. Owing to these instruments, periodic control measurements of concrete dams carried out as a part of geodetic surveying provide point models characterised by quasi-continuity. Basing on the results of these surveys, it is possible to conduct a number of geometric analyses, as well as to obtain information for detailed analytic and calculative deliberations. A scanner, similarly to a total station, determines spatial coordinates (X, Y, Z of the surveyed points by identifying distances and angles. Registration of intensity of the reflected laser beam (Intensity sent out by the scanner provides additional information on the surveyed object. Thanks to high working speed and a large amount of collected data, scanners have become an essential tool for a geodesist.This paper evaluates the possibility of applying Terrestrial Laser Scanning to test deformations and shifts of flagged points of concrete dam construction based on experimental measurements, including object inventory and evaluation of the dam’s concrete structure condition.

  8. Categorisation of full waveform data provided by laser scanning devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Andreas; Pfennigbauer, Martin

    2011-11-01

    In 2004, a laser scanner device for commercial airborne laser scanning applications, the RIEGL LMS-Q560, was introduced to the market, making use of a radical alternative approach to the traditional analogue signal detection and processing schemes found in LIDAR instruments so far: digitizing the echo signals received by the instrument for every laser pulse and analysing these echo signals off-line in a so-called full waveform analysis in order to retrieve almost all information contained in the echo signal using transparent algorithms adaptable to specific applications. In the field of laser scanning the somewhat unspecific term "full waveform data" has since been established. We attempt a categorisation of the different types of the full waveform data found in the market. We discuss the challenges in echo digitization and waveform analysis from an instrument designer's point of view and we will address the benefits to be gained by using this technique, especially with respect to the so-called multi-target capability of pulsed time-of-flight LIDAR instruments.

  9. Three-dimensional phase-contrast X-ray microtomography with scanning-imaging X-ray microscope optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomographic micro-imaging system has been developed. The optical system is based on a scanning-imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) optics, which is a hybrid system consisting of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. In the SIXM system, each 1D dataset of a two-dimensional (2D) image is recorded independently. An object is illuminated with a line-focused beam. Positional information of the region illuminated by the line-focused beam is recorded with the 1D imaging microscope optics as line-profile data. By scanning the object with the line focus, 2D image data are obtained. In the same manner as for a scanning microscope optics with a multi-pixel detector, imaging modes such as phase contrast and absorption contrast can be arbitrarily configured after the image data acquisition. By combining a tomographic scan method and the SIXM system, quantitative 3D imaging is performed. Results of a feasibility study of the SIXM for 3D imaging are shown.

  10. Imaging hyphal growth of Physisporinus vitreus in Norway spruce wood by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)

    OpenAIRE

    Schubert, Mark; Stührk, Chris; Fuhr, Matthias J.; Schwarze, Francis W.M.R.

    2017-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy are the most common methods for analyzing wood-decay fungi. However, the 3D visualization and quantification of the filamentous structure of fungi in wood is difficult to realize by means of these traditional techniques. In the present work, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was further developed for the quantitative imaging of the 3D microscopic hyphal growth of Physisporinus vitreus, a versatile fungus for engineering value-added wood product...

  11. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and processing parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    Selective laser melting is yet to become a standardized industrial manufacturing technique. The process continues to suffer from defects such as distortions, residual stresses, localized deformations and warpage caused primarily due to the localized heating, rapid cooling and high temperature...... gradients that occur during the process. While process monitoring and control of selective laser melting is an active area of research, establishing the reliability and robustness of the process still remains a challenge.In this paper, a methodology for generating reliable, optimized scanning paths...... and process parameters for selective laser melting of a standard sample is introduced. The processing of the sample is simulated by sequentially coupling a calibrated 3D pseudo-analytical thermal model with a 3D finite element mechanical model.The optimized processing parameters are subjected to a Monte Carlo...

  12. Ta Keo Temple Reconstruction Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ta Keo temple is one of the very famous temple complex of Angkor Wat in northwestern Cambodia. It has been suffering massive collapse and other serious damages in recent years. Nowadays, Terrestrial Laser Scanning(TLS technology is considered as a wellestablished resource for heritage documentation and protection (Lerma et al, 2008; Reshetyuk, 2009. This paper used TLS to reconstruct Ta Keo Temple. Firstly, we acquired 71 scanning stations of points cloud data with high density and high accuracy, and over one thousand images with high spatial resolution about the temple. Secondly, the raw points cloud data were denoised, reduced and managed efficiently, and registrated using an adjusted ICP algorithm. Thirdly, a triangulation method was used to model most objects. At last, we mapped the texture data into the digital model and a 3-D model of Ta Keo with high accuracy was achieved. The authors focus on large object reconstruction by TLS technology, and pay much attention to the scanning design, multi-station data and the whole project’s data registration, and texture mapping and so on. The research result will be useful for Ta Keo restoration, reconstruction and protection. Also, it is a good reference source for large complex buildings reconstruction when using terrestrial laser scanning technology.

  13. Imaging optical fields below metal films and metal-dielectric waveguides by a scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liangfu; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Ruxue; Qiu, Dong; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Rosenfeld, Mary; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2017-09-01

    Laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy (LSCM) is now an important method for tissue and cell imaging when the samples are located on the surfaces of glass slides. In the past decade, there has been extensive development of nano-optical structures that display unique effects on incident and transmitted light, which will be used with novel configurations for medical and consumer products. For these applications, it is necessary to characterize the light distribution within short distances from the structures for efficient detection and elimination of bulky optical components. These devices will minimize or possibly eliminate the need for free-space light propagation outside of the device itself. We describe the use of the scanning function of a LSCM to obtain 3D images of the light intensities below the surface of nano-optical structures. More specifically, we image the spatial distributions inside the substrate of fluorescence emission coupled to waveguide modes after it leaks through thin metal films or dielectric-coated metal films. The observed spatial distribution were in general agreement with far-field calculations, but the scanning images also revealed light intensities at angles not observed with classical back focal plane imaging. Knowledge of the subsurface optical intensities will be crucial in the combination of nano-optical structures with rapidly evolving imaging detectors.

  14. Tip-enhanced near-field Raman spectroscopy with a scanning tunneling microscope and side-illumination optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, K J; He, X N; Zhou, Y S; Xiong, W; Lu, Y F

    2008-07-01

    Conventional Raman spectroscopy (RS) suffers from low spatial resolution and low detection sensitivity due to the optical diffraction limit and small interaction cross sections. It has been reported that a highly localized and significantly enhanced electromagnetic field could be generated in the proximity of a metallic tip illuminated by a laser beam. In this study, a tip-enhanced RS system was developed to both improve the resolution and enhance the detection sensitivity using the tip-enhanced near-field effects. This instrument, by combining RS with a scanning tunneling microscope and side-illumination optics, demonstrated significant enhancement on both optical sensitivity and spatial resolution using either silver (Ag)-coated tungsten (W) tips or gold (Au) tips. The sensitivity improvement was verified by observing the enhancement effects on silicon (Si) substrates. Lateral resolution was verified to be below 100 nm by mapping Ag nanostructures. By deploying the depolarization technique, an apparent enhancement of 175% on Si substrates was achieved. Furthermore, the developed instrument features fast and reliable optical alignment, versatile sample adaptability, and effective suppression of far-field signals.

  15. Comparison of tissue damage caused by various laser systems with tissue tolerable plasma by light and laser scan microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersee, Staffan; Lademann, Jürgen; Richter, Heike; Patzelt, Alexa; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) represents a novel therapeutic method with promising capabilities in the field of dermatological interventions, in particular disinfection but also wound antisepsis and regeneration. The energy transfer by plasma into living tissue is not easily educible, as a variety of features such as the medium’s actual molecule-stream, the ions, electrons and free radicals involved, as well as the emission of ultraviolet, visible and infrared light contribute to its increasingly well characterized effects. Thus, relating possible adversary effects, especially of prolonged exposure to a single component of the plasma’s mode of action, is difficult. Until now, severe adverse events connected to plasma exposure have not been reported when conducted according to existing therapeutic protocols. In this study, we have compared the tissue damage-potential of CO2 and dye lasers with TTP in a porcine model. After exposure of pig ear skin to the three treatment modalities, all specimens were examined histologically and by means of laser scan microscopy (LSM). Light microscopical tissue damage could only be shown in the case of the CO2 laser, whereas dye laser and plasma treatment resulted in no detectable impairment of the specimens. In the case of TTP, LSM examination revealed only an impairment of the uppermost corneal layers of the skin, thus stressing its safety when used in vivo.

  16. Contrast and decay of cathodoluminescence from phosphor particles in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Engelsen, Daniel; Harris, Paul G; Ireland, Terry G; Fern, George R; Silver, Jack

    2015-10-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies are reported on phosphors in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). ZnO: Zn and other luminescent powders manifest a bright ring around the periphery of the particles: this ring enhances the contrast. Additionally, particles resting on top of others are substantially brighter than underlying ones. These phenomena are explained in terms of the combined effects of electrons backscattered out of the particles, together with light absorption by the substrate. The contrast is found to be a function of the particle size and the energy of the primary electrons. Some phosphor materials exhibit a pronounced comet-like structure at high scan rates in a CL-image, because the particle continues to emit light after the electron beam has moved to a position without phosphor material. Image analysis has been used to study the loss of brightness along the tail and hence to determine the decay time of the materials. The effect of phosphor saturation on the determination of decay times by CL-microscopy was also investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Examination of Scanning Electron Microscope and Computed Tomography Images of PICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Shklover, Valery

    2010-01-01

    Micrographs of PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) taken using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D images taken with a Computed Tomography (CT) system are examined. PICA is a carbon fiber based composite (Fiberform ) with a phenolic polymer matrix. The micrographs are taken at different surface depths and at different magnifications in a sample after arc jet testing and show different levels of oxidative removal of the charred matrix (Figs 1 though 13). CT scans, courtesy of Xradia, Inc. of Concord CA, were captured for samples of virgin PICA, charred PICA and raw Fiberform (Fig. 14). We use these images to calculate the thermal conductivity (TC) of these materials using correlation function (CF) methods. CF methods give a mathematical description of how one material is embedded in another and is thus ideally suited for modeling composites like PICA. We will evaluate how the TC of the materials changes as a function of surface depth. This work is in collaboration with ETH-Zurich, which has expertise in high temperature materials and TC modeling (including CF methods).

  18. Autoregressive linear least square single scanning electron microscope image signal-to-noise ratio estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kok Swee; NorHisham, Syafiq

    2016-11-01

    A technique based on linear Least Squares Regression (LSR) model is applied to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. In order to test the accuracy of this technique on SNR estimation, a number of SEM images are initially corrupted with white noise. The autocorrelation function (ACF) of the original and the corrupted SEM images are formed to serve as the reference point to estimate the SNR value of the corrupted image. The LSR technique is then compared with the previous three existing techniques known as nearest neighbourhood, first-order interpolation, and the combination of both nearest neighborhood and first-order interpolation. The actual and the estimated SNR values of all these techniques are then calculated for comparison purpose. It is shown that the LSR technique is able to attain the highest accuracy compared to the other three existing techniques as the absolute difference between the actual and the estimated SNR value is relatively small. SCANNING 38:771-782, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Development of a shear-force scanning near-field cathodoluminescence microscope for characterization of nanostructures' optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercu, N B; Troyon, M; Molinari, M

    2016-09-01

    An original scanning near-field cathodoluminescence microscope for nanostructure characterization has been developed and successfully tested. By using a bimorph piezoelectric stack both as actuator and detector, the developed setup constitutes a real improvement compared to previously reported SEM-based solutions. The technique combines a scanning probe and a scanning electron microscope in order to simultaneously offer near-field cathodoluminescence and topographic images of the sample. Share-force topography and cathodoluminescence measurements on GaN, SiC and ZnO nanostructures using the developed setup are presented showing a nanometric resolution in both topography and cathodoluminescence images with increased sensitivity compared to classical luminescence techniques. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Laser cutting of irregular shape object based on stereo vision laser galvanometric scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Shun; Tang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Huan; Zhang, Xuping

    2015-05-01

    Irregular shape objects with different 3-dimensional (3D) appearances are difficult to be shaped into customized uniform pattern by current laser machining approaches. A laser galvanometric scanning system (LGS) could be a potential candidate since it can easily achieve path-adjustable laser shaping. However, without knowing the actual 3D topography of the object, the processing result may still suffer from 3D shape distortion. It is desirable to have a versatile auxiliary tool that is capable of generating 3D-adjusted laser processing path by measuring the 3D geometry of those irregular shape objects. This paper proposed the stereo vision laser galvanometric scanning system (SLGS), which takes the advantages of both the stereo vision solution and conventional LGS system. The 3D geometry of the object obtained by the stereo cameras is used to guide the scanning galvanometers for 3D-shape-adjusted laser processing. In order to achieve precise visual-servoed laser fabrication, these two independent components are integrated through a system calibration method using plastic thin film target. The flexibility of SLGS has been experimentally demonstrated by cutting duck feathers for badminton shuttle manufacture.

  1. An Airborne Scanning Laser Altimetry Survey of Long Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofton, M. A.; Blair, J. B.; Minster, J.-B.; Ridgway, J. R.; Williams, N. P.; Bufton, J. L.; Rabine, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Between 28 September and 7 October 1995, we conducted an airborne laser altimetry experiment over the Long Valley caldera, California, in which each of two scanning laser altimeters (dubbed SLICER and RASCAL) were flown in a NASA T-39 jet aircraft. Operating concurrently were a Global Positioning System (GPS) guidance system and dual frequency receivers for precise navigation and post-flight calculation or the airplane trajectory relative to a ground station, and an inertial navigation system (INS) for attitude determination. Reduction of raw laser ranges requires merging the differential kinematic GPS aircraft trajectory and the INS data with the laser data, and determination of the atmospheric delay. Data geolocation consists of obtaining the centre location and the mean elevation within each footprint in a geodetic coordinate system. The elevation of Crowley Lake is recovered to an accuracy of approximately 3 cm or better from 3 km above ground level and crossover analysis indicates that the elevation estimates are consistent from pass to pass. We test our geolocation procedures by comparing laser-derived elevations with those determined in situ for recognizable ground features. A comparison of laser and GPS-derived positions shows that the horizontal accuracy is better than the diameter of the footprint and vertical accuracy is within the error inherent in the range measurement. A comparison of SLICER elevation data with digital elevation models (DEMs) of the region shows that the DEM data provides surface topography to within stated accuracy limits. Although research continues to utilize the full potential of laser altimetry data, our results constitute a successful demonstration that the technique may be used to perform geodetic monitoring of surface topographic changes.

  2. Comparison of solar and laser macula retinal injury using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Harry; Gagliano, Donald A.; Stuck, Bruce E.; Lund, David J.

    1994-07-01

    Both solar and laser sources may induce punctate foveal retinal damage. Unprotected viewing of the sun or bright blue sky represent potential solar radiation causes of photic maculopathy that may induce punctate foveal damage. Laser induced macular retinal damage is another more recent kind of photic maculopathy. Most documented cases of laser photic maculopathy have involved acute laser exposure generally from Q-switched visible or nonvisible near IR laser systems. In our comparison of these types of photic maculopathies, we have employed conventional as well as spectral and confocal scanning laser ophthalomoscopy to evaluate the depth of the photic maculopathy. Functionally, we have observed a tritan color vision loss present in nearly all photic maculopathies.

  3. High Heat Flux Interactions and Tritium Removal from Plasma Facing Components by a Scanning Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein

    2002-01-28

    A new technique for studying high heat flux interactions with plasma facing components is presented. The beam from a continuous wave 300 W neodymium laser was focused to 80 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the surface of carbon tiles. These tiles were previously used in the TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] inner limiter and have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was codeposited during plasma operations. Laser scanning released up to 84% of the codeposited tritium. The temperature rise of the codeposit on the tiles was significantly higher than that of the manufactured material. In one experiment, the codeposit surface temperature rose to 1,770 C while for the same conditions, the manufactured surface increased to only 1,080 C. The peak temperature did not follow the usual square-root dependence on heat pulse duration. Durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, while a duration of approximately 10 ms showed minimal change. A digital microscope imaged the codeposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed hot spots on a 100-micron scale. These results will be compared to analytic modeling and are relevant to the response of plasma facing components to disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) in next-step magnetic fusion devices.

  4. Codification of scan path parameters and development of perimeter scan strategies for 3D bowl-shaped laser forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, A.; Naeini, H. Moslemi; Roohi, Amir H.; Gollo, M. Hoseinpour; Shahabad, Sh. Imani

    2018-01-01

    In the 3D laser forming process, developing an appropriate laser scan pattern for producing specimens with high quality and uniformity is critical. This study presents certain principles for developing scan paths. Seven scan path parameters are considered, including: (1) combined linear or curved path; (2) type of combined linear path; (3) order of scan sequences; (4) the position of the start point in each scan; (5) continuous or discontinuous scan path; (6) direction of scan path; and (7) angular arrangement of combined linear scan paths. Regarding these path parameters, ten combined linear scan patterns are presented. Numerical simulations show continuous hexagonal, scan pattern, scanning from outer to inner path, is the optimized. In addition, it is observed the position of the start point and the angular arrangement of scan paths is the most effective path parameters. Also, further experimentations show four sequences due to creat symmetric condition enhance the height of the bowl-shaped products and uniformity. Finally, the optimized hexagonal pattern was compared with the similar circular one. In the hexagonal scan path, distortion value and standard deviation rather to edge height of formed specimen is very low, and the edge height despite of decreasing length of scan path increases significantly compared to the circular scan path. As a result, four-sequence hexagonal scan pattern is proposed as the optimized perimeter scan path to produce bowl-shaped product.

  5. Laser processing of materials based on microscopic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Richard F.

    2012-07-01

    Laser processing of materials has achieved significant successes in such areas as pulsed laser deposition, micro-and nanostructuring and surface modification and analysis. However, materials synthesis, fabrication and process monitoring with atomic and molecular specificity at the micro-and nanoscale is just now on the horizon. If the grand challenges attendant to those objectives were met, one could fairly conceive of photonic fabrication systems with important similarities to those of the semiconductor industry while enlarging the palette of materials that could be built, assembled and fabricated using the unique electronic and vibrational interactions of light with matter. This paper discusses the possibilities for meeting some of these grand challenges, starting from selected examples of novel approaches to laser-materials interactions across a range of wavelengths, pulse durations, intensities, and pulse-sequencing strategies. The implications for the design of new lasers and new materials-processing strategies are considered.

  6. Globally consistent registration of terrestrial laser scans via graph optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, Pascal Willy; Wegner, Jan Dirk; Schindler, Konrad

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present a framework for the automatic registration of multiple terrestrial laser scans. The proposed method can handle arbitrary point clouds with reasonable pairwise overlap, without knowledge about their initial orientation and without the need for artificial markers or other specific objects. The framework is divided into a coarse and a fine registration part, which each start with pairwise registration and then enforce consistent global alignment across all scans. While we put forward a complete, functional registration system, the novel contribution of the paper lies in the coarse global alignment step. Merging multiple scans into a consistent network creates loops along which the relative transformations must add up. We pose the task of finding a global alignment as picking the best candidates from a set of putative pairwise registrations, such that they satisfy the loop constraints. This yields a discrete optimization problem that can be solved efficiently with modern combinatorial methods. Having found a coarse global alignment in this way, the framework proceeds by pairwise refinement with standard ICP, followed by global refinement to evenly spread the residual errors. The framework was tested on six challenging, real-world datasets. The discrete global alignment step effectively detects, removes and corrects failures of the pairwise registration procedure, finally producing a globally consistent coarse scan network which can be used as initial guess for the highly non-convex refinement. Our overall system reaches success rates close to 100% at acceptable runtimes < 1 h, even in challenging conditions such as scanning in the forest.

  7. Multi-photon microscope driven by novel green laser pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marti, Dominik; Djurhuus, Martin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2016-01-01

    system. However, translation is hindered due to the high cost, high training demand and large footprint of a standard setup. We show in this article that minification of the setup, while also reducing cost and complexity, is indeed possible without compromising on image quality, by using a novel diode...... laser replacing the commonly used conventional solid state laser as the pump for the femtosecond system driving the imaging....

  8. The Registration and Segmentation of Heterogeneous Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Durgham, Mohannad M.

    Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) mapping has been emerging over the past few years as a mainstream tool for the dense acquisition of three dimensional point data. Besides the conventional mapping missions, LiDAR systems have proven to be very useful for a wide spectrum of applications such as forestry, structural deformation analysis, urban mapping, and reverse engineering. The wide application scope of LiDAR lead to the development of many laser scanning technologies that are mountable on multiple platforms (i.e., airborne, mobile terrestrial, and tripod mounted), this caused variations in the characteristics and quality of the generated point clouds. As a result of the increased popularity and diversity of laser scanners, one should address the heterogeneous LiDAR data post processing (i.e., registration and segmentation) problems adequately. Current LiDAR integration techniques do not take into account the varying nature of laser scans originating from various platforms. In this dissertation, the author proposes a methodology designed particularly for the registration and segmentation of heterogeneous LiDAR data. A data characterization and filtering step is proposed to populate the points' attributes and remove non-planar LiDAR points. Then, a modified version of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP), denoted by the Iterative Closest Projected Point (ICPP) is designed for the registration of heterogeneous scans to remove any misalignments between overlapping strips. Next, a region-growing-based heterogeneous segmentation algorithm is developed to ensure the proper extraction of planar segments from the point clouds. Validation experiments show that the proposed heterogeneous registration can successfully align airborne and terrestrial datasets despite the great differences in their point density and their noise level. In addition, similar testes have been conducted to examine the heterogeneous segmentation and it is shown that one is able to identify common

  9. Measurement of focused ultrasonic fields using a scanning laser vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuebing; Tyrer, John; Zhihong, Ping; Shiquan, Wang

    2007-05-01

    With the development of optical techniques, scanning laser vibrometers have been applied successfully in measuring particle velocities and distributions in ultrasonic fields. In this paper, to develop the optical interferometry in measuring focused fields with small amplitude, the "effective" refractive index used for plane waves and extended for spherical waves is presented, the piezo-optic effect as a function of the incident angle of the laser beam is simulated, and the ultrasonic field produced by a concave spherical transducer is calculated numerically around its focal region. To verify the feasibility of the optical method in detecting focused ultrasonic fields, a measurement system was set up that utilized both a scanning laser vibrometer and a membrane hydrophone. Measurements were made in different zones of a focusing transducer, and good results were acquired from the optical interferometry in regions where acoustic waves travel in plane form or spherical form. The data obtained from the optical method are used to reconstruct acoustic fields, and it is found that the focal plane, the maximum pressure, and the beamwidth of the transducer can be forecasted accurately.

  10. LAND-BASED MOBILE LASER SCANNING SYSTEMS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Puente

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile mapping has been using various photogrammetric techniques for many years. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of mobile mapping systems using laser scanners available in the market, partially because of the improvement in GNSS/INS performance for direct georeferencing. In this article, some of the most important land-based mobile laser scanning (MLS systems are reviewed. Firstly, the main characteristics of MLS systems vs. airborne (ALS and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS systems are compared. Secondly, a short overview of the mobile mapping technology is also provided so that the reader can fully grasp the complexity and operation of these devices. As we put forward in this paper, a comparison of different systems is briefly carried out regarding specifications provided by the manufacturers. Focuses on the current research are also addressed with emphasis on the practical applications of these systems. Most of them have been utilized for data collection on road infrastructures or building façades. This article shows that MLS technology is nowadays well established and proven, since the demand has grown to the point that there are several systems suppliers offering their products to satisfy this particular market.

  11. SEMI - AUTOMATED BUILDING E XTRACTION FROM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjasiewicz Marcin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main idea of this project is to introduce a conception of semi - automated method for building model extraction from Airborne Laser Scanning data. The presented method is based on the RANSAC algorithm, which provides automatic collection planes for roofs model creation. In the case of Airborne Laser Scanning, the algorithm can process point clouds influenced with noise and erroneous measurement (gross errors. The RANSAC algorithm is based on the iterative processing of a set of points in order to estimate the geometric model. Research of u sing algorithm for ALS data was performed in available Cloud Compare and SketchUP software. An important aspect in this research was algorithm parameters selection, which was made on the basis of characteristics of point cloud and scanned objects. Analysis showed that the accuracy of plane extraction with RANSAC algorithm does not exceed 20 centimeters for point clouds of density 4 pts . /m 2 . RANSAC can be successfully used in buildings modelling based on ALS data. Roofs created by the presented method could be used in visualizations on a much better level than Level of Detail 2 by CityGML standard. If model is textured it can represent LoD3 standard.

  12. Optical video projection using laser beam scanning technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynick, Tony J.

    1993-12-01

    Various techniques are currently used to project video images. One of these, described in a previous paper by the author, operates by mechanical scanning of a laser beam with acousto- optic modulation, and has been proven suitable for high definition television and computer display scan rates by use of novel electronic and optical compensation methods. The requirement for improved image intensity with greater efficiency has led to a re-appraisal of the selection of the light source and the relationship between the light source, the form of the modulator, and the method of scanning. The electrical input to visible radiation output ratio of the Argon-ion lasers currently used in the projector shows efficiency to be as low as 0.001%, a factor limiting the commercial exploitation of the projector. Recent developments in acousto- optics can be applied to the projector's optical system allowing alternative light sources to be used. These help to reduce the complexity of both the optical and signal processing stages as well as improve efficiency.

  13. Impact of multiple sub-melt laser scans on the activation and diffusion of shallow Boron junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosseel, E.; Vandervorst, W.; Clarysse, T.

    2008-01-01

    Sub-melt laser annealing is a promising technique to achieve the required sheet resistance and junction depth specifications for the 32 nm technology node and beyond. In order to obtain a production worthy process with minimal sheet resistance variation at a macroscopic and microscopic level...... of different implantation and anneal parameters will be explored. It turns out that the observed sheet resistance decrease with increasing number of laser scans is caused on one hand by a temperature dependent increase of the activation level, and on the other hand, by a non-negligible temperature......, careful process optimization is required. While macroscopic variations can easily be addressed using the proper spatial power compensation it is more difficult to completely eliminate the micro scale non-uniformity which is intimately linked to the laser beam profile, the amount of overlaps and the scan...

  14. Method for determining a spring constant for a deformable scanning probe microscope element, and scanning probe microscope and calibration device arranged for determining a spring constant for a probe element

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghian, H.; Yang, C.K.; Bossche, A.; French, P.J.; Goosen, J.F.L.; Van Keulen, A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for determining a spring constant k for a deformable probe element (102) of a scanning probe microscope SPM (100). The probe (102) has an outer surface area consisting of a tip area (112) on a first probe side (108) and a tip-less area (113). The probe (102) also has a probe electrode (114)

  15. Quantitative imaging of graphene impedance with the near-field scanning microwave microscope.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalugin, Nikolai G. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Gonzales, Edward; Kalichava, Irakli (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Gin, Aaron V.; Wickey, Lee (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Del Barga, Christopher (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Talanov, Vladimir V. (Neocera, LLC, Beltsville, MD); Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2010-07-01

    Graphene has emerged as a promising material for high speed nano-electronics due to the relatively high carrier mobility that can be achieved. To further investigate electronic transport in graphene and reveal its potential for microwave applications, we employed a near-field scanning microwave microscope with the probe formed by an electrically open end of a 4 GHz half-lambda parallel-strip transmission line resonator. Because of the balanced probe geometry, our microscope allows for truly localized quantitative characterization of various bulk and low-dimensional materials, with the response region defined by the one micron spacing between the two metallic strips at the probe tip. The single- and few-layer graphene flakes were fabricated by a mechanical cleavage method on 300-nm-thick silicon dioxide grown on low resistivity Si wafer. The flake thickness was determined using both AFM and Raman microscopies. We observe clear correlation between the near-field microwave and far-field optical images of graphene produced by the probe resonant frequency shift and thickness-defined color gradation, respectively. We show that the microwave response of graphene flakes is determined by the local sheet impedance, which is found to be predominantly active. Furthermore, we apply a quantitative electrodynamic model relating the probe resonant frequency shift to 2D conductivity of single- and few-layer graphene. From fitting a model to the experimental data we evaluate graphene sheet resistance as a function of thickness. Near-field scanning microwave microscopy can simultaneously image location, geometry, thickness, and distribution of electrical properties of graphene without a need for device fabrication. The approach may be useful for design of graphene-based microwave transistors, quality control of large area graphene sheets, or investigation of chemical and electrical doping effects on graphene transport properties. We acknowledge support from the DOE Center for

  16. Road Orthophoto/dtm Generation from Mobile Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, B.; Papelard, J.-P.

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a pipeline to produce road orthophoto and DTM from Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS). For the ortho, modern laser scanners provide a reflectance information allowing for high quality grayscale images, at a much finer resolution than aerial photography can offer. For DTM, MLS offers a much higher accuracy and density than aerial products. This increased precision and resolution leverages new applications for both ortho and DEM. The first task is to filter ground vs non ground, then an interpolation is conducted to build image tiles from the filtered points. Finally, multiple layers are registered and blended to allow for seamless fusion. Our proposed approach achieves high quality products and scaling up is demonstrated.

  17. Evaluation of blood cell attachment on Er: YAG laser applied root surface using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekici, Ali; Maden, Ilay; Yildiz, Sercan; San, Tangul; Isik, Gulden

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is dependent on the uninterrupted adhesion, maturation and absorption of fibrin clots to a periodontally compromised root surface. The modification of the root surface with different agents has been used for better fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment. It is known that Er:YAG laser application on dentin removes the smear layer succesfully. The aim of this study is to observe blood cell attachment and fibrin network formation following ER:YAG laser irradiation on periodontally compromised root surfaces in comparison to chemical root conditioning techniques in vitro. 40 dentin blocks prepared from freshly extracted periodontally compromised hopeless teeth. Specimens were divided in 5 groups; those applied with PBS, EDTA, Citric acid and Er:YAG. They were further divided into two groups: those which had received these applications, and the control group. The specimens were evaluated with scanning electron microscope and micrographs were taken. Smear layer and blood cell attachment scoring was performed. In the Er:YAG laser applied group, smear layer were totally removed. In the blood applied specimens, better fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment were observed in the Er:YAG group. In the group that had been applied with citric acid, the smear layer was also removed. The smear layer could not be fully removed in the EDTA group. Er:YAG laser application on the root dentin seems to form a suitable surface for fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment. Further clinical studies to support these results are necessitated.

  18. Membrane Vibration Studies Using a Scanning Laser Vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, James L.; Solter, Micah J.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes on-going experimental work at NASA Langley Research Center to measure the dynamics of a 1.016 m (40 in.) square polyimide film Kapton membrane. A fixed fully automated impact hammer and Polytec PSV-300-H scanning laser vibrometer were used for non-contact modal testing of the membrane with zero-mass-loading. The paper discusses the results obtained by testing the membrane at various tension levels and at various excitation locations. Results obtained by direct shaker excitation to the membrane are also discussed.

  19. Quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukojevic, Vladana; Heidkamp, Marcus; Ming, Yu; Johansson, Björn; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf

    2008-11-25

    A new approach to quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is presented. It relies on fluorescence intensity distribution to analyze the molecular occurrence statistics captured by digital imaging and enables direct determination of the number of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion rates without resorting to temporal or spatial autocorrelation analyses. Digital images of fluorescent molecules were recorded by using fast scanning and avalanche photodiode detectors. In this way the signal-to-background ratio was significantly improved, enabling direct quantitative imaging by CLSM. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using standard solutions of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules, quantum dots, and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein in solution and in live cells. The method was verified by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The relevance for biological applications, in particular, for live cell imaging, is discussed.

  20. Performance assessment of methods for estimation of fractal dimension from scanning electron microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risović, Dubravko; Pavlović, Zivko

    2013-01-01

    Processing of gray scale images in order to determine the corresponding fractal dimension is very important due to widespread use of imaging technologies and application of fractal analysis in many areas of science, technology, and medicine. To this end, many methods for estimation of fractal dimension from gray scale images have been developed and routinely used. Unfortunately different methods (dimension estimators) often yield significantly different results in a manner that makes interpretation difficult. Here, we report results of comparative assessment of performance of several most frequently used algorithms/methods for estimation of fractal dimension. To that purpose, we have used scanning electron microscope images of aluminum oxide surfaces with different fractal dimensions. The performance of algorithms/methods was evaluated using the statistical Z-score approach. The differences between performances of six various methods are discussed and further compared with results obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on the same samples. The analysis of results shows that the performance of investigated algorithms varies considerably and that systematically erroneous fractal dimensions could be estimated using certain methods. The differential cube counting, triangulation, and box counting algorithms showed satisfactory performance in the whole investigated range of fractal dimensions. Difference statistic is proved to be less reliable generating 4% of unsatisfactory results. The performances of the Power spectrum, Partitioning and EIS were unsatisfactory in 29%, 38%, and 75% of estimations, respectively. The results of this study should be useful and provide guidelines to researchers using/attempting fractal analysis of images obtained by scanning microscopy or atomic force microscopy. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Interfacial structure of poly-{alpha}-olefin laminate by using scanning thermal microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotera, Masaru, E-mail: kotera@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Rokko, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Urushihara, Yoshimasa [Hyogo Science and Technology Association, Kouto, Shingu, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Izumo, Daiki; Nishino, Takashi [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Rokko, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2012-03-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial structure of laminated PE/PP film was investigated by SThM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatial resolution of SThM technique was estimated to be 1.5 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-contrast image of apparent thermal conductivity could be observed at the interfacial region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial thickness, which depends on the thermal treatment of the laminate film, was estimated to be in micrometer order. - Abstract: The interfacial structure of laminated poly-{alpha}-olefin, polyethylene (PE)/polypropylene (PP), film was investigated by scanning thermal microscope (SThM). Spatial resolution of this technique was estimated as 1.5 {mu}m. Notwithstanding the flatness of the sample as observed in the height image of an atomic force micrograph, micro-thermomechanical analysis could distinguish each polymer. By scanning the thermal probe at isothermal temperature over a cross-section of the laminate film, a high-contrast image of apparent thermal conductivity at the interfacial region was obtained. The interfacial thickness was estimated to be in the micrometer order depending on the thermal treatment of the laminate film. This result coincides with the results of synchrotron X-ray microbeam diffraction. Moreover, the peel strength of the PE/PP laminate was considered to be influenced by the interfacial thickness. It is concluded that this proposed thermal-probe method is as a powerful tool for investigating the interfacial region of the polymer composites.

  2. Combined laser and atomic force microscope lithography on aluminum: Mask fabrication for nanoelectromechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Boisen, Anja; Davis, Zachary James

    1999-01-01

    A direct-write laser system and an atomic force microscope (AFM) are combined to modify thin layers of aluminum on an oxidized silicon substrate, in order to fabricate conducting and robust etch masks with submicron features. These masks are very well suited for the production of nanoelectromecha......A direct-write laser system and an atomic force microscope (AFM) are combined to modify thin layers of aluminum on an oxidized silicon substrate, in order to fabricate conducting and robust etch masks with submicron features. These masks are very well suited for the production...

  3. Nanoscale Imaging of Whole Cells Using a Liquid Enclosure and a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckys, Diana B.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Joy, David C.; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory. PMID:20020038

  4. Nanoscale imaging of whole cells using a liquid enclosure and a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana B Peckys

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7 were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM laboratory.

  5. Dark field imaging of biological macromolecules with the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Mitsuo; Isaacson, Michael S.; Crewe, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    A scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with a field emission gun has been employed for the examination of biological macromolecules at high resolution. The quality of micrographs obtained with the STEM is dependent upon the quality of the substrate used to support biological objects because the image contrast in dark field is proportional to the mass density of the specimen. In order to reduce deleterious effects of the substrates on the image quality, we have developed a method of fabricating substrates consisting of very thin, very clean carbon films supported on very clean fenestrated plastic films. These films are approximately 15 Å thick. Well-known biological macromolecules such as glutamine synthetase and tobacco mosaic virus (both stained) and low-density lipoprotein and ferritin (both unstained were placed on these substrates and examined with the STEM by using various modes of contrast. The micrographs obtained by using the dark field mode of contrast employing an annular detector were free from phase contrast, as expected. Using this contrast mode, we have been able to directly observe (in-focus) 2.5- to 4.4-Å lattice spacings in the ferritin core. The effect of electron radiation damage on the helical structure of tobacco mosaic virus was also examined. Micrographs as well as corresponding optical diffraction patterns obtained with moderately low doses showed very clear helical structure from both sides of the virus. In addition, the (11.5 Å)-1 layer lines indicated the effective resolution attained on these particles. Images PMID:35788

  6. Orientation mapping of nanostructured materials using transmission Kikuchi diffraction in the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimby, Patrick W., E-mail: patrick.trimby@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Madsen Building F09 Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the new technique of transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been applied for the first time to enable orientation mapping of bulk, nanostructured metals. The results show how the improved spatial resolution of SEM-TKD, compared to conventional EBSD, enables reliable mapping of truly nanostructured metals and alloys, with mean grain sizes in the 40-200 nm range. The spatial resolution of the technique is significantly below 10 nm, and contrasting examples are shown from both dense (Ni) and lighter (Al-alloy) materials. Despite the burden of preparing thin, electron-transparent samples, orientation mapping using SEM-TKD is likely to become invaluable for routine characterisation of nanocrystalline and, potentially, highly deformed microstructures. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report of orientation mapping by transmission Kikuchi diffraction in the SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SEM-TKD technique can achieve an effective spatial resolution of 2-4 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured Ni with a mean grain size of <50 nm has been effectively mapped. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly deformed Al-alloy, with sub-200 nm grains, has also been characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sample thickness is critical for effective results: ideally 75-200 nm for Al.

  7. Mass mapping of a protein complex with the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A; Baumeister, W; Saxton, W O

    1982-01-01

    A mass map of the hexagonally packed intermediate layer (HPI-layer), a regular protein monolayer from the cell envelope of Micrococcus radiodurans, has been obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Samples were freeze-dried within the microscope, and low-dose images were recorded in the dark-field mode directly in digital form and processed by correlation averaging. The averaged projection of the unstained structure--i.e., the mass map--thus calculated shows a resolution to 3-nm period and reveals morphological features consistent with those obtained by negative staining. The mass of individual morphological domains was extracted by using variously the mass map itself or an average from a negatively stained HPI layer to define the domain boundaries. Protrusions as small as 1,300 daltons could be measured reproducibly within the unit cell of 655,000 daltons. The method developed opens an avenue to identify molecular species in situ and to correlate topographic information with biochemical data. Images PMID:6955791

  8. A 30 mK, 13.5 T scanning tunneling microscope with two independent tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychowdhury, Anita; Gubrud, M. A.; Dana, R.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.; Dreyer, M.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of an ultra-low temperature, high-field scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with two independent tips. The STM is mounted on a dilution refrigerator and operates at a base temperature of 30 mK with magnetic fields of up to 13.5 T. We focus on the design of the two-tip STM head, as well as the sample transfer mechanism, which allows in situ transfer from an ultra high vacuum preparation chamber while the STM is at 1.5 K. Other design details such as the vibration isolation and rf-filtered wiring are also described. Their effectiveness is demonstrated via spectral current noise characteristics and the root mean square roughness of atomic resolution images. The high-field capability is shown by the magnetic field dependence of the superconducting gap of CuxBi2Se3. Finally, we present images and spectroscopy taken with superconducting Nb tips with the refrigerator at 35 mK that indicate that the effective temperature of our tips/sample is approximately 184 mK, corresponding to an energy resolution of 16 μeV.

  9. Vertical marginal discrepancies of metal castings obtained using different pattern materials: A scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Dental Casting involves various stages of processing, out of which any may affect the dimensional accuracy. The fit of a casting depends not only on the method of fabrication employed but also on the type of materials utilized. One important variable in the casting process is the type of pattern material employed. This study was carried out to determine and compare the effect of different pattern materials on the vertical marginal accuracy of complete cast crowns. Materials and Methods: A standardized metal master die simulating a prepared crown was used to prepare 60 models on which patterns were fabricated using Inlay Pattern Wax; Auto-polymerized Pattern Resin and Light Cured Modeling Resin and cast immediately. Castings of the patterns were subjected to analysis of marginal fit using a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results: One-way ANOVA result showed a significant difference in the gap observed between the castings fabricated using the three types of pattern materials (P 0.05. Conclusion: With strict adherence to the principles of pattern fabrication and immediate casting, Inlay wax can still be the pattern material of choice to produce a casting with minimal marginal discrepancy with added advantages of being user friendly and cost effective.

  10. Ultra-morphology of root surface subsequent to periodontal instrumentation: A scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare root surface characteristic following root planing with various hand and power driven instruments. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 single rooted teeth were used in this study, of which two specimens were used as control (no instrumentation done and remaining 18 specimens were equally divided into three groups. Specimens from each group were then subjected to root planing by one of the following instruments: (1 a Gracey curette (2 Ultrasonic tip and (3 a Rotary bur. In each case, the time required for scaling and root planing was measured. After treatment, the specimens were observed under scanning electron microscope and surface roughness was measured by using Roughness and loss of tooth substance index (RLTSI. Results: The mean RLTSI scores for Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument group were 2.5, 2.0 and 0.667 respectively. The mean scores of time spent for scaling and root planing by Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument group in seconds were 42.50, 35.83 and 54.50. Conclusion: All the three instruments namely Gracey curette, Ultrasonic tip and Rotary bur were effective in mechanical debridement of root surface. The results favoured the use of rotary instruments for root planing to achieve smooth clean root surface; however, the use of rotary instrument was more time consuming which might limit its use in clinical practice.

  11. Somatic Embryos in Catharanthus roseus: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid ASLAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don is an important medicinal plant as it contains several anti-cancerous compounds, like vinblastine and vincristine. Plant tissue culture technology (organogenesis and embryogenesis has currently been used in fast mass propagating raw materials for secondary metabolite synthesis. In this present communication, scanning electron microscopic (SEM study of somatic embryos was conducted and discussed. The embryogenic callus was first induced from hypocotyls of in vitro germinated seeds on which somatic embryos, differentiated in numbers, particularly on 2,4-D (1.0 mg/L Murashige and Skoog (MS was medium. To understand more about the regeneration method and in vitro formed embryos SEM was performed. The SEM study revealed normal somatic embryo origin and development from globular to heart-, torpedo- and then into cotyledonary-stage of embryos. At early stage, the embryos were clustered together in a callus mass and could not easily be detached from the parental tissue. The embryos were often long cylindrical structure with or without typical notch at the tip. Secondary embryos were also formed on primary embryo structure. The advanced cotyledonary embryos showed prominent roots and shoot axis, which germinated into plantlets. The morphology, structure and other details of somatic embryos at various stages were presented.

  12. Assessing the efficacy of citrus aurantifolia extract on smear layer removal with scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhari, Behnam; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Monsef Esfehani, Hamid Reza; Tavakolian, Pardis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of citrus aurantifolia (CA) extract on smear layer removal in different parts of root canals. Thirty-nine single-rooted human teeth were randomly divided into three experimental (n=12) and one control (n=3) groups. Teeth were instrumented using MTwo rotary instruments. Root canals were irrigated with NaOCl during instrumentation. The canals in each group were irrigated with one of the following: completed mixture of citrus aurantifolia extracts, 17% EDTA, and alcoholic extract of CA. Distilled water was used for the control group. The irrigants were left within the canal for 20 minutes, and then rinsed with normal saline solution. Teeth were subsequently split longitudinally into 2 halves, and the canals were examined by a scanning electron-microscope. Cleanliness was evaluated using a five point scoring system. Statistical significant difference was found between groups (Pcitrus aurantifolia extracts were not able to effectively remove smear layer compared with 17% EDTA during root canal therapy.

  13. Development of in situ two-coil mutual inductance technique in a multifunctional scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ming-Chao; Liu, Zhi-Long; Ge, Jian-Feng; Tang, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Guan-Yong; Wang, Zi-Xin; Guan, Dandan; Li, Yao-Yi; Qian, Dong; Liu, Canhua; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2017-07-01

    Superconducting thin films have been a focal point for intensive research efforts since their reduced dimension allows for a wide variety of quantum phenomena. Many of these films, fabricated in UHV chambers, are highly vulnerable to air exposure, making it difficult to measure intrinsic superconducting properties such as zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism with ex situ experimental techniques. Previously, we developed a multifunctional scanning tunneling microscope (MSTM) containing in situ four-point probe (4PP) electrical transport measurement capability in addition to the usual STM capabilities [Ge et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 053903 (2015)]. Here we improve this MSTM via development of both transmission and reflection two-coil mutual inductance techniques for in situ measurement of the diamagnetic response of a superconductor. This addition does not alter the original STM and 4PP functions of the MSTM. We demonstrate the performance of the two-coil mutual inductance setup on a 10-nm-thick NbN thin film grown on a Nb-doped SrTiO3(111) substrate.

  14. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  15. Inducing superconductivity at a nanoscale: photodoping with a near-field scanning optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decca, R S; Drew, H D; Maiorov, B; Guimpel, J; Osquiguil, E J

    1999-01-01

    The local modification of an insulating GdBa2Cu3O6.5 thin film, made superconducting by illumination with a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM), is reported. A 100-nm aperture NSOM probe acts as a sub-wavelength light source of wavelength lambda(exc) = 480-650 nm, locally generating photocarriers in an otherwise insulating GdBa2-Cu3O6.5 thin film. Of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs, electrons are trapped in the crystallographic lattice, defining an electrostatic confining potential to enable the holes to move. Reflectance measurements at lambda = 1.55 microm at room temperature show that photocarriers can be induced and constrained to move on a approximately 200 nm scale for all investigated lambda(exc). Photogenerated wires present a superconducting critical temperature Tc= 12 K with a critical current density Jc = 10(4) A cm(-2). Exploiting the flexibility provided by photodoping through a NSOM probe, a junction was written by photodoping a wire with a narrow (approximately 50 nm) under-illuminated gap. The strong magnetic field modulation of the critical current provides a clear signature of the existence of a Josephson effect in the junction.

  16. A scanning electron microscopic and microradiographic study of pits in fluorosed human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thylstrup, A; Fejerskov, O

    1979-04-01

    The aim of the present study has been to correlate the surface appearance of pitted, fluorosed enamel in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with the microradiographic features of the underlying tissue. Intact enamel surfaces of severely fluorosed teeth appeared similar to that of normal enamel. In the unabraded surfaces discrete pits were sharply demarcated from the surrounding intact enamel surface leaving steep walls of parallel running rods. The microradiographic appearance of sections made through pits indicated that focal loss of surface enamel occurred corresponding to the inner highly hypomineralized part of the fluorotic subsurface lesion. The abrupt wall formation and the finding that the striae of Retzius never changed direction along the margins of the lesions indicated that pits in fluorosed enamel may be secondarily produced defects rather than true hypoplasias. Further evidence of the posteruptive origin of the defects was derived from the observation that enamel lamellae occasionally formed part of the lateral border. The relatively higher degree of radiopacity observed in the tissue surrounding the pit indicates a posteruptively acquired deposition of minerals in the exposed porous enamel.

  17. Homebuilt single-molecule scanning confocal fluorescence microscope studies of single DNA/protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haocheng; Goldner, Lori S; Leuba, Sanford H

    2007-03-01

    Many technical improvements in fluorescence microscopy over the years have focused on decreasing background and increasing the signal to noise ratio (SNR). The scanning confocal fluorescence microscope (SCFM) represented a major improvement in these efforts. The SCFM acquires signal from a thin layer of a thick sample, rejecting light whose origin is not in the focal plane thereby dramatically decreasing the background signal. A second major innovation was the advent of high quantum-yield, low noise, single-photon counting detectors. The superior background rejection of SCFM combined with low-noise, high-yield detectors makes it possible to detect the fluorescence from single-dye molecules. By labeling a DNA molecule or a DNA/protein complex with a donor/acceptor dye pair, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be used to track conformational changes in the molecule/complex itself, on a single molecule/complex basis. In this methods paper, we describe the core concepts of SCFM in the context of a study that uses FRET to reveal conformational fluctuations in individual Holliday junction DNA molecules and nucleosomal particles. We also discuss data processing methods for SCFM.

  18. Improved design for a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with an in situ tip treatment stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-J.; Joo, S. H.; Lee, K. S.; Yoo, J. H.; Park, M. S.; Kwak, J. S.; Lee, Jinho

    2017-04-01

    The Low Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscope (LT-STM) is an extremely valuable tool not only in surface science but also in condensed matter physics. For years, numerous new ideas have been adopted to perfect LT-STM performances—Ultra-Low Vibration (ULV) laboratory and the rigid STM head design are among them. Here, we present three improvements for the design of the ULV laboratory and the LT-STM: tip treatment stage, sample cleaving stage, and vibration isolation system. The improved tip treatment stage enables us to perform field emission for the purpose of tip treatment in situ without exchanging samples, while our enhanced sample cleaving stage allows us to cleave samples at low temperature in a vacuum without optical access by a simple pressing motion. Our newly designed vibration isolation system provides efficient space usage while maintaining vibration isolation capability. These improvements enhance the quality of spectroscopic imaging experiments that can last for many days and provide increased data yield, which we expect can be indispensable elements in future LT-STM designs.

  19. Scanning microscopic study on the effects of radiation on the laryngeal mucosa of human and rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, T. (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-05-01

    The fine surface structure of the laryngeal mucosa of humans and rats was investigated by using a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray microanalyser. Experimental materials were obtained from human patients who were treated with doses of 3000r to 4000r for laryngeal cancer and rats which had been raised on a normal diet or a diet deprived of vitamin E. These rats were experimentally irradiated with doses of 1000r to 1500r. Significant changes on the laryngeal surface of the humans were seen on the supraglottic areas and ventricular cavity which were composed of nonciliated cells. There was loss of nonciliated cells from the surface and tightly packed microvilli on the surface. In some areas of the ciliated laryngeal epithelium, there were compound cilia, bleb-formation, polyp-like formation of cilia, and/or shortened cilia. The surface structure of the larynges of the rats experimentally irradiated rat with doses of 1000r to 1500r showed similar findings to those of the humans. They were especially prominent in the vitamin E-defficient rats. The surface structure of laryngeal cancer treated with radiation showed a bulging formation of cells, an irregular surface of intercellular space. In the biochemical study using an X-ray microanalyser, phosphorus and sulfur were found more frequently on the laryngeal cancer than on the intact larynx.

  20. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium.

  1. Design of Pixellated CMOS Photon Detector for Secondary Electron Detection in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Huang Chuah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method of detecting secondary electrons generated in the scanning electron microscope (SEM. The method suggests that the photomultiplier tube (PMT, traditionally used in the Everhart-Thornley (ET detector, is to be replaced with a configurable multipixel solid-state photon detector offering the advantages of smaller dimension, lower supply voltage and power requirements, and potentially cheaper product cost. The design of the proposed detector has been implemented using a standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology with optical enhancement. This microchip comprises main circuit constituents of an array of photodiodes connecting to respective noise-optimised transimpedance amplifiers (TIAs, a selector-combiner (SC circuit, and a postamplifier (PA. The design possesses the capability of detecting photons with low input optical power in the range of 1 nW with 100 μm × 100 μm sized photodiodes and achieves a total amplification of 180 dBΩ at the output.

  2. Observations of liver cancer cells in scanning probe acoustic microscope: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiaoyue; Xi, Qing; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Ning; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM) can be used to acquire the morphology image as well as the non-destructive internal structures acoustic image. However, the observations of the morphology image as well as the internal structures acoustic image of liver cancer cells in SPAM are few. In this paper, we cultured 4 different types of liver cancer cells on the silicon wafer and coverslip to observe their morphology images as well as acoustic images in SPAM, and made a preliminary study of the 8 types of cells specimens (hereinafter referred to as the silicon specimens and coverslips specimens). The experimental measurement results showed that some cellular pseudopodium were observed in the morphology images of the coverslip specimens while no such cellular pseupodium were appeared in the morphology images of the silicon specimens, which concluded that the living liver cancer cells were less likely to grow on the silicon wafer. SPAM provides a rapid and sensitive visual method for studying the morphology and internal structures of the cancer cells. The proposed method can be also used to obtain the morphology and internal information in both solid and soft material wafers, such as silicon and cells, with the resolution of nanometer scale.

  3. Image sharpness measurement in the scanning electron-microscope--part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N F; Postek, M T; Larrabee, R D; Vladár, A E; Keery, W J; Jones, S N

    1999-01-01

    Fully automated or semi-automated scanning electron microscopes (SEM) are now commonly used in semiconductor production and other forms of manufacturing. Testing and proving that the instrument is performing at a satisfactory level of sharpness is an important aspect of quality control. The application of Fourier analysis techniques to the analysis of SEM images is a useful methodology for sharpness measurement. In this paper, a statistical measure known as the multivariate kurtosis is proposed as an additional useful measure of the sharpness of SEM images. Kurtosis is designed to be a measure of the degree of departure of a probability distribution. For selected SEM images, the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transforms were computed. Then the bivariate kurtosis of this Fourier transform was calculated as though it were a probability distribution. Kurtosis has the distinct advantage that it is a parametric (i.e., a dimensionless) measure and is sensitive to the presence of the high spatial frequencies necessary for acceptable levels of image sharpness. The applications of this method to SEM metrology will be discussed.

  4. Soft x-ray spectromicroscopy using compact scanning transmission x-ray microscope at the photon factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeichi, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo.takeichi@kek.jp; Inami, Nobuhito; Ono, Kanta [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Ueno, Tetsuro [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Suga, Hiroki [Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Takahashi, Yoshio [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    We report the stability and recent performances of a new type of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. The optics and compact design of the microscope realized mobility and robust performance. Detailed consideration to the vibration control will be described. The insertion device upgraded to elliptical polarization undulator enabled linear dichroism and circular dichroism experiments.

  5. Bottlenecks in bog pine multiplication by somatic embryogenesis and their visualization with the environmental scanning electron microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlašínová, H.; Neděla, Vilém; Dordevic, B.; Havel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 254, č. 4 (2017), s. 1487-1497 ISSN 0033-183X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : somatic embryogenesis * pinus uncinata subsp uliginosa * abnormalities * environmental scanning electron microscope Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2016

  6. Analysis of improvement in performance and design parameters for enhancing resolution in an atmospheric scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo Hun; Kim, Seung Jae; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2015-12-01

    The scanning electron microscope is used in various fields to go beyond diffraction limits of the optical microscope. However, the electron pathway should be conducted in a vacuum so as not to scatter electrons. The pretreatment of the sample is needed for use in the vacuum. To directly observe large and fully hydrophilic samples without pretreatment, the atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) is needed. We developed an electron filter unit and an electron detector unit for implementation of the ASEM. The key of the electron filter unit is that electrons are transmitted while air molecules remain untransmitted through the unit. The electron detector unit collected the backscattered electrons. We conducted experiments using the selected materials with Havar foil, carbon film and SiN film. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy and ablation rates of hard dental tissue using 350-fs and 1-ns laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neev, Joseph; Huynh, Daniel S.; Dan, Claudiu C.; White, Joel M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Feit, Michael D.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Perry, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Stuart, Brent C.

    1996-04-01

    Lasers are currently limited in their ability to remove hard tissue. Furthermore, many laser systems, such as the long pulse infrared lasers used to ablate bone or hard dental tissue, also generate unacceptable heat levels and cause collateral tissue damage. Ultrashort pulse lasers, however, are highly efficient, quiet, and relatively free of charge. With recent developments now allowing operation at high pulse repetition rates, ultrashort pulse systems can yield significant material volume removal which can potentially match or even exceed conventional technology while still maintaining the minimal collateral damage characteristics. In this paper, the interaction characteristics of two pulse regimes with enamel and dentin: 350 fs pulse ablation of hard dental tissues is compared to the interaction with one nanosecond pulses. Ablation rates were characterized and surface morphology, and structure were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope.

  8. Application of Tuning Fork Sensors for In-situ Studies of Dynamic Force Interactions Inside Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana ANDZANE

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts have been probed in-situ by specially developed force sensor based on a quartz tuning fork resonator (TF. Additional control is provided by observation of process in scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. A piezoelectric manipulator allows precise positioning of atomic force microscope (AFM probe in contact with another electrode and recording of the TF oscillation amplitude and phase while simultaneously visualizing the contact area in electron microscope. Electrostatic control of interaction between the electrodes is demonstrated during observation of the experiment in SEM. In the TEM system the TF sensor operated in shear force mode: Use of TEM allowed for direct control of separation between electrodes. New opportunities for in situ studies of nanomechanical systems using these instruments are discussed.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.2.1927

  9. Microscopic mechanism analysis on rheology and harmful effects by low level laser irradiation of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhang, Canbang; Xu, Lin; Zhou, Lingyun

    2012-03-01

    The microscopic mechanism on rheology and harmful effects of low level laser irradiation of blood were analyzed by Quantum theory. The analyzed results showed that laser may resolve fibrin clot, then the property of rheology of blood is improved; and some bonds of the cholesterol in blood were fractured by low level laser (abbreviate LLL) , hence the ratio of membrane cholesterol/membrane phosp-hatide of red cell were reduced, then blood circulation can be improved. So low level laser irradiated blood possess the action of mending rheology of blood. But our analyses point out that LLL may cut off some bonds of living biomolecule (e.g. Protein molecule) yet, then some normal protein may emerged denaturation, so normal cells in blood may be destroyed, namely low level laser irradiation can produce the harmful effects on blood. This paper criticized the viewpoint intravascular low level laser irradiation (abbreviate ILLLI) have not action.

  10. Microscopic coherent Raman imaging using low-cost continuous wave lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2013-06-01

    Significant effort is devoted to improving the instrumentation for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, which plays an important role in non-invasive biomedical optical imaging by providing a chemically specific contrast without relying on fluorescent markers. In this work we employ low-cost continuous wave lasers to achieve highly sensitive SRS imaging suitable for future application in biology, medicine and materials science. We perform microscopic imaging of dimethyl sulfoxide using two independent, commonly used lasers: a diode pumped, intracavity doubled 532 nm laser and a He-Ne laser operating at 632.8 nm. We further demonstrate that SRS imaging using cw laser sources (cwSRS) is advantageous over pulsed laser based SRS, as it eliminates the possibility of sample damage due to exposure to high-intensity light radiation, while substantially reducing the cost and complexity of the setup and keeping a sub-micron spatial resolution.

  11. Determination of foveal location using scanning laser polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNasdale, Dean A; Elsner, Ann E; Weber, Anke; Miura, Masahiro; Haggerty, Bryan P

    2009-03-25

    The fovea is the retinal location responsible for our most acute vision. There are several methods used to localize the fovea, but the fovea is not always easily identifiable. Landmarks used to determine the foveal location are variable in normal subjects and localization becomes even more difficult in instances of retinal disease. In normal subjects, the photoreceptor axons that make up the Henle fiber layer are cylindrical and the radial orientation of these fibers is centered on the fovea. The Henle fiber layer exhibits form birefringence, which predictably changes polarized light in scanning laser polarimetry imaging. In this study 3 graders were able to repeatably identify the fovea in 35 normal subjects using near infrared image types with differing polarization content. There was little intra-grader, inter-grader, and inter-image variability in the graded foveal position for 5 of the 6 image types examined, with accuracy sufficient for clinical purposes. This study demonstrates that scanning laser polarimetry imaging can localize the fovea by using structural properties inherent in the central macula.

  12. Automatic Indoor Building Reconstruction from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, L.; Wang, R.

    2017-09-01

    Indoor reconstruction from point clouds is a hot topic in photogrammetry, computer vision and computer graphics. Reconstructing indoor scene from point clouds is challenging due to complex room floorplan and line-of-sight occlusions. Most of existing methods deal with stationary terrestrial laser scanning point clouds or RGB-D point clouds. In this paper, we propose an automatic method for reconstructing indoor 3D building models from mobile laser scanning point clouds. The method includes 2D floorplan generation, 3D building modeling, door detection and room segmentation. The main idea behind our approach is to separate wall structure into two different types as the inner wall and the outer wall based on the observation of point distribution. Then we utilize a graph cut based optimization method to solve the labeling problem and generate the 2D floorplan based on the optimization result. Subsequently, we leverage an ?-shape based method to detect the doors on the 2D projected point clouds and utilize the floorplan to segment the individual room. The experiments show that this door detection method can achieve a recognition rate at 97% and the room segmentation method can attain the correct segmentation results. We also evaluate the reconstruction accuracy on the synthetic data, which indicates the accuracy of our method is comparable to the state-of-the art.

  13. Extraction of power lines from mobile laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Qing; Li, Jonathan; Wen, Chenglu; Huang, Pengdi

    2016-03-01

    Modern urban life is becoming increasingly more dependent on reliable electric power supply. Since power outages cause substantial financial losses to producers, distributors and consumers of electric power, it is in the common interest to minimize failures of power lines. In order to detect defects as early as possible and to plan efficiently the maintenance activities, distribution networks are regularly inspected. Carrying out foot patrols or climbing the structures to visually inspect transmission lines and aerial surveys (e.g., digital imaging or most recent airborne laser scanning (ALS) are the two most commonly used methods of power line inspection. Although much faster in comparison to the foot patrol inspection, aerial inspection is more expensive and usually less accurate, in complex urban areas particularly. This paper presents a scientific work that is done in the use of mobile laser scanning (MLS) point clouds for automated extraction of power lines. In the proposed method, 2D power lines are extracted using Hough transform in the projected XOY plane and the 3D power line points are visualized after the point searching. Filtering based on an elevation threshold is applied, which is combined with the vehicle's trajectory in the horizontal section.

  14. An omnidirectional 3D sensor with line laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Gao, Bingtuan; Liu, Chuande; Wang, Peng; Gao, Shuanglei

    2016-09-01

    An active omnidirectional vision owns the advantages of the wide field of view (FOV) imaging, resulting in an entire 3D environment scene, which is promising in the field of robot navigation. However, the existing omnidirectional vision sensors based on line laser can measure points only located on the optical plane of the line laser beam, resulting in the low-resolution reconstruction. Whereas, to improve resolution, some other omnidirectional vision sensors with the capability of projecting 2D encode pattern from projector and curved mirror. However, the astigmatism property of curve mirror causes the low-accuracy reconstruction. To solve the above problems, a rotating polygon scanning mirror is used to scan the object in the vertical direction so that an entire profile of the observed scene can be obtained at high accuracy, without of astigmatism phenomenon. Then, the proposed method is calibrated by a conventional 2D checkerboard plate. The experimental results show that the measurement error of the 3D omnidirectional sensor is approximately 1 mm. Moreover, the reconstruction of objects with different shapes based on the developed sensor is also verified.

  15. The FAST module: An add-on unit for driving commercial scanning probe microscopes at video rate and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Friedrich; Dri, Carlo; Spessot, Alessio; Africh, Cristina; Cautero, Giuseppe; Giuressi, Dario; Sergo, Rudi; Tommasini, Riccardo; Comelli, Giovanni

    2011-05-01

    We present the design and the performance of the FAST (Fast Acquisition of SPM Timeseries) module, an add-on instrument that can drive commercial scanning probe microscopes (SPM) at and beyond video rate image frequencies. In the design of this module, we adopted and integrated several technical solutions previously proposed by different groups in order to overcome the problems encountered when driving SPMs at high scanning frequencies. The fast probe motion control and signal acquisition are implemented in a way that is totally transparent to the existing control electronics, allowing the user to switch immediately and seamlessly to the fast scanning mode when imaging in the conventional slow mode. The unit provides a completely non-invasive, fast scanning upgrade to common SPM instruments that are not specifically designed for high speed scanning. To test its performance, we used this module to drive a commercial scanning tunneling microscope (STM) system in a quasi-constant height mode to frame rates of 100 Hz and above, demonstrating extremely stable and high resolution imaging capabilities. The module is extremely versatile and its application is not limited to STM setups but can, in principle, be generalized to any scanning probe instrument.

  16. Quantitative measurements of autofluorescence with the scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delori, François; Greenberg, Jonathan P; Woods, Russell L; Fischer, Jörg; Duncker, Tobias; Sparrow, Janet; Smith, R Theodore

    2011-12-09

    To evaluate the feasibility and reliability of a standardized approach for quantitative measurements of fundus autofluorescence (AF) in images obtained with a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO). AF images (30°) were acquired in 34 normal subjects (age range, 20-55 years) with two different cSLOs (488-nm excitation) equipped with an internal fluorescent reference to account for variable laser power and detector sensitivity. The gray levels (GLs) of each image were calibrated to the reference, the zero GL, and the magnification, to give quantified autofluorescence (qAF). Images from subjects and fixed patterns were used to test detector linearity with respect to fluorescence intensity, the stability of qAF with change in detector gain, field uniformity, effect of refractive error, and repeatability. qAF was independent of detector gain and laser power over clinically relevant ranges, provided that detector gain was adjusted to maintain exposures within the linear detection range (GL instruments was Quantitative AF imaging appears feasible. It may enhance understanding of retinal degeneration, serve as a diagnostic aid and as a sensitive marker of disease progression, and provide a tool to monitor the effects of therapeutic interventions.

  17. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piochacz, Christian

    2009-11-20

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55{+-}0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 {mu}m. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5{+-}4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the

  18. Swirling Gas Jet-Assisted Laser Trepanning for a Galvanometer-Scanned CO2 Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Ching Ho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laser-drilled hole arrays are part of an important field that aim to improve efficiency without affecting the quality of laser-drilled holes. In this paper, a swirling gas jet was implemented to assist with laser trepanning for a galvanometer scanned CO2 laser. The proposed swirling gas jet is based on laser trepanning. This swirling gas jet nozzle was composed of four inlet tubes to produce the flow of the vortex. Then, the plume particles were excluded, and spatter on the surface of the workpiece decreased. Thus, this approach can mitigate the problem of overcooling. This study manipulated the appropriate parameter settings, which were simulated by computational fluid dynamics software ANSYS CFX. The proposed swirling gas jet can be used with galvanometer-based scanner systems to keep the laser beam from interference by spatter. In addition, a hollow position of the vortex was achieved by using the four inlet tubes, which resulted in pressure asymmetry in the nozzle and velocity distribution on the surface of the workpiece. The experiment verified that the depth of processing could be enhanced by 110% when trepanning at a scanning speed of 30 mm/s, and that the removal of volume could be enhanced by 71% in trepanning at a diameter of 1 mm by using a swirl assistant compared with a non-assisted condition. Furthermore, the material removal rate of the swirling jet increases when the machining area of the galvanometer-based scanner is larger.

  19. Scanning laser optical tomography for in toto imaging of the murine cochlea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Nolte

    Full Text Available The mammalian cochlea is a complex macroscopic structure due to its helical shape and the microscopic arrangements of the individual layers of cells. To improve the outcomes of hearing restoration in deaf patients, it is important to understand the anatomic structure and composition of the cochlea ex vivo. Hitherto, only one histological technique based on confocal laser scanning microscopy and optical clearing has been developed for in toto optical imaging of the murine cochlea. However, with a growing size of the specimen, e.g., human cochlea, this technique reaches its limitations. Here, we demonstrate scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT as a valuable imaging technique to visualize the murine cochlea in toto without any physical slicing. This technique can also be applied in larger specimens up to cm3 such as the human cochlea. Furthermore, immunolabeling allows visualization of inner hair cells (otoferlin or spiral ganglion cells (neurofilament within the whole cochlea. After image reconstruction, the 3D dataset was used for digital segmentation of the labeled region. As a result, quantitative analysis of position, length and curvature of the labeled region was possible. This is of high interest in order to understand the interaction of cochlear implants (CI and cells in more detail.

  20. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging in microscope mode with infrared lasers- bypassing the diffraction limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soltwisch, J.; Göritz, G.; Jungmann, JH|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/351240020; Kiss, A.; Smith, D.F.; Ellis, S.R.; Heeren, R.M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105188476

    2013-01-01

    This letter demonstrates the use of infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization coupled with microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging. It is aimed to explore the use of intrinsic water in tissue as a matrix for imaging at spatial resolutions below the diffraction limit of the employed IR

  1. Multimodal backside imaging of a microcontroller using confocal laser scanning and optical-beam-induced current imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkeldey, Markus; Göring, Lena; Schellenberg, Falk; Brenner, Carsten; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Microscopy imaging with a single technology is usually restricted to a single contrast mechanism. Multimodal imaging is a promising technique to improve the structural information that could be obtained about a device under test (DUT). Due to the different contrast mechanisms of laser scanning microscopy (LSM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and optical beam induced current microscopy (OBICM), a combination could improve the detection of structures in integrated circuits (ICs) and helps to reveal their layout. While OBIC imaging is sensitive to the changes between differently doped areas and to semiconductor-metal transitions, CLSM imaging is mostly sensitive to changes in absorption and reflection. In this work we present the implementation of OBIC imaging into a CLSM. We show first results using industry standard Atmel microcontrollers (MCUs) with a feature size of about 250nm as DUTs. Analyzing these types of microcontrollers helps to improve in the field of side-channel attacks to find hardware Trojans, possible spots for laser fault attacks and for reverse engineering. For the experimental results the DUT is placed on a custom circuit board that allows us to measure the current while imaging it in our in-house built stage scanning microscope using a near infrared (NIR) laser diode as light source. The DUT is thinned and polished, allowing backside imaging through the Si-substrate. We demonstrate the possibilities using this optical setup by evaluating OBIC, LSM and CLSM images above and below the threshold of the laser source.

  2. Sealing ability of three root-end filling materials prepared using an erbium: Yttrium aluminium garnet laser and endosonic tip evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjappa, A Salin; Ponnappa, KC; Nanjamma, KK; Ponappa, MC; Girish, Sabari; Nitin, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Aims: (1) To compare the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine, and Chitra-calcium phosphate cement (CPC) when used as root-end filling, evaluated under confocal laser scanning microscope using Rhodamine B dye. (2) To evaluate effect of ultrasonic retroprep tip and an erbium:yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser on the integrity of three different root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: The root canals of 80 extracted teeth were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha. The apical 3 mm of each tooth was resected and 3 mm root-end preparation was made using ultrasonic tip (n = 30) and Er:YAG laser (n = 30). MTA, Biodentine, and Chitra-CPC were used to restore 10 teeth each. The samples were coated with varnish and after drying, they were immersed in Rhodamine B dye for 24 h. The teeth were then rinsed, sectioned longitudinally, and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a post-hoc Tukey's test at P ultrasonics, the difference was found to be statistically significant (P ultrasonics. PMID:26180420

  3. Research on calibration algorithm in laser scanning projection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li Juan; Qu, Song; Hou, Mao Sheng

    2017-10-01

    Laser scanning projection technology can project the image defined by the existing CAD digital model to the working surface, in the form of a laser harness profile. This projection is in accordance with the ratio of 1: 1. Through the laser harness contours with high positioning quality, the technical staff can carry out the operation with high precision. In a typical process of the projection, in order to determine the relative positional relationship between the laser projection instrument and the target, it is necessary to place several fixed reference points on the projection target and perform the calibration of projection. This position relationship is the transformation from projection coordinate system to the global coordinate system. The entire projection work is divided into two steps: the first step, the calculation of the projector six position parameters is performed, that is, the projector calibration. In the second step, the deflection angle is calculated by the known projector position parameter and the known coordinate points, and then the actual model is projected. Typically, the calibration requires the establishment of six reference points to reduce the possibility of divergence of the nonlinear equations, but the whole solution is very complex and the solution may still diverge. In this paper, the distance is detected combined with the calculation so that the position parameters of the projector can be solved by using the coordinate values of three reference points and the distance of at least one reference point to the projector. The addition of the distance measurement increases the stability of the solution of the nonlinear system and avoids the problem of divergence of the solution caused by the reference point which is directly under the projector. Through the actual analysis and calculation, the Taylor expansion method combined with the least squares method is used to obtain the solution of the system. Finally, the simulation experiment is

  4. Center of Excellence for Laser Applications in Medicine, Microlaser Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, R. H.

    2003-01-17

    The Center of Excellence for Laser Applications in Medicine at the Schepens Eye Research Institute (SERI) is a Center for: A core group of researchers who support each other and their various projects for real-time medical imaging and diagnostics in contiguous space at SERI. Clinical collaborators who participate in the core research at SERI, MEEI, and local ophthalmology practices, and at associated sites around the world. Industrial partners who transfer our technology to commercial products that will reach clinical usage everywhere. Students, post-doctoral associates and medical fellows who work with us and learn how to practice real-time medical imaging and diagnostics.

  5. Achievement report for fiscal 1999 on research and development of technologies for medical welfare equipment. Chromosome image analysis and diagnosis device with confocal scanning laser microscope; 1999 nendo iryo fukushi kiki gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Kyoshoten laser kenbikyo ni yoru zensenshokutai gazo kaiseki shindan sochi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The device is now satisfactorily capable of all image processing functions (bi-levelling, color deviation, brilliance adjustment, etc.) with the exception the karyotyping function. A substance that emits fluorescence by laser excitation is developed (for labelling the probe). A direct labelling method is studied, in which nucleic acid probes (nucleic acid labelled for chromosomal identification) will prove to be remarkably high in sensitivity. A new fluorescent reagent is synthesized, which is a BHHCT-4-dUTP to act as a nucleic acid probe. It is found that the new substance is superior to the conventional fluorescent substances in terms of stability and that all chromosomes may be forced into hybridization (selective combination of a probe with a peculiar chromosome) when various probes are labelled by this substance. A programing unit is constructed for a chromosomal aberration database. Items needed relative to chromosomes and parameters relative to chromosomal aberration data are appropriately arranged, and conditions to satisfy for their development into a database are studied. A rough design of an interface is complete. (NEDO)

  6. Neonatal lines in the enamel of primary teeth--a morphological and scanning electron microscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina; Johansson, Carina; Kühnisch, Jan; Robertson, Agneta; Steiniger, Frank; Norén, Jörgen G; Klingberg, Gunilla; Nietzsche, Sandor

    2008-10-01

    The neonatal line (NNL) is in principle found in all primary teeth and the line represents the time of birth. Earlier findings of the appearance of the NNL in light microscope and in microradiographs have shown not only changes in the prism direction of the enamel, but that the NNL has a hypomineralized character. The neonatal line was analyzed in un-decalcified sections of primary lower and central incisors, collected from individuals of different ages utilizing polarized light microscopy, microradiography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray analysis (XRMA). In polarized light the NNL appeared to have a more porous structure than the enamel in general. The appearance of the NNL as a dark line in microradiographs is interpreted as the NNL being less mineralized than neighbouring enamel. Analysis with ImageJ visualized the reduction of the amount of grey value, indicating that the NNL is less mineralized. Analysis of the NNL in SEM showed a reduction of the diameter of enamel prisms, the more narrow diameters continued through the postnatal enamel. A change of the growth direction of the prisms was also observed at the NNL. In a three-dimensional image the NNL appeared as a grove, however, in non-etched enamel no grove was seen. The elemental analyses with XRMA showed no marked changes in the content of C, Ca, P, N, O or S in the area around the NNL. The NNL is an optical phenomenon due to alterations in height, and degree of mineralization of the enamel prisms.

  7. Chlorhexidine as a root canal irrigant: Antimicrobial and scanning electron microscopic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Slavoljub

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Selection of irrigant is very important for longterm success of root canal therapy. Objective. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution (CHX against five selected microorganisms and to evaluate its efficacy in root canal cleaning. Methods. In this study, by agar diffusion test, were evaluated antimicrobial effects of three root canal irrigants: 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX. The microorganisms tested in this study were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. A scanning electron microscope was used to evaluate root canal cleaning ability of 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl, 2% CHX and 15% EDTA. Twelve extracted single-root human teeth were divided into four groups depending on the irrigant used during instrumentation. Mechanical preparation was performed with Step back technique and K files. Data were analyzed statistically by Student’s t-test. Results 5.25% NaOCl was the most effective against all tested microorganisms. 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX showed antimicrobial effects against all tested microorganisms but zones of inhibition were smaller. The best results in root canal walls cleaning were obtained in the group where the irrigant was 15% EDTA (score 2.33. In 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX groups, there was more smear layer (score 4 and 5. Conclusion. 2% chlorhexidine digluconate showed strong antimicrobial effect on the tested microorganisms, but was not effective in cleaning root canal walls.

  8. Elevated temperature, nano-mechanical testing in situ in the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, J. M.; Michler, J. [EMPA - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, Thun CH-3602 (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    A general nano-mechanical test platform capable of performing variable temperature and variable strain rate testing in situ in the scanning electron microscope is described. A variety of test geometries are possible in combination with focused ion beam machining or other fabrication techniques: indentation, micro-compression, cantilever bending, and scratch testing. The system is intrinsically displacement-controlled, which allows it to function directly as a micro-scale thermomechanical test frame. Stable, elevated temperature indentation/micro-compression requires the indenter tip and the sample to be in thermal equilibrium to prevent thermal displacement drift due to thermal expansion. This is achieved through independent heating and temperature monitoring of both the indenter tip and sample. Furthermore, the apex temperature of the indenter tip is calibrated, which allows it to act as a referenced surface temperature probe during contact. A full description of the system is provided, and the effects of indenter geometry and of radiation on imaging conditions are discussed. The stabilization time and temperature distribution throughout the system as a function of temperature is characterized. The advantages of temperature monitoring and thermal calibration of the indenter tip are illustrated, which include the possibility of local thermal conductivity measurement. Finally, validation results using nanoindentation on fused silica and micro-compression of <100> silicon micro-pillars as a function of temperature up to 500 Degree-Sign C are presented, and procedures and considerations taken for these measurements are discussed. A brittle to ductile transition from fracture to splitting then plastic deformation is directly observed in the SEM for silicon as a function of temperature.

  9. Charge compensation by in-situ heating for insulating ceramics in scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Ji, Yuan, E-mail: jiyuan@bjut.edu.cn [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Wei, Bin; Zhang, Yinqi; Fu, Jingyong; Xu, Xuedong; Han, Xiaodong [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2009-10-15

    With a steady temperature increase under high vacuum (HV) in an environmental scanning electronic microscope, we observed charge-free characterization and fine secondary electron (SE) images in focus for insulating ceramics (alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum nitride (AlN), pure magnesium silicate (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4})). The sample current I{sub sc} increased from -8.18x10{sup -13} to 2.76x10{sup -7} A for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and -9.28x10{sup -12} to 2.77x10{sup -6} A for AlN with the temperature increased from 298 to 633 K. The surface conductance {sigma} increased from 5.6x10{sup -13} to 5.0x10{sup -11}/{Omega} for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 1.1x10{sup -12} to 1.0x10{sup -7}/{Omega} for AlN with the temperature increased from 363 to 593 K. The SE image contrast obtained via heating approach in high vacuum with an Everhart-Thornley SE-detector was better than that via conventional approach of electron-ion neutralization in low vacuum (LV) with a gaseous SE-detector. The differences of compensation temperatures for charge effects indicate dielectric and thermal properties, and band structures of insulators. The charge compensation mechanisms of heating approach mainly relate to accelerated release of trapped electrons on insulating surface and to increase of electron emission yield by heating.

  10. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope with open sample space observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, Mitsuo, E-mail: msuga@jeol.co.jp [Clair Project, JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji [Clair Project, JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Iwamatsu, Shinnosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki [Yamagata Research Institute of Technology, 2-2-1, Matsuei, Yamagata, 990-2473 (Japan); Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-4, Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Although conventional electron microscopy (EM) requires samples to be in vacuum, most chemical and physical reactions occur in liquid or gas. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) can observe dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas under atmospheric pressure in real time. An electron-permeable window made of pressure-resistant 100 nm-thick silicon nitride (SiN) film, set into the bottom of the open ASEM sample dish, allows an electron beam to be projected from underneath the sample. A detector positioned below captures backscattered electrons. Using the ASEM, we observed the radiation-induced self-organization process of particles, as well as phenomena accompanying volume change, including evaporation-induced crystallization. Using the electrochemical ASEM dish, we observed tree-like electrochemical depositions on the cathode. In silver nitrate solution, we observed silver depositions near the cathode forming incidental internal voids. The heated ASEM dish allowed observation of patterns of contrast in melting and solidifying solder. Finally, to demonstrate its applicability for monitoring and control of industrial processes, silver paste and solder paste were examined at high throughput. High resolution, imaging speed, flexibility, adaptability, and ease of use facilitate the observation of previously difficult-to-image phenomena, and make the ASEM applicable to various fields. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas in open ASEM dish. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Random motion and radiation-induced self-organization were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tree-like electrochemical deposition of gold was observed on an electrode in situ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature-dependent phase transitions of solder were dynamically observed in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silver and solder pastes were easily and rapidly observed in air for process control.

  11. Scanning electron microscope technique for measuring electrical conductivity: application to tetrathiafulvalene--tetracyanoquinodimethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, James Peter [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A new technique for measuring the electrical conductivity of small samples and its application to the organic conductor tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) is reported. A movable current source provided by the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope is used to map out the potential distribution on crystal faces containing the a-b crystallographic axes. Silver paint contacts are used to return the beam current to ground and measure voltage changes as the beam position is moved. The results of the new technique are confirmed and complemented by the conventional movable contact method and the extension of both methods to low temperature is discussed. The potential distributions for our samples reveal frequently occurring irregularities in current flow which are attributable to sample imperfections and inhomogeneities in the silver paint contacts. Methods are presented whereby the commonly reported conductivities sigmaa and sigmab can be determined despite the presence of certain current flow irrgularities; room temperature values are found to be: sigmab = 490 ± 80 (Ωcm)-1 and sigmaa = 1.21 ± 0.15 (Ωcm)-1. The relationship of sigmaa/ and sigmab to the elements of the correctly expressed conductivity tensor for TTF-TCNQ is clarified. The influence of contact inhomogeneities on four-probe measurements of the temperature dependence of the b-axis conductivity as determined with an electrolytic tank model are also presented. It is found that there is a large probability of slightly underestimating conductivity, but that it is possible in a small number of cases to greatly overestimate conductivity.

  12. Scanning laser optical tomography resolves structural plasticity during regeneration in an insect brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Eickhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optical Projection Tomography (OPT is a microscopic technique that generates three dimensional images from whole mount samples the size of which exceeds the maximum focal depth of confocal laser scanning microscopes. As an advancement of conventional emission-OPT, Scanning Laser Optical Tomography (SLOTy allows simultaneous detection of fluorescence and absorbance with high sensitivity. In the present study, we employ SLOTy in a paradigm of brain plasticity in an insect model system. METHODOLOGY: We visualize and quantify volumetric changes in sensory information procession centers in the adult locust, Locusta migratoria. Olfactory receptor neurons, which project from the antenna into the brain, are axotomized by crushing the antennal nerve or ablating the entire antenna. We follow the resulting degeneration and regeneration in the olfactory centers (antennal lobes and mushroom bodies by measuring their size in reconstructed SLOTy images with respect to the untreated control side. Within three weeks post treatment antennal lobes with ablated antennae lose as much as 60% of their initial volume. In contrast, antennal lobes with crushed antennal nerves initially shrink as well, but regain size back to normal within three weeks. The combined application of transmission-and fluorescence projections of Neurobiotin labeled axotomized fibers confirms that recovery of normal size is restored by regenerated afferents. Remarkably, SLOTy images reveal that degeneration of olfactory receptor axons has a trans-synaptic effect on second order brain centers and leads to size reduction of the mushroom body calyx. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that SLOTy is a suitable method for rapid screening of volumetric plasticity in insect brains and suggests its application also to vertebrate preparations.

  13. Multimodal ophthalmic imaging using spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Malone, Joseph D.; Li, Jianwei D.; Bozic, Ivan; Arquitola, Amber M.; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2017-08-01

    Ophthalmic surgery involves manipulation of delicate, layered tissue structures on milli- to micrometer scales. Traditional surgical microscopes provide an inherently two-dimensional view of the surgical field with limited depth perception which precludes accurate depth-resolved visualization of these tissue layers, and limits the development of novel surgical techniques. We demonstrate multimodal swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography (SS-SESLO-OCT) to address current limitations of image-guided ophthalmic microsurgery. SS-SESLO-OCT provides inherently co-registered en face and cross-sectional field-of-views (FOVs) at a line rate of 400 kHz and >2 GPix/s throughput. We show in vivo imaging of the anterior segment and retinal fundus of a healthy volunteer, and preliminary results of multi-volumetric mosaicking for ultrawide-field retinal imaging with 90° FOV. Additionally, a scan-head was rapid-prototyped with a modular architecture which enabled integration of SS-SESLO-OCT with traditional surgical microscope and slit-lamp imaging optics. Ex vivo surgical maneuvers were simulated in cadaveric porcine eyes. The system throughput enabled volumetric acquisition at 10 volumes-per-second (vps) and allowed visualization of surgical dynamics in corneal sweeps, compressions, and dissections, and retinal sweeps, compressions, and elevations. SESLO en face images enabled simple real-time co-registration with the surgical microscope FOV, and OCT cross-sections provided depth-resolved visualization of instrument-tissue interactions. Finally, we demonstrate novel augmented-reality integration with the surgical view using segmentation overlays to aid surgical guidance. SS-SESLO-OCT may benefit clinical diagnostics by enabling aiming, registration, and mosaicking; and intraoperative imaging by allowing for real-time surgical feedback, instrument tracking, and overlays of computationally extracted biomarkers of disease.

  14. Time-resolved ultraviolet near-field scanning optical microscope for characterizing photoluminescence lifetime of light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Jeong, Hyun; Kim, Yong Hwan; Yim, Sang-Youp; Lee, Hong Seok; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2013-03-01

    We developed a instrument consisting of an ultraviolet (UV) near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) combined with time-correlated single photon counting, which allows efficient observation of temporal dynamics of near-field photoluminescence (PL) down to the sub-wavelength scale. The developed time-resolved UV NSOM system showed a spatial resolution of 110 nm and a temporal resolution of 130 ps in the optical signal. The proposed microscope system was successfully demonstrated by characterizing the near-field PL lifetime of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells.

  15. Forest structure analysis combining laser scanning with digital airborne photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissak, Candide; Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2017-04-01

    The interest of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) for vegetation structure analysis has been demonstrated in several research context. Indeed, airborne or ground Lidar surveys can provide detailed three-dimensional data of the forest structure from understorey forest to the canopy. To characterize at different timescale the vegetation components in dense cedar forests we can combine several sources point clouds from Lidar survey and photogrammetry data. For our study, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS-Leica ScanStation C10 processed with Cyclone software) have been lead in three forest areas (≈ 200m2 each zone) mainly composed of japanese cedar (Japonica cryptomeria), in the region of Fukushima (Japan). The study areas are characterized by various vegetation densities. For the 3 areas, Terrestrial laser scanning has been performed from several location points and several heights. Various floors shootings (ground, 4m, 6m and 18m high) were able with the use of a several meters high tower implanted to study the canopy evolution following the Fukushima Daiishi nuclear power plant accident. The combination of all scanners provides a very dense 3D point cloud of ground and canopy structure (average 300 000 000 points). For the Tochigi forest area, a first test of a low-cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry has been lead and calibrated by ground GPS measurements to determine the coordinates of points. TLS combined to UAV photogrammetry make it possible to obtain information on vertical and horizontal structure of the Tochigi forest. This combination of technologies will allow the forest structure mapping, morphometry analysis and the assessment of biomass volume evolution from multi-temporal point clouds. In our research, we used a low-cost UAV 3 Advanced (200 m2 cover, 1300 pictures...). Data processing were performed using PotoScan Pro software to obtain a very dense point clouds to combine to TLS data set. This low-cost UAV photogrammetry data has been

  16. Development of a scanning nearfield optical microscope for low-temperature investigations of semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodeck, Kai Friedrich

    2009-02-19

    In the present work the electronic structure of MOCVD-grown InGaAs/GaAs and InAs/GaAs quantum dots which are characterized by a particularly low ground state transition energy, was investigated using Scanning Nearfield Optical Microscopy (SNOM). The pivotal question of the presented investigations is, which influence the interaction of the confined carriers has on the energy states of the biexcitons and the multiexcitons in a quantum dot. Therefore, photoluminescence spectra of single quantum dots were investigated under varying excitation intensity at different temperatures between 5 K and 300 K. The construction of a novel scanning nearfield microscope especially for low temperatures allowed the investigation of single quantum dots. Due to significant improvements of the positioning technology and the shear-force distance control between the sample and the nearfield probe a stable scanning of the quantum dot samples at 5 K could be demonstrated, showing a lateral optical resolution of 200 nm. This way, in the photoluminescence spectroscopy of single quantum dots the thermal linewidth broadening of the detected light was reduced down to a value of less than 1 meV, which allowed the identification of the transitions of biexcitons and multiexcitons. On the basis of the performed measurements, for the InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots a biexciton state was identified, with variable binding energies of 2-7 meV. Furthermore, a positively charged trion state with a binding energy of 11 meV was observed, showing high emission intensity, which can be assigned to the sample doping. Accordingly, for the positively charged biexciton state a binding energy of 11 meV can be announced. For the investigated InAs/GaAs quantum dots a biexciton state with binding energies of 3-4 meV was found. Some of the investigated InAs/GaAs quantum dots showed the formation of positively charged states, in particular of a trion state with a binding energy of 3 meV, and of the positively charged

  17. Confocal laser scanning microscopy-guided surgery for neurofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, S; Horn, M; Weger, W; Massone, C; Smolle, J; Gerger, A

    2009-12-01

    The neurofibromatoses comprise at least two separate genetic disorders with variable clinical features and an unpredictable course. The most common type, neurofibromatosis 1, is characterized by > or = 6 café-au-lait spots and the occurrence of neurofibromas, which may present as cutaneous, subcutaneous or plexiform lesions. Normally, excision of neurofibromas is only indicated in the presence of neurological symptoms, suspicion of malignancy or for exceptional cosmetic reasons. For a good functional and aesthetic result with the least danger of recurrence, the surgeon's goal is to excise as much tissue as necessary and as little tissue as possible. One of the main issues during the surgical procedure is to distinguish between neurofibroma and surrounding tissue. We report for the first time the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy to differentiate between neurofibroma and healthy skin.

  18. Linear and Nonlinear Damage Detection Using a Scanning Laser Vibrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Vanlanduit

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Because a Scanning Laser Vibrometer (SLV can perform vibration measurements with a high spatial resolution, it is an ideal instrument to accurately locate damage in a structure. Unfortunately, the use of linear damage detection features, as for instance FRFs or modal parameters, does not always lead to a successful identification of the damage location. Measurement noise and nonlinear distortions can make the damage detection procedure difficult. In this article, a combined linear-nonlinear strategy to detect and locate damage in a structure with the aid of a SLV, will be proposed. To minimize the effect of noise, the modal parameters will be estimated using a Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE. Both noise and nonlinear distortion levels are extracted using the residuals of a two-dimensional spline fit. The validation of the technique will be performed on SLV measurements of a delaminated composite plate.

  19. CLASSIFICATION OF MOBILE LASER SCANNING POINT CLOUDS FROM HEIGHT FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The demand for 3D maps of cities and road networks is steadily growing and mobile laser scanning (MLS systems are often the preferred geo-data acquisition method for capturing such scenes. Because MLS systems are mounted on cars or vans they can acquire billions of points of road scenes within a few hours of survey. Manual processing of point clouds is labour intensive and thus time consuming and expensive. Hence, the need for rapid and automated methods for 3D mapping of dense point clouds is growing exponentially. The last five years the research on automated 3D mapping of MLS data has tremendously intensified. In this paper, we present our work on automated classification of MLS point clouds. In the present stage of the research we exploited three features – two height components and one reflectance value, and achieved an overall accuracy of 73 %, which is really encouraging for further refining our approach.

  20. Classification of Mobile Laser Scanning Point Clouds from Height Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M.; Lemmens, M.; van Oosterom, P.

    2017-09-01

    The demand for 3D maps of cities and road networks is steadily growing and mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems are often the preferred geo-data acquisition method for capturing such scenes. Because MLS systems are mounted on cars or vans they can acquire billions of points of road scenes within a few hours of survey. Manual processing of point clouds is labour intensive and thus time consuming and expensive. Hence, the need for rapid and automated methods for 3D mapping of dense point clouds is growing exponentially. The last five years the research on automated 3D mapping of MLS data has tremendously intensified. In this paper, we present our work on automated classification of MLS point clouds. In the present stage of the research we exploited three features - two height components and one reflectance value, and achieved an overall accuracy of 73 %, which is really encouraging for further refining our approach.

  1. Construction of a four tip scanning tunneling microscope/scanning electron microscope combination and conductivity measurements of silicide nanowires; Aufbau einer Vierspitzen-Rastertunnelmikroskop/Rasterelektronenmikroskop-Kombination und Leitfaehigkeitsmessungen an Silizid Nanodraehten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubkov, Evgeniy

    2013-09-01

    In this work the combination of a four-tip scanning tunneling microscope with a scanning electron microscope is presented. By means of this apparatus it is possible to perform the conductivity measurements on the in-situ prepared nanostructures in ultra-high vacuum. With the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), it becomes possible to position the tunneling tips of the four-tip scanning tunneling microscope (STM), so that an arrangement for a four-point probe measurement on nanostructures can be obtained. The STM head was built according to the novel coaxial Beetle concept. This concept allows on the one hand, a very compact arrangement of the components of the STM and on the other hand, the new-built STM head has a good mechanical stability, in order to achieve atomic resolution with all four STM units. The atomic resolution of the STM units was confirmed by scanning a Si(111)-7 x 7 surface. The thermal drift during the STM operation, as well as the resonant frequencies of the mechanical structure of the STM head, were determined. The scanning electron microscope allows the precise and safe navigation of the tunneling tips on the sample surface. Multi tip spectroscopy with up to four STM units can be performed synchronously. To demonstrate the capabilities of the new-built apparatus the conductivity measurements were carried out on metallic yttrium silicide nanowires. The nanowires were prepared by the in-situ deposition of yttrium on a heated Si(110) sample surface. Current-voltage curves were recorded on the nanowires and on the wetting layer in-between. The curves indicate an existence of the Schottky barrier between the yttrium silicide nanowires and the silicon bulk. By means of the two-tip measurements with a gate, the insulating property of the Schottky barrier has been confirmed. Using this Schottky barrier, it is possible to limit the current to the nanowire and to prevent it from flowing through the silicon bulk. A four-tip resistance measurement

  2. Airborne Laser Scanning and Image Processing Techniques for Archaeological Prospection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltýnová, M.; Nový, P.

    2014-06-01

    Aerial photography was, for decades, an invaluable tool for archaeological prospection, in spite of the limitation of this method to deforested areas. The airborne laser scanning (ALS) method can be nowadays used to map complex areas and suitable complement earlier findings. This article describes visualization and image processing methods that can be applied on digital terrain models (DTMs) to highlight objects hidden in the landscape. Thanks to the analysis of visualized DTM it is possible to understand the landscape evolution including the differentiation between natural processes and human interventions. Different visualization methods were applied on a case study area. A system of parallel tracks hidden in a forest and its surroundings - part of old route called "Devil's Furrow" near the town of Sázava was chosen. The whole area around well known part of Devil's Furrow has not been prospected systematically yet. The data from the airborne laser scanning acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre was used. The average density of the point cloud was approximately 1 point/m2 The goal of the project was to visualize the utmost smallest terrain discontinuities, e.g. tracks and erosion furrows, which some were not wholly preserved. Generally we were interested in objects that are clearly not visible in DTMs displayed in the form of shaded relief. Some of the typical visualization methods were tested (shaded relief, aspect and slope image). To get better results we applied image-processing methods that were successfully used on aerial photographs or hyperspectral images in the past. The usage of different visualization techniques on one site allowed us to verify the natural character of the southern part of Devil's Furrow and find formations up to now hidden in the forests.

  3. URBAN TREE CLASSIFICATION USING FULL-WAVEFORM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zs. Koma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation mapping in urban environments plays an important role in biological research and urban management. Airborne laser scanning provides detailed 3D geodata, which allows to classify single trees into different taxa. Until now, research dealing with tree classification focused on forest environments. This study investigates the object-based classification of urban trees at taxonomic family level, using full-waveform airborne laser scanning data captured in the city centre of Vienna (Austria. The data set is characterised by a variety of taxa, including deciduous trees (beeches, mallows, plane trees and soapberries and the coniferous pine species. A workflow for tree object classification is presented using geometric and radiometric features. The derived features are related to point density, crown shape and radiometric characteristics. For the derivation of crown features, a prior detection of the crown base is performed. The effects of interfering objects (e.g. fences and cars which are typical in urban areas on the feature characteristics and the subsequent classification accuracy are investigated. The applicability of the features is evaluated by Random Forest classification and exploratory analysis. The most reliable classification is achieved by using the combination of geometric and radiometric features, resulting in 87.5% overall accuracy. By using radiometric features only, a reliable classification with accuracy of 86.3% can be achieved. The influence of interfering objects on feature characteristics is identified, in particular for the radiometric features. The results indicate the potential of using radiometric features in urban tree classification and show its limitations due to anthropogenic influences at the same time.

  4. Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning for Automated Map Updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, Leena; Hyyppä, Juha; Litkey, Paula

    2016-06-01

    During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS), often combined with multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and multispectral information is for the first time directly available for 3D ALS point clouds. This article discusses the potential of this new single-sensor technology in map updating, especially in automated object detection and change detection. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from a random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral intensity information is useful for land cover classification, also when considering ground surface objects and classes, such as roads. An out-of-bag estimate for classification error was about 3% for separating classes asphalt, gravel, rocky areas and low vegetation from each other. For buildings and trees, it was under 1%. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral features based on several channels were more useful that those based on one channel. Automatic change detection utilizing the new multispectral ALS data, an old digital surface model (DSM) and old building vectors was also demonstrated. Overall, our first analyses suggest that the new data are very promising for further increasing the automation level in mapping. The multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and intensity images produced from the data do not include shadows. These are significant advantages when the development of automated classification and change detection procedures is considered.

  5. MULTISPECTRAL AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING FOR AUTOMATED MAP UPDATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Matikainen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS, often combined with multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and multispectral information is for the first time directly available for 3D ALS point clouds. This article discusses the potential of this new single-sensor technology in map updating, especially in automated object detection and change detection. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from a random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral intensity information is useful for land cover classification, also when considering ground surface objects and classes, such as roads. An out-of-bag estimate for classification error was about 3% for separating classes asphalt, gravel, rocky areas and low vegetation from each other. For buildings and trees, it was under 1%. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral features based on several channels were more useful that those based on one channel. Automatic change detection utilizing the new multispectral ALS data, an old digital surface model (DSM and old building vectors was also demonstrated. Overall, our first analyses suggest that the new data are very promising for further increasing the automation level in mapping. The multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and intensity images produced from the data do not include shadows. These are significant advantages when the development of automated classification and change detection procedures is considered.

  6. PEDESTRIAN DETECTION BY LASER SCANNING AND DEPTH IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barsi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrian flow is much less regulated and controlled compared to vehicle traffic. Estimating flow parameters would support many safety, security or commercial applications. Current paper discusses a method that enables acquiring information on pedestrian movements without disturbing and changing their motion. Profile laser scanner and depth camera have been applied to capture the geometry of the moving people as time series. Procedures have been developed to derive complex flow parameters, such as count, volume, walking direction and velocity from laser scanned point clouds. Since no images are captured from the faces of pedestrians, no privacy issues raised. The paper includes accuracy analysis of the estimated parameters based on video footage as reference. Due to the dense point clouds, detailed geometry analysis has been conducted to obtain the height and shoulder width of pedestrians and to detect whether luggage has been carried or not. The derived parameters support safety (e.g. detecting critical pedestrian density in mass events, security (e.g. detecting prohibited baggage in endangered areas and commercial applications (e.g. counting pedestrians at all entrances/exits of a shopping mall.

  7. AUTOMATIC EXTRACTION OF ROAD MARKINGS FROM MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Road markings as critical feature in high-defination maps, which are Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS and self-driving technology required, have important functions in providing guidance and information to moving cars. Mobile laser scanning (MLS system is an effective way to obtain the 3D information of the road surface, including road markings, at highway speeds and at less than traditional survey costs. This paper presents a novel method to automatically extract road markings from MLS point clouds. Ground points are first filtered from raw input point clouds using neighborhood elevation consistency method. The basic assumption of the method is that the road surface is smooth. Points with small elevation-difference between neighborhood are considered to be ground points. Then ground points are partitioned into a set of profiles according to trajectory data. The intensity histogram of points in each profile is generated to find intensity jumps in certain threshold which inversely to laser distance. The separated points are used as seed points to region grow based on intensity so as to obtain road mark of integrity. We use the point cloud template-matching method to refine the road marking candidates via removing the noise clusters with low correlation coefficient. During experiment with a MLS point set of about 2 kilometres in a city center, our method provides a promising solution to the road markings extraction from MLS data.

  8. Automatic Extraction of Road Markings from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H.; Pei, Z.; Wei, Z.; Zhong, R.

    2017-09-01

    Road markings as critical feature in high-defination maps, which are Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) and self-driving technology required, have important functions in providing guidance and information to moving cars. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) system is an effective way to obtain the 3D information of the road surface, including road markings, at highway speeds and at less than traditional survey costs. This paper presents a novel method to automatically extract road markings from MLS point clouds. Ground points are first filtered from raw input point clouds using neighborhood elevation consistency method. The basic assumption of the method is that the road surface is smooth. Points with small elevation-difference between neighborhood are considered to be ground points. Then ground points are partitioned into a set of profiles according to trajectory data. The intensity histogram of points in each profile is generated to find intensity jumps in certain threshold which inversely to laser distance. The separated points are used as seed points to region grow based on intensity so as to obtain road mark of integrity. We use the point cloud template-matching method to refine the road marking candidates via removing the noise clusters with low correlation coefficient. During experiment with a MLS point set of about 2 kilometres in a city center, our method provides a promising solution to the road markings extraction from MLS data.

  9. Optical coherence tomography, scanning laser polarimetry and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in retinal nerve fiber layer measurements of glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanihagh, Farsad; Kremmer, Stephan; Anastassiou, Gerasimos; Schallenberg, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    To determine the correlations and strength of association between different imaging systems in analyzing the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) of glaucoma patients: optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO). 114 eyes of patients with moderate open angle glaucoma underwent spectral domain OCT (Topcon SD-OCT 2000 and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT), SLP (GDx VCC and GDx Pro) and CSLO (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph, HRT 3). Correlation coefficients were calculated between the structural parameters yielded by these examinations. The quantitative relationship between the measured RNFL thickness globally and for the four regions (superior, inferior, nasal, temporal) were evaluated with different regression models for all used imaging systems. The strongest correlation of RNFL measurements was found between devices using the same technology like GDx VCC and GDx Pro as well as Topcon OCT and Cirrus OCT. In glaucoma patients, the strongest associations (R²) were found between RNFL measurements of the two optical coherence tomography devices Topcon OCT and Cirrus OCT (R² = 0.513) and between GDx VCC and GDx Pro (R² = 0.451). The results of the OCTs and GDX Pro also had a strong quantitative relationship (Topcon OCT R² = 0.339 and Cirrus OCT R² = 0.347). GDx VCC and the OCTs showed a mild to moderate association (Topcon OCT R² = 0.207 and Cirrus OCT R² = 0.258). The confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT 3) had the lowest association to all other devices (Topcon OCT R² = 0.254, Cirrus OCT R² = 0.158, GDx Pro R² = 0.086 and GDx VCC R² = 0.1). The measurements of the RNFL in glaucoma patients reveal a high correlation of OCT and GDx devices because OCTs can measure all major retinal layers and SLP can detect nerve fibers allowing a comparison between the results of this devices. However, CSLO by means of HRT topography can only measure height values of the retinal surface but it cannot distinguish

  10. A high-stability scanning tunneling microscope achieved by an isolated tiny scanner with low voltage imaging capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Junting; Lu, Qingyou, E-mail: qxl@ustc.edu.cn [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hou, Yubin [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2013-11-15

    We present a novel homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with high quality atomic resolution. It is equipped with a small but powerful GeckoDrive piezoelectric motor which drives a miniature and detachable scanning part to implement coarse approach. The scanning part is a tiny piezoelectric tube scanner (industry type: PZT-8, whose d{sub 31} coefficient is one of the lowest) housed in a slightly bigger polished sapphire tube, which is riding on and spring clamped against the knife edges of a tungsten slot. The STM so constructed shows low back-lashing and drifting and high repeatability and immunity to external vibrations. These are confirmed by its low imaging voltages, low distortions in the spiral scanned images, and high atomic resolution quality even when the STM is placed on the ground of the fifth floor without any external or internal vibration isolation devices.

  11. A high-stability scanning tunneling microscope achieved by an isolated tiny scanner with low voltage imaging capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Hou, Yubin; Wang, Junting; Lu, Qingyou

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with high quality atomic resolution. It is equipped with a small but powerful GeckoDrive piezoelectric motor which drives a miniature and detachable scanning part to implement coarse approach. The scanning part is a tiny piezoelectric tube scanner (industry type: PZT-8, whose d31 coefficient is one of the lowest) housed in a slightly bigger polished sapphire tube, which is riding on and spring clamped against the knife edges of a tungsten slot. The STM so constructed shows low back-lashing and drifting and high repeatability and immunity to external vibrations. These are confirmed by its low imaging voltages, low distortions in the spiral scanned images, and high atomic resolution quality even when the STM is placed on the ground of the fifth floor without any external or internal vibration isolation devices.

  12. Histologic comparison of microscopic treatment zones induced by fractional lasers and radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min-Kyung; Choi, Jeong Hwee; Ahn, Soo Beom; Lee, Mu Hyoung

    2014-12-01

    Fractional photothermolysis induces microscopic, localized thermal injury in the skin surrounded by undamaged viable tissue in order to promote wound healing. This study evaluated acute histologic changes following each single pass of various fractional lasers and radiofrequency (RF). Three male domestic swine were used. We used fractional Erbium:glass (Er:glass), Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG), CO2 lasers, and fractional ablative microplasma RF. We analyzed features and average values of the diameter, depth, and vertical sectional areas treated with each kind of laser and RF. The microscopic treatment zone (MTZ) of fractional Er:glass resulted in separation of dermoepidermal junction with no ablative zone. Fractional Er:YAG provided the most superficial and broad MTZ with little thermal collateral damage. Fractional CO2 resulted in a narrow and deep "cone"-like MTZ. Fractional RF resulted in a superficial and broad "crater"-like MTZ. This study provides the first comparison of MTZs induced by various fractional lasers and RF. These data provide basic information on proper laser and RF options. We think that these findings could be a good reference for information about fractional laser-assisted drug delivery.

  13. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (marsh elevation response away from the measurement site. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) offers potential for high definition monitoring of marsh surface evolution. However, several challenges must be overcome in the application of the technology for geodetic imaging of marsh surfaces. These challenges include surface occlusion by dense vegetation, error propagation due to scan co-registration and referencing across time, impacts of scan angle, and filtering of non-ground points. Researchers at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi conducted a field-survey of a marsh within the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve using TLS and RTK GPS for comparison. Grand Bay in Mississippi USA is one of the most biologically productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to extract the bare-earth surface below the dense vegetation. This presentation will present results of the study including the developed

  14. Ultrastructural study of polyspermy during early embryo development in pigs, observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, P; Wang, Z; Yang, Z; Tan, J; Qin, P

    2001-02-01

    Polyspermy is generally considered a pathological phenomenon in mammals. Incidence of polyspermy in porcine eggs in vivo is extremely high (30-40%) compared with other species, and polyspermy rate in the in vitro fertilized eggs in pigs can reach 65%. It is still unknown whether polyspermy to a certain degree is a physiological condition in pigs, and whether porcine eggs have any capability with which to remove the accessory sperm in the cytoplasm. The objectives in the present study are to observe the ultrastructural changes of accessory sperm during early embryonic development in pigs. A total of 58 normal, early embryos at one-, two, three-, and four-cell and morular stages were collected from gilts and were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The surface ultrastructure showed that sperm fusion with the zona pellucida was a continuous process during one-, two-, three-, and four-cell and morular stages, as observed by the SEM. Accessory sperm were present in the cytoplasm of cleaved embryos. The sperm heads in the cytoplasm of cleaved embryos did not decondense. TEM revealed the presence of a condensed sperm head within a lysosome (or phagolysosome) in a three-cell embryo. These observations suggest that polyspermy may be a physiological condition in pigs and that early embryos may develop to term if accessory sperm do not interrupt the embryo genome. Furthermore, lysosome activity could be another physiological mechanism for removing accessory sperm in the cytoplasm of fertilized eggs and cleaved embryos after fertilization in pigs.

  15. Experimental setup for energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscopy (EFSCEM) in a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, P; Behan, G; Kirkland, A I; Nellist, P D, E-mail: peng.wang@materials.ox.ac.u [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) is a new imaging mode in electron microscopy. Spherical aberration corrected electron microscope instruments fitted with two aberration correctors can be used in this mode which provides improved depth resolution and selectivity compared to optical sectioning in a conventional scanning transmission geometry. In this article, we consider a confocal optical configuration for SCEM using inelastically scattered electrons. We lay out the necessary steps for achieving this new operational mode in a double aberration-corrected instrument with uncorrected chromatic aberration and present preliminary experimental results in such mode.

  16. Development of a single cell electroporation method using a scanning ion conductance microscope with a theta nanopipette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Koji; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Iwata, Futoshi

    2015-08-01

    We developed a novel electroporation method using a scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM) with a theta capillary nanopipette probe that has two apertures at the edge of the pipette. One aperture of the pipette probe was used to control the pipette-surface distance and to apply pulse voltage for electroporation. The other was used to eject material over the cell by local electrophoresis. Using the nanopipette, propidium iodide was successfully introduced into a targeted single Hela cell without influencing the surrounding cells. Furthermore, by scanning the theta nanopipette probe using the SICM, the morphological behaviors of the electroporated cells could be observed.

  17. Micro-four-point probes in a UHV scanning electron microscope for in-situ surface-conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraki, I.; Nagao, T.; Hasegawa, S.

    2000-01-01

    For in-situ measurements of surface conductivity in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), we have installed micro-four-point probes (probe spacings down to 4 mum) in a UHV scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with scanning reflection-high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). With the aid of piezoactuators...... for precise positioning of the probes, local conductivity of selected surface domains of well-defined superstructures could be measured during SEM and RHEED observations. It was found that the surface sensitivity of the conductivity measurements was enhanced by reducing the probe spacing, enabling...

  18. A Scanning Tunneling Microscope at the Milli-Kelvin, High Magnetic Field Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Brian B.

    The ability to access lower temperatures and higher magnetic fields has precipitated breakthroughs in our understanding of physical matter, revealing novel effects such as superconductivity, the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, and single spin magnetism. Extending the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to the extremity of the B-T phase space provides unique insight on these phenomena both at the atomic level and with spectroscopic power. In this thesis, I describe the design and operation of a full-featured, dilution refrigerator-based STM capable of sample preparation in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and spectroscopic mapping with an electronic temperature of 240 mK in fields up to 14 T. I detail technical solutions to overcome the stringent requirements on vibration isolation, electronic noise, and mechanical design necessary to successfully integrate the triad of the STM, UHV, and dilution refrigeration. Measurements of the heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn5 ( Tc = 2.3 K) directly leverage the resulting combination of ultra-low temperature and atomic resolution to identify its Cooper pairing to be of dx2-y2 symmetry. Spectroscopic and quasiparticle interference measurements isolate a Kondo-hybridized, heavy effective mass band near the Fermi level, from which nodal superconductivity emerges in CeCoIn5 in coexistence with an independent pseudogap. Secondly, the versatility of this instrument is demonstrated through measurements of the three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 up to the maximum magnetic field. Through high resolution Landau level spectroscopy, the dispersion of the conduction band is shown to be Dirac-like over an unexpectedly extended regime, and its two-fold degeneracy to be lifted in field through a combination of orbital and Zeeman effects. Indeed, these two experiments on CeCoIn5 and Cd3 As2 glimpse the new era of nano-scale materials research, spanning superconductivity, topological properties, and single spin phenomena, made

  19. Clinical and scanning electron microscopic assessments of porcelain and ceromer resin veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Pankaj; Prakash, Hari; Shah, Nassem

    2003-01-01

    Recently available Ceromer resin materials are promising for fabrication of esthetic anterior laminates and provices an alternative, cost effective treament modality to porcelain laminates for discolored anterior anterior teeth. It was proposed to study the esthetic quality and surface finish of veneers fbricated from ceromer resin and compare it with the standard porcelain veneers, both clinically as well as by scanning electron microscope (SEM) at baseline and at 12 months. If found comparable, ceromer resin veneer could provide an alternative to porcelain veneers which is an expensive technique for a developing country like India. Seventy-two veneers, 36 porcelain and 36 ceromer were placed in 12 subjects who were studied at 0, 6 and 12 months for clinical acceptability, and at 0 and 12 months for SEM assessment. The restorations were luted with Opal luting composite and Scotchbond multipurpose system; polyvinyl siloxane was used as the impression material. The clinical assessment was made using modified United Public Health Services criteria, whereas the SEM assessment was made by quantitative analysis of the marginal fit and surface characteristics of the two veneering materials. Ceromer exhibited good anatomical form during the study period, but depicted changes in color, surface appearance, marginal adaptation, increased marginal discoloration, and tissue response. Inability to achieve a good finish with high gloss was a major drawback of the ceromer. Porcelain exhibited better esthetics, marginal adaptation, finish qualities, and tissue response. The SEM showed good to excellent marginal fit at baselinne in ceromer and porcelain veneers, but loss of luting resin at the margins was evident in both the materials after 12 months, leading to visible gaps in a number of veneer restorations. Ceromer veneers exhibited poor surface characteristics in several restorations, which further degraded in an oral conditions over 12 months. Veneering is an effective mode of

  20. Terrestrial radar and laser scanning for deformation monitoring: first steps towards assisted radar scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wujanz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Deformation analysis based on multi-temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS surveys has been applied for many years in commercial and academic problem domains. Downsides of this technique are the sequential data acquisition as well as its limited accuracy compared to terrestrial InSAR or InRAR based technologies that are currently gaining attention of the geodetic community. A drawback of these instruments is its relative operation method while beneficially measurements within the entire field of view can be carried out simultaneously at high frequencies. At first comparative studies between TLS and InRAR scanning are presented which have been carried out at a quarry. Over the course of roughly two hours six epochs have been measured where geometric changes of different degrees have been purposely made. In order to ensure comparability concerning the outcome, both instrument coordinate systems have been transformed into a common coordinate system by applying corner cube reflectors. At last an assisted ground based RADAR approach is presented where advantages of both applied techniques are incorporated.

  1. Fundamental and experimental aspects of diffraction for characterizing dislocations by electron channeling contrast imaging in scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kriaa, H.; Guitton, A.; Maloufi, N.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays Field Emission Gun-Scanning Electron Microscopes provide detailed crystallographic information with high spatial and angular resolutions, and allow direct observation of crystalline defects, such as dislocations, through an attractive technique called Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI). Dislocations play a crucial role in the properties of materials and ECCI has naturally emerged as an adapted tool for characterizing defects in bulk specimen. Nevertheless, fine control of th...

  2. Scanning electron microscopic (Sem studies on fourth instar larva and pupa of Anopheles (Cellia stephensi Liston (Anophelinae: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagbir Singh Kirti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles (Cellia stephensi Liston is a major vector species of malaria in Indian subcontinent. Taxonomists have worked on its various morphological aspects and immature stages to explore additional and new taxonomic attributes. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM studies have been conducted on the fourth instar larva and pupa of An. stephensi to find additional taxonomic features for the first time from Punjab state.

  3. Fabrication of narrow surface relief features in a side-chain azobenzene polyester with a scanning near-field microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanujam, P.S.; Holme, N. C. R.; Pedersen, M.

    2001-01-01

    We show that it is possible to fabricate topographic submicron features in a side-chain azobenzene polyester with a scanning near-field optical microscope, Through irradiation at a wavelength of 488 run at intensity levels of 12 W/cm(2), topographic features as narrow as 240 nm and as high as 6 nm...... in high-density optical storage and high-resolution lithography....

  4. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  5. Anisotropic excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on a metal film by a scattering-type scanning near-field microscope with a non-rotationally-symmetric probe tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walla Frederik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on gold films with the metallized probe tip of a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM. The emission of the polaritons from the tip, illuminated by near-infrared laser radiation, was found to be anisotropic and not circularly symmetric as expected on the basis of literature data. We furthermore identified an additional excitation channel via light that was reflected off the tip and excited the plasmon polaritons at the edge of the metal film. Our results, while obtained for a non-rotationally-symmetric type of probe tip and thus specific for this situation, indicate that when an s-SNOM is employed for the investigation of plasmonic structures, the unintentional excitation of surface waves and anisotropic surface wave propagation must be considered in order to correctly interpret the signatures of plasmon polariton generation and propagation.

  6. Anisotropic excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on a metal film by a scattering-type scanning near-field microscope with a non-rotationally-symmetric probe tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walla, Frederik; Wiecha, Matthias M.; Mecklenbeck, Nicolas; Beldi, Sabri; Keilmann, Fritz; Thomson, Mark D.; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on gold films with the metallized probe tip of a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM). The emission of the polaritons from the tip, illuminated by near-infrared laser radiation, was found to be anisotropic and not circularly symmetric as expected on the basis of literature data. We furthermore identified an additional excitation channel via light that was reflected off the tip and excited the plasmon polaritons at the edge of the metal film. Our results, while obtained for a non-rotationally-symmetric type of probe tip and thus specific for this situation, indicate that when an s-SNOM is employed for the investigation of plasmonic structures, the unintentional excitation of surface waves and anisotropic surface wave propagation must be considered in order to correctly interpret the signatures of plasmon polariton generation and propagation.

  7. DEFORMATION MONITORING OF MOTORWAY UNDERPASSES USING LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Puente

    2012-07-01

    deformation monitoring is a Optech Lynx mobile LiDAR. This laser scanner is based on time of flight technology and presents an accuracy of 6 mm in the determination of the geometrical coordinates. This accuracy can be improved to around 1 mm using fitting post-processing techniques and makes this technology very useful for studies related with deformation monitoring. The laser scanner, in comparison with other geodetic techniques as total stations, allows the control of all the structure, including unexpected deformations. Reflective targets are permanently positioned over the small walls of the structure to allow the 3D orientation of the different scans. Two main scans are made for this study, before and after the backfilling process. Backfilling takes about 10 days for the construction companies. The scans need a time of approximately 12 minutes. Construction works do not need to be interrupted during the scans. Point clouds are then post-processed using QT Modeler Software. First, the point cloud is cleaned to use only the data directly related with the structure under study. Then, using the target coordinates, both point clouds are moved to the same coordinate system. Finally, the deformation of the underpass is studied using two algorithms specifically developed using Matlab software. First algorithm fits a geometrical surface to the point cloud of the first scan and evaluates the residuals of both scans for this fitting surface. Differences in the residuals give the deformation map of the structure. Second algorithm takes a portion of the point cloud from the top of the structure, where it is located the joining point between the voussoirs. The joining between two voussoirs shows a height step that in an ideal case must tend to zero. Deformations produced by the loading of the structure are measured as a comparison between the steps before and after the backfilling process. The analysis of the results show as some deformation occurs in the structure in the joining

  8. Scanning laser topography and scanning laser polarimetry: comparing both imaging methods at same distances from the optic nerve head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremmer, Stephan; Keienburg, Marcus; Anastassiou, Gerasimos; Schallenberg, Maurice; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Selbach, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of scanning laser topography (SLT) and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) on the rim of the optic nerve head and its surrounding area and thereby to evaluate whether these imaging technologies are influenced by other factors beyond the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). A total of 154 eyes from 5 different groups were examined: young healthy subjects (YNorm), old healthy subjects (ONorm), patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG), patients with open-angle glaucoma and early glaucomatous damage (OAGE) and patients with open-angle glaucoma and advanced glaucomatous damage (OAGA). SLT and SLP measurements were taken. Four concentric circles were superimposed on each of the images: the first one measuring at the rim of the optic nerve head (1.0 ONHD), the next measuring at 1.25 optic nerve head diameters (ONHD), at 1.5 ONHD and at 1.75 ONHD. The aligned images were analyzed using GDx/NFA software. Both methods showed peaks of RNFL thickness in the superior and inferior segments of the ONH. The maximum thickness, registered by the SLT device was at the ONH rim where the SLP device tended to measure the lowest values. SLT measurements at the ONH were influenced by other tissues besides the RNFL like blood vessels and glial tissues. SLT and SLP were most strongly correlated at distances of 1.25 and 1.5 ONHD. While both imaging technologies are valuable tools in detecting glaucoma, measurements at the ONH rim should be interpreted critically since both methods might provide misleading results. For the assessment of the retinal nerve fiber layer we would like to recommend for both imaging technologies, SLT and SLP, measurements in 1.25 and 1.5 ONHD distance of the rim of the optic nerve head.

  9. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology.

  10. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano eCardinale

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology.

  11. In-Situ Observation of Crystallization and Growth in High-Temperature Melts Using the Confocal Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Il; Dippenaar, Rian

    2016-08-01

    This review discusses the innovative efforts initiated by Emi and co-workers for in-situ observation of phase transformations at high temperatures for materials. By using the high-temperature confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM), a robust database of the phase transformation behavior during heating and cooling of slags, fluxes, and steel can be developed. The rate of solidification and the progression of solid-state phase transformations can be readily investigated under a variety of atmospheric conditions and be correlated with theoretical predictions. The various research efforts following the work of Emi and co-workers have allowed a deeper fundamental understanding of the elusive solidification and phase transformation mechanisms in materials beyond the ambit of steels. This technique continues to evolve in terms of its methodology, application to other materials, and its contribution to technology.

  12. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvin, M E; Richter, H; Zhu, Y J; Meinke, M C; Knorr, F; Lademann, J [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology, Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Gonchukov, S A [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Russian Federation); Koenig, K [JenLab GmbH, Schillerstr. 1, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-31

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted. (laser biophotonics)

  13. Laser apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Mark F.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells. The apparatus comprises a laser having an analysis region within the laser cavity for containing one or more biological cells to be analyzed. The presence of a cell within the analysis region in superposition with an activated portion of a gain medium of the laser acts to encode information about the cell upon the laser beam, the cell information being recoverable by an analysis means that preferably includes an array photodetector such as a CCD camera and a spectrometer. The apparatus and method may be used to analyze biomedical cells including blood cells and the like, and may include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis thereof.

  14. Development of an Online Archive for Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Christopher; Lowry, Ben; McWhirter, Jeff; Phillips, David; Meertens, Chuck

    2013-04-01

    The UNAVCO Geodetic Imaging program provides terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) support to the Earth science research community through a TLS instrumentation pool of five scanners, field engineering, data processing, and technical training. As part of this community TLS support role, UNAVCO is responsible for generation of level one (L1) TLS data products and TLS data archive and access. A UNAVCO-organized and US National Science Foundation-funded TLS community workshop held October 2011 in Boulder, Colorado defined many of the challenges and requirements a TLS data archive and access system must address. TLS data acquisition presents unique challenges for metadata, provenance capture, and data archive. TLS datasets are often large and level zero (L0 - raw) data are stored in a variety of proprietary formats, requiring conversion and standardization for access and exchange. Due to the wide range of scientific and engineering objectives that motivate TLS data collection, field methods and collection techniques vary greatly and must be thoroughly documented in project metadata. These challenges make data and metadata capture, preservation, and provenance important objectives for an online TLS archive. To address these challenges, UNAVCO is developing a TLS archive based on the open source RAMADDA platform (http://ramadda.org). The UNAVCO TLS archive will provide online archive of L0 and L1 data products, capture field metadata and data processing workflows for provenance, and store original georeferencing information. In addition, the TLS repository provides on-demand services for simple point cloud visualization, data sub-setting and thinning, and file format (e.g., LAS, ASCII, proprietary) data conversion. The system also offers automation of RINEX processing of GPS data, OPUS and CSRS submission and solution ingestion, and generation of control point lists to streamline georeferencing of TLS point cloud data. Georeferencing metadata and GPS file provenance are

  15. Laser scanning microscopy of broad freezing interfaces with applications to biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neils, Christopher Martin

    2000-09-01

    A new, vertical cryostage was used for microscopic observation of broad-front freezing in aqueous solutions. This cryostage complements traditional studies of cell behavior and interface morphology in cryobiology. Traditional systems directionally solidify thin samples perpendicular to the optical axis. Thin samples confer thermal and optical advantages for video brightfield microscopy. However, sample thickness can affect the interface morphology. In the new cryostage, ice propagates parallel to the microscope optical axis. The sample cup is 1 cm tall and 1.5 cm in diameter, with insulated sides and a nitrogen-cooled base to freeze the solution upward. The top of the solution is warmed passively through a cover glass or immersion objective. The freezing solutions contain dilute fluorescein dye, which is visible where it is concentrated by exclusion from the ice. The stage is mounted on a confocal laser-scanning microscope, and thermal control and image capture routines are centralized in a LabView user interface. Filtered water, physiological saline, 9.5% glycerol, and 10% glycerol with PBS were frozen at rates between -2°C/min and -10°C/min and sequential images at one plane were captured. Images distinctly revealed a lamellar interface but could not resolve 3-D morphology. The average lamellar spacing was quantified using image analysis. Physiological saline was frozen in flat glass capillary tubes with 0.05 to 0.4 mm path length, mounted vertically to observe internal ice in cross-section. Lamellae were randomly oriented with respect to the glass, suggesting caution when measuring dendrite spacing in a horizontal cryostage. No correlation between capillary size and lamellar spacing was noted. Cell monolayers and synthetic membranes were mounted horizontally to let a well-developed ice front approach the layer broadly. In transparent membranes, ice-membrane interaction was visible until ice grew over and obscured the membrane. The vertical cryostage improved

  16. Comparison between laser terahertz emission microscope and conventional methods for analysis of polycrystalline silicon solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Nakanishi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A laser terahertz emission microscope (LTEM can be used for noncontact inspection to detect the waveforms of photoinduced terahertz emissions from material devices. In this study, we experimentally compared the performance of LTEM with conventional analysis methods, e.g., electroluminescence (EL, photoluminescence (PL, and laser beam induced current (LBIC, as an inspection method for solar cells. The results showed that LTEM was more sensitive to the characteristics of the depletion layer of the polycrystalline solar cell compared with EL, PL, and LBIC and that it could be used as a complementary tool to the conventional analysis methods for a solar cell.

  17. Estimation of forest resources from a country wide laser scanning survey and national forest inventory data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Schumacher, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning may provide a means for assessing local forest biomass resources. In this study, national forest inventory (NFI) data was used as reference data for modeling forest basal area, volume, aboveground biomass, and total biomass from laser scanning data obtained in a countrywide...

  18. Tree Classification with Fused Mobile Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Hyyppä

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Laser Scanning data were collected simultaneously with hyperspectral data using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Sensei system. The data were tested for tree species classification. The test area was an urban garden in the City of Espoo, Finland. Point clouds representing 168 individual tree specimens of 23 tree species were determined manually. The classification of the trees was done using first only the spatial data from point clouds, then with only the spectral data obtained with a spectrometer, and finally with the combined spatial and hyperspectral data from both sensors. Two classification tests were performed: the separation of coniferous and deciduous trees, and the identification of individual tree species. All determined tree specimens were used in distinguishing coniferous and deciduous trees. A subset of 133 trees and 10 tree species was used in the tree species classification. The best classification results for the fused data were 95.8% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes. The best overall tree species classification succeeded with 83.5% accuracy for the best tested fused data feature combination. The respective results for paired structural features derived from the laser point cloud were 90.5% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes and 65.4% for the species classification. Classification accuracies with paired hyperspectral reflectance value data were 90.5% for the separation of coniferous and deciduous classes and 62.4% for different species. The results are among the first of their kind and they show that mobile collected fused data outperformed single-sensor data in both classification tests and by a significant margin.

  19. The potential of UAV laser scanning in forest inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert; Bronner, Günther

    2017-04-01

    Forest management, harvest operation, ecological conservation and relevant decision making need information from inventories. Conventionally, forest inventories were carried out mainly from field measurements with simple tools, and from field samples. Several vital tree attributes such as diameter at breast height (DBH), tree height, and species were collected at individual tree level. Various other attributes then can be inferred. For example, stem curve (i.e., taper function) can be interpolated by mathematical functions. The relation of different components of trees is often estimated by allometric functions based on DBH, tree height or other parameters of interest. In addition, these attributes are often aggregated to plot-level. For deriving taper functions for individual plots the required field measurements would be too expensive and therefore, the available taper functions are based on few sample trees. Recent advancements of remote sensing techniques, especially terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) showed promising potential in forest inventories. It acquires millions of 3D points, which enables fast determination of forest attributes in an automatic manner. Some additional attributes that cannot be directly measured in traditional field inventories such as stem curve and volume, even ecologically related parameters such as leaf area index (LAI) can be estimated with high precision. The deficiencies of the employment of TLS in forests include limited terrain accessibility, area coverage, and visibility in top canopy layer. On the other hand, the next geospatial frontier, UAV-borne Laser Scanning (ULS) is emerging as a candidate for forest inventories. The high density and accuracy of ULS data enable the modeling of individual tree with fine details up to branch level. In addition to its plot or transect level coverage, it achieves a high level of completeness with respect to the top canopy layer. Therefore, it generates a high potential especially in

  20. Comparison of macroscopic and microscopic (stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy) features of bone lesions due to hatchet hacking trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Luísa; Quatrehomme, Gérald; Bertrand, Marie-France; Rallon, Christophe; Ceinos, Romain; du Jardin, Philippe; Adalian, Pascal; Alunni, Véronique

    2017-03-01

    This experimental study examined the lesions produced by a hatchet on human bones (tibiae). A total of 30 lesions were produced and examined macroscopically (naked eye) and by stereomicroscopy. 13 of them were also analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The general shape of the lesion, both edges, both walls, the kerf floor and the extremities were described. The length and maximum width of the lesions were also recorded. The microscopic analysis of the lesions led to the description of a sharp-blunt mechanism. Specific criteria were identified (lateral pushing back, fragmentation of the upraising, fossa dug laterally to the edge and vertical striae) enabling the forensic expert to conclude that a hacking instrument was used. These criteria are easily identifiable using scanning electron microscopy, but can also be observed with stereomicroscopy. Overall, lateral pushing back and vertical striae visible using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy signal the use of a hacking tool.

  1. Pattern scan laser versus single spot laser in panretinal photocoagulation treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the efficacy of 577-nm pattern scan laser in panretinal photocoagulation(PRPtreatment in newly diagnosed proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR.METHODS:Prospective and comparative observation was performed in totally 32 patients with high-risk PDR. They were randomly divided into group 1(using pattern scan laser, PSLand 2(using single spot laser, SSL, each containing 16 subjects to which totally 20 eyes received PRP. Non-perfusion region was identified with fundus fluorescein angiography(FFAbefore and 3mo after final PRP. The advantage of PSL was verified in terms of the number and the duration of PRP sessions needed for satisfactory outcomes, and the pain score.RESULTS: Three PRP sessions were needed for each eye to complete the treatment using PSL, while 4 sessions were needed using SSL. The duration of each session with PSL in group 1 was 7.3±2.3min, which was significantly shorter than that with SSL in group 2(13.2±4.1, t38=5.596, PPCONCLUSION: PSL showed clear advantages over SSL in the PRP treatment of PDR, not only in the improved efficacy, but also in the reduction of pain and the improvement of effectiveness.

  2. Graded morphogenetic patterns during the development of the extraembryonic blood system and coelom of the chick blastoderm: A scanning electron microscope and light microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, J; Fabian, B C

    1985-06-01

    This scanning electron- and light-microscopic study traces the morphogenesis of the yolk-sac vascular system and extraembryonic coelom in the chick blastoderm. The fate of the mesodermal cells in both the area opaca vasculosa (AOV) and the area pellucida (AP) is followed, and the cellular patterning in these two areas is compared. We describe new details of the formation of coelom lining in the AOV, and new observations of the tendency of the intravascular blood island cells of the AOV to become flattened and attenuated. The morphogenesis of the blood system and coelom is analyzed in terms of polarized morphological patterns with coordinates in two modes:proximodistal (from the AP to the AOV) and dorsoventral (from the ectoderm to the endoderm). By highlighting differences in the methods of formation of blood vessels and coelom lining in the AP and AOV, this paper resolves some paradoxes in the literature.

  3. Low Temperature Apertureless Near-field Scanning Optical Microscope for Optical Spectroscopy of Single Ge/Si Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Henry; Patil, N. G.; Levy, Jeremy

    2001-03-01

    A low-temperature apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope has been designed and constructed for the purpose of investigating the optical properties of individual Ge/Si quantum dots. The microscope fits in the 37 mm bore of a Helium vapor magneto-optic cryostat, allowing operations down to liquid helium temperatures in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. An in situ microscope objective focuses light onto the sample, which is scanned in the three spatial directions using a compact modular stage. An AFM/STM tip resides on the top; feedback is achieved using a quartz tuning fork oscillator. Both tip and objective are attached to inertial sliding motors that can move in fine (10 nm) steps to achieve touchdown and focus. A femtosecond optical parametric oscillator is used to excite carriers in the quantum dots both resonantly and non-resonantly; scattered luminescence from the AFM/STM tip is collected and analyzed spectrally using a 1/2 meter imaging spectrometer and a LN_2-cooled InGaAs array. We gratefully acknowledge NSF (DMR-9701725, IMR-9802784) and DARPA (DAAD-16-99-C1036) for financial support of this work.

  4. Bottlenecks in bog pine multiplication by somatic embryogenesis and their visualization with the environmental scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlašínová, Helena; Neděla, Vilem; Đorđević, Biljana; Havel, Ladislav

    2017-07-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is an important biotechnological technique used for the propagation of many pine species in vitro. However, in bog pine, one of the most endangered tree species in the Czech Republic, limitations were observed, which negatively influenced the development and further germination of somatic embryos. Although initiation frequency was very low-0.95 %, all obtained cell lines were subjected to maturation. The best responding cell line (BC1) was used and subjected to six different variants of the maturation media. The media on which the highest number of early-precotyledonary/cotyledonary somatic embryos was formed was supplemented with 121 μM abscisic acid (ABA) and with 6 % maltose. In the end of maturation experiments, different abnormalities in formation of somatic embryos were observed. For visualization and identification of abnormalities in meristem development during proliferation and maturation processes, the environmental scanning electron microscope was used. In comparison to the classical light microscope, the non-commercial environmental scanning electron microscope AQUASEM II has been found as a very useful tool for the quick recognition of apical meristem disruption and abnormal development. To our knowledge, this is the first report discussing somatic embryogenesis in bog pine. Based on this observation, the cultivation procedure could be enhanced and the method for SE of bog pine optimized.

  5. CLUSTERING OF MULTISPECTRAL AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA USING GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Morsy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the evolution of the LiDAR technology, multispectral airborne laser scanning systems are currently available. The first operational multispectral airborne LiDAR sensor, the Optech Titan, acquires LiDAR point clouds at three different wavelengths (1.550, 1.064, 0.532 μm, allowing the acquisition of different spectral information of land surface. Consequently, the recent studies are devoted to use the radiometric information (i.e., intensity of the LiDAR data along with the geometric information (e.g., height for classification purposes. In this study, a data clustering method, based on Gaussian decomposition, is presented. First, a ground filtering mechanism is applied to separate non-ground from ground points. Then, three normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVIs are computed for both non-ground and ground points, followed by histograms construction from each NDVI. The Gaussian function model is used to decompose the histograms into a number of Gaussian components. The maximum likelihood estimate of the Gaussian components is then optimized using Expectation – Maximization algorithm. The intersection points of the adjacent Gaussian components are subsequently used as threshold values, whereas different classes can be clustered. This method is used to classify the terrain of an urban area in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, into four main classes, namely roofs, trees, asphalt and grass. It is shown that the proposed method has achieved an overall accuracy up to 95.1 % using different NDVIs.

  6. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  7. Monitoring Riverbank Erosion in Mountain Catchments Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Longoni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sediment yield is a key factor in river basins management due to the various and adverse consequences that erosion and sediment transport in rivers may have on the environment. Although various contributions can be found in the literature about sediment yield modeling and bank erosion monitoring, the link between weather conditions, river flow rate and bank erosion remains scarcely known. Thus, a basin scale assessment of sediment yield due to riverbank erosion is an objective hard to be reached. In order to enhance the current knowledge in this field, a monitoring method based on high resolution 3D model reconstruction of riverbanks, surveyed by multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning, was applied to four banks in Val Tartano, Northern Italy. Six data acquisitions over one year were taken, with the aim to better understand the erosion processes and their triggering factors by means of more frequent observations compared to usual annual campaigns. The objective of the research is to address three key questions concerning bank erosion: “how” erosion happens, “when” during the year and “how much” sediment is eroded. The method proved to be effective and able to measure both eroded and deposited volume in the surveyed area. Finally an attempt to extrapolate basin scale volume for bank erosion is presented.

  8. Performance of a scanning laser line striper in outdoor lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    For search and rescue robots and reconnaissance robots it is important to detect objects in their vicinity. We have developed a scanning laser line striper that can produce dense 3D images using active illumination. The scanner consists of a camera and a MEMS-micro mirror based projector. It can also detect the presence of optically difficult material like glass and metal. The sensor can be used for autonomous operation or it can help a human operator to better remotely control the robot. In this paper we will evaluate the performance of the scanner under outdoor illumination, i.e. from operating in the shade to operating in full sunlight. We report the range, resolution and accuracy of the sensor and its ability to reconstruct objects like grass, wooden blocks, wires, metal objects, electronic devices like cell phones, blank RPG, and other inert explosive devices. Furthermore we evaluate its ability to detect the presence of glass and polished metal objects. Lastly we report on a user study that shows a significant improvement in a grasping task. The user is tasked with grasping a wire with the remotely controlled hand of a robot. We compare the time it takes to complete the task using the 3D scanner with using a traditional video camera.

  9. MEASURING LEAF WATER CONTENT USING MULTISPECTRAL TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING

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    S. Junttila

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is increasing the amount and intensity of disturbance events, i.e. drought, pest insect outbreaks and fungal pathogens, in forests worldwide. Leaf water content (LWC is an early indicator of tree stress that can be measured remotely using multispectral terrestrial laser scanning (MS-TLS. LWC affects leaf reflectance in the shortwave infrared spectrum which can be used to predict LWC from spatially explicit MS-TLS intensity data. Here, we investigated the relationship between LWC and MS-TLS intensity features at 690 nm, 905 nm and 1550 nm wavelengths with Norway spruce seedlings in greenhouse conditions. We found that a simple ratio of 905 nm and 1550 nm wavelengths was able to explain 84 % of the variation (R2 in LWC with a respective prediction accuracy of 0.0041 g/cm2. Our results showed that MS-TLS can be used to estimate LWC with a reasonable accuracy in environmentally stable conditions.

  10. Nondestructive evaluation of composite materials via scanning laser ultrasound spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskelo, Elise Anne C.; Flynn, Eric B.

    2017-04-01

    Composite materials pose a complex problem for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation due to their unique material properties, greater damping, and often complicated geometry. In this study, we explored acoustic wavenumber spectroscopy (AWS) as a means of rapid inspection of laminate and honeycomb composites. Each aerospace sample was tested at different ultrasonic frequencies using steady-state excitation via a piezo electric actuator. We measured the velocity response of the composite at each pixel via a raster scan using a laser Doppler vibrometer. We were able to detect radial inserts along corners, delamination, and facing-core separation by analyzing local amplitude and wavenumber responses. For each honeycomb composite, we excited the sample at the first resonant frequency of the individual cells. The local mode shape for each cell was extracted from the local amplitude response. Analyzing local amplitude and phase responses for each cell provided an accurate indication as to the presence, size, shape, and type of defect present in the composite. We detected both delamination and deformation of cells within a honeycomb composite. For the laminar composites, we analyzed the non-resonance steady-state response at several excitation frequencies.

  11. Detecting Terrain Stoniness From Airborne Laser Scanning Data †

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    Paavo Nevalainen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Three methods to estimate the presence of ground surface stones from publicly available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS point clouds are presented. The first method approximates the local curvature by local linear multi-scale fitting, and the second method uses Discrete-Differential Gaussian curvature based on the ground surface triangulation. The third baseline method applies Laplace filtering to Digital Elevation Model (DEM in a 2 m regular grid data. All methods produce an approximate Gaussian curvature distribution which is then vectorized and classified by logistic regression. Two training data sets consisted of 88 and 674 polygons of mass-flow deposits, respectively. The locality of the polygon samples is a sparse canopy boreal forest, where the density of ALS ground returns is sufficiently high to reveal information about terrain micro-topography. The surface stoniness of each polygon sample was categorized for supervised learning by expert observation on the site. The leave-pair-out (L2O cross-validation of the local linear fit method results in the area under curve A U C = 0 . 74 and A U C = 0 . 85 on two data sets, respectively. This performance can be expected to suit real world applications such as detecting coarse-grained sediments for infrastructure construction. A wall-to-wall predictor based on the study was demonstrated.

  12. Perfusion measures from dynamic ICG scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

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    Larkin, Sean; Invernizzi, Alessandro; Beecher, David; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Tim

    2010-02-01

    Movies acquired from fundus imaging using Indocyanine Green (ICG) and a scanning laser ophthalmoscope provide information for identifying vascular and other retinal abnormalities. Today, the main limitation of this modality is that it requires esoteric training for interpretation. A straightforward interpretation of these movies by objective measurements would aid in eliminating this training barrier. A software program has been developed and tested that produces and visualizes 2D maps of perfusion measures. The program corrects for frame-to-frame misalignment caused by eye motion, including rigid misalignment and warp. The alignment method uses a cross-correlation operation that automatically detects the distance due to motion between adjacent frames. The d-ICG movie is further corrected by removing flicker and vignetting artifacts. Each pixel in the corrected movie sequence is fit with a least-squares spline to yield a smooth intensity temporal profile. From the dynamics of these intensity curves, several perfusion measures are calculated. The most effective of these measures include a metric that represents the amount of time required for a vessel to fill with dye, a metric that represents the diffusion of dye, and a metric that is affected by local blood volume. These metrics are calculated from movies acquired before and after treatment for a neovascular condition. A comparison of these before and after measures may someday provide information to the clinician that helps them to evaluate disease progression and response to treatment.

  13. High-Q MEMS Resonators for Laser Beam Scanning Displays

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    Ulrich Hofmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on design, fabrication and characterization of high-Q MEMS resonators to be used in optical applications like laser displays and LIDAR range sensors. Stacked vertical comb drives for electrostatic actuation of single-axis scanners and biaxial MEMS mirrors were realized in a dual layer polysilicon SOI process. High Q-factors up to 145,000 have been achieved applying wafer level vacuum packaging technology including deposition of titanium thin film getters. The effective reduction of gas damping allows the MEMS actuator to achieve large amplitudes at high oscillation frequencies while driving voltage and power consumption can be minimized. Exemplarily shown is a micro scanner that achieves a total optical scan angle of 86 degrees at a resonant frequency of 30.8 kHz, which fulfills the requirements for HD720 resolution. Furthermore, results of a new wafer based glass-forming technology for fabrication of three dimensionally shaped glass lids with tilted optical windows are presented.

  14. Clustering of Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning Data Using Gaussian Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, S.; Shaker, A.; El-Rabbany, A.

    2017-09-01

    With the evolution of the LiDAR technology, multispectral airborne laser scanning systems are currently available. The first operational multispectral airborne LiDAR sensor, the Optech Titan, acquires LiDAR point clouds at three different wavelengths (1.550, 1.064, 0.532 μm), allowing the acquisition of different spectral information of land surface. Consequently, the recent studies are devoted to use the radiometric information (i.e., intensity) of the LiDAR data along with the geometric information (e.g., height) for classification purposes. In this study, a data clustering method, based on Gaussian decomposition, is presented. First, a ground filtering mechanism is applied to separate non-ground from ground points. Then, three normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVIs) are computed for both non-ground and ground points, followed by histograms construction from each NDVI. The Gaussian function model is used to decompose the histograms into a number of Gaussian components. The maximum likelihood estimate of the Gaussian components is then optimized using Expectation - Maximization algorithm. The intersection points of the adjacent Gaussian components are subsequently used as threshold values, whereas different classes can be clustered. This method is used to classify the terrain of an urban area in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, into four main classes, namely roofs, trees, asphalt and grass. It is shown that the proposed method has achieved an overall accuracy up to 95.1 % using different NDVIs.

  15. VISUALIZATION OF MACULAR PUCKER BY MULTICOLOR SCANNING LASER IMAGING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic Muftuoglu, Ilkay; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Barteselli, Giulio; Gaber, Raouf; Nezgoda, Joseph; Freeman, William R

    2018-02-01

    To compare the visualization of the epiretinal membrane (ERM) using multicolor imaging (MCI) (Heidelberg Engineering, Carlsbad, CA) and conventional white light flood color fundus photography (FP) (Topcon). The paired images of patients with ERM who underwent same-day MCI and FP examinations were reviewed. Visibility of the ERM was graded using a scale (0: not visible, 1: barely visible, and 2: clearly visible) by masked readers, and surface folds were counted to quantify the membrane visibility for each method. Images from individual color channels in MCI (green, blue, and infrared) were also graded using the same method to further investigate MCI images. Forty-eight eyes of 42 patients were included. The average ERM visibility score was 1.8 ± 0.37 for MCI and 1.01 ± 0.63 for FP (P provided better detection of surface folds (5.54 ± 2.12) compared to blue reflectance (4.2 ± 2.34) and infrared reflectance (1.2 ± 0.9). Multicolor scanning laser imaging provides superior ERM detection and delineation of surface folds than conventional FP, primarily due to the green channel present in the combination-pseudocolor image in MCI.

  16. AN AUTOMATED ROAD ROUGHNESS DETECTION FROM MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA

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    P. Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rough roads influence the safety of the road users as accident rate increases with increasing unevenness of the road surface. Road roughness regions are required to be efficiently detected and located in order to ensure their maintenance. Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS systems provide a rapid and cost-effective alternative by providing accurate and dense point cloud data along route corridor. In this paper, an automated algorithm is presented for detecting road roughness from MLS data. The presented algorithm is based on interpolating smooth intensity raster surface from LiDAR point cloud data using point thinning process. The interpolated surface is further processed using morphological and multi-level Otsu thresholding operations to identify candidate road roughness regions. The candidate regions are finally filtered based on spatial density and standard deviation of elevation criteria to detect the roughness along the road surface. The test results of road roughness detection algorithm on two road sections are presented. The developed approach can be used to provide comprehensive information to road authorities in order to schedule maintenance and ensure maximum safety conditions for road users.

  17. Multi-Pass Approach for Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, J.; Eckels, R.; Evers, M.; Singh, R.; Olsen, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning (MTLS) has been utilised for an increasing number of corridor surveys. Current MTLS surveys require that many targets be placed along the corridor to monitor the MTLS trajectory's accuracy. These targets enable surveyors to directly evaluate the magnitude of GNSS errors at regular intervals and can also be used to adjust the trajectory to the survey control. However, this "Multi-Target" approach (MTA) is an onerous task that can significantly reduce efficiency. It also is inconvenient to the travelling public, as lanes are often blocked and traffic slowed to permit surveyors to work safely along the road corridor. This paper introduces a "Multi-Pass" approach (MPA), which minimises the number of targets required for monitoring the GNSS-controlled trajectory while still maintaining strict engineering accuracies. MPA uses the power of multiple, independent MTLS passes with different GNSS constellations to generate a "Control Polyline" from the point cloud for the corridor. The Control Polyline can be considered as a statistically valid survey measurement and be incorporated in a network adjustment to strengthen a control network by identifying outliers. Results from a test survey at the MTLS course maintained by the Oregon Department of Transportation illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.

  18. [The developement of the near-field scan optical microscope and near-field spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Zhang, S

    1997-08-01

    This paper introduces the basic principles and techniques of the near-field microscope and the status of recent development in the near-field spectroscopy. We also discuss problems facing the analysis of the results of the near-field spectra.

  19. An Analytical and Experimental Investigation of Average Laser Power and Angular Scanning Speed Effects on Laser Tube Bending Process

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    Imhan Khalil Ibraheem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser tube bending is a new technique of laser material forming to produce a complex and accurate shape due to its flexibility and high controllability. Moreover, the defects during conventional tube forming such as thinning, wrinkling, spring back and ovalization can be avoided in laser tube bending process, because there is no external force used. In this paper an analytical investigation has been conducted to analyses the effects of average laser power and laser scanning speed on laser tube bending process, the analytical results have been verified experimentally. The model used in this study is in the same trend of the experiment. The results show that the bending angle increased with the increasing of average laser power and decreased with the increasing of angular scanning speed.

  20. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.