WorldWideScience

Sample records for scanning electron

  1. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the object and, connected to the detector, a device for processing the detected electrons so as to form an object image, wherein a beam splitter is provided for dividing the electron beam from the electron...

  3. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for whic...

  4. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  5. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  6. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital c...

  7. Electronically-Scanned Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, C. F.; Parra, G. T.; Kauffman, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Sensors not pneumatically switched. Electronic pressure-transducer scanning system constructed in modular form. Pressure transducer modules and analog to digital converter module small enough to fit within cavities of average-sized wind-tunnel models. All switching done electronically. Temperature controlled environment maintained within sensor modules so accuracy maintained while ambient temperature varies.

  8. UAVSAR Active Electronically Scanned Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowy, Gregory, A.; Chamberlain, Neil F.; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Brown, Kyle M.; Fisher, Charles D.; Figueroa, Harry S.; Hamilton, Gary A.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Vorperian, Vatche; Grando, Maurio B.

    2011-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a pod-based, L-band (1.26 GHz), repeatpass, interferometric, synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Repeat-pass interferometric radar measurements from an airborne platform require an antenna that can be steered to maintain the same angle with respect to the flight track over a wide range of aircraft yaw angles. In order to be able to collect repeat-pass InSAR data over a wide range of wind conditions, UAVSAR employs an active electronically scanned array (AESA). During data collection, the UAVSAR flight software continuously reads the aircraft attitude state measured by the Embedded GPS/INS system (EGI) and electronically steers the beam so that it remains perpendicular to the flight track throughout the data collection

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This chapter described methods for Scanning Electron Microscopical imaging of bone and bone cells. Backscattered electron (BSE) imaging is by far the most useful in the bone field, followed by secondary electrons (SE) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analytical modes. This chapter considers preparing and imaging samples of unembedded bone having 3D detail in a 3D surface, topography-free, polished or micromilled, resin-embedded block surfaces, and resin casts of space in bone matrix. The chapter considers methods for fixation, drying, looking at undersides of bone cells, and coating. Maceration with alkaline bacterial pronase, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium or potassium hydroxide to remove cells and unmineralised matrix is described in detail. Attention is given especially to methods for 3D BSE SEM imaging of bone samples and recommendations for the types of resin embedding of bone for BSE imaging are given. Correlated confocal and SEM imaging of PMMA-embedded bone requires the use of glycerol to coverslip. Cathodoluminescence (CL) mode SEM imaging is an alternative for visualising fluorescent mineralising front labels such as calcein and tetracyclines. Making spatial casts from PMMA or other resin embedded samples is an important use of this material. Correlation with other imaging means, including microradiography and microtomography is important. Shipping wet bone samples between labs is best done in glycerol. Environmental SEM (ESEM, controlled vacuum mode) is valuable in eliminating -"charging" problems which are common with complex, cancellous bone samples.

  10. Multibeam scanning electron microscope : Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the first results obtained with their multibeam scanning electron microscope. For the first time, they were able to image 196 (array of 14×14) focused beams of a multielectron beam source on a specimen using single beam scanning electron microscope (SEM) optics. The system

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopy in modern dentistry research

    OpenAIRE

    Paradella, Thaís Cachuté; Unesp-FOSJC; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Unesp-FOSJC

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the usage of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in dentistry research nowadays, through a careful and updated literature review. By using the key-words Scanning Electron Microscopy and one of the following areas of research in dentistry (Endodontics, Periodontics and Implant), in international database (PubMed), in the year of 2012 (from January to September), a total of 112 articles were found. This data was tabled and the articles were classified ac...

  12. Wettability study using transmitted electrons in environmental scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkay, Z.

    2010-05-01

    A method for quantitative wettability study at nanoscale is presented. It is based on measuring transmitted electrons through nanodroplets using wet scanning transmission electron microscope (wet-STEM) detector in environmental scanning electron microscope. The quantitative information of the nanodroplet shape and contact angle is obtained by fitting Monte Carlo simulation results for transmitted electrons through spherical cap geometry with the experimental wet-STEM results. The characterization is demonstrated for particles and for initial stages of water droplet condensation over a nonhomogeneous holey carbon grid. The method is suggested for application in thin polymer and biological films.

  13. Development of Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscope Capability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Kimberlee Chiyoko [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Talin, Albert Alec [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandler, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Michael, Joseph R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Modern semiconductor devices rely on the transport of minority charge carriers. Direct examination of minority carrier lifetimes in real devices with nanometer-scale features requires a measurement method with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Achieving nanometer spatial resolutions at sub-nanosecond temporal resolution is possible with pump-probe methods that utilize electrons as probes. Recently, a stroboscopic scanning electron microscope was developed at Caltech, and used to study carrier transport across a Si p-n junction [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] . In this report, we detail our development of a prototype scanning ultrafast electron microscope system at Sandia National Laboratories based on the original Caltech design. This effort represents Sandia's first exploration into ultrafast electron microscopy.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy study of Trichomonas gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Tiana; De Carli, Geraldo A

    2003-12-01

    A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of Trichomonas gallinae (Rivolta, 1878), provided more information about the morphology of this flagellated protozoan. SEM showed the morphological features of the trophozoites; the emergence of the anterior flagella, the structure of the undulating membrane, the position and shape of the pelta, axostyle and posterior flagellum. Of special interest were the pseudocyst forms.

  15. Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McVitie, S., E-mail: stephen.mcvitie@glasgow.ac.uk; McGrouther, D.; McFadzean, S.; MacLaren, D.A.; O’Shea, K.J.; Benitez, M.J.

    2015-05-15

    We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale. - Highlights: • Demonstration of nanometre scale resolution in magnetic field free environment using aberration correction in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). • Implementation of differential phase contrast mode of Lorentz microscopy in aberration corrected STEM with improved sensitivity. • Quantitative imaging of magnetic induction of nanostructures in amorphous and cross-section samples.

  16. Scanning electron microscopic observations on bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C; Danylchuk, K D

    1977-01-01

    The maceration technique employed in the preparation of specimens of bone for museum purposes has also been found to be of use in the preparation of fresh specimens for study with the scanning electron microscope. The technique requires less technical supervision, permits a greater underprocessing to overprocessing margin, and allows comparability of recent biopsy material with previously macerated bone specimens with no less detail than that found by other authors using other techniques on biopsy material.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of molluscum contagiosum*

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida Jr,Hiram Larangeira de; Abuchaim,Martha Oliveira; Schneide, Maiko Abel; Marques, Leandra; Castro, Luis Antônio Suíta de

    2013-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a disease caused by a poxvirus. It is more prevalent in children up to 5 years of age. There is a second peak of incidence in young adults. In order to examine its ultrastructure, three lesions were curetted without disruption, cut transversely with a scalpel, and routinely processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The oval structure of molluscum contagiosum could be easily identified. In its core, there was a central umbilication and just below this depressio...

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of cold gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Bodhaditya; Ott, Herwig

    2015-06-01

    Ultracold quantum gases offer unique possibilities to study interacting many-body quantum systems. Probing and manipulating such systems with ever increasing degree of control requires novel experimental techniques. Scanning electron microscopy is a high resolution technique which can be used for in situ imaging, single site addressing in optical lattices and precision density engineering. Here, we review recent advances and achievements obtained with this technique and discuss future perspectives.

  20. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kociak, M., E-mail: mathieu.kociak@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-SudParis-Sud, CNRS-UMR 8502, Orsay 91405 (France); Zagonel, L.F. [“Gleb Wataghin” Institute of Physics University of Campinas - UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. - Highlights: • Reviews the field of STEM-CL. • Introduces the technical requirements and challenges for STEM-CL. • Introduces the different types of excitations probed by STEM-CL. • Gives comprehensive overview of the last fifteenth years in the field.

  1. Dopant profiling with the scanning electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, S L

    2001-01-01

    This dissertation is a detailed study of dopant profiling with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) using secondary electrons. The technique has been applied to a wide variety of doped silicon, gallium arsenide and gallium nitride semiconductor test structures as well as a metal-oxide field effect transistor and several light emitting diodes. A concise set of guide-lines are provided for users of this technique, including the optimum SEM operating conditions that should be used for maximum contrast, an image manipulation procedure, and the resolution and sensitivity limits that can be expected. Dopant contrast observed with the SEM has been studied over the past few years by a number of researchers, and a theory for the contrast has evolved. This theory considers the patch fields outside the specimen to be the dominant factor determining the secondary electron intensity. In this dissertation the contrast mechanism has been further investigated by examining the contrast at different temperatures and after su...

  2. Phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoda, Hiroki; Tamai, Takayuki; Iijima, Hirofumi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kondo, Yukihito

    2015-06-01

    This report introduces the first results obtained using phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (P-STEM). A carbon-film phase plate (PP) with a small center hole is placed in the condenser aperture plane so that a phase shift is introduced in the incident electron waves except those passing through the center hole. A cosine-type phase-contrast transfer function emerges when the phase-shifted scattered waves interfere with the non-phase-shifted unscattered waves, which passed through the center hole before incidence onto the specimen. The phase contrast resulting in P-STEM is optically identical to that in phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy that is used to provide high contrast for weak phase objects. Therefore, the use of PPs can enhance the phase contrast of the STEM images of specimens in principle. The phase shift resulting from the PP, whose thickness corresponds to a phase shift of π, has been confirmed using interference fringes displayed in the Ronchigram of a silicon single crystal specimen. The interference fringes were found to abruptly shift at the edge of the PP hole by π. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Towards Automated Nanomanipulation under Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xutao

    Robotic Nanomaterial Manipulation inside scanning electron microscopes (SEM) is useful for prototyping functional devices and characterizing one-dimensional nanomaterial's properties. Conventionally, manipulation of nanowires has been performed via teleoperation, which is time-consuming and highly skill-dependent. Manual manipulation also has the limitation of low success rates and poor reproducibility. This research focuses on a robotic system capable of automated pick-place of single nanowires. Through SEM visual detection and vision-based motion control, the system transferred individual silicon nanowires from their growth substrate to a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device that characterized the nanowires' electromechanical properties. The performances of the nanorobotic pick-up and placement procedures were quantified by experiments. The system demonstrated automated nanowire pick-up and placement with high reliability. A software system for a load-lock-compatible nanomanipulation system is also designed and developed in this research.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of molluscum contagiosum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Abuchaim, Martha Oliveira; Schneider, Maiko Abel; Marques, Leandra; de Castro, Luis Antônio Suíta

    2013-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a disease caused by a poxvirus. It is more prevalent in children up to 5 years of age. There is a second peak of incidence in young adults. In order to examine its ultrastructure, three lesions were curetted without disruption, cut transversely with a scalpel, and routinely processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The oval structure of molluscum contagiosum could be easily identified. In its core, there was a central umbilication and just below this depression, there was a keratinized tunnel. Under higher magnification, a proliferation similar to the epidermis was seen. Moreover, there were areas of cells disposed like a mosaic. Under higher magnification, rounded structures measuring 0.4 micron could be observed at the end of the keratinized tunnel and on the surface of the lesion. PMID:23539009

  5. Simplifying Electron Beam Channeling in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ryan J; Mittal, Anudha; Odlyzko, Michael L; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2017-08-01

    Sub-angstrom scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows quantitative column-by-column analysis of crystalline specimens via annular dark-field images. The intensity of electrons scattered from a particular location in an atomic column depends on the intensity of the electron probe at that location. Electron beam channeling causes oscillations in the STEM probe intensity during specimen propagation, which leads to differences in the beam intensity incident at different depths. Understanding the parameters that control this complex behavior is critical for interpreting experimental STEM results. In this work, theoretical analysis of the STEM probe intensity reveals that intensity oscillations during specimen propagation are regulated by changes in the beam's angular distribution. Three distinct regimes of channeling behavior are observed: the high-atomic-number (Z) regime, in which atomic scattering leads to significant angular redistribution of the beam; the low-Z regime, in which the probe's initial angular distribution controls intensity oscillations; and the intermediate-Z regime, in which the behavior is mixed. These contrasting regimes are shown to exist for a wide range of probe parameters. These results provide a new understanding of the occurrence and consequences of channeling phenomena and conditions under which their influence is strengthened or weakened by characteristics of the electron probe and sample.

  6. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp, to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders. It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  7. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  8. Time-Resolved Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    .... The pulsed electron beam is obtained by rapidly switching the electron emission of a field emission tip using the AC electric field arising from exposure to the intense electromagnetic radiation...

  9. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  10. Technology scan for electronic toll collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify and assess available technologies and methodologies for electronic toll collection (ETC) and to develop recommendations for the best way(s) to implement toll collection in the Louisville metropolitan area. ...

  11. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-15

    50. How to cite this article: Hema BS, Chandu GS, Shiraguppi VL. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces prepared with three rotary endodontic systems: Lightspeed, ProTaper and EndoWave. Niger J.

  12. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  13. UAVSAR Active Electronically-Scanned Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Chamberlain, Neil; Figueroa, Harry; Fisher, Charlie; Grando, Maurio; Hamilton, Gary; Vorperian, Vatche; Zawadzki, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) repeat pass, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Using complex radar images collected during separate passes on time scales of hours to years, changes in surface topography can be measured. The repeat-pass InSAR technique requires that the radar look angle be approximately the same on successive passes. Due to variations in aircraft attitude between passes, antenna beam steering is required to replicate the radar look angle. This paper describes an active, electronically steered array (AESA) that provides beam steering capability in the antenna azimuth plane. The array contains 24 transmit/receive modules generating 2800 W of radiated power and is capable of pulse-to-pulse beam steering and polarization agility. Designed for high reliability as well as serviceability, all array electronics are contained in single 178cm x 62cm x 12 cm air-cooled panel suitable for operation up 60,000 ft altitude.

  14. Characterization of Polycaprolactone Films Biodeterioration by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubanová, Kamila; Voberková, S.; Hermanová, S.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, S3 (2014), s. 1950-1951 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : polycaprolactone films * biodeterioration * scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.877, year: 2014

  15. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilatos, Gerasimos, E-mail: gerry@danilatos.com [ESEM Research Laboratory, 28 Wallis Parade, North Bondi, NSW 2026 (Australia); Kollia, Mary [Laboratory of Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis, School of Natural Sciences, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Dracopoulos, Vassileios [Foundation for Research & Technology-Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani P.O.Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-03-15

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. - Highlights: • Novel scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) called TESEM. • Use of the gaseous detection device (GDD) in scintillation mode that allows high resolution bright and dark field imaging in the TESEM. • Novel approach towards a unification of both vacuum and environmental conditions in both bulk/surface and transmission mode of electron microscopy.

  16. Transmission electron imaging in the Delft multibeam scanning electron microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.; Kruit, P.

    2016-01-01

    Our group is developing a multibeam scanning electron microscope (SEM) with 196 beams in order to increase the throughput of SEM. Three imaging systems using, respectively, transmission electron detection, secondary electron detection, and backscatter electron detection are designed in order to

  17. Composition quantification of electron-transparent samples by backscattered electron imaging in scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, E., E-mail: erich.mueller@kit.edu; Gerthsen, D.

    2017-02-15

    The contrast of backscattered electron (BSE) images in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) depends on material parameters which can be exploited for composition quantification if some information on the material system is available. As an example, the In-concentration in thin In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As layers embedded in a GaAs matrix is analyzed in this work. The spatial resolution of the technique is improved by using thin electron-transparent specimens instead of bulk samples. Although the BSEs are detected in a comparably small angular range by an annular semiconductor detector, the image intensity can be evaluated to determine the composition and local thickness of the specimen. The measured intensities are calibrated within one single image to eliminate the influence of the detection and amplification system. Quantification is performed by comparison of experimental and calculated data. Instead of using time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations, an analytical model is applied for BSE-intensity calculations which considers single electron scattering and electron diffusion. - Highlights: • Sample thickness and composition are quantified by backscattered electron imaging. • A thin sample is used to achieve spatial resolution of few nanometers. • Calculations are carried out with a time-saving electron diffusion model. • Small differences in atomic number and density detected at low electron energies.

  18. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  19. Applications of orientation mapping by scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    The potentials of orientation mapping techniques (in the following referred to as OIM) for studies of thermomechanical processes are analysed. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based OIM techniques are considered. Among the thermomechanical processes...... information is achieved when the results of OIM and these various techniques are combined. Examples hereof are given to illustrate the potentials of OIM techniques. Finally, limitations of TEM and SEM based OIM for specific applications are discussed....

  20. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The distribution of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) in himematsutake was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The atomic percentage of the metals was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Results show that the accumulation of ...

  1. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made.

  2. New Scanning Electron Microscope Used for Cryogenic Tensile Testing

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    At CERN engineering department's installation for cryogenic tensile testing, the new scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for detailed optical observations to be carried out. Using the SEM, surface coatings and tensile properties of materials can investigated in order to better understand how they behave under different conditions.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of Dermatobia hominis reveals cutaneous anchoring features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Mempel, Martin; Weichenmeier, Ingrid; Engst, Reinhard; Ring, Johannnes; Behrendt, Heidrun

    2007-10-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman suffering from cutaneous myiasis. With the use of scanning electron microscopy, we placed special focus on the mechanisms by which Dermatobia hominis can fasten securely within the human skin.

  4. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces prepared with three rotary endodontic systems: Lightspeed, ProTaper and EndoWave. ... presence or absence of debris and smear layer and the photographs were taken at coronal, middle and apical 1/3 with a magnification of ~200 and ~1000 respectively.

  5. Assessment of root surfaces of apicected teeth: A scanning electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-15

    May 15, 2014 ... Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the apical surface characteristics and presence of dental cracks in single‑rooted premolars, resected 3.0 mm from the root apex, using the Er: YAG laser, tungsten carbide bur, and diamond‑coated tip, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental ...

  6. Assessment of root surfaces of apicected teeth: A scanning electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the apical surface characteristics and presence of dental cracks in single‑rooted premolars, resected 3.0 mm from the root apex, using the Er: YAG laser, tungsten carbide bur, and diamond‑coated tip, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental design: Thirty ...

  7. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  8. Closed-Loop Autofocus Scheme for Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Le

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a full scale autofocus approach for scanning electron microscope (SEM. The optimal focus (in-focus position of the microscope is achieved by maximizing the image sharpness using a vision-based closed-loop control scheme. An iterative optimization algorithm has been designed using the sharpness score derived from image gradient information. The proposed method has been implemented and validated using a tungsten gun SEM at various experimental conditions like varying raster scan speed, magnification at real-time. We demonstrate that the proposed autofocus technique is accurate, robust and fast.

  9. Parallel electron-beam-induced deposition using a multi-beam scanning electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, P.C.; Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2011-01-01

    Lithography techniques based on electron-beam-induced processes are inherently slow compared to light lithography techniques. The authors demonstrate here that the throughput can be enhanced by a factor of 196 by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a multibeam electron source. Using

  10. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  11. Contribution of Metal Layer Thickness for Quantitative Backscattered Electron Imaging of Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Hyonchol; Takei, Hiroyuki; Negishi, Tsutomu; Kudo, Masato; Terazono, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    ...) imaging in field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were studied to evaluate the potential of using these particles as simultaneously distinguishable labels of target molecules in FE-SEM studies...

  12. Time-resolved scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frömter, Robert, E-mail: rfroemte@physik.uni-hamburg.de; Oepen, Hans Peter [Institut für Nanostruktur-und Festkörperphysik, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kloodt, Fabian; Rößler, Stefan; Frauen, Axel; Staeck, Philipp; Cavicchia, Demetrio R. [Institut für Nanostruktur-und Festkörperphysik, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Bocklage, Lars [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Röbisch, Volker; Quandt, Eckhard [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-04-04

    We demonstrate the feasibility of investigating periodically driven magnetization dynamics in a scanning electron microscope with polarization analysis based on spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction. With the present setup, analyzing the time structure of the scattering events, we obtain a temporal resolution of 700 ps, which is demonstrated by means of imaging the field-driven 100 MHz gyration of the vortex in a soft-magnetic FeCoSiB square. Owing to the efficient intrinsic timing scheme, high-quality movies, giving two components of the magnetization simultaneously, can be recorded on the time scale of hours.

  13. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Surface morphology of Trichinella spiralis by scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.W. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook); Ledbetter, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    The surface morphology of larval and adult Trichinella spiralis was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fixed, dried, and metal-coated specimens. The results are compared with those found earlier by various investigators using light and transmission electron microscopy. Some morphological features reported here are revealed uniquely by SEM. These include the pores of the cephalic sense organs, the character of secondary cuticular folds, variations of the hypodermal gland cell openings or pores, and the presence of particles on the copulatory bell.

  15. Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy and X Ray Microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsley, David

    This text is the third in a group that evolved from a short course taught annually at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pa., since 1972. Chapters on magnetic contrast a nd electron channeling, dropped from the second volume for reasons of space, are included here along with new topics such as image processing. The first seven chapters should be oT value to those geologists interested in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microanalysis. Chapters 8 and 9, concerned with specimen preparation for biological SEM a nd cryomicroscopy, make up about one third of the text.

  16. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  18. Black hairy tongue. A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y; Gaafar, H

    1977-01-01

    A patient with tongue malignancy associated with a black hairy tongue is presented. Specimens from e area fo the black hairy tongue and from a normally appearing part were studied with the scanning electron microscope. The "hairs" consisted of elongated filiform papillae due to accumulated keratinized layers. In-between these layers, fungi and bacteria were found. The aetiology of the blck hairy tongue in this patient is discussed.

  19. Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cristispira Species in Chesapeake Bay Oysters

    OpenAIRE

    Tall, Ben D.; Nauman, Robert K.

    1981-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was employed to observe the physical interactions between Cristispira spp. and the crystalline style of the Chesapeake Bay oyster (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin 1791). Cristispira organisms were found associated with both the inner and outer layers of the posterior two-thirds of the style. The spirochetes possessed blunt-tipped ends, a cell diameter range of 0.6 to 0.8 μm, and distended spirochetal envelopes which followed the contour of the cells. Transmission ele...

  20. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Samples in an Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Ludĕk; Hovorka, Miloš; Mikmeková, Šárka; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona; Pokorná, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    The high negative bias of a sample in a scanning electron microscope constitutes the “cathode lens” with a strong electric field just above the sample surface. This mode offers a convenient tool for controlling the landing energy of electrons down to units or even fractions of electronvolts with only slight readjustments of the column. Moreover, the field accelerates and collimates the signal electrons to earthed detectors above and below the sample, thereby assuring high collection efficiency and high amplification of the image signal. One important feature is the ability to acquire the complete emission of the backscattered electrons, including those emitted at high angles with respect to the surface normal. The cathode lens aberrations are proportional to the landing energy of electrons so the spot size becomes nearly constant throughout the full energy scale. At low energies and with their complete angular distribution acquired, the backscattered electron images offer enhanced information about crystalline and electronic structures thanks to contrast mechanisms that are otherwise unavailable. Examples from various areas of materials science are presented.

  1. Simulation and Characterization of a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Abbott, Terry O.; Sampson, Allen R.

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mSEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This effort focuses on the characterization of individual components of the mSEM and simulation of the complete system. SEMs can provide information on the size, shape, morphology and chemical composition of lunar regolith. Understanding these basic properties will allow us to better estimate the challenges associated with In-Situ Resource Utilization and to improve our basic science knowledge of the lunar surface (either precluding the need for sample return or allowing differentiation of unique samples to be returned to Earth.) The main components of the mSEM prototype includes: a cold field emission electron gun (CFEG), focusing lens, deflection/scanning system and backscatter electron detector. Of these, the electron gun development is of particular importance as it dictates much of the design of the remaining components. A CFEG was chosen for use with the lunar mSEM as its emission does not depend on heating of the tungsten emitter (lower power), it offers a long operation lifetime, is orders of magnitude brighter than tungsten hairpin guns, has a small source size and exhibits low beam energy spread.

  2. Advantages of environmental scanning electron microscopy in studies of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S P; Pope, R K; Scheetz, R W; Ray, R I; Wagner, P A; Little, B J

    1993-08-01

    Microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and microalgae, are composed predominantly of water which prohibits direct observation in a traditional scanning electron microscope (SEM). Preparation for SEM requires that microorganisms be fixed, frozen or dehydrated, and coated with a conductive film before observation in a high vacuum environment. Sample preparation may mechanically disturb delicate samples, compromise morphological information, and introduce other artifacts. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) provides a technology for imaging hydrated or dehydrated biological samples with minimal manipulation and without the need for conductive coatings. Sporulating cultures of three fungi, Aspergillus sp., Cunninghamella sp., and Mucor sp., were imaged in the ESEM to assess usefulness of the instrument in the direct observation of delicate, uncoated, biological specimens. Asexual sporophores showed no evidence of conidial displacement or disruption of sporangia. Uncoated algal cells of Euglena gracilis and Spirogyra sp. were examined using the backscatter electron detector (BSE) and the environmental secondary electron detector (ESD) of the ESEM. BSE images had more clearly defined intracellular structures, whereas ESD gave a clearer view of the surface E. gracilis cells fixed with potassium permanganate, Spirogyra sp. stained with Lugol's solution, and Saprolegnia sp. fixed with osmium tetroxide were compared using BSE and ESD to demonstrate that cellular details could be enhanced by the introduction of heavy metals. The effect of cellular water on signal quality was evaluated by comparing hydrated to critical point dried specimens.

  3. The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, D.C. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes as an essential part of their life cycle. While living inside erythrocytes, the parasite remodels the cell's intracellular organization as well as its outer surface. Late trophozoite-stage parasites and schizonts introduce numerous small protrusions on the erythrocyte surface, called knobs. Current methods for studying these knobs include atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy. Standard electron microscopy methods rely on chemical fixation and dehydration modifying cell size. Here, a novel method is presented using rapid freezing and scanning electron microscopy under cryogenic conditions allowing for high resolution and magnification of erythrocytes. This novel technique can be used for precise estimates of knob density and for studies on cytoadhesion. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    This thesis is concerned with fundamental research into electronic and magnetic interaction on the nanoscale. From small metallic and magnetic islands and layers to single atoms. The research revolves around magnetic interaction probed through the spectroscopic capabilities of the scanning....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...... coverage the silver preferably nucleates on top of the bilayer high cobalt islands compared to directly on the Cu(111) substrate. Furthermore, the silver forms a combination of a reconstruction and a Moire pattern which is investigated with low-energy electron diraction and spectroscopic STM mapping at 6...

  6. Standard practice for scanning electron microscope beam Size characterization

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides a reproducible means by which one aspect of the performance of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) may be characterized. The resolution of an SEM depends on many factors, some of which are electron beam voltage and current, lens aberrations, contrast in the specimen, and operator-instrument-material interaction. However, the resolution for any set of conditions is limited by the size of the electron beam. This size can be quantified through the measurement of an effective apparent edge sharpness for a number of materials, two of which are suggested. This practice requires an SEM with the capability to perform line-scan traces, for example, Y-deflection waveform generation, for the suggested materials. The range of SEM magnification at which this practice is of utility is from 1000 to 50 000 × . Higher magnifications may be attempted, but difficulty in making precise measurements can be expected. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ass...

  7. Simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope images on desktop computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: christian.dwyer@mcem.monash.edu.au [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Two independent strategies are presented for reducing the computation time of multislice simulations of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images: (1) optimal probe sampling, and (2) the use of desktop graphics processing units. The first strategy is applicable to STEM images generated by elastic and/or inelastic scattering, and requires minimal effort for its implementation. Used together, these two strategies can reduce typical computation times from days to hours, allowing practical simulation of STEM images of general atomic structures on a desktop computer.

  8. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning...... Electron Microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Twenty intact human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into four groups (n=5) treated as follows: G1- storage in artificial saliva (control group); G2- four 30-minute applications of 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure...

  9. [Pulmonary hydatidosis. Comparison of cytology and scanning electron microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaud, F; Nou, J M; Sadrin, R; de Montreynaud, J M; Adnet, J J

    1986-01-01

    The puncture of a hydatid cyst with a fine needle is not generally recommended as a procedure and may even be contra-indicated in the first instance. Sometimes, however, the cytologist will be surprised to discover some scolices in the aspirate when the radiology is misleading, or not suggestive, and the serology is negative. We report two cases where the diagnosis was made by the cytological examination of the aspirate. The cytological study of the liquids was compared with electron microscopy scanning, enabling the stages of development of the parasite in the tissue of the pulmonary parenchyma to be assessed.

  10. [Enamel bundles and lamellae under the scanning electron microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bures, H; Svejda, J

    1976-01-01

    Lamellae, tufts and cracks were found in the enamel near the dentionenamel junction. When investigated by the scanning electron microscop, lamellae and tufts were very similar to each other as to their structure. Lamellae appeared in two kinds: 1. Organic material originating in the dentionenamel membrane filled the whole space. 2. The space was empty, yet an organic membrane was covering the walls of adjacent prisms. Tufts and lamellae differed merely in their lenght. The walls of the cracks lacked organic material, the prisms being damaged or their course interrupted.

  11. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, K. S., E-mail: kssim@mmu.edu.my; Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  12. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-01-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Scanning electron microscopy of heat-damaged bone tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsanyl, L

    1977-02-01

    Parts of diaphyses of bones were exposed to high temperature of 200-1300 degrees C. Damage to the bone tissue caused by the heat was investigated. The scanning electron microscopic picture seems to be characteristic of the temperature applied. When the bones heated to the high temperature of 700 degrees C characteristic changes appear on the periostal surface, higher temperatura on the other hand causes damage to the compact bone tissue and can be observed on the fracture-surface. Author stresses the importance of this technique in the legal medicine and anthropology.

  14. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Jason, E-mail: jason.holm@nist.gov; Keller, Robert R.

    2016-08-15

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. - Highlights: • A modular aperture system for STEM-in-SEM imaging is described. • A flexible cantilever sample holder that can maximize camera length is described. • The aperture system and sample holder enable complete acceptance angle control. • Most STEM imaging modes can be implemented without multi-segment detectors.

  15. Electron beam confinement and image contrast enhancement in near field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, T L; De Pietro, L G; Pescia, D; Ramsperger, U

    2009-04-01

    In conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the lateral resolution is limited by the electron beam diameter impinging on the specimen surface. Near field emission scanning electron microscopy (NFESEM) provides a simple means of overcoming this limit; however, the most suitable field emitter remains to be determined. NFESEM has been used in this work to investigate the W (110) surface with single-crystal tungsten tips of (310), (111), and (100)-orientations. The topographic images generated from both the electron intensity variations and the field emission current indicate higher resolution capabilities with decreasing tip work function than with polycrystalline tungsten tips. The confinement of the electron beam transcends the resolution limitations of the geometrical models, which are determined by the minimum beam width.

  16. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D., E-mail: peter.nellist@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Cosgriff, Eireann C.; D' Alfonso, Adrian J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Allen, Leslie J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hashimoto, Ayako [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Quantum Dot Research Center, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. -- Research Highlights: {yields} The confocal probe image in a scanning confocal electron microscopy image reveals information about the thickness and height of the crystalline layer. {yields} The form of the contrast in a three-dimensional bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy image can be explained in terms of the confocal probe image. {yields} Despite the complicated form of the contrast in bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy, we see that depth information is transferred on a 10 nm scale.

  17. Advances in imaging and electron physics the scanning transmission electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.  This particular volume presents several timely articles on the scanning transmission electron microscope. Updated with contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts Discusses hot topic areas and presents current and future research trends Provides an invaluable reference and guide for physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

  18. Destructive effects induced by the electron beam in scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M. C.; Bita, B. I.; Banu, M. A.; Tomescu, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscopy has been validated by its impressive imaging and reliable measuring as an essential characterization tool for a variety of applications and research fields. This paper is a comprehensive study dedicated to the undesirable influence of the accelerated electron beam associated with the dielectric materials, sensitive structures or inappropriate sample manipulation. Depending on the scanning conditions, the electron beam may deteriorate the investigated sample due to the extended focusing or excessive high voltage and probe current applied on vulnerable configurations. Our aim is to elaborate an instructive material for improved SEM visualization capabilities by overcoming the specific limitations of the technique. Particular examination and measuring methods are depicted along with essential preparation and manipulation procedures in order to protect the integrity of the sample. Various examples are mentioned and practical solutions are described in respect to the general use of the electron microscope.

  19. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  20. Electron beam detection of a Nanotube Scanning Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Alessandro; Niguès, Antoine

    2017-09-14

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to probe matter at atomic scale by measuring the perturbation of a nanomechanical oscillator induced by near-field interaction forces. The quest to improve sensitivity and resolution of AFM forced the introduction of a new class of resonators with dimensions at the nanometer scale. In this context, nanotubes are the ultimate mechanical oscillators because of their one dimensional nature, small mass and almost perfect crystallinity. Coupled to the possibility of functionalisation, these properties make them the perfect candidates as ultra sensitive, on-demand force sensors. However their dimensions make the measurement of the mechanical properties a challenging task in particular when working in cavity free geometry at ambient temperature. By using a focused electron beam, we show that the mechanical response of nanotubes can be quantitatively measured while approaching to a surface sample. By coupling electron beam detection of individual nanotubes with a custom AFM we image the surface topography of a sample by continuously measuring the mechanical properties of the nanoresonators. The combination of very small size and mass together with the high resolution of the electron beam detection method offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of a new class of nanotube-based scanning force microscopy.

  1. Identification of sandstone core damage using scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Abdul Razak; Jaafar, Mohd Zaidi; Sulaiman, Wan Rosli Wan; Ismail, Issham; Shiunn, Ng Yinn

    2017-12-01

    Particles and fluids invasion into the pore spaces causes serious damage to the formation, resulting reduction in petroleum production. In order to prevent permeability damage for a well effectively, the damage mechanisms should be identified. In this study, water-based drilling fluid was compared to oil-based drilling fluids based on microscopic observation. The cores were damaged by several drilling fluid systems. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the damage mechanism caused by the drilling fluids. Results showed that the ester based drilling fluid system caused the most serious damage followed by synthetic oil based system and KCI-polymer system. Fine solids and filtrate migration and emulsion blockage are believed to be the major mechanisms controlling the changes in flow properties for the sandstone samples.

  2. Immunolabeling for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Martin W

    2008-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a high resolution surface imaging technique. Many biological process and structures occur at surfaces and if antibodies are available, their components can be located within the surface structure. This is usually done in a similar way to immuno-fluorescence, using an unconjugated primary antibody followed by a tagged secondary antibody against the primary. In this case the tag is usually a colloidal gold particle instead of a fluorophore. Therefore it is quite straightforward to adapt an immuno-fluorescence procedure for SEM, as long as certain precautions are followed, as discussed here. Progressing from immuno-fluorescence, which essentially only indicates the position of a protein within the volume of a cell, to immuno-SEM, puts the labeling into the context of cellular structures. The principles and practices of sample preparation, labeling and imaging are described here.

  3. Lagrange time delay estimation for scanning electron microscope image magnification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K-S; Thong, L W; Ting, H Y; Tso, C P

    2010-02-01

    Interpolation techniques that are used for image magnification to obtain more useful details of the surface such as morphology and mechanical contrast usually rely on the signal information distributed around edges and areas of sharp changes and these signal information can also be used to predict missing details from the sample image. However, many of these interpolation methods tend to smooth or blur out image details around the edges. In the present study, a Lagrange time delay estimation interpolator method is proposed and this method only requires a small filter order and has no noticeable estimation bias. Comparing results with the original scanning electron microscope magnification and results of various other interpolation methods, the Lagrange time delay estimation interpolator is found to be more efficient, more robust and easier to execute.

  4. Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy of Captured Cirrus Ice Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, N. B.; Boaggio, K.; Bandamede, M.; Bancroft, L.; Hurler, K.

    2016-12-01

    We present the latest collection of high-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy images and microanalysis of cirrus ice particles captured by high-altitude balloon (ICE-Ball, see abstracts by K. Boaggio and M. Bandamede). Ice particle images and sublimation-residues are derived from particles captured during approximately 15 balloon flights conducted in Pennsylvania and New Jersey over the past 12 months. Measurements include 3D digital elevation model reconstructions of ice particles, and associated statistical analyses of entire particles and particle sub-facets and surfaces. This 3D analysis reveals that morphologies of most ice particles captured deviate significantly from ideal habits, and display geometric complexity and surface roughness at multiple measureable scales, ranging from 100's nanometers to 100's of microns. The presentation suggests potential a path forward for representing scattering from a realistically complex array of ice particle shapes and surfaces.

  5. Trichomes of Cannabis sativa as viewed with scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledbetter, M.C.; Krikorian, A.D.

    1975-06-01

    Direct examination of fresh, unfixed and uncoated specimens from vegetative and floral parts of Cannabis sativa with the scanning electron microscope enables one to obtain a faithful representation of their surface morphology. The presence of two major types of trichomes has been confirmed: a glandular type comprising or terminating in a globoid structure, and a conically-shaped nonglandular type. Moreover, three or possibly four distinct glandular types can be distinguished: sessile globoid, small-stalked and large-stalked globoid, and a peltate type. The nonglandular trichomes can be distinguished by the nature of their surfaces: those with a warty surface, and those which are relatively smooth. The range of size and distribution, and the special features of all these types of trichomes are also provided.

  6. [Scanning electron microscopic study on newborn middle ear mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y

    1992-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopic studies were made on the mucosa of newborn middle ear. The results were: 1. The epithelial surface was found to contain four types of cell: the ciliated cell, the nonciliated cell without secretory granules (SG), the nonciliated cell with secretory granules (SG) and the flat cell. 2. The ciliated cell population appeared in the following order (from dense to sparse): eustachian tube, hypotympanum, antetympanum, epitympanum, promontory and post-tympanum. 3. The density of nonciliated cell without SG population was gradually increasing from anterior to posterior part of middle ear. 4. The population of nonciliated cell with SG was fewer and they were always found near the ciliated cells. 5. The flat cells were only seen on the flaccid part of tympanic membrane. This paper suggests that the ciliary system is basically mature and the development of mucus secreting members still is not perfect in newborn middle ear mucosa.

  7. Valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erni, Rolf; Browning, Nigel D

    2005-10-01

    With the development of monochromators for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) is developing into a unique technique to study the band structure and optical properties of nanoscale materials. This article discusses practical aspects of spatially resolved VEELS performed in scanning transmission mode and the alignments necessary to achieve the current optimum performance of approximately 0.15 eV energy resolution with an electron probe size of approximately 1 nm. In particular, a collection of basic concepts concerning the acquisition process, the optimization of the energy resolution, the spatial resolution and the data processing are provided. A brief study of planar defects in a Y(1)Ba(2)Cu(3)O(7-)(delta) high-temperature superconductor illustrates these concepts and shows what kind of information can be accessed by VEELS.

  8. Quantitative three-dimensional ice roughness from scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Nicholas; Rowe, Penny M.; Stewart, Emily; Roesel, David; Neshyba, Steven

    2017-03-01

    We present a method for inferring surface morphology of ice from scanning electron microscope images. We first develop a novel functional form for the backscattered electron intensity as a function of ice facet orientation; this form is parameterized using smooth ice facets of known orientation. Three-dimensional representations of rough surfaces are retrieved at approximately micrometer resolution using Gauss-Newton inversion within a Bayesian framework. Statistical analysis of the resulting data sets permits characterization of ice surface roughness with a much higher statistical confidence than previously possible. A survey of results in the range -39°C to -29°C shows that characteristics of the roughness (e.g., Weibull parameters) are sensitive not only to the degree of roughening but also to the symmetry of the roughening. These results suggest that roughening characteristics obtained by remote sensing and in situ measurements of atmospheric ice clouds can potentially provide more facet-specific information than has previously been appreciated.

  9. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  10. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barnaby D. A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M. C.; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A.; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  11. Scanning electron microscope automatic defect classification of process induced defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott; McGarvey, Steve

    2017-03-01

    With the integration of high speed Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) based Automated Defect Redetection (ADR) in both high volume semiconductor manufacturing and Research and Development (R and D), the need for reliable SEM Automated Defect Classification (ADC) has grown tremendously in the past few years. In many high volume manufacturing facilities and R and D operations, defect inspection is performed on EBeam (EB), Bright Field (BF) or Dark Field (DF) defect inspection equipment. A comma separated value (CSV) file is created by both the patterned and non-patterned defect inspection tools. The defect inspection result file contains a list of the inspection anomalies detected during the inspection tools' examination of each structure, or the examination of an entire wafers surface for non-patterned applications. This file is imported into the Defect Review Scanning Electron Microscope (DRSEM). Following the defect inspection result file import, the DRSEM automatically moves the wafer to each defect coordinate and performs ADR. During ADR the DRSEM operates in a reference mode, capturing a SEM image at the exact position of the anomalies coordinates and capturing a SEM image of a reference location in the center of the wafer. A Defect reference image is created based on the Reference image minus the Defect image. The exact coordinates of the defect is calculated based on the calculated defect position and the anomalies stage coordinate calculated when the high magnification SEM defect image is captured. The captured SEM image is processed through either DRSEM ADC binning, exporting to a Yield Analysis System (YAS), or a combination of both. Process Engineers, Yield Analysis Engineers or Failure Analysis Engineers will manually review the captured images to insure that either the YAS defect binning is accurately classifying the defects or that the DRSEM defect binning is accurately classifying the defects. This paper is an exploration of the feasibility of the

  12. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  13. Visualizing bone porosities using a tabletop scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, D.; DaPonte, J.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Daniel, D.; Alter, L.

    2010-04-01

    Pores are naturally occurring entities in bone. Changes in pore size and number are often associated with diseases such as Osteoporosis and even microgravity during spaceflight. Studying bone perforations may yield great insight into bone's material properties, including bone density and may contribute to identifying therapies to halt or potentially reverse bone loss. Current technologies used in this field include nuclear magnetic resonance, micro-computed tomography and the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) 2, 5. However, limitations in each method limit further advancement. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using a new generation of analytical instruments, the TM-1000 tabletop, SEM with back-scatter electron (BSE) detector, to analyze cortical bone porosities. Hind limb unloaded and age-based controlled mouse femurs were extracted and tested in vitro for changes in pores on the periosteal surface. An important advantage of using the tabletop is the simplified sample preparation that excludes extra coatings, dehydration and fixation steps that are otherwise required for conventional SEM. For quantitative data, pores were treated as particles in order to use an analyze particles feature in the NIH ImageJ software. Several image-processing techniques for background smoothing, thresholding and filtering were employed to produce a binary image suitable for particle analysis. It was hypothesized that the unloaded bones would show an increase in pore area, as the lack of mechanical loading would affect bone-remodeling processes taking place in and around pores. Preliminary results suggest only a slight different in frequency but not in size of pores between unloaded and control femurs.

  14. Cryo-planing for cryo-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijsse, J; van Aelst, A C

    1999-01-01

    In the past decade, investigators of cryo-planing for low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) have developed techniques that enable observations of flat sample surfaces. This study reviews these sample preparation techniques, compares and contrasts their results, and introduces modifications that improve results from cryo-planing. A prerequisite for all successful cryo-planing required a stable attachment of the specimen to a holder. In most cases, clamping with a screw mechanism and using indium as space-filler sufficed. Once this problem was solved, any of three existing cryo-planing methods could be used to provide successful results: cryo-milling, microtomy in a cold room, and cryo-ultramicrotomy. This study introduces modifications to the cryo-planing technique that produces flat surfaces of any desired plane through a specimen. These flat surfaces of frozen, fully hydrated samples can be used to improve observations from cryo-SEM as well as to enhance results from x-ray microanalysis and (digital) image analysis. Cryo-planing results of chrysanthemum (Dendranthema x grandiflorum Tzvelev) stems, hazel (Corylus avelane L.) stems, and repeseed (Brassica napus L.) pistils are presented to illustrate the use of the planing method on fibrous, hard, and delicate materials, respectively.

  15. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K. [St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Syková, E. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Kubinová, Š. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic)

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  16. Somatic Embryos in Catharanthus roseus: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid ASLAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don is an important medicinal plant as it contains several anti-cancerous compounds, like vinblastine and vincristine. Plant tissue culture technology (organogenesis and embryogenesis has currently been used in fast mass propagating raw materials for secondary metabolite synthesis. In this present communication, scanning electron microscopic (SEM study of somatic embryos was conducted and discussed. The embryogenic callus was first induced from hypocotyls of in vitro germinated seeds on which somatic embryos, differentiated in numbers, particularly on 2,4-D (1.0 mg/L Murashige and Skoog (MS was medium. To understand more about the regeneration method and in vitro formed embryos SEM was performed. The SEM study revealed normal somatic embryo origin and development from globular to heart-, torpedo- and then into cotyledonary-stage of embryos. At early stage, the embryos were clustered together in a callus mass and could not easily be detached from the parental tissue. The embryos were often long cylindrical structure with or without typical notch at the tip. Secondary embryos were also formed on primary embryo structure. The advanced cotyledonary embryos showed prominent roots and shoot axis, which germinated into plantlets. The morphology, structure and other details of somatic embryos at various stages were presented.

  17. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmaack, K. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wittmaack@gsf.de; Wehnes, H. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Heinzmann, U. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Agerer, R. [Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Department Biology, Biodiversity Research: Mycology, Menzinger Stasse 67, 80638 Munich (Germany)

    2005-06-15

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 {mu}m. The collected particles, sampled for short periods ({approx}15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C{sub 60} or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of eggs of Sabethes cyaneus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Mallet, Jacenir; Sarmento, Juliana Soares; Alencar, Jeronimo; Müller, Gerson Azulim; Oliveira, Eliana Medeiros; Foster, Woodbridge A; Marcondes, Carlos Brisola

    2013-03-01

    Mosquitoes of the Neotropical genus Sabethes, some species of which are yellow fever vectors, most often develop through the immature stages in tree holes. Sabethes eggs have not been previously characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Eggs of Sabethes cyaneus (length: 349.6 +/- 2.7 microm; width: 172.6 +/- 1.14 microm; n = 10) are almost biconical when examined from the top. From a lateral perspective 2 surfaces can be seen. One surface is smooth and more convex, whereas the other is less convex and partially covered by a network from which many fungiform tubercles arise. The micropyle is situated on the smooth surface of the pointed anterior tip and is surrounded by an irregular row of tubercles, some of which are leaf shaped. No structures possibly involved in adhesion to surfaces are visible. When hatching, the egg splits dorsoventrally approximately two-thirds of the length from the anterior end. The tubercles appear to be water repellent, and the more convex/smoother surface is downturned, and this position on water was confirmed by direct observation. The eggs float free on the water surface.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy applied to seed-borne fungi examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marcelo de Carvalho; Pozza, Edson Ampélio

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the standard scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as a potential alternative to study seed-borne fungi in seeds, by two different conditions of blotter test and water restriction treatment. In the blotter test, seeds were subjected to conditions that enabled pathogen growth and expression, whereas the water restriction method consisted in preventing seed germination during the incubation period, resulting in the artificial inoculation of fungi. In the first condition, seeds of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), maize (Zea mays L.), and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) were submitted to the standard blotter test and then prepared and observed with SEM. In the second condition, seeds of cotton (G. hirsutum), soybean (Glycine max L.), and common bean (P. vulgaris L.) were, respectively, inoculated with Colletotrichum gossypii var. cephalosporioides, Colletotrichum truncatum, and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum by the water restriction technique, followed by preparation and observation with SEM. The standard SEM methodology was adopted to prepare the specimens. Considering the seeds submitted to the blotter test, it was possible to identify Fusarium sp. on maize, C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides, and Fusarium oxysporum on cotton, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium sp., Rhizopus sp., and Mucor sp. on common bean. Structures of C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides, C. truncatum, and C. lindemuthianum were observed in the surface of inoculated seeds. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  1. [Scanning electron microscopy findings in titanium middle ear prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwager, K

    2000-12-01

    Titanium as a biomaterial in ossicular replacement has widely spread within the last couple of years. 23 prostheses (12 PORPs, partial ossicular replacement prostheses and 11 TORPs total ossicular replacement prostheses) removed during revision surgery were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The average implantation time was 8 (range 3-15) months. The specimens were investigated regarding tissue growth, epithelialization, inflammation and cellular signs of rejection. Only few prostheses were totally covered by connective tissue or epithelium due to technical problems in removing the implant and the covering tissue as one specimen. But this offered the possibility to study the interface at the edges where the tissue was torn off. The connective tissue looked unremarkable. Polygonal squamous epithelium was detected on several implants. Respiratory epithelium with ciliated cells and mucus producing goblet cells was seen in two specimens. In cases of cholesteatoma or protrusion the explanted prostheses showed typical rosette-like formation of hornifying squamous epithelium. According to underlying disease a lymphocytic infiltration could be seen. There were no cellular signs of incompatibility noticed neither macrophages nor foreign body giant cells. From these investigations titanium seems to be a favorable biomaterial for ossicular replacement with good acceptance also in an implantation site showing chronic inflammation.

  2. Scanning electron microscopy investigations regarding Adonis vernalis L. flower morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Neta GOSTIN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The floral morphology of Adonis vernalis L. was observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM. The investigations are important to clarify some taxonomical problems and also could provide useful diagnostic elements for the identification of this medicinal plant in powdered materials. All floral organs are initiated spirally and centripetally and develop centripetally. The petals (8-12 are shorter than the sepals (5-6 in early developmental stages. The petals are disposed on spiral (with 3-4 whorls. The stamens (numerous are unbranched and reach maturity centripetally; they are free of the perianth. The anther walls consisting of a single layer epidermis in the anther wall surrounding the sporagenous tissue, one row of endothecium, two to four rows of middle layer and one row of tapetum layer. In the anther walls, the tapetal cells, by glandular type, persist later in ontogenesis. Pollen grains are tricolpate with echinate surface. The gynoecium is multiple, apocarpous with distinct carpels. The carpels are ascidiate from the beginning. At the base of each carpel, numerousness short, unicellular, trichomes are present. The stigma differentiates as two crests along the ventral slit of the ovary. Each carpel contains a single ovule inside the ovary cavity. The mature ovule is anatropous, with two integuments. It is almost parallel to the funicle.

  3. From the physics of secondary electron emission to image contrasts in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaux, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Image formation in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a combination of physical processes, electron emissions from the sample, and of a technical process related to the detection of a fraction of these electrons. For the present survey of image contrasts in SEM, simplified considerations in the physics of the secondary electron emission yield, δ, are combined with the effects of a partial collection of the emitted secondary electrons. Although some consideration is initially given to the architecture of modern SEM, the main attention is devoted to the material contrasts with the respective roles of the sub-surface and surface compositions of the sample, as well as with the roles of the field effects in the vacuum gap. The recent trends of energy filtering in normal SEM and the reduction of the incident energy to a few electron volts in very low-energy electron microscopy are also considered. For an understanding by the SEM community, the mathematical expressions are explained with simple physical arguments.

  4. Special raster scanning for reduction of charging effects in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Oho, Eisaku

    2014-01-01

    A special raster scanning (SRS) method for reduction of charging effects is developed for the field of SEM. Both a conventional fast scan (horizontal direction) and an unusual scan (vertical direction) are adopted for acquiring raw data consisting of many sub-images. These data are converted to a proper SEM image using digital image processing techniques. About sharpness of the image and reduction of charging effects, the SRS is compared with the conventional fast scan (with frame-averaging) and the conventional slow scan. Experimental results show the effectiveness of SRS images. By a successful combination of the proposed scanning method and low accelerating voltage (LV)-SEMs, it is expected that higher-quality SEM images can be more easily acquired by the considerable reduction of charging effects, while maintaining the resolution. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Improved Visualization of Vertebrate Nuclear Pore Complexes by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaulov, Lihi; Harel, Amnon

    2012-01-01

    Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) can provide high-resolution three-dimensional surface imaging of many biological structures, including nuclear envelopes and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs...

  6. Autofocus on moving object in scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Andrey V; Dembélé, Sounkalo; Piat, Nadine

    2017-11-01

    The sharpness of the images coming from a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is a very important property for many computer vision applications at micro- and nanoscale. It represents how much object details are distinctive in the images: the object may be perceived sharp or blurred. Image sharpness highly depends on the value of focal distance, or working distance in the case of the SEM. Autofocus is the technique allowing to automatically adjust the working distance to maximize the sharpness. Most of the existing algorithms allows working only with a static object which is enough for the tasks of visualization, manual microanalysis or microcharacterization. These applications work with a low frame rate, less than 1 Hz, that guarantees a low level of noise. However, static autofocus can not be used for samples performing continuous 3D motion, which is the case of robotic applications where it is required to carry out a continuous 3D position measurement, e.g., nano-assembly or nanomanipulation. Moreover, in addition to constantly keeping object in focus while it is moving, it is required to perform the operation at high frame rate. The approach offering both these possibilities is presented in this paper and is referred as dynamic autofocus. The presented solution is based on stochastic optimization techniques. It allows tracking the maximum of the sharpness of the images without sweep and without training. It works under uncertainty conditions: presence of noise in images, unknown maximal sharpness and unknown 3D motion of the specimen. The experiments, that were performed with noisy images at high frame rate (5 Hz), were conducted on a Carl Zeiss Auriga 60 FE-SEM. They prove the robustness of the algorithm with respect to the variation of optimization parameters, object speed and magnification. Moreover, it is invariant to the object structure and its variation in time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Candida albicans morphologies revealed by scanning electron microscopy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Staniszewska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscope (SEM observations were used to analyze particular morphologies of Candida albicans clinical isolate (strain 82 and mutants defective in hyphae-promoting genes EFG1 (strain HLC52 and/ or CPH1 (strains HLC54 and Can16. Transcription factors Efg1 and Cph1 play role in regulating filamentation and adhesion of C. albicans' morphologies. Comparative analysis of such mutants and clinical isolate showed that Efg1 is required for human serum-induced cell growth and morphological switching. In the study, distinct differences between ultrastructural patterns of clinical strain's and null mutants' morphologies were observed (spherical vs tube-like blastoconidia, or solid and fragile constricted septa vs only the latter observed in strains with EFG1 deleted. In addition, wild type strain displayed smooth colonies of cells in comparison to mutants which exhibited wrinkled phenotype. It was observed that blastoconidia of clinical strain exhibited either polarly or randomly located budding. Contrariwise, morphotypes of mutants showed either multiple polar budding or a centrally located single bud scar (mother-daughter cell junction distinguishing tube-like yeast/ pseudohyphal growth (the length-to-width ratios larger than 1.5. In their planktonic form of growth, blastoconidia of clinical bloodstream isolate formed constitutively true hyphae under undiluted human serum inducing conditions. It was found that true hyphae are essential elements for developing structural integrity of conglomerate, as mutants displaying defects in their flocculation and conglomerate-forming abilities in serum. While filamentation is an important virulence trait in C. albicans the true hyphae are the morphologies which may be expected to play a role in bloodstream infections.

  8. Neural Network for Nanoscience Scanning Electron Microscope Image Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, Mohammad Hadi; Aversa, Rossella; Cozzini, Stefano; Ciancio, Regina; Leto, Angelo; Brandino, Giuseppe Piero

    2017-10-16

    In this paper we applied transfer learning techniques for image recognition, automatic categorization, and labeling of nanoscience images obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Roughly 20,000 SEM images were manually classified into 10 categories to form a labeled training set, which can be used as a reference set for future applications of deep learning enhanced algorithms in the nanoscience domain. The categories chosen spanned the range of 0-Dimensional (0D) objects such as particles, 1D nanowires and fibres, 2D films and coated surfaces, and 3D patterned surfaces such as pillars. The training set was used to retrain on the SEM dataset and to compare many convolutional neural network models (Inception-v3, Inception-v4, ResNet). We obtained compatible results by performing a feature extraction of the different models on the same dataset. We performed additional analysis of the classifier on a second test set to further investigate the results both on particular cases and from a statistical point of view. Our algorithm was able to successfully classify around 90% of a test dataset consisting of SEM images, while reduced accuracy was found in the case of images at the boundary between two categories or containing elements of multiple categories. In these cases, the image classification did not identify a predominant category with a high score. We used the statistical outcomes from testing to deploy a semi-automatic workflow able to classify and label images generated by the SEM. Finally, a separate training was performed to determine the volume fraction of coherently aligned nanowires in SEM images. The results were compared with what was obtained using the Local Gradient Orientation method. This example demonstrates the versatility and the potential of transfer learning to address specific tasks of interest in nanoscience applications.

  9. Environmental scanning electron microscopy observation of the ultrastructure of Demodex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xu; Shuling, Guo; Ying, Liu

    2005-12-01

    In this study, numbers of Demodex of hair follicles and sebaceous glands were prepared and the ultrastructure (especially the mouthparts) of Demodex was observed firstly with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The most suitable treatment methods and optimal environmental condition for observing the genus samples were found. The samples were washed with detergent and rinsed with distilled water, and then were taken to the specimen stage, on which there was carbon adhesive tape, using special tools. When the temperature was at 5 degrees C and chamber pressure at 5 mbar respectively, the surface of the samples could be fully imaged without covering water or dehydration. The sample surfaces were plump and clear without postmortem changes and charging artifacts. Detailed information about each part of Demodex was observed by ESEM, and clear three-dimensional images were recorded. The mouthparts of D. folliculorum were composed of a complex set of structures, which included a round oral opening, a sharp oral needle, and a special hypostome that looked like a longitudinal spindle in the central position. On the end segment of palpus, there were seven strong palpal claws located on each side of the mouthparts. D. folliculorum had special piercing mouthparts, while the mouthparts of D. brevis were a simpler structure. We could not observe the oral needle of D. brevis, and there were only five pairs of palpal claws on the end segment of palpus. The offensive organs of Demodex resulted in its pathogenic effects. After studying hundreds of Demodex, we identified both female and male species of D. folliculorum, but only females of D. brevis in our sample. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Reproducible strain measurement in electronic devices by applying integer multiple to scanning grating in scanning moiré fringe imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhyun Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Scanning moiré fringe (SMF imaging by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the strain field in the channel of a transistor with a CoSi2 source and drain. Nanometer-scale SMFs were formed with a scanning grating size of ds at integer multiples of the Si crystal lattice spacing dl (ds ∼ ndl, n = 2, 3, 4, 5. The moiré fringe formula was modified to establish a method for quantifying strain measurement. We showed that strain fields in a transistor measured by SMF images were reproducible with an accuracy of 0.02%.

  11. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  12. Observation of the sweating in lipstick by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, S Y; Lee, I S; Shin, H Y; Choi, K Y; Kang, S H; Ahn, H J

    1999-06-01

    The relationship between the wax matrix in lipstick and sweating has been investigated by observing the change of size and shape of the wax matrix due to sweating by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). For observation by SEM, a lipstick sample was frozen in liquid nitrogen. The oil in the lipstick was then extracted in cold isopropanol (-70 degrees C) for 1-3 days. After the isopropanol was evaporated, the sample was sputtered with gold and examined by SEM. The change of wax matrix underneath the surface from fine, uniform structure to coarse, nonuniform structure resulted from the caking of surrounding wax matrix. The oil underneath the surface migrated to the surface of lipstick with sweating; consequently the wax matrix in that region was rearranged into the coarse matrix. In case of flamed lipstick, sweating was delayed and the wax matrix was much coarser than that of the unflamed one. The larger wax matrix at the surface region was good for including oil. The effect of molding temperature on sweating was also studied. As the molding temperature rose, sweating was greatly reduced and the size of the wax matrix increased. It was found that sweating was influenced by the compatibility of wax and oil. A formula consisting of wax and oil that have good compatibility has a tendency to reduce sweating and increase the size of the wax matrix. When pigments were added to wax and oil, the size of the wax matrix was changed, but in all cases sweating was increased due to the weakening of the binding force between wax and oil. On observing the thick membrane of wax at the surface of lipstick a month after molding it was also found that sweating was influenced by ageing. In conclusion, the structure of the wax matrix at the surface region of lipstick was changed with the process of flaming, molding temperature, compatibility of wax and oil, addition of pigment, and ageing. In most cases, as the size of the wax matrix was increased, sweating was reduced and delayed.

  13. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  14. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  15. Metal particles in a ceramic matrix--scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, K

    2006-09-01

    This paper is concerned with ceramic matrix (Al(2)O(3)) composites with introduced metal particles (Ni, Fe). The composites were obtained via sintering of powders under very high pressure (2.5 GPa). Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were chosen as the tools for the identification and description of the shape, size and distribution of the metal particles. The Al(2)O(3)-Ni composite contained agglomerates of the Ni particles surrounded by ceramic grains and nanometre-size Ni particles located inside the ceramic grains and at the ceramic grain boundaries. In the Al(2)O(3)-Fe composite, the Fe particles were mostly surrounded by ceramic grains. Moreover, holes left by the Fe particles were found. The high pressure used in the fabrication of the composites changed the shape of the metal and ceramic powder grains via plastic deformation.

  16. Annular electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben, Gary [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bosman, Michel [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); D' Alfonso, Adrian J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Okunishi, Eiji; Kondo, Yukihito [JEOL Ltd., 1-2, Musashino 3-chome Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Allen, Leslie J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    We study atomic-resolution annular electron energy-loss spectroscopy (AEELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging with experiments and numerical simulations. In this technique the central part of the bright field disk is blocked by a beam stop, forming an annular entry aperture to the spectrometer. The EELS signal thus arises only from electrons scattered inelastically to angles defined by the aperture. It will be shown that this method is more robust than conventional EELS imaging to variations in specimen thickness and can also provide higher spatial resolution. This raises the possibility of lattice resolution imaging of lighter elements or ionization edges previously considered unsuitable for EELS imaging. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study annular electron energy-loss spectroscopy (AEELS) in STEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is more robust to changes in specimen thickness than conventional EELS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AEELS provides higher spatial resolution than conventional EELS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This raises the possibility of lattice resolution imaging of lighter elements.

  17. Electronically Steerable Antennas with Panoramic Scan Field of View Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electronically steerable antennas are key to effective radio transmission at millimeter-wave frequencies. To enable communication with rovers, robots, EVA...

  18. Experimental setup for energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscopy (EFSCEM) in a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, P; Behan, G; Kirkland, A I; Nellist, P D, E-mail: peng.wang@materials.ox.ac.u [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) is a new imaging mode in electron microscopy. Spherical aberration corrected electron microscope instruments fitted with two aberration correctors can be used in this mode which provides improved depth resolution and selectivity compared to optical sectioning in a conventional scanning transmission geometry. In this article, we consider a confocal optical configuration for SCEM using inelastically scattered electrons. We lay out the necessary steps for achieving this new operational mode in a double aberration-corrected instrument with uncorrected chromatic aberration and present preliminary experimental results in such mode.

  19. Imaging systems in the Delft Multi-Beam Scanning Electron Microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this Ph.D. research is to develop imaging systems for the multiple beam scanning electron microscope (MBSEM) built in Delft University of Technology. This thesis includes two imaging systems, transmission electron (TE) imaging system, and secondary electron (SE) imaging system. The major

  20. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning...... characteristic of an erosive process that took place on human enamel. Depression areas, including the formation of craters, and exposure of enamel rods could also be detected. Conclusion: Bleaching effects on enamel morphology were randomly distributed throughout enamel surface and various degrees of enamel...

  1. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  2. 3D correlative light and electron microscopy of cultured cells using serial blockface scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Burden, Jemima J.; Nkwe, David O.; Pelchen-Matthews, Annegret; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Durgan, Joanne; Weston, Anne; Jones, Martin L.; Peddie, Christopher J.; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Florey, Oliver; Marsh, Mark; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processes of life take place in multiple dimensions, but imaging these processes in even three dimensions is challenging. Here, we describe a workflow for 3D correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) of cell monolayers using fluorescence microscopy to identify and follow biological events, combined with serial blockface scanning electron microscopy to analyse the underlying ultrastructure. The workflow encompasses all steps from cell culture to sample processing, imaging strategy, and 3D image processing and analysis. We demonstrate successful application of the workflow to three studies, each aiming to better understand complex and dynamic biological processes, including bacterial and viral infections of cultured cells and formation of entotic cell-in-cell structures commonly observed in tumours. Our workflow revealed new insight into the replicative niche of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, HIV-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and the composition of the entotic vacuole. The broad application of this 3D CLEM technique will make it a useful addition to the correlative imaging toolbox for biomedical research. PMID:27445312

  3. Design of Pixellated CMOS Photon Detector for Secondary Electron Detection in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Huang Chuah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method of detecting secondary electrons generated in the scanning electron microscope (SEM. The method suggests that the photomultiplier tube (PMT, traditionally used in the Everhart-Thornley (ET detector, is to be replaced with a configurable multipixel solid-state photon detector offering the advantages of smaller dimension, lower supply voltage and power requirements, and potentially cheaper product cost. The design of the proposed detector has been implemented using a standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology with optical enhancement. This microchip comprises main circuit constituents of an array of photodiodes connecting to respective noise-optimised transimpedance amplifiers (TIAs, a selector-combiner (SC circuit, and a postamplifier (PA. The design possesses the capability of detecting photons with low input optical power in the range of 1 nW with 100 μm × 100 μm sized photodiodes and achieves a total amplification of 180 dBΩ at the output.

  4. Depth Sectioning with the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Albina Y. Borisevich; Andrew R. Lupini; Stephen J. Pennycook

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition...

  5. A Low Cost, Electronically Scanned Array (ESA) Antenna Technology for Aviation Hazard Detection and Avoidance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will investigate the feasibility of utilizing ThinKom's low cost electronically scanned array (ESA) antenna concepts to enable affordable...

  6. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  7. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence – scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  8. An electron beam linear scanning mode for industrial limited-angle nano-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengxiang; Zeng, Li; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Lingli; Guo, Yumeng; Gong, Changcheng

    2018-01-01

    Nano-computed tomography (nano-CT), which utilizes X-rays to research the inner structure of some small objects and has been widely utilized in biomedical research, electronic technology, geology, material sciences, etc., is a high spatial resolution and non-destructive research technique. A traditional nano-CT scanning model with a very high mechanical precision and stability of object manipulator, which is difficult to reach when the scanned object is continuously rotated, is required for high resolution imaging. To reduce the scanning time and attain a stable and high resolution imaging in industrial non-destructive testing, we study an electron beam linear scanning mode of nano-CT system that can avoid mechanical vibration and object movement caused by the continuously rotated object. Furthermore, to further save the scanning time and study how small the scanning range could be considered with acceptable spatial resolution, an alternating iterative algorithm based on ℓ0 minimization is utilized to limited-angle nano-CT reconstruction problem with the electron beam linear scanning mode. The experimental results confirm the feasibility of the electron beam linear scanning mode of nano-CT system.

  9. Interstitial cells of Cajal and Auerbach's plexus. A scanning electron microscopical study of guinea-pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Harry; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy...

  10. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a Zeiss Sigma HD VP SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    This method describes the characterization of inert and HE materials by the Zeiss Sigma HD VP field emission Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The SEM uses an accelerated electron beam to generate high-magnification images of explosives and other materials. It is fitted with five detectors (SE, Inlens, STEM, VPSE, HDBSD) to enable imaging of the sample via different secondary electron signatures, angles, and energies. In addition to imaging through electron detection, the microscope is also fitted with two Oxford Instrument Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) 80 mm detectors to generate elemental constituent spectra and two-dimensional maps of the material being scanned.

  11. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    OpenAIRE

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called ?big-data? methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient ima...

  12. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  13. Scanning Probe Evaluation of Electronic, Mechanical and Structural Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virwani, Kumar

    2011-03-01

    We present atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of a range of properties from three different classes of materials: mixed ionic electronic conductors, low-k dielectrics, and polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles. (1) Mixed ionic electronic conductors are being investigated as novel diodes to drive phase-change memory elements. Their current-voltage characteristics are measured with direct-current and pulsed-mode conductive AFM (C-AFM). The challenges to reliability of the C-AFM method include the electrical integrity of the probe, the sample and the contacts, and the minimization of path capacitance. The role of C-AFM in the optimization of these electro-active materials will be presented. (2) Low dielectric constant (low-k) materials are used in microprocessors as interlayer insulators, a role directly affected by their mechanical performance. The mechanical properties of nanoporous silicate low-k thin films are investigated in a comparative study of nanomechanics measured by AFM and by traditional nanoindentation. Both methods are still undergoing refinement as reliable analytical tools for determining nanomechanical properties. We will focus on AFM, the faster of the two methods, and its developmental challenges of probe shape, cantilever force constant, machine compliance and calibration standards. (3) Magnetic nanoparticles are being explored for their use in patterned media for magnetic storage. Current methods for visualizing the core-shell structure of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles include dye-staining the polymer shell to provide contrast in transmission electron microscopy. AFM-based fast force-volume measurements provide direct visualization of the hard metal oxide core within the soft polymer shell based on structural property differences. In particular, the monitoring of adhesion and deformation between the AFM tip and the nanoparticle, particle-by-particle, provides a reliable qualitative tool to visualize core-shell contrast without the use

  14. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  15. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  16. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy of the internal cellular organization of fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, W.H.; Aelst, van A.C.; Humbel, B.M.; Krift, van der T.P.; Boekhout, T.

    2000-01-01

    Internal viewing of the cellular organization of hyphae by scanning electron microscopy is an alternative to observing sectioned fungal material with a transmission electron microscope. To study cytoplasmic organelles in the hyphal cells of fungi by SEM, colonies were chemically fixed with

  17. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a LEO 438VP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, Fowzia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2016-03-08

    This method describes the characterization of HE powders by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). HE particles are dispersed onto an aluminum standard SEM specimen mount. Electron micrographs are collected at various magnifications (150 to 10,000 X) depending on HE particle size.

  18. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a LEO 438VP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, Fowzia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2016-03-21

    This method describes the characterization of HE powders by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). HE particles are dispersed onto an aluminum standard SEM specimen mount. Electron micrographs are collected at various magnifications (150 to 10,000 X) depending on HE particle size.

  19. Structural examination of lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals by combining scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremova, P. V.; Ped'ko, B. B.; Kuznecova, Yu. V.

    2016-02-01

    The structure of lithium niobate single crystals is studied by a complex technique that combines scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. By implementing the piezoresponse force method on an atomic force microscope, the domain structure of lithium niobate crystals, which was not revealed without electron beam irradiation, is visualized

  20. Monte Carlo modeling of cavity imaging in pure iron using back-scatter electron scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Garner, F. A.; Shao, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Backscattered electrons (BSE) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) can produce images of subsurface cavity distributions as a nondestructive characterization technique. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the mechanism of void imaging and to identify key parameters in optimizing void resolution. The modeling explores an iron target of different thicknesses, electron beams of different energies, beam sizes, and scan pitch, evaluated for voids of different sizes and depths below the surface. The results show that the void image contrast is primarily caused by discontinuity of energy spectra of backscattered electrons, due to increased outward path lengths for those electrons which penetrate voids and are backscattered at deeper depths. Size resolution of voids at specific depths, and maximum detection depth of specific voids sizes are derived as a function of electron beam energy. The results are important for image optimization and data extraction.

  1. Customized patterned substrates for highly versatile correlative light-scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Lorena; Sogne, Elisa; Rodighiero, Simona; Marchesi, Davide; Milani, Paolo; Francolini, Maura

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) combines the advantages of light and electron microscopy, thus making it possible to follow dynamic events in living cells at nanometre resolution. Various CLEM approaches and devices have been developed, each of which has its own advantages and technical challenges. We here describe our customized patterned glass substrates, which improve the feasibility of correlative fluorescence/confocal and scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25391455

  2. Fundamental and experimental aspects of diffraction for characterizing dislocations by electron channeling contrast imaging in scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kriaa, H.; Guitton, A.; Maloufi, N.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays Field Emission Gun-Scanning Electron Microscopes provide detailed crystallographic information with high spatial and angular resolutions, and allow direct observation of crystalline defects, such as dislocations, through an attractive technique called Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI). Dislocations play a crucial role in the properties of materials and ECCI has naturally emerged as an adapted tool for characterizing defects in bulk specimen. Nevertheless, fine control of th...

  3. Examination of mycological samples by means of the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species of Siphomycetes: Rhizopus arhizus, Rhizopus equinus and Rhizopus nigricans, as well as a Septomycete: Emericella nidulans, have been examined by means of a scanning electron microscope. Among the difjerent Rhizopus, this technique showed differences in the appearance of the sporangia. In Emericella nidulans, scanning microscopy enábled one to ascertain that the "Hull cells" were completely hollow and also demonstrated the ornemented aspect of the ascospores.

  4. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga+ -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga+ density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of galvannealed coatings on steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P; Uran, K; Macherey, F; Ebert, M; Ullrich, H-J; Sommer, D; Friedel, F

    2009-04-01

    The formation of Fe-Zn intermetallic compounds, as relevant in the commercial product galvannealed steel sheet, was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and different methods of X-ray diffraction. A scanning electron microscope with high resolution was applied to investigate the layers of the galvannealed coating and its topography. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID) was preferred over conventional Bragg-Brentano geometry for analysing thin crystalline layers because of its lower incidence angle alpha and its lower depth of information. Furthermore, in situ experiments at an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with an internal heating plate and at an X-ray diffractometer equipped with a high-temperature chamber were carried out. Thus, it was possible to investigate the phase evolution during heat treatment by X-ray diffraction and to display the growth of the zeta crystals in the ESEM.

  6. Optimal imaging techniques in the scanning transmission electron microscope: applications to biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, M; Crewe, A V

    1980-01-01

    We show applications of the optimal imaging method to stained biological macromolecules. This optimal imaging method involves the following basic procedures: (i) for any given resolution, which is represented by the electron probe size in the scanning transmission electron microscope, a preferred magnification is used; (ii) the micrographs taken at the condition described above are then spatially filtered by using a low-pass filter (nu < 1/2d, in which d is the space between scan lines) to optically reconstruct the final optimal image. It is found that the micrographs obtained by using the optimal imaging method clearly show an improvement in contrast. Images PMID:6933454

  7. Revealing the 1 nm/s Extensibility of Nanoscale Amorphous Carbon in a Scanning Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformati...... positive implications to explore some amorphous carbon as electron field emission device. SCANNING 35: 261-264, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.......In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformation...... promoted by the electric field, which resulted from an inner secondary electron potential difference from the main trunk of carbon film to the tip end of branches under electron beam. This result demonstrates importance of applying electrical effects to modify properties of carbon materials. It may have...

  8. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evolution of MEMS scanning mirrors for laser projection in compact consumer electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauscher, Jason; Davis, Wyatt O.; Brown, Dean; Ellis, Matt; Ma, Yunfei; Sherwood, Michael E.; Bowman, David; Helsel, Mark P.; Lee, Sung; Coy, John Wyatt

    2010-02-01

    The applicability of MOEMS scanning mirrors towards the creation of "flying spot" scanned laser displays is well established. The extension of this concept towards compact embedded pico-projectors has required an evolution of scanners and packaging to accommodate the needs of the consumer electronics space. This paper describes the progression of the biaxial MOEMS scanning mirrors developed by Microvision over recent years. Various aspects of the individual designs are compared. Early devices used a combination of magnetic quasistatic actuation and resonant electrostatic operation in an evacuated atmosphere to create a projection engine for retinal scanned displays. Subsequent designs realized the elimination of both the high voltage electrostatic drive and the vacuum package, and a simplification of the actuation scheme through proprietary technical advances. Additional advances have doubled the scan angle capability and greatly miniaturized the MOEMS component while not incurring significant increase in power consumption, making it an excellent fit for the consumer pico-projector application. The simplicity of the scanned laser-based pico-projector optical design enables high resolution and a large effective image size in a thin projection engine, all of which become critical both to the viability of the technology and adoption by consumers. Microvision's first scanned laser pico-projector is built around a MOEMS scanning mirror capable of projecting 16:9 aspect ratio, WVGA display within a 6.6 mm high package. Further evolution on this path promises continued improvement in resolution, size, and power.

  10. Development of electron optical system using annular pupils for scanning transmission electron microscope by focused ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsutani, Takaomi, E-mail: matutani@ele.kindai.ac.jp [Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yasumoto, Tsuchika; Tanaka, Takeo [Osaka Sangyo University, 3-1-1 Nakagaito, Daito, Osaka 574-8530 (Japan); Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Ichihashi, Mikio [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ikuta, Takashi [Osaka Electro-Communication University, 18-8 Hatsu-cho, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8530 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Annular pupils for electron optics were produced using a focused ion beam (FIB), enabling an increase in the depth of focus and allowing for aberration-free imaging and separation of the amplitude and phase images in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Simulations demonstrate that an increased focal depth is advantageous for three-dimensional tomography in the STEM. For a 200 kV electron beam, the focal depth is increased to approximately 100 nm by using an annular pupil with inner and outer semi-angles of 29 and 30 mrad, respectively. Annular pupils were designed with various outer diameters of 40-120 {mu}m and the inner diameter was designed at 80% of the outer diameter. A taper angle varying from 1 Degree-Sign to 20 Degree-Sign was applied to the slits of the annular pupils to suppress the influence of high-energy electron scattering. The fabricated annular pupils were inspected by scanning ion beam microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. These annular pupils were loaded into a STEM and no charge-up effects were observed in the scintillator projection images recorded by a CCD camera.

  11. Corrections of magnification and focusing in a cathode lens-equipped scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobacová, J; Zobac, M; Oral, M; Müllerová, I; Frank, L

    2006-01-01

    One of the well-proven and efficient methods of obtaining a very low-energy impact of primary electrons in the scanning electron microscope is to introduce a retarding field element below the pole piece of the objective lens (OL). It is advantageous to use the specimen alone as the negatively biased electrode (i.e., cathode of the cathode lens). The optical power of the cathode lens modifies some of the standard parameters of the image formation such as relation of working distance to OL excitation or magnification to the scanning coils current, the impact angle of primary electrons, and so forth. In computer-controlled electron microscopes these parameters, particularly with regard to focusing and magnification, can be corrected automatically. Derivation of algorithms for such corrections and their experimental verifications are presented in this paper. Furthermore, a more accurate analytical expression for the focal length of an aperture lens is derived.

  12. Imaging and identifying defects in nitride semiconductor thin films using a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Ruterana, P. [CIMAP UMR 6252 CNRS-ENSICAEN-CEA-UCBN, 6, Caen (France); Gamarra, P.; Lacam, C.; Tordjman, M.; Di Forte-Poisson, M.A. [Thales Research and Technology, III-V Lab, Marcoussis (France); Parbrook, P.J. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Claremont House, High St, Lydney (United Kingdom); England, G. [K. E. Developments Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    We describe the use of electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) - in a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) - to reveal and identify defects in nitride semiconductor thin films. In ECCI changes in crystallographic orientation, or changes in lattice constant due to local strain, are revealed by changes in grey scale in an image constructed by monitoring the intensity of backscattered electrons (BSEs) as an electron beam is scanned over a suitably oriented sample. Extremely small orientation changes are detectable, enabling small angle tilt and rotation boundaries and dislocations to be imaged. Images with a resolution of tens of nanometres are obtainable with ECCI. In this paper, we describe the use of ECCI with TEM to determine threading dislocation densities and types in InAlN/GaN heterostructures grown on SiC and sapphire substrates. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Simultaneous Bright-Field and Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy in Scanning Electron Microscopy: A New Approach for Analyzing Polymer System Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Binay S.

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy in scanning electron microscopy (STEM-IN-SEM) is a convenient technique for polymer characterization. Utilizing the lower accelerating voltages, larger field of view and, exclusion of post-specimen projection lens in an SEM; STEM-IN-SEM has shown results comparable to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of polymer morphology. Various specimen-holder geometries and detector arrangements have been used for bright field (BF) STEM-IN-SEM imaging. To further the characterization potential of STEM-IN-SEM a new specimen holder has been developed to facilitate simultaneous BF and dark field (DF) STEM-IN-SEM imaging. A new specimen holder and a new microscope configuration were designed for this new imaging technique. BF and DF signals were maximized for optimal STEM-IN-SEM imaging. BF signal intensities were found to be twice as large as DF signal intensities. BF and DF STEM-IN-SEM imaging spatial resolutions are limited to 1.8 nm and approximately 5 nm, respectively. Simultaneous BF & DF STEM-IN-SEM imaging is applicable to both industrial and academic research environments. Examples of commodity and engineering polymer morphology characterization are provided. Results are comparable to TEM observation and may serve as a suitable precursor to STEM characterization of polymer systems. Finally, future developments of various accessories for this technique are discussed.

  14. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  15. Studying Dynamic Processes of Nano-sized Objects in Liquid using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hermannsd?rfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Samples fully embedded in liquid can be studied at a nanoscale spatial resolution with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) using a microfluidic chamber assembled in the specimen holder for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and STEM. The microfluidic system consists of two silicon microchips supporting thin Silicon Nitride (SiN) membrane windows. This article describes the basic steps of sample loading and data acquisition. Most important of all is to ensure that the liquid c...

  16. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams.

  17. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent interest in monitoring and speciation of particulate matter has led to increased application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) to individual particle analysis. SEM/EDX provides information on the size, shape, co...

  18. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.

  19. Morphologic differences observed by scanning electron microscopy according to the reason for pseudophakic IOL explantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Buenaga, Roberto; Alio, Jorge L.; Ramirez, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare variations in surface morphology, as studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), of explanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) concerning the cause leading to the explantation surgery. Methods In this prospective multicenter study, explanted IOLs were analyzed by SEM and energy-dis...

  20. Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis for multilayered chiral spin textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, Juriaan; Kloodt-Twesten, Fabian; Frömter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter; Duine, Rembert A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830127; Swagten, Henk J. M.; Koopmans, Bert; Lavrijsen, Reinoud

    We show that scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA) that is sensitive to both in-plane magnetization components can be used to image the out-of-plane magnetized multi-domain state in multilayered chiral spin textures. By depositing a thin layer of Fe on top of the multilayer

  1. RGB color coded images in scanning electron microscopy of biological surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 349-352 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biological surfaces * Color images * Scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  2. Local electronic structure of Fe(001) surfaces studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, M.M.J.; Yamada, T.K.; Fang, C.M.; Groot, R.A. de; Kempen, H. van

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy is used to study the local electronic structure of Fe(001) whiskers. The influence of a voltage dependent background on the apparent peak energies in the dI/dV curves is discussed. A relation between this background and the apparent barrier height is established. The

  3. Surface morphology of the endolymphatic duct in the rat. A scanning electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P

    1995-01-01

    Following intracardiac vascular perfusion fixation of 8 rats with glutaraldehyde in a buffered and oxygenated blood substitute, the vestibular aqueduct and endolymphatic duct were opened by microsurgery of the resulting 16 temporal bones. Optimum preservation of the epithelium for scanning electron...

  4. Fine structure of the endolymphatic duct in the rat. A scanning and transmission electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P

    1995-01-01

    and thiocarbohydrazide followed by a continuous dehydration procedure. Three types of cells were identified with the scanning electron microscope: A polygonal and oblong epithelial cell was observed in the largest number throughout the duct, whereas in the juxta-saccular half of the duct two additional types...

  5. Focused Ion Beam - Scanning Electron Microscopy Applied to Electrically Insulating Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, D.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Focused Ion Beam – Scanning Electron Microscope (FIB-SEM) is a versatile instrument originating from the semiconductor industry. The FIB is used to produce cross sections of pre-defined locations of interest, which are imaged and analyzed with the SEM. Repeated FIB cross sectioning and

  6. Pollen grain surface in Vaccinium myrtillus as seen in scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Kocoń

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollen grain surface of Vaccinium myrtillus L. was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Pollen grains remain in tetrahedral tetrads. Grain surface is verrucose, consisting of thick, irregularly shaped muri, surrounding small, round or oval lumina. The surface of the muri is fissured, and minute papillae can also be noted.

  7. Scanning electron microscopic observation of the brown tumor of the head of mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunali, Selcuk; Celik, Hamdi H; Uslu, Sabri S; Aldur, Mustafa M

    2005-05-01

    Brown tumors are tumor-like, expansile osteolytic lesions of bone which are seen in both primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. They generally resolve after surgical treatment of the parathyroid adenoma. Here, we report a case of brown tumor of the mandible of a cadaver with its scanning electron microscopic observation and review of literature.

  8. THALLUS SURFACES IN COCCOCARPIACEAE AND PANNARIACEAE (LICHENIZED ASCOMYCETES) VIEWED WITH SCANNING ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUMBSCH, HT; KOTHE, HW

    1992-01-01

    The thallus surfaces of species belonging to the Coccocarpiaceae and Pannariaceae were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A pored epicortex was shown in Coccocarpia ssp., Degelia gayana and D. plumbea. In the other species studied no definite pores were found. The probable systematic

  9. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Bilan, S.; Zotti, L.A.; Arroyo, C.R.; Agraït, N.; Cuevas, J.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron

  10. Cold-induced imbibition damage of lettuce embryos: A study using cryo-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, J.; Walther, P.; Hoekstra, F.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of rehydration on a multicellular organism was studied in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) embryos, using cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). Naked embryos were sensitive to imbibitional stress, whereas embryos with an intact, thick-walled endosperm were not. Imbibitional injury to

  11. Low Energy Scanned Electron-Beam Dose Distribution in Thin Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Hjortenberg, P. E.; Pedersen, Walther Batsberg

    1975-01-01

    on different backings (wood, aluminum, and iron) for scanned electron beams (Emax = 400 keV) having a broad energy spectrum and diffuse incidence, such as those used in radiation curing of coatings, textiles, plastics, etc. Theoretical calculations of such distributions of energy depositions are relatively...

  12. [Depth dose characteristics of electron beams released from a scanning type Racetrack Microtron treatment machine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoharu

    2002-01-01

    The Racetrack Microtron MM50 capable of taking out x-rays and electron beams having a high energy of up to 50 MeV was evaluated by a dosimetry of electron beams in comparison with Microtron MM22. The MM50 flattens the intensity of electron beams by using the beam scanning method while the MM22 utilizes the flattening-filter method. A percentage depth dose (PDD) curve was obtained through the dosimetry of electron beams using a water phantom. As compared with the MM22, the MM50 emits an electron beam that has an energy much closer to the nominal one, that is less contaminated by x-rays, and whose intensity decreases steeply down to near zero on the PDD curve. The MM50 has an electron beam dose distribution that is practically useful since the dose tends to be concentrated on the target volume.

  13. Analytical Formulae for Calculation of X-Ray Detector Solid Angles in the Scanning and Scanning/Transmission Analytical Electron Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    2014-05-22

    Closed form analytical equations used to calculate the collection solid angle of six common geometries of solid-state X-ray detectors in scanning and scanning/transmission analytical electron microscopy are presented. Using these formulae one can make realistic comparisons of the merits of the different detector geometries in modern electron column instruments. This work updates earlier formulations and adds new detector configurations.

  14. High-contrast en bloc staining of neuronal tissue for field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Juan Carlos; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Hayworth, Kenneth J; Schalek, Richard; Lichtman, Jeff W; Smith, Stephen J; Buchanan, JoAnn

    2012-01-12

    Conventional heavy metal poststaining methods on thin sections lend contrast but often cause contamination. To avoid this problem, we tested several en bloc staining techniques to contrast tissue in serial sections mounted on solid substrates for examination by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Because FESEM section imaging requires that specimens have higher contrast and greater electrical conductivity than transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples, our technique uses osmium impregnation (OTO) to make the samples conductive while heavily staining membranes for segmentation studies. Combining this step with other classic heavy metal en bloc stains, including uranyl acetate (UA), lead aspartate, copper sulfate and lead citrate, produced clean, highly contrasted TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) samples of insect, fish and mammalian nervous systems. This protocol takes 7-15 d to prepare resin-embedded tissue, cut sections and produce serial section images.

  15. Imaging plant nuclei and membrane-associated cytoskeleton by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišerová, Jindřiška; Goldberg, Martin W

    2014-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a powerful technique that can image exposed surfaces in 3D. Modern scanning electron microscopes, with field emission electron sources and in-lens specimen chambers, achieve resolutions of better than 0.5 nm and thus offer views of ultrastructural details of subcellular structures or even macromolecular complexes. Obtaining a reliable image is, however, dependent on sample preparation methods that robustly but accurately preserve biological structures. In plants, exposing the object of interest may be difficult due to the existence of a cell wall. This protocol shows how to isolate plant nuclei for SEM imaging of the nuclear envelope and associated structures from both sides of the nuclear envelope in cultured cells as well as in leaf or root cells. Further, it provides a method for uncovering membrane-associated cytoskeletal structures.

  16. A compilation of cold cases using scanning electron microscopy at the University of Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Michael J.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2015-10-01

    Scanning electron microscopy combined with microchemical analysis has evolved into one of the most widely used instruments in forensic science today. In particular, the environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), has created unique opportunities in forensic science in regard to the examination of trace evidence; i.e. the examination of evidence without altering the evidence with conductive coatings, thereby enabling criminalists to solve cases that were previously considered unsolvable. Two cold cases were solved at URI using a JEOL 5900 LV SEM in conjunction with EDS. A cold case murder and a cold missing person case will be presented from the viewpoint of the microscopist and will include sample preparation, as well as image and chemical analysis of the trace evidence using electron microscopy and optical microscopy.

  17. Three-dimensional optical transfer functions in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L; Nellist, P D

    2014-05-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, hardware aberration correctors can now correct for the positive spherical aberration of round electron lenses. These correctors make use of nonround optics such as hexapoles or octupoles, leading to the limiting aberrations often being of a nonround type. Here we explore the effect of a number of potential limiting aberrations on the imaging performance of the scanning transmission electron microscope through their resulting optical transfer functions. In particular, the response of the optical transfer function to changes in defocus are examined, given that this is the final aberration to be tuned just before image acquisition. The resulting three-dimensional optical transfer functions also allow an assessment of the performance of a system for focal-series experiments or optical sectioning applications. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Computer Archiving and Image Enhancement of Diagnostic Electron Micrographs Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope as Real-Time Digitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okagaki, T.; Jones, M.H.; Clark, B.A.; Pan, T.; Ferro, J.M.; Hsing, R.; Tzou, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    Diagnostic electron micrographs were digitized in real time using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) controlled by a devoted front end processor at a resolution of 1K × 1K × 8. Various methods of image enhancement produced satisfactory results. From our experience, a faster front end processor with a larger memory size and 2K × 2K or 4K × 4K spatial resolution of an image are desirable. In order to facilitate storage and retrieval of an image archive, efficient data compression is necessary. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3

  19. Note on in situ (scanning) transmission electron microscopy study of liquid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan

    2017-08-01

    Liquid cell (scanning) transmission electron microscopy has been developed rapidly, using amorphous SiNx membranes as electron transparent windows. The current interpretations of electron beam effects are mainly based on radiolytic processes. In this note, additional effects of the electric field due to electron-beam irradiation are discussed. The electric field can be produced by the charge accumulation due to the emission of secondary and Auger electrons. Besides various beam-induced phenomena, such as nanoparticle precipitation and gas bubble formation and motion, two other effects need to be considered; one is the change of Gibbs free energy of nucleation and the other is the violation of Brownian motion due to ion drifting driven by the electric field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: Experimental observations and possible mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Su, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Egerton, R.F. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Konno, M. [Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Wu, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zhu, Y., E-mail: zhu@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. -- Research highlights: {yields} Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in an aberration-corrected electron microscope. {yields} High-resolution secondary electron imaging mechanism. {yields} Image contrast quantification and as functions of imaging conditions. {yields} Simultaneous acquisition of atomic images from surface and bulk.

  2. Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM)-in-SEM for Bio- and Organo-Mineral Interface Characterization in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Guillaume; Hellal, Jennifer; Ollivier, Patrick; Richard, Annie; Burel, Agnes; Jolly, Louis; Crampon, Marc; Michel, Caroline

    2017-11-16

    Understanding biofilm interactions with surrounding substratum and pollutants/particles can benefit from the application of existing microscopy tools. Using the example of biofilm interactions with zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI), this study aims to apply various approaches in biofilm preparation and labeling for fluorescent or electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) microanalysis for accurate observations. According to the targeted microscopy method, biofilms were sampled as flocs or attached biofilm, submitted to labeling using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindol, lectins PNA and ConA coupled to fluorescent dye or gold nanoparticles, and prepared for observation (fixation, cross-section, freezing, ultramicrotomy). Fluorescent microscopy revealed that nZVI were embedded in the biofilm structure as aggregates but the resolution was insufficient to observe individual nZVI. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showed nZVI aggregates close to bacteria, but it was not possible to confirm direct interactions between nZVI and cell membranes. Scanning transmission electron microscopy in the SEM (STEM-in-SEM) showed that nZVI aggregates could enter the biofilm to a depth of 7-11 µm. Bacteria were surrounded by a ring of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) preventing direct nZVI/membrane interactions. STEM/EDS mapping revealed a co-localization of nZVI aggregates with lectins suggesting a potential role of EPS in nZVI embedding. Thus, the combination of divergent microscopy approaches is a good approach to better understand and characterize biofilm/metal interactions.

  3. Further observations on cerebellar climbing fibers. A study by means of light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, O J; Castejón, H V; Alvarado, M V

    2000-12-01

    The intracortical pathways of climbing fibers were traced in several vertebrate cerebella using light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. They were identified as fine fibers up to 1(micron thick, with a characteristic crossing-over bifurcation pattern. Climbing fiber collaterals were tridimensionally visualized forming thin climbing fiber glomeruli in the granular layer. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed three types of collateral processes at the interface between granular and Purkinje cell layers. Scanning electron microscopy showed climbing fiber retrograde collaterals in the molecular layer. Asymmetric synaptic contacts of climbing fibers with Purkinje dendritic spines and stellate neuron dendrites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Correlative microscopy allowed us to obtain the basic three-dimensional morphological features of climbing fibers in several vertebrates and to show with more accuracy a higher degree of lateral collateralization of these fibers within the cerebellar cortex. The correlative microscopy approach provides new views in the cerebellar cortex information processing.

  4. Novel low-dose imaging technique for characterizing atomic structures through scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Ping; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chen, Chien-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To investigate dislocations or heterostructures across interfaces is now of great interest to condensed matter and materials scientists. With the advances in aberration-corrected electron optics, the scanning transmission electron microscope has demonstrated its excellent capability of characterizing atomic structures within nanomaterials, and well-resolved atomic-resolution images can be obtained through long-exposure data acquisition. However, the sample drifting, carbon contamination, and radiation damage hinder further analysis, such as deriving three-dimensional (3D) structures from a series of images. In this study, a method for obtaining atomic-resolution images with significantly reduced exposure time was developed, using which an original high-resolution image with approximately one tenth the electron dose can be obtained by combining a fast-scan high-magnification image and a slow-scan low-magnification image. The feasibility of obtaining 3D atomic structures using the proposed approach was demonstrated through multislice simulation. Finally, the feasibility and accuracy of image restoration were experimentally verified. This general method cannot only apply to electron microscopy but also benefit to image radiation-sensitive materials using various light sources.

  5. Observation of Live Ticks (Haemaphysalis flava) by Scanning Electron Microscopy under High Vacuum Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nakamura, Yuka; Oikawa, Yosaburo; Yano, Yasuhiro; Kuwabata, Susumu; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Takegami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes (SEM), which image sample surfaces by scanning with an electron beam, are widely used for steric observations of resting samples in basic and applied biology. Various conventional methods exist for SEM sample preparation. However, conventional SEM is not a good tool to observe living organisms because of the associated exposure to high vacuum pressure and electron beam radiation. Here we attempted SEM observations of live ticks. During 1.5×10−3 Pa vacuum pressure and electron beam irradiation with accelerated voltages (2–5 kV), many ticks remained alive and moved their legs. After 30-min observation, we removed the ticks from the SEM stage; they could walk actively under atmospheric pressure. When we tested 20 ticks (8 female adults and 12 nymphs), they survived for two days after SEM observation. These results indicate the resistance of ticks against SEM observation. Our second survival test showed that the electron beam, not vacuum conditions, results in tick death. Moreover, we describe the reaction of their legs to electron beam exposure. These findings open the new possibility of SEM observation of living organisms and showed the resistance of living ticks to vacuum condition in SEM. These data also indicate, for the first time, the usefulness of tick as a model system for biology under extreme condition. PMID:22431980

  6. Comparison of Electron Imaging Modes for Dimensional Measurements in the Scanning Electron Microscope†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, Michael T.; Vladár, András E.; Villarrubia, John S.; Muto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Dimensional measurements from secondary electron (SE) images were compared with those from backscattered electron (BSE) and low-loss electron (LLE) images. With the commonly used 50% threshold criterion, the lines consistently appeared larger in the SE images. As the images were acquired simultaneously by an instrument with the capability to operate detectors for both signals at the same time, the differences cannot be explained by the assumption that contamination or drift between images affected the SE, BSE, or LLE images differently. Simulations with JMONSEL, an electron microscope simulator, indicate that the nanometer-scale differences observed on this sample can be explained by the different convolution effects of a beam with finite size on signals with different symmetry (the SE signal’s characteristic peak versus the BSE or LLE signal’s characteristic step). This effect is too small to explain the > 100 nm discrepancies that were observed in earlier work on different samples. Additional modeling indicates that those discrepancies can be explained by the much larger sidewall angles of the earlier samples, coupled with the different response of SE versus BSE/LLE profiles to such wall angles. PMID:27452278

  7. Scanning Electron Microscope Calibration Using a Multi-Image Non-Linear Minimization Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Le; Marchand, Éric

    2015-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) calibrating approach based on non-linear minimization procedure is presented in this article. A part of this article has been published in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2014. . Both the intrinsic parameters and the extrinsic parameters estimations are achieved simultaneously by minimizing the registration error. The proposed approach considers multi-images of a multi-scale calibration pattern view from different positions and orientations. Since the projection geometry of the scanning electron microscope is different from that of a classical optical sensor, the perspective projection model and the parallel projection model are considered and compared with distortion models. Experiments are realized by varying the position and the orientation of a multi-scale chessboard calibration pattern from 300× to 10,000×. The experimental results show the efficiency and the accuracy of this approach.

  8. Depth sectioning with the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, Albina Y.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition brings depth resolution at the nanometer scale. Aberration correction therefore opens up the possibility of 3D imaging by optical sectioning. Here we develop a definition for the depth resolution for scanning transmission electron microscope depth sectioning and present initial results from this method. Objects such as catalytic metal clusters and single atoms on various support materials are imaged in three dimensions with a resolution of several nanometers. Effective focal depth is determined by statistical analysis and the contributing factors are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future capabilities available through new instruments are discussed. PMID:16492746

  9. Nanotubular Structure on the Ti-29Nb-5Zr Alloy by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ju; Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Kang, Bo-An; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we reported the observation of highly ordered nanotubular structure on the Ti-29Nb-5Zr alloy in various potentials and electrolytes by field emission scanning electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscope. From the X-ray diffraction results and microstructure analysis, Ti-29Nb-5Zr alloy had β phase. The nanotube morphologies of Ti-29Nb-5Zr alloy were transformed from nano-porous structure to nanotube structure as NaF concentration and voltage increased. Nanotube diameter and layer changed with different concentration of NaF in 1 M H3PO4 at the same voltage. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results, nanotube was formed by Nb, Zr, and Ti oxide. Also, barrier layer of large tube was about 50 nm thickness, small one was 60 nm thickness. The nanotube size and crystallinity on the β Ti alloy was controlled by fluoride concentration, applied potential, anodization time, and tube layer.

  10. Field emission scanning electron microscopy of biofilm-growing bacteria involved in nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuotto, Claudia; Donelli, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provides useful information on the shape, size, and localization within the biofilm of single bacteria as well as on the steps of biofilm formation process, on bacterial interactions, and on production of extracellular polymeric substances.When biofilms are constituted by microbial species involved in health care-associated infections, information provided by SEM can be fruitfully used not only for basic researches but also for diagnostic purposes.The protocols currently used in our laboratory for biofilm investigation by SEM are reported here. Particularly, the procedures to fix, dehydrate, and metalize in vitro-developed biofilms or ex vivo clinical specimens colonized by biofilm-growing microorganisms are described as well as the advantages of the observation of these samples by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Experimental Route to Scanning Probe Hot Electron Nanoscopy (HENs) Applied to 2D Material

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2017-06-09

    This paper presents details on a new experimental apparatus implementing the hot electron nanoscopy (HENs) technique introduced for advanced spectroscopies on structure and chemistry in few molecules and interface problems. A detailed description of the architecture used for the laser excitation of surface plasmons at an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is provided. The photogenerated current from the tip to the sample is detected during the AFM scan. The technique is applied to innovative semiconductors for applications in electronics: 2D MoS2 single crystal and a p-type SnO layer. Results are supported by complementary scanning Kelvin probe microscopy, traditional conductive AFM, and Raman measurements. New features highlighted by HEN technique reveal details of local complexity in MoS2 and polycrystalline structure of SnO at nanometric scale otherwise undetected. The technique set in this paper is promising for future studies in nanojunctions and innovative multilayered materials, with new insight on interfaces.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of experimental bone hacking trauma of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunni-Perret, Véronique; Borg, Cybèle; Laugier, Jean-Pierre; Bertrand, Marie-France; Staccini, Pascal; Bolla, Marc; Quatrehomme, Gérald; Muller-Bolla, Michèle

    2010-12-01

    The authors report on a macroscopic and microscopic study of human mandible bone lesions achieved by a single-blade knife and a hatchet. The aim of this work was to complete the previous data (scanning electron microscopy analysis of bone lesions made by a single-blade knife and a hatchet, on human femurs) and to compare the lesions of the femur with those of the mandible. The results indicate that the mandible is a more fragile bone, but the features observed on the mandible are quite similar to those previously observed on the femur. This work spells out the main scanning electron microscopy characteristics of sharp (bone cutting) and blunt (exerting a pressure on the bone) mechanisms on human bone. Weapon characteristics serve to explain all of these features.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  14. High-energy-resolution monochromator for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy/electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Ursin, Jonathan P; Bacon, Neil J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Hrncirik, Petr; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S

    2009-09-28

    An all-magnetic monochromator/spectrometer system for sub-30 meV energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope is described. It will link the energy being selected by the monochromator to the energy being analysed by the spectrometer, without resorting to decelerating the electron beam. This will allow it to attain spectral energy stability comparable to systems using monochromators and spectrometers that are raised to near the high voltage of the instrument. It will also be able to correct the chromatic aberration of the probe-forming column. It should be able to provide variable energy resolution down to approximately 10 meV and spatial resolution less than 1 A.

  15. Applications of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy to thin oxide films and interfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Luck, Julia T [ORNL; Torija, Maria [University of Minnesota; Sharma, M [University of Minnesota; Leighton, chris [University of Minnesota; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL; Christen, Hans M [ORNL; Murfitt, Matt [Nion Co; Dellby, Niklas [ORNL; Krivanek, Ondrej [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Aberration correction in the scanning transmission electron microscope allows spatial resolutions of the order of one ngstr m to be routinely achieved. When combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy, it is possible to simultaneously map the structure, the chemistry and even the electronic properties of materials in one single experiment. Here we will apply these techniques to the characterization of thin films and interfaces based on complex oxides with the perovskite structure. The relatively large lattice parameter of these materials combined with the fact that most of them have absorption edges within the reach of the spectrometer optics makes these materials ideal for these experiments. We will show how it is possible to map the chemistry of interfaces atomic plane by atomic plane, including light element imaging such as O. Applications to cobaltite and titanate thin films will be described.

  16. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    based on a slab model for the metal surface. The ordered monolayer offers a platform for submolecular scale electronic mapping that is an issue of fundamental interest but remains a challenge in STM imaging science and surface chemistry. Single Cys molecules were mapped as three electronic subunits......We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry...... contributed mainly from three chemical moieties: thiol (-SH), carboxylic (-COOH), and amine (-NH2) groups. The contrasts of the three subunits depend on the environment (e.g., pH), which affects the electronic structure of adsorbed species. From the DFT computations focused on single molecules, rational...

  17. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Van Den Avyle, J.; Damkroger, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-12

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia`s 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (150 and 225 kW), scan frequency (30, 115 and 450 Hz) and background pressure (10{sup {minus}3}, 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}5} torr).

  18. Visualizing Morphological Changes of Abscission Zone Cells in Arabidopsis by Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chun-Lin; Butenko, Melinka A

    2018-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope which produces detailed images of surface structures. It has been widely used in plants and animals to study cellular structures. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to prepare samples of floral abscission zones (AZs) for SEM, as well as further image analysis. We show that it is a powerful tool to detect morphologic changes at the cellular level during the course of abscission in wild-type plants and to establish the details of phenotypic alteration in abscission mutants.

  19. Reliable strain measurement in transistor arrays by robust scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhyun Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of the strain field in the channels of transistor arrays is critical for strain engineering in modern electronic devices. We applied atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy to quantitative measurement of the strain field in transistor arrays. The quantitative strain profile over 20 transistors was obtained with high reliability and a precision of 0.1%. The strain field was found to form homogeneously in the channels of the transistor arrays. Furthermore, strain relaxation due to the thin foil effect was quantitatively investigated for thicknesses of 35 to 275 nm.

  20. Focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in tissue structural research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, Vladka; Milani, Marziale; Tatti, Francesco; Tkalec, Ziva Pipan; Strus, Jasna; Drobne, Damjana

    2010-10-01

    The focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) are commonly used in material sciences for imaging and analysis of materials. Over the last decade, the combined FIB/SEM system has proven to be also applicable in the life sciences. We have examined the potential of the focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope system for the investigation of biological tissues of the model organism Porcellio scaber (Crustacea: Isopoda). Tissue from digestive glands was prepared as for conventional SEM or as for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The samples were transferred into FIB/SEM for FIB milling and an imaging operation. FIB-milled regions were secondary electron imaged, back-scattered electron imaged, or energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyzed. Our results demonstrated that FIB/SEM enables simultaneous investigation of sample gross morphology, cell surface characteristics, and subsurface structures. The same FIB-exposed regions were analyzed by EDX to provide basic compositional data. When samples were prepared as for TEM, the information obtained with FIB/SEM is comparable, though at limited magnification, to that obtained from TEM. A combination of imaging, micro-manipulation, and compositional analysis appears of particular interest in the investigation of epithelial tissues, which are subjected to various endogenous and exogenous conditions affecting their structure and function. The FIB/SEM is a promising tool for an overall examination of epithelial tissue under normal, stressed, or pathological conditions.

  1. Thirty per cent contrast in secondary-electron imaging by scanning field-emission microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, D A; De Pietro, L G; Peter, Q; Kostanyan, A; Cabrera, H; Vindigni, A; Bähler, Th; Pescia, D; Ramsperger, U

    2016-11-01

    We perform scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) in a regime where primary electrons are field-emitted from the tip and excite secondary electrons out of the target-the scanning field-emission microscopy regime (SFM). In the SFM mode, a secondary-electron contrast as high as 30% is observed when imaging a monoatomic step between a clean W(110)- and an Fe-covered W(110)-terrace. This is a figure of contrast comparable to STM. The apparent width of the monoatomic step attains the 1 nm mark, i.e. it is only marginally worse than the corresponding width observed in STM. The origin of the unexpected strong contrast in SFM is the material dependence of the secondary-electron yield and not the dependence of the transported current on the tip-target distance, typical of STM: accordingly, we expect that a technology combining STM and SFM will highlight complementary aspects of a surface while simultaneously making electrons, selected with nanometre spatial precision, available to a macroscopic environment for further processing.

  2. Magnification-continuous static calibration model of a scanning-electron microscope.

    OpenAIRE

    Malti, Abed Choaib; Dembélé, Sounkalo; Piat, Nadine; Rougeot, Patrick; Salut, Roland

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We present a new calibration model of both static distortion and projection for a scanning-electron microscope (SEM). The proposed calibration model depends continuously on the magnification factor. State-of-the-art methods have proposed models to solve the static distortion and projection model but for a discrete set of low and high magnifications: at low magnifications, existing models assume static distortion and perspective projection. At high magnifications, exist...

  3. Solving Research Tasks Using Desk top Scanning Electron Microscope Phenom ProX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vertsanova, O.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenom ProX — morden effective universal desktop Scanning Electron Microscope with integrated EDS system. Phenom-World helps customers to stay competitive in a world where critical dimensions are continuously getting smaller. All Phenom desktop systems give direct access to the high resolution and high-quality imaging and analysis required in a large variety of applications. They are affordable, flexible and a fast tool enabling engineers, technicians, researchers and educational professionals to investigate micron and submicron structures.

  4. Effect of Autoclave Cycles on Surface Characteristics of S-File Evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Razavian, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Mojtahedi, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Presence of surface defects in endodontic instruments can lead to unwanted complications such as instrument fracture and incomplete preparation of the canal. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of autoclave cycles on surface characteristics of S-File by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: In this experimental study, 17 brand new S-Files (#30) were used. The surface characteristics of the files were examined in four steps (without autocla...

  5. Clinical and scanning electron microscopic assessments of porcelain and ceromer resin veneers.

    OpenAIRE

    Dhawan P; Prakash H; Shah N

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently available Ceromer resin materials are promising for fabrication of esthetic anterior laminates and provices an alternative, cost effective treament modality to porcelain laminates for discolored anterior anterior teeth. It was proposed to study the esthetic quality and surface finish of veneers fbricated from ceromer resin and compare it with the standard porcelain veneers, both clinically as well as by scanning electron microscope (SEM) at baseline and at 12 months. If foun...

  6. Scanning electron microscopy and calcification in amelogenesis imperfecta in anterior and posterior human teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Quevedo, M.C.; Ceballos, G.; García, J. M.; Rodriguez, I. A.; Gómez de Ferraris, M.E.; Campos, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Teeth fragments from members of a famil? clinically and genetically diagnosed as having amelogenesis imperfecta were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microprobe analysis to establish the morphological patterns and the quantitative concentration of calcium in the enamel of anterior (canine, incisor) and posterior (premolar and molar) teeth. The prism patterns in the enamel of teeth from both regions were parallel or irregularly decussate, with ...

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of the egg-shell of the fly synthesiomyia Nudiseta (wulp)

    OpenAIRE

    El Alfy, Nagla Z. [نجلاء زكي الالفي

    1994-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the egg-shell of the fly Synthesiomyia nudiseta has been studied by scanning electron microscopy. The surface of the outer chorion is highly ridged, grooved and has a reticulate appearance except at the collar surrounding the micropyle. There are few aeropyles at the antimicropylar pole. The structure of the egg-shell outside the hatching lines is composed of three layers. The outer layer consists of vertical columns that arise from the middle layer, these columns bra...

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of the teguments of males from five populations of Schistosoma mattheei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, F J; Hamilton-Attwell, V L; Schutte, C H

    1986-06-01

    The teguments of males from 5 populations of S. mattheei, of which 3 were sympatric and 2 allopatric with S. haematobium, were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A certain percentage of the males of each sympatric population bore tubercle spines while the allopatric populations were spineless. It is postulated that the presence of tubercle spines is a characteristic inherited from S. haematobium.

  9. Scanning electron microscopical observations on the shedding of the tegument of adult Schistosoma mattheei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, F J; Joubert, P H

    1990-11-01

    In search of indications of membrane turnover the teguments of male Schistosoma mattheei from cattle and laboratory rodents were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. A number of slightly elevated circular patches of tegument which appeared to peel off on the edges were seen on the outer membrane of a limited number of specimens from both rodents and cattle. It is suggested that this phenomenon may represent limited rapid turnover of the outer layer in response to host immunological action.

  10. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Root Canal Irrigation with Saline, Sodium Hypochlorite, and Citric Acid,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    endodontic techniques; citric acid for root canal irrigation 4410,ABSTACgmf --,-,m- ,-rms n roc"---’This Study used a scanning electron microscope and a...wall is instrumented during canal preparation and that the smeared layer seems to be found only where endodontic instruments have scraped the surface...between the extremes. It was also decided to use a magnification of 75X to evaluate the superficial debris and 800X to evaluate the smeared layer

  11. The Dentin Tubule System: A Replica and Scanning Electron Microscope Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-20

    this laboratory to prepare soft and calci fied tissues for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The resolution, magnification range and...several intertubular connections , originally examined at a magnification of 17,000 times (Fig. 7). In addition to the omnipresent lateral tubule...branches , and the ease of penetration therein of endodontic reagents from the pulp. Intratubular network throughout the dentin may be a route of intra

  12. Scanning Electron Microscopy study of Macbat regeneration effect on lead-acid battery electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Emanuelsson, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Electrodes from lead-acid batteries were studied using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. This to observe the effects of cycling on the batteries and how a capacity recovery process, known as Macbat regeneration, affected the active material with focus on hard sulphation. First, two new batteries were cycled for two months and electrodes from them were studied when the batteries were new, cycled, fully charged after cycling and regenerated after cycling. Then ele...

  13. Corneal endothelium of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigatto, João A T; Laus, José L; Santos, Jaime M; Cerva, Cristine; Cunha, Luciana S; Ruoppolo, Valéria; Barros, Paulo S M

    2005-12-01

    The corneal endothelium is essential for the maintenance of the corneal transparency. The aim of this study was to examine the morphology of the endothelial surface and perform morphometric analysis of the normal corneal endothelial cells of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) using scanning electron microscopy. The present work demonstrates that the corneal endothelium of the Magellanic penguin is similar to those described in other vertebrates.

  14. Intensity interferometry experiments in a scanning transmission electron microscope : physics and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Meuret, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Quantum optics performed at the nanometer scale is an important challenge, especially for quantum emitters characterization. They can be point defects in material (few ang- ströms) or confined structures of a few nanometers. A way to reach this scale is by using cathodoluminescence (CL) performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (CL- STEM), which has only recently been done [1]. However, when aiming at studying the statistical properties of the light coming out of a CL experimen...

  15. Vison and visual servoing for nanomanipulation and nanocharacterization using scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Marturi, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    With the latest advances in nanotechnology, it became possible to design novel nanoscale devicesand systems with increasing efficiency. The consequence of this fact is an increase in the need for developing reliable and cutting edge processes for nanomanipulation and nanocharacterization. Since the human direct sensing is not a feasible option at this particular scale, the tasks are usually performedby an expert human operator using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped withmicro-nano...

  16. Histology and scanning electron microscopy observations of cryopreserved protocorm-like bodies of Dendrobium sonia-28

    OpenAIRE

    POOBATHY, Ranjetta; Sinniah, Uma Rani; RATHINAM, Xavier; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2013-01-01

    The genus Dendrobium possesses horticultural importance. Dendrobium sonia-28 is an important ornamental orchid in the flower industry. Cryopreservation is a favoured long-term storage method for orchids with propagation problems. Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Dendrobium sonia-28 were cryopreserved using the vitrification technique. Histology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations were conducted on stock, non-cryopreserved (control), and cryopreserved PLBs of Dendrobium sonia-28...

  17. A scanning electron microscopic evaluation of different root canal irrigation regimens

    OpenAIRE

    Chaves Medici Mônika; Izabel Cristina Fröner

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of endodontic irrigants in removing the smear layer from instrumented root canal walls using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The endodontic irrigants used were: 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); 1% NaOCl mixed to 17% EDTAC; 2% chlorhexidine gel; and Ricinus communis gel. Photomicrographs of the middle and apical thirds were evaluated with the aid of the Fotoscore - v. 2.0 software. The results indicated that the mixture of sodium hyp...

  18. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF DENTINAL TUBULES IN MONKEY DENTIN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF DENTINAL TUBULES IN Cebus apella DENTIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Humberto Antoniazzi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of the study was to investigate the number and diameter of the Cebus apella dentinal tubules. The roots of the Cebus apella teeth were examined in specific tooth locations: the apical, middle and cervical dentin. The calculations were based on the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fractured surfaces. The results showed that the average number of dentinal tubules for each location was: 74,800 tubules/mm2 for apical root dentin, 90,000 tubules/mm2 for mid-root dentin, 91,600 tubules/mm2 for cervical root dentin. The average diameter was the following: apical root dentin, 4,30µm; mid-root dentin, 4,37µm; cervical root dentin,  5,23µm. These findings demonstrate that the Cebus apella teeth are a suitable substitute for human in endodontics studies. 

    KEY WORDS: Dentin, dentinal tubules, teeth.
    The aim of the study was to investigate the number and diameter of the Cebus apella dentinal tubules. The roots of the Cebus apella teeth were examined in specific tooth locations: the apical, middle and cervical dentin. The calculations were based on the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fractured surfaces. The results showed that the average number of dentinal tubules for each location was: 74,800 tubules/mm2 for apical root dentin, 90,000 tubules/mm2 for mid-root dentin, 91,600 tubules/mm2 for cervical root dentin. The average diameter was the following: apical root dentin, 4,30µm; mid-root dentin, 4,37µm; cervical root dentin,  5,23µm. These findings demonstrate that the Cebus apella teeth are a suitable substitute for human in endodontics studies. 

    KEY WORDS: Dentin, dentinal tubules, teeth.

  19. Preparation and Observation of Thick Biological Samples by Scanning Transmission Electron Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trépout, Sylvain; Bastin, Philippe; Marco, Sergio

    2017-03-12

    This report describes a protocol for preparing thick biological specimens for further observation using a scanning transmission electron microscope. It also describes an imaging method for studying the 3D structure of thick biological specimens by scanning transmission electron tomography. The sample preparation protocol is based on conventional methods in which the sample is fixed using chemical agents, treated with a heavy atom salt contrasting agent, dehydrated in a series of ethanol baths, and embedded in resin. The specific imaging conditions for observing thick samples by scanning transmission electron microscopy are then described. Sections of the sample are observed using a through-focus method involving the collection of several images at various focal planes. This enables the recovery of in-focus information at various heights throughout the sample. This particular collection pattern is performed at each tilt angle during tomography data collection. A single image is then generated, merging the in-focus information from all the different focal planes. A classic tilt-series dataset is then generated. The advantage of the method is that the tilt-series alignment and reconstruction can be performed using standard tools. The collection of through-focal images allows the reconstruction of a 3D volume that contains all of the structural details of the sample in focus.

  20. Quantification of carbon contamination under electron beam irradiation in a scanning transmission electron microscope and its suppression by plasma cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, A J V; Walther, T, E-mail: t.walther@sheffield.ac.u [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sir Frederick Mappin Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    We have measured the build-up of carbon surface contamination as a function of time and irradiated area size for various specimens in a JEOL 2010F (scanning) transmission electron microscope, employing both t/{lambda} mapping with our Gatan imaging filter and recording changes in annular dark-field image intensity. It is shown that the total number of carbon atoms deposited per time for a given beam intensity is roughly constant at room temperature for as-received specimens while it is significantly lower for plasma cleaned specimens. This explains why contamination is generally only an issue at the highest magnifications where the contamination regions become smaller and the carbon layers correspondingly thicker. A Fischione plasma cleaner was then used to remove these carbon layers, and the rate of carbon removal has been determined for contamination spots produced in stationary spot mode as well as for extended regions scanned for a minute so that optimal cleaning times can be chosen.

  1. Dynamic investigation of electron trapping and charge decay in electron-irradiated Al sub 2 O sub 3 in a scanning electron microscope: Methodology and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Fakhfakh, S; Belhaj, M; Fakhfakh, Z; Kallel, A; Rau, E I

    2002-01-01

    The charging and discharging of polycrystalline Al sub 2 O sub 3 submitted to electron-irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) are investigated by means of the displacement current method. To circumvent experimental shortcomings inherent to the use of the basic sample holder, a redesign of the latter is proposed and tests are carried out to verify its operation. The effects of the primary beam accelerating voltage on charging, flashover and discharging phenomena during and after electron-irradiation are studied. The experimental results are then analyzed. In particular, the divergence between the experimental data and those predicted by the total electron emission yield approach (TEEYA) is discussed. A partial discharge was observed immediately after the end of the electron-irradiation exposure. The experimental data suggests, that the discharge is due to the evacuation to the ground, along the insulator surface, of released electrons from shallow traps at (or in the close vicinity of) the insulat...

  2. Specimen preparation by ion beam slope cutting for characterization of ductile damage by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Gerstein, Gregory; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate ductile damage in parts made by cold sheet-bulk metal forming a suited specimen preparation is required to observe the microstructure and defects such as voids by electron microscopy. By means of ion beam slope cutting both a targeted material removal can be applied and mechanical or thermal influences during preparation avoided. In combination with scanning electron microscopy this method allows to examine voids in the submicron range and thus to analyze early stages of ductile damage. In addition, a relief structure is formed by the selectivity of the ion bombardment, which depends on grain orientation and microstructural defects. The formation of these relief structures is studied using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction and the use of this side effect to interpret the microstructural mechanisms of voids formation by plastic deformation is discussed. A comprehensive investigation of the suitability of ion beam milling to analyze ductile damage is given at the examples of a ferritic deep drawing steel and a dual phase steel. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Contrast and decay of cathodoluminescence from phosphor particles in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Engelsen, Daniel; Harris, Paul G; Ireland, Terry G; Fern, George R; Silver, Jack

    2015-10-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies are reported on phosphors in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). ZnO: Zn and other luminescent powders manifest a bright ring around the periphery of the particles: this ring enhances the contrast. Additionally, particles resting on top of others are substantially brighter than underlying ones. These phenomena are explained in terms of the combined effects of electrons backscattered out of the particles, together with light absorption by the substrate. The contrast is found to be a function of the particle size and the energy of the primary electrons. Some phosphor materials exhibit a pronounced comet-like structure at high scan rates in a CL-image, because the particle continues to emit light after the electron beam has moved to a position without phosphor material. Image analysis has been used to study the loss of brightness along the tail and hence to determine the decay time of the materials. The effect of phosphor saturation on the determination of decay times by CL-microscopy was also investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-dimensional imaging of cerebellar mossy fiber rosettes by ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Namkug; Kim, Ki Woo; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2013-08-01

    The detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) organization of the nervous tissue provides essential information on its functional elucidation. We used serial block-face scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam (FIB) milling to reveal 3D morphologies of the mossy fiber rosettes in the mice cerebellum. Three-week-old C57 black mice were perfused with a fixative of 1% paraformaldehyde/1% glutaraldehyde in phosphate buffer; the cerebellum was osmicated and embedded in the Araldite. The block containing granule cell layer was sliced with FIB and observed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The contrast of backscattered electron image of the block-face was similar to that of transmission electron microscopy and processed using 3D visualization software for further analysis. The mossy fiber rosettes on each image were segmented and rendered to visualize the 3D model. The complete 3D characters of the mossy fiber rosette could be browsed on the A-Works, in-house software, and some preliminary quantitative data on synapse of the rosette could be extracted from these models. Thanks to the development of two-beam imaging and optimized software, we could get 3D information on cerebellar mossy fiber rosettes with ease and speedily, which would be an additive choice to explore 3D structures of the nervous systems and their networks.

  5. Facile synthesis and electron transport properties of NiO nanostructures investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Mallick

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique chemical, thermal, electronic and photonic properties, low -dimensional transition metal oxides, especially NiO, have attracted great deal of attention for potential applications in a wide range of technologies, such as, sensors, electrochromic coatings and self-healing materials. However, their synthesis involves multi-step complex procedures that in addition to being expensive, further introduce impurities. Here we present a low cost facile approach to synthesize uniform size NiO nanoparticles (NPs from hydrothermally grown Ni(OH2. Detailed transmission electron microscopic analysis reveal the average size of NiO NPs to be around 29 nm. The dimension of NiO NP is also corroborated by the small area scanning tunneling microscope (STM measurements. Further, we investigate electron transport characteristics of newly synthesized Ni(OH2 and NiO nanoparticles on p-type Si substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy. The conductivity of Ni(OH2 and NiO are determined to be 1.46x10-3 S/cm and 2.37x10-5 S/cm, respectively. The NiO NPs exhibit a lower voltage window (∼0.7 V electron tunneling than the parent Ni(OH2.

  6. Facile synthesis and electron transport properties of NiO nanostructures investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Govind; Labh, Jyotsna; Giri, Lily; Pandey, Avinash C.; Karna, Shashi P.

    2017-08-01

    Due to their unique chemical, thermal, electronic and photonic properties, low -dimensional transition metal oxides, especially NiO, have attracted great deal of attention for potential applications in a wide range of technologies, such as, sensors, electrochromic coatings and self-healing materials. However, their synthesis involves multi-step complex procedures that in addition to being expensive, further introduce impurities. Here we present a low cost facile approach to synthesize uniform size NiO nanoparticles (NPs) from hydrothermally grown Ni(OH)2. Detailed transmission electron microscopic analysis reveal the average size of NiO NPs to be around 29 nm. The dimension of NiO NP is also corroborated by the small area scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measurements. Further, we investigate electron transport characteristics of newly synthesized Ni(OH)2 and NiO nanoparticles on p-type Si substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy. The conductivity of Ni(OH)2 and NiO are determined to be 1.46x10-3 S/cm and 2.37x10-5 S/cm, respectively. The NiO NPs exhibit a lower voltage window (˜0.7 V) electron tunneling than the parent Ni(OH)2.

  7. Chemical-state imaging of Li using scanning Auger electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ISHIDA.Nobuyuki@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Fujita, Daisuke [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Advanced Nanocharacterization Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: •Scanning Auger electron microscopy is used to image chemical states of Li. •The combined use of AES and EELS signals for the elemental mapping is powerful. •Distribution corresponding to metallic and oxidized states of Li can be imaged. -- Abstract: The demand for measurement tools to detect Li with high spatial resolution and precise chemical sensitivity is increasing with the spread of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for use in a wide range of applications. In this work, scanning Auger electron microscopy (SAM) is used to image chemical states of a partially oxidized Li surface on the basis of the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data obtained during an oxidation process of a metal Li. We show that distribution of metallic and oxidized states of Li is clearly imaged by mapping the intensity of the corresponding AES and EELS peaks. Furthermore, a tiny difference in the extent of oxidation can be distinguished by comparing the elemental map of an AES peak with that of an EELS peak owing to the different behaviors of those signals to the chemical states of Li.

  8. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy: the potential for nano- and interface science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Pantelides, S.T. [Solid State Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Lupini, A.R.; Wang, L.G. [Solid State Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kadavanich, A. [Solid State Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dept. of Chemistry, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); McBride, J.R. [Dept. of Chemistry, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Rosenthal, S.J. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Puetter, R.C.; Yahil, A. [Pixon LLC, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Krivanek, O.L.; Dellby, N.; Nellist, P.D.L. [Nion Co., Kirkland, WA (United States); Duscher, G. [Solid State Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2003-04-01

    The sub-Aangstroem probe of an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope will enable imaging and analysis of nanostructures and interfaces with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. In conjunction with first-principles theory, new insights are anticipated into the atomistic processes of growth and the subtle link between structure and functionality. We present initial results from the aberration-corrected microscopes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that indicate the kinds of studies that will become feasible in the near future. Examples include (1) the three-dimensional location and identification of individual dopant and impurity atoms in semiconductor interfaces, and their effect on local electronic structure; (2) the accurate reconstruction of surface atomic and electronic structure on nanocrystals, and the effect on optical properties; and (3) the ability to distinguish which configurations of catalyst atoms are active, and why. (orig.)

  9. High-resolution characterization of multiferroic heterojunction using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhoushen; Ruan, Jieji; Xie, Lin; Pan, Xiaoqing; Wu, Di; Wang, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Multiferroic tunnel junctions have been considered as potential candidates for nonvolatile memory devices. Understanding the atomic structure at the interface is crucial for optimizing the performances in such oxide electronics. Spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combined with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy is employed to measure the compositional profiles across the interfaces of different layers with atomic resolution. Two-dimensional elemental imaging with atomic resolution is demonstrated, and the influences of the interface sharpness, the terminal layer, and cation intermixing are investigated. An asymmetric sublattice intermixing at the Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 interface is observed, which can affect the local Mn valence and coupling. The reduction in the Mn valence at the interface is further studied using EELS near-edge fine structures.

  10. A menu of electron probes for optimising information from scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D T; Findlay, S D; Etheridge, J

    2018-01-01

    We assess a selection of electron probes in terms of the spatial resolution with which information can be derived about the structure of a specimen, as opposed to the nominal image resolution. Using Ge [001] as a study case, we investigate the scattering dynamics of these probes and determine their relative merits in terms of two qualitative criteria: interaction volume and interpretability. This analysis provides a 'menu of probes' from which an optimum probe for tackling a given materials science question can be selected. Hollow cone, vortex and spherical wave fronts are considered, from unit cell to Ångstrom size, and for different defocus and specimen orientations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Observation of Martensite and Magnetic Domain Structures in Ni53Mn24Ga23 Shape Memory Alloys by Scanning Electron Acoustic Microscopy and Scanning Thermal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun-Yu; Zeng, Hua-Rong; Song, Hong-Zhang; Hui, Sen-Xing; Li, Guo-Rong; Yin, Qing-Rui

    2012-05-01

    We present observations of martensite variants and ferromagnetic domain structures of Ni53Mn24Ga23 ferromagnetic shape memory alloys with a pure tetragonal martensitic phase by using scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) and scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). Electron acoustic images show a polycrystalline morphology with martensite variants. Direct coincidence between crystallographic martensitic twin variants and magnetic domains is found. A domain-like structure, obtained by SThM, is firstly reported, and then confirmed by magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The experimental results will be helpful for investigating the local thermal properties of ferromagnets and understanding the relationship between martensite variants and magnetic domains.

  12. Analysis of improvement in performance and design parameters for enhancing resolution in an atmospheric scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo Hun; Kim, Seung Jae; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2015-12-01

    The scanning electron microscope is used in various fields to go beyond diffraction limits of the optical microscope. However, the electron pathway should be conducted in a vacuum so as not to scatter electrons. The pretreatment of the sample is needed for use in the vacuum. To directly observe large and fully hydrophilic samples without pretreatment, the atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) is needed. We developed an electron filter unit and an electron detector unit for implementation of the ASEM. The key of the electron filter unit is that electrons are transmitted while air molecules remain untransmitted through the unit. The electron detector unit collected the backscattered electrons. We conducted experiments using the selected materials with Havar foil, carbon film and SiN film. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Fundamental and experimental aspects of diffraction for characterizing dislocations by electron channeling contrast imaging in scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriaa, H; Guitton, A; Maloufi, N

    2017-08-29

    Nowadays Field Emission Gun-Scanning Electron Microscopes provide detailed crystallographic information with high spatial and angular resolutions, and allow direct observation of crystalline defects, such as dislocations, through an attractive technique called Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI). Dislocations play a crucial role in the properties of materials and ECCI has naturally emerged as an adapted tool for characterizing defects in bulk specimen. Nevertheless, fine control of the channeling conditions is absolutely required to get strong dislocation contrast for achieving comprehensive analysis. In this work, experiment-assisted fundamental aspects of the origin of dislocation contrast are studied. Experimentally, the potential of ECCI is explored in several dislocation configurations in Interstitial-Free steel (Fe - 1% Si) used as a model material. Full interpretations of dislocation contrast in (g, -g) and its evolution along the Kikuchi band are shown. Furthermore, a dislocation dipole is observed and fully characterized for the first time in an SEM.

  14. Atomic Imaging Using Secondary Electrons in a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope: Experimental Observations and Possible Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, D.; Inada, H.; Egerton, R.F.; Konno, M.; Wua, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-11-11

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondaryelectrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmissionelectron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. Apossiblemechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization.

  15. Telocytes and putative stem cells in the lungs: electron microscopy, electron tomography and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Suciu, Laura C; Manole, Catalin G; Hinescu, Mihail E

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a novel type of interstitial (stromal) cell - telocytes (TCs) - in the human and mouse respiratory tree (terminal and respiratory bronchioles, as well as alveolar ducts). TCs have recently been described in pleura, epicardium, myocardium, endocardium, intestine, uterus, pancreas, mammary gland, etc. (see www.telocytes.com ). TCs are cells with specific prolongations called telopodes (Tp), frequently two to three per cell. Tp are very long prolongations (tens up to hundreds of μm) built of alternating thin segments known as podomers (≤ 200 nm, below the resolving power of light microscope) and dilated segments called podoms, which accommodate mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Tp ramify dichotomously, making a 3-dimensional network with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. Confocal microscopy reveals that TCs are c-kit- and CD34-positive. Tp release shed vesicles or exosomes, sending macromolecular signals to neighboring cells and eventually modifying their transcriptional activity. At bronchoalveolar junctions, TCs have been observed in close association with putative stem cells (SCs) in the subepithelial stroma. SCs are recognized by their ultrastructure and Sca-1 positivity. Tp surround SCs, forming complex TC-SC niches (TC-SCNs). Electron tomography allows the identification of bridging nanostructures, which connect Tp with SCs. In conclusion, this study shows the presence of TCs in lungs and identifies a TC-SC tandem in subepithelial niches of the bronchiolar tree. In TC-SCNs, the synergy of TCs and SCs may be based on nanocontacts and shed vesicles.

  16. Examination of mycological samples by means of the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species of Siphomycetes: Rhizopus arhizus, Rhizopus equinus and Rhizopus nigricans, as well as a Septomycete: Emericella nidulans, have been examined by means of a scanning electron microscope. Among the difjerent Rhizopus, this technique showed differences in the appearance of the sporangia. In Emericella nidulans, scanning microscopy enábled one to ascertain that the "Hull cells" were completely hollow and also demonstrated the ornemented aspect of the ascospores.Três espécies de Sifomicetas: Rhizopus arhizus, Rhizopus equinus, Rhizopus nigricans e um Septomiceta: Emericella nidulans foram examinados em microscopia de exploração. Esta técnica mostrou detalhes não evidenciáveis ao poder de resolução do microscópio óptico, demonstrando ser útil para o diagnóstico em micologia.

  17. Electronic structure of carbon nanotube systems measured with scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbaker, Daniel Jay

    Carbon fullerenes are unusually structured molecules with robust mechanical and electronic properties. Their versatility is astounding; envisioned applications range from field emission displays to impregnated metal composites, battery storage media, and nanoelectronic devices. The combination of simple constituency, diverse behavior, and ease of fabrication makes these materials a cornerstone topic in current research. This thesis details scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments investigating how carbon nanotube fullerenes interact with and couple to their local environment. Scanning tunneling microscopy continues to be a key method for characterizing fullerenes, particularly in regards to their electronic properties. The atomic scale nature of this technique makes it uniquely suited for observing individual molecules and determining correlations between locally measured electronic properties and the particular environment of the molecule. The primary subject of this study is single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which were observed under various perturbative influences resulting in measurable changes in the electronic structure. Additionally, fullerene heterostructures formed by the encapsulation of C60 molecules within the hollow interiors of SWNTs were characterized for the first time with STM. These novel macromolecules (dubbed "peapods") demonstrate the potential for custom engineering the properties of fullerene materials. Measurements indicate that the properties of individual nanotubes depend sensitively on local interactions. In particular, pronounced changes in electronic behavior are observed in nanotubes exhibiting mechanical distortion, interacting with extrinsic materials (including other nanotubes), and possessing intrinsic defects in the atomic lattice. In fullerene peapods, while no discernable change in the atomic ordering of the encapsulating nanotubes was evident, the presence of interior C60 molecules has a dramatic effect on the

  18. Angle selective backscattered electron contrast in the low-voltage scanning electron microscope: Simulation and experiment for polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Q., E-mail: qwan2@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Masters, R.C. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Lidzey, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Abrams, K.J. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Dapor, M. [European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT-FBK) and Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications (TIFPA-INFN), via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Plenderleith, R.A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Rimmer, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Claeyssens, F.; Rodenburg, C. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    Recently developed detectors can deliver high resolution and high contrast images of nanostructured carbon based materials in low voltage scanning electron microscopes (LVSEM) with beam deceleration. Monte Carlo Simulations are also used to predict under which exact imaging conditions purely compositional contrast can be obtained and optimised. This allows the prediction of the electron signal intensity in angle selective conditions for back-scattered electron (BSE) imaging in LVSEM and compares it to experimental signals. Angle selective detection with a concentric back scattered (CBS) detector is considered in the model in the absence and presence of a deceleration field, respectively. The validity of the model prediction for both cases was tested experimentally for amorphous C and Cu and applied to complex nanostructured carbon based materials, namely a Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/Poly(ethylene glycol) Diacrylate (PNIPAM/PEGDA) semi-interpenetration network (IPN) and a Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) film, to map nano-scale composition and crystallinity distribution by avoiding experimental imaging conditions that lead to a mixed topographical and compositional contrast - Highlights: • An optimised model for nano-scale analysis of beam sensitive materials by LVSEM. • Simulation and separation of composition and topography in a CBS detector. • Selective angle backscattered electron collection for mapping of polymers.

  19. Fibrous architecture of cementodentinal junction in disease: A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, R; Pratebha, B

    2015-01-01

    The cementodentinal junction (CDJ) forms a biological and structural link between cementum and dentin. This biological link is regarded as a distinct tissue in its own right. Certain important proteins responsible for periodontal regeneration are said to be present in this tissue. Few studies have described the structure and composition of this layer by light and electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopic studies pertaining to CDJ in health and disease are few and documentation of periodontal pathological changes of CDJ is unclear. In the first phase of our study, the collagenous architecture of CDJ of healthy teeth has been reported. The objective of this study is to observe and report periodontal pathological changes in the fibrous or collagenous architecture of CDJ of periodontitis-affected teeth and discuss the probable clinical implications of CDJ in disease. Twenty periodontitis-affected teeth were collected and processed for observing under a scanning electron microscope. The results are as follows: Increased width of interface at CDJ in periodontitis samples (7.1 μ) compared to that of healthy samples; fewer areas of fiber intermingling at CDJ in periodontitis samples as compared to healthy samples; frequent detachment of cementum from dentin during sodium hydroxide maceration of samples. It may be inferred from results that there is a possibility of a definite weakening of CDJ in periodontally affected root surfaces and we believe that clinical procedures such as scaling and root planning may have a detrimental effect on the cementodentinal attachment of periodontally involved root surfaces.

  20. A streaming multi-GPU implementation of image simulation algorithms for scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Alan; Ophus, Colin; Miao, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Simulation of atomic-resolution image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy can require significant computation times using traditional methods. A recently developed method, termed plane-wave reciprocal-space interpolated scattering matrix (PRISM), demonstrates potential for significant acceleration of such simulations with negligible loss of accuracy. Here, we present a software package called Prismatic for parallelized simulation of image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using both the PRISM and multislice methods. By distributing the workload between multiple CUDA-enabled GPUs and multicore processors, accelerations as high as 1000 × for PRISM and 15 × for multislice are achieved relative to traditional multislice implementations using a single 4-GPU machine. We demonstrate a potentially important application of Prismatic, using it to compute images for atomic electron tomography at sufficient speeds to include in the reconstruction pipeline. Prismatic is freely available both as an open-source CUDA/C++ package with a graphical user interface and as a Python package, PyPrismatic.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy study of adhesion in sea urchin blastulae. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan D.

    1988-01-01

    The dissociation supernatant (DS) isolated by disaggregating Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae in calcium- and magnesium-free seawater specifically promotes reaggregation of S. purpuratus blastula cells. The purpose of this study was to use scanning electron microscopy to examine the gross morphology of aggregates formed in the presence of DS to see if it resembles adhesion in partially dissociated blastulae. A new reaggregation procedure developed here, using large volumes of cell suspension and a large diameter of rotation, was utilized to obtain sufficient quantities of aggregates for scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that aggregates formed in the presence of DS resemble partially dissociated intact embryos in terms of the direct cell-cell adhesion observed. DS did not cause aggregation to form as a result of the entrapment of cells in masses of extracellular material. These studies provide the groundwork for further studies using transmission electron microscopy to more precisely define the adhesive contacts made by cells in the presence of the putative adhesion molecules present in DS.

  2. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Manaka, Sachie [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Nakane, Daisuke [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo [Advanced Technology Division, JEOL Ltd., Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Miyata, Makoto [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  3. Dose-rate-dependent damage of cerium dioxide in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C., E-mail: aaron.johnston-peck@nist.gov [Materials Measurement Lab, National Institute of Standards Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); DuChene, Joseph S.; Roberts, Alan D.; Wei, Wei David [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nanostructured Electronic Materials, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Herzing, Andrew A. [Materials Measurement Lab, National Institute of Standards Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Beam damage caused by energetic electrons in the transmission electron microscope is a fundamental constraint limiting the collection of artifact-free information. Through understanding the influence of the electron beam, experimental routines may be adjusted to improve the data collection process. Investigations of CeO{sub 2} indicate that there is not a critical dose required for the accumulation of electron beam damage. Instead, measurements using annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy demonstrate that the onset of measurable damage occurs when a critical dose rate is exceeded. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is that oxygen vacancies created by exposure to a 300 keV electron beam are actively annihilated as the sample re-oxidizes in the microscope environment. As a result, only when the rate of vacancy creation exceeds the recovery rate will beam damage begin to accumulate. This observation suggests that dose-intensive experiments can be accomplished without disrupting the native structure of the sample when executed using dose rates below the appropriate threshold. Furthermore, the presence of an encapsulating carbonaceous layer inhibits processes that cause beam damage, markedly increasing the dose rate threshold for the accumulation of damage. - Highlights: • Electron beam interactions introduce oxygen vacancies in CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. • ADF-STEM and EELS can track the reduction of CeO{sub 2}. • The reduced nanoparticles will oxidize in the microscope environment. • There is no critical dose for the accumulation of detectable damage. • The accumulation of detectable damage is dose rate dependent.

  4. Target, purging magnet and electron collector design for scanned high-energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Roger; Aasell, Mats; Naefstadius, Peder; Brahme, Anders [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, PO Box 260, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-05-01

    A new method for producing very narrow and intense 50 MV bremsstrahlung beams with a half-width as low as 35 mm at a distance of 1 m from the target is presented. Such a beam is well suited for intensity modulation using scanned photon beams. An algorithm has been developed to minimize the width of the bremsstrahlung beam generated in a multilayer target by varying the individual layer thicknesses and atomic numbers under given constraints on the total target thickness and the mean energy of the transmitted electrons. Under such constraints the narrowest possible bremsstrahlung beam is obtained with a target composed of layers of monotonically increasing atomic number starting with the lowest possible value at the entrance side where the electrons impinge. It is also shown that the narrowest photon beam profile is associated with the highest possible forward photon yield. To be able to use the optimized target clinically it is desirable to be able to collect and stop all the electrons that are transmitted through the target. The electrons are most efficiently collected if they are kept close together, i.e. by minimizing the multiple scatter of the electrons and consequently the half-width of the generated bremsstrahlung beam. This is achieved by a thin low-atomic-number target. A dedicated electron stopper has been developed and integrated with the purging magnet. When the electron stopper is combined with a purging magnet, a primary photon collimator and a multileaf collimator, almost all of the transmitted electrons and their associated bremsstrahlung contamination can effectively be collected. The narrow photon beams from thin low-atomic-number targets have the additional advantage of producing the hardest and most penetrative photon spectrum possible, which is ideal for treating large deep-seated tumours. (author)

  5. A design for a subminiature, low energy scanning electron microscope with atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, D. A.; Edmondson, P.; Greene, S.; Donnelly, S.; Olsson, E.; Svensson, K.; Bleloch, A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a type of scanning electron microscope that works by directly imaging the electron field-emission sites on a nanotip. Electrons are extracted from the nanotip through a nanoscale aperture, accelerated in a high electric field, and focused to a spot using a microscale Einzel lens. If the whole microscope (accelerating section and lens) and the focal length are both restricted in size to below 10 μm, then computer simulations show that the effects of aberration are extremely small and it is possible to have a system with approximately unit magnification at electron energies as low as 300 eV. Thus a typical emission site of 1 nm diameter will produce an image of the same size, and an atomic emission site will give a resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm (1-2 Å). Also, because the beam is not allowed to expand beyond 100 nm in diameter, the depth of field is large and the contribution to the beam spot size from chromatic aberrations is less than 0.02 nm (0.2 Å) for 500 eV electrons. Since it is now entirely possible to make stable atomic sized emitters (nanopyramids), it is expected that this instrument will have atomic resolution. Furthermore the brightness of the beam is determined only by the field emission and can be up to 1×106 times larger than in a typical (high energy) electron microscope. The advantages of this low energy, bright-beam electron microscope with atomic resolution are described and include the possibility of it being used to rapidly sequence the human genome from a single strand of DNA as well as being able to identify atomic species directly from the elastic scattering of electrons.

  6. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Patricia K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Mahaffee, Walt F.

    2011-08-01

    The dual beam scanning electron microscope, equipped with both a focused ion- and scanning electron- beam (FIB SEM) is a novel tool for the exploration of the subsurface structure of biological tissues. The FIB can remove a predetermined amount of material from a selected site to allow for subsurface exploration and when coupled with SEM or scanning ion- beam microscopy (SIM) could be suitable to examine the subsurface structure of bacterial biofilms on the leaf surface. The suitability of chemical and cryofixation was examined for use with the FIB SEM to examine bacterial biofilms on leaf surfaces. The biological control agent, Burkholderia pyroccinia FP62, that rapidly colonizes the leaf surface and forms biofilms, was inoculated onto geranium leaves and incubated in a greenhouse for 7 or 14 days. Cryofixation was not suitable for examination of leaf biofilms because it created a frozen layer over the leaf surface that cracked when exposed to the electron beam and the protective cap required for FIB milling could not be accurately deposited. With chemically fixed samples, it was possible to precisely FIB mill a single cross section (5 µm) or sequential cross sections from a single site without any damage to the surrounding surface. Biofilms, 7 days post-inoculation (DPI), were composed of 2 to 5 bacterial cell layers while biofilms 14 DPI ranged from 5 to greater than 30 cell layers. Empty spaces between bacteria cells in the subsurface structure were observed in biofilms 7- and 14-DPI. Sequential cross sections inferred that the empty spaces were often continuous between FP62 cells and could possibly make up a network of channels throughout the biofilm. FIB SEM was a useful tool to observe the subsurface composition of a foliar biofilm.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.Sporothrix schenckii foi estudado em microscopia eletrônica. Foram observados caracteres das hífas e dos esporos, vários elementos da classificação periódica foram postos em evidência graças à micro-análise a raios X.

  8. Verifying Data Integrity of Electronically Scanned Pressure Systems at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    The proper operation of the Electronically Scanned Pressure (ESP) System critical to accomplish the following goals: acquisition of highly accurate pressure data for the development of aerospace and commercial aviation systems and continuous confirmation of data quality to avoid costly, unplanned, repeat wind tunnel or turbine testing. Standard automated setup and checkout routines are necessary to accomplish these goals. Data verification and integrity checks occur at three distinct stages, pretest pressure tubing and system checkouts, daily system validation and in-test confirmation of critical system parameters. This paper will give an overview of the existing hardware, software and methods used to validate data integrity.

  9. Imaging metazoan nuclear pore complexes by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtman, Boris; Shaulov, Lihi; Harel, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    High resolution three-dimensional surface images of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) can be obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy. We present a short retrospective view starting from the early roots of microscopy, through the discovery of the cell nucleus and the development of some modern techniques for sample preparation and imaging. Detailed protocols are presented for assembling anchored nuclei in a Xenopus cell-free reconstitution system and for the exposure of the nuclear surface in mammalian cell nuclei. Immunogold labeling of metazoan NPCs and a promising new technique for delicate coating with iridium are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Atomic bonding effects in annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. II. Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odlyzko, Michael L.; Held, Jacob T.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre, E-mail: mkhoyan@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Quantitatively calibrated annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) imaging experiments were compared to frozen phonon multislice simulations adapted to include chemical bonding effects. Having carefully matched simulation parameters to experimental conditions, a depth-dependent bonding effect was observed for high-angle ADF-STEM imaging of aluminum nitride. This result is explained by computational predictions, systematically examined in the preceding portion of this study, showing the propagation of the converged STEM beam to be highly sensitive to net interatomic charge transfer. Thus, although uncertainties in experimental conditions and simulation accuracy remain, the computationally predicted experimental bonding effect withstands the experimental testing reported here.

  11. Alcoholic liver injury: defenestration in noncirrhotic livers--a scanning electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Christoffersen, P; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1987-01-01

    (fractional area of fenestrae) was observed in acinar Zone 3, both in biopsies with and without Zone 3 fibrosis as judged by light microscopy. A significant reduction of porosity as shown in this study may influence the blood hepatocytic exchange and contribute to the alcohol-induced liver injury.......The fenestration of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells in 15 needle biopsies obtained from chronic alcoholics without cirrhosis was studied by scanning electron microscopy. As compared to nonalcoholics, a significant reduction in the number of fenestrae and porosity of the sinusoidal lining wall...

  12. Investigation on traceability of 3D Scanning Electron Microscopy based on the Stereo Pair Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) has a big potential as a metrology instrument for micro and nanotechnology due to its unique combination of three imaging properties: • Lateral ultimate resolution down to 2nm • Large range of possible magnification levels ranging from a few hundred times...... to one hundred thousand times magnification. • Large depth of field. Topography reconstruction with this instrument and stereo photogrammetric techniques has been known for a long time. Nowadays, availability of digital SEMs and the advances in computer technology have made it possible to implement...

  13. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis of daily disposable limbal ring contact lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, Kathrine Osborn; Kakkassery, Joseph; Boree, Danielle; Pinto, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Limbal ring (also known as ‘circle’) contact lenses are becoming increasingly popular, especially in Asian markets because of their eye-enhancing effects. The pigment particles that give the eye-enhancing effects of these lenses can be found on the front or back surface of the contact lens or ‘enclosed’ within the lens matrix. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pigment location and surface roughness of seven types of ‘circle’ contact lenses. Methods Scanning electron ...

  14. Compositional analysis of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures using quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauko, H.; Helvoort, A. T. J. van [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Zheng, C. L.; Glanvill, S. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Zhu, Y.; Etheridge, J., E-mail: joanne.etheridge@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Dwyer, C. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Munshi, A. M.; Fimland, B. O. [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)

    2013-12-02

    We demonstrate a method for compositional mapping of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}As heterostructures with high accuracy and unit cell spatial resolution using quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The method is low dose relative to spectroscopic methods and insensitive to the effective source size and higher order lens aberrations. We apply the method to study the spatial variation in Al concentration in cross-sectioned GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires and quantify the concentration in the Al-rich radial band and the AlGaAs shell segments.

  15. Metadislocations in complex metallic alloys: A high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heggen, Marc; Houben, Lothar; Feuerbacher, Michael [Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Metadislocations are highly complex defects which involve several hundreds of atoms in their core. We present a microstructural investigation on Metadislocations using aberration-corrected high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. A novel and highly complex deformation mechanism is found which is based on the movement of a metadislocation core mediating strain and separate escort defects. Upon deformation, the escort defects move along with the metadislocation core and locally transform the material structure. This mechanism implies the coordinated movement of hundreds of atoms per elementary step. Although the mechanism is very complex, it can be described by a simple jigsaw-puzzle-like rearrangement of basic structural subunits.

  16. [Scanning electron microscopic observations on the copulatory spicules of the male Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S E; Lu, X J; Xie, L C; Zhang, D P

    1993-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopic observations were made on the morphological structures of the two copulatory spicules of the male Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. In both species, one of the two copulatory spicules was in the shape of a concave groove and the other, in the shape of an oblate tube. Owing to the difference in the concavity of the groove shaped copulatory spicule between the two species as shown by the cross sections, Necator americanus usually appear to have only one copulatory spicule whereas Ancylostoma duodenale usually show two separate copulatory spicules in appearance (Figs 1-10).

  17. A scanning electron microscopic study of impala (Aepyceros melampus sperm from the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. Ackerman

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available Since knowledge of sperm morphological characteristics can play an important role in semen evaluation and fertilisation, baseline data on sperm ultrastructure are required. Live spermatozoa were collected from the cauda epididymis from 64 impala rams in the Kruger National Park and 5082 spermatozoa from 40 of these impala were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The mean length of impala sperm was 59.23 @ 2.7 um. The morphology of normal sperm as well as the occurrence of abnormalities were documented. The morphology of impala sperm were compared with those of other mammals. New findings on appendages of the cytoplasmic droplet are described and interpreted.

  18. Calibration of Electrochemical Capacitance-voltage Method on Pyramid Texture Surface Using Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Y.; Cesar, I. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O.Box 1, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Harata, D. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Schuring, E.W. [ECN Environment and Energy Engineering, P.O.Box 1, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Vlooswijk, A.H.G.; Venema, P.R. [Tempress Systems BV, Radeweg 31, 8171MD Vaassen (Netherlands); Katori, S.; Fujita, S. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The electrochemical capacitance-voltage (ECV) technique can practically profile carrier concentrations on textured surfaces, but reliable calibration of the surface area is strongly demanded since it plays a decisive role in calculating both the carrier concentration and the profiling depth. In this work, we calibrate the area factor of pyramidally textured surfaces by comparing ECV profiles with cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy image, and found out it is 1.66, and not 1.73 which was formerly assumed. Furthermore, the calibrated area factor was applied to POCl3 and BBr3 diffusions which resulted in comparable diffusion profiles for both textured and polished surfaces.

  19. Unveiling the Mysteries of Mars with a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunson, J.; Gaskin, J. A.; Doloboff, I. J.; Jerman, G.

    2017-01-01

    Development of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope that will utilize the martian atmosphere to dissipate charge during analysis continues. This instrument is expected to be used on a future rover or lander to answer fundamental Mars science questions. To identify the most important questions, a survey was taken at the 47th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC). From the gathered information initial topics were identified for a SEM on the martian surface. These priorities are identified and discussed below. Additionally, a concept of operations is provided with the goal of maximizing the science obtained with the minimum amount of communication with the instrument.

  20. Scanning electron microscopic analyses of Ferrocyanide tank wastes for the Ferrocyanide safety program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaway, W.S.

    1995-09-01

    This is Fiscal Year 1995 Annual Report on the progress of activities relating to the application of scanning electron microscopy in addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. The status of the FY 1995 activities directed towards establishing facilities capable of providing SEM based micro-characterization of ferrocyanide tank wastes is described. A summary of key events in the SEM task over FY 1995 and target activities in FY 1996 are presented. A brief overview of the potential applications of computer controlled SEM analytical data in light of analyses of ferrocyanide simulants performed by an independent contractor is also presented

  1. Observations on mouthparts of Dermatobia hominis (Linneaus Jr., 1781) (Diptera: Cuterebridae) by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Fernando de Freitas; Linardi, Pedro Marcos

    2002-02-01

    The ultrastructure of the mouthparts of Dermatobia hominis was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The morphological characteristics of the segments, articulations, sensory organs, and pilose covering are described. Mechanoreceptors of the long trichoid sensillum and smaller trichoid sensillum types were observed, as well as labellar gustatory receptors of the basiconic sensillum type, which differed between the sexes. These observations are discussed with reference to the current literature on the morphology and sense organs of dipteran mouthparts, and the prevailing view that the adult mouthparts of this species are non-functional is challenged.

  2. Scanning electron microscopy of the egg and the first instar larva of Dermatobia hominis (Diptera, cuterebridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cesar Rios Leite

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available The egg and the first instar larva of Dermatobia hominis were described based on observation with a scanning electron microscope.O ovo e a larva de primeiro estágio de Dermatobia hominis são descritos baseados em observações com um microscópio eletrônico de varredura. Comparações morfológicas são feitas com outras espécies de Diptera, particularmente com Cuterebridae.

  3. PRISMLESS ENAMEL IN HUMAN NON-ERUPTED DECIDUOUS MOLAR TEETH: A SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAVA Marcelo

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency, structure and thickness of the prismless enamel layer in the buccal and lingual surfaces of non-erupted deciduous molar teeth were described. The teeth were extracted, kept in a 70% ethanol solution, dried, coated with gold and examined in a scanning electron microscope JEOL, JSM-6.100. The aprismatic layer was observed in the occlusal, middle and cervical thirds of all buccal and lingual surfaces. The hydroxyapatite crystals were arranged parallel to each other and perpendicular to the enamel surface. No statistically significant differences were observed between the occlusal, middle and cervical thirds, which had 7.257 m m of average thickness.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of the collodion membrane from a self-healing collodion baby*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Isaacsson, Henrique; Guarenti, Isabelle Maffei; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antônio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Self-healing collodion baby is a well-established subtype of this condition. We examined a male newborn, who was covered by a collodion membrane. The shed membrane was examined with scanning electron microscopy. The outer surface showed a very compact keratin without the normal elimination of corneocytes. The lateral view of the specimen revealed a very thick, horny layer. The inner surface showed the structure of lower corneocytes with polygonal contour. With higher magnifications villous projections were seen in the cell membrane. PMID:26375232

  5. Manipulation of nanoparticles of different shapes inside a scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Polyakov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work polyhedron-like gold and sphere-like silver nanoparticles (NPs were manipulated on an oxidized Si substrate to study the dependence of the static friction and the contact area on the particle geometry. Measurements were performed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM that was equipped with a high-precision XYZ-nanomanipulator. To register the occurring forces a quartz tuning fork (QTF with a glued sharp probe was used. Contact areas and static friction forces were calculated by using different models and compared with the experimentally measured force. The effect of NP morphology on the nanoscale friction is discussed.

  6. Electronic properties of (Zn,CoO systems probed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Moldovan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to gain insight into theelectronic properties of (Zn,CoO system - a widebandgap Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors (DMSshowing room temperature (RT ferromagnetism undern-type doping conditions. On the experimental side, ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunnelling microscopy andspectroscopy (STM and STS at variable temperature (Tare used to probe the local electronic structure of thesystem. It is presented the map of the local density ofstates (LDOS of polar ZnO surfaces. Then, it is possibleto decorate (incorporate Co atoms onto (into thesemiconductor.

  7. Scanning electron microscopic study of hamster tracheal organ cultures infected with Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muse, K E; Collier, A M; Baseman, J B

    1977-12-01

    Hamster tracheal organculture was employed as a model for the study of the pathogenesis of infection due to bordetella pertusis. Scanning electron microscopy provided a three-dimensional view of the surface infection of the tracheal explants. Phase I B. pertussis attached only to the ciliated epithelial cells, and a sequence of events involving the injury, expulsion, and destruction of these differentiated cells occurred. This in vitro model provides insights into the mechanisms by which B. pertussis mediates host cell injury at the site of infection.

  8. Fatal poisoning by Rumex crispus (curled dock): pathological findings and application of scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, R; Sanz, P; Blanche, C; Fontarnau, R; Dominguez, A; Corbella, J

    1990-10-01

    A case of fatal poisoning due to ingestion of the plant Rumex crispus (curled dock) is described. The patient, a 53-year-old male, presented with gastrointestinal symptoms, severe hypocalcemia, metabolic acidosis and acute hepatic insufficiency. Despite therapeutic measures, the patient died 72 h after ingestion of the plant material. Noteworthy among the pathological findings were centrolobular hepatic necrosis and birefringent crystals in the liver and kidneys that were identified by histochemical techniques and scanning electron microscopy. These observations are compared with other reports in the medical literature, with an emphasis on the risk involved in the use of these plants for culinary or medicinal purposes.

  9. Scanning electron observation of protective effect of graphene films on Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Woo; An, Jin Yong; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kahng, Yung Ho

    2017-08-01

    Based on recent developments in nanotechnology, many interesting functions are expected to be performed by nanoscale structures in the future. With these expectations comes the realization that these delicate structures must be protected without interfering with their function. In the study reported here, we studied the protective effects of reduced and non-reduced graphene oxide films on Au nanoparticles deposited on a substrate surface as a type of nanoscale structure. The results indicate that the graphene films can function as a protective layer for the nanoparticles without interfering in their observations by scanning electron microscopy. Our results demonstrate the possibility of using graphene as a protective film for nanoscale structures.

  10. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forslind, B.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is frequently applied to dermatological problems, as is evident from a review of the recent literature. In this paper, preparation methods and new techniques allowing experimental studies on the integumentary system are emphasized. Quantitative analysis in the electron microscope by use of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) has become an important accessory technique. EDX can, for instance, be used to study problems involving physiological changes induced in skin by agents causing contact reactions. Recently, it has been shown that treatment with DNCB, chromate and nickel causes changes in elemental distribution in guinea-pig skin. In addition, elemental uptake in the integumentary system and in pathological inclusions in skin can be analyzed.

  11. Placing single atoms in graphene with a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Ondrej; Kim, Songkil; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    We employ the sub-atomically focused beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to introduce and controllably manipulate individual dopant atoms in a 2D graphene lattice. The electron beam is used to create defects and subsequently sputter adsorbed source materials into the graphene lattice such that individual vacancy defects are controllably passivated by Si substitutional atoms. We further document that Si point defects may be directed through the lattice via e-beam control or modified (as yet, uncontrollably) to form new defects which can incorporate new atoms into the graphene lattice. These studies demonstrate the potential of STEM for atom-by-atom nanofabrication and fundamental studies of chemical reactions in 2D materials on the atomic level.

  12. Annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) tomography of polymer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kangbo; Sourty, Erwan; Loos, Joachim

    2010-08-01

    We have utilized bright-field conventional transmission electron microscopy tomography and annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) tomography to characterize a well-defined carbon black (CB)-filled polymer nanocomposite with known CB volume concentration. For both imaging methods, contrast can be generated between the CB and the surrounding polymer matrix. The involved contrast mechanisms, in particular for ADF-STEM, will be discussed in detail. The obtained volume reconstructions were analysed and the CB volume concentrations were carefully determined from the reconstructed data. For both imaging modes, the measured CB volume concentrations are substantially different and only quantification based on the ADF-STEM data revealed about the same value as the known CB loading. Moreover, when applying low-convergence angles for imaging ADF-STEM tomography, data can be obtained of micrometre-thick samples.

  13. Atomic bonding effects in annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. I. Computational predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odlyzko, Michael L.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre, E-mail: mkhoyan@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Himmetoglu, Burak [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 and Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Cococcioni, Matteo [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 and Theory and Simulations of Materials, National Centre for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    Annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) image simulations were performed for zone-axis-oriented light-element single crystals, using a multislice method adapted to include charge redistribution due to chemical bonding. Examination of these image simulations alongside calculations of the propagation of the focused electron probe reveal that the evolution of the probe intensity with thickness exhibits significant sensitivity to interatomic charge transfer, accounting for observed thickness-dependent bonding sensitivity of contrast in all ADF-STEM imaging conditions. Because changes in image contrast relative to conventional neutral atom simulations scale directly with the net interatomic charge transfer, the strongest effects are seen in crystals with highly polar bonding, while no effects are seen for nonpolar bonding. Although the bonding dependence of ADF-STEM image contrast varies with detector geometry, imaging parameters, and material temperature, these simulations predict the bonding effects to be experimentally measureable.

  14. In situ study of live specimens in an environmental scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Shiojiri, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we introduce new methodology for the observation of living biological samples in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The methodology is based on an unconventional initiation procedure for ESEM chamber pumping, free from purge-flood cycles, and on the ability to control thermodynamic processes close to the sample. The gradual and gentle change of the working environment from air to water vapor enables the study of not only living samples in dynamic in situ experiments and their manifestation of life (sample walking) but also its experimentally stimulated physiological reactions. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations of primary electron beam energy losses in a water layer on the sample surface were studied; consequently, the influence of the water thickness on radiation, temperature, or chemical damage of the sample was considered.

  15. A comparative scanning electron microscopic view of the integument of domestic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, W; Neurand, K

    1987-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrates efficiently species-specific differences of hairy skin (integumentum commune) of domestic mammals (pig, cat, dog, horse, cattle, sheep, goat). This technique is very helpful in characterizing the typical structural features of the epidermal layers, the arrangement of the collagen fibre bundles and the elastic fibre network in the dermis, the external and internal construction of hair follicles and hair shafts, and the functional development of skin glands. It is also possible to observe certain domestication effects, especially where the hair coat is concerned. SEM supplements the knowledge about the integument as available from conventional transmission electron microscopy, light microscopy or histochemistry. Thus, comparative morphology can be the basis for the development of specific functional models of the different integumentary layers and derivatives or their tissues involved.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Weber, Charles F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bekar, Kursat B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  17. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  18. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E.; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  19. Electron transport parameters in CO$_2$: scanning drift tube measurements and kinetic computations

    CERN Document Server

    Vass, M; Loffhagen, D; Pinhao, N; Donko, Z

    2016-01-01

    This work presents transport coefficients of electrons (bulk drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization frequency) in CO2 measured under time-of-flight conditions over a wide range of the reduced electric field, 15Td <= E/N <= 2660Td in a scanning drift tube apparatus. The data obtained in the experiments are also applied to determine the effective steady-state Townsend ionization coefficient. These parameters are compared to the results of previous experimental studies, as well as to results of various kinetic computations: solutions of the electron Boltzmann equation under different approximations (multiterm and density gradient expansions) and Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental data extend the range of E/N compared with previous measurements and are consistent with most of the transport parameters obtained in these earlier studies. The computational results point out the range of applicability of the respective approaches to determine the different measured tr...

  20. Comparative analysis of Trichuris muris surface using conventional, low vacuum, environmental and field emission scanning electron microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lopes Torres, Eduardo José; de Souza, Wanderley; Miranda, Kildare

    2013-01-01

    .... The morphology of Trichuris spp. and other helminths has been mostly studied using conventional scanning electron microscopy of chemically fixed, dried and metal-coated specimens, although this kind of preparation has been shown...

  1. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) as an approach for nanoparticle detection inside cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrdova, M; Polakova, K; Skopalik, J; Vujtek, M; Mokdad, A; Homolkova, M; Tucek, J; Nebesarova, J; Zboril, R

    2014-12-01

    When developing new nanoparticles for bio-applications, it is important to fully characterize the nanoparticle's behavior in biological systems. The most common techniques employed for mapping nanoparticles inside cells include transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). These techniques entail passing an electron beam through a thin specimen. STEM or TEM imaging is often used for the detection of nanoparticles inside cellular organelles. However, lengthy sample preparation is required (i.e., fixation, dehydration, drying, resin embedding, and cutting). In the present work, a new matrix (FTO glass) for biological samples was used and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to generate images comparable to those obtained by TEM. Using FE-SEM, nanoparticle images were acquired inside endo/lysosomes without disruption of the cellular shape. Furthermore, the initial steps of nanoparticle incorporation into the cells were captured. In addition, the conductive FTO glass endowed the sample with high stability under the required accelerating voltage. Owing to these features of the sample, further analyses could be performed (material contrast and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)), which confirmed the presence of nanoparticles inside the cells. The results showed that FE-SEM can enable detailed characterization of nanoparticles in endosomes without the need for contrast staining or metal coating of the sample. Images showing the intracellular distribution of nanoparticles together with cellular morphology can give important information on the biocompatibility and demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle utilization in medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Visualising impregnated chitosan in Pinus radiata early wood cells using light and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Adya P; Singh, Tripti; Rickard, Catherine L

    2010-04-01

    Chitosan, a deacetylated product of an abundant naturally occurring biopolymer chitin, has been used in a range of applications, particularly in food and health areas, as an antimicrobial agent. In the work reported here Pinus radiata wood was impregnated with chitosan as an environmentally compatible organic biocide (Eikenes et al., 2005a,b) to protect wood against wood deteriorating microorganisms and to thus prolong the service life of wooden products. We developed sample preparation techniques targeted to visualise impregnated chitosan within wood tissues using light microscope and field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Sections were viewed with the light microscope without staining with a dye as well as after staining with the dye toluidine blue. Light microscopy was also undertaken on sections that had been stained with 1% aqueous osmium tetroxide (OsO(4)). For SEM observations, the sections were treated with OsO(4) and then examined with the FE-SEM, first in the secondary electron imaging mode (SEI) and then in the backscattered electron imaging (BEI) mode, imaging the same areas of a section in both SEI and BEI modes. The preparation techniques employed and the combined use of light and scanning electron microscopy provided valuable complementary information, revealing that chitosan had penetrated into the cavities (cell lumens, intercellular spaces) of all sizes present within wood tissues and had also impregnated early wood cell walls. The information obtained is discussed in relation to its importance in further development of chitosan formulations and refinement of impregnation technologies to optimise chitosan impregnation into and distribution within wood tissues as well as in assessing chitosan efficacy. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguy, Amanda [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than adenine

  4. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Hans G.J.; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS

  5. Critical-point drying and gold sputtering as applied to scanning electron microscopy of human reproductive tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, H; Metzger, H; Hafez, E S

    1976-01-01

    Improved techniques have been developed for washing, pinning, fixation, dehydration and critical-point drying of tissues of female and male reproductive tracts, gametes, for viewing by scanning electron microscopy. The sputtering method, performed by an ion gun, is applied to shadow and produce a thin film of gold. Technical details and metal coating are noted which are suitable to improve images of surface ultrastructure of cilia and microvilli. Studies using scanning electron microscopy, histological and histochemical techniques, and cinematography are described.

  6. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopic investigation of enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina; Klingberg, Gunilla; Dietz, Wolfram; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental disturbance during enamel formation, defined as a macroscopic defect in the enamel, with a reduction of the enamel thickness with rounded, smooth borders. Information on the microstructural level is still limited, therefore further studies are of importance to better understand the mechanisms behind enamel hypoplasia. To study enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth by means of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Nineteen primary teeth with enamel hypoplasia were examined in a polarized light microscope and in a scanning electron microscope. The cervical and incisal borders of the enamel hypoplasia had a rounded appearance, as the prisms in the rounded cervical area of the hypoplasia were bent. The rounded borders had a normal surface structure whereas the base of the defects appeared rough and porous. Morphological findings in this study indicate that the aetiological factor has a short duration and affects only certain ameloblasts. The bottom of the enamel hypoplasia is porous and constitutes possible pathways for bacteria into the dentin.

  7. Analysis of acute impact of oleoresin capsicum on rat nasal mucosa using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catli, Tolgahan; Acar, Mustafa; Olgun, Yüksel; Dağ, İlknur; Cengiz, Betül Peker; Cingi, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of acute cellular changes seen in nasal mucosa of Wistar-Albino rats exposed to different doses of oleoresin capsicum for various time periods by means of scanning electron microscopy. Thirty-five Wistar-Albino rats were divided into five groups of seven rats each. 6-gram oleoresin capsicum per second was sprayed into cages of the groups except group 1. Spray times and duration of exposure to pepper gasses were different for each group. Thirty minutes after the exposure, the animals were killed and specimens from their nasal mucosas were harvested and examined under scanning electron microscope. Mucosal damage was scored from 0-4 points. Mean values of nasal mucosa damage scores of the groups were calculated and compared statistically. Average damage scores of the groups exposed to identical doses of oleoresin capsicum for various exposure times were compared and a statistically significant difference was seen between Groups 2 and 3 (p 0.05). Average damage scores of the groups exposed to various doses for identical exposure times were compared, and statistically significant differences were observed between Groups 2 and 4 and also Groups 3 and 5 (p < 0.05). Outcomes of our study have demonstrated that pepper gas exerts destructive changes on rat nasal mucosa. The extent of these destructive changes increases with the prolonged exposure to higher doses. Besides, exposure time also stands out as an influential factor on the extent of the destructive changes.

  8. Fast Orthogonal Row-Column Electronic Scanning With Top-Orthogonal-to-Bottom Electrode Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceroici, Chris; Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J

    2017-06-01

    Recently, top-orthogonal-to-bottom electrode 2-D arrays were introduced as a practical design for 3-D ultrasound imaging without requiring the wiring of a 2-D grid of elements. However, previously proposed imaging schemes suffered from speed or image-quality limitations. Here, we propose a new imaging scheme which we call Fast Orthogonal Row-Column Electronic Scanning (FORCES). This new approach takes advantage of bias sensitivity to enable high-quality and fast B-scan imaging. We compare this imaging scheme with an equivalent linear array, a previously proposed row-column imaging scheme, as well as with the Explososcan imaging scheme for 2-D arrays through simulations. In a point phantom simulation, the lateral (azimuthal) resolution of a 64 ×64 element 6.67-MHz λ /2-pitch array using the FORCES imaging scheme with an f-number of 1.7 was 0.52 mm with similar in-plane image quality to an equivalent linear array but with improved and electronically steerable elevational resolution. When compared with other 3-D imaging schemes in point phantom simulations, the FORCES imaging scheme showed an azimuthal resolution improvement of 54% compared with Explososcan. Compared with a previously introduced row-column method, the FORCES imaging scheme had similar resolution but a 25-dB decrease in sidelobe amplitude, significantly impacting contrast to noise in scattering phantoms.

  9. Ultrastructural analysis of testicular tissue and sperm by transmission and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemes, Hector E

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have provided the basis for an in-depth understanding of the cell biology and normal functioning of the testis and male gametes and have opened the way to characterize the functional role played by specific organelles in spermatogenesis and sperm function. The development of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) extended these boundaries to the recognition of cell and organ surface features and the architectural array of cells and tissues. The merging of immunocytochemical and histochemical approaches with electron microscopy has completed a series of technical improvements that integrate structural and functional features to provide a broad understanding of cell biology in health and disease. With these advances the detailed study of the intricate structural and molecular organization as well as the chemical composition of cellular organelles is now possible. Immunocytochemistry is used to identify proteins or other components and localize them in specific cells or organelles with high specificity and sensitivity, and histochemistry can be used to understand their function (i.e., enzyme activity). When these techniques are used in conjunction with electron microscopy their resolving power is further increased to subcellular levels. In the present chapter we will describe in detail various ultrastructural techniques that are now available for basic or translational research in reproductive biology and reproductive medicine. These include TEM, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural histochemistry, and SEM.

  10. New insights into subsurface imaging of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T; Villarrubia, J S; Vladár, András E; Alexander Liddle, J

    2015-02-27

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by three-dimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  11. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@ua.ac.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Verbeeck, J. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Erni, R. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 72R0150, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bals, S. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Luysberg, M. [Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Center for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Helmholtz Research Center Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-09-15

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  12. New Insights on Subsurface Imaging of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composites via Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladar, Andras E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by threedimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  13. High resolution surface scanning of Thick-GEM for single photo-electron detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamar, G.; Varga, D.

    2012-12-01

    An optical system for high resolution scanning of TGEM UV photon detection systems is introduced. The structure exploits the combination of a single Au-coated TGEM under study, and an asymmetric MWPC (Close Cathode Chamber) as post-amplification stage. A pulsed UV LED source with emission down to 240 nm has been focused to a spot of 0.07 mm on the TGEM surface, and single photo-electron charge spectra has been recorded over selected two dimensional regions. This way, the TGEM gain (order of 10-100) and TGEM photo-electron detection efficiency is clearly separated, unlike in case of continuous illumination. The surface structure connected to the TGEM photon detection is well observable, including inefficiencies in the holes and at the symmetry points between holes. The detection efficiency as well as the gas gain are fluctuating from hole to hole. The gain is constant in the hexagon around any hole, pointing to the fact that the gain depends on hole geometry, and less on the position where the electron enters. The detection probability map strongly changes with the field strength above the TGEM surface, in relation to the change of the actual surface field configuration. The results can be confronted with position-dependent simulations of TGEM electron transfer and gas multiplication.

  14. Weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy for quantitative dislocation density measurement in steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenta; Shimodaira, Masaki; Toyama, Takeshi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Milan, Konstantinovic J; Gerard, Robert; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate dislocations induced by neutron irradiation, we developed a weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy (WB-STEM) system by installing a novel beam selector, an annular detector, a high-speed CCD camera and an imaging filter in the camera chamber of a spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The capabilities of the WB-STEM with respect to wide-view imaging, real-time diffraction monitoring and multi-contrast imaging are demonstrated using typical reactor pressure vessel steel that had been used in an European nuclear reactor for 30 years as a surveillance test piece with a fluence of 1.09 × 1020 neutrons cm-2. The quantitatively measured size distribution (average loop size = 3.6 ± 2.1 nm), number density of the dislocation loops (3.6 × 1022 m-3) and dislocation density (7.8 × 1013 m m-3) were carefully compared with the values obtained via conventional weak-beam transmission electron microscopy studies. In addition, cluster analysis using atom probe tomography (APT) further demonstrated the potential of the WB-STEM for correlative electron tomography/APT experiments. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy to Reconstruct Three-Dimensional Tissue Nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denk Winfried

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D structural information on many length scales is of central importance in biological research. Excellent methods exist to obtain structures of molecules at atomic, organelles at electron microscopic, and tissue at light-microscopic resolution. A gap exists, however, when 3D tissue structure needs to be reconstructed over hundreds of micrometers with a resolution sufficient to follow the thinnest cellular processes and to identify small organelles such as synaptic vesicles. Such 3D data are, however, essential to understand cellular networks that, particularly in the nervous system, need to be completely reconstructed throughout a substantial spatial volume. Here we demonstrate that datasets meeting these requirements can be obtained by automated block-face imaging combined with serial sectioning inside the chamber of a scanning electron microscope. Backscattering contrast is used to visualize the heavy-metal staining of tissue prepared using techniques that are routine for transmission electron microscopy. Low-vacuum (20-60 Pa H2O conditions prevent charging of the uncoated block face. The resolution is sufficient to trace even the thinnest axons and to identify synapses. Stacks of several hundred sections, 50-70 nm thick, have been obtained at a lateral position jitter of typically under 10 nm. This opens the possibility of automatically obtaining the electron-microscope-level 3D datasets needed to completely reconstruct the connectivity of neuronal circuits.

  16. Study of fossil bones by synchrotron radiation micro-spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zougrou, I M; Katsikini, M; Pinakidou, F; Paloura, E C; Papadopoulou, L; Tsoukala, E

    2014-01-01

    Earlymost Villafranchian fossil bones of an artiodactyl and a perissodactyl from the Milia excavation site in Grevena, Greece, were studied in order to evaluate diagenetic effects. Optical microscopy revealed the different bone types (fibro-lamellar and Haversian, respectively) of the two fragments and their good preservation state. The spatial distribution of bone apatite and soil-originating elements was studied using micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) mapping and scanning electron microscopy. The approximate value of the Ca/P ratio was 2.2, as determined from scanning electron microscopy measurements. Bacterial boring was detected close to the periosteal region and Fe bearing oxides were found to fill bone cavities, e.g. Haversian canals and osteocyte lacunae. In the perissodactyl bone considerable amounts of Mn were detected close to cracks (the Mn/Fe weight ratio takes values up to 3.5). Goethite and pyrite were detected in both samples by means of metallographic microscopy. The local Ca/P ratio determined with µ-XRF varied significantly in metal-poor spots indicating spatial inhomogeneities in the ionic substitutions. XRF line scans that span the bone cross sections revealed that Fe and Mn contaminate the bones from both the periosteum and medullar cavity and aggregate around local maxima. The formation of goethite, irrespective of the local Fe concentration, was verified by the Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Finally, Sr K-edge extended XAFS (EXAFS) revealed that Sr substitutes for Ca in bone apatite without obvious preference to the Ca1 or Ca2 unit-cell site occupation.

  17. Experimental evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopes at high chamber pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzek, H; Schroettner, H; Wagner, J; Hofer, F; Rattenberger, J

    2015-11-01

    In environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) high pressure applications have become increasingly important. Wet or biological samples can be investigated without time-consuming sample preparation and potential artefacts from this preparation can be neglected. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio strongly decreases with increasing chamber pressure. To evaluate the high pressure performance of ESEM and to compare different electron microscopes, information about spatial resolution and detector type is not enough. On the one hand, the scattering of the primary electron beam increases, which vanishes the contrast in images; and on the other hand, the secondary electrons (SE) signal amplification decreases. The stagnation gas thickness (effective distance the beam has to travel through the imaging gas) as well as the SE detection system depend on the microscope and for a complete and serious evaluation of an ESEM or low vacuum SEM it is necessary to specify these two parameters. A method is presented to determine the fraction of scattered and unscattered electrons and to calculate the stagnation gas thickness (θ). To evaluate the high pressure performance of the SE detection system, a method is presented that allows for an analysis of a single image and the calculation of the signal-to-noise ratio of this image. All investigations are performed on an FEI ESEM Quanta 600 (field emission gun) and an FEI ESEM Quanta 200 (thermionic gun). These methods and measurements should represent opportunities for evaluating the high pressure performance of an ESEM. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Charge compensation by in-situ heating for insulating ceramics in scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Ji, Yuan, E-mail: jiyuan@bjut.edu.cn [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Wei, Bin; Zhang, Yinqi; Fu, Jingyong; Xu, Xuedong; Han, Xiaodong [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2009-10-15

    With a steady temperature increase under high vacuum (HV) in an environmental scanning electronic microscope, we observed charge-free characterization and fine secondary electron (SE) images in focus for insulating ceramics (alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum nitride (AlN), pure magnesium silicate (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4})). The sample current I{sub sc} increased from -8.18x10{sup -13} to 2.76x10{sup -7} A for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and -9.28x10{sup -12} to 2.77x10{sup -6} A for AlN with the temperature increased from 298 to 633 K. The surface conductance {sigma} increased from 5.6x10{sup -13} to 5.0x10{sup -11}/{Omega} for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 1.1x10{sup -12} to 1.0x10{sup -7}/{Omega} for AlN with the temperature increased from 363 to 593 K. The SE image contrast obtained via heating approach in high vacuum with an Everhart-Thornley SE-detector was better than that via conventional approach of electron-ion neutralization in low vacuum (LV) with a gaseous SE-detector. The differences of compensation temperatures for charge effects indicate dielectric and thermal properties, and band structures of insulators. The charge compensation mechanisms of heating approach mainly relate to accelerated release of trapped electrons on insulating surface and to increase of electron emission yield by heating.

  19. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope with open sample space observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, Mitsuo, E-mail: msuga@jeol.co.jp [Clair Project, JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji [Clair Project, JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Iwamatsu, Shinnosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki [Yamagata Research Institute of Technology, 2-2-1, Matsuei, Yamagata, 990-2473 (Japan); Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-4, Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Although conventional electron microscopy (EM) requires samples to be in vacuum, most chemical and physical reactions occur in liquid or gas. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) can observe dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas under atmospheric pressure in real time. An electron-permeable window made of pressure-resistant 100 nm-thick silicon nitride (SiN) film, set into the bottom of the open ASEM sample dish, allows an electron beam to be projected from underneath the sample. A detector positioned below captures backscattered electrons. Using the ASEM, we observed the radiation-induced self-organization process of particles, as well as phenomena accompanying volume change, including evaporation-induced crystallization. Using the electrochemical ASEM dish, we observed tree-like electrochemical depositions on the cathode. In silver nitrate solution, we observed silver depositions near the cathode forming incidental internal voids. The heated ASEM dish allowed observation of patterns of contrast in melting and solidifying solder. Finally, to demonstrate its applicability for monitoring and control of industrial processes, silver paste and solder paste were examined at high throughput. High resolution, imaging speed, flexibility, adaptability, and ease of use facilitate the observation of previously difficult-to-image phenomena, and make the ASEM applicable to various fields. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas in open ASEM dish. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Random motion and radiation-induced self-organization were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tree-like electrochemical deposition of gold was observed on an electrode in situ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature-dependent phase transitions of solder were dynamically observed in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silver and solder pastes were easily and rapidly observed in air for process control.

  20. Skeletal growth phases of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa shown by scanning electron microscope and electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchi, Vincent; Vonlanthen, Pierre; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Crowley, Quentin G.

    2016-04-01

    Lophelia pertusa is a cold-water coral, which may form reefs by the association of multiple coralites within which a polyp lives. Each individual polyp builds an aragonite skeleton by an initial phase of early mineralization (traditionally referred to as centres of calcification) from which aragonite fibres grow in thickening deposits. The skeleton wall features successive optically opaque and translucent bands previously attributed to different regimes of growth as either uniform in crystal orientation (translucent bands) or with a chaotic organization (opaque bands). The processes involved in any organizational changes are still unknown. Microlayers in the coral wall, which represent separate periods of skeletal growth, have been recently identified and described. These growth patterns are readily visible under scanning electron microscope (SEM) after etching in dilute formic acid, but they do not necessarily form continuously visible structures. Here we present high quality SEM images and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps to study aragonite fibre orientation across the wall of L. pertusa. Both microlayers and opaque and translucent bands are compared to the crystallographic orientation of the aragonite fibres. EBSD maps and SEM images indicate that aragonite fibres do not exhibit a chaotic orientation, even in opaque bands. The absence of continuity of microlayers is partially explained by an association of multiple crystallographic preferred orientations of aragonite fibres. In the case of L. pertusa, careful textural characterisation is necessary prior to elemental or isotope analysis in order to select a skeletal transect representing a linear and continuous time period.

  1. Nanoscale Imaging of Whole Cells Using a Liquid Enclosure and a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckys, Diana B.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Joy, David C.; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory. PMID:20020038

  2. Nanoscale imaging of whole cells using a liquid enclosure and a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana B Peckys

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7 were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM laboratory.

  3. Studying Dynamic Processes of Nano-sized Objects in Liquid using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermannsdörfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-02-05

    Samples fully embedded in liquid can be studied at a nanoscale spatial resolution with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) using a microfluidic chamber assembled in the specimen holder for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and STEM. The microfluidic system consists of two silicon microchips supporting thin Silicon Nitride (SiN) membrane windows. This article describes the basic steps of sample loading and data acquisition. Most important of all is to ensure that the liquid compartment is correctly assembled, thus providing a thin liquid layer and a vacuum seal. This protocol also includes a number of tests necessary to perform during sample loading in order to ensure correct assembly. Once the sample is loaded in the electron microscope, the liquid thickness needs to be measured. Incorrect assembly may result in a too-thick liquid, while a too-thin liquid may indicate the absence of liquid, such as when a bubble is formed. Finally, the protocol explains how images are taken and how dynamic processes can be studied. A sample containing AuNPs is imaged both in pure water and in saline.

  4. Direct imaging of defect formation in strained organic flexible electronics by Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Tobias; Travaglini, Lorenzo; Lai, Stefano; Patruno, Luca; de Miranda, Stefano; Bonfiglio, Annalisa; Cosseddu, Piero; Fraboni, Beatrice

    2016-12-02

    The development of new materials and devices for flexible electronics depends crucially on the understanding of how strain affects electronic material properties at the nano-scale. Scanning Kelvin-Probe Microscopy (SKPM) is a unique technique for nanoelectronic investigations as it combines non-invasive measurement of surface topography and surface electrical potential. Here we show that SKPM in non-contact mode is feasible on deformed flexible samples and allows to identify strain induced electronic defects. As an example we apply the technique to investigate the strain response of organic thin film transistors containing TIPS-pentacene patterned on polymer foils. Controlled surface strain is induced in the semiconducting layer by bending the transistor substrate. The amount of local strain is quantified by a mathematical model describing the bending mechanics. We find that the step-wise reduction of device performance at critical bending radii is caused by the formation of nano-cracks in the microcrystal morphology of the TIPS-pentacene film. The cracks are easily identified due to the abrupt variation in SKPM surface potential caused by a local increase in resistance. Importantly, the strong surface adhesion of microcrystals to the elastic dielectric allows to maintain a conductive path also after fracture thus providing the opportunity to attenuate strain effects.

  5. Simultaneous measurement of lateral and vertical size of nanoparticles using transmission scanning electron microscopy (TSEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, E.; Bug, M. U.; Bergmann, D.; Cizmar, P.; Frase, C. G.

    2017-03-01

    A scanning electron microscope operated in transmission mode (TSEM) enables both the measurement of the lateral and vertical size (thickness) of nanoparticles. The lateral size is measured with a previously described technique where the particle boundary is determined in the TSEM image. Particle thickness is deduced from the TSEM signal level measured at the centre of the particle, which requires prior knowledge of the expected TSEM signal level. We applied different and well-known Monte-Carlo based simulation tools (Geant4 and MCSEM) to describe the electron diffusion in solid states and to calculate the expected TSEM signals taking into account particle and instrument properties. The simulation results of the different simulation models differ slightly revealing current limits of small-angle and low-energy electron scattering modelling in solid states. Nonetheless, the method allows one to correlate lateral and vertical particle thickness and thus to obtain additional information about the 3D morphology of nanoparticles. We demonstrate the method for silica particles with sizes in the range of about 10 nm-100 nm.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of individual nanoparticle bio-markers in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liv, Nalan, E-mail: n.liv@tudelft.nl; Lazić, Ivan; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated SEM imaging of nanoparticle biomarkers suspended below a thin membrane, with the ultimate goal of integrating functional fluorescence and structural SEM measurements of samples kept at ambient or hydrated conditions. In particular, we investigated how resolving power in liquid SEM is affected by the interaction of the electron beam with the membrane. Simulations with the Geant4-based Monte Carlo scheme developed by Kieft and Bosch (2008) [1] are compared to experimental results with suspended nanoparticles. For 20 nm and 50 nm thin membranes, we found a beam broadening of 1.5 nm and 3 nm, respectively, with an excellent agreement between simulations and experiments. 15 nm Au nanoparticles and bio-functionalized core-shell quantum dots can be individually resolved in denser clusters. We demonstrated the imaging of single EGF-conjugated quantum dots docked at filopodia during cellular uptake with both fluorescence microscopy and SEM simultaneously. These results open novel opportunities for correlating live fluorescence microscopy with structural electron microscopy. - Highlights: • We investigate the achievable resolution in liquid scanning electron microscopy (SEM). • We demonstrate liquid SEM imaging of individual fluorescent nanoparticle bio-markers • We show imaging of cellular QDot uptake with simultaneous fluorescence microscopy and SEM. • The positions of individual QDots can be resolved with details on cellular structure.

  7. Bottlenecks in bog pine multiplication by somatic embryogenesis and their visualization with the environmental scanning electron microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlašínová, H.; Neděla, Vilém; Dordevic, B.; Havel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 254, č. 4 (2017), s. 1487-1497 ISSN 0033-183X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : somatic embryogenesis * pinus uncinata subsp uliginosa * abnormalities * environmental scanning electron microscope Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2016

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of Leucochloridiomorpha constantiae during development from metacercaria to adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, W F; Wittrock, D D

    1980-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the tegument of Leucochloridiomorpha constantiae metacercariae was marked with interconnected longitudinal and transverse ridges. Alteration of the ridges began within 1 hr after implantation into the chick coelom. Ridges were completely lost by the 4th hr, leaving a smooth tegument. Body shape altered from that of a tapered metacercaria to a plump, rounded adult within 3 days, and was accompanied by doubling of the acetabular diameter. Papillae, present in both the metacercaria and adult, were located on the suckers, genital orifice, and body surface. The microtopography of the tegument consisted of knoblike protuberances that gave the surface a cobblestonelike appearance. Tegumental knobs in te vicinity of the genital pore contained minute, rounded inclusions.

  9. Improved visualization of vertebrate nuclear pore complexes by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaulov, Lihi; Harel, Amnon

    2012-03-07

    Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) can provide high-resolution three-dimensional surface imaging of many biological structures, including nuclear envelopes and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). For this purpose, it is important to preserve NPCs as close as possible to their native morphology, embedded in undamaged nuclear membranes. We present optimized methodologies for FESEM imaging in a cell-free reconstitution system and for the direct visualization of mammalian cell nuclei. The use of anchored chromatin templates in the cell-free system is particularly advantageous for imaging fragile intermediates inhibited at early stages of assembly. Our new method for exposing the surface of mammalian nuclei results in an unprecedented quality of NPC images, avoiding detergent-induced and physical damage. These new methodologies pave the way for the combined use of FESEM imaging with biochemical and genetic manipulation, in cell-free systems and in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The low-temperature method for study of coniferous tissues in the environmental scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neděla, Vilém; Tihlaříková, Eva; Hřib, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The use of non-standard low-temperature conditions in environmental scanning electron microscopy might be promising for the observation of coniferous tissues in their native state. This study is aimed to analyse and evaluate the method based on the principle of low-temperature sample stabilization. We demonstrate that the upper mucous layer is sublimed and a microstructure of the sample surface can be observed with higher resolution at lower gas pressure conditions, thanks to a low-temperature method. An influence of the low-temperature method on sample stability was also studied. The results indicate that high-moisture conditions are not suitable for this method and often cause the collapse of samples. The potential improvement of stability to beam damage has been demonstrated by long-time observation at different operation parameters. We finally show high applicability of the low-temperature method on different types of conifers and Oxalis acetosella. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopic Studies of the Pecten Oculi in the Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris F. Pourlis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to extend the microscopic investigations of the pecten oculi in the quail in order to add some information on the unresolved functional anatomy of this unique avian organ. The pecten oculi of the quail was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Eighteen- to-twenty two highly vascularised accordion-like folds were joined apically by a heavily pigmented bridge of tissue, which holds the pecten in a fanlike shape, widest at the base. The structure of the double layered limiting membrane was recorded. The presence of hyalocytes with macrophage-like appearance was illustrated. It is assumed that the pecten oculi of the quail resembles that of the chicken. Illustrated morphological features of this species may add information on the active physiological role of the pecten. But still, the functional significance of this organ is a matter of controversies.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of the tegumental surface of adult Schistosoma spindale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruatrachue, M; Riengrojpitak, S; Upatham, E S; Sahaphong, S

    1983-09-01

    The tegumental surfaces of adult male and female of Schistosoma spindale were studied by scanning electron microscopy. In general, the body surface of the male appears to be fairly uniform from anterior end to posterior end. It is characterized by the presence of transverse ridges and papillae of various types. These papillae are distributed fairly regularly over the whole body surface of the worm. The tegument lining the gynecophoral canal of the male worm is covered with numerous spines interspersed with papillae, some without cilia and some with crater-like holes in the centres and apical cilia. The tegument of the female worm is covered with smooth and perforated ridges and sensory bulbs with apical nodules.

  13. Standard practice for calibrating the magnification of a scanning electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers general procedures necessary for the calibration of magnification of scanning electron microscopes. The relationship between true magnification and indicated magnification is a complicated function of operating conditions. Therefore, this practice must be applied to each set of standard operating conditions to be used. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. A versatile atomic force microscope integrated with a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreith, J.; Strunz, T.; Fantner, E. J.; Fantner, G. E.; Cordill, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    A versatile atomic force microscope (AFM), which can be installed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), is introduced. The flexible design of the instrument enables correlated analysis for different experimental configurations, such as AFM imaging directly after nanoindentation in vacuum. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the specially designed AFM installed inside a SEM, slip steps emanating around nanoindents in single crystalline brass were examined. This example showcases how the combination of AFM and SEM imaging can be utilized for quantitative dislocation analysis through the measurement of the slip step heights without the hindrance of oxide formation. Finally, an in situ nanoindentation technique is introduced, illustrating the use of AFM imaging during indentation experiments to examine plastic deformation occurring under the indenter tip. The mechanical indentation data are correlated to the SEM and AFM images to estimate the number of dislocations emitted to the surface.

  15. Frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser for use in periodontology: a scanning electron microscopic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas

    1996-12-01

    During prior studies it could be demonstrated that engaging a frequency double Alexandrite-laser allows a fast and strictly selective ablation of supra- and subgingival calculus. Furthermore, the removal of unstained microbial plaque was observed. First conclusions were drawn following light microscopic investigations on undecalcified sections of irradiated teeth. In the present study the cementum surface after irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite-laser was observed by means of a scanning electron microscope. After irradiation sections of teeth were dried in alcohol and sputtered with gold. In comparison irradiated cementum surfaces of unerupted operatively removed wisdom teeth and tooth surfaces after the selective removal of calculus were investigated. A complete removal of calculus was observed as well as a remaining smooth surface of irradiated cementum.

  16. Morphology of the dentin structure of sloths Bradypus tridactylus: a light and scanning electron microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, L N S; Barbosa, L V M; Teixeira, F B; Costa, A M P; Fernandes, L M P; Lima, R R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dentine morphology of sloths (Bradypus tridactylus). The sloth teeth were removed and prepared for light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy analyses (SEM). LM revealed two patterns of tubular dentins: an outer with dentinary tubules over the all tooth length and one in the inner part with larger diameter and more spaced tubules, when compared to those present in the outer dentine. These findings were confirmed by SEM, which revealed a tubular pattern in the outer dentine like in humans. The inner dentine displayed pared grouped tubules that were characterized as vascular channels. It can be concluded that this sloth species present two types of dentins: an inner dentin (ortodentin) and an outer dentin characterized as a vascular dentin. This suggests a partial evolutive/adaptive process of this dental tissue, as compared to other mammalian species. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Anterior lens epithelium in cataract patients with retinitis pigmentosa - scanning and transmission electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelic, Sofija; Drašlar, Kazimir; Hvala, Anastazija; Hawlina, Marko

    2017-05-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients, relatively minor lens opacity in central part of posterior pole of the lens may cause disproportionate functional symptoms requiring cataract operation. To investigate the possible structural reasons for this opacity development, we studied the structure of the lens epithelium of patients with RP. The anterior lens capsule (aLC: basement membrane and associated lens epithelial cells, LECs) was obtained from cataract surgery and prepared for scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Both SEM and TEM show a number of abnormal features in the anterior lens epithelium of cataract patients with RP. The abnormalities appear mainly as holes, thinning and degradation of the epithelium, with the dimensions from cataractous lens. We suggest that the lens epithelium has a role in the development of the cataract in patients with RP. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Scanning electron microscopic observations of fibrous structure of cemento-dentinal junction in healthy teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratebha, B; Jaikumar, N D; Sudhakar, R

    2014-01-01

    The cemento-dentinal junction (CDJ) is a structural and biologic link between cementum and dentin present in the roots of teeth. Conflicting reports about the origin, structure and composition of this layer are present in literature. The width of this junctional tissue is reported to be about 2-4 μm with adhesion of cementum and dentin by proteoglycans and by collagen fiber intermingling. The objective of this study is to observe and report the fibrous architecture of the CDJ of healthy tooth roots. A total of 15 healthy teeth samples were collected, sectioned into halves, demineralized in 5% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, processed using NaOH maceration technique and observed under a scanning electron microscope. The CDJ appeared to be a fibril poor groove with a width of 2-4 µm. Few areas of collagen fiber intermingling could be appreciated. A detailed observation of these tissues has been presented.

  19. Large area strain analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy across multiple images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oni, A. A.; Sang, X.; LeBeau, J. M., E-mail: jmlebeau@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7907 (United States); Raju, S. V.; Saxena, S. [Center for the Study of Matter under Extreme Conditions, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Dumpala, S.; Broderick, S.; Rajan, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kumar, A.; Sinnott, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Here, we apply revolving scanning transmission electron microscopy to measure lattice strain across a sample using a single reference area. To do so, we remove image distortion introduced by sample drift, which usually restricts strain analysis to a single image. Overcoming this challenge, we show that it is possible to use strain reference areas elsewhere in the sample, thereby enabling reliable strain mapping across large areas. As a prototypical example, we determine the strain present within the microstructure of a Ni-based superalloy directly from atom column positions as well as geometric phase analysis. While maintaining atomic resolution, we quantify strain within nanoscale regions and demonstrate that large, unit-cell level strain fluctuations are present within the intermetallic phase.

  20. The migration of lymphocytes across the vascular endothelium in lymph nodes: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, M; Hamada, N; Nomura, H; Mastueda, M; Aiko, T

    1979-03-01

    Endothelial cells of Postcapillary Venules (PCV) and the passage of lymphocytes through the wall of PCV were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) in mesenteric lymph nodes of rats. Individual endothelial cells of PCV in the lymph node did not have flat surface or were not typically cubic, but swelled at the central part assuming a foot ball-like shape. Circulating lymphocytes are considered to migrate into lymphatic tissues through the wall of PCV from the blood stream. Two hypotheses, inter-endothelial cell passage and intra-endothelial cell passage, have been proposed. The three-dimensional studies on lymphocytes passing the wall with SEM confirmed that migrating lymphocytes pushes their way through the intercellular space with pressing the adjoining endothelial cells from beginning to end, supporting the former hypothesis. Invasion of lymphocytes into endothelial cells were not observed.

  1. Determination of the sequence of intersecting lines using Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiye; Kim, MinJung; An, JinWook; Kim, Yunje

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to verify that the combination of focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) could be applied to determine the sequence of line crossings. The samples were transferred into FIB/SEM for FIB milling and an imaging operation. EDX was able to explore the chemical components and the corresponding elemental distribution in the intersection. The technique was successful in determining the sequence of heterogeneous line intersections produced using gel pens and red sealing ink with highest success rate (100% correctness). These observations show that the FIB/SEM was the appropriate instrument for an overall examination of document. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  3. Evaluation of vermicompost maturity using scanning electron microscopy and paper chromatography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, D; Satheesh Kumar, P; Rajendran, N M; Uthaya Kumar, V; Anbuganapathi, G

    2014-04-02

    Vermicompost was produced from flower waste inoculated with biofertilizers using the earthworm Eisenia fetida. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) were carried out on the basis of physicochemical parameters of vermicomposted samples. From the results of the PCA and CA, it was possible to classify two different groups of vermicompost samples in the following categories: E2 and E5; and E1, E3, E4, and control. Scanning electron microscopy and biodynamic circular paper chromatography analysis were used to investigate the changes in surface morphology and functional groups in the control and vermicompost products. SEM analysis of E1-E5 shows more fragment and pores than the control. Chromatographic analysis of vermicompost indicated the mature condition of the compost materials.

  4. Imaging thiol redox status in murine tumors in vivo with rapid-scan electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Sundramoorthy, Subramanian V.; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Maggio, Matthew C.; Tseytlin, Mark; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Halpern, Howard J.

    2017-03-01

    Thiol redox status is an important physiologic parameter that affects the success or failure of cancer treatment. Rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance (RS EPR) is a novel technique that has shown higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional continuous-wave EPR in in vitro studies. Here we used RS EPR to acquire rapid three-dimensional images of the thiol redox status of tumors in living mice. This work presents, for the first time, in vivo RS EPR images of the kinetics of the reaction of 2H,15N-substituted disulfide-linked dinitroxide (PxSSPx) spin probe with intracellular glutathione. The cleavage rate is proportional to the intracellular glutathione concentration. Feasibility was demonstrated in a FSa fibrosarcoma tumor model in C3H mice. Similar to other in vivo and cell model studies, decreasing intracellular glutathione concentration by treating mice with L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) markedly altered the kinetic images.

  5. A morphological study of molecularly imprinted polymers using the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paniagua Gonzalez, Gema [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: gpaniagua@pas.uned.es; Fernandez Hernando, Pilar [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Durand Alegria, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-31

    Molecular imprinting is an emerging technique for producing polymers with applications in affinity-based separation, in biomimetic sensors, in catalysis, etc. This variety of uses relies upon the production of polymers with different affinities, specificities, sensitivities and loading capacities. Research into the development of molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with new or improved morphologies - which involves modification of the polymerisation process - is therefore underway. This paper reports a comparative study of non-covalent MIPs synthesised by 'bulk' polymerisation using digoxin as template. These were synthesised under different conditions, i.e., changing the functional monomers employed (methacrylic acid or 2-vinylpyridine), the porogens (acetonitrile or dichloromethane) used, and by altering the volume of the latter. The polymerisation process was allowed to proceed either under UV light or in a thermostat-controlled waterbath. The surface morphology (was determined by scanning electron microscopy) and the ability of the different polymers to selectively rebind the template was then evaluated.

  6. [Scanning electron microscopic study of films of the loose connective tissue of mice exposed to DMBA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ol'shevskaia, L V

    1979-01-01

    Under examination by scanning electron microscopy were film samples of the subcutaneous connective tissue. The surface of the films from intact mice was even and smooth, fibroblasts have a spread pattern. Following the saline injection the film was even, collagen fibres, differing in the character of surface and the size of diameter, were readily seen. The collagen fibres formed a multilayer system with a definite orientation inside the layer. After DMBA injection the film surface would get uneven and tuberous, the fibroblast body rising over the film surface, thus the orientation of fibres and all strata was disturbed. There was a spacial rearrangement of all tissue components. It is suggested that carcinogenic agents affecting the relationship between tissue components could interfere the contact inhibition of cell division and result in the development of focal cell proliferates.

  7. Descriptive study of Aeolidia papillosa with scanning electron micrographs of the radula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, H.

    1974-01-01

    Aeolidia papillosa (Linnaeus, 1761) is a cosmopolitan nudibranch of the northern hemisphere which feeds on sea anemones. The radula of Aeolidia papillosa, here figured by scanning electron micrographs for the first time, has 18 to 28 rows of teeth. Each row consists of a single large, pectinate, arched tooth, which is curved forward, and bears a series of stout, regular, lanceolate tipped denticles. The denticles vary in number: anywhere from 30 to 58 having been reported; the specimen figured in this paper from the Bodega Bay area, California, has 55 denticles. Some specimens show a distinctly wider space separating the central two denticles. This has also been illustrated by Pruvot-Fol and O'Donoghue. Other specimens show no interruption in the midline of the teeth as figured by MacFarland and Marcus. This variation has no geographical correlation, and is not considered of specific importance.

  8. A novel and compact nanoindentation device for in situ nanoindentation tests inside the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In situ nanomechanical tests provide a unique insight into mechanical behaviors of materials, such as fracture onset and crack propagation, shear band formation and so on. This paper presents a novel in situ nanoindentation device with dimensions of 103mm×74mm×60mm. Integrating the stepper motor, the piezoelectric actuator and the flexure hinge, the device can realize coarse adjustment of the specimen and precision loading and unloading of the indenter automatically. A novel indenter holder was designed to guarantee that the indenter penetrates into and withdraws from the specimen surface vertically. Closed-loop control of the indentation process was established to solve the problem of nonlinearity of the piezoelectric actuator and to enrich the loading modes. The in situ indentation test of Indium Phosphide (InP inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM was carried out and the experimental result indicates the feasibility of the developed device.

  9. Regenerated middle ear mucosa after tympanoplasty. Part II. Scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamoletti, R; Lanzarini, P; Sanna, M; Zini, C

    1986-04-01

    The ultrastructural appearance of the regenerated middle ear epithelium, found at the second operation of staged ICWT with mastoidectomy, has been investigated herein with the scanning electron microscope. The regenerated epithelium consists of flat nonciliated cells, "elevated" nonciliated cells with microvilli, and ciliated cells. Secretory material is present on the surface of the "elevated" nonciliated cells surrounding the ciliated ones. Regeneration of the mucosa occurs following precise topographic differences that mimic the distribution of epithelial cells in the normal middle ear. It is confirmed that a morphologically normal middle ear epithelium regenerates to cover all denuded bone surfaces within 12 months--after first stage ICWT with mastoidectomy--when silicone rubber sheeting has been used to maintain an aerated middle ear and mastoid space.

  10. Colorimeter and scanning electron microscopy analysis of teeth submitted to internal bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Biedma, Benjamin; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Lopes, Manuela; Lopes, Luis; Vilar, Rui; Bahillo, José; Varela-Patiño, Purificación

    2010-02-01

    This in vitro study compared the tooth color and the ultrastructure of internal dental tissues before and after internal bleaching. Sodium perborate was placed in the pulp chamber of endodontically treated molars and sealed with intermediate restorative material. The test samples were stored in a physiologic solution, and the bleaching agent was replaced every 7 days. A control group was used. After 1 month, the colors of the test and control samples were measured with a colorimeter, and the internal surfaces were observed under field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Statistically significant differences were found between the test and control sample colors. The FESEM ultrastructure analysis of the internal enamel and dentin surfaces did not show any changes after the internal bleaching. The results of the present study show that sodium perborate is effective in bleaching nonvital teeth and does not produce ultrastructural changes in the dental tissues. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-09-15

    We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of Emulsions of Fish Oil and Water by Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    to the many double bonds. Emulsions of fish oil in water are potential candidates for a delivery system of fish oil to food products. It has been suggested that oxidation of oil-in-water emulsions is initiated at the interface between oil and water. It has also been proposed that oxidation is to some extent...... dependent on the ultra structure of the emulsion; including the size of oil droplets, their distribution and the thickness of the interface between oil and water. This interface is stabilized by macromolecules such as proteins, phospholipids and hydrocolloids. The main objective of this study...... is to characterize fish oil in water emulsions with respect to oil droplet size, distribution, and ultimately to view the structure and thickness of the interface layer. A freeze-fractured surface viewed at low temperatures under the scanning electron microscope is a promising strategy to reveal variations...

  13. Marginal Leakage of Class V Composite Restorations Assessed Using Microcomputed Tomography and Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengo, C; Goracci, C; Ametrano, G; Chieffi, N; Spagnuolo, G; Rengo, S; Ferrari, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare in Class V composite restorations marginal leakage measurements obtained with microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. Class V cavities were prepared on 10 human molars and restored using Optibond FL (Kerr, Orange, CA, USA) and Premise Flowable (Kerr). Sealing ability was evaluated by assessing silver-nitrate penetration depth along enamel and dentin margins. Leakage was quantified using a scoring system. Micro-CT analysis provided 502 cross-sectional images for each tooth. Microleakage evaluation was performed first on three cross-sections corresponding to the sections examined by SEM, then on all 502 of the obtained micro-CT images. SEM observations were performed first at 20× magnification, then, if showing a zero score, at 80× magnification. Enamel and dentin microleakage scores assigned to corresponding sections through micro-CT and SEM (20×) were compared (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, α=0.05). No statistically significant difference in leakage scores emerged between micro-CT and 20×-magnification SEM. Eight tooth sections that were given a zero score under SEM at 20× magnification showed to be infiltrated at the higher magnification (80×). For five teeth a higher score was assigned following scanning of 502 cross-sections than based on the observation of three sections. Micro-CT presents as a valid, nondestructive in vitro method to quantitatively evaluate marginal leakage of adhesive restorations.

  14. Examination of Scanning Electron Microscope and Computed Tomography Images of PICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Shklover, Valery

    2010-01-01

    Micrographs of PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) taken using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D images taken with a Computed Tomography (CT) system are examined. PICA is a carbon fiber based composite (Fiberform ) with a phenolic polymer matrix. The micrographs are taken at different surface depths and at different magnifications in a sample after arc jet testing and show different levels of oxidative removal of the charred matrix (Figs 1 though 13). CT scans, courtesy of Xradia, Inc. of Concord CA, were captured for samples of virgin PICA, charred PICA and raw Fiberform (Fig. 14). We use these images to calculate the thermal conductivity (TC) of these materials using correlation function (CF) methods. CF methods give a mathematical description of how one material is embedded in another and is thus ideally suited for modeling composites like PICA. We will evaluate how the TC of the materials changes as a function of surface depth. This work is in collaboration with ETH-Zurich, which has expertise in high temperature materials and TC modeling (including CF methods).

  15. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  16. Plasmons and Electrons as Nanosecond-Fast Sensors for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    The ability to measure the fast dynamical evolution of atomic-scale systems often holds the key to their understanding. We combine fast pump-probe spectroscopy tools with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to study atomically assembled arrays of magnetic atoms. The dynamical information quantifies spin lifetimes, magnetic stability and even allows identifying the cross-over between quantum spins and classical magnetism. The spin relaxation times of transition metal atoms can be measured by all-electronic pump probe spectroscopy in which nanosecond-fast voltage pulses excite the spins and probe the average time-dependent response by variations in the spin-polarized tunnel current. In addition, the fast evolution of the local electrostatic potential can be mapped by detecting plasmonic light emission from the STM tunnel junction with time correlating single photon counting. The combination of electrical stimulus and optical detection provides precise control of the excitation process of individual atoms enabling new experiments to probe charge and spin dynamics in the scanning tunneling microscope.

  17. Autoregressive linear least square single scanning electron microscope image signal-to-noise ratio estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kok Swee; NorHisham, Syafiq

    2016-11-01

    A technique based on linear Least Squares Regression (LSR) model is applied to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. In order to test the accuracy of this technique on SNR estimation, a number of SEM images are initially corrupted with white noise. The autocorrelation function (ACF) of the original and the corrupted SEM images are formed to serve as the reference point to estimate the SNR value of the corrupted image. The LSR technique is then compared with the previous three existing techniques known as nearest neighbourhood, first-order interpolation, and the combination of both nearest neighborhood and first-order interpolation. The actual and the estimated SNR values of all these techniques are then calculated for comparison purpose. It is shown that the LSR technique is able to attain the highest accuracy compared to the other three existing techniques as the absolute difference between the actual and the estimated SNR value is relatively small. SCANNING 38:771-782, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Snow crystal imaging using scanning electron microscopy: III. Glacier ice, snow and biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, A.; Wergin, W.P.; Erbe, E.F.; Josberger, E.G.

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe metamorphosed snow, glacial firn, and glacial ice obtained from South Cascade Glacier in Washington State, USA. Biotic samples consisting of algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis) and ice worms (a species of oligochaetes) were also collected and imaged. In the field, the snow and biological samples were mounted on copper plates, cooled in liquid nitrogen, and stored in dry shipping containers which maintain a temperature of -196??C. The firn and glacier ice samples were obtained by extracting horizontal ice cores, 8 mm in diameter, at different levels from larger standard glaciological (vertical) ice cores 7.5 cm in diameter. These samples were cooled in liquid nitrogen and placed in cryotubes, were stored in the same dry shipping container, and sent to the SEM facility. In the laboratory, the samples were sputter coated with platinum and imaged by a low-temperature SEM. To image the firn and glacier ice samples, the cores were fractured in liquid nitrogen, attached to a specimen holder, and then imaged. While light microscope images of snow and ice are difficult to interpret because of internal reflection and refraction, the SEM images provide a clear and unique view of the surface of the samples because they are generated from electrons emitted or reflected only from the surface of the sample. In addition, the SEM has a great depth of field with a wide range of magnifying capabilities. The resulting images clearly show the individual grains of the seasonal snowpack and the bonding between the snow grains. Images of firn show individual ice crystals, the bonding between the crystals, and connected air spaces. Images of glacier ice show a crystal structure on a scale of 1-2 mm which is considerably smaller than the expected crystal size. Microscopic air bubbles, less than 15 ??m in diameter, clearly marked the boundaries between these crystal-like features. The life forms associated with the glacier were

  19. External morphogenesis of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Vladimir; Minich, Irene; Mayer, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Tardigrada, commonly called water bears, is a taxon of microscopic panarthropods with five-segmented bodies and four pairs of walking legs. Although tardigrades have been known to science for several centuries, questions remain regarding many aspects of their biology, such as embryogenesis. Herein, we used scanning electron microscopy to document the external changes that occur during embryonic development in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini (Eutardigrada, Parachela, Hypsibiidae). Our results show an accelerated development of external features, with approximately 30 hrs separating the point at which external structures first become recognizable and a fully formed embryo. All segments appear to arise simultaneously between ∼20 and 25 hrs of development, and no differences in the degree of development could be detected between the limb buds at any stage. Claws emerge shortly after the limb buds and are morphologically similar to those of adults. The origin of the claws is concurrent with that of the sclerotized parts of the mouth, suggesting that all cuticular structures arise simultaneously at ∼30 hrs. The mouth arises as an invagination in the terminal region of the head at ∼25 hrs, closes later in development, and opens again shortly before hatching. The anlagen of the peribuccal lobes arise as one dorsal and one ventral row, each consisting of three lobes, and later form a ring in the late embryo, whereas there is no indication of a labrum anlage at any point during development. Furthermore, we describe limited postembryonic development in the form of cuticular pores that are absent in juveniles but present in adults. This study represents the first scanning electron micrographs of tardigrade embryos, demonstrating the utility of this technique for studying embryogenesis in tardigrades. This work further adds an external morphological perspective to the developmental data already available for H. dujardini, facilitating future comparisons to related

  20. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millaku, Agron, E-mail: agron.mi@hotmail.com [Limnos-Company for Applied Ecology Ltd, Podlimbarskega 31, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drobne, Damjana [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Advanced Materials and Technologies for the Future (CO NAMASTE), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Nanocentre), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Torkar, Matjaz [Institute of Metals and Technology IMT, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Novak, Sara [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Remškar, Maja [Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pipan-Tkalec, Živa [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells.

  1. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodighiero, Simona; Torre, Bruno; Sogne, Elisa; Ruffilli, Roberta; Cagnoli, Cinzia; Francolini, Maura; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Direct Visualization of Local Electromagnetic Field Structures by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Findlay, Scott D; Matsumoto, Takao; Kohno, Yuji; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-07-18

    The functional properties of materials and devices are critically determined by the electromagnetic field structures formed inside them, especially at nanointerface and surface regions, because such structures are strongly associated with the dynamics of electrons, holes and ions. To understand the fundamental origin of many exotic properties in modern materials and devices, it is essential to directly characterize local electromagnetic field structures at such defect regions, even down to atomic dimensions. In recent years, rapid progress in the development of high-speed area detectors for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub-angstrom spatial resolution has opened new possibilities to directly image such electromagnetic field structures at very high-resolution. In this Account, we give an overview of our recent development of differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy for aberration-corrected STEM and its application to many materials problems. In recent years, we have developed segmented-type STEM detectors which divide the detector plane into 16 segments and enable simultaneous imaging of 16 STEM images which are sensitive to the positions and angles of transmitted/scattered electrons on the detector plane. These detectors also have atomic-resolution imaging capability. Using these segmented-type STEM detectors, we show DPC STEM imaging to be a very powerful tool for directly imaging local electromagnetic field structures in materials and devices in real space. For example, DPC STEM can clearly visualize the local electric field variation due to the abrupt potential change across a p-n junction in a GaAs semiconductor, which cannot be observed by normal in-focus bright-field or annular type dark-field STEM imaging modes. DPC STEM is also very effective for imaging magnetic field structures in magnetic materials, such as magnetic domains and skyrmions. Moreover, real-time imaging of electromagnetic field structures can

  4. Dark field imaging of biological macromolecules with the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Mitsuo; Isaacson, Michael S.; Crewe, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    A scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with a field emission gun has been employed for the examination of biological macromolecules at high resolution. The quality of micrographs obtained with the STEM is dependent upon the quality of the substrate used to support biological objects because the image contrast in dark field is proportional to the mass density of the specimen. In order to reduce deleterious effects of the substrates on the image quality, we have developed a method of fabricating substrates consisting of very thin, very clean carbon films supported on very clean fenestrated plastic films. These films are approximately 15 Å thick. Well-known biological macromolecules such as glutamine synthetase and tobacco mosaic virus (both stained) and low-density lipoprotein and ferritin (both unstained were placed on these substrates and examined with the STEM by using various modes of contrast. The micrographs obtained by using the dark field mode of contrast employing an annular detector were free from phase contrast, as expected. Using this contrast mode, we have been able to directly observe (in-focus) 2.5- to 4.4-Å lattice spacings in the ferritin core. The effect of electron radiation damage on the helical structure of tobacco mosaic virus was also examined. Micrographs as well as corresponding optical diffraction patterns obtained with moderately low doses showed very clear helical structure from both sides of the virus. In addition, the (11.5 Å)-1 layer lines indicated the effective resolution attained on these particles. Images PMID:35788

  5. Orientation mapping of nanostructured materials using transmission Kikuchi diffraction in the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimby, Patrick W., E-mail: patrick.trimby@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Madsen Building F09 Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the new technique of transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been applied for the first time to enable orientation mapping of bulk, nanostructured metals. The results show how the improved spatial resolution of SEM-TKD, compared to conventional EBSD, enables reliable mapping of truly nanostructured metals and alloys, with mean grain sizes in the 40-200 nm range. The spatial resolution of the technique is significantly below 10 nm, and contrasting examples are shown from both dense (Ni) and lighter (Al-alloy) materials. Despite the burden of preparing thin, electron-transparent samples, orientation mapping using SEM-TKD is likely to become invaluable for routine characterisation of nanocrystalline and, potentially, highly deformed microstructures. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report of orientation mapping by transmission Kikuchi diffraction in the SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SEM-TKD technique can achieve an effective spatial resolution of 2-4 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured Ni with a mean grain size of <50 nm has been effectively mapped. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly deformed Al-alloy, with sub-200 nm grains, has also been characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sample thickness is critical for effective results: ideally 75-200 nm for Al.

  6. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo Jácome, L; Eggeler, G; Dlouhý, A

    2012-11-01

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of field emission scanning electron microscopy to assess recombinant adenovirus stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenauer-Kutner, Linda J; Ihnat, Peter M; Yang, Tong-Yuan; Dovey-Hartman, Barbara J; Balu, Arthi; Cullen, Constance; Bordens, Ronald W; Grace, Michael J

    2002-09-20

    A field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) method was developed to assess the stability of a recombinant adenovirus (rAd). This method was designed to simultaneously sort, count, and size the total number of rAd viral species observed within an image field. To test the method, a preparation of p53 transgene-expressing recombinant adenovirus (rAd/p53) was incubated at 37 degrees C and the viral particles were evaluated by number, structure, and degree of aggregation as a function of time. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also used to obtain ultrastructural detail. In addition, the infectious activity of the incubated rAd/p53 samples was determined using flow cytometry. FESEM image-analysis revealed that incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in a time-dependent decrease in the total number of detectable single rAd/p53 virus particles and an increase in apparent aggregates composed of more than three adenovirus particles. There was also an observed decrease in both the diameter and perimeter of the single rAd/p53 viral particles. TEM further revealed the accumulation of damaged single particles with time at 37 degrees C. The results of this study demonstrate that FESEM, coupled with sophisticated image analysis, may be an important tool in quantifying the distribution of aggregated species and assessing the overall stability of rAd samples.

  8. Cryo-field emission scanning electron microscopy imaging of a rigid surfactant mesophase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Grace; Xu, Peng; John, Vijay T; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Agarwal, Vivek; Bose, Arijit

    2008-10-07

    The aerosol OT/ L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine/isooctane/water system forms a rigid mesophase that transitions from reverse hexagonal to multilamellar in structure at specific water contents. This study shows that characteristics of ordered liquid-crystalline mesophases can be distinguished and imaged in high clarity using cryo-field emission scanning electron microscopy (cryo-FESEM). The reverse hexagonal phase consists of bundles of long cylinders, some with length scales of over 2 microm, that are randomly oriented as part of a larger domain. Cryo-imaging allows the visualization of the intercylinder spacings and the details of transitions from one domain to another. The multilamellar structured mesophase consists of spherical vesicles of 100 nm to 10 microm in diameter, with intervening noncrystalline isotropic regions. Coexistence regions containing both the reverse hexagonal and lamellar structures are also observed in the transition from the reverse hexagonal to the lamellar phase. These results complement and qualitatively verify our earlier studies with small-angle neutron scattering, high-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and freeze-fracture direct imaging transmission electron microscopy. The information is useful in understanding materials templating in these rigid systems.

  9. Immunogold labeling of amelogenin in developing porcine enamel revealed by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chang; Fan, Daming; Sun, Zhi; Fan, Yuwei; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2009-01-01

    The present study describes a method using immunohistochemical labeling in combination with high-resolution imaging (field emission scanning electron microscopy) to investigate the spatial localization of amelogenins on apatite crystallites in developing porcine enamel. Cross-sections of developing enamel tissue from freeze-fractured pig third molar were treated with antiserum against recombinant mouse amelogenin and immunoreactivity confirmed by Western blot analysis. The samples were then treated with the goat anti-rabbit IgG conjugated with 10-nm gold particles. The control samples were treated with the secondary antibody only. The in-lens secondary electrons detector and quadrant back-scattering detector were employed to reveal the high-resolution morphology of enamel structures and gold particle distribution. The immunolabeling showed a preference of the gold particle localization along the side faces of the ribbon-like apatite crystals. The preferential localization of amelogenin in vivo on enamel crystals strongly supports its direct function in controlling crystal morphology. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Correlative microscopy of Purkinje dendritic spines: a field emission scanning and transmission electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, O J; Castellano, A; Arismendi, G; Apkarian, R

    2004-01-01

    Purkinje dendritic spines (Pds) of mouse cerebellar cortex were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using ultrathin sections and freeze-etching replicas, to study their three-dimensional features and intramembrane morphology. FESEM showed unattached mushroom-type, elongated and lanceolate Pds separated by 100-500 nm on the dendritic shaft surface. High resolution FESEM showed 25-50 nm globular subunits at the spine postsynaptic density corresponding to the localization of postsynaptic proteins and/or postsynaptic receptors. TEM images of ultrathin sections showed gem-like, mushroom-shaped, lanceolate and neckless or stubby spines. Freeze etching replicas exposed postsynaptic intramembrane particles that can be correlated with the globular subunits observed at high resolution FESEM. Parallel and climbing fiber endings were observed making asymmetric synaptic contacts with the Pds heads. Simultaneous contacts with the necks and heads were also found. The variety of Pds shapes were interpreted as spine conformational changes related with spine dynamic, and spine plasticity.

  11. Evaluation of the infection process by Lecanicillium fungicola in Agaricus bisporus by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Nunes, Janaira; Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Cunha Zied, Diego; Aparecida das Graças Leite, Eloisa; Souza Dias, Eustáquio; Alves, Eduardo

    Lecanicillium fungicola causes dry bubble disease in Agaricus bisporus mushrooms leading to significant economic losses in commercial production. To monitor the infection process of L. fungicola in Brazilian strains of A. bisporus. The interaction between the mycelium of L. fungicola (LF.1) and three strains of A. bisporus (ABI 7, ABI 11/14 and ABI 11/21) was studied. Electron microscopy and X-ray microanalyses of vegetative growth and basidiocarp infection were evaluated. Micrographs show that the vegetative mycelium of the Brazilian strains of A. bisporus is not infected by the parasite. The images show that the pathogen can interlace the hyphae of A. bisporus without causing damage, which contributes to the presence of L. fungicola during the substrate colonization, allowing their presence during primordial formation of A. bisporus. In the basidiocarp, germ tubes form within 16h of infection with L. fungicola and the beginning of penetration takes place within 18h, both without the formation of specialized structures. Scanning electron microscopy enabled the process of colonization and reproduction to be observed within the formation of phialides, conidiophores and verticils of L. fungicola. The formation of calcium oxalate crystals by the pathogen was also visible using the X-ray microanalysis, both at the hyphae in the Petri plate and at basidiocarp infection site. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  13. Joint denoising and distortion correction of atomic scale scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Wirth, Benedikt

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays, modern electron microscopes deliver images at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure encodes information about material properties. Thus, an important ingredient in the image analysis is to locate the centers of the atoms shown in micrographs as precisely as possible. Here, we consider scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which acquires data in a rastering pattern, pixel by pixel. Due to this rastering combined with the magnification to atomic scale, movements of the specimen even at the nanometer scale lead to random image distortions that make precise atom localization difficult. Given a series of STEM images, we derive a Bayesian method that jointly estimates the distortion in each image and reconstructs the underlying atomic grid of the material by fitting the atom bumps with suitable bump functions. The resulting highly non-convex minimization problems are solved numerically with a trust region approach. Existence of minimizers and the model behavior for faster and faster rastering are investigated using variational techniques. The performance of the method is finally evaluated on both synthetic and real experimental data.

  14. Novel scanning electron microscopy methods for analyzing the 3D structure of the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Daisuke; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The structure of the Golgi apparatus has been extensively examined by light and electron microscopy, but details of its three-dimensional (3D) structure have remained unclear because of the technical limitations of conventional microscopy techniques. To overcome this problem, we have developed several novel scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods for observing the 3D structure of subcellular organelles including the Golgi apparatus: (1) an osmium maceration method that facilitates SEM observation of membranous organelles, including the Golgi apparatus, by selectively removing soluble cytoplasmic proteins, (2) an osmium impregnation/maceration method that combines an osmium impregnation method with the osmium maceration method to determine the polarity of the Golgi apparatus by SEM, (3) a correlative light and SEM method that combines a cryosectioning technique with the osmium maceration method to enable correlation of the immunocytochemical distribution of molecules with the 3D ultrastructure of the Golgi apparatus, and (4) array tomography based on the systematic collection and integration of SEM images of serial ultrathin sections on glass slides for revealing the 3D ultrastructure of the entire Golgi apparatus. Together, the novel SEM techniques listed above can reveal the complete 3D structure of the Golgi apparatus in different cell types.

  15. Hygroscopic analysis of individual Beijing haze aerosol particles by environmental scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhangpeng; Ji, Yuan; Pi, Yiqun; Yang, Kaixiang; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yinqi; Zhai, Yadi; Yan, Zhengguang; Han, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    Investigating the hygroscopic behavior of haze aerosol particles is essential for understanding their physicochemical properties and their impacts on regional weather and visibility. An environmental scanning electron microscope equipped with a home-made transmission-scattering electron imaging setup and an energy dispersive spectrometer was used for in-situ observations of pure water-soluble (WS) salts and Beijing haze particles. This imaging setup showed obvious advantages for improving the resolution and acquiring internal information of mixed particles in hydrated environments. We measured the deliquescence relative humidity of pure NaCl, NH4NO3, and (NH4)2SO4 by deliquescence-crystallization processes with an accuracy of up to 0.3% RH. The mixed haze particles showed hygroscopic activation like water uptake and morphological changes when they included WS components such as nitrates, sulfates, halides, ammoniums, and alkali metal salts. In addition, the hygroscopic behavior provides complementary information for analyzing possible phases in mixed haze particles.

  16. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  17. In situ observation of water in a fuel cell catalyst using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Satoru; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Koizumi, Satoshi; Tsutsumi, Yasuyuki

    2015-04-01

    To visualize water in the catalyst of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), backscattered electron (BSE) imaging by means of scanning electron microscopy was employed. To confine a wet specimen of catalyst, an environmental wet cell was manufactured with a silicon nitride thin film (∼100 nm) as the beam window. By supplying humidified gas into the cell, a change in BSE brightness was detected in the catalyst attached to the silicon nitride window. As humidification proceeded, the BSE image became darker and returned brighter by switching to a dry gas. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the energy and number of BSE obtained after passing through water with thickness d. Combining the results of the Monte Carlo simulation successfully converted the change in brightness to the change in thickness from d = 100 nm to d = 3 μm. This established method of evaluating water with a thickness resolution of the order of Δd = 100 nm can be applied to in situ observations of the catalyst in a PEFC during operation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Direct Observation of Protein Microcrystals in Crystallization Buffer by Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Sato

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available X-ray crystallography requires high quality crystals above a given size. This requirement not only limits the proteins to be analyzed, but also reduces the speed of the structure determination. Indeed, the tertiary structures of many physiologically important proteins remain elusive because of the so-called “crystallization bottleneck”. Once microcrystals have been obtained, crystallization conditions can be optimized to produce bigger and better crystals. However, the identification of microcrystals can be difficult due to the resolution limit of optical microscopy. Electron microscopy has sometimes been utilized instead, with the disadvantage that the microcrystals usually must be observed in vacuum, which precludes the usage for crystal screening. The atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM allows samples to be observed in solution. Here, we report the use of this instrument in combination with a special thin-membrane dish with a crystallization well. It was possible to observe protein crystals of lysozyme, lipase B and a histone chaperone TAF-Iβ in crystallization buffers, without the use of staining procedures. The smallest crystals observed with ASEM were a few µm in width, and ASEM can be used with non-transparent solutions. Furthermore, the growth of salt crystals could be monitored in the ASEM, and the difference in contrast between salt and protein crystals made it easy to distinguish between these two types of microcrystals. These results indicate that the ASEM could be an important new tool for the screening of protein microcrystals.

  19. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L., E-mail: krivanek@nion.com [Nion Company, 1102 8th Street, Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Chisholm, Matthew F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6069 (United States); Murfitt, Matthew F.; Dellby, Niklas [Nion Company, 1102 8th Street, Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5 A resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TV-rate STEM imaging of heavy atoms is demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA sequencing by STEM dark field imaging should be possible at a rate of 10{sup 6} bases/s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Individual silicon atom impurities in graphene are imaged atom-by-atom. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single atoms of nitrogen and boron incorporated in graphene are imaged spectroscopically. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bonding of individual atoms can be probed by analyzing the fine structures of their EEL spectra.

  20. Video-frequency scanning transmission electron microscopy of moving gold nanoparticles in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Elisabeth A; de Jonge, Niels

    2012-11-01

    Immobilized gold nanoparticles were imaged in a liquid containing water and 50% glycerol with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The specimen was enclosed in a liquid compartment formed by two silicon microchips with electron transparent windows. A series of images was recorded at video frequency with a spatial resolution of 1.5nm. The nanoparticles detached from their support after imaging them for several seconds at a magnification of 250,000. Their movement was found to be much different than the movement of nanoparticles moving freely in liquid as described by Brownian Motion. The direction of motion was not random-the nanoparticles moved either in a preferred direction, or radially outwards from the center of the image. The displacement of the gold nanoparticles over time was three orders of magnitude smaller than expected on the basis of Brownian Motion. This finding implies that nanoscale objects of flexible structure or freely floating, including nanoparticles and biological objects, can be imaged with nanoscale resolution, as long as they are in close proximity to a solid support structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunogold scanning electron microscopy can reveal the polysaccharide architecture of xylem cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Sun, Yuliang; Juzenas, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    Immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunogold transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are the two main techniques commonly used to detect polysaccharides in plant cell walls. Both are important in localizing cell wall polysaccharides, but both have major limitations, such as low resolution in IFM and restricted sample size for immunogold TEM. In this study, we have developed a robust technique that combines immunocytochemistry with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study cell wall polysaccharide architecture in xylem cells at high resolution over large areas of sample. Using multiple cell wall monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), this immunogold SEM technique reliably localized groups of hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides in the cell walls of five different xylem structures (vessel elements, fibers, axial and ray parenchyma cells, and tyloses). This demonstrates its important advantages over the other two methods for studying cell wall polysaccharide composition and distribution in these structures. In addition, it can show the three-dimensional distribution of a polysaccharide group in the vessel lateral wall and the polysaccharide components in the cell wall of developing tyloses. This technique, therefore, should be valuable for understanding the cell wall polysaccharide composition, architecture and functions of diverse cell types. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  2. Nano-Tomography of Porous Geological Materials Using Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomographic analysis using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM provides three-dimensional information about solid materials with a resolution of a few nanometres and thus bridges the gap between X-ray and transmission electron microscopic tomography techniques. This contribution serves as an introduction and overview of FIB-SEM tomography applied to porous materials. Using two different porous Earth materials, a diatomite specimen, and an experimentally produced amorphous silica layer on olivine, we discuss the experimental setup of FIB-SEM tomography. We then focus on image processing procedures, including image alignment, correction, and segmentation to finally result in a three-dimensional, quantified pore network representation of the two example materials. To each image processing step we consider potential issues, such as imaging the back of pore walls, and the generation of image artefacts through the application of processing algorithms. We conclude that there is no single image processing recipe; processing steps need to be decided on a case-by-case study.

  3. Cell organelles at uncoated cryofractured surfaces as viewed with the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, P S; Ledbetter, M C

    1976-06-01

    A method of direct visualization of cell organelles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is described. Plant and animal tissues fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide are treated with the ligand thiocarbohydrazide and a second osmium tetroxide solution, to increase their osmium content. Tissues are then dehydrated, infiltrated with an epoxy monomer, and together solidified with dry ice and fractured. The pieces are transferred to pure acetone, critical-point dried, attached to stubs with silver paint and viewed by SEM. The ligating procedure increases the osmium concentration at its original bonding site sufficiently to render the tissue electrically conductive, thus obviating the need for metallic coating. he organelles at the fractured surface are revaled in relation to their osmium incorporation rather than by surface irregularities as with coating methods. The image derived from the uncoated surface approaches in resolution that of transmission electron micrographs of thin sections. A protion of the image arising from a small distance below the surface, while at progressively lower resolution, provides some 3-dimensional information about cell fine structure.

  4. Study of skin of an Egyptian mummy using a scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mańkowska-Pliszka Hanna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The first study of modified human remains using an electron microscope was carried out at the end of the 1950 and in 1979 the first result of the study involving a scanning electron microscope (SEM was published for the first time. The study was mainly focused on the structure of tissues and cells. With the help of this technique cell and tissue elements, viruses and bacterial endospores as well as the structure of epithelium and the collagen contents of dermis were identified and described. In the above-mentioned case the object of the study using a SEM was a free part of the right hand (forearm with the dorsal and palmar parts of hand of unknown origin, with signs of mummification revealed during microscopic analysis. Our study was aimed at finding the answer to the question if the mummification of the studied limb was natural or intentional, and if the study using a SEM could link the anonymous remains with ancient Egypt.

  5. Poor electronic screening in lightly doped Mott insulators observed with scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, I.; Fedoseev, V.; Bastiaans, K. M.; de la Torre, A.; Perry, R. S.; Baumberger, F.; Allan, M. P.

    2017-06-01

    The effective Mott gap measured by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the lightly doped Mott insulator (Sr1-xLax) 2IrO4 differs greatly from values reported by photoemission and optical experiments. Here we show that this is a consequence of the poor electronic screening of the tip-induced electric field in this material. Such effects are well known from STM experiments on semiconductors and go under the name of tip-induced band bending (TIBB). We show that this phenomenon also exists in the lightly doped Mott insulator (Sr1-xLax) 2IrO4 and that, at doping concentrations of x ≤4 % , it causes the measured energy gap in the sample density of states to be bigger than the one measured with other techniques. We develop a model able to retrieve the intrinsic energy gap leading to a value which is in rough agreement with other experiments, bridging the apparent contradiction. At doping x ≈5 % we further observe circular features in the conductance layers that point to the emergence of a significant density of free carriers in this doping range and to the presence of a small concentration of donor atoms. We illustrate the importance of considering the presence of TIBB when doing STM experiments on correlated-electron systems and discuss the similarities and differences between STM measurements on semiconductors and lightly doped Mott insulators.

  6. Can X-ray spectrum imaging replace backscattered electrons for compositional contrast in the scanning electron microscope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2011-01-01

    The high throughput of the silicon drift detector energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SDD-EDS) enables X-ray spectrum imaging (XSI) in the scanning electron microscope to be performed in frame times of 10-100 s, the typical time needed to record a high-quality backscattered electron (BSE) image. These short-duration XSIs can reveal all elements, except H, He, and Li, present as major constituents, defined as 0.1 mass fraction (10 wt%) or higher, as well as minor constituents in the range 0.01-0.1 mass fraction, depending on the particular composition and possible interferences. Although BSEs have a greater abundance by a factor of 100 compared with characteristic X-rays, the strong compositional contrast in element-specific X-ray maps enables XSI mapping to compete with BSE imaging to reveal compositional features. Differences in the fraction of the interaction volume sampled by the BSE and X-ray signals lead to more delocalization of the X-ray signal at abrupt compositional boundaries, resulting in poorer spatial resolution. Improved resolution in X-ray elemental maps occurs for the case of a small feature composed of intermediate to high atomic number elements embedded in a matrix of lower atomic number elements. XSI imaging strongly complements BSE imaging, and the SDD-EDS technology enables an efficient combined BSE-XSI measurement strategy that maximizes the compositional information. If 10 s or more are available for the measurement of an area of interest, the analyst should always record the combined BSE-XSI information to gain the advantages of both measures of compositional contrast. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ultrastructural study of polyspermy during early embryo development in pigs, observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, P; Wang, Z; Yang, Z; Tan, J; Qin, P

    2001-02-01

    Polyspermy is generally considered a pathological phenomenon in mammals. Incidence of polyspermy in porcine eggs in vivo is extremely high (30-40%) compared with other species, and polyspermy rate in the in vitro fertilized eggs in pigs can reach 65%. It is still unknown whether polyspermy to a certain degree is a physiological condition in pigs, and whether porcine eggs have any capability with which to remove the accessory sperm in the cytoplasm. The objectives in the present study are to observe the ultrastructural changes of accessory sperm during early embryonic development in pigs. A total of 58 normal, early embryos at one-, two, three-, and four-cell and morular stages were collected from gilts and were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The surface ultrastructure showed that sperm fusion with the zona pellucida was a continuous process during one-, two-, three-, and four-cell and morular stages, as observed by the SEM. Accessory sperm were present in the cytoplasm of cleaved embryos. The sperm heads in the cytoplasm of cleaved embryos did not decondense. TEM revealed the presence of a condensed sperm head within a lysosome (or phagolysosome) in a three-cell embryo. These observations suggest that polyspermy may be a physiological condition in pigs and that early embryos may develop to term if accessory sperm do not interrupt the embryo genome. Furthermore, lysosome activity could be another physiological mechanism for removing accessory sperm in the cytoplasm of fertilized eggs and cleaved embryos after fertilization in pigs.

  8. Analysis of Facial Implants for Bacterial Biofilm Formation Using Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thomas J; Toriumi, Dean M

    2016-07-01

    Alloplastic implants are widely used in facial plastic surgery, both in rhinoplasty and nonrhinoplasty procedures. Implant infection and extrusion are significant concerns of such implants after placement. Bacterial biofilms have been previously implicated in chronic wound infections, particularly in the presence of foreign bodies, such as alloplastic facial implants. Owing to their structural composition, biofilms are resistant to treatment with conventional antibiotics, and implant removal is frequently the only option. To evaluate explanted alloplastic facial implants for the presence or absence of bacterial biofilm using scanning electron microscopy. Facial implants explanted by a single surgeon were analyzed for biofilm formation between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013. Of 7 facial implants, 4 consisted of silicone, and 3 were porous polyethylene. Six of the 7 were nasal dorsal implants, and 1 silicone implant was removed from the midface. Nonexplanted fresh silicone and porous polyethylene implants were each used as a control. Scanning electron microscopy images were analyzed by an electron microscopist masked to the clinical history and implant type. The presence of biofilm formation was graded as none, mild, moderate, or severe. A total of 7 patients with previously placed alloplastic facial implants at an outside institution underwent revision rhinoplasty and removal of facial implants. All porous polyethylene implants showed biofilm formation to various degrees. Furthermore, all porous polyethylene implants had at least some areas of severe biofilm formation. One of the 3 porous polyethylene implants demonstrated severe biofilm formation on the entire implant, and the other 2 porous polyethylene implants showed areas of mild and severe biofilm formation. The only 2 implants without any evidence of biofilm were silicone implants. Of the other 2 silicone implants, 1 demonstrated no biofilm formation in 1 area and severe biofilm formation in another area

  9. Is scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) quantitative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2013-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a widely applied elemental microanalysis method capable of identifying and quantifying all elements in the periodic table except H, He, and Li. By following the "k-ratio" (unknown/standard) measurement protocol development for electron-excited wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS), SEM/EDS can achieve accuracy and precision equivalent to WDS and at substantially lower electron dose, even when severe X-ray peak overlaps occur, provided sufficient counts are recorded. Achieving this level of performance is now much more practical with the advent of the high-throughput silicon drift detector energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SDD-EDS). However, three measurement issues continue to diminish the impact of SEM/EDS: (1) In the qualitative analysis (i.e., element identification) that must precede quantitative analysis, at least some current and many legacy software systems are vulnerable to occasional misidentification of major constituent peaks, with the frequency of misidentifications rising significantly for minor and trace constituents. (2) The use of standardless analysis, which is subject to much broader systematic errors, leads to quantitative results that, while useful, do not have sufficient accuracy to solve critical problems, e.g. determining the formula of a compound. (3) EDS spectrometers have such a large volume of acceptance that apparently credible spectra can be obtained from specimens with complex topography that introduce uncontrolled geometric factors that modify X-ray generation and propagation, resulting in very large systematic errors, often a factor of ten or more. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  11. STEMsalabim: A high-performance computing cluster friendly code for scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of thin specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelerich, Jan Oliver; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Baranovskii, Sergei D; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-06-01

    We present a new multislice code for the computer simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images based on the frozen lattice approximation. Unlike existing software packages, the code is optimized to perform well on highly parallelized computing clusters, combining distributed and shared memory architectures. This enables efficient calculation of large lateral scanning areas of the specimen within the frozen lattice approximation and fine-grained sweeps of parameter space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of macroscopic and microscopic (stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy) features of bone lesions due to hatchet hacking trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Luísa; Quatrehomme, Gérald; Bertrand, Marie-France; Rallon, Christophe; Ceinos, Romain; du Jardin, Philippe; Adalian, Pascal; Alunni, Véronique

    2017-03-01

    This experimental study examined the lesions produced by a hatchet on human bones (tibiae). A total of 30 lesions were produced and examined macroscopically (naked eye) and by stereomicroscopy. 13 of them were also analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The general shape of the lesion, both edges, both walls, the kerf floor and the extremities were described. The length and maximum width of the lesions were also recorded. The microscopic analysis of the lesions led to the description of a sharp-blunt mechanism. Specific criteria were identified (lateral pushing back, fragmentation of the upraising, fossa dug laterally to the edge and vertical striae) enabling the forensic expert to conclude that a hacking instrument was used. These criteria are easily identifiable using scanning electron microscopy, but can also be observed with stereomicroscopy. Overall, lateral pushing back and vertical striae visible using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy signal the use of a hacking tool.

  13. Performance assessment of methods for estimation of fractal dimension from scanning electron microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risović, Dubravko; Pavlović, Zivko

    2013-01-01

    Processing of gray scale images in order to determine the corresponding fractal dimension is very important due to widespread use of imaging technologies and application of fractal analysis in many areas of science, technology, and medicine. To this end, many methods for estimation of fractal dimension from gray scale images have been developed and routinely used. Unfortunately different methods (dimension estimators) often yield significantly different results in a manner that makes interpretation difficult. Here, we report results of comparative assessment of performance of several most frequently used algorithms/methods for estimation of fractal dimension. To that purpose, we have used scanning electron microscope images of aluminum oxide surfaces with different fractal dimensions. The performance of algorithms/methods was evaluated using the statistical Z-score approach. The differences between performances of six various methods are discussed and further compared with results obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on the same samples. The analysis of results shows that the performance of investigated algorithms varies considerably and that systematically erroneous fractal dimensions could be estimated using certain methods. The differential cube counting, triangulation, and box counting algorithms showed satisfactory performance in the whole investigated range of fractal dimensions. Difference statistic is proved to be less reliable generating 4% of unsatisfactory results. The performances of the Power spectrum, Partitioning and EIS were unsatisfactory in 29%, 38%, and 75% of estimations, respectively. The results of this study should be useful and provide guidelines to researchers using/attempting fractal analysis of images obtained by scanning microscopy or atomic force microscopy. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Micro-four-point probes in a UHV scanning electron microscope for in-situ surface-conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraki, I.; Nagao, T.; Hasegawa, S.

    2000-01-01

    For in-situ measurements of surface conductivity in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), we have installed micro-four-point probes (probe spacings down to 4 mum) in a UHV scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with scanning reflection-high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). With the aid of piezoactuators...... for precise positioning of the probes, local conductivity of selected surface domains of well-defined superstructures could be measured during SEM and RHEED observations. It was found that the surface sensitivity of the conductivity measurements was enhanced by reducing the probe spacing, enabling...

  15. Electropolymerized nanoporous polymeric SPME coatings: preparation and characterization by small angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszewski, Boguslaw; Olszowy, Pawel; Pikus, Stanislaw; Kozak, Maciej

    Polymeric polypyrrole and polythiophene solid phase microextraction (SPME) coatings were prepared using electropolymerization with a linear sweep voltammetry technique. Physicochemical properties were measured using different methods, in particular small angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy. By using innovative approaches for pore size measurement, we were able to calculate a maximum of the pore size range from 80 to 90 nm. Additionally, film thicknesses measured from 90 to 150 μm. Using scanning electron microscopy, we describe the characteristics of polymer growth on the support surface.

  16. Validation of cell-free culture using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Elankumaran, Y; Hijjawi, N; Ryan, U

    2015-06-01

    A cell-free culture system for Cryptosporidium parvum was analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterise life cycle stages and compare gene expression in cell-free culture and cell culture using HCT-8 cells. Cryptosporidium parvum samples were harvested at 2 h, 8 h, 14 h, 26 h, 50 h, 74 h, 98 h, 122 h and 170 h, chemically fixed and specimens were observed using a Zeiss 1555 scanning electron microscope. The presence of sporozoites, trophozoites and type I merozoites were identified by SEM. Gene expression in cell culture and cell-free culture was studied using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the sporozoite surface antigen protein (cp15), the glycoprotein 900 (gp900), the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in both cell free and conventional cell culture. In cell culture, cp15 expression peaked at 74 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and 98 h and COWP expression peaked at 50 h. In cell-free culture, CP15 expression peaked at 98 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and COWP expression peaked at 122 h. The present study is the first to compare gene expression of C. parvum in cell culture and cell-free culture and to characterise life cycle stages of C. parvum in cell-free culture using SEM. Findings from this study showed that gene expression patterns in cell culture and cell-free culture were similar but in cell-free culture, gene expression was delayed for CP15 and COWP in cell free culture compared with the cell culture system and was lower. Although three life cycle stageswere conclusively identified, improvements in SEM methodology should lead to the detection of more life cycle stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The importance of scanning electron microscopy (sem in taxonomy and morphology of Chironomidae (Diptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kownacki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on the value of scanning electron microscopy (SEM in the taxonomy and morphology of Chironomidae. This method has been relatively rarely used in Chironomidae studies. Our studies suggest that the SEM method provides a lot of new information. For example, the plastron plate of the thoracic horn of Macropelopia nebulosa (Meigen under light microscopy is visible as points, while under SEM we have found that it consists of a reticular structure with holes. By using SEM a more precise picture of the body structure of Chironomidae can be revealed. It allows researchers to explain inconsistencies in the existing descriptions of species. Another advantage of the SEM method is obtaining spatial images of the body and organs of Chironomidae. However, the SEM method also has some limitations. The main problem is dirt or debris (e.g. algae, mud, secretions, mucus, bacteria, etc., which often settles on the external surface of structures, especially those which are uneven or covered with hair. The dirt should be removed after collection of chironomid material because if left in place it can become chemically fixed to various surfaces. It unnecessarily remains at the surface and final microscopic images may contain artifacts that obscure chironomid structures being investigated. In this way many details of the surface are thus unreadable. The results reported here indicate that SEM examination helps us to identify new morphological features and details that will facilitate the identification of species of Chironomidae and may help to clarify the function of various parts of the body. Fast development of electron microscope technique allows us to learn more about structure of different organisms.

  18. Interfacial reactions of glasses for biomedical application by scanning transmission electron microscopy and microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchet, V; Michel, J; Jallot, E; Wortham, L; Bouthors, S; Laurent-Maquin, D; Balossier, G

    2006-05-01

    Short-term physico-chemical reactions at the interface between bioactive glass particles and biological fluids are studied for three glasses with different bioactive properties; these glasses are in the SiO(2)-Na(2)O-CaO-P(2)O(5)-K(2)O-Al(2)O(3)-MgO system. Our aim is to show the difference between the mechanisms of their surface reactions. The relation between the composition and the bioactive properties of these glasses is also discussed. The elemental analysis is performed at the submicrometer scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy associated with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. After different immersion times (ranging from 0 to 96 h) of bioactive glass particles in a simulated biological solution, results show the formation of different surface layers at the glass periphery in the case of two bioactive glasses (A9 and BVA). For the third glass (BVH) we do not observe any surface layer formation or any modification of the glass composition. For the two other glasses (A9 and BVA), we observe the presence of different layers: an already observed (Si, O, Al) rich layer at the periphery, a previously demonstrated thin (Si, O) layer formed on top of the (Si, O, Al) layer and a (Ca, P) layer. We determine the different steps of the mechanisms of the surface reactions, which appear to be similar in these glasses, and compare the physico-chemical reactions and kinetics using the different immersion times. The A9 glass permits the observation of all important steps of the surface reactions which lead to bioactivity. This study shows the important relationship between composition and bioactivity which can determine the medical applicability of the glass.

  19. An optimized methodology to analyze biopolymer capsules by environmental scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conforto, Egle, E-mail: egle.conforto@univ-lr.fr [LaSIE UMR 7356 CNRS-ULR, Université de La Rochelle, UFR Sciences, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle (France); Joguet, Nicolas [Equipe Approches Moléculaires Environnement-Santé, LIENSs, UMR 7266 CNRS-ULR, Université de La Rochelle, UFR Sciences, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle (France); Buisson, Pierre [INNOV' IA, 4 rue Samuel Champlain, Z.I. Chef de Baie, 17000 La Rochelle (France); Vendeville, Jean-Eudes; Chaigneau, Carine [IDCAPS, filiale R and D INNOV' IA, 4 rue Samuel Champlain, Z.I. Chef de Baie, 17000 La Rochelle (France); Maugard, Thierry [Equipe Approches Moléculaires Environnement-Santé, LIENSs, UMR 7266 CNRS-ULR, Université de La Rochelle, UFR Sciences, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle (France)

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe an optimized methodology to study the surface characteristics and internal structure of biopolymer capsules using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in environmental mode. The main advantage of this methodology is that no preparation is required and, significantly, no metallic coverage is deposited on the surface of the specimen, thus preserving the original capsule shape and its surface morphology. This avoids introducing preparation artefacts which could modify the capsule surface and mask information concerning important feature like porosities or roughness. Using this method gelatin and mainly fatty coatings, difficult to be analyzed by standard SEM technique, unambiguously show fine details of their surface morphology without damage. Furthermore, chemical contrast is preserved in backscattered electron images of unprepared samples, allowing visualizing the internal organization of the capsule, the quality of the envelope, etc.… This study provides pointers on how to obtain optimal conditions for the analysis of biological or sensitive material, as this is not always studied using appropriate techniques. A reliable evaluation of the parameters used in capsule elaboration for research and industrial applications, as well as that of capsule functionality is provided by this methodology, which is essential for the technological progress in this domain. - Highlights: • We optimized a methodology using ESEM to analyze biopolymer capsules. • This methodology allows analyzing original surface samples without any preparation. • No preparation artefact are introduced which would mask important surface details. • Morphological details and chemical contrast from the original surface are preserved. • Capsule shape, volume, surface roughness and coating quality were reliably evaluated.

  20. Scanning electron microscope technique for measuring electrical conductivity: application to tetrathiafulvalene--tetracyanoquinodimethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, James Peter [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A new technique for measuring the electrical conductivity of small samples and its application to the organic conductor tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) is reported. A movable current source provided by the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope is used to map out the potential distribution on crystal faces containing the a-b crystallographic axes. Silver paint contacts are used to return the beam current to ground and measure voltage changes as the beam position is moved. The results of the new technique are confirmed and complemented by the conventional movable contact method and the extension of both methods to low temperature is discussed. The potential distributions for our samples reveal frequently occurring irregularities in current flow which are attributable to sample imperfections and inhomogeneities in the silver paint contacts. Methods are presented whereby the commonly reported conductivities sigmaa and sigmab can be determined despite the presence of certain current flow irrgularities; room temperature values are found to be: sigmab = 490 ± 80 (Ωcm)-1 and sigmaa = 1.21 ± 0.15 (Ωcm)-1. The relationship of sigmaa/ and sigmab to the elements of the correctly expressed conductivity tensor for TTF-TCNQ is clarified. The influence of contact inhomogeneities on four-probe measurements of the temperature dependence of the b-axis conductivity as determined with an electrolytic tank model are also presented. It is found that there is a large probability of slightly underestimating conductivity, but that it is possible in a small number of cases to greatly overestimate conductivity.

  1. Cytoarchitecture of the normal rat olfactory epithelium: light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Sugata; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2004-06-01

    The three-dimensional cytoarchitecture of the normal rat olfactory epithelium was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of KOH digested tissues as well as by light and transmission electron microscopy of plastic sections. Observations specimens from the lateral side of the olfactory epithelium allowed identification of four cell types by their surface structure: olfactory neurons, supporting cells, basal cells, and duct cells of the Bowman's gland. The olfactory neurons were characterized by the presence of a thick apical process (i.e., dendrite) and a thin basal process (i.e., axon). These olfactory neurons tended to be aligned along the vertical axis of the epithelium. Immature olfactory neurons were present at the basal part of the epithelium and had a pear-shaped cell body with a thin and long axon and a short dendrite which failed to reach the epithelial surface. Supporting cells were roughly columnar in shape and occupied the full length of the epithelium. They became thinner in the basal two thirds of their length but had branched foot processes spreading on the basal surface of the epithelium. Basal cells located in the basal epithelial region were oval, round or cuboidal and present among the foot processes of the supporting cells. The ducts of the Bowman's gland entered the epithelium from the lamina propria and took straight, perpendicular courses within the epithelium. These intraepithelial ducts were composed of several slender cells. The acinar cells are sometimes present in the epithelium and appeared as a globular bulge of the duct at the basal part of the epithelium. SEM observation of the basal surface of the olfactory epithelium also clearly showed that axon bundles were surrounded by the sheet-like processes of Schwann cells, the investment being found at the base of the epithelium just before axon bundles leave the epithelium.

  2. Thromboembolic ischemic stroke and the presence of necrotic platelets: a scanning electron microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Engelbrecht, Mia-Jeanne; Duim, Wiebren

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most debilitating diseases worldwide, with its occurrence increasing in Western societies. Central to the pathogenesis of thromboembolic stroke is the involvement of platelets. During thromboembolic events, nucleated cells undergo cell death, and platelets are also affected by parameters causing these incidents. Particularly, initiation of necrotic cell death at sites of vascular injury may play an important role in inducing inflammatory and repair processes. In the current research, the authors investigate whether a changed platelet ultrastructure is visible in thromboembolic stroke and whether it might be visible in platelets as apoptosis or necrosis. Therefore, in the current investigation, the authors study smears of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) from thromboembolic ischemic stroke patients to investigate whether a changed morphology is visible in distressed platelets. Scanning electron microscopy is used and platelets are viewed at up to 200,000× machine magnification. Results indicate that thromboembolic ischemic stroke causes membrane tears and swollen platelets, and this is indicative of necrosis. It is therefore concluded that this morphology might be due to the pro-coagulant activity characteristic of the disease.

  3. Reissner's fibre in the rat: a scanning and transmission electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollam, D H; Collins, P

    1980-01-01

    The structure and connexions of Reissner's fibre have been studied in the rat by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The fibre was found to arise from a series of filaments, each of which was formed by a structure forming the juxta-aqueductal surface or lining of the subcommissural organ. This structure was termed 'apical spherical protrusion' and was found to be rich in rough endoplasmic reticulum. The fibre was firmly attached at its rostral end to the subcommissural organ, at its middle to the ventral surface of the termination of the aqueduct and finally to the calamus scriptorius of the fourth ventricle. It was held in a state of considerable tension between these three points and attached to it were numerous cilia from the ependymal lining. In sections examined by TEM the fibre appeared to be totally amorphous in structure, with erythrocytes and other debris attached to it. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7440397

  4. Mass mapping of a protein complex with the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A; Baumeister, W; Saxton, W O

    1982-01-01

    A mass map of the hexagonally packed intermediate layer (HPI-layer), a regular protein monolayer from the cell envelope of Micrococcus radiodurans, has been obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Samples were freeze-dried within the microscope, and low-dose images were recorded in the dark-field mode directly in digital form and processed by correlation averaging. The averaged projection of the unstained structure--i.e., the mass map--thus calculated shows a resolution to 3-nm period and reveals morphological features consistent with those obtained by negative staining. The mass of individual morphological domains was extracted by using variously the mass map itself or an average from a negatively stained HPI layer to define the domain boundaries. Protrusions as small as 1,300 daltons could be measured reproducibly within the unit cell of 655,000 daltons. The method developed opens an avenue to identify molecular species in situ and to correlate topographic information with biochemical data. Images PMID:6955791

  5. Profile and Morphology of Fungal Aerosols Characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanou, Komlavi Anani; Straumfors, Anne; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Skaar, Ida; Hjeljord, Linda; Skare, Øivind; Green, Brett James; Tronsmo, Arne; Eduard, Wijnand

    Fungal aerosols consist of spores and fragments with diverse array of morphologies; however, the size, shape, and origin of the constituents require further characterization. In this study, we characterize the profile of aerosols generated from Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, and Penicillium chrysogenum grown for 8 weeks on gypsum boards. Fungal particles were aerosolized at 12 and 20 L min-1 using the Fungal Spore Source Strength Tester (FSSST) and the Stami particle generator (SPG). Collected particles were analyzed with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). We observed spore particle fraction consisting of single spores and spore aggregates in four size categories, and a fragment fraction that contained submicronic fragments and three size categories of larger fragments. Single spores dominated the aerosols from A. fumigatus (median: 53%), while the submicronic fragment fraction was the highest in the aerosols collected from A. versicolor (median: 34%) and P. chrysogenum (median: 31%). Morphological characteristics showed near spherical particles that were only single spores, oblong particles that comprise some spore aggregates and fragments (3.5 μm). Further, the near spherical particles dominated the aerosols from A. fumigatus (median: 53%), while oblong particles were dominant in the aerosols from A. versicolor (68%) and P. chrysogenum (55%). Fiber-like particles represented 21% and 24% of the aerosols from A. versicolor and P. chrysogenum, respectively. This study shows that fungal particles of various size, shape, and origin are aerosolized, and supports the need to include a broader range of particle types in fungal exposure assessment.

  6. Ion milling coupled field emission scanning electron microscopy reveals current misunderstanding of morphology of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Donny; Mouftah, Samiha; Steffen, Robert; Beduneau, Arnaud; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are currently used as drug delivery systems for numerous therapeutic macromolecules, e.g. proteins or DNA. Based on the preparation by double emulsion solvent evaporation a sponge-like structure was postulated entrapping hydrophilic drugs inside an internal aqueous phase. However, a direct proof of this hypothesized structure is still missing today. NPs were prepared from different polymers using a double-emulsion method and characterized for their physicochemical properties. Combining ion milling with field emission scanning electron microscopy allowed to cross section single NP and to visualize their internal morphology. The imaging procedure permitted cross-sectioning of NPs and visualization of the internal structure as well as localizing drugs associated with NPs. It was observed that none of the model actives was encapsulated inside the polymeric matrix when particle diameters were below around 470 nm but predominantly adsorbed to the particle surface. Even at larger diameters only a minority of particles of a diameter below 1 μm contained an internal phase. The properties of such drug loaded NPs, i.e. drug release or the observations in cellular uptake or even drug targeting needs to be interpreted carefully since in most cases NP surface properties are potentially dominated by the 'encapsulated' drug characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Microbe repelling coated stainless steel analysed by field emission scanning electron microscopy and physicochemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulio, Mari; Järn, Mikael; Ahola, Juhana; Peltonen, Jouko; Rosenholm, Jarl B; Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka; Ruokolainen, Timo; Narko, Pekka; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2008-07-01

    Coating of stainless steel with diamond-like carbon or certain fluoropolymers reduced or almost eliminated adhesion and biofilm growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Deinococcus geothermalis, Meiothermus silvanus and Pseudoxanthomonas taiwanensis. These species are known to be pertinent biofilm formers on medical implants or in the wet-end of paper machines. Field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis showed that Staph. epidermidis, D. geothermalis and M. silvanus grew on stainless steel using thread-like organelles for adhesion and biofilm formation. The adhesion threads were fewer in number on fluoropolymer-coated steel than on plain steel and absent when the same strains were grown in liquid culture. Psx. taiwanensis adhered to the same surfaces by a mechanism involving cell ghosts on which the biofilm of live cells grew. Hydrophilic (diamond-like carbon) or hydrophobic (fluoropolymer) coatings reduced the adherence of the four test bacteria on different steels. Selected topographic parameters, including root-mean-square roughness (S (q)), skewness (S (sk)) and surface kurtosis (S (ku)), were analysed by atomic force microscopy. The surfaces that best repelled microbial adhesion of the tested bacteria had higher skewness values than those only slightly repelling. Water contact angle, measured (theta (m)) or roughness corrected (theta (y)), affected the tendency for biofilm growth in a different manner for the four test bacteria.

  8. Indirect Immunodetection of Fungal Fragments by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanou, Komlavi Anani; Straumfors, Anne; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Nayak, Ajay P; Skaar, Ida; Hjeljord, Linda; Tronsmo, Arne; Eduard, Wijnand; Green, Brett James

    2015-09-01

    Submicronic fungal fragments have been observed in in vitro aerosolization experiments. The occurrence of these particles has therefore been suggested to contribute to respiratory health problems observed in mold-contaminated indoor environments. However, the role of submicronic fragments in exacerbating adverse health effects has remained unclear due to limitations associated with detection methods. In the present study, we report the development of an indirect immunodetection assay that utilizes chicken polyclonal antibodies developed against spores from Aspergillus versicolor and high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Immunolabeling was performed with A. versicolor fragments immobilized and fixed onto poly-l-lysine-coated polycarbonate filters. Ninety percent of submicronic fragments and 1- to 2-μm fragments, compared to 100% of >2-μm fragments generated from pure freeze-dried mycelial fragments of A. versicolor, were positively labeled. In proof-of-concept experiments, air samples collected from moldy indoor environments were evaluated using the immunolabeling technique. Our results indicated that 13% of the total collected particles were derived from fungi. This fraction comprises 79% of the fragments that were detected by immunolabeling and 21% of the spore particles that were morphologically identified. The methods reported in this study enable the enumeration of fungal particles, including submicronic fragments, in a complex heterogeneous environmental sample. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Evaluation of an automated system for root canal irrigation: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Orsini, Giovanna; Giuliodori, Francesca; DI Cristoforo, Adriano; Procaccini, Maurizio; Mengucci, Paolo; Putignano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated a new automated system using alternative irrigants for root canal cleaning treatments. This method relies on a system inserting an enzymatic solution based on Trypsin flowing inside the pulp chambers and root canals, completely avoiding traditional endodontic instrumentation. Sixty freshly extracted human molar teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups to assess 3 regimens (R1-3) differing in 0.25% Trypsin/EDTA and 5% Sodium Hypochlorite (NaOCl) solutions administration. Scanning electron microscopy observations and scores taking into account changes in dentin tubules were used to assess treatment effects in pulp chambers and roots. Significant changes in root cleaning ability relative to administration timing were observed, with the best results found in R3, with scheduled alternated cycles of Trypsin/EDTA and NaOCl inside the tooth. The non-invasive root canal method demonstrates good teeth cleaning ability independent of root morphology. This equipment may provide lower discomfort levels for patients undergoing endodontic treatment.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of the attachment of Treponema pallidum to nerve cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repesh, L A; Fitzgerald, T J; Oakes, S G; Pozos, R S

    1982-01-01

    Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) was incubated with cultured nerve cells derived from rat embryos. Primary cultures were established from dorsal root ganglia, superior cervical ganglia, and spinal cord. Using phase contrast microscopy treponemes were seen to interact with the nerve cells in a similar manner to other cultured mammalian cells. Organisms began to attach within minutes after inoculation, actively motile organisms attached at the tip of one end, higher numbers of organisms attached with continued incubation, and attached organisms survived longer than unattached organisms. T pallidum attached both to nerve cell bodies and to neuronal processes of each of the three nerve cell cultures. As shown by scanning electron microscopy the mechanism of attachment was identical to that of cultured cells derived from rabbits testis, rat skeletal muscle, and human cervical carcinoma. There was no indentation or swelling of the cultured cell surface at the point of attachment, just a close physical proximity of organisms and cells. These techniques provide a biological means of studying the in-vitro detrimental influences of micro-organisms on nerve tissue. Images PMID:7049315

  11. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF THE RAT ADRENAL GLAND AFTER SURGICAL LASER EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Kemoklidze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We studied via low vacuum scanning electron microscopy the effects of a surgical laser exposure to adrenal glands and results of regeneration processes after. Materials and methods.Purpose of this work is modeling of effects of the removal with a surgical laser a pathological focus in the adrenal glands. For this Wistar male rat (n = 19 adrenal glands were researched without the laser exposure, immediately after it and 1 month later. Results. Immediately after exposure occurs laser ablation crater with rough edges and melted surface penetrated by equidistant pores, which are footprints of blood vessels. Beneath of the surface are numerous vaporizationbubbles. Around the crater, the surface wrinkles and sags due to decreased ability to retain water. 1 month after the laser damage, the affected area tightened by a scar. Its coarse bundles of collagen fibers braid shapeless lumps of coal and caverns. Tissues with normal appearance are close to the scar, both outside and inside of the organ. The wrinkling and the sagging are absent. The undamaged organ part has retained the previous shape, without hypertrophies. The damaged part has shrunk. The nature of the regeneration processes indicates a low probability of a relapse after the destruction of a pathological focus via the surgical laser exposure.

  12. Antioxidant mix: A novel pulpotomy medicament: A scanning electron microscopy evaluation

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    M Ajay Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to evaluate the clinical, radiographic, and histological success rate of antioxidant mix as a new pulpotomy agent for primary teeth. Settings and Design: Commercially available antioxidants, namely Antioxidants plus trace elements (OXIn-Xt tm , India were used. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out on 36 primary molar teeth in 32 children, with age that ranged from 6 to 9 years. Regular conventional pulpotomy procedure followed by placement of antioxidant mix over the radicular orifice was done. Recall was scheduled for 3, 6, and 9 months, respectively, after treatment. Results: Thirty-six pulpotomized primary molars were available for follow-up evaluations. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of samples showing convex shaped hard tissue barrier formation may be proof of the role of antioxidant material in localization and direction and morphology of the hard tissue barrier. One tooth which presented with pain was assessed as unsuccessful. Conclusion: Quite promising clinical, radiographic, and histological results of antioxidants in the present study shows their potential to be an ideal pulpotomy agent.

  13. Scanning Electron Microscopic Features of the External and Internal Surfaces of Normal Adult Lacrimal Drainage System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad Javed; Baig, Farhana; Lakshman, Mekala; Naik, Milind N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the ultrastructural features of the external and internal surfaces of healthy lacrimal drainage systems. A prospective interventional study was performed on the healthy adult lacrimal drainage systems obtained from fresh exenterated specimens. Exenteration was performed for malignancies unrelated to lacrimal system where preoperative lacrimal evaluation was normal. A careful and thorough dissection was carried out to isolate the entire lacrimal drainage system from the punctum to the nasolacrimal duct. The analysis was performed using the standard protocols of scanning electron microscopy. Inner punctal surfaces showed a definite and slightly elevated junction between the luminal surfaces of punctum and beginning of the vertical canaliculus. Similar junction could be identified between the lacrimal sac and nasolacrimal duct. The valves of the canaliculi showed broad rugae-like mucosal surfaces, whereas the external surfaces of the canaliculi demonstrated well-defined orbicularis muscle with collagenous attachments. The walls of the lacrimal sac and nasolacrimal duct showed dense vascular plexus which included wide luminal arteries, throttle veins, and large capacitance vessels. Ultrastructural features of external and internal surfaces of lacrimal drainage system help in better understanding of its anatomy and physiology. The junctional area between the punctum-vertical canaliculus and lacrimal sac-nasolacrimal duct needs further exploration to understand their roles.

  14. Bacterial adhesion to antibiotic-loaded guided tissue regeneration membranes - a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Fang; Wu, Kai-Ming; Chen, Yen-Ting; Hung, Shan-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of sites undergoing guided tissue regeneration (GTR) therapy may reduce the efficiency of periodontal regeneration. This study compared bacterial adhesion onto various GTR membranes incorporated with antibiotics. Three barrier membranes, including expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane, collagen membrane, and glycolide fiber membrane, were loaded with tetracycline or amoxicillin. The adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans onto the GTR membranes with or without antibiotics was analyzed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The SEM analysis showed no apparent alteration in the physical structure of the membranes loaded with antibiotics. Both S. mutans and A. actinomycetemcomitans attached best on the collagen membranes, followed by the ePTFE membranes, and then the glycolide fiber membranes without antibiotics. Moreover, higher numbers of bacteria were observed on the fibril areas than on the laminar areas of the ePTFE membranes. The amounts of attached bacteria on the GTR membranes increased after longer incubation. Incorporation of tetracycline or amoxicillin greatly reduced the adhesion of S. mutans and A. actinomycetemcomitans onto all of the GTR membranes examined. Incorporation of tetracycline or amoxicillin greatly reduced adhesion of S. mutans or A. actinomycetemcomitans on the ePTFE, glycolide fiber, or collagen membranes. This finding indicates that it is valuable and effective to use the antibiotic-loaded GTR membranes for periodontal regeneration therapy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Vertical marginal discrepancies of metal castings obtained using different pattern materials: A scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Dental Casting involves various stages of processing, out of which any may affect the dimensional accuracy. The fit of a casting depends not only on the method of fabrication employed but also on the type of materials utilized. One important variable in the casting process is the type of pattern material employed. This study was carried out to determine and compare the effect of different pattern materials on the vertical marginal accuracy of complete cast crowns. Materials and Methods: A standardized metal master die simulating a prepared crown was used to prepare 60 models on which patterns were fabricated using Inlay Pattern Wax; Auto-polymerized Pattern Resin and Light Cured Modeling Resin and cast immediately. Castings of the patterns were subjected to analysis of marginal fit using a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results: One-way ANOVA result showed a significant difference in the gap observed between the castings fabricated using the three types of pattern materials (P 0.05. Conclusion: With strict adherence to the principles of pattern fabrication and immediate casting, Inlay wax can still be the pattern material of choice to produce a casting with minimal marginal discrepancy with added advantages of being user friendly and cost effective.

  16. Ultra-morphology of root surface subsequent to periodontal instrumentation: A scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare root surface characteristic following root planing with various hand and power driven instruments. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 single rooted teeth were used in this study, of which two specimens were used as control (no instrumentation done and remaining 18 specimens were equally divided into three groups. Specimens from each group were then subjected to root planing by one of the following instruments: (1 a Gracey curette (2 Ultrasonic tip and (3 a Rotary bur. In each case, the time required for scaling and root planing was measured. After treatment, the specimens were observed under scanning electron microscope and surface roughness was measured by using Roughness and loss of tooth substance index (RLTSI. Results: The mean RLTSI scores for Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument group were 2.5, 2.0 and 0.667 respectively. The mean scores of time spent for scaling and root planing by Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument group in seconds were 42.50, 35.83 and 54.50. Conclusion: All the three instruments namely Gracey curette, Ultrasonic tip and Rotary bur were effective in mechanical debridement of root surface. The results favoured the use of rotary instruments for root planing to achieve smooth clean root surface; however, the use of rotary instrument was more time consuming which might limit its use in clinical practice.

  17. Somatic Embryos in Catharanthus roseus: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

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    Junaid ASLAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don is an important medicinal plant as it contains several anti-cancerous compounds, like vinblastine and vincristine. Plant tissue culture technology (organogenesis and embryogenesis has currently been used in fast mass propagating raw materials for secondary metabolite synthesis. In this present communication, scanning electron microscopic (SEM study of somatic embryos was conducted and discussed. The embryogenic callus was first induced from hypocotyls of in vitro germinated seeds on which somatic embryos, differentiated in numbers, particularly on 2,4-D (1.0 mg/L Murashige and Skoog (MS was medium. To understand more about the regeneration method and in vitro formed embryos SEM was performed. The SEM study revealed normal somatic embryo origin and development from globular to heart-, torpedo- and then into cotyledonary-stage of embryos. At early stage, the embryos were clustered together in a callus mass and could not easily be detached from the parental tissue. The embryos were often long cylindrical structure with or without typical notch at the tip. Secondary embryos were also formed on primary embryo structure. The advanced cotyledonary embryos showed prominent roots and shoot axis, which germinated into plantlets. The morphology, structure and other details of somatic embryos at various stages were presented.

  18. [Scanning electron microscopic investigations on the anatomy of the fetlock joint in horses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, S; Stiglhuber, A; König, H E

    1997-07-01

    Striking synovial structures were taken and their surface was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Depending where the probes were taken from, the stratum synovial was arranged in a different way. The synovial intima seems to miss under the tendon of the long/commune extensor muscle, the collateral ligaments and the sesamoidean collateral ligaments. That is why the subsynovial tissue forms the superficial layer. The surface of the probes taken sidewards to the tendon of the extensor muscle and of the synovial fold, which is situated between the metacarpus/metatarsus and the proximal phalanx as well as from the palmar/plantar recess is dominated by synovial intima. Synovial cells are mainly arranged as monolayer. Synovial cells are variable in their appearance. Some resemble blackberrys, others show a quite undulating surface. The length of processes of synovial cells differs from 2-10 microns, the diameter of the synovial cells from 5-10 microns. The space between two cells amounts to 2-10 microns. The intercellular gap is put in relation to the length of the cells' processes. The synovial intima is supposed to form a barrier between the articular cavity and the surrounding structures.

  19. Microscopical characterization of known postmortem root bands using light and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietpas, Jack; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Richard, Adam H; Shaw, Stephen; Castillo, Hilda S; Donfack, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    A postmortem root band (PMRB) is a distinct microscopic feature that is postulated to occur in hair remaining in the follicle during the postmortem interval [1] (Petraco et al., 1998). The scientific validity of this premise has been highlighted in two recent high-profile criminal cases involving PMRBs [2,3] (State of Florida v. Casey Marie Anthony, 2008; People v. Kogut, 2005). To better understand the fundamental aspects of postmortem root banding, the microscopical properties of known PMRBs(1) were characterized by light microscopy, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of microtomed sections of hairs showing root banding. The results from this study show that the appearance of the PMRB may be due to the degradation of the chemically labile, non-keratin intermacrofibrillar matrix (IMM) in the pre-keratin/keratogenous region of anagen hairs. In addition, this degradation is confined to the cortex of the hair, with no apparent damage to the layers of the cuticle. These results could provide valuable information for determining the mechanism of band formation, as well as identify a set of microscopic features that could be used to distinguish hairs with known PMRBs from similarly looking environmentally degraded hairs. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Assessing the efficacy of citrus aurantifolia extract on smear layer removal with scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhari, Behnam; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Monsef Esfehani, Hamid Reza; Tavakolian, Pardis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of citrus aurantifolia (CA) extract on smear layer removal in different parts of root canals. Thirty-nine single-rooted human teeth were randomly divided into three experimental (n=12) and one control (n=3) groups. Teeth were instrumented using MTwo rotary instruments. Root canals were irrigated with NaOCl during instrumentation. The canals in each group were irrigated with one of the following: completed mixture of citrus aurantifolia extracts, 17% EDTA, and alcoholic extract of CA. Distilled water was used for the control group. The irrigants were left within the canal for 20 minutes, and then rinsed with normal saline solution. Teeth were subsequently split longitudinally into 2 halves, and the canals were examined by a scanning electron-microscope. Cleanliness was evaluated using a five point scoring system. Statistical significant difference was found between groups (Pcitrus aurantifolia extracts were not able to effectively remove smear layer compared with 17% EDTA during root canal therapy.

  1. PRECIPITATES ANALYSIS BY SCANNING ELECTRON AND TRANSMISSION MICROSCOPY IN A BORON STEEL

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    Cássio Aurélio Suski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the carbides precipitation of low carbon steel with boron austenitized at 870°C, 1,050°C and 1,200°C, oil-hardened by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission (TEM. We evaluated the nucleation sites and size of the precipitates, in addition to the microstructure obtained. The precipitates by TEM analysis was performed using the replica and carbon thin films. It was observed the presence of cementite, Fe3 C, and borocarbides, M23(C,B6 at all test conditions. The cementite showed approximately equal sizes in all austenitizing temperatures, which was attributed to solubilization and reprecipitation during cooling tempering. It was observed the presence of borocarbides in all austenitizing temperatures, and at a temperature of 870°C the precipitation was coarser. This size distribution was not attributed to solubilization and coarsening of borocarbides to 870°C and the solubilization and reprecipitation during cooling tempering the other two temperatures. There was also a lesser precipitation in the grain boundary borocarbides to 1,050°C compared to 1,200°C.

  2. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  3. Correlation between auditory brainstem recordings and morphology as seen through the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultcrantz, M.

    1988-09-01

    Pregnant CBA/CBA mice were exposed to 0.5, 1 and 2 Grey (Gy), (1 Gy = 100 rad) in single doses with whole body gamma-irradiation on the 12th, 13th and 16th gestational days, respectively. The animals were tested at an age of one month for vestibular and cochlear function. Thereafter the inner ears were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. A morphological analysis with cytocochleograms was performed. Morphological changes in the vestibular part showed gross malformations in the cristae ampullares. Hair cells of type I seemed to be more severely changed than hair cells type II. The macula utriculi also showed malformations of the otoconia. All these changes were more pronounced when the irradiation was given early during pregnancy and with the highest doses used, except the otoconia which were more injured when irradiated day 16 of gestation. No disturbances of the equilibrium reflexes were noted. In the cochlea a dose-dependent, time-related damage pattern was demonstrated with pathological changes of outer (OHC) and inner (IHC) hair cells. When tested electrophysiologically for auditory function with auditory brainstem recordings (ABR), elevated thresholds were revealed different in shape depending on when during pregnancy irradiation took place. A good correlation existed between the morphological changes as seen in the cytocochleograms and the functional changes documented with the ABR.

  4. A scanning electron microscopic and microradiographic study of pits in fluorosed human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thylstrup, A; Fejerskov, O

    1979-04-01

    The aim of the present study has been to correlate the surface appearance of pitted, fluorosed enamel in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with the microradiographic features of the underlying tissue. Intact enamel surfaces of severely fluorosed teeth appeared similar to that of normal enamel. In the unabraded surfaces discrete pits were sharply demarcated from the surrounding intact enamel surface leaving steep walls of parallel running rods. The microradiographic appearance of sections made through pits indicated that focal loss of surface enamel occurred corresponding to the inner highly hypomineralized part of the fluorotic subsurface lesion. The abrupt wall formation and the finding that the striae of Retzius never changed direction along the margins of the lesions indicated that pits in fluorosed enamel may be secondarily produced defects rather than true hypoplasias. Further evidence of the posteruptive origin of the defects was derived from the observation that enamel lamellae occasionally formed part of the lateral border. The relatively higher degree of radiopacity observed in the tissue surrounding the pit indicates a posteruptively acquired deposition of minerals in the exposed porous enamel.

  5. Effect of Autoclave Cycles on Surface Characteristics of S-File Evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavian, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Mojtahedi, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Presence of surface defects in endodontic instruments can lead to unwanted complications such as instrument fracture and incomplete preparation of the canal. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of autoclave cycles on surface characteristics of S-File by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this experimental study, 17 brand new S-Files (#30) were used. The surface characteristics of the files were examined in four steps (without autoclave, 1 autoclave cycle, 5 autoclave cycles and 10 autoclave cycles) by SEM under 200× and 1000× magnifications. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software and the paired sample t-test, independent sample t-test and multifactorial repeated measures ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 0.05. New files had debris and pitting on their surfaces. When the autoclave cycles were increased, the mean of surface roughness also increased at both magnifications (Pautoclave increased the surface roughness of the files and this had was directly related to the number of autoclave cycles.

  6. Morphology of the antenna of Dermatobia hominis (Diptera: Cuterebridae) based on scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Fernandes Fernando Freitas; Linardi, Pedro Marcos; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio

    2002-01-01

    Sensilla of the antennae of male and female Dermatobia hominis were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The images obtained were interpreted according to the scientific literature referring to the sensory structures of insects. Sensilla of the "long bristle" type and smaller spines of the "microtrichia" type were found in different numbers and patterns of distribution on the scape and pedicel. Coeloconic sensilla with longitudinal cuticular furrows were observed on the female flagellum, as well as two varieties of basiconic sensilla: a large one surrounded by pointed foliaceous structures and a smaller form implanted on a raised cuticular process. The larger type of basiconic sensilla was also observed on the flagellum of the male antenna, as well as a variety of coeloconic sensilla with apical dilatations. Trichoid and chaetic sensilla were encountered in greater numbers on the arista of females, with the former type predominating. Coeloconic sensilla were observed on the arista of both sexes, as well as sensilla of the "long bristle" and styloconic types exclusively in males. Adult D. hominis were observed to possess sensory structures with chemoreceptory, thermo-hygroreceptory and mechanoreceptory functions on their antennae. These results could facilitate the identification of the chemoreceptors by electrophysiological techniques. The sexual dimorphism noted for the antennae constitutes a new criterion for distinguishing between the sexes of D. hominis

  7. Morphology of the second- and third-instar larvae of Dermatobia hominis by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Filippis, T; Leite, A C

    1998-04-01

    Larvae of Dermatobia hominis 10-27 days old were collected from experimentally infected rats and their morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The moult from the second to third instar occurs at 18 days, with emergence from the host at 30 days post-infection. The second-instar larvae bear on the pseudocephalon, antennae (coeloconic sensilla), and coeloconic and basicoconic sensilla on the maxillary sensory complex. The thoracic segments bear small backwardly-directed spines anteriorly and ventral trichoid and campaniform sensilla. The first four abdominal segments have small and large backwardly-directed spines that are absent on segments five and six. The seventh and eighth abdominal segments have medium-sized forwardly-directed spines. Abdominal segments are encircled by campaniform sensilla. The terminal end of the eighth abdominal segment bears the anus, prominent anal lobes and two spiracular openings on each spiracular plate. Spiracular plates show a radial sun ray pattern. The rear abdomen also bears an ecdysal aperture, several pores and eight coeloconic sensilla. Although there are slight morphological differences, the spines (predominantly flat and thorn-like) and sensilla (campaniform and coeloconic) of the third-instar larvae show a similar arrangement to that of second-instar larvae. Thoracic trichoid sensilla are not seen in third-instar larvae. A perispiracular gland aperture is situated above each posterior spiracular opening. These morphological features are compared with those of other cuterebrid larvae.

  8. Direct observation of graphene growth and associated copper substrate dynamics by in situ scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Weinberg, Gisela; Zhang, Qiang; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Klein-Hoffmann, Achim; Kurnatowska, Michalina; Plodinec, Milivoj; Li, Qing; Chi, Lifeng; Schloegl, R; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2015-02-24

    This work highlights the importance of in situ experiments for an improved understanding of graphene growth on copper via metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene growth inside the chamber of a modified environmental scanning electron microscope under relevant low-pressure CVD conditions allows visualizing structural dynamics of the active catalyst simultaneously with graphene nucleation and growth in an unparalleled way. It enables the observation of a complete CVD process from substrate annealing through graphene nucleation and growth and, finally, substrate cooling in real time and nanometer-scale resolution without the need of sample transfer. A strong dependence of surface dynamics such as sublimation and surface premelting on grain orientation is demonstrated, and the influence of substrate dynamics on graphene nucleation and growth is presented. Insights on the growth mechanism are provided by a simultaneous observation of the growth front propagation and nucleation rate. Furthermore, the role of trace amounts of oxygen during growth is discussed and related to graphene-induced surface reconstructions during cooling. Above all, this work demonstrates the potential of the method for in situ studies of surface dynamics on active metal catalysts.

  9. Regenerating titanium ventricular assist device surfaces after gold/palladium coating for scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achneck, Hardean E; Serpe, Michael J; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M; Eibest, Leslie M; Craig, Stephen L; Lawson, Jeffrey H

    2010-01-01

    Titanium is one of the most commonly used materials for implantable devices in humans. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) serves as an important tool for imaging titanium surfaces and analyzing cells and other organic matter adhering to titanium implants. However, high-vacuum SEM imaging of a nonconductive sample requires a conductive coating on the surface. A gold/palladium coating is commonly used and to date no method has been described to "clean" such gold/palladium covered surfaces for repeated experiments without etching the titanium itself. This constitutes a major problem with titanium-based implantable devices which are very expensive and thus in short supply. Our objective was to devise a protocol to regenerate titaniumsurfaces after SEM analysis. In a series of experiments, titanium samples from implantable cardiac assist devices were coated with fibronectin, seeded with cells and then coated with gold/palladium for SEM analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra were obtained before and after five different cleaning protocols. Treatment with aqua regia (a 1:3 solution of concentrated nitric and hydrochloric acid), with or without ozonolysis, followed by sonication in soap solution and sonication in deionized water, allowed regenerating titanium surfaces to their original state. Atomic force microscopy confirmed that the established protocol did not alter the titanium microstructure. The protocol described herein is applicable to almost all titanium surfaces used in biomedical sciences and because of its short exposure time to aqua regia, will likely work for many titanium alloys as well. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Smoking and fluidity of erythrocyte membranes: a high resolution scanning electron and atomic force microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Etheresia; du Plooy, Jeanette N; Soma, Prashilla; Keyser, Ina; Buys, Antoinette V

    2013-11-30

    Smoking affects the general health of an individual, however, the red blood cells (RBCs) and their architecture are particularly vulnerable to inhaled toxins related to smoking. Smoking is one of the lifestyle diseases that are responsible for the most deaths worldwide and an individual who smokes is exposed to excessive amounts of oxidants and toxins which generate up to 10(18) free radicals in the human body. Recently, it was reported that smoking decreases RBC membrane fluidity. Here we confirm this and we show changes visible in the topography of RBC membranes, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). RBC membranes show bubble formation of the phospholipid layer, as well as balloon-like smooth areas; while their general discoid shapes are changed to form pointed extensions. We also investigate membrane roughness using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and these results confirm SEM results. Due to the vast capability of RBCs to be adaptable, their state of well-being is a major indication for the general health status of an individual. We conclude that these changes, using an old technique in a novel application, may provide new insights and new avenues for future improvements in clinical medicine pertaining to conditions like COPD. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Morphology of the Lingual and Buccal Papillae in Alpaca (Vicugna pacos) - Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goździewska-Harłajczuk, K; Klećkowska-Nawrot, J; Janeczek, M; Zawadzki, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was the description of the lingual and buccal papillae in adult alpaca (Vicugna pacos) by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tongue consisted of apex, body and root. Four types of lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, conical and circumvallate) in addition to two types of buccal papillae were observed. The filiform papillae, some with secondary papillae, were distributed on both the corpus and apex of the tongue, with stratified epithelium, and layer of keratin coat were recognized. The short (small) cone papillae had pointed top, while bunoform papillae were wide with smooth apex. The much less numerous circumvallate papillae with pseudopapillae on the each rim of the caudal lingual body were present with weak layer of keratin and intra-epithelial taste buds. The small fungiform papillae were found on the dorsal lingual surface, while the large fungiform papillae were situated on the ventral surface of the tongue, especially, in rostral part and were round in shape with numerous gustatory pores and very thin keratin coat. Pseudopapillae were present on the buccal conical 'bunoform' papillae surface, while 'elongate' buccal papillae surface was rather softly folded with thin coat of keratin. Microridges were observed in the less keratinized parts of each type of papillae. The orientation of either lingual or buccal papillae into the throat side facilitates the emptying of oral cavity from nutrient and swallowing of food. In conclusion, the anatomical features of the alpaca tongue are an adaptation to the feeding habits. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (ESEM OF Morinda citrifolia L. (Rubiaceae COLLETERS

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    Sergimar Kennedy de Paiva PINHEIRO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the colleters of Morinda citrifolia L. (Rubiaceae by using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Two different developmental stages were characterized as well as the chemical composition of secretion. Colleters are secretory structures that produce mucilage protecting the meristems and leaf primordia against desiccation and/or pathogens. Although these secretory structures are common on Rubiaceae, the results reported here is to the best of our knowledge the first record of colleters on Morinda genus. Colleters are present at the stipule adaxial surface, distributed in lines. These secretory structures are standard type and have no base constriction, differently from all studied species until now. In order to better understand the colleters structure and secretion, two phases were distinguished: a secretory phase and a senescence one. On secretory phase standard type colleters were visualized between leaf primordia and stipule, emerge on secretion. They present smooth surface, however was also possible to observe the contours of secretory cells anticlinal walls. In senescent phase colleters morphology was alternated exhibiting rough surface and blunt to point tips. The surface was rough and on stipule sections was possible to observe idioblasts with raphides bundles. The secretion process of M. citrifolia colleters occurs with the disruption of cuticle and the chemical elements are mostly dominated by carbon and oxygen.

  13. Bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization following orthograde mineral trioxide aggregate obturation: a scanning electron microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jun Sang; Chang, Seok-Woo; Oh, So Ram; Perinpanayagam, Hiran; Lim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Oh, Yeo-Rok; Woo, Sang-Bin; Han, Seung-Hyun; Zhu, Qiang; Kum, Kee-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    The time domain entombment of bacteria by intratubular mineralization following orthograde canal obturation with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Single-rooted human premolars (n=60) were instrumented to an apical size #50/0.06 using ProFile and treated as follows: Group 1 (n=10) was filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS); Group 2 (n=10) was incubated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks, and then filled with PBS; Group 3 (n=20) was obturated orthograde with a paste of OrthoMTA (BioMTA, Seoul, Korea) and PBS; and Group 4 (n=20) was incubated with E. faecalis for 3 weeks and then obturated with OrthoMTA–PBS paste. Following their treatments, the coronal openings were sealed with PBS-soaked cotton and intermediate restorative material (IRM), and the roots were then stored in PBS for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. After each incubation period, the roots were split and their dentin/MTA interfaces examined in both longitudinal and horizontal directions by SEM. There appeared to be an increase in intratubular mineralization over time in the OrthoMTA-filled roots (Groups 3 and 4). Furthermore, there was a gradual entombment of bacteria within the dentinal tubules in the E. faecalis inoculated MTA-filled roots (Group 4). Therefore, the orthograde obturation of root canals with OrthoMTA mixed with PBS may create a favorable environment for bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization. PMID:25012869

  14. Evaluation of blood cell attachment on Er: YAG laser applied root surface using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekici, Ali; Maden, Ilay; Yildiz, Sercan; San, Tangul; Isik, Gulden

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is dependent on the uninterrupted adhesion, maturation and absorption of fibrin clots to a periodontally compromised root surface. The modification of the root surface with different agents has been used for better fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment. It is known that Er:YAG laser application on dentin removes the smear layer succesfully. The aim of this study is to observe blood cell attachment and fibrin network formation following ER:YAG laser irradiation on periodontally compromised root surfaces in comparison to chemical root conditioning techniques in vitro. 40 dentin blocks prepared from freshly extracted periodontally compromised hopeless teeth. Specimens were divided in 5 groups; those applied with PBS, EDTA, Citric acid and Er:YAG. They were further divided into two groups: those which had received these applications, and the control group. The specimens were evaluated with scanning electron microscope and micrographs were taken. Smear layer and blood cell attachment scoring was performed. In the Er:YAG laser applied group, smear layer were totally removed. In the blood applied specimens, better fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment were observed in the Er:YAG group. In the group that had been applied with citric acid, the smear layer was also removed. The smear layer could not be fully removed in the EDTA group. Er:YAG laser application on the root dentin seems to form a suitable surface for fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment. Further clinical studies to support these results are necessitated.

  15. Distinguishing respirable quartz in coal fly ash using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Cprek; Naresh Shah; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science and Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2007-05-15

    Determination and classification of quartz in coal fly ash (CFA) is a subject of interest because of the adverse health effects caused by inhalation of crystalline silica. Workers with prolonged exposure to this carcinogen can develop respiratory diseases over time. This obviously may include utility plant workers involved in the handling, loading, and hauling of CFA. In this investigation, computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate Si-rich phases in CFA to develop a better approach for the determination of respirable quartz. Three CFA samples from utility boilers and a NIST glass standard CFA sample were investigated. The XRD measurements indicated that the four samples contained from 7.0 to 16.0 wt.% of quartz. The CCSEM measurements utilized both particle size distributions and a particle shape parameter, circularity, to classify the Si-rich phases in these ashes as either crystalline or amorphous (glass). The results indicated that the amount of free, respirable, quartz in these CFA samples ranged from only 0.1-1.0 vol % and showed little correlation with the XRD results for the bulk ash. These results are significant in view of the fact that XRD is the traditional method of measuring crystalline silica in dust collected from workplace atmospheres. The results provide a better understanding of studies that indicate very little evidence of a link between human exposure to CFA and silicosis and lung cancer. 24 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Quantitative analysis of sharp-force trauma: an application of scanning electron microscopy in forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelink, E J; Wiersema, J M; Demaree, R S

    2001-11-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has occasionally been used by anthropologists and forensic scientists to look at morphological characteristics that certain implements leave on bone. However, few studies have addressed techniques or protocols for assessing quantitative differences between tool marks on bone made by different bladed implements. In this study, the statistical variation in cut mark width was examined between control and test samples on bone using a scalpel blade, paring knife, and kitchen utility knife. Statistically significant differences (p marks made by the same knife under control and test conditions for all three knife types used in the study. When the control sample and test samples were examined individually for differences in mean variation between knife types, significant differences were also found (p mark width were found, caution should be used in trying to classify individual cut marks as being inflicted by a particular implement, due to the overlap in cut mark width that exists between different knife types. When combined, both quantitative and qualitative analyses of cut marks should prove to be more useful in trying to identify a suspect weapon. Furthermore, the application of SEM can be particularly useful for assessing many of these features.

  17. Comparison of different retreatment techniques and root canal sealers: a scanning electron microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Simsek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two retreatment techniques, in terms of the operating time and scanning electron microscopy (SEM results, in removing three different root canal sealers from root canals that were previously filled with gutta-percha. Sixty extracted single-rooted human premolars were divided into three groups and filled with iRoot SP, MM Seal, and AH Plus sealers, along with gutta-percha, through a lateral compaction technique. Root canal fillings of the samples were removed by ESI ultrasonic tips or R-Endo files. The time to reach the working length was recorded. Longitudinally sectioned samples were examined under SEM magnification. Each picture was evaluated in terms of the residual debris. Data were statistically analyzed with the Kruskall-Wallis test. No statistically significant differences were found in terms of operating time (p>0.05. Significant differences in the number of debris-free dentinal tubules were found among the root canal thirds, but this finding was not influenced by the experimental group (p < 0.05. Resin sealer tags were observed inside the dentinal tubules in the MM Seal group. Under the conditions of this study, it may be established that there was no difference among the sealers and retreatment techniques.

  18. Redescription of Cichlidogyrus philander (Monogenea, Ancyrocephalidae using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and molecular analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igeh Patience C

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sclerotized structures of monogeneans have traditionally been studied by light microscopy and different staining techniques. Recently, enzymatic digestion followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM has enabled the examination of structural details not visible with light microscopy. In order to obtain better, and more accurate, morphological information on sclerotized structures not affected by mounting medium or cover slip pressure, the sclerites of Cichlidogyrus philander Douëllou, 1993 (Monogenea, Ancyrocephalidae, collected from Pseudocrenilabrus philander (Weber, 1897, were redescribed using SEM. Parasites were collected from Padda Dam, Gauteng, South Africa and soft tissue was digested to release the sclerotized structures. The digested tissue also provided sufficient genetic material for molecular characterization of this species. Cichlidogyrus philander is characterised by a penis with a sharp, curved, lateral termination, an accessory piece with a hook-like extremity that may appear forked terminally, and lack of a visible vagina. The transverse bars have concave and convex surfaces with ribs on the concave surface. The dorsal bar bears fenestrations at the base of the auricles and the ventral and dorsal gripi are dissimilar. Furthermore, the large first pair of uncinuli shows lateral wings on the left side of the base. On top of this wing, a ball-like structure with a small fenestration is visible. Genetic characters derived from the 28S rDNA, the COI mitochondrial DNA and ITS1 rDNA regions distinguish C. philander from all other Cichlidogyrus sequenced species.

  19. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium.

  20. [Scanning electron microscopic observations on the middle ear mucosa of human fetuses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J

    1992-01-01

    The epithelial development of middle ear mucosa in nine human fetuses, ranging from the 12th week to full term, was observed by the scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the ciliated cells were found in the tympanic cleft of the 12th week fetus. The ciliated cells were especially dense in a crescent region along the antero-inferior periphery of the inner surface of eardrum, and were distributed around the tympanic orifice predominantly, above and blow the promontory and the hypotympanum. The length of cilia and the population of the ciliated cells increased with the fetal age. At the 26th week, the ciliated cell population and the length of cilia were similar to those of the neonate. The goblet cells appeared at the 26th fetal week. The secretory phenomenon of the goblet cells was seen at the 34th fetal age. These findings indicated that the mucociliary transportation system has been developed well at the late period of fetal development.

  1. The collagenic structure of human digital skin seen by scanning electron microscopy after Ohtani maceration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiorgi, Simone; Manelli, Alessandro; Protasoni, Marina; Ronga, Mario; Raspanti, Mario

    2005-03-01

    We performed a morphological scanning electron microscope (SEM) study to describe the fine structure and disposition of collagenous tissue in the human toe. After therapeutic amputation of a human right leg, we applied the Othani maceration technique to the skin of three toes surgically explanted from the foot. We distinguished eight cutaneous regions and focused on some specialized collagenous structures differing in the thickness of the skin. The eight areas investigated were: the dorsal skin, the eponychium, the perionychium, the hyponychium, the region under the visible nail, the nail root, the plantar skin and finally the toe tip. Each of these areas is characterized by a distinctive collagenous surface disposition, with some peculiar features mostly related to dermal papillae. At high magnification, we observed the spatial arrangement of the collagen fibers constituting the top of the dermal papillae that represents the attachment site of the proliferative basal layer of the epidermis. We also noted an impressive density of collagen fibers throughout the thickness of the dermal layer, organized in specialized structures and constituting the skeleton of dermal thermoreceptorial corpuscles or sweat glands. A combination of SEM and Ohtani technique disclosed the three-dimensional architecture of the collagenous matrix of tarsal skin under physiologic conditions, giving a detailed description of the most reactive tissue during pathologic processes.

  2. Scanning Electron Microscopic Structure of the Lingual Papillae of the Common Opossum (Didelphis marsupialis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Shigenori; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2005-08-01

    The mammalian tongue has evolved for specialized functions in different species. The structure of its papillae tells about the animal's diet, habit, and taxonomy. The opossum has four kinds of lingual papillae (filiform, conical, fungiform, vallate). Scanning electron microscopy of the external features, connective tissue cores, and corrosion casts of the microvasculature show the filiform papillae have a spearhead-like main process and spiny accessory processes around the apical part of the main process. The shape and number of both processes depend on their position on the tongue. On the apex, the main processes have shovel-like capillary networks and the accessory processes have small conical networks. On the lingual radix, the processes have small capillary loops. In the patch region, conical papillae have capillaries arranged as a full sail curving posteriorly. The fungiform papillae are scattered among the filiform papillae and have capillary baskets beneath each taste bud. Giant fungiform papillae on the tongue tip are three to four times larger than the ones on the lingual body. Capillaries of giant papillae form a fan-shaped network. The opossum has three vallate papillae arranged in a triangle. Their tops have secondary capillary loops but not their lateral surfaces. Mucosal folds on the posterolateral border have irregular, fingerlike projections with cylindrical capillary networks. These findings and the structure of the rest of the masticatory apparatus suggest the lingual papillae of opossum have kept their ancestral carnivorous features but also developed the herbivore characteristics of other marsupials.

  3. Effect of ultrasonic excitation on the porosity of glass ionomer cement: a scanning electron microscope evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldebella, Cármen Regina; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; Zuanon, Angela Cristina Cilense

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic excitation (US) was applied to glass ionomer cement (GIC) during early set time to increase the advantageous properties of this material. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the inner porosity of GIC after US. A total of 16 specimens, for each material, were prepared from high-viscosity GIC Fuji IX GP, Ketac Molar, and Ketac Molar Easymix. Half of these specimens (n = 8) received 30 s of US during the initial cement setting. After completion of the material setting, specimens were fractured and observed by scanning electronic microscopy to quantitatively assay porosity inside the material using Image J software. Statistical data analysis revealed that US reduced the porosity for all tested materials (P ≤ 0.05). The following reductions (expressed in percentages) were achieved: Fuji IX--from 3.9% to 2.8%; Ketac Molar Easy Mix--from 4.4% to 2.6%, and Ketac Molar--from 2.4% to 1.6%. Under the tested conditions, US was an effective method for porosity reduction inside the material. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Applications of scanning electron microscopy to the study of mineral matter in peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Andrejko, M.J.; Bardin, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) have been used for in situ analysis of minerals in peats by combining methods for producing oriented microtome sections of peat with methods for critical point drying. The combined technique allows SEM analysis of the inorganic components and their associated botanical constituents, along with petrographic identification of the botanical constituents. In peat deposits with abundant fluvial- or marine-derived minerals, one may use the above technique and/or medium- or low-temperature ashing followed by x-ray diffraction to readily identify the various mineral components. However, in some freshwater environments the scarcity of non-silica minerals makes the above techniques impractical. By separating the inorganic residues from the peat, one can isolate the non-silica mineral matter in the SEM for analysis by EDS. Furthermore, such separation allows SEM analysis of features and textures of both silica and non-silica mineral particles that might otherwise be unidentifiable. Results indicate the occurrence of detritial minerals in both Okefenokee and Snuggedy Swamp peats, the presence of authigenic or diagenetic minerals growing within peats, and dissolution features on freshwater sponge spicules that may account for the absence of spicules in Tertiary lignites.

  5. Volume change measurements of rice by environmental scanning electron microscopy and stereoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaohu; De Rooij, Mario; De Jong, Liesbeth

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of volume change, which is induced by changing the relative humidity, is performed on rice by using environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and stereoscopy techniques. The typical DeltaV% approximately RH curve of rice in both sorption and desorption can be categorized into three regions: low, intermediate, and high dependence on relative humidity from low- to high-relative humidity. The volume changes faster for rice samples with lower crystallinity, which is because the amorphous component is easier to absorb moisture than the crystalline component. The volume change behavior in various relative humidity environments is comparable with rice isotherm curve in sorption process though discrepancies exist in desorption, which are thought to be the presence of small pores and microstructure changes at high relative humidity. The volume in the desorption branch is less than that in the sorption branch at the same relative humidity, which can be attributed to the collapse of interior structures, existence of small pores, surface topography loss, and amylose leach.

  6. Saphenous vein graft thrombus findings by scanning electron microscopy in a patient with acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Marcela Dias; Aguillera, André Haraguti [Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Brilhante, José Joaquim; Caixeta, Adriano [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    An eighty-year-old male patient with a history of prior (19 years) coronary artery bypass graft surgery was admitted to the hospital with non ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). During the hospital stay he was taking acetylsalicylic acid 100mg per day, a loading dose of 600mg clopidogrel, and low molecular weight heparin 1mg/kg twice a day. Twenty-four hours later the patient underwent coronary angiography, which showed a 90% obstruction in the mid portion of the saphenous vein graft to obtuse marginal with signs of degeneration and local thrombus (Figure 1). Thrombus aspiration was performed with a 6-Fr Export{sup ™} catheter (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA, USA), which removed small reddish colored fragments. They were fixed in 2,5% glutaraldehyde in a 0.1M sodium cacodilate buffer. The material was processed following the GOTO protocol in which the fragments were washed with osmium tetroxide and titanic acid, after which they were dried in a critical-point device and a golden bath. Scanning electron microscopy and high definition photos (3,000 to 27,221x magnification) were obtained by the FEI Quanta{sup ™} FEG SEM device (FEI Company, Hillsboro, OR, USA). The images showed that the thrombus was rich in activated platelets, with few erythrocytes or inflammatory cells. Many cholesterol crystals were observed (Figures 2 to). The fibrin networks were sparse and thin, which is compatible with a short ischemic time and recent thrombus formation.

  7. In Vitro Laser Fenestration of Aortic Stent-Grafts: A Qualitative Analysis Under Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Udgiri, Naval; Guidoin, Robert; Panneton, Jean; Guan, Xiaoning; Guillemette, Maxime; Wang, Lu; Du, Jia; Zhu, Dajie; Nutley, Mark; Zhang, Ze

    2016-11-01

    In situ fenestration of stent-grafts allows patients with life threatening aortic pathologies to be amenable to emergent "off the shelf indications for use" percutaneous treatments as a bail out technique. Three types of aortic stent-grafts were subjected to laser fenestration in a physiological saline solution followed by balloon angioplasty using 8, 10 or 12 mm in diameter noncompliant balloons. The morphology and the size of fenestrations were observed under optical and scanning electron microscopy. The damage to the fabrics was analyzed and quantified. The creation of fenestrations was feasible in all devices, with varying degrees of fraying and/or tearing. The monofilament twill weave (Medtronic Valiant) tore in two directions (warp and weft) while the multifilament weave fenestrations showed more fraying (Anaconda Vascutek and Zenith TX2 Cook). The size and directions of tearing were more predictable with the 8 mm diameter balloon whereas the results obtained with the 10 and 12 mm diameter balloons were more unpredictable. The fenestrations were free of melting of the yarns and blackening of the filaments. The in situ fenestration is feasible but the observed damage to the fabric constructions must be carefully considered. This procedure must currently be limited to urgent and emergent life threatening cases because it is off indications for use for approved devices. Copyright © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Virtual rough samples to test 3D nanometer-scale scanning electron microscopy stereo photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarrubia, J S; Tondare, V N; Vladár, A E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of scanning electron microscopy for high spatial resolution, images from multiple angles to provide 3D information, and commercially available stereo photogrammetry software for 3D reconstruction offers promise for nanometer-scale dimensional metrology in 3D. A method is described to test 3D photogrammetry software by the use of virtual samples-mathematical samples from which simulated images are made for use as inputs to the software under test. The virtual sample is constructed by wrapping a rough skin with any desired power spectral density around a smooth near-trapezoidal line with rounded top corners. Reconstruction is performed with images simulated from different angular viewpoints. The software's reconstructed 3D model is then compared to the known geometry of the virtual sample. Three commercial photogrammetry software packages were tested. Two of them produced results for line height and width that were within close to 1 nm of the correct values. All of the packages exhibited some difficulty in reconstructing details of the surface roughness.

  9. Structural defects in cubic semiconductors characterized by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira; Kozak, Roksolana; Erni, Rolf; Rossell, Marta D., E-mail: marta.rossell@empa.ch

    2017-05-15

    The development of new electro-optical devices and the realization of novel types of transistors require a profound understanding of the structural characteristics of new semiconductor heterostructures. This article provides a concise review about structural defects which occur in semiconductor heterostructures on the basis of micro-patterned Si substrates. In particular, one- and two-dimensional crystal defects are being discussed which are due to the plastic relaxation of epitaxial strain caused by the misfit of crystal lattices. Besides a few selected examples from literature, we treat in particular crystal defects occurring in GaAs/Si, Ge/Si and β-SiC/Si structures which are studied by high-resolution annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The relevance of this article is twofold; firstly, it should provide a collection of data which are of help for the identification and characterization of defects in cubic semiconductors by means of atomic-resolution imaging, and secondly, the experimental data shall provide a basis for advancing the understanding of device characteristics with the aid of theoretical modelling by considering the defective nature of strained semiconductor heterostructures. - Highlights: • The heterogeneous integration of high-quality compound semiconductors remains a challenge. • Lattice defects cause severe degradation of the semiconductor device performances. • Aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM allows atomic-scale characterization of defects. • An overview of lattice defects found in cubic semiconductors is presented. • Theoretical modelling and calculations are needed to determine the defect properties.

  10. Image sharpness measurement in the scanning electron-microscope--part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N F; Postek, M T; Larrabee, R D; Vladár, A E; Keery, W J; Jones, S N

    1999-01-01

    Fully automated or semi-automated scanning electron microscopes (SEM) are now commonly used in semiconductor production and other forms of manufacturing. Testing and proving that the instrument is performing at a satisfactory level of sharpness is an important aspect of quality control. The application of Fourier analysis techniques to the analysis of SEM images is a useful methodology for sharpness measurement. In this paper, a statistical measure known as the multivariate kurtosis is proposed as an additional useful measure of the sharpness of SEM images. Kurtosis is designed to be a measure of the degree of departure of a probability distribution. For selected SEM images, the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transforms were computed. Then the bivariate kurtosis of this Fourier transform was calculated as though it were a probability distribution. Kurtosis has the distinct advantage that it is a parametric (i.e., a dimensionless) measure and is sensitive to the presence of the high spatial frequencies necessary for acceptable levels of image sharpness. The applications of this method to SEM metrology will be discussed.

  11. Exploring diffusion of ultrasonically consolidated aluminum and copper films through scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sietins, Jennifer Mueller

    Ultrasonic consolidation (UC) is a promising manufacturing method for metal matrix composite pre-preg tapes or foils that utilizes a layer build-up technique. The process involves three main variables: applied load, oscillation amplitude, and rolling speed. A main advantage of this process is the ability to manufacture multi-material parts at lower processing temperatures compared to other metal matrix composites processes. A major disadvantage, however, is a lack of understanding of diffusion during the ultrasonic consolidation process, which is expected to affect the microstructure, bond quality, and strength within the interface region. The role of diffusion during the low temperature, short duration ultrasonic consolidation process was explored. First, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) was used to measure concentration profiles of ultrasonically consolidated high purity aluminum and copper through which the interdiffusion coefficients were calculated. It was found that the experimental accelerating voltage had a significant impact on the measurement of the concentration profiles, and associated interdiffusion coefficients, due to the interaction volume interference. The effect of the interaction volume on the concentration profiles was confirmed through Monte Carlo simulations of electron trajectories, and the error due the interaction volume was quantified. The results showed the diffusion distance was too small for accurate measurements with SEM XEDS even at low accelerating voltages. To significantly reduce the error due to the interaction volume, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples were prepared using a focused ion beam (FIB) to ensure a uniform thickness. The TEM XEDS concentration profile and images revealed intermetallic phase transformations that occurred during the welding process. TEM images also showed dislocation pile-up located at the subgrain/bulk aluminum interface. This microstructural

  12. Visualization of carrier dynamics in p(n)-type GaAs by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongweon; Hwang, Taek Yong; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2014-02-11

    Four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy is used to investigate doping- and carrier-concentration-dependent ultrafast carrier dynamics of the in situ cleaved single-crystalline GaAs(110) substrates. We observed marked changes in the measured time-resolved secondary electrons depending on the induced alterations in the electronic structure. The enhancement of secondary electrons at positive times, when the electron pulse follows the optical pulse, is primarily due to an energy gain involving the photoexcited charge carriers that are transiently populated in the conduction band and further promoted by the electron pulse, consistent with a band structure that is dependent on chemical doping and carrier concentration. When electrons undergo sufficient energy loss on their journey to the surface, dark contrast becomes dominant in the image. At negative times, however, when the electron pulse precedes the optical pulse (electron impact), the dynamical behavior of carriers manifests itself in a dark contrast which indicates the suppression of secondary electrons upon the arrival of the optical pulse. In this case, the loss of energy of material's electrons is by collisions with the excited carriers. These results for carrier dynamics in GaAs(110) suggest strong carrier-carrier scatterings which are mirrored in the energy of material's secondary electrons during their migration to the surface. The approach presented here provides a fundamental understanding of materials probed by four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy, and offers possibilities for use of this imaging technique in the study of ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in heterogeneously patterned micro- and nanostructured material surfaces and interfaces.

  13. LOW-VOLTAGE FIELD-EMISSION SCANNING ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY OF NON-COATED GUINEA-PIG HAIR CELL STEREOCILIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DUNNEBIER, EA; SEGENHOUT, JM; KALICHARAN, D; JONGEBLOED, WL; WIT, HP; ALBERS, FWJ

    1995-01-01

    The stereociliar structures of the guinea-pig cochlear organ of Corti were studied at low-voltage (1-5 kV) with field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) using various pre- and post-fixation methods, such as OTOTO (OsO4/thiocarbohydrazide/OsO4/thiocarbohydrazide/OsO4) and TAO (tannic

  14. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy analysis of morphology and enzyme distribution within an industrial biocatalytic particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roon, van J.L.; Aelst, van A.C.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Tramper, J.; Beeftink, H.H.

    2005-01-01

    Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was used in a technical feasibility study to obtain insight into the internal morphology and the intraparticle enzyme distribution of Assemblase®, an industrial biocatalytic particle containing immobilized penicillin-G acylase. The results were

  15. Cryo dualbeam focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the interface between cells and nanopatterned scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.A.D.; Lamers, Edwin; Walboomers, X. Frank; Domanski, Maciej; McKerr, George; O'Hagan, Barry M.; Barnes, Clifford A.; Peto, Lloyd; Lüttge, Regina; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Jansen, John A.

    2011-01-01

    With the advance of nanotechnology in biomaterials science and tissue engineering, it is essential that new techniques become available to observe processes that take place at the direct interface between tissue and scaffold materials. Here, Cryo DualBeam focused ion beam–scanning electron

  16. The early development of inflorescences and flowers of the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) seen through the scanning electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heel, van W.A.; Breure, C.J.; Menendez, T.

    1987-01-01

    The development of inflorescences and flowers of the African Oil Palm up to anthesis is illustrated by scanning electron microscopy images. The time of origin relative to the development of the foliage leaves of the basipetalous succession of flowering rachillae is determined, as well as the time of

  17. Advantages of indium-tin oxide-coated glass slides in correlative scanning electron microscopy applications of uncoated cultured cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluk, H.; Stokes, D.J.; Lich, B.; Wieringa, B.; Fransen, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    A method of direct visualization by correlative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence light microscopy of cell structures of tissue cultured cells grown on conductive glass slides is described. We show that by growing cells on indium-tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass slides, secondary

  18. Scanning electron microscopic assessment of coating irregularities and their precursors in unexpanded durable polymer-based drug-eluting stents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basalus, M.W.; Tandjung, K.; Tandjung, K.; van Westen, T.; Sen, H.; van der Jagt, P.K.N.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; von Birgelen, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To assess and quantify coating irregularities on unexpanded and expanded durable polymer-based drug-eluting stents (DES) to gain insights into the origin of coating irregularities. Background: Previous scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies in various expanded DES revealed

  19. Analysis of aerospace nickel-cadmium battery cells. [cadmium migration as seen by scanning electron microscopy and metallographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    Various steps followed in analyzing the electrolyte, separator, and electrodes are reviewed. Specific emphasis is given to scanning electron microscopic and metallographic analysis of the plates. Cadmium migration is defined, its effects and causes are examined, and methods for its reduction in cells are suggested.

  20. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Den Dekker, A.J.; Martinez, G.T.; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage

  1. Discretization of electronic states in large InAsP/InP multilevel quantum dots probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, B; Robert-Philip, I; Beveratos, A; David, C; Wang, Z Z; Sagnes, I; Girard, J C

    2012-03-23

    The topography and the electronic structure of InAsP/InP quantum dots are probed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The study of the local density of states in such large quantum dots confirms the discrete nature of the electronic levels whose wave functions are measured by differential conductivity mapping. Because of their large dimensions, the energy separation between the discrete electronic levels is low, allowing for quantization in both the lateral and growth directions as well as the observation of the harmonicity of the dot lateral potential.

  2. Beam spot diameter of the near-field scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyritsakis, A; Xanthakis, J P

    2013-02-01

    We have examined the beam spot diameter at the anode of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in the near-field mode as a function of the anode-tip distance d. The detector lateral resolution of this type of microscopy is approximately equal to this spot diameter. For our calculations we have simulated the apex region of the tip with an ellipsoid of revolution of radii R₁ and R₂ with R₁>R₂ as suggested by TEM images of the realistic tips. We have then solved the Laplace equation to obtain the electrostatic potential and to this we have added a spherical image potential. The calculated electrostatic field is highly asymmetric, being strong along the tip-axis and weakening quickly towards the sides. When a 3-dimensional WKB approximation is used to calculate the electron paths corresponding to such a potential, the latter are shown to bend significantly towards the vertical (tip-axis) direction producing a beam narrowing effect very similar to the beam narrowing effect we discovered for the traditional SEM case. When the values of R₁, R₂ are chosen from fittings to the TEM images of the tips used in the experiments, the beam spot diameter W at the anode (d=25 nm) varies from 12.5 nm to 9 nm depending on the fitted R₁, R₂. These values of W are considerably smaller than previously predicted by calculating solid angles of emission from spherical surfaces (41 nm) but also much closer to the detector lateral resolution (6-7 nm) obtained from differentiating the experimental current step. This trend continued at all other d examined. Furthermore the beam width W was found to decrease quickly with increasing sharpness S=R₁/R₂ of the tip and then saturate. W is also decreasing with decreasing R₁, R₂ with S kept constant. We deduce that the sharpness of the tip is important not only for creating high extraction fields but also for guaranteeing a very small beam spot diameter. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Focusing on Environmental Biofilms With Variable-Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, L.; Wolfaardt, G. M.; Du Plessis, K.

    2006-12-01

    Since the term biofilm has been coined almost 30 years ago, visualization has formed an integral part of investigations on microbial attachment. Electron microscopic (EM) biofilm studies, however, have been limited by the hydrated extracellular matrix which loses structural integrity with conventional preparative techniques, and under required high-vacuum conditions, resulting in a loss of information on spatial relationships and distribution of biofilm microbes. Recent advances in EM technology enable the application of Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy (VP SEM) to biofilms, allowing low vacuum and hydrated chamber atmosphere during visualization. Environmental biofilm samples can be viewed in situ, unfixed and fully hydrated, with application of gold-sputter-coating only, to increase image resolution. As the impact of microbial biofilms can be both hazardous and beneficial to man and his environment, recognition of biofilms as a natural form of microbial existence is needed to fully assess the potential role of microbial communities on technology. The integration of multiple techniques to elucidate biofilm processes has become imperative for unraveling complex phenotypic adaptations of this microbial lifestyle. We applied VP SEM as integrative technique with traditional and novel analytical techniques to (1)localize lignocellulosic microbial consortia applied for producing alternative bio-energy sources in the mining wastewater industry, (2) characterize and visualize wetland microbial communities in the treatment of winery wastewater, and (3)determine the impact of recombinant technology on yeast biofilm behavior. Visualization of microbial attachment to a lignocellulose substrate, and degradation of exposed plant tissue, gave insight into fiber degradation and volatile fatty acid production for biological sulphate removal from mining wastewater. Also, the 3D-architecture of complex biofilms developing in constructed wetlands was correlated with

  4. Dislocation imaging for orthopyroxene using an atom-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Akihito; Kogure, Toshihiro; Raimbourg, Hugues; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-11-01

    Dislocations, one-dimensional lattice defects, appear as a microscopic phenomenon while they are formed in silicate minerals by macroscopic dynamics of the earth crust such as shear stress. To understand ductile deformation mechanisms of silicates, atomic structures of the dislocations have been examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Among them, it has been proposed that {100} primary slip system of orthopyroxene (Opx) is dissociated into partial dislocations, and a stacking fault with the clinopyroxene (Cpx) structure is formed between the dislocations. This model, however, has not been determined completely due to the complex structures of silicates. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has a potential to determine the structure of dislocations with single-atomic column sensitivity, particularly by using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) and annular bright field (ABF) imaging with a probing aberration corrector.[1] Furthermore, successive analyses from light microscopy to atom-resolved STEM have been achieved by focused ion beam (FIB) sampling techniques.[2] In this study, we examined dislocation arrays at a low-angle grain boundary of ∼1° rotation about the b-axis in natural deformed Opx using a simultaneous acquisition of HAADF/ABF (JEM-ARM200F, JEOL) equipped with 100 mm2 silicon drift detector (SDD) for energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Figure 1 shows averaged STEM images viewed along the b- axis of Opx extracted from repeating units. HAADF provides the cation-site arrangement, and ABF distinguishes the difference of slightly rotated SiO4 tetrahedron around the a- axis. This is useful to distinguish the change of stacking sequence between the partial dislocations. Two types of stacking faults with Cpx and protopyroxene (Ppx) structures were identified between three partial dislocations. Furthermore, Ca accumulation in M2 (Fe) site around the stacking faults was detected by STEM-EDS. Interestingly, Ca is

  5. Evaluation of intracameral injection of ranibizumab and bevacizumab on the corneal endothelium by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Seyhmus; Nergiz, Yusuf; Aksit, Ihsan; Sahin, Alparslan; Cingu, Kursat; Caca, Ihsan

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of intracameral injection of ranibizumab and bevacizumab on the corneal endothelium by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Twenty-eight female rabbits were randomly divided into four equal groups. Rabbits in groups 1 and 2 underwent intracameral injection of 1 mg/0.1 mL and 0.5 mg/0.05 mL ranibizumab, respectively; group 3 was injected with 1.25 mg/0.05 mL bevacizumab. All three groups were injected with a balanced salt solution (BSS) into the anterior chamber of the left (fellow) eye. None of the rabbits in group 4 underwent an injection. Corneal thickness and intraocular pressure were measured before the injections, on the first day, and in the first month after injection. The rabbits were sacrificed and corneal tissues were excised in the first month after injection. Specular microscopy was used for the corneal endothelial cell count. Endothelial cell density was assessed and comparisons drawn between the groups and the control. Micrographs were recorded for SEM examination. The structure of the corneal endothelial cells, the junctional area of the cell membrane, the distribution of microvillus, and the cell morphology of the eyes that underwent intracameral injection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), BSS, and the control group were compared. Corneal thickness and intraocular pressure were not significantly different between the groups that underwent anti-VEGF or BSS injection and the control group on the first day and in the first month of injection. The corneal endothelial cell count was significantly diminished in all three groups; predominantly in group 1 and 2 (Pendothelium and intercellular junctions were normal. However, a relative reduction was observed in the microvillus density of endothelial cells. Although eyes in group 3 were morphologically similar to fellow eyes and the control group, disarrangement in endothelial cell borders was evident. The SEM examination pointed out deterioration in endothelial

  6. Scanning Electron Microscopic study of Piper betle L. leaves extract effect against Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaidah Haji Abdul Rahim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have shown that Piper betle L. leaves extract inhibits the adherence of Streptococcus mutans to glass surface, suggesting its potential role in controlling dental plaque development. OBJECTIVES: In this study, the effect of the Piper betle L. extract towards S. mutans (with/without sucrose using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and on partially purifed cell-associated glucosyltransferase activity were determined. MATERIAL AND METHODS: S. mutans were allowed to adhere to glass beads suspended in 6 different Brain Heart Infusion broths [without sucrose; with sucrose; without sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL-1 and 4 mg mL-1; with sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL-1 and 4 mg mL-1]. Positive control was 0.12% chlorhexidine. The glass beads were later processed for SEM viewing. Cell surface area and appearance and, cell population of S. mutans adhering to the glass beads were determined upon viewing using the SEM. The glucosyltransferase activity (with/without extract was also determined. One- and two-way ANOVA were used accordingly. RESULTS: It was found that sucrose increased adherence and cell surface area of S. mutans (p<0.001. S. mutans adhering to 100 µm² glass surfaces (with/without sucrose exhibited reduced cell surface area, fuffy extracellular appearance and cell population in the presence of the Piper betle L. leaves extract. It was also found that the extract inhibited glucosyltransferase activity and its inhibition at 2.5 mg mL-1 corresponded to that of 0.12% chlorhexidine. At 4 mg mL-1 of the extract, the glucosyltransferase activity was undetectable and despite that, bacterial cells still demonstrated adherence capacity. CONCLUSION: The SEM analysis confrmed the inhibitory effects of the Piper betle L. leaves extract towards cell adherence, cell growth and extracellular polysaccharide formation of S. mutans visually. In bacterial cell adherence, other factors besides glucosyltransferase are

  7. Comparative scanning electron microscopic study of the effect of different dental conditioners on dentin micromorphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Henrique Susin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated comparatively by scanning electron microscopy (SEM the effect of different dental conditioners on dentin micromorphology, when used according to the same protocol. Forty dentin sticks were obtained from 20 caries-free third human molars and were assigned to 4 groups corresponding to 3 conditioners (phosphoric acid 37%, Clearfil SE Bond and iBond and an untreated control group. After application of the conditioners, the specimens were immersed in 50% ethanol solution during 10 s, chemically fixed and dehydrated to prepare them to SEM analysis. In the control group, dentin surface was completely covered by smear layer and all dentinal tubules were occluded. In the phosphoric acid-etched group, dentin surface was completely clean and presented exposed dentinal tubule openings; this was the only group in which the tubules exhibited the funnel-shaped aspect. In the groups conditioned with Clearfil SE Bond primer and iBond, which are less acidic than phosphoric acid, tubule openings were occluded or partially occluded, though smear layer removal was observed. SE Bond was more efficient in removing the smear layer than iBond. In the Clearfil SE Bond group, the cuff-like aspect of peritubular dentin was more evident. It may be concluded all tested conditioners were able to change dentin morphology. However, it cannot be stated that the agent aggressiveness was the only cause of the micromorphological alterations because a single morphological pattern was not established for each group, but rather an association of different aspects, according to the aggressiveness of the tested conditioner.

  8. Neonatal lines in the enamel of primary teeth--a morphological and scanning electron microscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina; Johansson, Carina; Kühnisch, Jan; Robertson, Agneta; Steiniger, Frank; Norén, Jörgen G; Klingberg, Gunilla; Nietzsche, Sandor

    2008-10-01

    The neonatal line (NNL) is in principle found in all primary teeth and the line represents the time of birth. Earlier findings of the appearance of the NNL in light microscope and in microradiographs have shown not only changes in the prism direction of the enamel, but that the NNL has a hypomineralized character. The neonatal line was analyzed in un-decalcified sections of primary lower and central incisors, collected from individuals of different ages utilizing polarized light microscopy, microradiography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray analysis (XRMA). In polarized light the NNL appeared to have a more porous structure than the enamel in general. The appearance of the NNL as a dark line in microradiographs is interpreted as the NNL being less mineralized than neighbouring enamel. Analysis with ImageJ visualized the reduction of the amount of grey value, indicating that the NNL is less mineralized. Analysis of the NNL in SEM showed a reduction of the diameter of enamel prisms, the more narrow diameters continued through the postnatal enamel. A change of the growth direction of the prisms was also observed at the NNL. In a three-dimensional image the NNL appeared as a grove, however, in non-etched enamel no grove was seen. The elemental analyses with XRMA showed no marked changes in the content of C, Ca, P, N, O or S in the area around the NNL. The NNL is an optical phenomenon due to alterations in height, and degree of mineralization of the enamel prisms.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the hedgehog stomach worm, Physaloptera clausa (Spirurida: Physalopteridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Physaloptera clausa (Spirurida: Physalopteridae) nematodes parasitize the stomach of the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) and cause weight loss, anorexia and gastric lesions. The present study provides the first morphological description of adult P. clausa from the stomachs of infected hedgehogs, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods From June to October 2011, 10 P. clausa from European hedgehogs were fixed, dried, coated and subjected to SEM examination. Results Males and females (22–30 mm and 28–47 mm, respectively) were stout, with the cuticle reflecting over the lips to form a large cephalic collarette and showing fine transverse striations in both sexes. The mouth was characterized by two large, simple triangular lateral pseudolabia, each armed with external and internal teeth. Inside the buccal cavity, a circle of internal small teeth can be observed. Around the mouth, four sub-median cephalic papillae and two large amphids were also observed. The anterior end of both male and female bore an excretory pore on the ventral side and a pair of lateral ciliated cervical papillae. In the female worm, the vulva was located in the middle and the eggs were characterized by smooth surfaces. The posterior end of the female worm was stumpy with two large phasmids in proximity to its extremity. The posterior end of the male had large lateral alae, joined together anteriorly across the ventral surface, with subequal and dissimilar spicules, as well as four pairs of stalked pre-cloacal papillae, three pairs of post-cloacal papillae, and two phasmids. Three sessile papillae occured anteriorly and four posteriorly to the cloaca. Conclusions The present SEM study provides the first in-depth morphological characterization of adult P. clausa, and highlights similarities and differences with P. bispiculata P. herthameyerae, Heliconema longissimum and Turgida turgida. PMID:23566611

  10. Elaphostrongylus spp. from Scandinavian cervidae - a scanning electron microscope study (SEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Stéen

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes of the genus Elaphostrongylus collected from moose (Alces alces L., reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L., and red deer (Cervus elaphus L., respectively, were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. Morphological differences in the ribs of the genital bursa were demonstrated. The Elaphostrongylus species from reindeer and red deer differed from each other in four ribs of the genital bursa. These results agree with the morphological characters of E. cervi and E. rangiferi described by Cameron (1931 and Mitskevitch (1960. The genital bursa of Elaphostrongylus sp. from moose, in accordance with the description of E. alces by Steen et al. (1989 showed characteristics differing from those found in Elaphostrongylus spp. from reindeer and red deer respectively. These results support the hypothesis that there are three separate species of Elaphostrongylus present in Scandinavian Cervidae. Svep-elektroniska studier på Elaphostrongylus spp. hos skandinaviska hjortdjur.Abstract in Swedish / Sammandrag: Rundmaskar inom slaktet Elaphostrongylus funna hos alg (Alces alces L., ren (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L. och kronhjort(Cervus elaphus L. studerades med hjalp av svepelelektronmikroskop. De hanliga bursorna med sin a stodjeribbor uppvisade variationer i utseende, langd och placering mellan dessa rundmaskar. De arter av Elaphostrongylus funna hos ren och kronhjort skilde sig åt avseende fyra stodjeribbor på de hanliga bursorna. Dessa resultat stammer val overens med de karaktarer som tidigare ar beskrivna av Cameron(1931 och av Mitskevich (1960. Den hanliga bursan hos arten Elaphostrongylus funnen hos alg, vilken tidigare ar beskriven av Steen et al. (1989, visade upp ett utseende som skilde sig från bursorna hos de Elaphostrongylus-arter funna hos ren och kronhjort. Dessa resultat stoder hypotesen om tre skilda arter av Elaphostrongylus hos skandinaviska hjortdjur.

  11. Chlorhexidine as a root canal irrigant: Antimicrobial and scanning electron microscopic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Slavoljub

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Selection of irrigant is very important for longterm success of root canal therapy. Objective. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution (CHX against five selected microorganisms and to evaluate its efficacy in root canal cleaning. Methods. In this study, by agar diffusion test, were evaluated antimicrobial effects of three root canal irrigants: 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX. The microorganisms tested in this study were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. A scanning electron microscope was used to evaluate root canal cleaning ability of 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl, 2% CHX and 15% EDTA. Twelve extracted single-root human teeth were divided into four groups depending on the irrigant used during instrumentation. Mechanical preparation was performed with Step back technique and K files. Data were analyzed statistically by Student’s t-test. Results 5.25% NaOCl was the most effective against all tested microorganisms. 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX showed antimicrobial effects against all tested microorganisms but zones of inhibition were smaller. The best results in root canal walls cleaning were obtained in the group where the irrigant was 15% EDTA (score 2.33. In 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX groups, there was more smear layer (score 4 and 5. Conclusion. 2% chlorhexidine digluconate showed strong antimicrobial effect on the tested microorganisms, but was not effective in cleaning root canal walls.

  12. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M.; O' Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

    2012-03-08

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of canal cleaning after canal preparation with nickel titanium files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Slavoljub

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Root canal preparation is the most important phase of endodontic procedure and it consists of adequate canal space cleaning and shaping. In recent years, rotary instruments and techniques have gained importance because of the great efficacy, speed and safety of the preparation procedure. Objective. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of different NiTi files on the canal wall cleaning quality, residual dentine debris and smear layer. Methods. The research was conducted on extracted human teeth in vitro conditions. Teeth were divided in 7 main groups depending on the kind of instruments used for root canal preparation: ProTaper, GT, ProFile, K-3, FlexMaster, hand ProTaper and hand GT. Root canal preparation was accomplished by crown-down technique. Prepared samples were assessed on scanning electron microscopy JEOL, JSM-6460 LV. The evaluation of dentine debris was done with 500x magnification, and the evaluation of smear layer with 1,000 times magnification. Quantitive assessment of dentine debris and smear layer was done according to the criteria of Hulsmann. Results. The least amount of debris and smear layer has been found in canals shaped with ProFile instruments, and the largest amount in canals shaped with FlexMaster instruments. Canal cleaning efficacy of hand GT and ProTaper files has been similar to cleaning efficacy of rotary NiTi files. Statistic analysis has shown a significant difference in amount of dentine debris and smear layer on the canal walls between sample groups shaped with different instruments. Conclusion. Completely clean canals have not been found in any tested group of instruments. The largest amount of debris and smear layer has been found in the apical third of all canals. The design and the type of endodontic instruments influence the efficacy of the canal cleaning.

  14. Elevated temperature, nano-mechanical testing in situ in the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, J. M.; Michler, J. [EMPA - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, Thun CH-3602 (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    A general nano-mechanical test platform capable of performing variable temperature and variable strain rate testing in situ in the scanning electron microscope is described. A variety of test geometries are possible in combination with focused ion beam machining or other fabrication techniques: indentation, micro-compression, cantilever bending, and scratch testing. The system is intrinsically displacement-controlled, which allows it to function directly as a micro-scale thermomechanical test frame. Stable, elevated temperature indentation/micro-compression requires the indenter tip and the sample to be in thermal equilibrium to prevent thermal displacement drift due to thermal expansion. This is achieved through independent heating and temperature monitoring of both the indenter tip and sample. Furthermore, the apex temperature of the indenter tip is calibrated, which allows it to act as a referenced surface temperature probe during contact. A full description of the system is provided, and the effects of indenter geometry and of radiation on imaging conditions are discussed. The stabilization time and temperature distribution throughout the system as a function of temperature is characterized. The advantages of temperature monitoring and thermal calibration of the indenter tip are illustrated, which include the possibility of local thermal conductivity measurement. Finally, validation results using nanoindentation on fused silica and micro-compression of <100> silicon micro-pillars as a function of temperature up to 500 Degree-Sign C are presented, and procedures and considerations taken for these measurements are discussed. A brittle to ductile transition from fracture to splitting then plastic deformation is directly observed in the SEM for silicon as a function of temperature.

  15. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi, E-mail: hinishiy@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Koizumi, Mitsuru, E-mail: koizumi@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Ogawa, Koji, E-mail: kogawa@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Kitamura, Shinich, E-mail: kitamura@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Konyuba, Yuji, E-mail: ykonyuub@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: watanabeyoshiy@pref.yamagata.jp [Yamagata Research Institute of Technology, 2-2-1, Matsuei, Yamagata 990-2473 (Japan); Ohbayashi, Norihiko, E-mail: n.ohbayashi@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsunori, E-mail: nori@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo, E-mail: msuga@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-4, Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control.

  16. Longitudinal micromorphological 15-year results of posterior composite restorations using three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Wolfram; Montag, Regina; Kraft, Ulrike; Walther, Mario; Sigusch, Bernd W; Gaengler, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Hybrid composite restorations in posterior teeth were evaluated over 15 years using the semiquantitative Clinical, Photographic and Micromorphologic (CPM) index. It was a further aim to quantitate the surface morphology by three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy (3D-SEM). Thirty seven hybrid composite restorations (Ketac-Bond/Visio-Molar X, ESPE, Seefeld/Germany) were longitudinally followed up. Parallel to clinical assessment replicas were taken at baseline, after 1, 5, 10 and 15 years and evaluated by SEM, and profilometrical analyses of 3D-SEM data were computed. The profilometrical results were statistically analysed by ANOVA. The level of significance was set to p<0.05. The semiquantitative micromorphological evaluation exhibited the most considerable deterioration within the first year and up to 5 years of function. Less change was detected during the next 10 years. The profilometrical quantification showed raising depth of the negative marginal ledges with a mean of 27.2μm (range 0.6-94.5μm) after 10 years, with no statistically significant changes from 5 to 10 and 10 to 15 years. The 3D-SEM revealed marginal grooves beneath the level of the ledges (mean 34.5μm after 5 years) within the bonding zone, exposing enamel margins. Leakages, marginal fractures and surface roughness did not seriously deteriorate the quality of restorations. Hybrid composite restorations of Class I and II cavities surviving the first five years performed well over 15 years of function. Quantitative 3D-SEM profilometrical measurements revealed the dynamics of marginal behaviour over time. Long-term parallel clinical and micromorphological evaluation of posterior composite restorations of Class I and Class II cavities documented the clinical safety and acceptable longevity. The longitudinal 3D micromorphologic assessment of the surface changes and of the marginal behaviour revealed deteriorating as well as improving factors hidden in clinical performance. Copyright © 2014

  17. Bioresorption mechanisms of chitosan physical hydrogels: A scanning electron microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaise, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.malaise@gmail.com [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères (IMP-UMR 5223), 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Rami, Lila [Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Inserm U1026, Bioingénierie Tissulaire, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Montembault, Alexandra; Alcouffe, Pierre [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères (IMP-UMR 5223), 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Burdin, Béatrice [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre Technologique des Microstructure, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Bordenave, Laurence [Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Inserm U1026, Bioingénierie Tissulaire, Bordeaux 33000 (France); CHU de Bordeaux, CIC-IT Biomaterials, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); Delmond, Samantha [CHU de Bordeaux, CIC-IT Biomaterials, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); David, Laurent [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères (IMP-UMR 5223), 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-09-01

    Tissue-engineered biodegradable medical devices are widely studied and systems must present suitable balance between versatility and elaboration simplicity. In this work, we aim at illustrating that such equilibrium can be found by processing chitosan physical hydrogels without external cross-linker. Chitosan concentration, degree of acetylation, solvent composition, and neutralization route were modulated in order to obtain hydrogels exhibiting different physico-chemical properties. The resulting in vivo biological response was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. “Soft” hydrogels were obtained from chitosan of high degree of acetylation (35%) and by the neutralization with gaseous ammonia of a chitosan acetate aqueous solutions presenting low polymer concentration (Cp = 1.6% w/w). “Harder” hydrogels were obtained from chitosan with lower degree of acetylation (5%) and after neutralization in sodium hydroxide bath (1 M) of hydro-alcoholic chitosan solutions (50/50 w/w water/1,2-propanediol) with a polymer concentration of 2.5% w/w. Soft and hard hydrogels exhibited bioresorption times from below 10 days to higher than 60 days, respectively. We also evidenced that cell colonization and neo-vascularization mechanisms depend on the hydrogel-aggregated structure that is controlled by elaboration conditions and possibly in relation with mechanical properties. Specific processing conditions induced micron-range capillary formation, which can be assimilated to colonization channels, also acting on the resorption scenario. - Highlights: • We elaborated physical chitosan hydrogels presenting tuneable biological properties. • Cell colonization mechanism depends on biological and mechanical hydrogel properties. • Increasing the degree of acetylation will reduce the bioresorption time. • Capillaries played a role of cell colonization pathways.

  18. Different scanning electron microscopic evaluation methods of cement interface homogeneity of adhesively luted glass fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzke, Ronny; Frankenberger, Roland; Naumann, Michael

    2011-03-01

    To compare two methods used to examine the cement interface homogeneity of adhesively luted glass fiber posts (GFPs). GFPs were divided into four groups (n = 5 in each) and inserted into artificial root canals under standardized conditions: Group I = RelyX Unicem, application with application aid; Group II = RelyX Unicem; Group III = Panavia F 2.0; and Group IV = Variolink II. Posts in Groups II-IV were cemented without using an appliance. All specimens were sectioned at three levels (cervical, middle and apical) perpendicularly to the post's long axis and examined and photographed (n = 60) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cement interface inhomogeneities were (A) measured by means of SEM software and (B) estimated using a graphics program with SEM images being divided into 72 equal circle segments to calculate a percentage value of inhomogeneities of the 360° circumference. Median values of inhomogeneities (A/B; %) within the cement interface for the cervical, middle and apical levels of analysis, respectively were 1.4/2.1, 2.2/4.2 and 1.9/2.1 for Group I; 21.0/20.1, 24.8/23.6 and 27.0/24.3 for Group II; 1.5/1.7, 5.5/6.3 and 19.4/20.8 for Group III; and 18.1/16.7, 16.1/15.3 and 27.2/25.7 for Group IV. The two methods correlated very well (0.994), with a value of one indicating a 100% correlation. Both evaluation methods were found to be equally appropriate for quantifying the cement interface homogeneity of SEM cross-sections of adhesively luted GFPs.

  19. Drying techniques for the visualisation of agarose-based chromatography media by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nweke, Mauryn C; Turmaine, Mark; McCartney, R Graham; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2017-03-01

    The drying of chromatography resins prior to scanning electron microscopy is critical to image resolution and hence understanding of the bead structure at sub-micron level. Achieving suitable drying conditions is especially important with agarose-based chromatography resins, as over-drying may cause artefact formation, bead damage and alterations to ultrastructural properties; and under-drying does not provide sufficient resolution for visualization under SEM. This paper compares and contrasts the effects of two drying techniques, critical point drying and freeze drying, on the morphology of two agarose based resins (MabSelect™/dw ≈85 µm and Capto™ Adhere/dw ≈75 µm) and provides a complete method for both. The results show that critical point drying provides better drying and subsequently clearer ultrastructural visualization of both resins under SEM. Under this protocol both the polymer fibers (thickness ≈20 nm) and the pore sizes (diameter ≈100 nm) are clearly visible. Freeze drying is shown to cause bead damage to both resins, but to different extents. MabSelect resin encounters extensive bead fragmentation, whilst Capto Adhere resin undergoes partial bead disintegration, corresponding with the greater extent of agarose crosslinking and strength of this resin. While freeze drying appears to be the less favorable option for ultrastructural visualization of chromatography resin, it should be noted that the extent of fracturing caused by the freeze drying process may provide some insight into the mechanical properties of agarose-based chromatography media. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Studies of the small bowel surface by scanning electron microscopy in infants with persistent diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Fagundes-Neto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the ultrastructural abnormalities of the small bowel surface in 16 infants with persistent diarrhea. The age range of the patients was 2 to 10 months, mean 4.8 months. All patients had diarrhea lasting 14 or more days. Bacterial overgrowth of the colonic microflora in the jejunal secretion, at concentrations above 10(4 colonies/ml, was present in 11 (68.7% patients. The stool culture was positive for an enteropathogenic agent in 8 (50.0% patients: for EPEC O111 in 2, EPEC O119 in 1, EAEC in 1, and Shigella flexneri in 1; mixed infections due to EPEC O111 and EAEC in 1 patient, EPEC O119 and EAEC in 1 and EPEC O55, EPEC O111, EAEC and Shigella sonnei in 1. Morphological abnormalities in the small bowel mucosa were observed in all 16 patients, varying in intensity from moderate 9 (56.3% to severe 7 (43.7%. The scanning electron microscopic study of small bowel biopsies from these subjects showed several surface abnormalities. At low magnification (100X most of the villi showed mild to moderate stunting, but on several occasions there was subtotal villus atrophy. At higher magnification (7,500X photomicrographs showed derangement of the enterocytes; on several occasions the cell borders were not clearly defined and very often microvilli were decreased in number and height; in some areas there was a total disappearance of the microvilli. In half of the patients a mucus-fibrinoid pseudomembrane was seen partially coating the enterocytes, a finding that provides additional information on the pathophysiology of persistent diarrhea.

  1. Accuracy of four transfer impression techniques for dental implants: a scanning electron microscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Elcio; Marotti, Juliana; de Campos, Tomie Toyota; Neto, Pedro Tortamano

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the accuracy of four impression techniques for osseointegrated implants (with or without acrylic resin splinting and with irreversible hydrocolloid or polyvinyl siloxane [PVS] impression material). A metal master model was made with three implant analogs and two prosthetic spaces. This model was used as the standard for all impressions. Two impression materials were used (irreversible hydrocolloid and PVS) and two transfer techniques were used (squared impression copings indexed by the impression material and squared impression copings splinted with acrylic resin). Four groups were therefore analyzed (n = 5): IH = irreversible hydrocolloid only, IHS = irreversible hydrocolloid + splint, P = PVS only, and PS = PVS + splint. A reference framework made with palladium-silver alloy over the UCLA abutment was created on the master model. The fit of this structure to the master model was used as a reference. SEM images of the front and side gaps between the abutments and the implant analogs were created and then measured using image analysis software. IH presented the largest misfit. The splinted impression copings generated a smaller marginal gap than the indexed material technique, irrespective of the impression material used. There was no significant difference between IHS, P, PS, and the reference (multivariate test, Wilks criteria). However, PS presented a standard deviation that was three times lower than those of the other groups, and its mean was closer to the reference. The IH impression technique was the least accurate technique. There was no difference between IHS, P, and PS techniques with regard to the reference constant. The impression techniques that used splinted impression copings generated more accurate casts, irrespective of the impression material.

  2. Adapted methods for scanning electron microscopy (SEM in assessment of human sperm morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Nussdorfer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a widespread problem, and in some cases, the routine basic semen analysis is not sufficient to detect the cause of male infertility. The use of the scanning electron microscope (SEM could provide a detailed insight into spermatozoa morphology, but it requires specific sample preparation techniques. The purpose of this study was to select, adjust, and optimize a method for the preparation of spermatozoa samples prior to SEM analysis, and to establish the protocol required for its use in clinical practice. We examined sperm samples of 50 men. The samples were fixed with modified iso-osmolar aldehyde solution followed by osmium post-fixation. In the first method, dehydration of the cells and subsequent critical point drying (CPD were performed on a coverslip. In the second method, the samples were dehydrated in centrifuge tubes; hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS was used as a drying agent instead of CPD, and the samples were air-dried. The third procedure was based on a membrane filter. The samples were dehydrated and dried with HMDS in a Gooch crucible, continuously, without centrifugation or redispersion of the sample. Our results showed that the fixation with modified iso-osmolar aldehyde solution followed by osmium post-fixation, and combined with dehydration and CPD on a coverslip, is the most convenient procedure for SEM sample preparation. In the case of small-size samples or low sperm concentration, dehydration and drying with HMDS on the membrane filter enabled the best reliability, repeatability, and comparability of the results. The presented procedures are suitable for routine use, and they can be applied to confirm as well as to correct a diagnosis.

  3. Studies of Paramecium caudatum by means of scanning electron microscope and projection X-ray microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Keiji; Abe, Taiki; Haga, Nobuyuki

    2009-01-01

    Samples of Paramecium caudatum are observed by means of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a projection X-ray microscope (XRM) with computer tomography (CT) function. The samples are fixed with two kinds of fixatives, glutaraldehyde and osmium-tetra oxide acid. After the fixation and replacement procedure with t-buthyl alcohol, the samples followed by a freeze drying, well retain their structures. Surface structures, cilia and microfibrillar systems including infraciliary lattice structures, are clearly depicted by SEM observation. On the other hand, XRM images give quite different information, namely, in the case of osmium oxide fixation, the structures of internal organelles like the macronucleus placed in the central part of cell body and trichocysts located under the cell membrane of a whole body are visible. In the case of glutaraldehyde fixation, the surface structures and internal structures are both visible but their image contrast is fairly weak. In order to examine toxicological effect, Paramecium caudatum samples treated in the environmental condition containing nano-particles of Ag (17 nm across) and Co-ferrite (300 nm across) are observed with results of certain morphological differences, namely, inner vacuoles increase in number and in volume in Co-ferrite treated cells as compared with Ag treated ones. But then, cilia-less areas increase on the surface of the body of Ag treated cells. In the case of Co-ferrite treated cells, cilia-less areas are not clearly detected. Whether these morphological differences observed in Ag and Co-ferrite treated cells are caused by the differences of materials or particle sizes remain to be examined in future.

  4. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muratore, Massimo, E-mail: M.Muratore@ed.ac.uk [Institute of Integrated Micro and Nano System, School of Engineering, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JF (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Steve [Institute of Molecular Plant Science, School of Biological Science, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JF (United Kingdom); Waterfall, Martin [Institute of Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Science, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Dielectrophoretic separation/sorting of multipotent cells. •Plasma membrane microvilli structure of C2C12 and fibroblasts by SEM microscopy. •Cell cycle determination by Ki-67 in DEP-sorted cells. •Plasma membrane differences responsible for changes in membrane capacitance. -- Abstract: Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Scanning photocurrent microscopy reveals electron-hole asymmetry in ionic liquid-gated WS{sub 2} transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubrig, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.ubrig@unige.ch; Kuzmenko, Alexey B., E-mail: Alexey.Kuzmenko@unige.ch [DPMC, Université de Genève, 24 quai Ernest Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Jo, Sanghyun; Morpurgo, Alberto F. [DPMC, Université de Genève, 24 quai Ernest Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); GAP, Université de Genève, 24 quai Ernest Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Berger, Helmuth [Institut de Physique de la Matière Condendée, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-04-28

    We perform scanning photocurrent microscopy on WS{sub 2} ionic liquid-gated field effect transistors exhibiting high-quality ambipolar transport. By properly biasing the gate electrode, we can invert the sign of the photocurrent showing that the minority photocarriers are either electrons or holes. Both in the electron- and hole-doping regimes the photocurrent decays exponentially as a function of the distance between the illumination spot and the nearest contact, in agreement with a two-terminal Schottky-barrier device model. This allows us to compare the value and the doping dependence of the diffusion length of the minority electrons and holes on a same sample. Interestingly, the diffusion length of the minority carriers is several times larger in the hole accumulation regime than in the electron accumulation regime, pointing out an electron-hole asymmetry in WS{sub 2}.

  6. Acquisition parameters optimization of a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction system in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope for nanomaterials characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Trudeau, Michel; Gauvin, Raynald

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron forward scatter diffraction (t-EFSD) is a new technique providing crystallographic information with high resolution on thin specimens by using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system in a scanning electron microscope. In this study, the impact of tilt angle, working distance, and detector distance on the Kikuchi pattern quality were investigated in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope (CFE-SEM). We demonstrated that t-EFSD is applicable for tilt angles ranging from -20° to -40°. Working distance (WD) should be optimized for each material by choosing the WD for which the EBSD camera screen illumination is the highest, as the number of detected electrons on the screen is directly dependent on the scattering angle. To take advantage of the best performances of the CFE-SEM, the EBSD camera should be close to the sample and oriented towards the bottom to increase forward scattered electron collection efficiency. However, specimen chamber cluttering and beam/mechanical drift are important limitations in the CFE-SEM used in this work. Finally, the importance of t-EFSD in materials science characterization was illustrated through three examples of phase identification and orientation mapping. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Embryogenesis and Larval Development of the Asteroid Patiriella regularis Viewed by Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, M; Barker, M F

    1991-06-01

    The sea star Patiriella regularis (Verrill, 1867) has indirect development through bipinnaria and brachiolaria larvae. Development of this species is typical of asteroids with planktotrophic larvae and takes 9-10 weeks. The embryos develop through a wrinkled blastula and hatch as early gastrulae. In contrast to most asteroids, a third enterocoel forms on the left side of the stomach of the bipinnaria. This structure gives rise to the left posterior coelom; its significance is discussed. We suggest that this coelom is homologous to the trunk coelom in enteropneust embryology. The surface features of the larvae were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Newly hatched gastrulae are covered by cilia, and the bipinnaria have bands of cilia that follow the contours of the larval processes. A previously undescribed plug-like structure positioned on the post-oral surface appears to function as a seal for the mouth. Brachiolaria larvae have three brachiolar arms and a centrally located adhesive disc. Each arm is covered by adhesive papillae. Raised epithelial cells that dot the surface of the papillae and adhesive disc may be batteries of secretory cells. The brachiolar arms have an extracellular coat that may serve as a protective cover for the adhesive surfaces. Competent brachiolaria swim along the substratum and exhibit searching behavior with flexure of the median brachium. They settle on the undersides of natural shell substrata and do not respond to a primary algal film. Shade appears to be an important factor in settlement and metamorphosis in P. regularis. Metamorphosis takes 5-6 days, and the post-larvae take up a free existence at a diameter of 450-500 {mu}m. The indirect development of P. regularis contrasts with the lecithotrophic and viviparous modes of development of other Patiriella species and provides the comparative basis to determine the ontogenic changes involved with evolution of direct development in the genus. The use of the divergent life

  8. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of the material interface of adjacent layers of dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette

    2011-09-01

    Many dental materials are used in contact with each other in sandwich techniques. Liners, bases and permanent restorative materials are placed adjacent to each other and allowed to set under the same conditions. The same applies for endodontic materials where irrigating solutions and root canal dressings come in contact with root canal obturating materials and root-end fillers. The aim of this research was to investigate the material interface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in contact with non-setting calcium hydroxide paste (CH), glass ionomer cement (GIC) and intermediate restorative material (IRM). All materials were mixed according to manufacturer's instructions. Freshly mixed MTA (Dentsply) was placed in a plastic container and another dental material was compacted on it while still unset. These materials included GIC (Fuji IX), non-setting calcium hydroxide (Calasept) and IRM (Dentsply). The materials were allowed to set for 28 days at 37°C and 100% humidity. The layered materials were sectioned longitudinally embedded in resin and polished to expose the interface between the two materials. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed of the interface and X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX) was conducted at 50 μm intervals to establish elements present at specific distances from the material interface. The calcium hydroxide paste did not affect the hydration of MTA. Migration of silicon, aluminum and bismuth from the MTA to the CH occurred. The GIC exhibited a high degree of micro-cracking and some porosity in the interfacial region. Strontium from the GIC was detected at 200 μm within the MTA. The zinc from the IRM cement was detected at 100 μm within the MTA. The zinc affected the hydration of the MTA leading to retardation of setting and increased porosity. MTA interacts with other dental materials with resultant elemental migration in adjacent materials. Zinc oxide eugenol based cements should be avoided in the presence of MTA as zinc

  9. Clinical and scanning electron microscopic assessments of porcelain and ceromer resin veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Pankaj; Prakash, Hari; Shah, Nassem

    2003-01-01

    Recently available Ceromer resin materials are promising for fabrication of esthetic anterior laminates and provices an alternative, cost effective treament modality to porcelain laminates for discolored anterior anterior teeth. It was proposed to study the esthetic quality and surface finish of veneers fbricated from ceromer resin and compare it with the standard porcelain veneers, both clinically as well as by scanning electron microscope (SEM) at baseline and at 12 months. If found comparable, ceromer resin veneer could provide an alternative to porcelain veneers which is an expensive technique for a developing country like India. Seventy-two veneers, 36 porcelain and 36 ceromer were placed in 12 subjects who were studied at 0, 6 and 12 months for clinical acceptability, and at 0 and 12 months for SEM assessment. The restorations were luted with Opal luting composite and Scotchbond multipurpose system; polyvinyl siloxane was used as the impression material. The clinical assessment was made using modified United Public Health Services criteria, whereas the SEM assessment was made by quantitative analysis of the marginal fit and surface characteristics of the two veneering materials. Ceromer exhibited good anatomical form during the study period, but depicted changes in color, surface appearance, marginal adaptation, increased marginal discoloration, and tissue response. Inability to achieve a good finish with high gloss was a major drawback of the ceromer. Porcelain exhibited better esthetics, marginal adaptation, finish qualities, and tissue response. The SEM showed good to excellent marginal fit at baselinne in ceromer and porcelain veneers, but loss of luting resin at the margins was evident in both the materials after 12 months, leading to visible gaps in a number of veneer restorations. Ceromer veneers exhibited poor surface characteristics in several restorations, which further degraded in an oral conditions over 12 months. Veneering is an effective mode of

  10. Investigations of a Cretaceous limestone with spectral induced polarization and scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Sara; Sparrenbom, Charlotte; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Lindskog, Anders; Olsson, Per-Ivar; Dahlin, Torleif; Rosqvist, Håkan

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of varying bedrock properties is a common need in various contexts, ranging from large infrastructure pre-investigations to environmental protection. A direct current resistivity and time domain induced polarization (IP) survey aiming to characterize properties of a Cretaceous limestone was carried out in the Kristianstad basin, Sweden. The time domain IP data was processed with a recently developed method in order to suppress noise from the challenging urban setting in the survey area. The processing also enabled extraction of early decay times resulting in broader spectra of the time decays and inversion for Cole-Cole parameters. The aims of this study is to investigate if large-scale geoelectrical variations as well as small-scale structural and compositional variations exist within the Kristianstad limestone, and to evaluate the usefulness of Cole-Cole inverted IP data in early time ranges for bedrock characterization. The inverted sections showed variations within the limestone that could be caused by variations in texture and composition. Samples from a deep drilling in the Kristianstad basin were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the results showed that varying amounts of pyrite, glauconite and clay matrix were present at different levels in the limestone. The local high IP anomalies in the limestone could be caused by these minerals otherwise the IP responses were generally weak. There were also differences in the texture of the limestone at different levels, governed by fossil shapes and composition, proportions of calcareous cement and matrix as well as amount of silicate grains. Textural variations may have implications on the variation in Cole-Cole relaxation time and frequency factor. However, more research is needed in order to directly connect microgeometrical properties in limestone to spectral IP responses. The results from this study show that it is possible to recover

  11. Histology and scanning electron microscopy of the tubal tonsil of goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indu, V. R.; Lucy, K. M.; Chungath, J. J.; Ashok, N.; Maya, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To observe the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the caprine tubal tonsil. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on six crossbred male goats of 6 months of age. From the median sections of the head, tissue pieces from the nasopharynx around the auditory tube were collected and fixed for histology and SEM. Results: Tonsillar lymphoid tissue was located in the nasopharynx ventral to the auditory tube opening in the lateral wall of the pharynx. The height of the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsil measured 80.17±1.08 µm and was a pseudostratified ciliated columnar type with basal, supporting, and goblet cells. Above the dome of lymphoid nodules, the epithelium was modified into a follicle associated epithelium (FAE), also called lympho-epithelium or reticular epithelium and was characterized by the absence of goblet cells and cilia, reduced number of cell layers, and a large number of lymphoid cells due to interrupted basement membrane. The height of FAE was smaller than that of the surface epithelium and measured 34.33±0.92 µm. The surface of tubal tonsil showed folds and invaginations, which formed crypts. The lamina propria-submucosa underneath the epithelium was formed by the meshwork of reticular and, thin and loose collagen fibers with dome-like accumulation of lymphoid nodules. In the secondary lymphoid nodules, a corona, parafollicular area, and interfnodular area were observed. The average number of lymphoid nodules counted per field under low power magnification of microscope was 1.17±0.17, and the internodular distance was 34.00±4.37 µm. The mean diameter of lymphoid nodules was 566.67±11.45 µm and the lymphocyte count per nodule was 14741.67±174.36. The number of plasma cells counted per field under low power was 44.38±2.90 below the surface epithelium. The tubal tonsil was not encapsulated. In SEM, the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsils presented ciliated cells, microvillus (MV) cells, and goblet cells. The

  12. Histology and scanning electron microscopy of the tubal tonsil of goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Indu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM of the caprine tubal tonsil. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on six crossbred male goats of 6 months of age. From the median sections of the head, tissue pieces from the nasopharynx around the auditory tube were collected and fixed for histology and SEM. Results: Tonsillar lymphoid tissue was located in the nasopharynx ventral to the auditory tube opening in the lateral wall of the pharynx. The height of the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsil measured 80.17±1.08 μm and was a pseudostratified ciliated columnar type with basal, supporting, and goblet cells. Above the dome of lymphoid nodules, the epithelium was modified into a follicle associated epithelium (FAE, also called lympho-epithelium or reticular epithelium and was characterized by the absence of goblet cells and cilia, reduced number of cell layers, and a large number of lymphoid cells due to interrupted basement membrane. The height of FAE was smaller than that of the surface epithelium and measured 34.33±0.92 μm. The surface of tubal tonsil showed folds and invaginations, which formed crypts. The lamina propria-submucosa underneath the epithelium was formed by the meshwork of reticular and, thin and loose collagen fibers with dome-like accumulation of lymphoid nodules. In the secondary lymphoid nodules, a corona, parafollicular area, and interfnodular area were observed. The average number of lymphoid nodules counted per field under low power magnification of microscope was 1.17±0.17, and the internodular distance was 34.00±4.37 μm. The mean diameter of lymphoid nodules was 566.67±11.45 μm and the lymphocyte count per nodule was 14741.67±174.36. The number of plasma cells counted per field under low power was 44.38±2.90 below the surface epithelium. The tubal tonsil was not encapsulated. In SEM, the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsils presented ciliated cells, microvillus (MV cells, and

  13. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis of daily disposable limbal ring contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Kathrine Osborn; Kakkassery, Joseph; Boree, Danielle; Pinto, David

    2014-09-01

    Limbal ring (also known as 'circle') contact lenses are becoming increasingly popular, especially in Asian markets because of their eye-enhancing effects. The pigment particles that give the eye-enhancing effects of these lenses can be found on the front or back surface of the contact lens or 'enclosed' within the lens matrix. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pigment location and surface roughness of seven types of 'circle' contact lenses. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis was performed using a variable pressure Hitachi S3400N instrument to discern the placement of lens pigments. Atomic force microscopy (Dimension Icon AFM from Bruker Nano) was used to determine the surface roughness of the pigmented regions of the contact lenses. Atomic force microscopic analysis was performed in fluid phase under contact mode using a Sharp Nitride Lever probe (SNL-10) with a spring constant of 0.06 N/m. Root mean square (RMS) roughness values were analysed using a generalised linear mixed model with a log-normal distribution. Least square means and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were estimated for each brand, location and pigment combination. SEM cross-sectional images at 500× and 2,000× magnification showed pigment on the surface of six of the seven lens types tested. The mean depth of pigment for 1-DAY ACUVUE DEFINE (1DAD) lenses was 8.1 μm below the surface of the lens, while the remaining lens types tested had pigment particles on the front or back surface. Results of the atomic force microscopic analysis indicated that 1DAD lenses had significantly lower root mean square roughness values in the pigmented area of the lens than the other lens types tested. SEM and AFM analysis revealed pigment on the surface of the lens for all types tested with the exception of 1DAD. Further research is required to determine if the difference in pigment location influences on-eye performance. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental

  14. Histology and scanning electron microscopy of the tubal tonsil of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indu, V R; Lucy, K M; Chungath, J J; Ashok, N; Maya, S

    2015-08-01

    To observe the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the caprine tubal tonsil. The study was conducted on six crossbred male goats of 6 months of age. From the median sections of the head, tissue pieces from the nasopharynx around the auditory tube were collected and fixed for histology and SEM. Tonsillar lymphoid tissue was located in the nasopharynx ventral to the auditory tube opening in the lateral wall of the pharynx. The height of the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsil measured 80.17±1.08 µm and was a pseudostratified ciliated columnar type with basal, supporting, and goblet cells. Above the dome of lymphoid nodules, the epithelium was modified into a follicle associated epithelium (FAE), also called lympho-epithelium or reticular epithelium and was characterized by the absence of goblet cells and cilia, reduced number of cell layers, and a large number of lymphoid cells due to interrupted basement membrane. The height of FAE was smaller than that of the surface epithelium and measured 34.33±0.92 µm. The surface of tubal tonsil showed folds and invaginations, which formed crypts. The lamina propria-submucosa underneath the epithelium was formed by the meshwork of reticular and, thin and loose collagen fibers with dome-like accumulation of lymphoid nodules. In the secondary lymphoid nodules, a corona, parafollicular area, and interfnodular area were observed. The average number of lymphoid nodules counted per field under low power magnification of microscope was 1.17±0.17, and the internodular distance was 34.00±4.37 µm. The mean diameter of lymphoid nodules was 566.67±11.45 µm and the lymphocyte count per nodule was 14741.67±174.36. The number of plasma cells counted per field under low power was 44.38±2.90 below the surface epithelium. The tubal tonsil was not encapsulated. In SEM, the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsils presented ciliated cells, microvillus (MV) cells, and goblet cells. The region of FAE possessed Type-I and

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrese, James C.; Aceros, Juan; Donoghue, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Signal attenuation is a major problem facing intracortical sensors for chronic neuroprosthetic applications. Many studies suggest that failure is due to gliosis around the electrode tips, however, mechanical and material causes of failure are often overlooked. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors contributing to progressive signal decline by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to visualize structural changes in chronically implanted arrays and histology to examine the tissue response at corresponding implant sites. Approach. We examined eight chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) explanted from non-human primates at times ranging from 37 to 1051 days post-implant. We used SEM, in vivo neural recordings, and histology (GFAP, Iba-1, NeuN). Three MEAs that were never implanted were also imaged as controls. Main results. SEM revealed progressive corrosion of the platinum electrode tips and changes to the underlying silicon. The parylene insulation was prone to cracking and delamination, and in some instances the silicone elastomer also delaminated from the edges of the MEA. Substantial tissue encapsulation was observed and was often seen growing into defects in the platinum and parylene. These material defects became more common as the time in vivo increased. Histology at 37 and 1051 days post-implant showed gliosis, disruption of normal cortical architecture with minimal neuronal loss, and high Iba-1 reactivity, especially within the arachnoid and dura. Electrode tracts were either absent or barely visible in the cortex at 1051 days, but were seen in the fibrotic encapsulation material suggesting that the MEAs were lifted out of the brain. Neural recordings showed a progressive drop in impedance, signal amplitude, and viable channels over time. Significance. These results provide evidence that signal loss in MEAs is truly multifactorial. Gliosis occurs in the first few months after implantation but does

  16. Fast Focal Point Correction in Prism-Coupled Total Internal Reflection Scanning Imager Using an Electronically Tunable Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenggang Zhu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Total internal reflection (TIR is useful for interrogating physical and chemical processes that occur at the interface between two transparent media. Yet prism-coupled TIR imaging microscopes suffer from limited sensing areas due to the fact that the interface (the object plane is not perpendicular to the optical axis of the microscope. In this paper, we show that an electrically tunable lens can be used to rapidly and reproducibly correct the focal length of an oblique-incidence scanning microscope (OI-RD in a prism-coupled TIR geometry. We demonstrate the performance of such a correction by acquiring an image of a protein microarray over a scan area of 4 cm2 with an effective resolution of less than 20 microns. The electronic focal length tuning eliminates the mechanical movement of the illumination lens in the scanning microscope and in turn the noise and background drift associated with the motion.

  17. Ku/Ka/W-band Antenna for Electronically-Scanned Cloud and Precipitation Radar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of the key antenna technologies for Tri-band (Ku/Ka/W), scanning precipitation and cloud radar is a required milestone in preparation for one or more...

  18. An endolithic microbial community in dolomite rock in central Switzerland: characterization by reflection spectroscopy, pigment analyses, scanning electron microscopy, and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horath, T; Neu, T R; Bachofen, R

    2006-04-01

    A community of endolithic microorganisms dominated by phototrophs was found as a distinct band a few millimeters below the surface of bare exposed dolomite rocks in the Piora Valley in the Alps. Using in situ reflectance spectroscopy, we detected chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycobilins, carotenoids, and an unknown type of bacteriochlorophyll-like pigment absorbing in vivo at about 720 nm. In cross sections, the data indicated a defined distribution of different groups of organisms perpendicular to the rock surface. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses of pigments extracted with organic solvents confirmed the presence of two types of bacteriochlorophylls besides chlorophylls and various carotenoids. Spherical organisms of varying sizes and small filaments were observed in situ with scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (one- and two-photon technique). The latter allowed visualization of the distribution of phototrophic microorganisms by the autofluorescence of their pigments within the rock. Coccoid cyanobacteria of various sizes predominated over filamentous ones. Application of fluorescence-labeled lectins demonstrated that most cyanobacteria were embedded in an exopolymeric matrix. Nucleic acid stains revealed a wide distribution of small heterotrophs. Some biological structures emitting a green autofluorescence remain to be identified.

  19. Evaluation of Enterococcus faecalis adhesion, penetration, and method to prevent the penetration of Enterococcus faecalis into root cementum: Confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkai, Rahul S; Hegde, Mithra N; Halkai, Kiran R

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the role of Enterococcus faecalis in persistent infection and a possible method to prevent the penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum. One hundred and twenty human single-rooted extracted teeth divided into five groups. Group I (control): intact teeth, Group II: no apical treatment done, Group III divided into two subgroups. In Groups IIIa and IIIb, root apex treated with lactic acid of acidic and neutral pH, respectively. Group IV: apical root cementum exposed to lactic acid and roughened to mimic the apical resorption. Group V: apical treatment done same as Group IV and root-end filling done using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Apical one-third of all samples immersed in E. faecalis broth for 8 weeks followed by bone morphogenetic protein and obturation and again immersed into broth for 8 weeks. Teeth split into two halves and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope, organism identified by culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques. Adhesion and penetration was observed in Group IIIa and Group IV. Only adhesion in Group II and IIIB and no adhesion and penetration in Group I and V. Adhesion and penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum providing a long-term nidus for subsequent infection are the possible reason for persistent infection and root-end filling with MTA prevents the adhesion and penetration.

  20. Evaluation of Enterococcus faecalis adhesion, penetration, and method to prevent the penetration of Enterococcus faecalis into root cementum: Confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkai, Rahul S.; Hegde, Mithra N.; Halkai, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To ascertain the role of Enterococcus faecalis in persistent infection and a possible method to prevent the penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum. Methodology: One hundred and twenty human single-rooted extracted teeth divided into five groups. Group I (control): intact teeth, Group II: no apical treatment done, Group III divided into two subgroups. In Groups IIIa and IIIb, root apex treated with lactic acid of acidic and neutral pH, respectively. Group IV: apical root cementum exposed to lactic acid and roughened to mimic the apical resorption. Group V: apical treatment done same as Group IV and root-end filling done using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Apical one-third of all samples immersed in E. faecalis broth for 8 weeks followed by bone morphogenetic protein and obturation and again immersed into broth for 8 weeks. Teeth split into two halves and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope, organism identified by culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques. Results: Adhesion and penetration was observed in Group IIIa and Group IV. Only adhesion in Group II and IIIB and no adhesion and penetration in Group I and V. Conclusion: Adhesion and penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum providing a long-term nidus for subsequent infection are the possible reason for persistent infection and root-end filling with MTA prevents the adhesion and penetration. PMID:27994316

  1. Mass measurement with the electron microscope. [Application of scanning transmission electron microscopy in molecular weight determinations of fd phage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The use of electron scattering measurements performed in the electron microscope as a means of measurement of particle molecular weight is described. Various potential sources of errors are identified and estimated where possible. Specimen preparation and observation conditions to minimize errors are described. The fd phage is presented as an example of analysis and an illustration of the accuracy obtainable at low dose.

  2. Electronic “Edge” State on Molybdenite Basal Plane Observed by Ultrahigh-Vacuum Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Masaharu; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Yoda, Eisuke

    2007-09-01

    An electronic state heretofore unreported has been found on a cleaved basal plane of a natural molybdenite (MoS2) single crystal by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM), and examined in detail both by STM and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The new electronic state resides on the edge of the upper terrace of MoS2(0001), manifesting itself in the form of bright ridges with a width of ca. 4 nm along the step edges in negatively sample-biased STM images. This ridge structure is nonexistent in STM images taken with positive sample biases. STS showed that the local density of states (LDOS) on such ridge structures is much higher than that on the terraces in the range of 0.2-1.2 eV below the Fermi edge. The nature and origin of this high LDOS at the step edges are discussed.

  3. Mapping of valence energy losses via energy-filtered annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin; Sigle, Wilfried; Koch, Christoph T; Nelayah, Jaysen; Srot, Vesna; van Aken, Peter A

    2009-08-01

    The advent of electron monochromators has opened new perspectives on electron energy-loss spectroscopy at low energy losses, including phenomena such as surface plasmon resonances or electron transitions from the valence to the conduction band. In this paper, we report first results making use of the combination of an energy filter and a post-filter annular dark-field detector. This instrumental design allows us to obtain energy-filtered (i.e. inelastic) annular dark-field images in scanning transmission electron microscopy of the 2-dimensional semiconductor band-gap distribution of a GaN/Al(45)Ga(55)N structure and of surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoprisms. In comparison to other approaches, the technique is less prone to inelastic delocalization and relativistic artefacts. The mixed contribution of elastic and inelastic contrast is discussed.

  4. Probing the electronic structure of graphene sheets with various thicknesses by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Lili; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Jing; Sun, Xuhui, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn; Zhong, Jun, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2013-12-16

    The electronic structure of an aggregation of graphene sheets with various thicknesses was probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. A uniform oxidation of the graphene sheets in the flat area was observed regardless of the thickness, while in the folded area the result could be strongly affected by the geometry. Moreover, thick parts of the aggregation showed strong angle-dependence to the incident X-ray, while thin parts showed less angle-dependence, which might be related to the surface wrinkles and ripples. The electronic structure differences due to the geometry and thickness suggest a complicated situation in the aggregation of graphene sheets.

  5. Use of a Secondary Current Sensor in Plasma during Electron-Beam Welding with Focus Scanning for Process Control

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitriy Trushnikov; Elena Krotova; Elena Koleva

    2016-01-01

    We consider questions of building a closed-loop focus control system for electron-beam welding. As a feedback signal, we use the secondary current in the plasma that forms above the welding zone. This article presents a model of a secondary current sensor in plasma during electron-beam welding with focus scanning. A comparison of modeled results with experimental data confirms the adequacy of the model. We show that the best results for focus control are obtained when using phase relationship...

  6. Atomic resolution elemental mapping using energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy with chromatic aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, F F; Rosenauer, A; Barthel, J; Mayer, J; Urban, K; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Brown, H G; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses a novel approach to atomic resolution elemental mapping, demonstrating a method that produces elemental maps with a similar resolution to the established method of electron energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dubbed energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM) this mode of imaging is, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, equivalent to tilting the probe in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) through a cone and incoherently averaging the results. In this paper we present a proof-of-principle EFISTEM experimental study on strontium titanate. The present approach, made possible by chromatic aberration correction, has the advantage that it provides elemental maps which are immune to spatial incoherence in the electron source, coherent aberrations in the probe-forming lens and probe jitter. The veracity of the experiment is supported by quantum mechanical image simulations, which provide an insight into the image-forming process. Elemental maps obtained in EFTEM suffer from the effect known as preservation of elastic contrast, which, for example, can lead to a given atomic species appearing to be in atomic columns where it is not to be found. EFISTEM very substantially reduces the preservation of elastic contrast and yields images which show stability of contrast with changing thickness. The experimental application is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle study on strontium titanate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of resin-dentin interfacial morphology of two ethanol-based universal adhesives: A scanning electron microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Awad, Mohamed Moustafa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the resin-dentin interfacial morphology created by two universal adhesives using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: The occlusal surfaces of ten (n = 5) molars were reduced to expose a flat surface of dentin. Two universal adhesives, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive and Tetric N-Bond Universal, were independently applied to air-dried dentin. Light-cured resin-based composite restorative materials were used to incrementa...

  8. Visualization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in 2Dand 3D-Cultures by Scanning Electron Microscopy with Lanthanide Contrasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, I A; Vakhrushev, I V; Antonov, E N; Yarygin, K N; Subbot, A M

    2017-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells from deciduous teeth in 2D- and 3D-cultures on culture plastic, silicate glass, porous polystyrene, and experimental polylactoglycolide matrices were visualized by scanning electron microscopy with lanthanide contrasting. Supravital staining of cell cultures with a lanthanide-based dye (neodymium chloride) preserved normal cell morphology and allowed assessment of the matrix properties of the carriers. The developed approach can be used for the development of biomaterials for tissue engineering.

  9. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of the Fractured Surfaces of Canine Calculi from Substrata with Different Surface Free Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Uyen, H. M. W.; Jongebloed, W. L.; Busscher, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    The strength of adhesion between dental calculus and enamel or dentin surfaces determines the ease with which the calculus can be removed by brushing or professional dental treatment. In this study, we examined the adhesion of canine calculi formed on substrata with different surface free energies (sfe) and roughness by means of scanning electron microscopy. In 4 beagle dogs fenestrated crowns were made on the upper fourth premolars. Subsequently, facings of glass (sfe = 120 mJ. m-2), bovine ...

  10. Scanning electron microscopy on adults of Schistosoma mansoni treated in-vivo with praziquantel and RO-15 (5458).

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, S. H. [شادية ح. محمد; Fawzi, Samia M.

    1997-01-01

    In view of the known relationship between changes in the tegumental surface of schistosomes and the potency of antischistosomal drugs, the present work is done to study the effect of two oral drugs, namely Praziquantel and Ro-15 (5458), on the tegument of Schistosoma mansoni by scanning electron microscopy. The damage produced in the tegument of both male and female worms after treatment with the curative and subcurative doses of Praziquantel and Ro-15 (5458) are described. A pronounced de...

  11. Nanocrystals of [Cu3(btc)2] (HKUST-1): a combined time-resolved light scattering and scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Denise; Liu, Jianing; Huber, Klaus; Fischer, Roland A

    2009-03-07

    The formation of [Cu(3)(btc)(2)] (HKUST-1; btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) nanocrystals from a super-saturated mother solution at room temperature was monitored by time-resolved light scattering (TLS); the system is characterized by a rapid growth up to a size limit of 200 nm within a few minutes, and the size and shape of the crystallites were also determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  12. Scanning electron microscopic (Sem studies on fourth instar larva and pupa of Anopheles (Cellia stephensi Liston (Anophelinae: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagbir Singh Kirti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles (Cellia stephensi Liston is a major vector species of malaria in Indian subcontinent. Taxonomists have worked on its various morphological aspects and immature stages to explore additional and new taxonomic attributes. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM studies have been conducted on the fourth instar larva and pupa of An. stephensi to find additional taxonomic features for the first time from Punjab state.

  13. Visualization of the cytostome in Trypanosoma cruzi by high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy using secondary and backscattered electron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatarunakamura, Celso; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2005-01-15

    High resolution scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the surface of epimastigote, amastigote and trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Significant differences were observed between these forms and in different areas of the same cell. The cytostome found in amastigote and epimastigote forms could be easily visualized in images, which resemble those obtained only using the freeze-fracture technique. In contrast to other areas of the cell surface, the region of the cytostome, localized close to the flagellar pocket, showed a rugous surface and an opening with a diameter of 90 nm. Gold-labeled concanavalin A binds to the whole cell surface. However, the extent of binding was much higher in the region of the cytostome. The results obtained show that high resolution scanning electron microscopy is a powerful technique for analyzing the surface of protozoa.

  14. Epithelial maturation pattern of dysplastic epithelium and normal oral epithelium exposed to tobacco and alcohol: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Nithya; Ramani, Pratibha; Premkumar, Priya; Natesan, Anuja; Sherlin, Herald J

    2013-05-01

    The detection of oral cancer at an early stage is an optimal strategy and is the most effective approach for preventing further progression. The rationale of the study was to evaluate the epithelial maturation pattern in oral mucosa exposed to tobacco/alcohol and on dysplastic oral mucosa using the scanning electron microscope. Fifteen subjects were selected based on clinical examination and divided into three groups: group 1-patients with apparently normal oral mucosa; group 2-patients with oral mucosa exposed to tobacco/alcohol; group 3-patients with clinical diagnosis of leukoplakia. An incisional biopsy was performed from the buccal mucosa. One part of the specimen was prepared for light microscopy and the other part was prepared for scanning electron microscopy. Light microscopy revealed nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium in group 1, while group 2 demonstrated hyperparakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium with mild cytological atypia, and group 3 showed architectural and cytological changes. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated flat-surfaced cells with equidistant parallel microridges in group 1, while group 2 showed irregular and widened microridges with numerous pits and absence of honeycomb pattern. Group 3 showed irregularly arranged broad and swollen cells with numerous pits and irregular microvilli projecting over the surface. The present study establishes the relationship of the surface abnormalities to the tendency of the cells to become malignant and thus serves as a tool in early detection of squamous cell carcinoma. It also emphasizes the need of routine follow-up in these high-risk patients for progression of carcinoma.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy combined with image processing technique: Microstructure and texture analysis of legumes and vegetables for instant meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieniazek, Facundo; Messina, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    Development and innovation of new technologies are necessary especially in food quality; due that most instrumental technique for measuring quality properties involves a considerable amount of manual work. Image analysis is a technique that allows to provide objective evaluations from digitalized images that can estimate quality parameters for consumer's acceptance. The aim of the present research was to study the effect of freeze drying on the microstructure and texture of legume and vegetables using scanning electron microscopy at different magnifications' combined with image analysis. Cooked and cooked freeze dried rehydrated legumes and vegetables were analyzed individually by scanning electron microscopy at different magnifications' (250, 500, and 1000×).Texture properties were analyzed by texture analyzer and image analysis. Significant differences (P image and instrumental texture parameters. A linear trend with a linear correlation was applied for instrumental and image features. Results showed that image features calculated from Grey level co-occurrence matrix at 1,000× had high correlations with instrumental features. In rice, homogeneity and contrast can be applied to evaluate texture parameters gumminess and adhesiviness; Lentils: contrast, correlation, energy, homogeneity, and entropy for hardness, adhesiviness, gumminess, and chewiness; Potato and carrots: contrast, energy, homogeneity and entropy for adhesiviness, chewiness, hardness, cohesiviness, and resilence. Results revealed that combing scanning electron microscopy with image analysis can be a useful tool to analyze quality parameters in legumes and vegetables. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging of field emission scanning electron microscopy for discrimination of nano-scale elements with nm-order spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Negishi, Tsutomu; Kudo, Masato; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Discrimination of thin film elements by backscattered electron (BSE) imaging of field emission scanning electron microscope was examined. Incident electron acceleration voltage dependence on thin films' BSE intensities in five elements (Au, Ag, Ge, Cu and Fe) on a silicon substrate was experimentally measured from 3 to 30 kV. Normalization of BSE intensities using the difference between maximum and minimum brightness was proposed and allowed reproducible comparison among the elements. Measured intensities, which have correlation with electron backscattering coefficient against atomic number, indicated the existence of adequate acceleration voltage for improvement of resolution to discriminate different elements, showing the possibility of discriminating at least these six elements simultaneously by BSE imaging with nanometer-scale spatial resolution.

  17. Identification of magnetic Fe-Ti oxides in marine sediments by electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, C.; Pennock, G.M.; Drury, M.R.; Engelmann, R.; Lattard, D.; Garming, J.F.L.; Dobeneck, T. von; Dekkers, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    In paleomagnetic and environmental magnetic studies the magnetomineralogical identification is usually based on a set of rock magnetic parameters, complemented by crystallographic and chemical information retrieved from X-ray diffraction (XRD), (electron) microscopy or energy dispersive spectroscopy

  18. Whole-cell imaging of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-voltage scanning transmission electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: kazum@nips.ac.jp [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Esaki, Masatoshi; Ogura, Teru [Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Arai, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Yuta; Tanaka, Nobuo [Ecotopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Electron tomography using a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) provides three-dimensional information about cellular components in sections thicker than 1 μm, although in bright-field mode image degradation caused by multiple inelastic scattering of transmitted electrons limit the attainable resolution. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is believed to give enhanced contrast and resolution compared to conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). Samples up to 1 μm in thickness have been analyzed with an intermediate-voltage electron microscope because inelastic scattering is not a critical limitation, and probe broadening can be minimized. Here, we employed STEM at 1 MeV high-voltage to extend the useful specimen thickness for electron tomography, which we demonstrate by a seamless tomographic reconstruction of a whole, budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell, which is ∼3 μm in thickness. High-voltage STEM tomography, especially in the bright-field mode, demonstrated sufficiently enhanced contrast and intensity, compared to CTEM tomography, to permit segmentation of major organelles in the whole cell. STEM imaging also reduced specimen shrinkage during tilt-series acquisition. The fidelity of structural preservation was limited by cytoplasmic extraction, and the spatial resolution was limited by the relatively large convergence angle of the scanning probe. However, the new technique has potential to solve longstanding problems of image blurring in biological specimens beyond 1 μm in thickness, and may facilitate new research in cellular structural biology. - Highlights: • High voltage TEM and STEM tomography were compared to visualize whole yeast cells. • 1-MeV STEM-BF tomography had significant improvements in image contrast and SNR. • 1-MeV STEM tomography showed less specimen shrinkage than the TEM tomography. • KMnO{sub 4} post-treatment permitted segmenting the major cellular components.

  19. Scanning probe microscopy and field emission schemes for studying electron emission from polycrystalline diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Chubenko, Oksana; Baturin, Stanislav S.; Baryshev, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    The letter introduces a diagram that rationalizes tunneling atomic force microscopy (TUNA) observations of electron emission from polycrystalline diamonds as described in recent publications. The direct observations of electron emission from grain boundary sites by TUNA could indeed be evidence of electrons originating from grain boundaries under external electric fields. At the same time, from the diagram it follows that TUNA and field emission schemes are complimentary rather than equivalen...

  20. Imaging interactions of metal oxide nanoparticles with macrophage cells by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Starr, Clarise R; Armstrong, Linda S; Ponce, Arturo; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2012-11-01

    Use of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles in a plethora of biological applications and custom products has warned about some possible dose-dependent cytotoxic effects. Macrophages are key components of the innate immune system used to study possible toxic effects and internalization of different nanoparticulate materials. In this work, ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to offer new insights into the dynamical processes of interaction of nanomaterials with macrophage cells dosed with different concentrations of metal oxide nanoparticles (CeO(2), TiO(2) and ZnO). The versatility of FE-SEM has allowed obtaining a detailed characterization of processes of adsorption and endocytosis of nanoparticles, by using advanced analytical and imaging techniques on complete unstained uncoated cells, including secondary electron imaging, high-sensitive backscattered electron imaging, X-ray microanalysis and stereoimaging. Low voltage BF/DF-STEM confirmed nanoparticle adsorption and internalization into endosomes of CeO(2) and TiO(2), whereas ZnO develop apoptosis after 24 h of interaction caused by dissolution and invasion of cell nucleus. Ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques provided new insights into interactions of inorganic nanoparticles with macrophage cells with high spatial resolution.