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Sample records for scandinavian waters inferred

  1. Long-term feeding ecology and habitat use in harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena from Scandinavian waters inferred from trace elements and stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontaine, Michaël C; Tolley, Krystal A; Siebert, Ursula; Gobert, Sylvie; Lepoint, Gilles; Bouquegneau, Jean-Marie; Das, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the feeding ecology and habitat use of 32 harbour porpoises by-caught in 4 localities along the Scandinavian coast from the North Sea to the Barents Sea using time-integrative markers: stable isotopes (delta13C, delta15N) and trace elements (Zn, Cu, Fe, Se, total Hg and

  2. Scandinavian Egalitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgård, Andreas Pihl

    The dissertation finds that, compared to people in other western countries, the Scandinavians were exceptionally egalitarian in the period from 1992 to 2009. This Scandinavian egalitarianism seems constituted mostly of an aversion to top-level excess, rather than a wish to spoil the bottom of the...

  3. Scandinavian Cooperative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert; Freeman, R. Edward

    2015-01-01

    . We conclude by endorsing the expression “Scandinavian cooperative advantage” in an effort to draw attention to the Scandinavian context and encourage the field of strategic management to shift its focus from achieving a competitive advantage toward achieving a cooperative advantage....

  4. Scandinavian Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ole Sejer; Smith, Rachel Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    As Scandinavian Participatory Design (PD) approach is a highly values-led design approach, and is gaining importance in IDC research, we discuss the underlying values of democracy, quality of work and emancipation of this approach. We present a case study, Digital Natives, in which the Scandinavian...... PD approach was put into practice. Here we involved seven teenagers in the design of an interactive museum exhibition. We discuss how this particular approach effects key design activities such as the establishment of the design space, power relations among participants, the dialogical design process......, project evaluation and the final outcome of the project. We conclude that the end goal of Scandinavian PD is not necessarily the final research prototype. Rather, in Scandinavian PD, designers strive to provide children with meaningful alternatives to existing technologies. It is to help children realize...

  5. Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper

    .1 with the title ‘Inference'.) This contribution concerns statistical inference for parametric models used in stochastic geometry and based on quick and simple simulation free procedures as well as more comprehensive methods using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. Due to space limitations the focus......(This text written by Jesper Møller, Aalborg University, is submitted for the collection ‘Stochastic Geometry: Highlights, Interactions and New Perspectives', edited by Wilfrid S. Kendall and Ilya Molchanov, to be published by ClarendonPress, Oxford, and planned to appear as Section 4...... is on spatial point processes....

  6. Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Chapter 9: This contribution concerns statistical inference for parametric models used in stochastic geometry and based on quick and simple simulation free procedures as well as more comprehensive methods based on a maximum likelihood or Bayesian approach combined with markov chain Monte Carlo...... (MCMC) techniques. Due to space limitations the focus is on spatial point processes....

  7. The Scandinavian Welfare States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    1987-01-01

    and emphasises the need to explore the relationship between the family and the state ( and the family and the economy) in difefrent wefare states. The paper emphasises that the qualitative difference in the organization of care work are important for understanding the institutional differences for between...... the welfare states, and especially the Scandinavian welfare states, where motherhood and care work has to day bef´come part of social citizenship The auther argues that even though women have in important ways been empowered in the Scandinavian woefare states as mothers, workers and citizens, they have...

  8. The Society for Scandinavian Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]......The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]...

  9. Action research: Scandinavian Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2004-01-01

    The article focus on paradigms, methods and ethics of action research in the Scandinavian countries. The special features of the action research paradigm is identified. A historical overview follows of some main action research projects in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. The tendency towards upsclae...

  10. Challenging Scandinavian employment relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Christian Lyhne; Larsen, Trine Pernille; Madsen, Jørgen Steen

    2011-01-01

    and employment relations in the Danish, Norwegian and Swedish public sector. In this paper, we argue that although differences exist across the Scandinavian countries, it is evident that they have managed to adopt and implement NPM-inspired reforms without dismantling their universal welfare services and strong...

  11. The Scandinavian Cooperative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert; Freeman, R. Edward

    In this article we clarify the historical roots of stakeholder theory to establish that a much larger role was played by Scandinavian thinkers in its development than is currently acknowledged. We show that important contributions to the stakeholder concept were being made by Eric Rhenman and his...

  12. Scandinavian Model of Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Within the so-called welfare modeling business Scandinavia stands out as a space with a particular welfare regime. It is a peculiar combination of market, state, and civil societal interventions into people's social life, that define this welfare regime. The particular welfare mix emphasizes...... universal public interventions and a high degree of employment in the formal labor market for all. The thesis promoted in this paper is, that the Scandinavian welfare regime ought to be highly desirable elsewhere, but unfortunately rather difficult to replicate, because it is premised upon a set...

  13. Religion in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, I develop a theoretical framework for the discussion of religion i Scandinavian crime fiction where I consider theories of transgression and religion. Secondly, I run through five relatively popular examples of Scandinavian crime fiction to show how this genre trend works. Lastly, I...

  14. New Nordic and Scandinavian retro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels Peter; Munch, Anders V.

    2016-01-01

    to the current international neo-modernism in the form of digitally designed and industrially produced items in often thought-provoking minimalist forms and are directed at an elitist, international audience that wants to engage with these demanding aesthetics and the ideal picture of Nordic cultures—as a nice...... design and gourmet destination. New Nordic Design shows that the image and ideals of Scandinavian Modern are still living, as a subtle version of Scandinavian Retro, a reimagination of the lifestyle and values of Scandinavian Modern....

  15. Approaches to Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Gunhild

    2010-01-01

    The working paper discusses some of the major approaches to Scandinavian crime fiction in the light of the dominant features of crime culture, e.g. the broad exposure of crime fiction via different platforms and media. In this connection, the concept of mediatization is considered as well...... as the approach of genre typology and the concept of evil – seemingly disparate concepts and approaches, but all related to the complex processes in the borderlands between crime fiction and society. Using examples from Scandinavian crime fiction, I discuss whether the growing proximity to international genres......, ways of production and standards increasingly removes Scandinavian crime fiction from its original attractions or not....

  16. Religion in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    connected with modernity, modern society and ensuing secularity, but the question is, then, what happens to crime fiction if modern societies no longer uphold its trust in secular ideals. The thesis is that this leaves modern Scandinavian media open for a religious discussion which then also seeps...... into popular crime fiction. In novels by Arne Dahl, Henning Mortensen, Gunnar Staalesen, A.J. Kazinski, Gretelise Holm and several other Scandinavian writers of crime fiction it is possible to locate an interest in theology and topics of religious philosophy which reflects this current trend in modern...... Scandinavian media where religion has become mediatized. Consumers of popular culture no longer endorse confidence in institutionalized religion, but that does not mean that people are losing faith: Faith only seem to adjust itself and tiptoe into popular media and popular fiction. Hence, this paper seeks...

  17. Postsecularism in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the postsecular turn in Scandinavian crime fiction. Postsecularism describes a renewed openness towards questions of spirituality, while maintaining the practice of critical scrutiny. Since 2000, we have seen an intensive increase in the number of titles treating religion and....../or spirituality in a way which differs from the genre’s usual approach. Firstly, I will frame the traditional attitude towards religion in crime fiction by Scandinavian welfare modernity, outlining the conspicuous absence of religion in the genre. Secondly, I propose a typology of the treatment of religion...... in crime fiction. My examples are all taken from the vast corpus of contemporary Scandinavian crime fiction, but it would be rather unproblematic to stretch the scope of the theory to an analysis of western crime fiction in general. Within this typology, I will introduce the phenomenon of a religious...

  18. Archival Education in Scandinavian Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Hanefi Kutluoğlu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Every country has responsibilities to provide the necessary personnel needed for their archival inheritance by education. Education can be shaped through tradition, historical inheritance and scientifi c necessities by defi ning the right educational method. Scandinavian countries have determined different education models based on their tradition, historical inheritance and requirements. In this article we focused on the formation of archival tradition, application of archival education in Scandinavian countries and the infl uence of the developments taking place in Europe on these countries. The relation between the archival education in European and Scandinavian countries is evaluated through a comparative method, and similarities to other countries are also evaluated. Finally, the present situation of archival education and the measures needed in this fi eld are taken into consideration.

  19. The Infinitive Marker across Scandinavian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ken Ramshøj

    2007-01-01

    In this paper I argue that the base-position of the infinitive marker in the Scandinavian languages and English share a common origin site. It is inserted as the top-most head in the VP-domain. The cross-linguistic variation in the syntactic distribution of the infinitive marker can be accounted...

  20. FUZZY INFERENCE BASED LEAK ESTIMATION IN WATER PIPELINES SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lavanya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pipeline networks are the most widely used mode for transporting fluids and gases around the world. Leakage in this pipeline causes harmful effects when the flowing fluid/gas is hazardous. Hence the detection of leak becomes essential to avoid/minimize such undesirable effects. This paper presents the leak detection by spectral analysis methods in a laboratory pipeline system. Transient in the pressure signal in the pipeline is created by opening and closing the exit valve. These pressure variations are captured and power spectrum is obtained by using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT method and Filter Diagonalization Method (FDM. The leaks at various positions are simulated and located using these methods and the results are compared. In order to determine the quantity of leak a 2 × 1 fuzzy inference system is created using the upstream and downstream pressure as input and the leak size as the output. Thus a complete leak detection, localization and quantification are done by using only the pressure variations in the pipeline.

  1. Inferring immobile and in-situ water saturation from laboratory and field measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belen, Rodolfo P., Jr.

    2000-06-01

    Analysis of experimental data and numerical simulation results of dynamic boiling experiments revealed that there is an apparent correlation between the immobile water saturation and the shape of the steam saturation profile. An elbow in the steam saturation profile indicates the sudden drop in steam saturation that marks the transition from steam to two-phase conditions inside the core during boiling. The immobile water saturation can be inferred from this elbow in the steam saturation profile. Based on experimental results obtained by Satik (1997), the inferred immobile water saturation of Berea sandstone was found to be about 0.25, which is consistent with results of relative permeability experiments reported by Mahiya (1999). However, this technique may not be useful in inferring the immobile water saturation of less permeable geothermal rocks because the elbow in the steam saturation profile is less prominent. Models of vapor and liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that were developed based on Darcy's law and material and energy conservation equations proved to be useful in inferring the in-situ and immobile water saturations from field measurements of cumulative mass production, discharge enthalpy, and downhole temperature. Knowing rock and fluid properties, and the difference between the stable initial, T{sub o}, and dry-out, T{sub d}, downhole temperatures, the in-situ and immobile water saturations of vapor-dominated reservoirs can be estimated. On the other hand, the in-situ and immobile water saturations, and the change in mobile water content of liquid-dominated reservoirs can be inferred from the cumulative mass production, {Delta}m, and enthalpy, h{prime}, data. Comparison with two-phase, radial flow, numerical simulation results confirmed the validity and usefulness of these models.

  2. On the biases affecting water ages inferred from isotopic data

    CERN Document Server

    Cornaton, F J; Deleersnijder, E

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater age has become a fundamental concept in groundwater hydrology, but ages originating from isotopic analyses are still identified with a lack of clarity and using models that occasionally are unrealistic. If the effect of advection and dispersion on water ages has already been extensively identified, very few studies address the reliability of using radiometric ages as derived from isotopic data to estimate aquifer properties such as average velocities. Using simple one-dimensional and two-dimensional analytical solutions for single-site and two-sites mobile-immobile systems, we compare the radiometric ages to the mean ages (or residence times) as deduced from a direct, physically-based simulation approach (using the mean age equation), and show that the competition between isotope decay rate and dispersion coefficient can generate important discrepancies between the two types of ages. A correction for the average apparent velocity originating from apparent isotopic ages is additionally provided. Th...

  3. Age- and Gender-Specific Unemployment in Scandinavian Countries: An Analysis based on Okun’s Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadtmann, Georg; Hutengs, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigates Scandinavian countries and their male and female unemployment rates. Okun’s law is used to estimate age cohort and gender-specific Okun coefficients to make inference about the business-cycle dependence of young peoples’ unemployment across Scandinavian countries. Results...... show that men have higher Okun coefficients in absolute terms. Thus, their unemployment rate reacts more strongly to any change in GDP....

  4. The Infinitive Marker across Scandinavian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ramshøj Christensen

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I argue that the base-position of the infinitive marker in the Scandinavian languages and English share a common origin site. It is inserted as the top-most head in the VP-domain. The cross-linguistic variation in the syntactic distribution of the infinitive marker can be accounted for by assuming that it undergoes head movement. This movement is optional in Danish, English, Norwegian, and Early Modern Danish and is not feature-driven. In Faroese, Icelandic, and Swedish, on the other hand, it is triggered by φ-feature checking on Finº. In Icelandic and Swedish these φ-features are strong and induce obligatory vº→Finº movement, whereas they are weak in Faroese and do not induce vº→Finº movement.

  5. Do Scandinavians Care about International Law?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Although Scandinavians are often celebrated as the vanguards of human rights and international law, we know little about whether courts and judges in these countries have embraced those international courts and conventions that they themselves helped establish after the Second World War....... This article presents original and comprehensive data on three Scandinavian courts’ citation practice. It demonstrates that not only do Scandinavian Supreme Courts engage surprisingly little with international law, but also that there is great variation in the degree to which they have domesticated...... international law and courts by citing their case law. Building on this author’s previous research, it is argued that Norway sticks out as much more engaged internationally due to a solid judicial review tradition at the national level. It is also argued that Scandinavian legal positivism, has influenced a much...

  6. Do Scandinavian Care about international law?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Although Scandinavians are often celebrated as the vanguards of human rights and international law, we know little about whether courts and judges in these countries have embraced those international courts and conventions that they themselves helped establish after the Second World War....... This article presents original and comprehensive data on three Scandinavian courts' citation practice. It demonstrates that not only do Scandinavian Supreme Courts engage surprisingly little with international law, but also that there is great variation in the degree to which they have domesticated...... international law and courts by citing their case law. Building on this author's previous research, it is argued that Norway sticks out as much more engaged internationally due to a solid judicial review tradition at the national level. It is also argued that Scandinavian legal positivism has influenced a much...

  7. Inference of effective river properties from remotely sensed observations of water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garambois, Pierre-André; Monnier, Jérôme

    2015-05-01

    The future SWOT mission (Surface Water and Ocean Topography) will provide cartographic measurements of inland water surfaces (elevation, widths and slope) at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Given synthetic SWOT like data, forward flow models of hierarchical-complexity are revisited and few inverse formulations are derived and assessed for retrieving the river low flow bathymetry, roughness and discharge (A0, K, Q) . The concept of an effective low flow bathymetry A0 (the real one being never observed) and roughness K , hence an effective river dynamics description, is introduced. The few inverse models elaborated for inferring (A0, K, Q) are analyzed in two contexts: (1) only remotely sensed observations of the water surface (surface elevation, width and slope) are available; (2) one additional water depth measurement (or estimate) is available. The inverse models elaborated are independent of data acquisition dynamics; they are assessed on 91 synthetic test cases sampling a wide range of steady-state river flows (the Froude number varying between 0.05 and 0.5 for 1 km reaches) and in the case of a flood on the Garonne River (France) characterized by large spatio-temporal variabilities. It is demonstrated that the most complete shallow-water like model allowing to separate the roughness and bathymetry terms is the so-called low Froude model. In Case (1), the resulting RMSE on infered discharges are on the order of 15% for first guess errors larger than 50%. An important feature of the present inverse methods is the fairly good accuracy of the discharge Q obtained, while the identified roughness coefficient K includes the measurement errors and the misfit of physics between the real flow and the hypothesis on which the inverse models rely; the later neglecting the unobserved temporal variations of the flow and the inertia effects. A compensation phenomena between the indentifiedvalues of K and the unobserved bathymetry A0 is highlighted, while the

  8. Scandinavian Semantics and the Human Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levisen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an ethnolinguistic analysis of how the space between the head and the body is construed in Scandinavian semantic systems vis-a-vis the semantic system of English. With an extensive case study of neck-related meanings in Danish, and with cross-Scandinavian reference, it is demo......This paper presents an ethnolinguistic analysis of how the space between the head and the body is construed in Scandinavian semantic systems vis-a-vis the semantic system of English. With an extensive case study of neck-related meanings in Danish, and with cross-Scandinavian reference......, it is demonstrated that Scandinavian and English systems differ significantly in some aspects of the way in which the construe the human body with words. The study ventures an innovative combination of methods, pairing the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM) approach to linguistic and conceptual analysis...... with empirical evidence from the Evolution of Semantic Systems (EoSS) project. This combination of empirical and interpretative tools helps to integrate evidence from semantics and semiotics, pinning out in great detail the intricacies of the meanings of particular body words. The paper concludes that body words...

  9. Scandinavian Participatory Design - Beyond Design, Beyond Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Pär-Ola; Georgsen, Marianne; Nyvang, Tom

    2011-01-01

    approaches, of which there are many in development research, but to a specific body of work that stems from Scandinavia. Within the research fields relating to design of ICT systems the Scandinavian countries have a rich history of incorporating disadvantaged groups in societies. This paper argues...

  10. Modern Perceptions of Roman-Scandinavian Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grane, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the modern research history of connections between Scandinavian Iron Age societies and the Roman Empire focusing more or less on the last half century. In this time, there has been a significant increase in Danish excavations of Roman Iron Age sites, of which several have...

  11. Shifting Authenticities in Scandinavian Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyndahl, Petter; Nielsen, Siw Graabraek

    2014-01-01

    There has been an ongoing tendency, taking place in the Scandinavian countries from the late 1970s onwards, to expand the repertoires and resources of music as an educational matter, an academic field, as well as an area for support and funding from cultural authorities, organisations and institutions. Here, popular music, jazz, folk music and…

  12. Application of Artificial Neuro-Fuzzy Logic Inference System for Predicting the Microbiological Pollution in Fresh Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouharati, S.; Benmahammed, K.; Harzallah, D.; El-Assaf, Y. M.

    The classical methods for detecting the micro biological pollution in water are based on the detection of the coliform bacteria which indicators of contamination. But to check each water supply for these contaminants would be a time-consuming job and a qualify operators. In this study, we propose a novel intelligent system which provides a detection of microbiological pollution in fresh water. The proposed system is a hierarchical integration of an Artificial Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). This method is based on the variations of the physical and chemical parameters occurred during bacteria growth. The instantaneous result obtained by the measurements of the variations of the physical and chemical parameters occurred during bacteria growth-temperature, pH, electrical potential and electrical conductivity of many varieties of water (surface water, well water, drinking water and used water) on the number Escherichia coli in water. The instantaneous result obtained by measurements of the inputs parameters of water from sensors.

  13. Sustained Water Changes in California during Drought and Heavy Precipitation Inferred from GPS, InSAR, and GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, D. F.; Fu, Y.; Landerer, F. W.; Wiese, D. N.; Farr, T. G.; Liu, Z.; Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    About 1200 GPS sites in the westernmost United States are used to weigh changes in surface water as a function of location from 2006 to 2015. The effect of known changes in water in artificial reservoirs is removed, allowing changes in the total of snow, soil moisture, and mountain fracture groundwater to be inferred from GPS. In this study water changes inferred from GPS are placed into the context of complementary InSAR and GRACE data. The southern Central Valley (the San Joaquin Valley and Tulare Basin) is subsiding at spectacular rates of 0.01 m/yr to 0.2 m/yr in response to groundwater management. We construct an elastic model of groundwater change of the southern Central Valley, using GRACE as the basis of total groundwater loss and InSAR to infer the lateral distribution of that groundwater loss. This elastic model of Central Valley groundwater loss is removed from the GPS displacements. Because snow in California is insignificant in October, and because changes in soil moisture between successive autumns are small, we can infer changes in Sierra Nevada mountain fracture groundwater to be: -19 km3 during drought from 2006 to 2009, +35 km3 during heavy precipitation from 2009 to 2011, and -38 km3 during drought from 2011 to 2014 (start and end times are all in October). We infer changes in Sierra Nevada mountain groundwater to be playing an important role in modulating Central Valley groundwater loss. Total water in the Sierra Nevada recovered by 16 km3 from October 2014 to April 2015, but water is being lost again in summer 2015.

  14. Inferring Soil Moisture Memory from Streamflow Observations Using a Simple Water Balance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Koster, Randal Dean; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2013-01-01

    Soil moisture is known for its integrative behavior and resulting memory characteristics. Soil moisture anomalies can persist for weeks or even months into the future, making initial soil moisture a potentially important contributor to skill in weather forecasting. A major difficulty when investigating soil moisture and its memory using observations is the sparse availability of long-term measurements and their limited spatial representativeness. In contrast, there is an abundance of long-term streamflow measurements for catchments of various sizes across the world. We investigate in this study whether such streamflow measurements can be used to infer and characterize soil moisture memory in respective catchments. Our approach uses a simple water balance model in which evapotranspiration and runoff ratios are expressed as simple functions of soil moisture; optimized functions for the model are determined using streamflow observations, and the optimized model in turn provides information on soil moisture memory on the catchment scale. The validity of the approach is demonstrated with data from three heavily monitored catchments. The approach is then applied to streamflow data in several small catchments across Switzerland to obtain a spatially distributed description of soil moisture memory and to show how memory varies, for example, with altitude and topography.

  15. Land cover and water yield: inference problems when comparing catchments with mixed land cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. J. M. van Dijk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled experiments provide strong evidence that changing land cover (e.g. deforestation or afforestation can affect mean catchment streamflow (Q. By contrast, a similarly strong influence has not been found in studies that interpret Q from multiple catchments with mixed land cover. One possible reason is that there are methodological issues with the way in which the Budyko framework was used in the latter type studies. We examined this using Q data observed in 278 Australian catchments and by making inferences from synthetic Q data simulated by a hydrological process model (the Australian Water Resources Assessment system Landscape model. The previous contrasting findings could be reproduced. In the synthetic experiment, the land cover influence was still present but not accurately detected with the Budyko- framework. Likely sources of interpretation bias demonstrated include: (i noise in land cover, precipitation and Q data; (ii additional catchment climate characteristics more important than land cover; and (iii covariance between Q and catchment attributes. These methodological issues caution against the use of a Budyko framework to quantify a land cover influence in Q data from mixed land-cover catchments. Importantly, however, our findings do not rule out that there may also be physical processes that modify the influence of land cover in mixed land-cover catchments. Process model simulations suggested that lateral water redistribution between vegetation types and recirculation of intercepted rainfall may be important.

  16. Global carbon-water cycles patterns inferred from FLUXNET observations - useful for model evaluation? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichstein, M.; Jung, M.; Beer, C.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Tomelleri, E.; Papale, D.; Fluxnet Lathuille Synthesis Team (Cf. Www. Fluxdata. Org)

    2010-12-01

    The current FLUXNET database (www.fluxdata.org) of CO2, water and energy exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere contains almost 1000 site-years with data from more than 250 sites, encompassing all major biomes of the world and being processed in a standardized way (1-3). In this presentation we show that the information in the data is sufficient to derive generalized empirical relationships between vegetation/respective remote sensing information, climate and the biosphere-atmosphere exchanges across global biomes. These empirical patterns are used to generate global grids of the respective fluxes and derived properties (e.g. radiation and water-use efficiencies or climate sensitivities in general, bowen-ratio, AET/PET ratio). For example we re-estimate global “text-book” numbers such as global Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) as ca. 123PgC (4), or global evapotranspiration (ET) as ca. 65km3/yr (5) - for the first time with a more solid and direct empirical basis. Evaluation against independent data at regional to global scale (e.g. atmospheric carbon dioxide inversions, runoff data) lends support to the validity of our almost purely empirical up-scaling approaches. Moreover climate factors such as radiation, temperature and water balance are identified as driving factors for variations and trends of carbon and water fluxes, with distinctly different sensitivities between different regions. Hence, these global fields of biosphere-atmosphere exchange and the inferred relations between climate, vegetation type and fluxes should be used for evaluation or benchmarking of climate models or their land-surface components, while overcoming scale-issues with classical point-to-grid-cell comparisons. 1. M. Reichstein et al., Global Change Biology 11, 1424 (2005). 2. D. Baldocchi, Australian Journal of Botany 56,1 (2008). 3. D. Papale et al., Biogeosciences 3, 571 (2006). 4. Beer et al. Science 329 (2010). 5. Jung et al. Nature in press (doi:10

  17. Remote sensing of seasonal distribution of precipitable water vapor over the oceans and inference of boundary layer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, C.

    1979-01-01

    Over the ocean satellite infrared spectral measurements in the 18 micrometer water vapor band and the 11 micrometer window region were used to derive precipitable water vapor, w, in the atmosphere and the sea surface temperature, SST. Seasonal maps of w on the oceans derived from these data reveal the dynamical influence of the large scale atmospheric circulation. With the help of a model for the vertical distribution of water vapor, the configuration of the atmospheric boundary layer over the oceans can be inferred from w when the information of SST is combined. The gross seasonal mean structure of the boundary layer inferred in this fashion reveals the broad areas of the trade wind inversion and the convectively active areas such as the intertropical convergence zones.

  18. Teaching Scandinavian Interaction Design in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jannick Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Methods for interaction design have emerged and established themselves first in a Scandinavian context, later in US context and in the rest of the developed world. While good usability and good user experiences are important to all users of ICT, the question is whether the methods and techniques...... that were mainly developed in Scandinavia, Europe and US are suitable for ICT development in West Africa? Can ideals for user-involvement be directly transferred? This paper aims to initiate a discussion of the communication of interaction design knowledge in West Africa by discussing whether insights from...... Scandinavian Participatory design can be used to localize the learning process and make interaction design methods sensitive to the West African context. The paper is based on the author’s reflection on his experiences teaching interaction design in West Africa....

  19. Diversity Management and the Scandinavian Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romani, Laurence; Holck, Lotte; Holgersson, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    This chapter presents the principal interpretations that took place in Denmark and Sweden regarding the discourse on ‘Diversity Management’. We organise our presentation around three major themes that are central to the local Scandinavian context: gender equality, migration and moral grounds....... This chapter shows the important role of gender equality work practices and how these practices now tend to be progressively incorporated in a broad Diversity Management construct, possibly leading to a less radical stance. Moreover, the comparison between Denmark and Sweden reveals the political associations...... with Diversity Management and migration in Denmark, but not in Sweden. Our third contribution unveils the tensions between the value of equality, which remains strong in the Scandinavian welfare state model, and the actual practices of Diversity Management....

  20. Scandinavian Object Shift and Optimality Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engels, Eva; Vikner, Sten

    This study presents an account of object shift, a word order phenomenon found in most of the Scandinavian languages where an object occurs unexpectedly to the left and not to the right of a sentential adverbial. The book examines object shift across many of the Scandinavian languages and dialects...... and original observations, this book is an important addition to the fields of phonology, optimality theory and theoretical syntax......., and analyses the variation, for example whether object shift is optional or obligatory, whether it applies only to pronouns or other objects as well, and whether it applies to adverbials. The authors show that optimality theory, traditionally used in phonology, is a useful framework for accounting...

  1. Gastrointestinal hormone research - with a Scandinavian annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from neuroendocrine cells in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gut, which makes it the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasible to conceive the hormones un......, but also constitute regulatory systems operating in the whole organism. This overview of gut hormone biology is supplemented with an annotation on some Scandinavian contributions to gastrointestinal hormone research....

  2. Scandinavian Approaches to Gender Equality in Academia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates how Denmark, Norway, and Sweden approach issues of gender equality in research differently. Based on a comparative document analysis of gender equality activities in six Scandinavian universities, together with an examination of the legislative and political frameworks...... surrounding these activities, the article provides new insights into the respective strategies for governing and promoting the advancement of women researchers. In doing so, it exposes some interesting disparities among the cases and shows how Norwegian and Swedish gender equality activities revolve around...

  3. Scandinavian epidemiological research in gastroenterology and hepatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsson, Einar S; Ekbom, Anders

    2015-06-01

    In the last decades, a large number of epidemiological studies in gastroenterology and hepatology have originated from the Scandinavian countries. With the help of large health databases, with good validity and other registries related to patient outcomes, researchers from the Scandinavian countries have been able to make some very important contributions to the field. These countries, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark and Iceland, have all universal access to health care and have shown to be ideal for epidemiological research. Population-based studies have been frequent and follow-up studies have been able to describe the temporal trends and changes in phenotypes. Our ability in Scandinavia to follow up defined groups of patients over time has been crucial to learn the natural history of many gastrointestinal and liver diseases and often in a population-based setting. Patient-related outcomes measures will probably gain increasing importance in the future, but Scandinavian gastroenterologists and surgeons are likely to have a better infrastructure for such endeavors compared to most other populations. Thus, there is a bright future for international competitive research within the field of gastrointestinal and liver diseases in Scandinavia.

  4. SCANDINAVIAN MIGRATION IN THE VIKING AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladyslaw Duczko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Movements of Scandinavians in period between late 8th AD to middle of 11th AD, called Viking Age, were combined military actions-piracy – and migrations with goal to colonize territories in the West Europe – mainly Insular world of Atlantic and British isles, but also in East Europe, among Finno-Ugrians and Slavs. This activity is seen as the recent, and last, of the Migration Period, the time of great movements of Germanic people in the 4th century AD.

  5. A Scandinavian Model of Innovative Product Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Timothy Charles; Andreasen, Mogens Myrup; Boelskifte, Per

    2007-01-01

    competencies. We reflect on our efforts to produce a new type of design professionalism, pointing to new roles and identities for the professional-ism of synthesis and innovation. Finally, we round up by articulating what we see as the future pattern of product development, which should be sup-ported already......The educational systems in the small Scandinavian countries are open to experiments and new education programmes. This paper presents such an initiative from Denmark, showing new interpretations of industrial needs, research insights, educational ideas and identification of core innovative...

  6. Seventh Scandinavian Conference on Artificial Intelligence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Mayoh, Brian Henry; Perram, John

    2001-01-01

    The book covers the seventh Scandinavian Conference on Artificial Intelligence, held at the Maersk Mc-Kinney Moller Institute for Production Technology at the University of Southern Denmark during the period 20-21 February, 2001. It continues the tradition established by SCAI of being one...... of the most important regional AI conferences in Europe, attracting high quality submissions from Scandinavia and the rest of the world, including the Baltic countries. The contents include robotics, sensor/motor intelligence, evolutionary robotics, behaviour-based systems, multi-agent systems, applications...

  7. Diversification of unicellular eukaryotes: cryptomonad colonizations of marine and fresh waters inferred from revised 18S rRNA phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Bråte, Jon; Logares, Ramiro; Klaveness, Dag; Berney, Cédric; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2008-10-01

    The cryptomonads is a well-defined lineage of unicellular eukaryotes, composed of several marine and freshwater groups. However, the evolutionary relationships among these groups are unclear due to conflicting inferences between morphological and molecular phylogenies. Here, we have inferred the evolutionary relationships among marine and freshwater species in order to better understand the importance of the marine-freshwater boundary on the historical diversification patterns of cryptomonads. We have constructed improved molecular phylogenies by taking into account rate variation both across sites and across sequences (covarion substitutions), and by analysing the vast majority of publicly available cryptomonad 18S rRNA sequences and related environmental phylotypes. The resulting phylogenies included 55 sequences, and revealed two novel freshwater cryptomonad clades (CRY1 and CRY2) and a large hidden diversity of cryptomonads. CRY1 was placed deeply within the cryptomonad phylogeny together with all the major freshwater lineages (i.e. Goniomonas and Cryptomonas), while CRY2 was placed within a lineage of marine species identified as Plagioselmis-like with the aid of a new sequence generated from a cultured species. The inferred phylogenies suggest only few successful marine-freshwater transitions over the history of cryptomonads. Most of the transitions seem to have occurred from marine to fresh waters, but re-colonizations of marine habitats have also taken place. This implies that the differences in the biogeophysical conditions between marine and fresh waters constitute a substantial barrier for the cross-colonization of these environments by cryptomonads.

  8. Scandinavian Accents in Their Relation to One Another

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, A. S.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is concerned with four Scandinavian prosodemes: accent 1, accent 2, stoed, and no stoed. The aim is to establish the function of each of them, i.e., the role they play in the system of each Scandinavian language. Available from Liber Laeromedel, Box 1205, S-22105 Lund, Sweden. (Author/TL)

  9. Remote sensing of seasonal distribution of precipitable water vapor over the oceans and the inference of boundary-layer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, C.; Lo, R. C.; Nath, N. R.; Dalu, G.

    1979-01-01

    From the depth of the water vapor spectral lines in the 8-9 micron window region, measured by the Nimbus 4 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) with a resolution of about 3/cm, the precipitable water vapor over the oceans is remotely sensed. In addition the IRIS spectral data in the 11-13 micron window region have been used to derive the sea surface temperature (SST). Seasonal maps of w on the oceans deduced from the spectral data reveal the dynamical influence of the large-scale atmospheric circulation. With the help of a model for the vertical distribution of water vapor, the configuration of the atmospheric boundary layer over the oceans can be inferred from these remotely sensed w and SST. The gross seasonal mean structure of the boundary layer inferred in this fashion reveals the broad areas of trade wind inversion and the convectively active areas such as the ITCZ. The derived information is in reasonable agreement with some observed climatological patterns over the oceans.

  10. Governing health equity in Scandinavian municipalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Christian Elling; Little, Ingvild; Diderichsen, Finn

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Local governments in the Scandinavian countries are increasingly committed to reduce health inequity through 'health equity in all policies' (HEiAP) governance. There exists, however, only very sporadic implementation evidence concerning municipal HEiAP governance, which is the focus...... to health equity goals outside of the health sector and inadequate economic prioritization budget curbs implementation. Concerning evidence, there is a lack of epidemiological data, detailed evidence of health equity interventions as well as indicators relevant for monitoring implementation. Concerted...... administrative action relates to a lack of vertical support and alignment from the national and the regional level to the local level. Horizontally within the municipality, insufficient coordination across policy sectors inhibits effective health equity governance. CONCLUSIONS: A shift away from 'health in all...

  11. Innovation gaps in Scandinavian rural tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalager, Anne Mette; Kwiatkowski, Grzegorz; Østervig Larsen, Martin

    2018-01-01

    that rural tourism has its basis in a dichotomy between authenticity and modernization. New and prospective customer groups, particularly from Germany, demand more diversified and higher quality rural tourism products than current groups, for example, in relation to outdoor opportunities, leisure festivals......© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group Drawing on primary data from a consumer survey (N = 2000), this study demonstrates a clear growth potential in rural tourism in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, which is, however, hampered by innovation gaps. At the conceptual level......, the study offers a model that identifies the following five innovation gaps in Scandinavian rural tourism: (1) the portfolio gap, (2) the policy departmentalization gap, (3) the knowledge gap, (4) the change motivation gap, and (5) the resource interpretation gap. At the empirical level, the study shows...

  12. The Scandinavian baltic pancreatic club (SBPC) database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren Maagaard; Poulsen, Jakob L; Drewes, Asbjørn M.

    2017-01-01

    , we describe the design of the database and characteristics of the study cohort. METHODS: Nine centres from six different countries in the Scandinavian-Baltic region joined the database. Patients with definitive or probable CP (M-ANNHEIM diagnostic criteria) were included. Standardised case report......: The study cohort comprised of 910 patients (608 men: 302 women; median age 58 (IQR: 48-67) years with definite 848 (93%) or probable CP 62 (7%). Nicotine (70%) and alcohol (59%) were the most frequent aetiologies and seen in combination in 44% of patients. A history of recurrent acute pancreatitis was seen...... in 49% prior to the development of CP. Pain (69%) and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (68%) were the most common complications followed by diabetes (43%). Most patients (30%) were classified as clinical stage II (symptomatic CP with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency). Less than 10% of the patients...

  13. Scandinavian-Saami religious connections in the history of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Rydving

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The religions of Scandinavians and Saamis have, for decades of scholarship, functioned as sources of analogies to explain elements in one another. For the study of Saami religion answers to questions about origins were sought in Scandinavian religion, while Saami religion has been seen by students of Scandinavian religion, as a preserver and a faithful witness of Scandinavian concepts and rites that had vanished in the times reflected in the literary sources. This view has now changed. In recent decades the tendency has been to use the loan- explanations more and more sparsely. Elements in Saami religion that were seen earlier as Scandinavian loans are now explained in a Finno-Ugric context, whereas the few elements in Scandinavian religion that were thought of as loans from the Saamis are more often looked upon as inherited from a common origin, a North Eurasian cultural stratum. The search for analogies has, in any case, preoccupied the historian of religions in this field, too. The purpose here is to provide a short and selective résumé of some aspects of a theme in the history of scholarship, a theme where "resemblances" have been found, compared, used as analogies, and — called into question: the comparative study of the religions of the Scandinavians and Saamis.

  14. Forecasting Water Level Fluctuations of Urmieh Lake Using Gene Expression Programming and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Karimi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting lake level at various prediction intervals is an essential issue in such industrial applications as navigation, water resource planning and catchment management. In the present study, two data driven techniques, namely Gene Expression Programming and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System, were applied for predicting daily lake levels for three prediction intervals. Daily water-level data from Urmieh Lake in Northwestern Iran were used to train, test and validate the used techniques. Three statistical indexes, coefficient of determination, root mean square error and variance accounted for were used to assess the performance of the used techniques. Technique inter-comparisons demonstrated that the GEP surpassed the ANFIS model at each of the prediction intervals. A traditional auto regressive moving average model was also applied to the same data sets; the obtained results were compared with those of the data driven approaches demonstrating superiority of the data driven models to ARMA.

  15. Paleoenvironmental inference models from sediment diatom assemblages in Baffin Island lakes (Nunavut, Canada) and reconstruction of summer water temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joynt, E. H. III; Wolfe, A. P. [Colorado Univ., Inst. of Arctic and Alpine Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Lake sediments are attractive repositories for paleoclimate proxy data because they are temporally continuous, undisturbed and datable. It is particularly true of lakes which are ubiquitous throughout the Arctic regions, enabling dense spatial coverage of sampling sites. In more recent times diatoms have been applied to a a variety of paleoenvironmental questions. However, these studies have been of limited usefulness because they lack a regional training set that would facilitate making quantitative paleoenvironmental inferences. This article provides this inferential tool, together with an example of its application. Conductivity, pH, summer lake water temperature, and mean annual air temperature have been identified as the significant controls over diatom assemblages from the surface sediments of 61 lakes on Baffin Island. Using weighted-averaging regression and calibration, predictive models for these parameters have been developed. Results show that the summer lake water temperature model provides realistic reconstructions when compared with other paleoenvironmental records. Over the past 5000 years the amplitude of reconstructed summer lake water temperature was found to be on the order of 4 degrees C, expressed primarily as progressive neoglacial cooling culminating in the Little Ice Age. Diatom-inferred summer water temperatures have increased by about 2 degrees C in the past 150 years, which is also in agreement with independent paleoclimatic reconstructions. The data obtained in this study complements similar efforts from the western Canadian Arctic and the northern reaches of Scandinavia, however, this is the first training set developed for lakes situated entirely north of the tree line. As such, it extends the applicability of diatoms for paleotemperature reconstructions well into the Arctic tundra biome. 45 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs., 1 appendix.

  16. Acoustic and optical methods to infer water transparency at Time Series Station Spiekeroog, Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Anne-Christin; Badewien, Thomas H.; Garaba, Shungudzemwoyo P.; Zielinski, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Water transparency is a primary indicator of optical water quality that is driven by suspended particulate and dissolved material. A data set from the operational Time Series Station Spiekeroog located at a tidal inlet of the Wadden Sea was used to perform (i) an inter-comparison of observations related to water transparency, (ii) correlation tests among these measured parameters, and (iii) to explore the utility of both acoustic and optical tools in monitoring water transparency. An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler was used to derive the backscatter signal in the water column. Optical observations were collected using above-water hyperspectral radiometers and a submerged turbidity metre. Bio-fouling on the turbidity sensors optical windows resulted in measurement drift and abnormal values during quality control steps. We observed significant correlations between turbidity collected by the submerged metre and that derived from above-water radiometer observations. Turbidity from these sensors was also associated with the backscatter signal derived from the acoustic measurements. These findings suggest that both optical and acoustic measurements can be reasonable proxies of water transparency with the potential to mitigate gaps and increase data quality in long-time observation of marine environments.

  17. Distribution and ventilation of water masses in the western Ross Sea inferred from CFC measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivaro, Paola; Ianni, Carmela; Magi, Emanuele; Massolo, Serena; Budillon, Giorgio; Smethie, William M.

    2015-03-01

    During the CLIMA Project (R.V. Italica cruise PNRA XVI, January-February 2001), hydrographic and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) observations were obtained, particularly in the western Ross Sea. Their distribution demonstrated water mass structure and ventilation processes in the investigated areas. In the surface waters (AASW) the CFC saturation levels varied spatially: CFCs were undersaturated in all the areas (range from 80 to 90%), with the exception of few stations sampled near Ross Island. In particular, the Terra Nova Bay polynya, where high salinity shelf water (HSSW) is produced, was a low-saturated surface area (74%) with respect to CFCs. Throughout most of the shelf area, the presence of modified circumpolar deep water (MCDW) was reflected in a mid-depth CFC concentration minima. Beneath the MCDW, CFC concentrations generally increased in the shelf waters towards the seafloor. We estimated that the corresponding CFCs saturation level in the source water region for HSSW was about 68-70%. Waters with high CFC concentrations were detected in the western Ross Sea on the down slope side of the Drygalski Trough, indicating that AABW was being supplied to the deep Antarctic Basin. Estimates of ventilation ages depend strongly on the saturation levels. We calculated ventilation ages using the saturation level calibrated tracer ratio, CFC11/CFC12. We deduced a mean residence time of the shelf waters of about 6-7 years between the western Ross Sea source and the shelf break.

  18. Simulating sunflower canopy temperatures to infer root-zone soil water potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Idso, S. B.

    1983-01-01

    A soil-plant-atmosphere model for sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), together with clear sky weather data for several days, is used to study the relationship between canopy temperature and root-zone soil water potential. Considering the empirical dependence of stomatal resistance on insolation, air temperature and leaf water potential, a continuity equation for water flux in the soil-plant-atmosphere system is solved for the leaf water potential. The transpirational flux is calculated using Monteith's combination equation, while the canopy temperature is calculated from the energy balance equation. The simulation shows that, at high soil water potentials, canopy temperature is determined primarily by air and dew point temperatures. These results agree with an empirically derived linear regression equation relating canopy-air temperature differential to air vapor pressure deficit. The model predictions of leaf water potential are also in agreement with observations, indicating that measurements of canopy temperature together with a knowledge of air and dew point temperatures can provide a reliable estimate of the root-zone soil water potential.

  19. The Puzzle of the Scandinavian Welfare State and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2015-01-01

    The Scandinavian welfare model is a puzzle to economists: It works economically, even though free-riding should prevail with its explosive cocktail of high taxation and high social benefits. One overlooked solution to the puzzle could be the unique stock of social trust present in Scandinavia. Here......, the four Scandinavian countries (Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland) form the top three with scores above 60 percent social trust on a ranking that covers 94 countries from all over the world....

  20. Whole grain foods and health : a Scandinavian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Frølich, Wenche; Åman, Per; Tetens, Inge

    2013-01-01

    The food-based dietary guidelines in the Scandinavian countries that recommend an intake of minimum 75 g whole grain per 10 MJ (2,388 kcal) per day are mainly derived from prospective cohort studies where quantitative but little qualitative details are available on whole grain products. The objective of the current paper is to clarify possible differences in nutritional and health effects of the types of whole grain grown and consumed in the Scandinavian countries. A further objective is to s...

  1. Population genomics of the inbred Scandinavian wolf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenblad, Jenny; Olsson, Maria; Parker, Heidi G; Ostrander, Elaine A; Ellegren, Hans

    2009-04-01

    The Scandinavian wolf population represents one of the genetically most well-characterized examples of a severely bottlenecked natural population (with only two founders), and of how the addition of new genetic material (one immigrant) can at least temporarily provide a 'genetic rescue'. However, inbreeding depression has been observed in this population and in the absence of additional immigrants, its long-term viability is questioned. To study the effects of inbreeding and selection on genomic diversity, we performed a genomic scan with approximately 250 microsatellite markers distributed across all autosomes and the X chromosome. We found linkage disequilibrium (LD) that extended up to distances of 50 Mb, exceeding that of most outbreeding species studied thus far. LD was particularly pronounced on the X chromosome. Overall levels of observed genomic heterozygosity did not deviate significantly from simulations based on known population history, giving no support for a general selection for heterozygotes. However, we found evidence supporting balancing selection at a number of loci and also evidence suggesting directional selection at other loci. For markers on chromosome 23, the signal of selection was particularly strong, indicating that purifying selection against deleterious alleles may have occurred even in this very small population. These data suggest that population genomics allows the exploration of the effects of neutral and non-neutral evolution on a finer scale than what has previously been possible.

  2. Mediterranean sea water budget long-term trend inferred from salinity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliris, N.; Zika, J. D.; Herold, L.; Josey, S. A.; Marsh, R.

    2018-01-01

    Changes in the Mediterranean water cycle since 1950 are investigated using salinity and reanalysis based air-sea freshwater flux datasets. Salinity observations indicate a strong basin-scale multi-decadal salinification, particularly in the intermediate and deep layers. Evaporation, precipitation and river runoff variations are all shown to contribute to a very strong increase in net evaporation of order 20-30%. While large temporal uncertainties and discrepancies are found between E-P multi-decadal trend patterns in the reanalysis datasets, a more robust and spatially coherent structure of multi-decadal change is obtained for the salinity field. Salinity change implies an increase in net evaporation of 8 to 12% over 1950-2010, which is considerably lower than that suggested by air-sea freshwater flux products, but still largely exceeding estimates of global water cycle amplification. A new method based on water mass transformation theory is used to link changes in net evaporation over the Mediterranean Sea with changes in the volumetric distribution of salinity. The water mass transformation distribution in salinity coordinates suggests that the Mediterranean basin salinification is driven by changes in the regional water cycle rather than changes in salt transports at the straits.

  3. Timescales of spherulite crystallization in obsidian inferred from water concentration profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Jonathan M.; Beck, Pierre; Tuffen, Hugh; Nichols, Alexander R.L.; Dingwell, Donald B.; Martin, Michael C

    2008-06-25

    We determined the kinetics of spherulite growth in obsidians from Krafla volcano, Iceland. We measured water concentration profiles around spherulites in obsidian by synchrotron Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The distribution of OH? groups surrounding spherulites decreases exponentially away from the spherulite-glass border, reflecting expulsion of water during crystallization of an anhydrous paragenesis (plagioclase + SiO2 + clinopyroxene + magnetite). This pattern is controlled by a balance between the growth rate of the spherulites and the diffusivity of hydrous solute in the rhyolitic melt. We modeled advective and diffusive transport of the water away from the growing spherulites by numerically solving the diffusion equation with a moving boundary. Numerical models fit the natural data best when a small amount of post-growth diffusion is incorporated in the model. Comparisons between models and data constrain the average spherulite growth rates for different temperatures and highlight size-dependent growth among a small population of spherulites.

  4. The Northeast Greenland Sirius Water Polynya dynamics and variability inferred from satellite imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jørn Bjarke Torp; Kaufmann, Laura Hauch; Kroon, Aart

    2010-01-01

    One of the most prominent polynyas in Northeast Greenland, already noted by the early expeditions in the area, is located around Shannon Ø and Pendulum Øer between 75° and 74°N in the transition zone between the fast ice and pack ice. This study names the polynya the ‘Sirius Water Polynya...

  5. Residual water transport in the Marsdiep tidal inlet inferred from observations and a numerical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, M.G.; Gerkema, T.; Duran-Matute, M.; Nauw, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    At tidal inlets, large amounts of water are exchanged with the adjacent sea during the tidal cycle.The residual flows, the net effect of ebb and flood, are generally small compared with the gross flux;they vary in magnitude and sign from one tidal period to the other; and their long-term mean

  6. Complication with Intraosseous Access: Scandinavian Users' Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hallas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraosseous access (IO is indicated if vascular access cannot be quickly established during resuscitation. Complication rates are estimated to be low, based on small patient series, model or cadaver studies, and case reports. However, user experience with IO use in real-life emergency situations might differ from the results in the controlled environment of model studies and small patient series. We performed a survey of IO use in real-life emergency situations to assess users’ experiences of complications.Methods: An online questionnaire was sent to Scandinavian emergency physicians, anesthesiologists and pediatricians.Results: 1,802 clinical cases of IO use was reported by n=386 responders. Commonly reported complications with establishing IO access were patient discomfort/pain (7.1%, difficulties with penetration of periosteum with IO needle (10.3%, difficulties with aspiration of bone marrow (12.3%, and bended/broken needle (4.0%. When using an established IO access the reported complications were difficulties with injection fluid and drugs after IO insertion (7.4%, slow infusion (despite use of pressure bag (8.8%, displacement after insertion (8.5%, and extravasation (3.7%. Compartment syndrome and osteomyelitis occurred in 0.6% and 0.4% of cases respectively.Conclusion: In users’ recollection of real-life IO use, perceived complications were more frequent than usually reported from model studies. The perceived difficulties with using IO could affect the willingness of medical staff to use IO. Therefore, user experience should be addressed both in education of how to use, and research and development of IOs. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:440–443.

  7. Inferring changes in water cycle dynamics of intensively managed landscapes via the theory of time-variant travel time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh-Yazdi, Mohammad; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Karwan, Diana L.; Botter, Gianluca

    2016-10-01

    Climatic trends and anthropogenic changes in land cover and land use are impacting the hydrology and water quality of streams at the field, watershed, and regional scales in complex ways. In poorly drained agricultural landscapes, subsurface drainage systems have been successful in increasing crop productivity by removing excess soil moisture. However, their hydroecological consequences are still debated in view of the observed increased concentrations of nitrate, phosphorus, and pesticides in many streams, as well as altered runoff volumes and timing. In this study, we employ the recently developed theory of time-variant travel time distributions within the StorAge Selection function framework to quantify changes in water cycle dynamics resulting from the combined climate and land use changes. Our results from analysis of a subbasin in the Minnesota River Basin indicate a significant decrease in the mean travel time of water in the shallow subsurface layer during the growing season under current conditions compared to the pre-1970s conditions. We also find highly damped year-to-year fluctuations in the mean travel time, which we attribute to the "homogenization" of the hydrologic response due to artificial drainage. The dependence of the mean travel time on the spatial heterogeneity of some soil characteristics as well as on the basin scale is further explored via numerical experiments. Simulations indicate that the mean travel time is independent of scale for spatial scales larger than approximately 200 km2, suggesting that hydrologic data from larger basins may be used to infer the average of smaller-scale-driven changes in water cycle dynamics.

  8. Scandinavian Nurse Specialist Group/Cystic Fibrosis (SNSG/CF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Erwander, Inger

    2006-01-01

    Aims: SNSG/CF was established to stimulate and improve cooperation between CF nurses from Scandinavian CF centers. Methods: SNSG/CF includes all the CF centers in Norway (Oslo and Bergen), Sweden (Stockholm, Gothenburg, Lund and Uppsala) and Denmark (Copenhagen and Aarhus). The board of SNSG....../CF comprises one CF nurse from each of the centers. The board meets twice a year to plan workshops and courses. SNSG/CF is part of the International Nurse Specialist Group/Cystic Fibrosis (INSG/CF). Results: Within the framework of SNSG/CF a 2-day workshop is held every second year for approximately 40...... Scandinavian CF nurses. A twelve-day CF course equivalent to 5 ECTS has been held once. Twenty-one nurses, physiotherapists and dieticians attended the course and the course will be repeated. SNSG/CF plans to make a common Scandinavian database on nursing interventions in CE SNSG/CF aims to conduct common...

  9. Scandinavian exceptionalism in anti-doping within sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tangen, Jan Ove; Møller, Verner

    2017-01-01

    Why are Scandinavian countries so committed to the cause of antidoping? In this paper, we propose that the Scandinavian mentality, formed by paternalistic welfare models, is a useful framework for understanding anti-doping. We focus on anti-doping policy and work in Norway and Denmark. We start......: the Norwegian self-image and its impact on politics, and Danish amateurism and corrupt idealism. We conclude that Nordic antidoping is pursued with rigour and determination, and suggest this is rooted in the Nordic countries’ exceptional social-welfare ideology and strong paternalism....

  10. Pore water geochemistry along continental slopes north of the East Siberian Sea: inference of low methane concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Miller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Continental slopes north of the East Siberian Sea potentially hold large amounts of methane (CH4 in sediments as gas hydrate and free gas. Although release of this CH4 to the ocean and atmosphere has become a topic of discussion, the region remains sparingly explored. Here we present pore water chemistry results from 32 sediment cores taken during Leg 2 of the 2014 joint Swedish–Russian–US Arctic Ocean Investigation of Climate–Cryosphere–Carbon Interactions (SWERUS-C3 expedition. The cores come from depth transects across the slope and rise extending between the Mendeleev and the Lomonosov ridges, north of Wrangel Island and the New Siberian Islands, respectively. Upward CH4 flux towards the seafloor, as inferred from profiles of dissolved sulfate (SO42−, alkalinity, and the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, is negligible at all stations east of 143° E longitude. In the upper 8 m of these cores, downward SO42− flux never exceeds 6.2 mol m−2 kyr−1, the upward alkalinity flux never exceeds 6.8 mol m−2 kyr−1, and δ13C composition of DIC (δ13C-DIC only moderately decreases with depth (−3.6 ‰ m−1 on average. Moreover, upon addition of Zn acetate to pore water samples, ZnS did not precipitate, indicating a lack of dissolved H2S. Phosphate, ammonium, and metal profiles reveal that metal oxide reduction by organic carbon dominates the geochemical environment and supports very low organic carbon turnover rates. A single core on the Lomonosov Ridge differs, as diffusive fluxes for SO42− and alkalinity were 13.9 and 11.3 mol m−2 kyr−1, respectively, the δ13C-DIC gradient was 5.6 ‰ m−1, and Mn2+ reduction terminated within 1.3 m of the seafloor. These are among the first pore water results generated from this vast climatically sensitive region, and they imply that abundant CH4, including gas hydrates, do not characterize the East Siberian Sea slope or rise along the investigated

  11. Pore water geochemistry along continental slopes north of the East Siberian Sea: inference of low methane concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Clint M.; Dickens, Gerald R.; Jakobsson, Martin; Johansson, Carina; Koshurnikov, Andrey; O'Regan, Matt; Muschitiello, Francesco; Stranne, Christian; Mörth, Carl-Magnus

    2017-06-01

    Continental slopes north of the East Siberian Sea potentially hold large amounts of methane (CH4) in sediments as gas hydrate and free gas. Although release of this CH4 to the ocean and atmosphere has become a topic of discussion, the region remains sparingly explored. Here we present pore water chemistry results from 32 sediment cores taken during Leg 2 of the 2014 joint Swedish-Russian-US Arctic Ocean Investigation of Climate-Cryosphere-Carbon Interactions (SWERUS-C3) expedition. The cores come from depth transects across the slope and rise extending between the Mendeleev and the Lomonosov ridges, north of Wrangel Island and the New Siberian Islands, respectively. Upward CH4 flux towards the seafloor, as inferred from profiles of dissolved sulfate (SO42-), alkalinity, and the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), is negligible at all stations east of 143° E longitude. In the upper 8 m of these cores, downward SO42- flux never exceeds 6.2 mol m-2 kyr-1, the upward alkalinity flux never exceeds 6.8 mol m-2 kyr-1, and δ13C composition of DIC (δ13C-DIC) only moderately decreases with depth (-3.6 ‰ m-1 on average). Moreover, upon addition of Zn acetate to pore water samples, ZnS did not precipitate, indicating a lack of dissolved H2S. Phosphate, ammonium, and metal profiles reveal that metal oxide reduction by organic carbon dominates the geochemical environment and supports very low organic carbon turnover rates. A single core on the Lomonosov Ridge differs, as diffusive fluxes for SO42- and alkalinity were 13.9 and 11.3 mol m-2 kyr-1, respectively, the δ13C-DIC gradient was 5.6 ‰ m-1, and Mn2+ reduction terminated within 1.3 m of the seafloor. These are among the first pore water results generated from this vast climatically sensitive region, and they imply that abundant CH4, including gas hydrates, do not characterize the East Siberian Sea slope or rise along the investigated depth transects. This contradicts previous modeling and discussions, which

  12. Preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is a frequent intervention in intensive care. Colloids are widely used, but recent data suggest harm by some of these solutions. This calls for more clinical studies on this matter, but the current preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units (ICUs...

  13. Scandinavian perspectives on plant gene technology: applications, policies and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Dennis; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Chawade, Aakash; Holme, Inger B; Hvoslef-Eide, Trine A K; Ritala, Anneli; Teeri, Teemu H; Thorstensen, Tage

    2017-10-28

    Plant research and breeding has a long and successful history in the Scandinavian countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Researchers in the region have been early in adopting plant gene technologies as they developed. This review gives a background, as well as discuss the current and future progress of plant gene technology in these four countries. Country-specific details of the regulation of genetically modified plants are described, as well as similarities and differences in the approach to regulation of novel genome-editing techniques. Also, the development of a sustainable bioeconomy may encompass the application of plant gene technology and we discuss whether or not this is reflected in current associated national strategies. In addition, country-specific information about the opinion of the public and other stakeholders on plant gene technology is presented, together with a country-wise political comparison and a discussion of the potential reciprocal influence between public opinion and the political process of policy development. The Scandinavian region is unique in several aspects, such as climate and certain agriculturally related regulations, and at the same time the region is vulnerable to changes in plant breeding investments due to the relatively small market sizes. It is therefore important to discuss the role and regulation of innovative solutions in Scandinavian plant research and breeding. © 2017 The Authors. Physiologia Plantarum published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  14. [Scandinavian guidelines for prehospital management of severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollid, S.; Sundstrom, T.; Kock-Jensen, C.

    2008-01-01

    . Evidence-based guidelines already exist that focus on all steps in the process. In the present article members of the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee present recommendations on prehospital management of traumatic brain injury adapted to the infrastructure of the Nordic region Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/26...

  15. Whole grain foods and health - A Scandinavian perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Wenche; Aman, Per; Tetens, Inge

    2013-01-01

    The food-based dietary guidelines in the Scandinavian countries that recommend an intake of minimum 75 g whole grain per 10 MJ (2,388 kcal) per day are mainly derived from prospective cohort studies where quantitative but little qualitative details are available on whole grain products. The objec...

  16. Scandinavian Approaches to Gender Equality in Academia: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates how Denmark, Norway, and Sweden approach issues of gender equality in research differently. Based on a comparative document analysis of gender equality activities in six Scandinavian universities, together with an examination of the legislative and political frameworks surrounding these activities, the article provides new…

  17. The Ethical Dimensions of Curriculum Leadership in Scandinavian Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Katarina; Johansson, Olof

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Schooling is a significant tool for fostering future generations, which, in turn, implies that the curriculum is an ethical document. It mirrors the society's notion of what is valuable, useful and necessary from a societal and individual perspective. The purpose of this paper is to address the Scandinavian curricula's ethical framework,…

  18. Identifying and Comparing Scandinavian Ethnography: Comparisons and Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant growth in the volume of research production in education ethnography in Scandinavia due partly to a regionally financed network. The present article makes some comparisons between Scandinavian and other education research contexts in relation to aspects of general ethnographic design to try to analyse…

  19. Null Objects under Coordination in Yiddish and Scandinavian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikner, Sten

    2003-01-01

    appear at first glance. I shall however try to show that this might provide support for what I take to be a more basic difference between Yiddish on one hand and the Scandinavian languages on the other, namely that Yiddish is an OV-language like German and Dutch, not a VO-language like English...

  20. Freshwater balance and the sources of deep and bottom waters in the Arctic Ocean inferred from the distribution of H218O

    OpenAIRE

    Bauch, Dorothea; Schlosser, Peter; Fairbanks, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    Data from sections across the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean occupied in 1987 and 1991 are used to derive information on the freshwater balance of the Arctic Ocean and on sources of the deep waters of the Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov basins. Using salinity, H218O, and mass balances we estimate the river-runoff and the sea-ice melt water fractions contained in the upper waters of the Arctic Ocean and infer pathways of the river-runoff signal from the shelf seas across the central Arctic Oc...

  1. Migrations in Norway and in Other Scandinavian Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Olav Ǿstrem

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of migration movements in Norway and other Scandinavian countries. The overview most of all focuses on history, but gives also comments on the present situation. The quantitative dimension of Norwegian and Scandinavian emigration in different periods is dealt with, but the article also discusses cultural circumstances in connection with emigration from and immigration to this north European region. Emigration started earlier in Norway than in the other Scandinavian or Nordic countries. Of the Scandinavian countries, “it was only from Norway that emigration to America took place on a larger scale during the 1850s”. Sweden and Denmark “during the 1860s … entered a stage of massive emigration which culminated during the 1880s”. Emigration from Iceland started later, but the country experienced “a veritable flood during the 1880s”, at the same time as Eastern and Western Europe. Finland did not reach “great numbers until the initial decades of the 20th century.” The reasons for emigration from the Scandinavian countries have in traditional migration studies been linked to economic and social factors. In this article, based on the author’s thesis on emigration from the local parish Skjold in Rogaland county, Norway, from 1837 to 1914, the focus is on the cultural factor when discussing underlying causes of Nordic mass emigration. By using the term emigrant culture – a personification of the migrants – a way to employ the individual psychological or motive factor is attempted. Considering migration a process of two sides also strengthens the cultural or psychological individual factor.

  2. Distributional Inference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, A.H.; van der Meulen, E.A.; Poortema, Klaas; Schaafsma, W.

    1995-01-01

    The making of statistical inferences in distributional form is conceptionally complicated because the epistemic 'probabilities' assigned are mixtures of fact and fiction. In this respect they are essentially different from 'physical' or 'frequency-theoretic' probabilities. The distributional form is

  3. Low methane concentrations in sediment along the continental slope north of Siberia: Inference from pore water geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C.; Dickens, G. R.; Jakobsson, M.; Koshurnikov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Eastern Siberian Margin (ESM), a vast region of the Arctic, potentially holds large amounts of methane in sediments as gas hydrate and free gas. Although this CH4 has become a topic of discussion, primarily because of rapid regional climate change, the ESM remains sparingly explored. Here we present pore water chemistry results from 32 cores taken during Leg 2 of the 2014 SWERUS-C3 expedition. The cores come from depth transects across the continental slope of the ESM between Wrangel Island and the New Siberian Islands. Upward CH4 flux towards the seafloor, as inferred from profiles of dissolved sulfate (SO42-), alkalinity, and the δ13C-dissolved inorganic Carbon (DIC), is negligible at all stations east of where the Lomonosov Ridge abuts the ESM at about 143°E. In the upper eight meters of these cores, downward sulfate flux never exceeds 9.2 mol/m2-kyr, the upward alkalinity flux never exceeds 6.8 mol/m2-kyr, and δ13C-DIC only slowly decreases with depth (-3.6‰/m on average). Additionally, dissolved H2S was not detected in these cores, and nutrient and metal profiles reveal that metal oxide reduction by organic carbon dominates the geochemical environment. A single core on Lomonosov Ridge differs, as diffusive fluxes for SO42- and alkalinity were 13.9 and 11.3 mol/m2-kyr, respectively, the δ13C-DIC gradient was 5.6‰/m, and Mn2+ reduction terminated within 1.3 m of the seafloor. These are among the first pore water results generated from this vast climatically sensitive region, and they imply that significant quantities of CH4, including gas hydrates, do not exist in any of our investigated depth transects spread out along much of the ESM continental slope. This contradicts previous assumptions and hypothetical models and discussion, which generally have assumed the presence of substantial CH4.

  4. Functional antifreeze glycoprotein genes in temperate-water New Zealand nototheniid fish infer an Antarctic evolutionary origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Hing C; Chen, Liangbiao; Near, Thomas J; Jin, Yumi

    2003-11-01

    The fish fauna of the Antarctic Ocean is dominated by five endemic families of the Perciform suborder Notothenioidei, thought to have arisen in situ within the Antarctic through adaptive radiation of an ancestral stock that evolved antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) enabling survival as the ocean chilled to subzero temperatures. The endemism results from geographic confinement imposed by a massive oceanographic barrier, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, which also thermally isolated Antarctica over geologic time, leading to its current frigid condition. Despite this voluminous barrier to fish dispersal, a number of species from the Antarctic family Nototheniidae now inhabit the nonfreezing cool temperate coasts of the southern continents. The origin of these temperate-water nototheniids is not completely understood. Since the AFGP gene apparently evolved only once, before the Antarctic notothenioid radiation, the presence of AFGP genes in extant temperate-water nototheniids can be used to infer an Antarctic evolutionary origin. Genomic Southern analysis, PCR amplification of AFGP genes, and sequencing showed that Notothenia angustata and Notothenia microlepidota endemic to southern New Zealand have two to three AFGP genes, structurally the same as those of the Antarctic nototheniids. At least one of these genes is still functional, as AFGP cDNAs were obtained and low levels of mature AFGPs were detected in the blood. A phylogenetic tree based on complete ND2 coding sequences showed monophyly of these two New Zealand nototheniids and their inclusion in the monophyletic Nototheniidae consisted of mostly AFGP-bearing taxa. These analyses support an Antarctic ancestry for the New Zealand nototheniids. A divergence time of approximately 11 Myr was estimated for the two New Zealand nototheniids, approximating the upper Miocene northern advance of the Antarctic Convergence over New Zealand, which might have served as the vicariant event that lead to the northward dispersal

  5. Prediction of settled water turbidity and optimal coagulant dosage in drinking water treatment plant using a hybrid model of k-means clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Chan Moon; Parnichkun, Manukid

    2017-01-01

    .... In this research, a hybrid of k-means clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (k-means-ANFIS) is proposed for the settled water turbidity prediction and the optimal coagulant dosage determination using full-scale historical data...

  6. Preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A.; Aneman, A.; Guttormsen, A.B.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fluid resuscitation is a frequent intervention in intensive care. Colloids are widely used, but recent data suggest harm by some of these solutions. This calls for more clinical studies on this matter, but the current preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units...... (ICUs) are unknown. METHODS: In March-May 2007, 120 Scandinavian ICUs were invited to answer a web-based survey consisting of 18 questions on types of colloids, indications, contraindications and rationale of use. RESULTS: Seventy-three ICUs, of which 31 were university hospital units, answered...... the questionnaire. Most ICUs used both synthetic and natural colloids, and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 was the preferred colloid in 59 units. Eleven ICUs had protocols for colloid use. The most frequent indication was second-line fluid for hypovolaemia, but one in three ICUs used colloids as first-line fluid...

  7. Future needs for Nursing Talents in Scandinavian countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Randi Kjelde; Herholdt-Lomholdt, Sine Maria

    2017-01-01

    Review question/objective: The aim of this review is to systematically identify, appraise and synthesize available text and opinion papers from policy-makers and trade unions in Scandinavian countries (Denmark, Sweden and Norway) containing information about nursing talent needed in healthcare...... systems for the future. The overall objective is to identify and synthesize the opinions of various stakeholders of what they believe is required in terms of nursing talent in Scandinavia. In this review, ‘‘nursing talent’’ refers to certain skills or competencies that are essential within nursing to meet...... the challenges and demands of future health care. The purpose of this review is to provide knowledge about the opinions of two key stakeholders (policy-makers and trade unions) on nursing talent needed in future Scandinavian healthcare systems....

  8. Benzodiazepine prescribing patterns in a high-prescribing Scandinavian community

    OpenAIRE

    Ekedahl, Anders; Lidbeck, Jan; Lithman, T; Noreen, D; Melander, Arne

    1993-01-01

    Sales statistics indicate large variations in benzodiazepine consumption between the Scandinavian countries: the current difference between Denmark (highest) and Sweden (lowest) is almost two-fold. There are also large within-country variations: e.g. benzodiazepine sales in the Swedish city of Helsingborg, which is close to Denmark, were at the average Danish level and were the highest in Sweden. Repeated prescription analyses were carried out in Helsingborg, and register data were used to co...

  9. Applying Critical Scandinavian ISD research principles in an African Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw; Tjørnehøj, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    IT-driven organizational changes through information systems development and implementation (ISD&I) is highly challenging because of high complexity and many stakeholders and even more so in developing countries, where the failure rates are higher than elsewhere. Unfortunately, since these countr...... we think the Scandinavian approaches to ISD&I can be useful for the African context and in developing countries in general....

  10. Water flow pathways and the water balance within a head-water catchment containing a dambo: inferences drawn from hydrochemical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. McCartney

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Dambos, seasonally saturated wetlands, are widespread in headwater catchments in sub-Saharan Africa. It is widely believed that they play an important role in regional hydrology but, despite research conducted over the last 25 years, their hydrological functions remain poorly understood. To improve conceptualisation of hydrological flow paths and investigate the water balance of a small Zimbabwean catchment containing a single dambo, measurements of alkalinity and chloride in different water types within the catchment have been used as chemical markers. The temporal variation in alkalinity is consistent with the premise that all stream water, including the prolonged dry season recession, is derived predominantly from shallow sources. The proposition that dry season recession flows are maintained by water travelling at depth within the underlying saprolite is not substantiated. There is evidence that a low permeability clay lens, commonly present in many dambos, acts as a barrier for vertical water exchange. However, the highly heterogeneous chemical composition of different waters precludes quantitative hydrograph split-ting using end member mixing analysis. Calculation of the chloride mass-balance confirms that, after rainfall, evaporation is the largest component of the catchment water budget. The study provides improved understanding of the hydrological functioning of dambos. Such understanding is essential for the development and implementation of sustainable management strategies for this landform.

  11. Whole grain foods and health – a Scandinavian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenche Frølich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The food-based dietary guidelines in the Scandinavian countries that recommend an intake of minimum 75 g whole grain per 10 MJ (2,388 kcal per day are mainly derived from prospective cohort studies where quantitative but little qualitative details are available on whole grain products. The objective of the current paper is to clarify possible differences in nutritional and health effects of the types of whole grain grown and consumed in the Scandinavian countries. A further objective is to substantiate how processing may influence the nutritional value and potential health effects of different whole grains and whole grain foods. The most commonly consumed whole grain cereals in the Scandinavian countries are wheat, rye, and oats with a considerable inter-country variation in the consumption patterns and with barley constituting only a minor role. The chemical composition of these different whole grains and thus the whole grain products consumed vary considerably with regard to the content of macro- and micronutrients and bioactive components. A considerable amount of scientific substantiation shows that processing methods of the whole grains are important for the physiological and health effects of the final whole grain products. Future research should consider the specific properties of each cereal and its processing methods to further identify the uniqueness and health potentials of whole grain products. This would enable the authorities to provide more specific food-based dietary guidelines in relation to whole grain to the benefit of both the food industry and the consumer.

  12. A Scandinavian Public Transport Model? Reform Changes in Denmark, Sweden and Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Lisa; Lissandrello, Enza; Næss, Petter

    2017-01-01

    model of public transport. The findings are based on public documents, reform evaluations, and statistics. This is the first paper focusing on Scandinavian public transport systems and their governing models per se, taking into account the considerable reforms of the 2000s. The results provide......Scandinavian public transport, especially aspects of how the Scandinavian countries (i.e., Sweden, Denmark, and Norway) have created governing structures for a cohesive public transport system, is often cited positively in international research. Scandinavia is often treated as a homogeneous unit...... in public transport research, which sometimes refers to the “Scandinavian model of public transport”. It is not uncommon for conclusions regarding Scandinavian countries to be based on analyses of just one country. Is there actually such a thing as a Scandinavian model of public transport? All around Europe...

  13. Contact Angles of Water-repellent Porous Media Inferred by Tensiometer- TDR Probe Measurement Under Controlled Wetting and Drying Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subedi, Shaphal; Komatsu, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    The time dependency of water repellency (WR) in hydrophobic porous media plays a crucial role for water infiltration processes after rainfall and for the long-term performance of capillary barrier systems. The contact angle (CA) of hydrophobic media normally decreases with continuous contact...... with water, eventually allowing water imbibition. However, the effect of the reduction in CA with soil-water contact time on the water retention function of hydrophobic media is not yet fully understood. In this study, water retention characteristics were measured using a hanging water column apparatus...... equipped with a mini-time domain reflectometry (TDR) coil probe under controlled wetting and drying in a water-repellent volcanic ash soil (VAS) and in sands coated with different hydrophobic agents. The contact angle (CA–SWRC) under imbibition was evaluated based on the inflection points on the water...

  14. Intermediate to deep water hydrographic changes of the Japan Sea over the past 10 Myr, inferred from radiolarian data (IODP Exp. 346, Site U1425)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Kenji M.; Itaki, Takuya; Tada, Ryuji; Kurokawa, Shunsuke

    2017-04-01

    .7 Ma. For older interval (2.7- 10 Ma), deep water species of the North Pacific could be identified at site U1425, inferring influences of deep water from the North Pacific and consequently a deeper sill depths of the connecting strait. Radiolarian assemblages also show that the intermediate water of the Japan sea is characterized by taxa living in equatorial to mid latitude area of the Northwest Pacific during the time interval between 2.7-10 Ma. While between 4 and 5 Ma, taxa related to the Sea of Okhotsk show very high abundances, inferring also inflow of intermediate water from the Sea of Okhotsk in the Japan Sea.

  15. Water quality analysis in rivers with non-parametric probability distributions and fuzzy inference systems: application to the Cauca River, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Duque, William; Osorio, Carolina; Piamba, Christian; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2013-02-01

    The integration of water quality monitoring variables is essential in environmental decision making. Nowadays, advanced techniques to manage subjectivity, imprecision, uncertainty, vagueness, and variability are required in such complex evaluation process. We here propose a probabilistic fuzzy hybrid model to assess river water quality. Fuzzy logic reasoning has been used to compute a water quality integrative index. By applying a Monte Carlo technique, based on non-parametric probability distributions, the randomness of model inputs was estimated. Annual histograms of nine water quality variables were built with monitoring data systematically collected in the Colombian Cauca River, and probability density estimations using the kernel smoothing method were applied to fit data. Several years were assessed, and river sectors upstream and downstream the city of Santiago de Cali, a big city with basic wastewater treatment and high industrial activity, were analyzed. The probabilistic fuzzy water quality index was able to explain the reduction in water quality, as the river receives a larger number of agriculture, domestic, and industrial effluents. The results of the hybrid model were compared to traditional water quality indexes. The main advantage of the proposed method is that it considers flexible boundaries between the linguistic qualifiers used to define the water status, being the belongingness of water quality to the diverse output fuzzy sets or classes provided with percentiles and histograms, which allows classify better the real water condition. The results of this study show that fuzzy inference systems integrated to stochastic non-parametric techniques may be used as complementary tools in water quality indexing methodologies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clustering of affective categories in Scandinavian and Romance languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina

    communication), this study focuses on levels and patterns of categorization in the domain of affectivity. Cross-cultural comparable data collected in several Romance (Spanish, Italian, Romanian) and Scandinavian (Danish, Swedish, Norwegian) languages with the help of a series of experiments inspired by Fehr...... categorizations in the 6 languages, with the Romance languages and Norwegian having 2, and Danish and Swedish only 1. Special attention is devoted, not as much to frequency of mention, order of mention and indexes of salience - parameters that are usually discussed in categorization and cultural domain studies...

  17. Methods and validity of dietary assessments in four Scandinavian populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, S; Wiggins, H S; Englyst, H

    1982-01-01

    the survey, thereby implying that dietary habits had not changed as a result of the investigative technique. It is concluded that the dietary data are indicative of current patterns of food consumption and are sufficiently valid for comparison with data on cancer risk in the 4 areas.......Average intakes of nonstarch polysaccharides (dietary fiber), foods, and nutrients were measured in representative samples of 30 men aged 50-59 in 4 Scandinavian populations with a 3-4 fold difference in risk for large bowel cancer. The assessment technique, a 4-day weighed record of food consumed...

  18. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines on general anaesthesia for emergency situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadegaard Jensen, Anders; Callesen, T; Hagemo, J S

    2010-01-01

    Emergency patients need special considerations and the number and severity of complications from general anaesthesia can be higher than during scheduled procedures. Guidelines are therefore needed. The Clinical Practice Committee of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care...... influence on intubation conditions, and should be chosen on other grounds. Ketamine should be considered in haemodynamically compromised patients. Opioids may be used to reduce the stress response following intubation. For optimal intubation conditions, succinylcholine 1-1.5 mg/kg is preferred. Outside...

  19. Methods and validity of dietary assessments in four Scandinavian populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, S; Wiggins, H S; Englyst, H

    1982-01-01

    Average intakes of nonstarch polysaccharides (dietary fiber), foods, and nutrients were measured in representative samples of 30 men aged 50-59 in 4 Scandinavian populations with a 3-4 fold difference in risk for large bowel cancer. The assessment technique, a 4-day weighed record of food consume...... the survey, thereby implying that dietary habits had not changed as a result of the investigative technique. It is concluded that the dietary data are indicative of current patterns of food consumption and are sufficiently valid for comparison with data on cancer risk in the 4 areas....

  20. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, J; Hietanen, J

    2012-01-01

    as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral...... medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide...... subject representatives in curriculum development and planning. We have created an advisory topic list in oral pathology and oral medicine....

  1. Proceedings of the 39th Scandinavian Symposium on Physical Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Viggen, Erlend Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The 39th Scandinavian Symposium on Physical Acoustics was held at Geilo, Norway from January 31 to February 3, 2016. It was arranged by the Acoustics and Optics group of the Norwegian Physical Society, and was coordinated by Ulf Kristiansen and Erlend Magnus Viggen. This year, there were 48 participants, holding a total of 31 presentations on various topics in physical acoustics, such as ultrasonics, underwater sound propagation, waves in solids, flow acoustics, and sonar. After the conference, 9 of these presentations were submitted as papers to these proceedings.

  2. Statistical inference

    CERN Document Server

    Rohatgi, Vijay K

    2003-01-01

    Unified treatment of probability and statistics examines and analyzes the relationship between the two fields, exploring inferential issues. Numerous problems, examples, and diagrams--some with solutions--plus clear-cut, highlighted summaries of results. Advanced undergraduate to graduate level. Contents: 1. Introduction. 2. Probability Model. 3. Probability Distributions. 4. Introduction to Statistical Inference. 5. More on Mathematical Expectation. 6. Some Discrete Models. 7. Some Continuous Models. 8. Functions of Random Variables and Random Vectors. 9. Large-Sample Theory. 10. General Meth

  3. Identification of water quality management policy of watershed system with multiple uncertain interactions using a multi-level-factorial risk-inference-based possibilistic-probabilistic programming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Yongping; Huang, Guohe; Fu, Haiyan; Zhang, Junlong; Cheng, Guanhui

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a multi-level-factorial risk-inference-based possibilistic-probabilistic programming (MRPP) method is proposed for supporting water quality management under multiple uncertainties. The MRPP method can handle uncertainties expressed as fuzzy-random-boundary intervals, probability distributions, and interval numbers, and analyze the effects of uncertainties as well as their interactions on modeling outputs. It is applied to plan water quality management in the Xiangxihe watershed. Results reveal that a lower probability of satisfying the objective function (θ) as well as a higher probability of violating environmental constraints (q i ) would correspond to a higher system benefit with an increased risk of violating system feasibility. Chemical plants are the major contributors to biological oxygen demand (BOD) and total phosphorus (TP) discharges; total nitrogen (TN) would be mainly discharged by crop farming. It is also discovered that optimistic decision makers should pay more attention to the interactions between chemical plant and water supply, while decision makers who possess a risk-averse attitude would focus on the interactive effect of q i and benefit of water supply. The findings can help enhance the model's applicability and identify a suitable water quality management policy for environmental sustainability according to the practical situations.

  4. From Binary Features to Elements: The Case of Scandinavian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tifrit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show how the Contrastivist Hypothesis (Hall 2007, Dresher 2008 can be amended using Element Theory (KLV 1988; Angoujard 1997; Scheer 1999; Backley 2011 and Government Phonology (KLV 1990; Lowenstamm 1996; Scheer 2004. Given the richness of the phenomenology of Nordic languages, this family constitutes our testing ground. While one might expect five different hierarchies, given that Scandinavian languages are distinct languages, what we actually find is one unique hierarchy where the same features are used in the same order. However, if we want a full understanding of the Nordic phenomenology and if we maintain the hierarchy exactly as it is, two difficulties appear: the first one involves motivation, the second one naturalness. In order to overcome the two kinds of difficulties mentioned above, we aim to develop a representation of the obstruent inventory based on unary primes using Element Theory and Government Phonology. The results we get from this hierarchy cannot be considered independently from the syllabic structure. Therefore, we propose a rereading of the phenomenology of Nordic that connects the new elementary representations that we posit to the syllabic constraints. As a consequence, we explore new hypotheses concerning the phonological activity in Scandinavian languages.

  5. Object shift in the Scandinavian languages : syntax, information structure, and intonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosono, Mayumi

    2013-01-01

    The thesis discusses Object Shift, weak pronoun shift in the Scandinavian languages, from the intonational perspective, by presenting experimental data from all the Scandinavian languages. It is shown that downstep typically occurs in the Object Shift construction but does not occur in the

  6. Is gastronomy a new tourism lure of Scandinavian countries? : An exploratory study on Chinese tourists

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Jin

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study initially attempts to generate basic understanding regarding how do Chinese tourists evaluate the importance of Scandinavian gastronomies when holidaying the countries. And it further judge the states could whether implement gastronomical development strategy. Additionally, the study generally explores Chinese tourists’ food behavior, motivation and preference in a culturally different environment when holidaying in Scandinavian countries. The study also provides a deta...

  7. Quality Assurance Policies and Practices in Scandinavian Higher Education Systems: Convergence or Different Paths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpazidou Schmidt, Evanthia

    2017-01-01

    Because there is close cooperation on quality assurance in the Scandinavian countries, one would expect there to be convergence of quality assurance policies and practices in Scandinavian higher education. Few studies have analysed these quality assurance policies and practices from a comparative viewpoint. Based on empirical evidence produced in…

  8. "Folkbildning" through Hip-Hop: How the Ideals of Three Rappers Parallel a Scandinavian Educational Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how the rappers' talk about hip-hop and its connection to pedagogy and social activism parallel the Scandinavian tradition of folkbildning. Scandinavian folkbildning can be seen as a movement to provide voluntary education for the general population. It can also be the name of the process of learning in which…

  9. Prevalence and causes of visual impairment and blindness among 9980 Scandinavian adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesgaard, Helena; Vinding, Troels; La Cour, Morten

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the age-specific prevalence and causes of visual impairment and blindness in an epidemiologic study of an adult Scandinavian population.......To investigate the age-specific prevalence and causes of visual impairment and blindness in an epidemiologic study of an adult Scandinavian population....

  10. Writing in the literacy era: Scandinavian teachers’ notions of writing in mother tongue education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This study is part of a Scandinavian research project, Nordfag.net, that investigates Scandinavian mother tongue teachers’ didactic profiles and conceptions of the mother tongue education (MTE) subject through an ethnographic approach. The purpose of the present study is to discuss...

  11. Migration, distribution and population (stock) structure of shallow-water hake (Merluccius capensis) in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem inferred using a geostatistical population model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis; Kristensen, Kasper; Kainge, Paulus Inekela

    2016-01-01

    Shallow-water hake (Merluccius capensis) is of considerable ecological and economic importance in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem in South Africa and Namibia. Optimal management of the resource is currently constrained by the limited understanding of migration patterns and population...... (stock) structure. We combined data from multiple demersal trawl surveys from the entire distribution area to estimate growth rate, mortality and spatial and temporal patterns of M. capensis. Analyses were conducted using the geostatistical model GeoPop. The complexity of the model and the amount of data...... required a new level of soft- and hardware performance. This was achieved by utilizing Template Model Builder and high-end computational hardware (Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, EC2). The data and the model enabled us to follow the distribution and infer movements of M. capensis from the recruitment...

  12. Origin and age of thermal waters in Cieplice Spa, Sudeten, Poland, inferred from isotope, chemical and noble gas data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciȩżkowski, W.; Gröning, M.; Leśniak, P. M.; Weise, S. M.; Zuber, A.

    1992-12-01

    Isotope and hydrochemical data of the thermal water system in Cieplice Ṡlaskie Zdrój (Spa) indicate the existence of two subsystems that greatly differ in volume and which meet at the fault zones of a granitic horst, where they discharge at an altitude of about 340m. One of the subsystems is very small (about 4 × 10 3 m 3) as indicated by the tritium age of the order of 10 years and a low outflow rate. Its recharge area found from the δ18O and δD values, is about 200m above the springs, most probably on the slopes of the foothills of the Karkonosze Mountains south-southwest of the spa. The large subsystem contains water which is free of tritium and whose 14C content is from 1 to 8 pmc with δ13C = -8.0 to -9.2‰. The isotopic composition of this water reflects either the climatic effect (low-altitude recharge during a cooler pre-Holocene climate) or the altitude effect (recharge in the early Holocene period at about 1000m at the heights of the Karkonosze assuming that the 14C concentration is strongly reduced by exchange with calcite in veins). For the former hypothesis, the recharge area of this water is probably either at the foot of the southeastern slopes of the Kaczawa Mountains or/and at the foot of the Rudawy Janowickie Mountains, to the east of Cieplice. The noble gas temperatures are more consistent with the pre-Holocene recharge. Similarly, the 4He excess and {40Ar}/{36Ar} ratio support the hypothesis of a pre-Holecene age. The constant {3He}/{4He} ratio of 26 × 10 -8 for highly different helium contents indicates crustal origin of helium. For the pre-Holocene age of water its volume is calculated at >- 10 9m 3 (stagnant water in micropores and mobile water in fractures) and the hydraulic conductivity of the host granite massif is estimated at about 7 × 10 -8 ms -1. Two outflows from this subsystem have different and variable fractions of a modern water component (bomb age), most probably originating from the bank infiltration of a nearby stream.

  13. Cryptic population structuring in Scandinavian lynx: reply to Pamilo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorde, P E; Rueness, E K; Stenseth, N C; Jakobsen, K S

    2006-04-01

    In a recent Commentary in this journal, Pamilo (2004) criticized our analysis of the spatial genetic structure of the Eurasian lynx in Scandinavia (Rueness et al. 2003). The analyses uncovered a marked geographical differentiation along the Scandinavian peninsula with an apparent linear gradient in the north-south direction. We used computer simulations to check on the proposition that the observed geographical structure could have arisen by genetic drift and isolation by distance in the approximate 25 generations that have passed since the last bottleneck. Pamilo disapproved of our choice of population model and also how we compared the outcome of the simulations with data. As these issues should be of interest to a wider audience we discuss them in some detail.

  14. The Mediatization of Politics in Contemporary Scandinavian Film and Television

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    2015-01-01

    The increased mediatization of society since 1960 has lead to a discussion of the mediatization of politics and the role of media for political debate and democracy. Habermas as early as 1962 discussed the rise and potential decline of the public sphere. The role of media in general was central...... in this debate, and the rise of the internet in modern societies has increased the analysis and theories of the mediatization of politics in theories of democracy and in media sociology. Audio–visual media and the new digital media have increased the visibility of all parts of private and public life and changed...... the relation between media, public figures and the citizen. In this article, I will discuss main positions in theories on the mediatization of politics. I will also discuss and analyse three types of film and television genres that reflect this mediatization of politics in Scandinavian film and television...

  15. Inbreeding and relatedness in Scandinavian grey wolves Canis lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegren, H

    1999-01-01

    Management of small and threatened populations may require detailed knowledge about the genetic status of individuals and the genetic relatedness between individuals. I show here that individual heterozygosity at a set of 29 microsatellite loci correlates closely to the degree of inbreeding in a captive grey wolf population. Microsatellite allele sharing similarly correlates closely to known relatedness between pairs of individuals. Genotyping the same markers in a small (60-70 individuals) natural population of grey wolves in Sweden, low individual heterozygosities and high values of allele sharing between some animals were found. Since inbreeding depression has been documented in a captive grey wolf population of Scandinavian origin, the results point out an additional risk for the small Swedish wild population.

  16. Usability and Interaction Design - New Challenges for the Scandinavian Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Sundblad, Yngve

    2008-01-01

    , augmented reality, small interfaces, tangible interfaces, etc. are dramatically changing the nature of HCI (human-computer interaction). We witness the creation of ad hoc configurations of large and small user interfaces. The new interfaces are moveable and used in changing locations and contexts; different......Computer use and interaction possibilities are changing quickly, while use contexts and application types are radically broadening. Technology no longer consists of static tools belonging only to the workplace but permeates work on the move, homes and everyday lives. Pervasive technologies...... understanding of usability and interaction design. In particular, we discuss how the Scandinavian tradition of user involvement in development is facing up with the challenges of new work and of non-work contexts. There is a tendency that much recent investigations into non-work settings get stuck in a divide...

  17. Thrombolytic treatment for stroke in the Scandinavian countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, K.B.; Murray, V.; Boysen, G.

    2009-01-01

    (85%) felt that its risks were acceptable. Main barriers were: unawareness of stroke symptoms among patients (82%) and their failure to respond adequately (54%); ambulance services not triaging acute stroke as urgent (23%); and insufficient in-hospital routines (15%). The respondents suggested......Objective - We wanted to describe the use of thrombolytic treatment for stroke in Scandinavia, to assess stroke doctors' opinions on this treatment, to identify barriers against treatment, and to suggest improvements to overcome these barriers. Methods - We sent questionnaires to 493 Scandinavian...... doctors, who were involved in acute stroke care. Results - We received 453 (92%) completed questionnaires. Overall, 1.9% (range per hospital 0-13.9%) of patients received thrombolytic treatment. A majority (94%) of the respondents was convinced of the beneficial effects of thrombolytic treatment and many...

  18. Enacting Green Consumers: The Case of the Scandinavian Preppies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuentes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to develop and illustrate an analytic approach that brings the active making and makings of green consumer images to the fore. Efforts to "know" the green consumers have generated multiple representations. Enactments of the green consumer are not innocent but also play a role in shaping how we understand and approach sustainable consumption. Because of this it is important to examine and critically discuss how green consumers are enacted today. This paper develops an approach that allows us to examine how green consumers are enacted and discuss the consequences these constructions might have for sustainability. Theoretically, a performativity approach drawing on theories from Science and Technology Studies (STS and economic sociology is used to discuss the enactment of green consumers. Empirically, focus is on Boomerang � a Swedish fashion retailer, brand, and producer � and its marketing practices. The analysis shows how the marketing work of the Boomerang Company leads to the enactment of the Green Scandinavian Preppy. This specific version of the green consumer is a combination of the knowledgeable green connoisseur - a consumer that knows quality when he/she sees it - and the green hedonist in search of the good life. The Green Scandinavian Preppy wants to enjoy nature, go sailing, and do so wearing fashionable quality clothes. This is a consumer that knows quality, appreciates design, and has the means to pay for both. While this is a version of the green consumer that might be appealing and thus have the potential to pro-mote a version of green consumption, it is also a green consumer image that has lost much of its political power as green consumption is framed as simply another source of pleasure and identity-making.

  19. Sarcoptic mange in the Scandinavian wolf Canis lupus population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Boris; Zimmermann, Barbara; Wabakken, Petter; Bornstein, Set; Månsson, Johan; Evans, Alina L; Liberg, Olof; Sand, Håkan; Kindberg, Jonas; Ågren, Erik O; Arnemo, Jon M

    2016-07-27

    Sarcoptic mange, a parasitic disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei, is regularly reported on wolves Canis lupus in Scandinavia. We describe the distribution and transmission of this parasite within the small but recovering wolf population by analysing 269 necropsy reports and performing a serological survey on 198 serum samples collected from free-ranging wolves between 1998 and 2013. The serological survey among 145 individual captured Scandinavian wolves (53 recaptures) shows a consistent presence of antibodies against sarcoptic mange. Seropositivity among all captured wolves was 10.1 % (CI. 6.4 %-15.1 %). Sarcoptic mange-related mortality reported at necropsy was 5.6 % and due to secondary causes, predominantly starvation. In the southern range of the population, seroprevalence was higher, consistent with higher red fox densities. Female wolves had a lower probability of being seropositive than males, but for both sexes the probability increased with pack size. Recaptured individuals changing from seropositive to seronegative suggest recovery from sarcoptic mange. The lack of seropositive pups (8-10 months, N = 56) and the occurrence of seropositive and seronegative individuals in the same pack indicates interspecific transmission of S. scabiei into this wolf population. We consider sarcoptic mange to have little effect on the recovery of the Scandinavian wolf population. Heterogenic infection patterns on the pack level in combination with the importance of individual-based factors (sex, pack size) and the north-south gradient for seroprevalence suggests low probability of wolf-to-wolf transmission of S. scabiei in Scandinavia.

  20. Reactive transport modelling to infer changes in soil hydraulic properties induced by non-conventional water irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Abellan, Javier; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín; Candela, Lucila; Jacques, Diederik; Kohfahl, Claus; Tamoh, Karim

    2017-06-01

    The use of non-conventional water (e.g., treated wastewater, desalinated water) for different purposes is increasing in many water scarce regions of the world. Its use for irrigation may have potential drawbacks, because of mineral dissolution/precipitation processes, such as changes in soil physical and hydraulic properties (e.g., porosity, permeability), modifying infiltration and aquifer recharge processes or blocking root growth. Prediction of soil and groundwater impacts is essential for achieving sustainable agricultural practices. A numerical model to solve unsaturated water flow and non-isothermal multicomponent reactive transport has been modified implementing the spatio-temporal evolution of soil physical and hydraulic properties. A long-term process simulation (30 years) of agricultural irrigation with desalinated water, based on a calibrated/validated 1D numerical model in a semi-arid region, is presented. Different scenarios conditioning reactive transport (i.e., rainwater irrigation, lack of gypsum in the soil profile, and lower partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)) have also been considered. Results show that although boundary conditions and mineral soil composition highly influence the reactive processes, dissolution/precipitation of carbonate species is triggered mainly by pCO2, closely related to plant roots. Calcite dissolution occurs in the root zone, precipitation takes place under it and at the soil surface, which will lead a root growth blockage and a direct soil evaporation decrease, respectively. For the studied soil, a gypsum dissolution up to 40 cm depth is expected at long-term, with a general increase of porosity and hydraulic conductivity.

  1. The Economy of Scandinavian-American Exchange: Donations and Scholarships in the American-Scandinavian Foundation, 1912–1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Mays

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of philanthropy for academic exchange cannot be overestimated. Especially in the first half of the twentieth century, scholarships for academic exchange originated from the private sector instead of the state. But what is the relationship between academic exchange and the donations which finance scholarships? How can specific donations and the restrictions placed on them change the flow of exchange? This article investigates donation and scholarship praxis within the American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF from 1912–1995, a philanthropic organisation devoted to academic exchange between Scandinavia and the United States. The period, 1912–1944, is characterised by various small donations and few scholarships to mostly American fellows. The second period, 1945–1995, represents an era of economic growth created from a surge in large, restricted donations invested in scholarship funds. This led to an increased number of scholarships to a more geographically diverse population.

  2. A Social Poetics of Documentary: Grierson and the Scandinavian Documentary Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the influence of John Grierson on the development of the Scandinavian documentary film and television movement. Grierson's poetic for a new documentary had a strong influence on the Scandinavian documentary movement from the 1930s and on. The combination of a documentary f...... format that combined a new aesthetic form with a social vision was developed in the early British class society but pointed towards a more democratic wellfare society. Key Scandinavian figures and institutions in this development of a modern, documentary movement is analysed....

  3. Oligoclonal band status in Scandinavian multiple sclerosis patients is associated with specific genetic risk alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mero, Inger-Lise; Gustavsen, Marte W; Sæther, Hanne S

    2013-01-01

    The presence of oligoclonal bands (OCB) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a typical finding in multiple sclerosis (MS). We applied data from Norwegian, Swedish and Danish (i.e. Scandinavian) MS patients from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to search for genetic differences in MS relating...... to OCB status. GWAS data was compared in 1367 OCB positive and 161 OCB negative Scandinavian MS patients, and nine of the most associated SNPs were genotyped for replication in 3403 Scandinavian MS patients. HLA-DRB1 genotypes were analyzed in a subset of the OCB positive (n = 2781) and OCB negative (n...

  4. Prediction of settled water turbidity and optimal coagulant dosage in drinking water treatment plant using a hybrid model of k-means clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan Moon; Parnichkun, Manukid

    2017-02-01

    Coagulation is an important process in drinking water treatment to attain acceptable treated water quality. However, the determination of coagulant dosage is still a challenging task for operators, because coagulation is nonlinear and complicated process. Feedback control to achieve the desired treated water quality is difficult due to lengthy process time. In this research, a hybrid of k-means clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (k-means-ANFIS) is proposed for the settled water turbidity prediction and the optimal coagulant dosage determination using full-scale historical data. To build a well-adaptive model to different process states from influent water, raw water quality data are classified into four clusters according to its properties by a k-means clustering technique. The sub-models are developed individually on the basis of each clustered data set. Results reveal that the sub-models constructed by a hybrid k-means-ANFIS perform better than not only a single ANFIS model, but also seasonal models by artificial neural network (ANN). The finally completed model consisting of sub-models shows more accurate and consistent prediction ability than a single model of ANFIS and a single model of ANN based on all five evaluation indices. Therefore, the hybrid model of k-means-ANFIS can be employed as a robust tool for managing both treated water quality and production costs simultaneously.

  5. Prediction of settled water turbidity and optimal coagulant dosage in drinking water treatment plant using a hybrid model of k-means clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan Moon; Parnichkun, Manukid

    2017-11-01

    Coagulation is an important process in drinking water treatment to attain acceptable treated water quality. However, the determination of coagulant dosage is still a challenging task for operators, because coagulation is nonlinear and complicated process. Feedback control to achieve the desired treated water quality is difficult due to lengthy process time. In this research, a hybrid of k-means clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system ( k-means-ANFIS) is proposed for the settled water turbidity prediction and the optimal coagulant dosage determination using full-scale historical data. To build a well-adaptive model to different process states from influent water, raw water quality data are classified into four clusters according to its properties by a k-means clustering technique. The sub-models are developed individually on the basis of each clustered data set. Results reveal that the sub-models constructed by a hybrid k-means-ANFIS perform better than not only a single ANFIS model, but also seasonal models by artificial neural network (ANN). The finally completed model consisting of sub-models shows more accurate and consistent prediction ability than a single model of ANFIS and a single model of ANN based on all five evaluation indices. Therefore, the hybrid model of k-means-ANFIS can be employed as a robust tool for managing both treated water quality and production costs simultaneously.

  6. Inferring the heterogeneity, transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity of crystalline aquifers from a detailed water-table map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewandel, Benoît; Jeanpert, Julie; Ladouche, Bernard; Join, Jean-Lambert; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Estimating the transmissivity or hydraulic conductivity field to characterize the heterogeneity of a crystalline aquifer is particularly difficult because of the wide variations of the parameters. We developed a new approach based on the analysis of a dense network of water-table data. It is based on the concept that large-scale variations in hydraulic head may give information on large-scale aquifer parameters. The method assumes that flux into the aquifer is mainly sub-horizontal and that the water table is mostly controlled by topography, rather than recharge. It is based on an empirical statistical relationship between field data on transmissivity and the inverse slope values of a topography-reduced water-table map. This relationship is used to compute a transmissivity map that must be validated with field measurements. The proposed approach can provide a general pattern of transmissivity, or hydraulic conductivity, but cannot correctly reproduce strong variations at very local scale (less than10 m), and will face of some uncertainties where vertical flows cannot be neglected. The method was tested on a peridotite (ultramafic rock) aquifer of 3.5 km2 in area located in New Caledonia. The resulting map shows transmissivity variations over about 5 orders of magnitude (average LogT: -5.2 ± 0.7). Comparison with a map based on measured water-level data (n = 475) shows that the comparison between LogT-computed values and LogT data deduced from 28 hydraulic tests is estimated with an error less than 20% in 71% of cases (LogT ± 0.4), and with an error less than 10% (LogT ± 0.2 on average) in 39% of cases. From this map a hydraulic-conductivity map has been computed showing values ranging over 8 orders of magnitude. The repeatability of the approach was tested on a second data set of hydraulic-head measurements (n = 543); the mean deviation between both LogT maps is about 11%. These encouraging results show that the method can give valuable parameter estimates, and

  7. Spawning patterns of shallow-water hake (Merluccius capensis) and deep-water hake (M. paradoxus) in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem inferred from gonadosomatic indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis; Kainge, Paulus Inekela; Singh, Larvika

    2015-01-01

    , on the western Agulhas bank in the southern Benguela, spawning peaks were observed in both summer and winter. These peaks largely coincided with peaks in phytoplankton production that are linked to upwelling conditions in the region. Hake condition decreased subsequent to the development of the gonads......We use gonad- and body-weight data from 54,000 samples of Merluccius capensis and Merluccius paradoxus collected in all months of the years between 1991 and 2013 to infer peak spawning periods and areas in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem. We develop and apply a new gonadosomatic index...... threshold for identification of spawning individuals. Spawning M. capensis were observed throughout the study area, mainly in areas of about 100. m bottom depth. The highest proportions of spawning M. capensis females in the northern Benguela region were observed off central Namibia between 24.0 and 26.0°S...

  8. Inferring the interconnections between surface water bodies, tile-drains and an unconfined aquifer-aquitard system: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombani, N.; Di Giuseppe, D.; Faccini, B.; Ferretti, G.; Mastrocicco, M.; Coltorti, M.

    2016-06-01

    Shallow lenses in reclaimed coastal areas are precious sources of freshwater for crop development, but their seasonal behaviour is seldom known in tile-drained fields. In this study, field monitoring and numerical modelling provide a robust conceptual model of these complex environments. Crop and meteorological data are used to implement an unsaturated flow model to reconstruct daily recharge. Groundwater fluxes and salinity, water table elevation, tile-drains' discharge and salinity are used to calibrate a 2D density-dependent numerical model to quantify non-reactive solute transport within the aquifer-aquitard system. Results suggest that lateral fluxes in low hydraulic conductivity sediments are limited, while water table fluctuation is significant. The use of depth-integrated monitoring to calibrate the model results in poor efficiency, while multi-level soil profiles are crucial to define the mixing zone between fresh and brackish groundwater. Measured fluxes and chloride concentrations from tile-drains not fully compare with calculated ones due to preferential flow through cracks.

  9. What the Inbred Scandinavian Wolf Population Tells Us about the Nature of Conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannikke Räikkönen

    Full Text Available The genetic aspects of population health are critical, but frequently difficult to assess. Of concern has been the genetic constitution of Scandinavian wolves (Canis lupus, which represent an important case in conservation. We examined the incidence of different congenital anomalies for 171 Scandinavian wolves, including the immigrant founder female, born during a 32-year period between 1978 and 2010. The incidence of anomalies rose from 13% to 40% throughout the 32-year study period. Our ability to detect this increase was likely facilitated by having considered multiple kinds of anomaly. Many of the found anomalies are likely associated with inbreeding or some form of genetic deterioration. These observations have implications for understanding the conservation needs of Scandinavian wolves. Moreover, these observations and the history of managing Scandinavian wolves focus attention on a broader question, whether conservation is merely about avoiding extinction of remnant populations, or whether conservation also entails maintaining genetic aspects of population health.

  10. Changes in deep-water formation during the Younger Dryas event inferred from 10Be and 14C records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscheler, R; Beer, J; Wagner, G; Finkel, R C

    2000-11-30

    Variations in atmospheric radiocarbon (14C) concentrations can be attributed either to changes in the carbon cycle--through the rate of radiocarbon removal from the atmosphere--or to variations in the production rate of 14C due to changes in solar activity or the Earth's magnetic field. The production rates of 10Be and 14C vary in the same way, but whereas atmospheric radiocarbon concentrations are additionally affected by the carbon cycle, 10Be concentrations reflect production rates more directly. A record of the 10Be production-rate variations can therefore be used to separate the two influences--production rates and the carbon cycle--on radiocarbon concentrations. Here we present such an analysis of the large fluctuations in atmospheric 14C concentrations, of unclear origin, that occurred during the Younger Dryas cold period. We use the 10Be record from the GISP2 ice core to model past production rates of radionuclides, and find that the largest part of the fluctuations in atmospheric radiocarbon concentrations can be attributed to variations in production rate. The residual difference between measured 14C concentrations and those modelled using the 10Be record can be explained with an additional change in the carbon cycle, most probably in the amount of deep-water formation.

  11. Habitat use and migratory behaviour of pikeperch Sander lucioperca in Lithuanian and Latvian waters as inferred from otolith Sr:Ca ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ložys, Linas; Shiao, Jen-Chieh; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki; Minde, Atis; Pūtys, Žilvinas; Jakubavičiūtė, Eglė; Dainys, Justas; Gorfine, Harry; Tzeng, Wann-Nian

    2017-11-01

    Determination of the geographic boundaries that define a stock is a key challenge in fisheries management. Acquiring an understanding of spatial distribution and migration patterns of pikeperch Sander lucioperca populations in the south-eastern Baltic Sea region would help to delineate the stocks and contribute towards sustainable exploitation of the population. In this study, habitat use and migratory behaviour of S. lucioperca were inferred from otolith Sr:Ca ratios obtained via an Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer. S. lucioperca collected from the inland Kaunas City water reservoir, where downstream migration is precluded by a hydro-power plant, consistently showed a freshwater signature in their otoliths throughout their life history. In contrast, those collected from the Baltic Sea and Curonian Lagoon in Lithuania, and the lower reaches of the Daugava River in Latvia had ratios indicative of movement between fresh and brackish water habitats. Although S. lucioperca can inhabit brackish water bodies, they predominantly reside and reproduce in freshwater systems. It is thought that periodic post-spawning migration to the sea during spring is related to better foraging conditions and perhaps as a strategy for shedding ectoparasites. Currently, catch quotas apply only to those S. lucioperca taken from the Curonian Lagoon and not the Baltic Sea. Frequent migration between freshwater habitats and the Baltic Sea suggest that S. lucioperca stocks from a given river/estuary system should be considered as a single management unit despite individual differences in migratory behaviour. The extent to which migration into the Baltic Sea could potentially compromise the effectiveness of catch quotas was the main issue which initiated this study.

  12. Experiences of Scandinavian nurses in discussing sexuality with patients, clients and residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Birgitte Schantz; Rasmussen, Philippa; Conroy, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective of this review is to critically appraise, synthesize, and present the best available evidence to address the question: How do Scandinavian nurses experience discussing sexual issues with patients, residents and clients?......REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective of this review is to critically appraise, synthesize, and present the best available evidence to address the question: How do Scandinavian nurses experience discussing sexual issues with patients, residents and clients?...

  13. A Scandinavian Experience of Register Collaboration: The Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelin, Leif I; Robertsson, Otto; Fenstad, Anne M

    2011-01-01

    The Nordic (Scandinavian) countries have had working arthroplasty registers for several years. However, the small numbers of inhabitants and the conformity within each country with respect to preferred prosthesis brands and techniques have limited register research.......The Nordic (Scandinavian) countries have had working arthroplasty registers for several years. However, the small numbers of inhabitants and the conformity within each country with respect to preferred prosthesis brands and techniques have limited register research....

  14. Dress in Scandinavian Iconography of the 5-10th centuries AD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannering, Ulla

    2004-01-01

    In the Scandinavian Late Iron Age costume studies plays an important role. The many new finds of gold sheet images comprise an until now unexploited source that can enlight the often fragmented and degraded textile remains.......In the Scandinavian Late Iron Age costume studies plays an important role. The many new finds of gold sheet images comprise an until now unexploited source that can enlight the often fragmented and degraded textile remains....

  15. Red Resurrection : The Challenges Faced by Scandinavian Vendors when Marketing the Menstrual Cup

    OpenAIRE

    Coe-Björsell, Emily; Jansson, Linn

    2015-01-01

    It is argued in this thesis that the stigmatization of menstruation and the atypical product features of the menstrual cup constitute a unique marketing challenge for vendors of the menstrual cup. The purpose of this study is therefore to investigate these issues and the ways in which Scandinavian vendors approach them. Further, the possible effects of this approach on the rate of adoption of the menstrual cup are analyzed. In order to do so, interviews with four Scandinavian vendors of the m...

  16. Scandinavian Oncophorus (Bryopsida, Oncophoraceae: species, cryptic species, and intraspecific variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Hedenäs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Scandinavian members of the acrocarpous moss genus Oncophorus were revised after field observations had suggested unrecognized diversity. Based on molecular (nuclear: internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, ITS; plastid: trnGUCC G2 intron, trnG, rps4 gene + trnS-rps4 spacer, rps4 and morphological evidence, four morphologically distinguishable species are recognized, Oncophorus elongatus (I.Hagen Hedenäs, O. integerrimus Hedenäs sp. nov. (syn. O. virens var. elongatus Limpr., O. virens (Hedw. Brid., and O. wahlenbergii Brid. (O. sardous Herzog, syn. nov.. Oncophorus elongatus was earlier recognized, but much of its variation was hidden within O. wahlenbergii. Its circumscription is here expanded to include plants with long leaves having mostly denticulate or sharply denticulate upper margins and with long and narrow marginal cells in the basal portion of the sheathing leaf lamina. The new species O. integerrimus sp. nov. differs from O. virens in having more loosely incurved leaves and entire or almost entire upper leaf margins. Besides these characters, the species in the respective pairs differ in quantitative features of the leaf lamina cells. Several cryptic entities were found, in several cases as molecularly distinct as some of the morphologically recognizable species, and phylogeographic structure is present within O. elongatus and O. virens.

  17. Chrysophyte cyst-inferred variability of warm season lake water chemistry and climate in northern Poland: training set and downcore reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Almeida, Iván; Grosjean, Martin; Tylmann, Wojciech; Bonk, Alicja

    2014-05-01

    Transfer Functions based on modern training sets are well established and powerful tools in quantitative paleolimnology and environmental/climate reconstructions. Lake sediments are excellent natural archive to reconstruct long-term climate and environmental fluctuations. In this sense, the project 'Climate of northern Poland during the last 1000 years: Constraining the future with the past' (CLIMPOL) aims to develop quantitative climate reconstruction in northern Poland during the last millennium using lake sediments. The Polish training set consists of Chrysophyte cyst (golden brown algae, class Chrysophyceae) sediment trap and surface sediment samples, and data for 19 environmental variables collected from 50 lakes in northern Poland. Canonical correspondence analyses (CCA) revealed that water electric conductivity, total nitrogen, total phosphorous, turbidity, cation and anion compositions (Ca2+, HCO3-) contributed significantly to explaining chrysophytes distribution in the lakes of the training set. A quantitative transfer function was then developed to estimate Ca2+ (log10 transformed) from modern chrysophyte cysts assemblages using weighted-averaging regression (WA) with classical deshrinking. The bootstrapped regression coefficient (R2boot) was 0.68, with a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.143 (log10 units). The calibration model was applied to a varved sedimentary sequence (AD 1898-2010) from Lake Żabińskie, Masurian Lakeland (NE Poland). Cyst-inferred lake water Ca2+ concentrations were significantly correlated with zonal wind speed (m•s-1) (R=0.50; padjcysts assemblages in Polish lakes respond to hydrochemical factors driven by climate variability.

  18. Evidences of Silurian dextral transpression in the Scandinavian Caledonides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgersen, Espen; Viola, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides are classically interpreted as a fold and thrust belt resulting from the collision between Laurentia and Baltica during the Silurian, which involved the up-to-400 km ESE-wards translation of nappes onto the Baltoscandian platform. It has been suggested that the Caledonian fold and thrust belt formed through several distinct orogenic episodes, from early shortening in the Late Ordovician to orogenic collapse in the Devonian. The classic Caledonian, orogen-perpendicular ESE-ward nappe transport is constrained by abundant and consistently oriented stretching lineations across the entire orogen and unambiguous kinematic indicators. However, there is also a large number of NW-SE-trending and roughly orogen-parallel lineations, particularly in the upper ophiolite- and eclogite-bearing nappes, which are more challenging to interpret with the traditional orogeny evolution model. The analysis of the areal extent, spatial distribution and geometrical relationships of the Caledonian nappes in southern and central Norway, however, offers new insights and allows for new constraints on the bulk kinematic framework of the shortening history of the belt. Here we present new, first-order geological observations that demonstrate a two-fold compressional history and associated strain partitioning during Caledonian convergence. More specifically, we propose that Late Ordovician NNW-SSE shortening caused early compression, followed by WNW-ESE Early Silurian shortening, which resulted in strain partitioning along the planar fabrics and discontinuities from the earlier event. In detail, orogen-parallel dextral wrench tectonics caused significant lateral displacement along at least three, orogen-scale NE-SW striking corridors, wherein the nappes appear to be consistently displaced in a dextral fashion. We propose that the Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex, which accommodated significant sinistral displacements during the later Devonian orogenic collapse

  19. Fluctuations in Anoxia and the Depth of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Thermocline Inferred from a 2000 Year Sediment Record of Water-Column Denitrification Off Baja California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geen, A.; Mey, J. L., IV; Thunell, R.; Berelson, W.; Deutsch, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution records of sediment 15N at three sites along the western margin of North America were recently shown to indicate a gradual weakening of water-column denitrification and therefore anoxia from 1860 to 1990 followed by two decades of intensifying denitrification and anoxia (Deutsch et al., Science August 8, 2014). An ocean general circulation model driven by wind and buoyancy fluxes reproduces these variations for the last 50 years and mechanistically links them to changes in the depth of the thermocline in the eastern Pacific. The data-model comparison shows that strong denitrification and anoxia are associated with a shallow thermocline in the eastern equatorial Pacific and vice-versa. We present here a longer record of sediment 15N from one of the previously studied sites, Soledad basin, indicating that the period of particularly weak denitrification and anoxia in the eastern Pacific reached in the early 1990s was unprecedented for the past 2000 years. This supports the notion that a concomitant deepening of the thermocline during the 20th century simulated by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change models may have been driven by the anthropogenic buildup of greenhouse gases. At the other end of the spectrum, the extended sediment 15N record indicates a period of particularly strong denitrification and anoxia extending from about 800 to 1200 AD. This coincides with the Medieval Warm Period of prolonged droughts indicated by tree-ring studies in the American West as well as reduced runoff recorded off coastal Peru. The particularly shallow thermocline inferred from the Soledad basin 15N record for this interval is consistent with the prolonged La Nina-like conditions in the equatorial Pacific that have been proposed to explain the Medieval droughts.

  20. Quality assurance policies and practices in Scandinavian higher education systems: convergence or different paths?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalpazidou Schmidt, Evanthia

    2017-01-01

    Because there is close cooperation on quality assurance in the Scandinavian countries, one would expect there to be convergence of quality assurance policies and practices in Scandinavian higher education. Few studies have analysed these quality assurance policies and practices from a comparative...... quality assurance. The debate is compelling with regard to the Swedish case in particular, with its ‘one size fits all’ approach and exclusive focus on outcomes which has been heavily criticised by the higher education institutions and has turned out to be controversial from the European viewpoint....... viewpoint. Based on empirical evidence produced in connection with studies of recent quality reforms in Scandinavia and an approach based on linking diffusion and translation theories with institutionalist perspectives focusing on path dependency, the paper contributes to the current debate on Scandinavian...

  1. Networked Intermedia Agenda Setting: The Geography of a Hyperlinked Scandinavian News Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøvaag, Helle; Stavelin, Eirik; Karlsson, Michael

    How does agenda setting work within the hyperlinked Scandinavian news ecology? This paper investigates intermedia agenda setting within and between the local, regional, national and supra-national levels in Sweden, Denmark and Norway; analyses the center/periphery dimensions of hyperlink connecti......How does agenda setting work within the hyperlinked Scandinavian news ecology? This paper investigates intermedia agenda setting within and between the local, regional, national and supra-national levels in Sweden, Denmark and Norway; analyses the center/periphery dimensions of hyperlink...... between news agendas in the three countries, and c) the connectedness enabled by size, resources and central location in the Scandinavian hyperlinked information structure. The network analysis provides new insights into the relationship between centralized political structures, media ownership dispersal...

  2. Cirque-driven erosion of the Scandinavian mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, John D.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Egholm, David L.; Knudsen, Mads F.; Korup, Oliver; Stroeven, Arjen; Goodfellow, Bradley; Andersen, Jane L.; Ugelvig, Sofie V.; Klein, Josefin

    2015-04-01

    Climatic versus tectonic explanations for Scandinavian topography have sustained a century-long dispute. Here, at high-latitudes, the more recent question of whether Late-Cenozoic cooling has influenced mountain erosion rates is especially apt because glaciations commenced earlier: >10 Myr and possibly ~34 Myr according to marine palaeorecords. Although selective glacial incision along valley troughs is well recognised in Scandinavia, the legacy of glacial cirque erosion has yet to be fully investigated. We examine the topographic legacy of mountain glaciation in seven massifs of the Caledonian Scandes (western Scandinavia ~61-70° N): Lyngen, Kebnekaise, Sarek, Saltfjellet, Dovrefjell, Jostedalsbreen, and Jotunheimen. Glacial cirques are the product of discrete alpine glaciers and so the elevation of ice-free cirques provides a guide to past fluctuations in regional equilibrium line altitude (ELA). The Scandes currently hosts >3400 mountain glaciers and the distribution of >10,000 ice-free cirques indicates that glaciers have extended much lower and farther in the past. Previous workers argue that alpine glaciations focus erosion selectively at and above a zone of cirques, which approximates the long-term average 'palaeo-ELA'. First, we set out to examine the topographic relationships between mountain peak elevation, ELA, cirque-floor elevations, and the distribution of low-slope (<10°) terrain. To estimate the regional ELA for each massif, inclined planar trend-surfaces (first-order polynomial) were fitted to median elevations of existing glaciers. A total of ~4000 ice-free cirques were mapped and plotted relative to the ELA surfaces. For all seven massifs, cirque-floors cluster within a discrete elevational range: 240-490 m (25-75th percentiles) below ELA, suggesting a well-defined 'palaeo-ELA'. Hypsometric analyses show that this 'palaeo-ELA' closely matches the maximum frequency of low-slope terrain. Consistent with studies elsewhere, terrain surface area

  3. Scandinavian women's experiences in connection with "abortion on request": a systematic review protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mille Nyboe; Fandt Hansen, Christl

    2014-01-01

    , Sweden and Norway, who have experienced an induced (medical or surgical) abortion without a medical reason, described here as an “abortion on request”. Phenomena of interest: The objective of this review is to investigate Scandinavian women’s experiences in connection with – meaning before, during...

  4. Preaching in times of the European ‘Refugee Crisis’. Scandinavian perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorensen, Marlene Ringgaard; Kaufman, Tone Stangeland; Sundberg, Carina

    2017-01-01

    . The crisis situation stirred public debate as well as church-based initiatives trying to deal with the situation. In order to understand the interaction between public discourse and local preaching a group of homileticians from seven European countries collaborated on an empirical study of how the refugee...... crisis impacted preaching. In what follows we present the initial results from the Scandinavian countries....

  5. Mobbing in the Schools. Scandinavian Initiatives in the Prevention and Reduction of Group Violence among Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Kristen D.

    The paper defines the concept of mobbing and notes alternate terms such as bullying, scapegoating, and group violence or aggression. Scandinavian research and literature on mobbing is analyzed, especially as it relates to the incidence of mobbing and characteristics of aggressor and victim. Intervention efforts are described, such as individual…

  6. The Derivation of Scandinavian Object Shift and Remnant VP-Topicalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engels, Eva; Vikner, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Based on the examination of remnant VP-topicalization constructions, this chapter argues for an order preservation analysis to Scandinavian Object Shift. Reviewing Fox and Pesetsky’s (2003, 2005) cyclic linearization approach and extending the empirical data base, we show that the phenomena...

  7. Coping with Remote Control: Scandinavian Subsidiaries in Germany and East Asia 1995-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr; Bonderup Bjørn, Lars; Søndergaard, Mikael

    subsidiaries in Japan and Germany including qualitative perception of problems. In order to trace general effects, this study includes other Scandinavian subsidiaries in East Asia, in total 140 subsidiaries in 1995 and 41 subsidiaries in 2005. Cultural distance is found to be associated with a configuration...

  8. The Shaping of the Scandinavian Socio-technical IS Research Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn-Andersen, Niels; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2017-01-01

    This paper relates stories instrumental in shaping the career of an individual and which have also contributed to shaping of the IS field in general and the ‘Scandinavian Socio-Technical (S/T) Information Systems Research Tradition’ in particular. The method in this paper is an autoethnography (L...

  9. Impact of recent studies on attitudes and use of hormone therapy among Scandinavian gynaecologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Iversen, Ole-Erik; Løkkegaard, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    or secondary preventive effects of HT on coronary heart disease, and other studies have indicated an increased risk of breast cancer, stroke and venous thromboembolism among HT users. In 2001, we reported on knowledge, attitudes, management strategies and use of HT among Scandinavian gynaecologists. The aim...

  10. The Shaping of the Scandinavian Socio-technical IS Research Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn-Andersen, Niels; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2017-01-01

    This paper relates stories instrumental in shaping the career of an individual and which have also contributed to shaping of the IS field in general and the ‘Scandinavian Socio-Technical (S/T) Information Systems Research Tradition’ in particular. The method in this paper is an autoethnography...

  11. Slow Shift--Developing Provisions for Talented Students in Scandinavian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, Marca; Hogenstijn, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    For decades, Scandinavian culture effectively prohibited the development of special provisions for talented students in higher education. However, in recent years, a cultural shift has gradually made more room for excellence and talent development in the national discourses. This paper analyzes the climate for talent development in Denmark,…

  12. Slow shift – developing provisions for talented students in Scandinavian higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Maarten Hogenstijn; Dr. Marca Wolfensberger

    2016-01-01

    For decades, Scandinavian culture effectively prohibited the development of special provisions for talented students in higher education. However, in recent years, a cultural shift has gradually made more room for excellence and talent development in the national discourses. This paper analyzes the

  13. Is the Scandinavian Way of Organizing Challenged by the Growing Chinese Economy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westenholz, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The institutional order of organizing in working life is very different in Scandinavia and China. When Scandinavian and Chinese managers and employees meet in concrete work relations they not only work together on a product they also become engaged in institutional work dealing with the inconsist...

  14. The epidermal melanocyte system in individuals of Scandinavian origin, determined by DOPA-staining and TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drzewiecki, K T; Piltz-Drzewiecka, J

    1979-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of DOPA-positive epidermal melanocytes in 16 patients of Scandinavian origin showed both individual and regional differences in the melanocyte count. Our data is in agreement with other published studies. The distribution in the number of melanocytes varies significant...... concerning the presence of the epidermal melanin unit....

  15. The epidermal melanocyte system in individuals of Scandinavian origin, determined by DOPA-staining and TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drzewiecki, K T; Piltz-Drzewiecka, J

    1979-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of DOPA-positive epidermal melanocytes in 16 patients of Scandinavian origin showed both individual and regional differences in the melanocyte count. Our data is in agreement with other published studies. The distribution in the number of melanocytes varies significantly...

  16. Y chromosome haplotyping in Scandinavian wolves (Canis lupus) based on microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, A K; Ellegren, H; Olivier, M; Vilà, C

    2001-08-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences has for a long time been the most extensively used genetic tool for phylogenetic, phylogeographic and population genetic studies. Since this approach only considers female lineages, it tends to give a biased picture of the population history. The use of protein polymorphisms and microsatellites has helped to obtain a more unbiased view, but complementing population genetic studies with Y chromosome markers could clarify the role of each sex in natural processes. In this study we analysed genetic variability at four microsatellite loci on the canid Y chromosome. With these four microsatellites we constructed haplotypes and used them to study the genetic status of the Scandinavian wolf population, a population that now contains 60-70 animals but was thought to have been extinct in the 1970s. In a sample of 100 male wolves from northern Europe we found 17 different Y chromosome haplotypes. Only two of these were found in the current Scandinavian population. This indicates that there should have been at least two males involved in the founding of the Scandinavian wolf population after the bottleneck in the 1970s. The two Scandinavian Y chromosome haplotypes were not found elsewhere in northern Europe, which indicates low male gene flow between Scandinavia and the neighbouring countries.

  17. Scandinavian object shift, remnant VP-topicalisation, verb particles and causatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engels, Eva; Vikner, Sten

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of an examination of remnant VP-topicalisation constructions, this paper argues for an order preservation analysis of Scandinavian Object Shift. Extending the empirical database, we account for the phenomena in an Optimality Theoretic framework. The paper focusses on two particular...

  18. Inference in `poor` languages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, S.

    1996-10-01

    Languages with a solvable implication problem but without complete and consistent systems of inference rules (`poor` languages) are considered. The problem of existence of finite complete and consistent inference rule system for a ``poor`` language is stated independently of the language or rules syntax. Several properties of the problem arc proved. An application of results to the language of join dependencies is given.

  19. The Essentialist Inference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    It is often claimed that principles of individuation imply essential properties of the things individuated. For example, sets are individuated by their members, hence sets have their members essentially. But how does this inference work? First I discuss the form of such inferences, and conclude that

  20. Stan: Statistical inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Development Team

    2018-01-01

    Stan facilitates statistical inference at the frontiers of applied statistics and provides both a modeling language for specifying complex statistical models and a library of statistical algorithms for computing inferences with those models. These components are exposed through interfaces in environments such as R, Python, and the command line.

  1. Knowledge and inference

    CERN Document Server

    Nagao, Makoto

    1990-01-01

    Knowledge and Inference discusses an important problem for software systems: How do we treat knowledge and ideas on a computer and how do we use inference to solve problems on a computer? The book talks about the problems of knowledge and inference for the purpose of merging artificial intelligence and library science. The book begins by clarifying the concept of """"knowledge"""" from many points of view, followed by a chapter on the current state of library science and the place of artificial intelligence in library science. Subsequent chapters cover central topics in the artificial intellig

  2. The effects of mood on spontaneous trait inferences about the actor: Evidence from Chinese undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meifang; Zhao, Yaolong; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Prior research has indicated that positive moods increase but negative moods decrease the trait activation of spontaneous trait inferences (STIs). However, it is unknown whether this difference is also present in STIs about the actor. In Study 1, using a false recognition paradigm, we found that Chinese undergraduates made STIs about the actor. In Study 2, we found that the happy Chinese undergraduates were more likely to make STIs about the actor than the sad Chinese undergraduates. These findings showed that Chinese people made STIs about the actor and moods had an influence on their STIs about the actor. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Genetic screening of Scandinavian families with febrile seizures and epilepsy or GEFS+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, K K; Egeland, T; Solaas, M H

    2008-01-01

    Background - Mutations in the three genes SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2, all encoding subunits of ion channels, have been known to cause generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) in families of different origin. Objective - To study the occurrence of mutations in these genes in families...... identified only one mutation in SCN1A, which seems to be a rare variant with no functional consequence. Conclusion - This suggests that mutations in these three genes are not a prevalent cause of familial cases of FS and epilepsy or GEFS+ in Scandinavia....... with GEFS+ or a GEFS+ resembling phenotype of Scandinavian origin. Material and methods - We performed linkage analysis in 19 Scandinavian families with a history of febrile seizures (FS) and epilepsy or GEFS+. Where linkage could not be excluded, the genes of interest were sequenced. Results - We...

  4. Jewish history as a history of immigration: an overview of current historiography in the Scandinavian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christhard Hoffmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a first critical overview of the historiography of Jewish immigration and integration in Sweden, Denmark and Norway. While the experience of immigration has been crucial for Scandinavian Jewry, scholarly interest in Jewish migration history only emerged during the 1980s in connection with the focus on migration and ethnicity in Swedish research and the adaptation of sociological concepts of migration in general historiography. By analysing key historio-graphical works, focusing on their approaches and main narratives, this article aims at a critical methodological self-reflection. It identifies two major approaches to Jewish immigration history in current Scandinavian historiography: the demographic and social history approach, focusing in particular on the role of Jewish immigrants in the labour market, their settlement and housing conditions and their social mobility; and the cultural history approach, reconstructing and preserving the vanished world of Yiddish immigrant culture.

  5. Statistical inferences in phylogeography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Beaumont, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    In conventional phylogeographic studies, historical demographic processes are elucidated from the geographical distribution of individuals represented on an inferred gene tree. However, the interpretation of gene trees in this context can be difficult as the same demographic/geographical process ...

  6. Combined androgen blockade in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer--an overview. The Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1997-01-01

    The value of combined androgen blockade in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer is still controversial. In this review by the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group, the literature addressing the concept and its clinical use is critically reviewed.......The value of combined androgen blockade in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer is still controversial. In this review by the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group, the literature addressing the concept and its clinical use is critically reviewed....

  7. Impact of recent studies on attitudes and use of hormone therapy among Scandinavian gynaecologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Iversen, Ole-Erik; Løkkegaard, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Climacteric medicine has been in focus during the last 2 decades, and an intensive debate has been ongoing regarding the positive and negative aspects of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT). Recent randomised controlled studies have been unable to confirm data from observational studies of primar...... of the present study was to re-assess the same parameters concerning HT among Scandinavian gynaecologists in 2002-2003, and compare the results with the data collected in 1995-1997....

  8. Commodity tax competition – purchases of spirits in the Scandinavian countries

    OpenAIRE

    Nygård, Odd Erik

    2009-01-01

    A simulation model consisting of a representative consumer for each Scandinavian country is constructed and calibrated, in which consumers consume two goods: spirits and 'other goods'. Spirits is exposed to cross-border shopping, and the countries engage in tax competition. The equilibrium tax rates show large price differentials on spirits in Scandinavia. The findings also suggest that Norway and Denmark pay more attention to cross-border shopping and tax competition when setting the tax rat...

  9. ‘The Scandinavian Report: its origins and impact on the Kilkenny Design Workshops’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Una Walker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The publication of Design in Ireland: Report of the Scandinavian Design Group in Ireland in 1962 has been described as providing the catalyst for change in the approach to design in Ireland. The Report was commissioned by the Irish Export Board and the Scandinavian Design Group was formed for this purpose. It stimulating protracted debate on design education in Ireland, and also afforded a reason for the establishment of the Kilkenny Design Workshops. This paper, which draws on unpublished material from a number of archives, will provide a brief overview of the Report and the rational for commissioning it, followed by an examination of government interventions to improve design standards in Ireland from the founding of the State until the 1960s. It will examine the origins of Scandinavian influence on the evolution of public policy on design in Ireland, question if the Report expanded the discourse on design in industry in Ireland and assess its influence during the early years of the Workshops.

  10. Stylistic Fronting in the Ormulum - Scandinavian Syntactic Phenomena in Early Middle English Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Trips

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with Scandinavian influence in Early Middle English texts and especially with one syntactic phenomenon, stylistic fronting. It is claimed here that the OV/VO word order change in Early Middle English was triggered by language contact with Scandinavian (Kroch & Taylor, 1997 and that the occurrence of syntactic phenomena like stylistic fronting are taken to be evidence for the heavy impact on the English language that led to this change. The focus of the paper lies on the findings from one Early Middle English poetic text, the Ormulum, which shows non-syntactic as well as syntactic evidence for Scandinavian influence. It is shown that the orders that seem to reflect the fronting operation are indeed true instantiations of stylistic fronting. Moreover, in this text stylistic fronting is a phonological phenomenon, because it is used by Orm, its author, whenever the metrical pattern would otherwise be violated. Thus, it was part of Orm's grammar and he could use it for phonological reasons. The fact that the fronting operation is metrically driven supports Holmberg's (2000 analysis of stylistic fronting as a PF-operation.

  11. Lost in translation?: Comparing three Scandinavian translations of the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granas, Anne Gerd; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2014-08-01

    The "Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire" (BMQ) assess balance of necessity and concern of medicines. The BMQ has been translated from English to many languages. However, the original meaning of statements, such as "My medicine is a mystery to me", may be lost in translation. The aim of this study is to compare three Scandinavian translations of the BMQ. (1) How reliable are the translations? (2) Are they still valid after translation? Translated Norwegian, Swedish and Danish versions of the BMQ were scrutinized by three native Scandinavian researchers. Linguistic differences and ambiguities in the 5-point Likert scale and the BMQ statements were compared. In the Scandinavian translations, the Likert scale expanded beyond the original version at one endpoint (Swedish) or both endpoints (Danish). In the BMQ statements, discrepancies ranged from smaller inaccuracies toward completely different meaning. Some dissimilarities reflect different cultural beliefs about medicines. When translating questionnaires, bilingual researchers should scrutinize translations across similar languages to address content validity across different countries and languages. Our findings are of relevance to other BMQ translations in non-English countries, as direct comparisons between different translations might not be reliable or valid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Water quality analysis in rivers with non-parametric probability distributions and fuzzy inference systems: Application to the Cauca River, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo, J.L.; Schuhmacher, M; Piamba, C; Osorio, C; Ocampo-Duque, W

    2013-01-01

    10.1016/j.envint.2012.11.007 The integration of water quality monitoring variables is essential in environmental decision making. Nowadays, advanced techniques to manage subjectivity, imprecision, uncertainty, vagueness, and variability are required in such complex evaluation process. We here propose a probabilistic fuzzy hybrid model to assess river water quality. Fuzzy logic reasoning has been used to compute a water quality integrative index. By applying a Monte Carlo technique, based ...

  13. Gas Hydrate Occurrence Inferred from Dissolved Cl− Concentrations and δ18O Values of Pore Water and Dissolved Sulfate in the Shallow Sediments of the Pockmark Field in Southwestern Xisha Uplift, Northern South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Luo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-water pockmarks are frequently accompanied by the occurrence of massive gas hydrates in shallow sediments. A decline in pore-water Cl− concentration and rise in δ18O value provide compelling evidence for the gas hydrate dissociation. Mega-pockmarks are widely scattered in the southwestern Xisha Uplift, northern South China Sea (SCS. Pore water collected from a gravity-core inside of a mega-pockmark exhibits a downward Cl− concentration decrease concomitant with an increase in δ18O value at the interval of 5.7–6.7 mbsf. Concentrations of Cl−, Na+, and K+ mainly cluster along the seawater freshening line without distinct Na+ enrichment and K+ depletion. Thus, we infer that the pore water anomalies of Cl− concentrations and δ18O values are attributed to gas hydrate dissociation instead of clay mineral dehydration. Moreover, the lower δ18O values of sulfate in the target core (C14 than those in the reference core (C9 may be associated with the equilibrium oxygen fractionation during sulfate reduction between sulfate and the relatively 18O-depleted ambient water resulting from gas hydrate formation. The gas hydrate contents are estimated to be 6%–10% and 7%–15%, respectively, according to the offset of Cl− concentrations and δ18O values from the baselines. This pockmark field in southwestern Xisha Uplift is likely to be a good prospective area for the occurrence of gas hydrate in shallow sediments.

  14. Addressing Flooding and SuDS when Improving Drainage and Sewerage Systems—A Comparative Study of Selected Scandinavian Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Torgersen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pluvial flooding already challenges the capacity of drainage and sewerage system in urban areas in Scandinavia. For system owners this requires a stricter prioritization when improving the systems. Experts seem to agree that a regime shift from improving old combined sewers by piped solutions to more sustainable drainage systems (SuDS, must take place. In this paper results from an investigation amongst the largest cities in Norway, Denmark and Sweden concerning drivers and preferred methods for improving the old system are presented. The results indicate that Norway ranks flood prevention lower than the other Scandinavian countries. During the last decades, Norwegian authorities have had a strong focus on pollution from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP. The attention to drainage and sewerage system regarding flooding, water leaks, infiltration or pollution has been neglected. Renewal or rate of investment in relation to existing drainage and sewerage system is easy to register, and provides a measure of the activity. In order to optimize flood prevention, and may be promoting the use of SuDS, the cities should be required to measure the efficiency, either by monitoring or modeling the impact of stormwater to the system. Lack of such requirements from Norwegian authorities seem to be a plausible explanation to why Norwegian cities are less focused on flood prevention compared to Swedish and Danish cities.

  15. Inferences on mass composition and tests of hadronic interactions from 0.3 to 100 EeV using the water-Cherenkov detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barbato, F.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalani, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Cobos, A.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Consolati, G.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorosti, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Farmer, J.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fenu, F.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Halliday, R.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Jurysek, J.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemmerich, N.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; Lago, B. L.; LaHurd, D.; Lang, R. G.; Lauscher, M.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lo Presti, D.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Lorek, R.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Merenda, K.-D.; Michal, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, A. L.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Mussa, R.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perlin, M.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Ridky, J.; Riehn, F.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roncoroni, M. J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehl, P.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schröder, S.; Schulz, A.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strafella, F.; Streich, A.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šupík, J.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Ventura, C.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Wirtz, M.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Yang, L.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We present a new method for probing the hadronic interaction models at ultrahigh energy and extracting details about mass composition. This is done using the time profiles of the signals recorded with the water-Cherenkov detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The profiles arise from a mix of the muon and electromagnetic components of air showers. Using the risetimes of the recorded signals, we define a new parameter, which we use to compare our observations with predictions from simulations. We find, first, inconsistencies between our data and predictions over a greater energy range and with substantially more events than in previous studies. Second, by calibrating the new parameter with fluorescence measurements from observations made at the Auger Observatory, we can infer the depth of shower maximum Xmax for a sample of over 81,000 events extending from 0.3 to over 100 EeV. Above 30 EeV, the sample is nearly 14 times larger than what is currently available from fluorescence measurements and extending the covered energy range by half a decade. The energy dependence of ⟨Xmax⟩ is compared to simulations and interpreted in terms of the mean of the logarithmic mass. We find good agreement with previous work and extend the measurement of the mean depth of shower maximum to greater energies than before, reducing significantly the statistical uncertainty associated with the inferences about mass composition.

  16. SEMANTIC PATCH INFERENCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Collateral evolution the problem of updating several library-using programs in response to API changes in the used library. In this dissertation we address the issue of understanding collateral evolutions by automatically inferring a high-level specification of the changes evident in a given set...... of updated programs. We have formalized a concept of transformation parts that serve as an indication of when a change specification is evident in a set of changes. Based on the transformation parts concept, we state a subsumption relation on change specifications. The subsumption relation allows decision...... specifications inferred by spdiff in Linux are shown. We find that the inferred specifications concisely capture the actual collateral evolution performed in the examples....

  17. Application of MODIS Products to Infer Possible Relationships Between Basin Land Cover and Coastal Waters Turbidity Using the Magdalena River, Colombia, as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrinan, Max Jacobo Moreno; Cordova, Africa Flores; Olivares, Francisco Delgado; Irwin, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Basin development and consequent change in basin land cover have been often associated with an increased turbidity in coastal waters because of sediment yield and nutrients loading. The later leads to phytoplankton abundance further exacerbating water turbidity. This subsequently affects biological and physical processes in coastal estuaries by interfering with sun light penetration to coral reefs and sea grass, and even affecting public health. Therefore, consistent estimation of land cover changes and turbidity trend lines is crucial to design environmental and restoration management plans, to predict fate of possible pollutants, and to estimate sedimentary fluxes into the ocean. Ground solely methods to estimate land cover change would be unpractical and traditional methods of monitoring in situ water turbidity can be very expensive and time consuming. Accurate monitoring on the status and trends of basin land cover as well as the water quality of the receiving water bodies are required for analysis of relationships between the two variables. Use of remote sensing (RS) technology provides a great benefit for both fields of study, facilitating monitoring of changes in a timely and cost effective manner and covering wide areas with long term measurements. In this study, the Magdalena River basin and fixed geographical locations in the estuarine waters of its delta are used as a case to study the temporal trend lines of both, land cover change and the reflectance of the water turbidity using satellite technology. Land cover data from a combined product between sensors Terra and Aqua (MCD12Q1) from MODIS will be adapted to the conditions in the Magdalena basin to estimate changes in land cover since year 2000 to 2009. Surface reflectance data from a MODIS, Terra (MOD09GQ), band 1, will be used in lieu of in situ water turbidity for the time period between 2000 and present. Results will be compared with available existing data.

  18. Inferring land use and land cover impact on stream water quality using a Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach in the Xitiaoxi River Watershed, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Rongrong; Cai, Shanshan; Li, Hengpeng; Yang, Guishan; Li, Zhaofu; Nie, Xiaofei

    2014-01-15

    Lake eutrophication has become a very serious environmental problem in China. If water pollution is to be controlled and ultimately eliminated, it is essential to understand how human activities affect surface water quality. A recently developed technique using the Bayesian hierarchical linear regression model revealed the effects of land use and land cover (LULC) on stream water quality at a watershed scale. Six LULC categories combined with watershed characteristics, including size, slope, and permeability were the variables that were studied. The pollutants of concern were nutrient concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP), common pollutants found in eutrophication. The monthly monitoring data at 41 sites in the Xitiaoxi Watershed, China during 2009-2010 were used for model demonstration. The results showed that the relationships between LULC and stream water quality are so complicated that the effects are varied over large areas. The models suggested that urban and agricultural land are important sources of TN and TP concentrations, while rural residential land is one of the major sources of TN. Certain agricultural practices (excessive fertilizer application) result in greater concentrations of nutrients in paddy fields, artificial grasslands, and artificial woodlands. This study suggests that Bayesian hierarchical modeling is a powerful tool for examining the complicated relationships between land use and water quality on different scales, and for developing land use and water management policies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Residence times and age distributions of spring waters at the Semmering catchment area, Eastern Austria, as inferred from tritium, CFCs and stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Liangfeng; Hacker, Peter; Gröning, Manfred

    2007-03-01

    The groundwater system in the mountainous area of Semmering, Austria, was studied by environmental tracers in several karst springs. The tracers used included stable isotopes ((18)O, (2)H), tritium ((3)H) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The tracers provided valuable information in regard to (1) the mean altitude of the spring catchment areas; (2) the residence time and age distribution of the spring waters; and (3) the interconnection of the springs to a sinkhole. The combination of the stable isotopic data and the topography/geology provided the estimates of the mean altitudes of the catchment areas. Based on the stable isotopic data the recharge temperature of the spring waters was estimated. The smoothing of precipitation's isotopic signal in spring discharge provided information on the minimum transit time of the spring waters. Due to short observation time, (3)H data alone cannot be used for describing the mean residence time of the karst waters. CFCs, though useful in recognizing the co-existence of young (post-1993) water with old (CFC-free) water, could not be used to resolve age distribution models. It is shown in this article, however, that the combined use of tritium and CFCs can provide a better assessment of models to account for different groundwater age distributions. In Appendix A, a simplified method for collecting groundwater samples for the analysis of CFCs is described. The method provides a real facilitation for fieldwork. Test data are given for this sampling method in regard to potential contamination by atmospheric CFCs.

  20. Paleoclimatic Inferences from a 120,000-Yr Calcite Record of Water-Table Fluctuation in Browns Room of Devils Hole, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, B. J.; Kolesar, Peter T.; Riggs, A.C.; Winograd, I.J.; Ludwig, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    The petrographic and morphologic differences between calcite precipitated below, at, or above the present water table and uranium-series dating were used to reconstruct a chronology of water-table fluctuation for the past 120,000 yr in Browns Room, a subterranean air-filled chamber of Devils Hole fissure adjacent to the discharge area of the large Ash Meadows groundwater flow system in southern Nevada. The water table was more than 5 m above present level between about 116,000 and 53,000 yr ago, fluctuated between about +5 and +9 m during the period between about 44,000 and 20,000 yr ago, and declined rapidly from +9 to its present level during the past 20,000 yr. Because the Ash Meadows groundwater basin is greater than 12,000 km2 in extent, these documented water-table fluctuations are likely to be of regional significance. Although different in detail, water-level fluctuation recorded by Browns Room calcites generally correlate with other Great Basin proxy palcoclimatic data.

  1. Baseline water-quality sampling to infer nutrient and contaminant sources at Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, Island of Hawai‘i, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Baseline water-quality sampling was conducted for dissolved nutrients and for chemical and isotopic tracers at Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park on the Island of Hawai'i. Existing and future urbanization in the surrounding areas have the potential to affect water quality in the Park, and so the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey designed a water-sampling strategy to document baseline conditions against which future changes can be compared. Sites in and near the Park were sampled twice, in July and December 2009, and included four anchialine pools, two large fishponds, five monitoring wells, an upland production well, tap water, and a holding pond for golf-course irrigation water. Water samples within the coastal park were brackish, ranging in salinity from 15 to 67 percent seawater. Samples were analyzed for dissolved inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), stable isotopes (nitrogen and oxygen in dissolved nitrate; hydrogen and oxygen in the water molecule), pharmaceuticals, wastewater compounds, and volatile organic compounds. A case of acute, but temporary, fertilizer contamination was evident along the Park's north boundary during the turf grow-in period of a newly constructed golf course. A maximum nitrogen concentration 280 percent above background level was measured in monitoring well MW401 in July, later falling to 109 percent above background by December. Two nearby sites (MW400 and AP 144) had nitrogen concentrations that were elevated compared to remaining sites but less severely than at MW401. Aside from this localized fertilizer influence, other water samples had lower nutrient enrichments: 40 percent or less above background for nitrogen and 57 percent or less above background for phosphorus. Background was defined in this study by a graphical mixing line between saltwater from a deep well in the Park and freshwater at a reference well in the mountainous uplands (Honokōhau production well, at 1,675 ft altitude

  2. Type Inference with Inequalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    1991-01-01

    Type inference can be phrased as constraint-solving over types. We consider an implicitly typed language equipped with recursive types, multiple inheritance, 1st order parametric polymorphism, and assignments. Type correctness is expressed as satisfiability of a possibly infinite collection...

  3. Comprehensive heat transfer correlation for water/ethylene glycol-based graphene (nitrogen-doped graphene) nanofluids derived by artificial neural network (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Maryam; Moghaddam, Amin Hedayati; Amiri, Ahmad; Shanbedi, Mehdi; Ayub, Mohamad Nizam Bin

    2017-10-01

    Herein, artificial neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system are employed for modeling the effects of important parameters on heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of a car radiator and followed by comparing with those of the experimental results for testing data. To this end, two novel nanofluids (water/ethylene glycol-based graphene and nitrogen-doped graphene nanofluids) were experimentally synthesized. Then, Nusselt number was modeled with respect to the variation of inlet temperature, Reynolds number, Prandtl number and concentration, which were defined as the input (design) variables. To reach reliable results, we divided these data into train and test sections to accomplish modeling. Artificial networks were instructed by a major part of experimental data. The other part of primary data which had been considered for testing the appropriateness of the models was entered into artificial network models. Finally, predictad results were compared to the experimental data to evaluate validity. Confronted with high-level of validity confirmed that the proposed modeling procedure by BPNN with one hidden layer and five neurons is efficient and it can be expanded for all water/ethylene glycol-based carbon nanostructures nanofluids. Finally, we expanded our data collection from model and could present a fundamental correlation for calculating Nusselt number of the water/ethylene glycol-based nanofluids including graphene or nitrogen-doped graphene.

  4. Spatially variable stage-driven groundwater-surface water interaction inferred from time-frequency analysis of distributed temperature sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Elwaseif, Mehrez; Johnson, Carole

    2012-03-01

    Characterization of groundwater-surface water exchange is essential for improving understanding of contaminant transport between aquifers and rivers. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FODTS) provides rich spatiotemporal datasets for quantitative and qualitative analysis of groundwater-surface water exchange. We demonstrate how time-frequency analysis of FODTS and synchronous river stage time series from the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, Washington, provides spatial information on the strength of stage-driven exchange of uranium contaminated groundwater in response to subsurface heterogeneity. Although used in previous studies, the stage-temperature correlation coefficient proved an unreliable indicator of the stage-driven forcing on groundwater discharge in the presence of other factors influencing river water temperature. In contrast, S-transform analysis of the stage and FODTS data definitively identifies the spatial distribution of discharge zones and provided information on the dominant forcing periods (≥2 d) of the complex dam operations driving stage fluctuations and hence groundwater-surface water exchange at the 300-Area.

  5. Social policies and activation in the Scandinavian welfare model: the case of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.

    countries been able to reconcile social objectives with a high employment level? It is argued that the Scandinavian welfare model has a strong employment focus both because it is an important element in social policy based on social inclusion, but also because a collective welfare arrangement is only...... financially viable if (private) employment is sufficiently high. To ensure this, the social safety net includes a number of employment conditionalities (active labour market policies/workfare) to balance income protection with an employment focus. These policies are discussed using Denmark as an example...

  6. Dusart Syndrome in a Scandinavian family characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis at young age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanathan, Ramshanker; Gram, Jørgen; Feddersen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dysfibrinogenemia is a rare group of qualitative fibrinogen disorders caused by structural abnormalities in the fibrinogen molecule. The laboratory diagnosis of dysfibrinogenemia is controversial. Fibrinogen Paris V, clinically termed Dusart Syndrome, is a dysfibrinogenemia caused...... by a single base substitution in the gene coding for the Aα-chain of the fibrinogen molecule. OBJECTIVES: To diagnose the first Scandinavian family with Fibrinogen Paris V affecting several family members; the proband, a seven-year-old boy with cerebral vein thrombosis. METHODS: The diagnosis was established...... by significantly reduced fibrin polymerization (p p p p

  7. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-01-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met. PMID:26955224

  8. Corporate risk and external sourcing: A study of Scandinavian multinational firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom; Pantzalis, Christos; Sørensen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    External sourcing from foreign suppliers is an important aspect of the firm’s internationalization. However, data on such sourcing is available from neither databases nor annual reports. Thus, the corporate risk implications of such sourcing have not been studied previously. We obtain the necessary...... data by surveying Scandinavian non-financial firms. We find that highly international firms reduce corporate risk by externally sourcing from foreign suppliers both compared to sourcing from own production facilities abroad (due to superior flexibility) and compared to domestic sourcing (due...

  9. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic hypothermia and post-resuscitation care after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrén, M; Silfvast, T; Rubertsson, S

    2009-01-01

    studies MTH has been proven to be safe, with few complications and improved survival, and is recommended by the International Liaison of Committee on Resuscitation. The aim of this paper is to recommend clinical practice guidelines for MTH treatment after cardiac arrest from the Scandinavian Society...... fibrillation (GOR A), the SSAITFTH also recommend MTH after restored spontaneous circulation, if active treatment is chosen, in patients with initial pulseless electrical activity and asystole (GOR D). Normal ethical considerations, premorbid status, total anoxia time and general condition should decide...

  10. Introduction to Nordlyd 31: The Proceedings of the 19th Scandinavian Conference of Linguistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Svenonius

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This special five-volume edition is both Nordlyd number 31 and the Proceedings for the Nineteenth Scandinavian Conference of Linguistics. Here I provide a little background for the conference and the Proceedings. SCL 19 was held in Tromsø on January 10–12, 2002, under the auspices of the Nordic Association of Linguists (NAL and with support from the Nordic Academy for Advanced Study (NorFA, the University of Tromsø, the Faculty of Humanities, and the English Department at the University of Tromsø. The Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Linguistics (CASTL also contributed to the production of this Proceedings.

  11. Causal inference in econometrics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreinovich, Vladik; Sriboonchitta, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to the analysis of causal inference which is one of the most difficult tasks in data analysis: when two phenomena are observed to be related, it is often difficult to decide whether one of them causally influences the other one, or whether these two phenomena have a common cause. This analysis is the main focus of this volume. To get a good understanding of the causal inference, it is important to have models of economic phenomena which are as accurate as possible. Because of this need, this volume also contains papers that use non-traditional economic models, such as fuzzy models and models obtained by using neural networks and data mining techniques. It also contains papers that apply different econometric models to analyze real-life economic dependencies.

  12. Stochastic processes inference theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Malempati M

    2014-01-01

    This is the revised and enlarged 2nd edition of the authors’ original text, which was intended to be a modest complement to Grenander's fundamental memoir on stochastic processes and related inference theory. The present volume gives a substantial account of regression analysis, both for stochastic processes and measures, and includes recent material on Ridge regression with some unexpected applications, for example in econometrics. The first three chapters can be used for a quarter or semester graduate course on inference on stochastic processes. The remaining chapters provide more advanced material on stochastic analysis suitable for graduate seminars and discussions, leading to dissertation or research work. In general, the book will be of interest to researchers in probability theory, mathematical statistics and electrical and information theory.

  13. Making Type Inference Practical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff; Oxhøj, Nicholas; Palsberg, Jens

    1992-01-01

    We present the implementation of a type inference algorithm for untyped object-oriented programs with inheritance, assignments, and late binding. The algorithm significantly improves our previous one, presented at OOPSLA'91, since it can handle collection classes, such as List, in a useful way. Abo......, the complexity has been dramatically improved, from exponential time to low polynomial time. The implementation uses the techniques of incremental graph construction and constraint template instantiation to avoid representing intermediate results, doing superfluous work, and recomputing type information....... Experiments indicate that the implementation type checks as much as 100 lines pr. second. This results in a mature product, on which a number of tools can be based, for example a safety tool, an image compression tool, a code optimization tool, and an annotation tool. This may make type inference for object...

  14. Scandinavian links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Knowles, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The European Round Table of Industrialists identified in the 1980ies 14 missing links in the transportation network of the continent. Three of them were found around the Danish island of Zealand. One link is within the nation, the other two are between nations. One link connects heavy economic....... They concentrate traffic flows and create strong transport corridors. They are the basis of new regional development regimes. “Ferries connect systems, fixed links unite systems”....

  15. Genetic Population Structure and Demographic History of the Widespread Common Shipworm Teredo navalis Linnaeus 1758 (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Teredinidae in European Waters Inferred from Mitochondrial COI Sequence Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Weigelt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The first documented scientific reports of the common marine shipworm Teredo navalis (Bivalvia for Central European waters date back to the time between 1700 and 1730 in the Netherlands. During the following centuries there were several irregular mass occurrences reported for both the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. These events were accompanied by massive destruction of wooden ships and coastal protection structures. In this study, the first population analysis of T. navalis is presented with the aim to detect the genetic population structure in the waters of Central Europe. The mtDNA COI (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I locus was found as suitable molecular marker and hence a 675 bp gene fragment was studied. A total of 352 T. navalis specimens from 13 different sampling sites distributed across Central Europe were examined. Subsequently, various population genetic indices including FST values and an AMOVA analysis were applied for the description of the population structure. To visualize the distribution of haplotypes at the different sampling sites two median-joining networks were calculated. In addition, the past demographic structure of the T. navalis population was analyzed, among others by calculating Tajima's D, Fu's F and the mismatch distribution. Finally, all computations of the population genetic indices could not reveal differentiated populations or any kind of distinct population structure in T. navalis. The network analyses revealed “star-like” patterns without differentiated substructures or demes. Therefore, it can be assumed that a sudden expansion of this species took place without any indications of neither a bottleneck nor a founder effect for the study area. The results of this study support the concept of a regional panmictic population in the waters of Central Europe with unhindered migration of individuals (e.g., via pelagic larvae between the various sampling sites as reflected by a high gene flow.

  16. Scope Ambiguity and Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    9) The yacht was often used for social and political events by several presidents until Carter disposed of it. and people don’t seem to have trouble...over an undergrad. 3. World knowledge. For example, one may use facts about the social rules of dating to infer that the most likely interpretation of (1...of equivalence clases , while the semantics of every should be based on pairs. A more illuminating solution would be to assume an ambiguity

  17. Consistency and Plausible Inference,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    than a syllogism . Again, experts can operate in environments containing inconsistent or contradictory "facts," but such environments are useless in...than- categorical affirmation of B even when A is known with certainty. A useful way of viewing this formalism is as an inference net [Hayes-Roth...34, the precise interpretation of these numbers is open. It is intended that a proposition or relation with validity l be equivalent to a categorical

  18. Active inference and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl; FitzGerald, Thomas; Rigoli, Francesco; Schwartenbeck, Philipp; O Doherty, John; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    This paper offers an active inference account of choice behaviour and learning. It focuses on the distinction between goal-directed and habitual behaviour and how they contextualise each other. We show that habits emerge naturally (and autodidactically) from sequential policy optimisation when agents are equipped with state-action policies. In active inference, behaviour has explorative (epistemic) and exploitative (pragmatic) aspects that are sensitive to ambiguity and risk respectively, where epistemic (ambiguity-resolving) behaviour enables pragmatic (reward-seeking) behaviour and the subsequent emergence of habits. Although goal-directed and habitual policies are usually associated with model-based and model-free schemes, we find the more important distinction is between belief-free and belief-based schemes. The underlying (variational) belief updating provides a comprehensive (if metaphorical) process theory for several phenomena, including the transfer of dopamine responses, reversal learning, habit formation and devaluation. Finally, we show that active inference reduces to a classical (Bellman) scheme, in the absence of ambiguity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Causal inference in multisensory perception

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Körding, Konrad P; Beierholm, Ulrik; Ma, Wei Ji; Quartz, Steven; Tenenbaum, Joshua B; Shams, Ladan

    2007-01-01

    .... Here we use multisensory cue combination to study causal inference in perception. We formulate an ideal-observer model that infers whether two sensory cues originate from the same location and that also estimates their location...

  20. Continuous Integrated Invariant Inference Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will develop a new technique for invariant inference and embed this and other current invariant inference and checking techniques in an...

  1. Causes and Consequences of Past and Projected Scandinavian Summer Temperatures, 500–2100 AD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büntgen, Ulf; Raible, Christoph C.; Frank, David; Helama, Samuli; Cunningham, Laura; Hofer, Dominik; Nievergelt, Daniel; Verstege, Anne; Timonen, Mauri; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Esper, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Tree rings dominate millennium-long temperature reconstructions and many records originate from Scandinavia, an area for which the relative roles of external forcing and internal variation on climatic changes are, however, not yet fully understood. Here we compile 1,179 series of maximum latewood density measurements from 25 conifer sites in northern Scandinavia, establish a suite of 36 subset chronologies, and analyse their climate signal. A new reconstruction for the 1483–2006 period correlates at 0.80 with June–August temperatures back to 1860. Summer cooling during the early 17th century and peak warming in the 1930s translate into a decadal amplitude of 2.9°C, which agrees with existing Scandinavian tree-ring proxies. Climate model simulations reveal similar amounts of mid to low frequency variability, suggesting that internal ocean-atmosphere feedbacks likely influenced Scandinavian temperatures more than external forcing. Projected 21st century warming under the SRES A2 scenario would, however, exceed the reconstructed temperature envelope of the past 1,500 years. PMID:21966436

  2. Cryptic population structure in a large, mobile mammalian predator: the Scandinavian lynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueness, E K; Jorde, P E; Hellborg, L; Stenseth, N C; Ellegren, H; Jakobsen, K S

    2003-10-01

    The Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) is an example of a species that has gone through a severe bottleneck, leading to near extinction in Scandinavia around 1930-- a pattern shared with several other large carnivorous mammals. Here we extend previous genetic analyses of northern European lynx, confirming that lynx from the Scandinavian Peninsula represent a distinct clade differing clearly from European conspecifics. Furthermore, and despite a recent bottleneck and subsequent range expansion, we detect marked genetic differentiation within Scandinavia. This differentiation is largely manifested as a north-south gradient, with a linear increase in the quantity FST/(1 - FST). Aided by computer simulations we find that this pattern is unlikely to have arisen by random genetic drift in the short time since lynx started to expand in the 1950s, suggesting that the spatial structure may predate the bottleneck. Individual-based analyses indicate that, instead of a continuous gradient, Scandinavian lynx may be structured into three more or less distinct groups, possibly corresponding to northern, central and southern subpopulations. The presence of such structuring was unknown previously and was unexpected from general considerations on the mobility of the species, historical data and the absence of geographical barriers. Our study demonstrates how molecular markers may be used to detect cryptic population structure, invisible using traditional methods.

  3. Are the Fenno-Scandinavian Arctic Wetlands a Significant Regional Source of Formic Acid?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T. Jones

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the first gaseous formic acid (HC(OOH concentration measurements collected over the Fenno-Scandinavian wetlands (67.9–68.0° N, 22.1–27.8° E as part of the MAMM (Methane and other greenhouse gases in the Arctic-Measurements, process studies and Modelling aircraft campaigns conducted in August and September 2013. A boundary layer box model approach has been used to calculate a regionally representative (~240 km2 surface flux for HC(OOH of 0.0098 (±0.0057 mg[HCOOH]·m−2·h−1. A surface-type classification map was used to estimate proportional source contributions to the observed HC(OOH flux over the measurement region. The removal of expected source contributions (using available literature parameterisations from the calculated surface flux identified that 75% remained unaccounted for. This may suggest that HC(OOH emission from wetland within the Fenno-Scandinavian region could contribute up to 29 times higher per unit area than previous theoretical HC(OOH globally-averaged wetland estimates, highlighting a need for further constrained wetland studies of HC(OOH emission to better understand its potentially significant impact on the Arctic HC(OOH budget and consequent impacts on oxidative capacity.

  4. Anglian and Anglo-Scandinavian Cottam: linking digital publication and archive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian D. Richards

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Anglian and Anglo-Scandinavian settlements at Cottam, East Yorkshire, was first indicated in 1987 by numerous finds of copper alloy coins, dress pins and strap ends by metal detector users. This report presents the results of fieldwork carried out on behalf of the Department of Archaeology, University of York, between 1993-5, including field walking, geophysical survey, and excavation. This revealed an enclosure of the eighth-ninth centuries, containing traces of a small number of post-built halls. In the late ninth century this settlement was then abandoned, a process which led to the incorporation of a human female skull in a domestic rubbish pit. A new enclosed settlement was laid out nearby, which was occupied briefly in the early tenth century. It is argued that the Anglian settlement may have been part of a royal multiple estate but that as a result of estate reorganisation after the Scandinavian settlement it developed into an independent manor. Cottam is the first so-called "productive site" in the environs of York to be the subject of archaeological investigations. The results suggest that it was a prosperous but not exceptional site, and that the primary activity was farming, with limited evidence for trade or manufacture. This work also prompts a reassessment of the typology of crop mark enclosures and the re-examination of the large number of undated enclosures in the area.

  5. Hematology and serum clinical chemistry reference intervals for free-ranging Scandinavian gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Stein I; Arnemo, Jon M; Liberg, Olof

    2009-06-01

    Scandinavian free-ranging wolves (Canis lupus) are endangered, such that laboratory data to assess their health status is increasingly important. Although wolves have been studied for decades, most biological information comes from captive animals. The objective of the present study was to establish reference intervals for 30 clinical chemical and 8 hematologic analytes in Scandinavian free-ranging wolves. All wolves were tracked and chemically immobilized from a helicopter before examination and blood sampling in the winter of 7 consecutive years (1998-2004). Seventy-nine blood samples were collected from 57 gray wolves, including 24 juveniles (24 samples), 17 adult females (25 samples), and 16 adult males (30 samples). Whole blood and serum samples were stored at refrigeration temperature for 1-3 days before hematologic analyses and for 1-5 days before serum biochemical analyses. Reference intervals were calculated as 95% confidence intervals except for juveniles where the minimum and maximum values were used. Significant differences were observed between adult and juvenile wolves for RBC parameters, alkaline phosphatase and amylase activities, and total protein, albumin, gamma-globulins, cholesterol, creatinine, calcium, chloride, magnesium, phosphate, and sodium concentrations. Compared with published reference values for captive wolves, reference intervals for free-ranging wolves reflected exercise activity associated with capture (higher creatine kinase activity, higher glucose concentration), and differences in nutritional status (higher urea concentration).

  6. Slow Shift—Developing Provisions for Talented Students in Scandinavian Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marca Wolfensberger

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For decades, Scandinavian culture effectively prohibited the development of special provisions for talented students in higher education. However, in recent years, a cultural shift has gradually made more room for excellence and talent development in the national discourses. This paper analyzes the climate for talent development in Denmark, Sweden, and Norway. Following a first inventory of honors programs in Scandinavian higher education in which the only programs were found in Denmark, 10 experts were interviewed to analyze their national situation and reflect on the leading role of Denmark. In this country, external incentives, focus on quality, pioneers, and an open atmosphere were found to produce a culture more appreciative of excellence over the last decade. Starting from the Danish experience, the situation in Norway and Sweden is analyzed, showing that the combination of factors leading to change in Denmark is not yet present here. Lessons for other countries are highlighted, notably the importance of sharing information and exchanging knowledge at an international level.

  7. Understanding the impact of extra-tropical storms from CORDEX projections over the Scandinavian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldore, Vidyunmala; Luna, Byron Quan

    2017-04-01

    Response of extra-tropical storms to climate change over the Scandinavian coast in high resolution regional climate projection is investigated in the current study. The complex interactions between North Atlantic oscillation, arctic amplification, ocean-atmospheric interactions and changing nature of synoptic waves will affect the generation and extremity of storm types. The nature of these storms is dependent on large-scale systems over this region, and hence higher resolution climate models might be able to represent the structure and intensity of the storms with accuracy. We propose a tracking algorithm for two seasons autumn (September-October-November) and winter season (December-January-February) providing features to detect the frequency and intensity of storm types for a given coast. Our objective is to understand the impact of changing nature of extreme storm types over the Scandinavian coast. Using a spatial assessment, possible impacts due to future storms in RCP8.5 scenario are assessed and hazard levels are represented.

  8. The Innovation Clusters in the Developments by the Scandinavian School of Cluster Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onipko Tetiana A.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article generalizes and analyzes the developments by the Scandinavian School of cluster theory (scientists from Sweden, Norway and Denmark on innovative clusters. It has been found that the Scandinavian scientists considered innovative clusters as an integral component of both the regional and the national innovation systems. It has been clarified that the efficiency of an innovative cluster depends largely on the «knowledge base». It was emphasized that innovative clusters, by facilitating interactive training and generating new ideas, stimulate the development of the «economy of training». It has been determined that the coordinating structures of innovative clusters are the institutions of cooperation that facilitate interaction between enterprises, scientific centres, and authorities. It has been specified that innovative clusters contribute to the emerging of benefits for participants, including the growing opportunities for innovation, improved conditions for establishing a business, and increased productivity. It has been concluded that the development of the inner environment of an innovative cluster depends largely on its relationships to the external environment.

  9. Ancient DNA reveals lack of continuity between neolithic hunter-gatherers and contemporary Scandinavians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, Helena; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Thomas, Mark G; Brandström, Mikael; Storå, Jan; Molnar, Petra; Andersen, Pernille K; Bendixen, Christian; Holmlund, Gunilla; Götherström, Anders; Willerslev, Eske

    2009-11-03

    The driving force behind the transition from a foraging to a farming lifestyle in prehistoric Europe (Neolithization) has been debated for more than a century [1-3]. Of particular interest is whether population replacement or cultural exchange was responsible [3-5]. Scandinavia holds a unique place in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted Ware culture [6]. Intriguingly, these late hunter-gatherers existed in parallel to early farmers for more than a millennium before they vanished some 4,000 years ago [7, 8]. The prolonged coexistence of the two cultures in Scandinavia has been cited as an argument against population replacement between the Mesolithic and the present [7, 8]. Through analysis of DNA extracted from ancient Scandinavian human remains, we show that people of the Pitted Ware culture were not the direct ancestors of modern Scandinavians (including the Saami people of northern Scandinavia) but are more closely related to contemporary populations of the eastern Baltic region. Our findings support hypotheses arising from archaeological analyses that propose a Neolithic or post-Neolithic population replacement in Scandinavia [7]. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the view that the eastern Baltic represents a genetic refugia for some of the European hunter-gatherer populations.

  10. Prescribed journeys through life: Cultural differences in mental time travel between Middle Easterners and Scandinavians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottsen, Christina Lundsgaard; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2015-12-01

    Mental time travel is the ability to remember past events and imagine future events. Here, 124 Middle Easterners and 128 Scandinavians generated important past and future events. These different societies present a unique opportunity to examine effects of culture. Findings indicate stronger influence of normative schemas and greater use of mental time travel to teach, inform and direct behaviour in the Middle East compared with Scandinavia. The Middle Easterners generated more events that corresponded to their cultural life script and that contained religious words, whereas the Scandinavians reported events with a more positive mood impact. Effects of gender were mainly found in the Middle East. Main effects of time orientation largely replicated recent findings showing that simulation of future and past events are not necessarily parallel processes. In accordance with the notion that future simulations rely on schema-based construction, important future events showed a higher overlap with life script events than past events in both cultures. In general, cross-cultural discrepancies were larger in future compared with past events. Notably, the high focus in the Middle East on sharing future events to give cultural guidance is consistent with the increased adherence to normative scripts found in this culture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mobility of plume-derived volcanogenic elements in meteoric water at Nyiragongo volcano (Congo) inferred from the chemical composition of single rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Marcello; Shamavu, Patient; Scaglione, Sarah; D'Alessandro, Walter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Bruno Giuffrida, Giovanni; Tedesco, Dario; Calabrese, Sergio

    2017-11-01

    The chemical composition of single rainfall events was investigated at Nyiragongo volcano (Democratic Republic of Congo) with the aim of determining the relative contributions of plume-derived elements. The different locations of the sampling sites allowed both plume-affected samples (hereafter referred to as ;fumigated samples;) and samples representative of the local background to be collected. The chemical composition of the local background reflects the peculiar geographic features of the area, being influenced by biomass burning, geogenic dust, and biological activity. Conversely, fumigated samples contain large amounts of volcanogenic elements that can be clearly distinguished from the local background. These elements are released into the atmosphere from the persistently boiling lava lake of the Nyiragongo crater and from the neonate lava lake of Nyamulagira. These emissions result in a volcanic plume that includes solid particles, acidic droplets, and gaseous species. The chemical signature of the volcanic emissions appears in falling raindrops as they interact with the plume. HCl and HBr readily dissolve in water, and so their ratio in rain samples reflects that of the volcanic plume. The transport of HF is mediated by the large amount of silicate particles generated at the magma-air interface. SO2 is partially converted into SO42- that dissolves in water. The refractory elements dissolved in rain samples derive from the dissolution of silicate particles, and most of them (Al, Mg, Ca, and Sr) are present at exactly the same molar ratios as in the rocks. In contrast, elements such as Na, K, Rb, Cu, and Pb are enriched relative to the whole-rock composition, suggesting that they are volatilized during magma degassing. After correcting for the dissolution of silicate particles, we can define that the volatility of the elements decreases in the following order: Pb ≫ Rb > K > Na. This finding, which is the first for a volcanic plume, is consistent with

  12. Structural and geochemical characteristics of faulted sediments and inferences on the role of water in deformatiion, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Minor, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    The San Ysidro fault is a spectacularly exposed normal fault located in the northwestern Albuquerque Basin of the Rio Grande Rift. This intrabasin fault is representative of many faults that formed in poorly lithified sediments throughout the rift. The fault is exposed over nearly 10 km and accommodates nearly 700 m of dip slip in subhorizontal, siliciclastic sediments. The extent of the exposure facilitates study of along-strike variations in deformation mechanisms, archi tecture, geochemistry, and permeability. The fault is composed of structural and hydrogeologic components that include a clay-rich fault core, a calcite-cemented mixed zone, and a poorly developed damage zone primarily consisting of deformation bands. Structural textures suggest that initial deformation in the fault occurred at low temperature and pressure, was within the paleosaturated zone of the evolving Rio Grande Rift, and was dominated by particulate flow. Little geochemical change is apparent across the fault zone other than due to secondary processes. The lack of fault-related geochemical change is interpreted to reflect the fundamental nature of water-saturated, particulate fl ow. Early mechanical entrainment of low-permeability clays into the fault core likely caused damming of groundwater flow on the up-gradient, footwall side of the fault. This may have caused a pressure gradient and flow of calcite-saturated waters in higher-permeability, fault-entrained siliciclastic sediments, ultimately promoting their cementation by sparry calcite. Once developed, the cemented and clay-rich fault has likely been, and continues to be, a partial barrier to cross-fault groundwater flow, as suggested by petrophysical measurements. Aeromagnetic data indicate that there may be many more unmapped faults with similar lengths to the San Ysidro fault buried within Rio Grande basins. If these buried faults formed by the same processes that formed the San Ysidro fault and have persistent low

  13. D/H of late Miocene meteoric waters in Western Australia: Paleoenvironmental conditions inferred from the δD of (U-Th)/He-dated CID goethite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapp, Crayton J.; Shuster, David L.

    2017-09-01

    Nineteen (U-Th)/He ages were determined for eight samples from a core drilled in an ore-grade channel iron deposit (CID) of the Robe Pisolite (Robe Formation) of Mesa J in Western Australia. With one exception, uncorrected ages of the analyzed aliquots range from 6.7(±0.4) Ma to 30.2(±3.1) Ma, while molar ratios of Th/U range from 0.42 to 5.06. The exception is an aliquot with an apparent age of 2.7 Ma and Th/U of 5.70. A three-component mixing model involving one generation of goethite and two generations of hematite suggests that the age of crystallization of the oolitic goethites is ∼7(±1) Ma. If so, the goethites have effectively been closed systems for ∼7 million years and should preserve a stable hydrogen isotope record of late Miocene rainfall in the vicinity of Mesa J. Cenozoic movement of the Australian continent had placed Mesa J and environs in the subtropics at a paleolatitude of about 29 °S during the late Miocene. Al-adjusted δD values of oolitic goethite in the eight CID samples range from -153‰ to -146‰ and imply that the δD of the late Miocene meteoric waters ranged from -61‰ to -53‰, with an average of -56‰. These relatively negative δD values might indicate that near-coastal, late Miocene rain was derived primarily from summer-season tropical cyclones with storm tracks that extended into the subtropics of western Australia. The postulated late Miocene tropical cyclones would have occurred more often and/or exhibited greater intensity at a paleolatitude of 29 °S than is the case for modern sites at approximately 30 °S on the west coast of Australia (e.g., Perth). Higher fluxes of meteoric water in the Miocene summers would have facilitated dissolution and removal of BIF-sourced silica with concomitant enrichment in oxidized Fe. Moreover, wetter late Miocene summers could have promoted multiple cycles of microbially mediated dissolution and recrystallization of Fe(III) oxides in the aerobic systems. The oolitic textures may

  14. Nonparametric statistical inference

    CERN Document Server

    Gibbons, Jean Dickinson

    2010-01-01

    Overall, this remains a very fine book suitable for a graduate-level course in nonparametric statistics. I recommend it for all people interested in learning the basic ideas of nonparametric statistical inference.-Eugenia Stoimenova, Journal of Applied Statistics, June 2012… one of the best books available for a graduate (or advanced undergraduate) text for a theory course on nonparametric statistics. … a very well-written and organized book on nonparametric statistics, especially useful and recommended for teachers and graduate students.-Biometrics, 67, September 2011This excellently presente

  15. Inference for Noisy Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE In the current work, some well-known inference procedures including testing and estimation are adjusted to accommodate noisy data that lead to nonidentically distributed sample.  The main two cases addressed are the Poisson and the normal distributions. Both one and two sample cases are addressed.  Other cases including the exponential and the Pareto distributions are briefly mentioned.  In the Poisson case, the situation when the sample size is random is mentioned.

  16. Nanotechnology and statistical inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesely, Sara; Vesely, Leonardo; Vesely, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    We discuss some problems that arise when applying statistical inference to data with the aim of disclosing new func-tionalities. A predictive model analyzes the data taken from experiments on a specific material to assess the likelihood that another product, with similar structure and properties, will exhibit the same functionality. It doesn't have much predictive power if vari-ability occurs as a consequence of a specific, non-linear behavior. We exemplify our discussion on some experiments with biased dice.

  17. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine : statement on oral pathology and oral medicine in the European Dental Curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kragelund, C.; Reibel, J.; Hadler-Olsen, E. S.; Hietanen, J.; Johannessen, A. C.; Kenrad, B.; Nylander, K.; Puranen, M.; Rozell, B.; Salo, T.; Syrjanen, S.; Soland, T. M.; van der Waal, I.; van der Wal, J. E.; Warfvinge, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: For many years, dentists have migrated between the Scandinavian countries without an intentionally harmonized dental education. The free movement of the workforce in the European Union has clarified that a certain degree of standardization or harmonization of the European higher

  18. From the History of Cultural Cooperation Between the Murmansk Region and the Scandinavian Countries and Finland (1985 – 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Taraskina

    2009-03-01

    subject of this article is cultural cooperation between the Murmansk region, the Scandinavian countries and Finland. This article will examine cooperation in the field of libraries and literature studies, and cooperation in the exhibition and management of the museums within this Region.

  19. Knowledge contained and knowledge constrained in the communication across culture: a case on Scandinavian managers in an international setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob

    that the use of social constructivist theories with regard to interaction and knowledge sharing may be the way forward. Based on the authors own empirical research involving Scandinavian managers in engaging in cross cultural communication it is shown that barriers to a positive link between cross...

  20. Semantic change and grammaticalization : The development of modal and postmodal meanings in Mainland Scandinavian ma, matte and maste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijering, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative synchronic corpus investigation of Mainland Scandinavian ma, matte and maste 'must, may'. These modals developed a wide range of different meanings and uses within the realm of necessity, possibility and beyond, i.e., ability, capacity, need, desirability,

  1. Caseworkers’ discretions of eligibility to social insurance in Denmark and Sweden – signs of Neoliberalism in Scandinavian welfare states?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Østergaard; Stensöta, Helena

    It has been argued that the Scandinavian welfare states have been resilient to trends of globalization and fiscal crises, and that the global pressure of neoliberalism has led to a partial retrenchment rather than a restructuring during last decades. This conclusion is, however, drawn without...

  2. Chewing lice Trichodectes pinguis pinguis in Scandinavian brown bears (Ursus arctos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Fandos Esteruelas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In April 2014 and 2015, we noted localized alopecia (neck, forelimbs, and chest and hyperpigmentation on two adult brown bears (Ursus arctos captured in central-south Sweden for ecological studies under the Scandinavian Brown Bear Research Project. In spring 2015, a brown bear was shot because of human-wildlife conflict in the same region. This bear also had extensive alopecia and hyperpigmentation. Ectoparasites were collected from the affected skin areas in all three individuals and preserved in ethanol for identification. Based on morphological characteristics, the lice were identified as Trichodectes spp. and Trichodectes pinguis pinguis. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of chewing lice in free-ranging brown bears in Scandinavia.

  3. Natality Decline and Miscarriages Associated With the 1918 Influenza Pandemic: The Scandinavian and United States Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloom-Feshbach, Kimberly; Simonsen, Lone; Viboud, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    Background. Although pregnancy is a recognized risk factor for severe influenza infection, the effect of influenza on miscarriages and births remains unclear. We examined the relationship between influenza and birth rates during the 1918 pandemic in the United States, Denmark, Sweden, and Norway....... Methods. We compiled monthly birth rates from 1911 through 1930 in 3 Scandinavian countries and the United States, identified periods of unusually low or high birth rates, and quantified births as “missing” or “in excess” of the normal expectation. Using monthly influenza data, we correlated the timing...... of peak pandemic exposure and depressions in birth rates, and identified pregnancy stages at risk of influenza-related miscarriage. Results. Birth rates declined in all study populations in spring 1919 by a mean of 2.2 births per 1000 persons, representing a 5%–15% drop below baseline levels (P

  4. The last Scandinavian ice sheet in northwestern Russia: ice flow patterns and decay dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demidov, L.; Houmark-Nielsen, Michael; Kjær, Kurt Henrik

    2006-01-01

    the main ice sheet. During the Lateglacial warming, disintegration and melting took place in a 200-600 km wide zone along the northeastern rim of SIS associated with thick Quaternary accumulations. Deglaciation occurred through aerial downwasting within large fields of dead ice developed during......Advance of the Late Weichselian (Valdaian) Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) in northwestern Russia took place after a period of periglacial conditions. Till of the last SIS, Bobrovo till, overlies glacial deposits from the previous Barents and Kara Sea ice sheets and marine deposits of the Last...... in Russia than previously outlined and the time of termination at 18-16 cal. kyr BP was almost 10 kyr delayed compared to the southwestern part of the ice sheet. We argue that the lithology of the ice sheets' substrate, and especially the location of former proglacial lake basins, influenced the dynamics...

  5. Viking and early Middle Ages northern Scandinavian textiles proven to be made with hemp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, G; Nockert, M; Holst, B

    2013-10-18

    Nowadays most plant textiles used for clothing and household are made of cotton and viscose. Before the 19th century however, plant textiles were mainly made from locally available raw materials, in Scandinavia these were: nettle, hemp and flax. It is generally believed that in Viking and early Middle Ages Scandinavia hemp was used only for coarse textiles (i.e. rope and sailcloth). Here we present an investigation of 10 Scandinavian plant fibre textiles from the Viking and Early Middle Ages, believed to be locally produced. Up till now they were all believed to be made of flax. We show that 4 textiles, including two pieces of the famous Överhogdal Viking wall-hanging are in fact made with hemp (in three cases hemp and flax are mixed). This indicates that hemp was important, not only for coarse but also for fine textile production in Viking and Early Middle Ages in Scandinavia.

  6. Upper-mantle velocities below the Scandinavian Mountains from P- and S- wave traveltime tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejrani, Babak; Balling, N.; Jacobsen, B. H.

    2017-01-01

    More than 20000 arrival-times of teleseismic P- and S-waves were measured over a period of more than 10 years in five separate temporary and two permanent seismic networks covering the Scandinavian (Scandes) Mountains and adjacent areas of the Baltic Shield. The relative traveltime residuals were...... inverted to 3D tomograms of P- and S- velocities and the VP/VS ratio. Resolution analysis documents that good 3D resolution is available under the dense network south of 64° latitude (Southern Scandes Mountains), and patchier, but highly useful resolution is available further north, where station coverage...... is more uneven. A pronounced upper-mantle velocity boundary (UMVB), transecting the study region is defined. It runs from SE Norway (east of the Oslo Graben) across the mountains to the Norwegian coast near Trondheim (around the Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex), from where it follows the coast and runs...

  7. Do the Scandinavian consumers pay a "fair" price for German white wines?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Jan Børsen; Smith, Valdemar

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the retail prices of German white wines sold in the Scandinavian countries. German white wines account for approximately 5-6 per cent of the total sale of wines - both red and white wines - in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. However, the market shares of German wines...... in Scandinavia have been declining for a number of years. Diminishing market shares may reflect changes in consumer tastes or simply 'wrong' prices, the latter related to both the level of wine prices (German wines being relatively expensive) and the structure of wine prices. In general, country-specific price...... differences for identical wines are expected to be a sign of differences in taxes, import prices, transportation costs as well as other costs - and also different competitive conditions at the retail level in the respective countries. Differences in wine prices across countries do not always reflect...

  8. Adaptive Traffic Control Systems in a medium-sized Scandinavian city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Niels; Olesen, Anne Vingaard

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive Traffic Control Systems (ATCS) are aimed at reducing congestion. ATCS adapt to approaching traffic to continuously optimise the traffic flows in question. ATCS have been implemented in many locations, including the Scandinavian countries, with various effects. Due to congestion problems......, ATCS were installed in the eight signalised intersections of a 1.7 km stretch of the ring road in the medium-sized Danish city of Aalborg. To measure the effect of ATCS a with/without study was carried out. GPS data from a car following the traffic, recorded transportation times for buses in service......, and GPS data from a range of cars driving on the ring road formed the basis for the study. The result of ATCS implementation was a significant 17% reduction in transportation time on the ring road in the most congested period, the afternoon peak. Less significant effects were found regarding the morning...

  9. Evaluation of periprosthetic bone cysts in patients with a scandinavian total ankle replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janni; Frøkjær, Johnny; Gerke, Oke

    2014-01-01

    radiography compared with 3D weight-bearing multiplanar reconstructed (MPR) fluoroscopic imaging when diagnosing periprosthetic bone cysts in patients who have undergone TAR. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Forty-two consecutive patients with a Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR) were consecutively enrolled...... and underwent digital radiography and 3D MPR imaging in the same session. All 3D MPR images were interpreted in a blinded fashion, specifically with regard to the presence and extent of periprosthetic bone cysts. Cysts were measured in three planes whenever possible. Interrater and intrarater reliability...... that of cysts diagnosed on digital radiography (1545 mm(3) vs 253 mm(3)) (p analysis based on the presence or absence of cysts in individual patients did not show a significant difference between 3D MPR and digital radiography (p = 0.23). CONCLUSION. The data imply that cysts are better...

  10. Factors associated with time consumption when answering drug-related queries to Scandinavian drug information centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reppe, L. A.; Spigset, O.; Bottiger, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose There is little research-based documentation on the services provided by drug information centres (DICs). The aim of this multi-centre study was to explore for the first time the factors associated with time consumption when answering drug-related queries at eight different but comparable...... DICs. Methods During an 8-week period, staff members at eight Scandinavian DICs recorded the number of minutes during which they responded to queries. Mixed model linear regression analyses were used to explore the factors associated with time consumption when answering queries. Results The mean time...... consumption per query was 178 min (range 4-2540 min). The mean time consumed per query increased by 28 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 23 to 33, p...

  11. Nation-building in the Scandinavian Welfare State: The Immigration Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grete Brochmann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Scandinavia represents a particular type of welfare state, characterized by institutionalized social rights, universal access, generous benefits, a high degree of public involvement and comparatively high levels of redistribution. The basically tax-based system, which was designed to constitute a basic safety net for all citizens from cradle to grave, has been remarkably generous - and thereby also costly. It is thus vulnerable in relation to newcomers who cannot support themselves economically. In all of Scandinavia, the welfare state was from the beginning the self-evident instrument for incorporation of newcomers. Gradually, this instrument has turned more controversial, in parallel with general processes of social reform, in which the restructuring of policies has been regarded as necessary in order to avoid dependency traps and "overconsumption". This article spells out the historical background for the specific Scandinavian approach to immigration, and discusses the current dilemmas attached to this normatively complicated policy field.

  12. Current use of nitrous oxide in public hospitals in Scandinavian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husum, B; Stenqvist, O; Alahuhta, S; Sigurdsson, G H; Dale, O

    2013-10-01

    The use of nitrous oxide in modern anaesthesia has been questioned. We surveyed changes in use of nitrous oxide in Scandinavia and its justifications during the last two decades. All 191 departments of anaesthesia in the Scandinavian countries were requested by email to answer an electronic survey in SurveyMonkey. One hundred and twenty-five (64%) of the departments responded; four were excluded. The 121 departments provided 807.520 general anaesthetics annually. The usage of nitrous oxide was reported in 11.9% of cases, ranging from 0.6% in Denmark to 38.6% in Iceland while volatile anaesthetics were employed in 48.9%, lowest in Denmark (22.6%) and highest in Iceland (91.9%). Nitrous oxide was co-administered with volatile anaesthetics in 21.5% of general anaesthetics [2.4% (Denmark) -34.5% (Iceland)]. Use of nitrous oxide was unchanged in five departments (4%), decreasing in 75 (62%) and stopped in 41 (34%). Reasons for decreasing or stopping use of nitrous oxide were fairly uniform in the five countries, the most important being that other agents were 'better', whereas few put weight on its potential risk for increasing morbidity. Decision to stop using nitrous oxide was made by the departments except in four cases. Of 87 maternity wards, nitrous oxide was used in 72, whereas this was the case in 42 of 111 day-surgery units. The use of nitrous oxide has decreased in the Scandinavian countries, apparently because many now prefer other agents. Difference in practices between the five countries were unexpected and apparently not justified on anticipated evidence only. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Geomorphological evidence of channelized subglacial meltwater drainage under the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Aleksander; Wysota, Wojciech; Sobiech, Marcin; Piotrowski, Jan A.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of subglacial meltwater erosion on shaping glacial landscapes is contentious and often difficult to constrain due to the lack of unequivocal diagnostic criteria. The same holds for the role of subglacial meltwater in glacier movement processes and sediment transport and deposition. Here we present new evidence of widespread channelized erosion under the southern, soft-bedded fringe of the last Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) based on high-resolution terrain analysis with LiDAR imagery. We identify several tens of sites with "glacial curvilineation" landscapes first recognized by Lesemann et al. (2010, 2014) and considered as evidence of erosion by turbulent meltwater flows at the ice/bed interface. The "glacial curvilineation" landscapes mapped here consist of sets of parallel, winding ridges typically several metres high and up to several kilometres long occupying glacial overdeepenings and tunnel valleys. The ridges are aligned approximately perpendicular to the past ice sheet margins and they are composed of various deposits often pre-dating the last ice advance. We interpret them as erosional remnants of older landscapes dissected by high-energy subglacial meltwater flows. These findings suggest that the palaeoglaciological significance of meltwater drainage under the southern portion of SIS may have been grossly underestimated. References Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J.A. and Wysota, W., 2010. „Glacial curvilineations": New glacial landforms produced by longitudinal vortices in subglacial meltwater flows. Geomorphology 120, 153-161. Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J.A. and Wysota, W., 2014. Genesis of the "glacial curvilineation" landscape by meltwater processes under the former Scandinavian Ice Sheet, Poland. Sedimentary Geology 312, 1-18.

  14. Inclusive and Women-friendly in a time of Diversity? The Scandinavian citizenship regime – the ‘childcare lesson’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilie Thun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I ask: Is the Scandinavian citizenship regime inclusive and women-friendly in a time of diversity? I approach this question by addressing the intersection of gender and ethnicity in relation to social citizenship with the main concern being childcare. I emphasize Norway as a case but also see Norway in comparison with Sweden and Denmark. In comparative studies, the Scandinavian citizenship regime is presented as being the most ‘women-friendly’. However, faced with an increasingly multicultural population, a pertinent question is whether this citizenship model is able to accommodate diversity. I explore two tensions that are basic to the inclusiveness and women-friendliness of the Scandinavian citizenship regime in diverse societies: 1 The tension between principles of gender equality and cultural diversity, and 2 the tension between liberating and controlling aspects of the welfare state. This article discusses the Norwegian family policy ‘hybrid’, which combines dual-earner support with traditional breadwinner elements. One might say that the Norwegian family ‘hybrid’ can be a solution to the tension between, on the one hand, a specific gender-equality family norm, and, on the other hand, the respect for other family norms. However, I argue that there is a double standard with regard to minority women, and it can be understood in light of a discourse about Norwegianness. Parental choice is considered a good thing – as long as the mother in question is considered ‘fully’ Norwegian. However, assumed cultural and ethnic differences – often based on stereotypical collective categories of difference – are used as boundary-markers between the majority and minorities. I conclude that, despite variations, all the Scandinavian countries grapple with the same tensions, and that there is a Scandinavian double standard regarding minority women.

  15. Admissibility of logical inference rules

    CERN Document Server

    Rybakov, VV

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the fundamental theoretical results concerning inference rules in deductive formal systems. Primary attention is focused on: admissible or permissible inference rules the derivability of the admissible inference rules the structural completeness of logics the bases for admissible and valid inference rules. There is particular emphasis on propositional non-standard logics (primary, superintuitionistic and modal logics) but general logical consequence relations and classical first-order theories are also considered. The book is basically self-contained and

  16. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: Scandinavian Cohort for osteonecrosis of the jaw – work in progress and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiodt M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Morten Schiodt,1 Cecilia Larsson Wexell,2,3 Bente Brokstad Herlofson,4 Karen Marie Giltvedt,4 Sven Erik Norholt,5 Vera Ehrenstein61Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Södra Älvsborg Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Borås, 3Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 4Department of Oral Surgery and Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 5Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Aarhus University and University Hospital, 6Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkAbstract: Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ is a severe side effect associated with antiresorptive treatment. Monitoring of ONJ using routine databases in Scandinavian countries is a challenge owing to lack of valid algorithms and to heterogeneous referral practices. The aim of this paper is to describe the process of establishing a Scandinavian ONJ Cohort enrolling all ONJ cases related to antiresorptive treatment arising in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden between 2011 and 2019. The initial purpose of the cohort is to support an ongoing pharmacovigilance study of denosumab and zoledronic acid in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The three countries, with their 199 clinics, departments, and units of oral and maxillofacial surgery, both hospital-based and freestanding, differ somewhat in referral practices of the ONJ patients. By directly contacting all providers of care to ONJ patients in the three countries, we established a network for reporting incident cases to each country's research database directly or through a member of the Scandinavian ONJ task force as a liaison. The task force includes a Scandinavian coordinator and three national coordinators collaborating directly with the clinics. A uniform ONJ

  17. Causal Inference and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Causal inference is of central importance to developmental psychology. Many key questions in the field revolve around improving the lives of children and their families. These include identifying risk factors that if manipulated in some way would foster child development. Such a task inherently involves causal inference: One wants to know whether…

  18. Gauging Variational Inference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ahn, Sungsoo [Korea Advanced Inst. Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jinwoo [Korea Advanced Inst. Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-25

    Computing partition function is the most important statistical inference task arising in applications of Graphical Models (GM). Since it is computationally intractable, approximate methods have been used to resolve the issue in practice, where meanfield (MF) and belief propagation (BP) are arguably the most popular and successful approaches of a variational type. In this paper, we propose two new variational schemes, coined Gauged-MF (G-MF) and Gauged-BP (G-BP), improving MF and BP, respectively. Both provide lower bounds for the partition function by utilizing the so-called gauge transformation which modifies factors of GM while keeping the partition function invariant. Moreover, we prove that both G-MF and G-BP are exact for GMs with a single loop of a special structure, even though the bare MF and BP perform badly in this case. Our extensive experiments, on complete GMs of relatively small size and on large GM (up-to 300 variables) confirm that the newly proposed algorithms outperform and generalize MF and BP.

  19. Social Inference Through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulasvirta, Antti

    Awareness cues are computer-mediated, real-time indicators of people’s undertakings, whereabouts, and intentions. Already in the mid-1970 s, UNIX users could use commands such as “finger” and “talk” to find out who was online and to chat. The small icons in instant messaging (IM) applications that indicate coconversants’ presence in the discussion space are the successors of “finger” output. Similar indicators can be found in online communities, media-sharing services, Internet relay chat (IRC), and location-based messaging applications. But presence and availability indicators are only the tip of the iceberg. Technological progress has enabled richer, more accurate, and more intimate indicators. For example, there are mobile services that allow friends to query and follow each other’s locations. Remote monitoring systems developed for health care allow relatives and doctors to assess the wellbeing of homebound patients (see, e.g., Tang and Venables 2000). But users also utilize cues that have not been deliberately designed for this purpose. For example, online gamers pay attention to other characters’ behavior to infer what the other players are like “in real life.” There is a common denominator underlying these examples: shared activities rely on the technology’s representation of the remote person. The other human being is not physically present but present only through a narrow technological channel.

  20. Life Disparity before, during and after Stagnation of Danish Female Life Expectancy. a Cause of Death Analysis and a Comparison with Their Scandinavian Counterparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aburto, José Manuel; Wensink, Maarten Jan; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune

    cancers and non-infectious respiratory diseases, offsetting continuous improvement in cardiovascular mortality. Before and after stagnation, life expectancy increased as disparity decreased, as the cardiovascular revolution unfolded. Comparing Denmark and its Scandinavian counterparts, we find...

  1. REVIEW: E-book about E-learning Online Education and Learning Management Systems-Global E-learning in a Scandinavian Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Demiray, Reviewed By Prof. Dr. Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Prior to year 2000 Scandinavian universities offered selected online courses attracting a few pioneering students. Today, even primary schools offer online services to students, teachers and parents. Online education is becoming mainstream education in Scandinavia.

  2. Quality assessment of structure and language elements of written responses given by seven Scandinavian drug information centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reppe, Linda Amundstuen; Spigset, Olav; Kampmann, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    for which queries were part of the study. The responses were assessed qualitatively by six clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and six general practitioners (GPs, external experts). In addition, linguistic aspects of the responses were evaluated by a plain language expert. RESULTS: The quality......PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to identify structure and language elements affecting the quality of responses from Scandinavian drug information centres (DICs). METHODS: Six different fictitious drug-related queries were sent to each of seven Scandinavian DICs. The centres were blinded...... of responses was generally judged as satisfactory to good. Presenting specific advice and conclusions were considered to improve the quality of the responses. However, small nuances in language formulations could affect the individual judgments of the experts, e.g. on whether or not advice was given. Some...

  3. Highly discrepant proportions of female and male Scandinavian and British Isles ancestry within the isolated population of the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Thomas D; Jorgensen, Tove H; Børglum, Anders D

    2006-01-01

    Isles ancestry. In the present study we used 122 new and 19 previously published hypervariable region I sequences of the mitochondrial control region to analyse the genetic diversity of the Faroese population and compare it with other populations in the North Atlantic region. The analyses suggested......The Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic Ocean are inhabited by a small population, whose origin is thought to date back to the Viking Age. Historical, archaeological and linguistic evidence indicates that the present population of the Faroe Islands may have a mixture of Scandinavian and British...... the female settlers of the Faroe Islands. Compared to other admixed populations of the North Atlantic region, the population of the Faroe Islands appears to have the highest level of asymmetry in Scandinavian vs British Isles ancestry proportions among female and male settlers of the archipelago....

  4. A possible association between schizophrenia and GRIK3 polymorphisms in a multicenter sample of Scandinavian origin (SCOPE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K D; Hansen, T; Djurovic, S

    2009-01-01

    Map-selected tagging SNPs across GRIK3 in three independent samples of Scandinavian origin from the Scandinavian Collaboration of Psychiatric Etiology (SCOPE), including a total of 839 cases with schizophrenia spectrum and 1473 healthy controls. Four markers (rs6671364, rs17461259, rs472188, and rs535620) attained......There is considerable evidence of altered glutamatergic signalling in schizophrenia and a polymorphic variant of the GRIK3 glutamate receptor gene on 1p34-33 has previously been associated to this psychotic disorder. We therefore conducted a systematic association study with 30 Hap...... and rs535620) to scores for negative symptoms on the PANSS scale. The present results, although not robust, support the importance of more extensive investigations of GRIK3, given its potential role in mediating risk for schizophrenia....

  5. Sustainability Performance of Scandinavian Corporations and their Value Chains assessed by UN Global Compact and Global Reporting Initiative standards - a way to identify superior performers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a combination of the two most adopted multi- stakeholder standards for sustainability reporting as an alternate framework for assessing sustainability performance in Scandinavian corporations. This novel approach leverages numeric measures on the criteria...... Strategies & Policies, Management Systems, Monitoring and Evaluation Mechanisms and Key Outcomes on sustainability defined broadly as the Human Rights, Labour, Environment and Anti-Corruption issues by the UN Global Compact. The study firmly concludes that Scandinavian corporations on average...

  6. Assessment as learning in music education:The risk of ‘criteria compliance’ replacing ’learning’ in the Scandinavian countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ferm, Cecilia; Zandén, Olle; Vinge, John; Nyberg, Johan; Andersson, Ninnie; Väkevä, Lauri

    2014-01-01

    Assessment as learning in music education - the risk of ‘criteria compliance’ replacing ’learning’ in the Scandinavian countriesRecent reforms in England and USA give evidence that teaching methods and content can change rapidly, given a strong external pressure, for example through economic incentives, inspections, school choice and public display of schools’ and pupils’ performances. Educational activities in the Scandinavian countries have increasingly become dominated by obligations regar...

  7. An observational study of compliance with the Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heskestad, Ben; Waterloo, Knut; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2012-01-01

    The Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injuries were developed to provide safe and cost effective assessment of head injured patients. In a previous study conducted one year after publication and implementation of the guidelines (2003), we showed low complia...... compliance, involving over-triage with computed tomography (CT) and hospital admissions. The aim of the present study was to investigate guideline compliance after an educational intervention....

  8. Two centuries of the Scandinavian wolf population: patterns of genetic variability and migration during an era of dramatic decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagstad, Ø; Walker, C W; Vilà, C; Sundqvist, A-K; Fernholm, B; Hufthammer, A K; Wiig, Ø; Koyola, I; Ellegren, H

    2003-04-01

    The grey wolf (Canis lupus) was numerous on the Scandinavian peninsula in the early 19th century. However, as a result of intense persecution, the population declined dramatically and was virtually extinct from the peninsula by the 1960s. We examined historical patterns of genetic variability throughout the period of decline, from 1829 to 1979. Contemporary Finnish wolves, considered to be representative of a large eastern wolf population, were used for comparison. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variability among historical Scandinavian wolves was significantly lower than in Finland while Y chromosome variability was comparable between the two populations. This may suggest that long-distance migration from the east has been male-biased. Importantly though, as the historical population was significantly differentiated from contemporary Finnish wolves, the overall immigration rate to the Scandinavian peninsula appears to have been low. Levels of variability at autosomal microsatellite loci were high by the early 1800s but declined considerably towards the mid-20th century. At this time, approximately 40% of the allelic diversity and 30% of the heterozygosity had been lost. After 1940, however, there is evidence of several immigration events, coinciding with episodes of marked population increase in Russian Karelia and subsequent westwards migration.

  9. Optimization methods for logical inference

    CERN Document Server

    Chandru, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    Merging logic and mathematics in deductive inference-an innovative, cutting-edge approach. Optimization methods for logical inference? Absolutely, say Vijay Chandru and John Hooker, two major contributors to this rapidly expanding field. And even though ""solving logical inference problems with optimization methods may seem a bit like eating sauerkraut with chopsticks. . . it is the mathematical structure of a problem that determines whether an optimization model can help solve it, not the context in which the problem occurs."" Presenting powerful, proven optimization techniques for logic in

  10. Mesopause dynamics from the scandinavian triangle ofradars within the PSMOS-DATAR Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Manson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The "Scandinavian Triangle" is a unique trio of radars within the DATAR Project (Dynamics and Temperatures from the Arctic MLT (60–97km region: Andenes MF radar (69°N, 16°E; Tromsø MF radar (70°N, 19°E and Esrange "Meteor" radar (68°N, 21°E. The radar-spacings range from 125-270km, making it unique for studies of wind variability associated with small-scale waves, comparisons of large-scale waves measured over small spacings, and for comparisons of winds from different radar systems. As such it complements results from arrays having spacings of 25km and 500km that have been located near Saskatoon. Correlation analysis is used to demonstrate a speed bias (MF smaller than the Meteor between the radar types, which varies with season and altitude. Annual climatologies for the year 2000 of mean winds, solar tides, planetary and gravity waves are presented, and show indications of significant spatial variability across the Triangle and of differences in wave characteristics from middle latitudes.

    Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides: instrument and techniques

  11. Mesopause dynamics from the scandinavian triangle of radars within the PSMOS-DATAR Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Manson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The "Scandinavian Triangle" is a unique trio of radars within the DATAR Project (Dynamics and Temperatures from the Arctic MLT (60–97km region: Andenes MF radar (69°N, 16°E; Tromsø MF radar (70°N, 19°E and Esrange "Meteor" radar (68°N, 21°E. The radar-spacings range from 125-270km, making it unique for studies of wind variability associated with small-scale waves, comparisons of large-scale waves measured over small spacings, and for comparisons of winds from different radar systems. As such it complements results from arrays having spacings of 25km and 500km that have been located near Saskatoon. Correlation analysis is used to demonstrate a speed bias (MF smaller than the Meteor between the radar types, which varies with season and altitude. Annual climatologies for the year 2000 of mean winds, solar tides, planetary and gravity waves are presented, and show indications of significant spatial variability across the Triangle and of differences in wave characteristics from middle latitudes. Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides: instrument and techniques

  12. Mesopause dynamics from the scandinavian triangle ofradars within the PSMOS-DATAR Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, A.; Meek, C.; Hall, C.; Nozawa, S.; Mitchell, N.; Pancheva, D.; Singer, W.; Hoffmann, P.

    2004-02-01

    . The ``Scandinavian Triangle" is a unique trio of radars within the DATAR Project (Dynamics and Temperatures from the Arctic MLT (60-97km) region): Andenes MF radar (N, E); Tromsø MF radar (N, E) and Esrange ``Meteor" radar (N, E). The radar-spacings range from 125-270km, making it unique for studies of wind variability associated with small-scale waves, comparisons of large-scale waves measured over small spacings, and for comparisons of winds from different radar systems. As such it complements results from arrays having spacings of 25km and 500km that have been located near Saskatoon. Correlation analysis is used to demonstrate a speed bias (MF smaller than the Meteor) between the radar types, which varies with season and altitude. Annual climatologies for the year 2000 of mean winds, solar tides, planetary and gravity waves are presented, and show indications of significant spatial variability across the Triangle and of differences in wave characteristics from middle latitudes.

  13. A Scandinavian Island in a Slavonic Linguistic Environment. The Dialect of Gammalsvenskby: Nouns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Александр Евгеньевич Маньков

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper initiates a series of publications on the morphology of the dialect of Staroshvedskoye (Sw. Gammalsvenskby, which is the only surviving Scandinavian dialect on the territory of the former Soviet Union. The village of Staroshvedskoye is located in the Kherson region, Ukraine. Its Swedish dialect historically belongs to the group of Swedish dialects of Estonia and goes back to the dialect of the island of Dagö (Hiiumaa. The dialect of Gammalsvenskby is of interest to slavists as an example of a language island in the Slavonic environment. From around the 1950s, the main spoken language of all village residents, including dialect speakers, has been surzhik. Due to the complete lack of studies of the present-day dialect and because of the severe endangerment in which the dialect is currently situated, the most urgent task is to collect, classify and publish the factual material. This paper introduces comprehensive material on nouns in the conservative variety of the present-day dialect. It lists all masculine nouns of type 1a together with their cognates from Estonian Swedish dialects; comments on the history of the forms are given as well. The sources for the material presented here are interviews with speakers of the conservative variety of the dialect recorded by the author during fieldwork in the village from 2004 to 2012. We plan to publish nouns of other types in later articles.

  14. A Scandinavian Island in a Slavonic Linguistic Environment. The Dialect of Gammalsvenskby: Nouns (Paper 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Mankov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper continues the series of publications on the morphology of the dialect of Staroshvedskoye (Sw. Gammalsvenskby, which is the only surviving Scandinavian dialect in the territory of the former Soviet Union. The village of Staroshvedskoye is located in the Kherson region, Ukraine. Its Swedish dialect historically belongs to the group of Swedish dialects of Estonia and goes back to the dialect of the island of Dagö (Hiiumaa. The dialect of Gammalsvenskby is of interest to slavists as an example of a language island in the Slavonic environment. From around the 1950s, the main spoken language of all village residents, including dialect speakers, has been surzhik. Due to the complete lack of studies of the present-day dialect and because of the severe endangerment in which the dialect is currently situated, the most urgent task is to collect, classify, and publish the factual material. This paper introduces comprehensive material on nouns in the conservative variety of the present-day dialect. It lists all masculine nouns of types 1b, c, d, and e together with their cognates from Estonian Swedish dialects; comments on the history of the forms are given as well. The sources for the material presented here are interviews with speakers of the conservative variety of the dialect recorded by the author during fieldwork in the village from 2004 to 2013. We plan to publish nouns of other types in later articles.

  15. Impact of Volcanic Aerosols on Scandinavian Ice Sheet Melting during the Last Deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschitiello, F.; Pausata, F. S. R.; Wohlfarth, B.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic aerosols play a key role on Earth's climate driving a variety of feedbacks that can potentially affect the mass balance of modern ice sheets. Yet, empirical evidence that highlights the sensitivity of ancient ice sheets to volcanic forcing and the related feedbacks is still missing. Here we present a new annual and continuous glacial clay-varve chronology recording the melting history of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet during the end of the last deglaciation ( 13,200-12,000 years BP). By precisely synchronizing the chronology to the Greenland ice-core time scale, we document a correspondence between anomalous melt events in our varve record and volcanic aerosol emissions as registered in ice cores. Climate model simulations identify a positive feedback between volcanism and summer cloud cover over the North Atlantic. We thus suggest that ice sheet melting could have been enhanced by cloud radiative effects and variations in snow albedo owing to direct ash deposition. The sensitivity of past ice sheets to volcanic aerosols highlights the need for an accurate coupling between atmosphere and ice sheet components in climate model. These results have also important implications with respect to the tremendous amount of meltwater trapped by retreating ice sheets and their pivotal role in the rapid climate shifts of the past.

  16. The drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake and a new Scandinavian reference 10Be production rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeven, Arjen P.; Heyman, Jakob; Fabel, Derek; Björck, Svante; Caffee, Marc W.; Fredin, Ola; Harbor, Jonathan M.

    2015-04-01

    An important constraint on the reliability of cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is the derivation of tightly controlled production rates. We present a new dataset for 10Be production rate calibration from Mount Billingen, southern Sweden, the site of the final drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake, an event dated to 11,620 ± 100 cal yr BP. Nine samples of flood-scoured bedrock surfaces and depositional boulders and cobbles unambiguously connected to the drainage event yield a reference 10Be production rate of 4.09 ± 0.22 atoms g-1 yr-1 for the CRONUS Lm scaling and 3.93 ± 0.21 atoms g-1 yr-1 for the LSD general spallation scaling. We also recalibrate the reference 10Be production rates for four sites in Norway and combine these with the Billingen results to derive a tightly clustered Scandinavian reference 10Be production rate of 4.12 ± 0.10 (4.12 ± 0.25 for altitude scaling) atoms g-1 yr-1 for the Lm scaling scheme and 3.96 ± 0.10 (3.96 ± 0.24 for altitude scaling) atoms g-1 yr-1 for the LSD scaling scheme.

  17. Dietary intake and nutritional status in a Scandinavian adult cystic fibrosis-population compared with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Inger E; Nilsson, Kristina; Andersson, Anna; Fagerland, Morten W; Fluge, Gjermund; Hollsing, Annika; Gilljam, Marita; Mared, Lena; Pressler, Tacjana; Santi, Henriette; Storrøsten, Olav-Trond; Hjelte, Lena

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition is a well-known complication in cystic fibrosis (CF). There is good evidence that maintaining a normal body-weight correlates well with improved survival in CF. Energy intake in excess of 120% of the estimated average requirement (EAR) has been advised since 1980s. To investigate the nutritional intake and status in the adult Scandinavian CF-population. A cross-sectional multi-centre study was used to investigate the nutritional status of 456 adult CF-patients (2003 2006). Height and weight were measured and body mass index (BMI) and z-scores were calculated. Pulmonary function was examined by dynamic spirometry. A 7-day pre-coded food record (FR) obtained energy and nutrient intake data in 180 patients. The mean energy intake was 114 (SD 30.0)% of EAR and thus significantly lower than the target of 120% EAR (pnutritional status must still be closely monitored and nutritional advice and intervention should be individualised and adjusted to actual needs.

  18. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  19. Statistical inference via fiducial methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomé, Diemer

    1998-01-01

    In this thesis the attention is restricted to inductive reasoning using a mathematical probability model. A statistical procedure prescribes, for every theoretically possible set of data, the inference about the unknown of interest. ... Zie: Summary

  20. Aerobic exercise capacity at sea level and at altitude in Kenyan boys, junior and senior runners compared with Scandinavian runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltin, B; Larsen, H; Terrados, N; Bangsbo, J; Bak, T; Kim, C K; Svedenhag, J; Rolf, C J

    1995-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize Kenyan runners in regard to their oxygen uptake and blood and ammonia responses when running. Untrained Kenyan boys (14.2 +/- 0.2 years) and Scandinavian runners were included for comparison. The studies were performed at altitude (approximately 2.000 m.a.s.l.) and, for several Kenyan and Scandinavian runners, at sea level as well. At altitude sedentary adolescent Kenyan boys had a mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) of 47 (44-51) ml.kg-1.min-1, whereas similarly aged boys regularly walking or running but not training for competition reached above 62 (58-71) ml.kg-1.min-1 in VO2max. Kenyan runners in active training had 68 +/- 1.4 ml.kg-1.min-1 at altitude and 79.9 +/- 1.4 ml.kg-1.min-1 at sea level, with individuals reaching 85 ml.kg-1.min-1. The best Scandinavian runners were not significantly different from the Kenyan runners in VO2max both at altitude and at sea level, but none of the Scandinavians reached as high individual values as observed for some Kenyan runners. The running efficiency, determined as the oxygen cost at a given running speed, was less in the Kenyan runners, and the difference became more pronounced when body weight was expressed in ml.kg-0.75 min-1. Blood lactate concentration was in general lower in the Kenyan than in the Scandinavian runners, and the Kenyans also had extremely low ammonia accumulation in the blood even at very high exercise intensities. It is concluded that it is the physical activity during childhood, combined with intense training as teenagers that brings about the high VO2max observed in some Kenyan runners. Their high aerobic capacity, as well as their good running economy, makes them such superior runners. In addition, their low blood lactate and ammonia accumulation in blood when running may also be contributing factors.

  1. Active inference, communication and hermeneutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl J; Frith, Christopher D

    2015-07-01

    Hermeneutics refers to interpretation and translation of text (typically ancient scriptures) but also applies to verbal and non-verbal communication. In a psychological setting it nicely frames the problem of inferring the intended content of a communication. In this paper, we offer a solution to the problem of neural hermeneutics based upon active inference. In active inference, action fulfils predictions about how we will behave (e.g., predicting we will speak). Crucially, these predictions can be used to predict both self and others--during speaking and listening respectively. Active inference mandates the suppression of prediction errors by updating an internal model that generates predictions--both at fast timescales (through perceptual inference) and slower timescales (through perceptual learning). If two agents adopt the same model, then--in principle--they can predict each other and minimise their mutual prediction errors. Heuristically, this ensures they are singing from the same hymn sheet. This paper builds upon recent work on active inference and communication to illustrate perceptual learning using simulated birdsongs. Our focus here is the neural hermeneutics implicit in learning, where communication facilitates long-term changes in generative models that are trying to predict each other. In other words, communication induces perceptual learning and enables others to (literally) change our minds and vice versa. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimal inference with suboptimal models: addiction and active Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H B; Mathys, Christoph; Dolan, Ray; Wurst, Friedrich; Kronbichler, Martin; Friston, Karl

    2015-02-01

    When casting behaviour as active (Bayesian) inference, optimal inference is defined with respect to an agent's beliefs - based on its generative model of the world. This contrasts with normative accounts of choice behaviour, in which optimal actions are considered in relation to the true structure of the environment - as opposed to the agent's beliefs about worldly states (or the task). This distinction shifts an understanding of suboptimal or pathological behaviour away from aberrant inference as such, to understanding the prior beliefs of a subject that cause them to behave less 'optimally' than our prior beliefs suggest they should behave. Put simply, suboptimal or pathological behaviour does not speak against understanding behaviour in terms of (Bayes optimal) inference, but rather calls for a more refined understanding of the subject's generative model upon which their (optimal) Bayesian inference is based. Here, we discuss this fundamental distinction and its implications for understanding optimality, bounded rationality and pathological (choice) behaviour. We illustrate our argument using addictive choice behaviour in a recently described 'limited offer' task. Our simulations of pathological choices and addictive behaviour also generate some clear hypotheses, which we hope to pursue in ongoing empirical work. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Existing data sources in clinical epidemiology: the Scandinavian Thrombosis and Cancer Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensvoll H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hilde Jensvoll,1,2 Marianne T Severinsen,3,4 Jens Hammerstrøm,5 Sigrid K Brækkan,1,2 Søren R Kristensen,4,6 Suzanne C Cannegieter,7 Kristine Blix,1,2 Anne Tjønneland,8 Frits R Rosendaal,1,7,9 Olga Dziewiecka,1 Kim Overvad,10,11 Inger Anne Næss,12 John-Bjarne Hansen1,21Department of Clinical Medicine, KG Jebsen – Thrombosis Research and Expertise Center (TREC, UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, 2Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway; 3Department of Hematology, Aalborg University Hospital, 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; 5Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 6Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 7Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; 8Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; 9Department of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; 10Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, 11Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; 12Department of Hematology, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Although venous thromboembolism (VTE is a known common complication in cancer patients, there is limited knowledge on patient-related and cancer-specific risk factors in the general population. The Scandinavian Thrombosis and Cancer (STAC Cohort was established by merging individual data from three large Scandinavian cohorts (The Tromsø Study, the second Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, and the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study. Here, we present the profile of the STAC cohort and provide age-specific incidence rates of VTE and cancerMethods: The STAC cohort includes 144,952 subjects aged 19–101 years

  4. Ice-dammed lakes reconstruction in the southeastern Scandinavian ice sheet periphery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Nikolai

    2017-04-01

    The study of glacier erosion processes, paleolake dynamics and topographical changes, together give us insight into both localized and broader landscape evolution patterns while also assisting human exploration. After carrying number of paleographic discoveries of North-West of Russia, we've gathered the data requiring generalizing, systemizing, visualizing. Objective: reconstruction of proglacial lakes based on lithostratigraphic and geomorphic analysis using GIS technology. GIS modeling of ice-dammed lakes was done via the ArcGIS Desktop 10 software package. The GIS was used as a means to categorize published, time mapped data and thereby fuse and unify the changes into a single, integrated prototype. Publications on limnologo-glaciological and geomorphological reconstructions of paleotopography and paleolakes north of the Russian plain, along with additional copyrighted and grant-funded GIS studies, together served as resources to authenticate the paleolake contour modeling. A quaternary sediments map and an updated topography map that was designed via semiautomatic vectorization of a topographical map, served as foundations for the electronic shape modeling paleoreconstructions. Based upon preliminary results from publication summaries, and initial data collected when analyzing the maps (quaternary sediments, geomorphological, topographical), the contours and maximum glacial lake rise levels in the southeastern Scandinavian ice sheet periphery, including the levels and contours of their coastline, have been duly identified. Boundary reconstruction of Late Pleistocene lake boundaries have been completed for five sections of the Scandinavian ice sheet: the Molovo-Sheksninskoy, the Belozersko-Kubensky, the Vozhe-Lachsko-Kubensky, the Vazhskoy, and the Severodvinskoy. The territories studied revealed 13 major paleobasins covering an area of more than 1,000 km2, which based upon their position most closely resemble periglacial, intraglacial and postglacial lakes. Of

  5. Scandinavian guidelines for initial management of minor and moderate head trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrand, Ramona; Rosenlund, Christina; Undén, Johan

    2016-02-18

    The management of minor and moderate head trauma in children differs widely between countries. Presently, there are no existing guidelines for management of these children in Scandinavia. The purpose of this study was to produce new evidence-based guidelines for the initial management of head trauma in the paediatric population in Scandinavia. The primary aim was to detect all children in need of neurosurgical intervention. Detection of any traumatic intracranial injury on CT scan was an important secondary aim. General methodology according to the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used. Systematic evidence-based review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) methodology and based upon relevant clinical questions with respect to patient-important outcomes. Quality ratings of the included studies were performed using Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS)-2 and Centre of Evidence Based Medicine (CEBM)-2 tools. Based upon the results, GRADE recommendations, a guideline, discharge instructions and in-hospital observation instructions were drafted. For elements with low evidence, a modified Delphi process was used for consensus, which included relevant clinical stakeholders. The guidelines include criteria for selecting children for CT scans, in-hospital observation or early discharge, and suggestions for monitoring routines and discharge advice for children and guardians. The guidelines separate mild head trauma patients into high-, medium- and low-risk categories, favouring observation for mild, low-risk patients as an attempt to reduce CT scans in children. We present new evidence and consensus based Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee guidelines for initial management of minor and moderate head trauma in children. These guidelines should be validated before

  6. Elaphostrongylus spp. from Scandinavian cervidae - a scanning electron microscope study (SEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Stéen

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes of the genus Elaphostrongylus collected from moose (Alces alces L., reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L., and red deer (Cervus elaphus L., respectively, were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. Morphological differences in the ribs of the genital bursa were demonstrated. The Elaphostrongylus species from reindeer and red deer differed from each other in four ribs of the genital bursa. These results agree with the morphological characters of E. cervi and E. rangiferi described by Cameron (1931 and Mitskevitch (1960. The genital bursa of Elaphostrongylus sp. from moose, in accordance with the description of E. alces by Steen et al. (1989 showed characteristics differing from those found in Elaphostrongylus spp. from reindeer and red deer respectively. These results support the hypothesis that there are three separate species of Elaphostrongylus present in Scandinavian Cervidae. Svep-elektroniska studier på Elaphostrongylus spp. hos skandinaviska hjortdjur.Abstract in Swedish / Sammandrag: Rundmaskar inom slaktet Elaphostrongylus funna hos alg (Alces alces L., ren (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L. och kronhjort(Cervus elaphus L. studerades med hjalp av svepelelektronmikroskop. De hanliga bursorna med sin a stodjeribbor uppvisade variationer i utseende, langd och placering mellan dessa rundmaskar. De arter av Elaphostrongylus funna hos ren och kronhjort skilde sig åt avseende fyra stodjeribbor på de hanliga bursorna. Dessa resultat stammer val overens med de karaktarer som tidigare ar beskrivna av Cameron(1931 och av Mitskevich (1960. Den hanliga bursan hos arten Elaphostrongylus funnen hos alg, vilken tidigare ar beskriven av Steen et al. (1989, visade upp ett utseende som skilde sig från bursorna hos de Elaphostrongylus-arter funna hos ren och kronhjort. Dessa resultat stoder hypotesen om tre skilda arter av Elaphostrongylus hos skandinaviska hjortdjur.

  7. Scandinavian clinical practice guideline on mechanical ventilation in adults with the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesson, J; Freundlich, M; Gunnarsson, I; Laake, J H; Vandvik, P O; Varpula, T; Aasmundstad, T A

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (SSAI) task force on mechanical ventilation in adults with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is to formulate treatment recommendations based on available evidence from systematic reviews and randomised trials. This guideline was developed according to standards for trustworthy guidelines through a systematic review of the literature and the use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system for assessment of the quality of evidence and for moving from evidence to recommendations in a systematic and transparent process. We found evidence of moderately high quality to support a strong recommendation for pressure limitation and small tidal volumes in patients with ARDS. Also, we suggest positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) > 5 cm H2O in moderate to severe ARDS and prone ventilation 16/24 h for the first week in moderate to severe ARDS (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). Volume controlled ventilation or pressure control may be equally beneficial or harmful and partial modes of ventilatory support may be used if clinically feasible (weak recommendation, very low quality evidence). We suggest utilising recruitment manoeuvres as a rescue measure in catastrophic hypoxaemia only (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). Based on high-quality evidence, we strongly recommend not to use high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. We could find no relevant data from randomised trials to guide decisions on choice of FiO2 or utilisation of non-invasive ventilation. We strongly recommend pressure- and volume limitation and suggest using higher PEEP and prone ventilation in patients with severe respiratory failure. © 2014 The Authors. The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Ethics and collective identity building: Scandinavian semicommunication and the possibilities of Philippine ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah Lasquety-Reyes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available How should national societies build legitimate and inclusive collective identities amidst prolific multiculturalism and linguistic diversity? We argue that cultural ownership of particular ways of framing ethics should be part of this collective identity building process. We should avoid unfair domination of minority cultural identities, but how do we do this when ethical discourses themselves tend to be shaped by particular dominant identities? We look into the case of the challenges that a particular multicultural society, the Philippines, faces in its ongoing collective identity building project on three levels: (1 ethnic and linguistic differences (e.g. differences between Tagalog, Cebuano, Maranao, etc., (2 the historical layers of foreign culture (e.g. Islamic, Spanish, and American that have each influenced these distinct cultural identities in different degrees, and (3 the apparent domination of Tagalog linguistic culture over others. Our answer to the question of legitimate and inclusive collective identity comes from an inter-linguistic dialogue that can be effected between cultures by harnessing similarities of ethical concepts, without compromising cultural differences. We present three different possible approaches under the following headings: (1 Pilipino ethics, (2 Filipino ethics and (3 Philippine ethics, each representing a particular stance to the dominant Tagalog linguistic culture. We argue for the third option, which is the most inclusive because of how it equalizes the status of all participating cultures in the dialogue. We also draw from the possibilities afforded by the phenomena of Scandinavian semicommunication (Haugen 1966 and what this practice offers in making collective identity building more inclusive.

  9. Results of the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group XIV protocol for classical osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The Scandinavian Sarcoma Group (SSG) XIV protocol is based on experience from previous SSG trials and other osteosarcoma intergroup trials, and has been considered the best standard of care for patients with extremity localized, non-metastatic osteosarcoma. We analyzed the outcome in 63 consecutive patients. Patients and methods From 2001 through 2005, 63 patients recruited from centers in Sweden, Norway, and Finland were included. They received preoperative chemotherapy consisting of 2 cycles of paired methotrexate (12 g/m2), cisplatin (90 mg/m2), and doxorubicin (75 mg/m2). 3 cycles were administered postoperatively, and poor histological responders were given 3 additional cycles of ifosfamide (10–12 g/m2) as a salvage strategy. Results With a median follow-up of 77 months for survivors, the estimated metastasis-free and sarcoma-related survival at 5 years was 70% and 76%, respectively. 53 patients were treated with limb salvage surgery or rotationplasty and 2 patients experienced a local recurrence. 3 toxic deaths were recorded, all related to acute toxicity from chemotherapy. The 5-year metastasis-free survival of poor histological responders receiving add-on treatment with ifosfamide was 47%, as compared to 89% for good histological responders. Interpretation Outcome from the SSG XIV protocol compares favorably with the results of previous SSG trials and other published osteosarcoma trials. However, salvage therapy given to poor responders did not improve outcome to a similar degree as for good responders. In a multi-institutional setting, more than four-fifths of the patients were operated with limb salvage surgery or rotationplasty, with few local recurrences. PMID:21434784

  10. Locative inferences in medical texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, P S; Bailey, G H; Mayer, R J; Hillis, A; Dvoracek, J E

    1987-06-01

    Medical research relies on epidemiological studies conducted on a large set of clinical records that have been collected from physicians recording individual patient observations. These clinical records are recorded for the purpose of individual care of the patient with little consideration for their use by a biostatistician interested in studying a disease over a large population. Natural language processing of clinical records for epidemiological studies must deal with temporal, locative, and conceptual issues. This makes text understanding and data extraction of clinical records an excellent area for applied research. While much has been done in making temporal or conceptual inferences in medical texts, parallel work in locative inferences has not been done. This paper examines the locative inferences as well as the integration of temporal, locative, and conceptual issues in the clinical record understanding domain by presenting an application that utilizes two key concepts in its parsing strategy--a knowledge-based parsing strategy and a minimal lexicon.

  11. An Inference Language for Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedemonte, Stefano; Catana, Ciprian; Van Leemput, Koen

    2014-01-01

    We introduce iLang, a language and software framework for probabilistic inference. The iLang framework enables the definition of directed and undirected probabilistic graphical models and the automated synthesis of high performance inference algorithms for imaging applications. The iLang framework...... is composed of a set of language primitives and of an inference engine based on a message-passing system that integrates cutting-edge computational tools, including proximal algorithms and high performance Hamiltonian Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques. A set of domain-specific highly optimized GPU......-accelerated primitives specializes iLang to the spatial data-structures that arise in imaging applications. We illustrate the framework through a challenging application: spatio-temporal tomographic reconstruction with compressive sensing....

  12. Feasibility of comparing core data from existing trauma registries in scandinavia. Reaching for a Scandinavian major trauma outcome study (MTOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringdal, K G; Lossius, H M

    2007-01-01

    The organisation of trauma care in Scandinavia has several similarities, including trauma registries, but so far there are limited amount of research on efficiency and outcome. Data and results from trauma outcome studies like the US MTOS are not fully applicable to the Scandinavian trauma population. To reveal the feasibility of using data from existing trauma registries of major hospitals in Scandinavia, for a minimal common dataset, in a joint, prospective Scandinavian MTOS. We collected data points, data point definitions, and inclusion/exclusion criteria, from the major trauma registries of the Swedish trauma registry standard, three university hospitals in Denmark, one university hospital in Finland, and the Norwegian National Trauma Registry. The collected material was compared to reveal common data points, inclusion criteria, and the compatibility of data point definitions. The median number of data points was 147 (range 71-257; interquartile range = 90-205). Most registries lacked precise data definition catalogues. Only 16 data points could be considered as common, of which just a few were core trauma data. Four data points had the same data category options but were not considered having the same data point definitions. The inclusion criteria were not uniform. Trauma registries in Scandinavia have few common core data and data point definitions. There were data points for calculating the Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) but the inclusion criteria varied too much to ensure a valid comparison. A consensus process for a joint trauma core data set will be initiated by the Scandinavian Networking Group for Trauma and Emergency Management (SCANTEM) to increase research on trauma efficiency and outcome.

  13. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy is effective as relapse prevention for patients with recurrent depression in Scandinavian primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Josefine L; Zelleroth, Clara; Axberg, Ulf; Norlander, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in primary care for patients with recurrent depression (major depressive disorder: MDD). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), MDD is now the leading cause of disease burden in middle- and high-income countries. Patients (N = 45) with three or more previous depressive episodes were recruited to participate in MBCT as a preventative intervention. Using a benchmarking approach, outcome data was compared with data from a recent efficacy study. The methodology is a rigorous approach to assessing effectiveness when evidence-based UK protocols are transferred into the existing Scandinavian service delivery. Additionally, a person-centred methodological approach was used to assess clinical significance on the Reliable Change Index (RCI). The analysis revealed comparable or larger effects from pre-test to post-test in reduced psychiatric symptoms, increased quality of life and level of mindfulness, and the effects were maintained over 14 months. Analysis of the relapse rate in the current study (16%) compared to the TAU in the efficacy study (68%) yielded an h value of 0.78, a moderate effect size. Only 13% dropped out of the treatment. According to the RCI findings, 65% to 67% of participants in the clinical group improved, no individual worsened, and women showed a significantly greater improvement of depression and anxiety than men. Therapeutic alliance and motivation had no impact on the outcome. The overall result suggests that MBCT can be implemented successfully in Scandinavian primary health care as a preventive intervention for patients with recurrent depression. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Consequences of a demographic bottleneck on genetic structure and variation in the Scandinavian brown bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenikoudakis, G; Ersmark, E; Tison, J-L; Waits, L; Kindberg, J; Swenson, J E; Dalén, L

    2015-07-01

    The Scandinavian brown bear went through a major decline in population size approximately 100 years ago, due to intense hunting. After being protected, the population subsequently recovered and today numbers in the thousands. The genetic diversity in the contemporary population has been investigated in considerable detail, and it has been shown that the population consists of several subpopulations that display relatively high levels of genetic variation. However, previous studies have been unable to resolve the degree to which the demographic bottleneck impacted the contemporary genetic structure and diversity. In this study, we used mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA markers from pre- and postbottleneck Scandinavian brown bear samples to investigate the effect of the bottleneck. Simulation and multivariate analysis suggested the same genetic structure for the historical and modern samples, which are clustered into three subpopulations in southern, central and northern Scandinavia. However, the southern subpopulation appears to have gone through a marked change in allele frequencies. When comparing the mitochondrial DNA diversity in the whole population, we found a major decline in haplotype numbers across the bottleneck. However, the loss of autosomal genetic diversity was less pronounced, although a significant decline in allelic richness was observed in the southern subpopulation. Approximate Bayesian computations provided clear support for a decline in effective population size during the bottleneck, in both the southern and northern subpopulations. These results have implications for the future management of the Scandinavian brown bear because they indicate a recent loss in genetic diversity and also that the current genetic structure may have been caused by historical ecological processes rather than recent anthropogenic persecution. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Perception, illusions and Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Matthew M; Nour, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Descriptive psychopathology makes a distinction between veridical perception and illusory perception. In both cases a perception is tied to a sensory stimulus, but in illusions the perception is of a false object. This article re-examines this distinction in light of new work in theoretical and computational neurobiology, which views all perception as a form of Bayesian statistical inference that combines sensory signals with prior expectations. Bayesian perceptual inference can solve the 'inverse optics' problem of veridical perception and provides a biologically plausible account of a number of illusory phenomena, suggesting that veridical and illusory perceptions are generated by precisely the same inferential mechanisms. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Automatic Inference of DATR Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Barg, P

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the automatic acquisition of linguistic knowledge from unstructured data. The acquired knowledge is represented in the lexical knowledge representation language DATR. A set of transformation rules that establish inheritance relationships and a default-inference algorithm make up the basis components of the system. Since the overall approach is not restricted to a special domain, the heuristic inference strategy uses criteria to evaluate the quality of a DATR theory, where different domains may require different criteria. The system is applied to the linguistic learning task of German noun inflection.

  17. Eight challenges in phylodynamic inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D.W. Frost

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The field of phylodynamics, which attempts to enhance our understanding of infectious disease dynamics using pathogen phylogenies, has made great strides in the past decade. Basic epidemiological and evolutionary models are now well characterized with inferential frameworks in place. However, significant challenges remain in extending phylodynamic inference to more complex systems. These challenges include accounting for evolutionary complexities such as changing mutation rates, selection, reassortment, and recombination, as well as epidemiological complexities such as stochastic population dynamics, host population structure, and different patterns at the within-host and between-host scales. An additional challenge exists in making efficient inferences from an ever increasing corpus of sequence data.

  18. Behaviour of the lake district ice lobe of the Scandinavian ice sheet during the younger dryas chronozone (ca. 12 800 - 11 500 years ago)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunkka, J.P.; Erikkilae, A. [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    2012-04-15

    It is highly relevant to picture the conditions that prevailed under and in front of the ice sheets as they were stationary or in equilibrium for many hundreds of years. This knowledge is particularly relevant when planning to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in a repository underground. For estimating what kind of conditions might exist at the ice margin basic knowledge is needed from the palaeoice sheets that remained stationary for long periods of time. During Younder Dryas Stadial (c. 12 800 - 11 500 years ago) glaciers remained stationary or advanced worldwide as a result of climate cooling. The major end moraine complexes that run around Fennoscandia, Russian Karelia and the Kola Peninsula were deposited at that time and mark the former Younger Dryas ice margin. It this work the palaeoenvironments have been reconstructed in order to reveal the conditions that existed for more than 1000 years in the area where the former Lake District Ice Lobe of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet was in the Salpausselkae zone in southern Finland. Work was carried out using GIS-based reconstruction tools, sedimentological and geophysical (ground penetrating radar) methods. In addition, a detailed palaeoenvironmental reconstruction was produced for the Kylaeniemi area which forms a part of the Salpausselkae II end moraine. The GIS-based reconstructions clearly indicate that the ice grounding line of the Lake District Ice Lobe was standing in shallow water depth in the Baltic Ice Lake. The water depth in front of Salpausselkae I, which marks the ice margin at c. 12 500 years ago was mainly between 20-40 metres. When the ice margin was in Salpausselkae II at around 11 700 years ago the water depth in front of the ice margin was on average less than 20 metres. Although the surface profile of ice was not possible to calculate subgalcial and ice frontal landforms indicate that subgalcial tunnel systems were responsible for releasing melt water and sediment to the ice margin throughout the

  19. Association analysis of PALB2 and BRCA2 in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in a scandinavian case-control sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesli, Martin; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Mattingsdal, Morten

    2010-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) found significant association between the PALB2 SNP rs420259 and bipolar disorder (BD). The intracellular functions of the expressed proteins from the breast cancer risk genes PALB2 and BRCA2 are closely related. Therefore, we investigated the relation...... between genetic variants in PALB2 and BRCA2 and BD. Due to increasing evidence of genetic overlap between BD and schizophrenia (SCZ), we also investigated association with SCZ. In a Scandinavian case-control sample (n¿=¿686/2,538) we found the BRCA2 SNP rs9567552 to be significantly associated with BD...

  20. Association study of PDE4B gene variants in Scandinavian schizophrenia and bipolar disorder multicenter case-control samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kähler, Anna K; Otnæss, Mona K; Wirgenes, Katrine V

    2010-01-01

    and analyzed 40 and 72 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) in SZ and BP multicenter samples, respectively, from the Scandinavian Collaboration on Psychiatric Etiology (SCOPE), involving 837 SZ cases and 1,473 controls plus 594 BP cases and 1,421 partly overlapping controls. Six and 16 tag...... in the SZ sample were also associated with BP, but the genotypic effect (i.e., homozygosity for the minor allele), pointed in opposite directions. Finally, four SNPs were found to be associated with Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) positive symptom scores in a subgroup of SZ patients (n = 153...

  1. The Scandinavian multicenter hemodynamic evaluation of the SJM Regent aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Offstad Jon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 112 patients who received small and medium sized St.Jude Regent heart valves (19-25 mm at 7 Scandinavian centers were studied between January 2003 and February 2005 to obtain non-invasive data regarding the hemodynamic performance at rest and during Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE testing one year after surgery. Material and methods 46 woman and 66 men, aged 61.8 ± 9.7 (18-75 years, were operated on for aortic regurgitation (17, stenosis (65, or mixed dysfunction (30. Valve sizes were 19 mm (6, 21 mm (33, 23 mm (41, 25 mm (30. Two patients receiving size 27 valves were excluded from the hemodynamic evaluation. Pledgets were used in 100 patients, everted mattress in 66 and simple interrupted sutures in 21. Valve orientation varied and was dependent on the surgeons' choice. 34 patients (30.4% underwent concomitant coronary artery surgery. Results There were two early deaths (1.8% and three late deaths, one because of pancreatic cancer. Late events during follow-up were: non structural dysfunction (1, bleeding (2, thromboembolism (2. At one year follow up 93% of the patients were in NYHA classes 1-2 versus 47.8% preoperatively. Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE was performed in a total of 66 and maximal peak stress was reached in 61 patients. During DSE testing, the following statistically significant changes took place: Heart rate increased by 73.0%, cardiac output by 85.5%, left ventriclular ejection fraction by 19.6%, and maximal mean prosthetic transvalvular gradient by 133.8%, whereas the effective orifice area index did not change. Left ventricular mass fell during one year from 215 ± 63 to 197 ± 62 g (p Conclusion The Dobutamine test induces a substantial stress, well suitable for echocardiographic assessment of prosthesis valve function and can be performed in the majority of the patients. The changes in pressure gradients add to the hemodynamic characteristics of the various valve sizes. In our patients

  2. Type inference for COBOL systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Deursen (Arie); L.M.F. Moonen (Leon)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTypes are a good starting point for various software reengineering tasks. Unfortunately, programs requiring reengineering most desperately are written in languages without an adequate type system (such as COBOL). To solve this problem, we propose a method of automated type inference

  3. Spaces for the Social Shaping of Information Technology and Work. A reassessment of Scandinavian action research and its implications for action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian

    2004-01-01

    30 years. The paper provides an overview of Scandinavian research within technology and working life form a Danish perspective. A major contribution is con-cerned with a variety of strategies employed by social actors involved in action research pro-jects and their role in the social shaping......This contribution explores a range of social spaces where unions and workers have played or potential can play a role in the local social shaping of IT and work. It will mainly be based on the authors own research and experiences within Scandinavian research on technology and working from the past...... of technology. The point is made that no single strat-egy have proved to provide an uncontested route for union or workers influence. Instead the Scandinavian experiences indicate, that a range of spaces, players and positions have been developed, providing opportunities for addressing questions related...

  4. Educational inequalities in self-rated health: whether post-socialist Estonia and Russia are performing better than 'Scandinavian' Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vöörmann, Rein; Helemäe, Jelena

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study is to analyse relationship between self-rated health (SRH) and education in post-socialist countries (Estonia and Russia) and in Finland, a Scandinavian country. Data from the 5th wave of the European Social Survey (ESS) carried out in 2010 were used. In particular, we used a sub-sample of the 25-69 years old. Two-step analysis was carried out: descriptive overview of relationship between SRH and education to assess the knowledge-related impact of education on SRH in pooled model for all three countries; and logistic regression analysis to evaluate separate models in each country. The prevalence of at-least-good health was the highest in Finland, Estonia occupied the second position and Russia the third. Knowledge-related educational inequalities were lower in Russia compared to Finland, while they were of similar magnitude in Estonia and Finland. Our expectations that knowledge-based inequalities are lower in post-socialist countries compared to a Scandinavian country turn to be true in case of Russia, not Estonia. Possible reasons for the expectations might be a lack of attention paid to educational inequalities in terms of access to social resources, competitiveness in the labour market and to what extent education provide a tool against uncertainty (preventing work- and unemployment-related stress). Series of comparative studies revealing links between certain institutional packages and (socio-economic and knowledge-related) educational inequalities seem to be of special relevance.

  5. Quality assessment of structure and language elements of written responses given by seven Scandinavian drug information centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppe, Linda Amundstuen; Spigset, Olav; Kampmann, Jens Peter; Damkier, Per; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed; Böttiger, Ylva; Schjøtt, Jan

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify structure and language elements affecting the quality of responses from Scandinavian drug information centres (DICs). Six different fictitious drug-related queries were sent to each of seven Scandinavian DICs. The centres were blinded for which queries were part of the study. The responses were assessed qualitatively by six clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and six general practitioners (GPs, external experts). In addition, linguistic aspects of the responses were evaluated by a plain language expert. The quality of responses was generally judged as satisfactory to good. Presenting specific advice and conclusions were considered to improve the quality of the responses. However, small nuances in language formulations could affect the individual judgments of the experts, e.g. on whether or not advice was given. Some experts preferred the use of primary sources to the use of secondary and tertiary sources. Both internal and external experts criticised the use of abbreviations, professional terminology and study findings that was left unexplained. The plain language expert emphasised the importance of defining and explaining pharmacological terms to ensure that enquirers understand the response as intended. In addition, more use of active voice and less compressed text structure would be desirable. This evaluation of responses to DIC queries may give some indications on how to improve written responses on drug-related queries with respect to language and text structure. Giving specific advice and precise conclusions and avoiding too compressed language and non-standard abbreviations may aid to reach this goal.

  6. Sequence polymorphism in candidate genes for differences in winter plumage between Scottish and Scandinavian Willow Grouse (Lagopus lagopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus Skoglund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Population variation in the degree of seasonal polymorphism is rare in birds, and the genetic basis of this phenomenon remains largely undescribed. Both sexes of Scandinavian and Scottish Willow grouse (Lagopus lagopus display marked differences in their winter phenotypes, with Scottish grouse retaining a pigmented plumage year-round and Scandinavian Willow grouse molting to a white morph during winter. A widely studied pathway implicated in vertebrate pigmentation is the melanin system, for which functional variation has been characterised in many taxa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced coding regions from four genes involved in melanin pigmentation (DCT, MC1R, TYR and TYRP1, and an additional control involved in the melanocortin pathway (AGRP, to investigate the genetic basis of winter plumage in Lagopus. Despite the well documented role of the melanin system in animal coloration, we found no plumage-associated polymorphism or evidence for selection in a total of approximately 2.6 kb analysed sequence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the genetic basis of alternating between pigmented and unpigmented seasonal phenotypes is more likely explained by regulatory changes controlling the expression of these or other loci in the physiological pathway leading to pigmentation.

  7. Subglacial conditions and Scandinavian Ice Sheet dynamics at the coarse-grained substratum of the fore-mountain area of southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Tomasz

    2016-11-01

    The fore-mountain areas of southern Poland are locally composed of the coarse-grained sediments of alluvial fans, which created unusual conditions under the advancing Scandinavian Ice Sheet during the Elsterian glaciation. This highly permeable substratum potentially enabled rapid outflow of meltwater from the ice sheet base, thereby reducing the water pressure and strongly influencing the ice sheet dynamics. The subglacial conditions and the relationship between the ice sheet behaviour and its coarse-grained substratum were studied at the foreland of the western Carpathian Mountains. The sedimentological and structural analysis of the till and related sediments that were deposited above the alluvial gravel of the fore-mountain fans are presented. The study indicates that despite the high permeability of the coarse-grained substratum, it did not slow the ice sheet movement. Conversely, the ice sheet moved mainly due to basal slip and locally shallow deformations. This was a consequence of very high basal water pressure, which resulted largely from the presence of permafrost that restricted subglacial groundwater outflow. In addition, the ice sheet substratum was inclined opposite to the direction of its movement, increasing the pressure of the subglacial water. Numerous subhorizontal sandy laminae within the till indicate that the meltwater from the ice sheet base was drained by a water film along the ice/bed interface. The water escape structures within the till and subtill sediments indicate the occasional instability of the ice sheet hydrological system and suggest that the meltwater was periodically stored in the ice sheet base. Temporal changes occurring in the ice sheet hydrological system might indicate variations in the ice sheet behaviour; i.e. phases of relatively fast ice flow and phases of ice stagnation. The latter were probably correlated with the freezing of the ice margin to its base. The study shows how the coarse-grained substratum could

  8. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... environment and your health: Green living Sun Water Health effects of water pollution How to protect yourself from water pollution Air Chemicals Noise Quizzes Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth. ...

  9. Statistical inference an integrated approach

    CERN Document Server

    Migon, Helio S; Louzada, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Information The concept of probability Assessing subjective probabilities An example Linear algebra and probability Notation Outline of the bookElements of Inference Common statistical modelsLikelihood-based functions Bayes theorem Exchangeability Sufficiency and exponential family Parameter elimination Prior Distribution Entirely subjective specification Specification through functional forms Conjugacy with the exponential family Non-informative priors Hierarchical priors Estimation Introduction to decision theoryBayesian point estimation Classical point estimation Empirical Bayes estimation Comparison of estimators Interval estimation Estimation in the Normal model Approximating Methods The general problem of inference Optimization techniquesAsymptotic theory Other analytical approximations Numerical integration methods Simulation methods Hypothesis Testing Introduction Classical hypothesis testingBayesian hypothesis testing Hypothesis testing and confidence intervalsAsymptotic tests Prediction...

  10. Nonparametric Bayesian inference in biostatistics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    As chapters in this book demonstrate, BNP has important uses in clinical sciences and inference for issues like unknown partitions in genomics. Nonparametric Bayesian approaches (BNP) play an ever expanding role in biostatistical inference from use in proteomics to clinical trials. Many research problems involve an abundance of data and require flexible and complex probability models beyond the traditional parametric approaches. As this book's expert contributors show, BNP approaches can be the answer. Survival Analysis, in particular survival regression, has traditionally used BNP, but BNP's potential is now very broad. This applies to important tasks like arrangement of patients into clinically meaningful subpopulations and segmenting the genome into functionally distinct regions. This book is designed to both review and introduce application areas for BNP. While existing books provide theoretical foundations, this book connects theory to practice through engaging examples and research questions. Chapters c...

  11. Statistical inference on residual life

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Jong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    This is a monograph on the concept of residual life, which is an alternative summary measure of time-to-event data, or survival data. The mean residual life has been used for many years under the name of life expectancy, so it is a natural concept for summarizing survival or reliability data. It is also more interpretable than the popular hazard function, especially for communications between patients and physicians regarding the efficacy of a new drug in the medical field. This book reviews existing statistical methods to infer the residual life distribution. The review and comparison includes existing inference methods for mean and median, or quantile, residual life analysis through medical data examples. The concept of the residual life is also extended to competing risks analysis. The targeted audience includes biostatisticians, graduate students, and PhD (bio)statisticians. Knowledge in survival analysis at an introductory graduate level is advisable prior to reading this book.

  12. System Support for Forensic Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehani, Ashish; Kirchner, Florent; Shankar, Natarajan

    Digital evidence is playing an increasingly important role in prosecuting crimes. The reasons are manifold: financially lucrative targets are now connected online, systems are so complex that vulnerabilities abound and strong digital identities are being adopted, making audit trails more useful. If the discoveries of forensic analysts are to hold up to scrutiny in court, they must meet the standard for scientific evidence. Software systems are currently developed without consideration of this fact. This paper argues for the development of a formal framework for constructing “digital artifacts” that can serve as proxies for physical evidence; a system so imbued would facilitate sound digital forensic inference. A case study involving a filesystem augmentation that provides transparent support for forensic inference is described.

  13. Causal inference based on counterfactuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höfler M

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The counterfactual or potential outcome model has become increasingly standard for causal inference in epidemiological and medical studies. Discussion This paper provides an overview on the counterfactual and related approaches. A variety of conceptual as well as practical issues when estimating causal effects are reviewed. These include causal interactions, imperfect experiments, adjustment for confounding, time-varying exposures, competing risks and the probability of causation. It is argued that the counterfactual model of causal effects captures the main aspects of causality in health sciences and relates to many statistical procedures. Summary Counterfactuals are the basis of causal inference in medicine and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the estimation of counterfactual differences pose several difficulties, primarily in observational studies. These problems, however, reflect fundamental barriers only when learning from observations, and this does not invalidate the counterfactual concept.

  14. Bayesian inference with ecological applications

    CERN Document Server

    Link, William A

    2009-01-01

    This text is written to provide a mathematically sound but accessible and engaging introduction to Bayesian inference specifically for environmental scientists, ecologists and wildlife biologists. It emphasizes the power and usefulness of Bayesian methods in an ecological context. The advent of fast personal computers and easily available software has simplified the use of Bayesian and hierarchical models . One obstacle remains for ecologists and wildlife biologists, namely the near absence of Bayesian texts written specifically for them. The book includes many relevant examples, is supported by software and examples on a companion website and will become an essential grounding in this approach for students and research ecologists. Engagingly written text specifically designed to demystify a complex subject Examples drawn from ecology and wildlife research An essential grounding for graduate and research ecologists in the increasingly prevalent Bayesian approach to inference Companion website with analyt...

  15. Bayesian Inference of FRC plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jesus A.; Dettrick, Sean; Onofri, Marco; TAE Team

    2017-10-01

    Bayesian analysis techniques are currently being used at TAE to infer FRC magnetic topology and the radial profile of the electron density. The Bayesian method provides all the solutions compatible with both the prior assumptions and the measurements in the form of a probability distribution termed the posterior, from which the most likely solution and its uncertainty can readily be obtained. Bayesian analysis of field reversed configurations reveals strong field reversal on axis as well as non-monotonic radial density profiles. The later feature is only observed in global transport simulations in cases where significant fast ion pressure and current drive are present. Hence the inferred non-monotonic density profiles are indicative of current drive in the experiment.

  16. Bayesian inference for agreement measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Ignacio; de Castro, Mário

    2016-08-25

    The agreement of different measurement methods is an important issue in several disciplines like, for example, Medicine, Metrology, and Engineering. In this article, some agreement measures, common in the literature, were analyzed from a Bayesian point of view. Posterior inferences for such agreement measures were obtained based on well-known Bayesian inference procedures for the bivariate normal distribution. As a consequence, a general, simple, and effective method is presented, which does not require Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods and can be applied considering a great variety of prior distributions. Illustratively, the method was exemplified using five objective priors for the bivariate normal distribution. A tool for assessing the adequacy of the model is discussed. Results from a simulation study and an application to a real dataset are also reported.

  17. Statistical inference a short course

    CERN Document Server

    Panik, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    A concise, easily accessible introduction to descriptive and inferential techniques Statistical Inference: A Short Course offers a concise presentation of the essentials of basic statistics for readers seeking to acquire a working knowledge of statistical concepts, measures, and procedures. The author conducts tests on the assumption of randomness and normality, provides nonparametric methods when parametric approaches might not work. The book also explores how to determine a confidence interval for a population median while also providing coverage of ratio estimation, randomness, and causal

  18. Applied statistical inference with MINITAB

    CERN Document Server

    Lesik, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Through clear, step-by-step mathematical calculations, Applied Statistical Inference with MINITAB enables students to gain a solid understanding of how to apply statistical techniques using a statistical software program. It focuses on the concepts of confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, validating model assumptions, and power analysis.Illustrates the techniques and methods using MINITABAfter introducing some common terminology, the author explains how to create simple graphs using MINITAB and how to calculate descriptive statistics using both traditional hand computations and MINITAB. Sh

  19. De novo SNP discovery in the Scandinavian brown bear (Ursus arctos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Anita J; Street, Nathaniel R; Spong, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Information about relatedness between individuals in wild populations is advantageous when studying evolutionary, behavioural and ecological processes. Genomic data can be used to determine relatedness between individuals either when no prior knowledge exists or to confirm suspected relatedness. Here we present a set of 96 SNPs suitable for inferring relatedness for brown bears (Ursus arctos) within Scandinavia. We sequenced reduced representation libraries from nine individuals throughout the geographic range. With consensus reads containing putative SNPs, we applied strict filtering criteria with the aim of finding only high-quality, highly-informative SNPs. We tested 150 putative SNPs of which 96% were validated on a panel of 68 individuals. Ninety-six of the validated SNPs with the highest minor allele frequency were selected. The final SNP panel includes four mitochondrial markers, two monomorphic Y-chromosome sex-determination markers, three X-chromosome SNPs and 87 autosomal SNPs. From our validation sample panel, we identified two previously known parent-offspring dyads with reasonable accuracy. This panel of SNPs is a promising tool for inferring relatedness in the brown bear population in Scandinavia.

  20. De novo SNP discovery in the Scandinavian brown bear (Ursus arctos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita J Norman

    Full Text Available Information about relatedness between individuals in wild populations is advantageous when studying evolutionary, behavioural and ecological processes. Genomic data can be used to determine relatedness between individuals either when no prior knowledge exists or to confirm suspected relatedness. Here we present a set of 96 SNPs suitable for inferring relatedness for brown bears (Ursus arctos within Scandinavia. We sequenced reduced representation libraries from nine individuals throughout the geographic range. With consensus reads containing putative SNPs, we applied strict filtering criteria with the aim of finding only high-quality, highly-informative SNPs. We tested 150 putative SNPs of which 96% were validated on a panel of 68 individuals. Ninety-six of the validated SNPs with the highest minor allele frequency were selected. The final SNP panel includes four mitochondrial markers, two monomorphic Y-chromosome sex-determination markers, three X-chromosome SNPs and 87 autosomal SNPs. From our validation sample panel, we identified two previously known parent-offspring dyads with reasonable accuracy. This panel of SNPs is a promising tool for inferring relatedness in the brown bear population in Scandinavia.

  1. A multilocus assay reveals high nucleotide diversity and limited differentiation among Scandinavian willow grouse (Lagopus lagopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintela Maria

    2008-12-01

    levels of linkage disequilibrium were observed within genes, with an average r2 = 0.084 ± 0.110, which is expected for a large outbred population with no population differentiation. The mean per site per generation recombination parameter (ρ was comparably high (0.028 ± 0.018, indicating high recombination rates in these genes. Conclusion We found unusually high levels of nucleotide diversity in the Scandinavian willow grouse as well as very little population structure among localities with up to 1647 km distance. There are also low levels of linkage disequilibrium within the genes and the population recombination rate is high, which is indicative of an old panmictic population, where recombination has had time to break up any haplotype blocks. The non-synonymous nucleotide diversity is low compared with the silent, which is in agreement with effective purifying selection, possibly due to the large effective population size.

  2. Efficiency of preventive actions for landslides and flooding - evaluation of Scandinavian practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, R.; Andersson-sköld, Y. B.; Nyberg, L.; Johansson, M.; Persson, E.

    2011-12-01

    Author: Ramona Bergman, Yvonne Andersson-Sköld, Lars Nyberg, Magnus Johansson, Erik Persson Preventive actions can be, and are frequently, taken to reduce accidents and their consequences in different ways. The MSB funded research programme "Effects of Society's Security actions" (ESS, 2009-2013) aims to study the relationship between such actions and their effects. The program is divided into three subgroups: Frequent accidents Natural hazards (such as flooding, erosion and landslide) Chemical and landfill accidents The results presented here covers natural hazards with focus on land slides and flooding. The results are based on Swedish/Scandinavian contexts. Natural events such as erosion, flooding and land slides are common, but the number of accidents (events causing severe negative impact) is rare. Therefore, in such analysis there is limited data and other information available which can be used for example in statistical analysis of actions and their effects. Instead, the analysis must be based on other information. Therefore, the analysis may have to include aspects that only can be assessed by scenario and "what-if" analyses. In this project the main method has been interviews with officials in Swedish municipalities and national agencies in Sweden and Norway. The two levels are chosen since policies are taken on national (or international) level, while the key actions and actors are on the municipal level. The interviews cover experiences and potential scenarios. In all municipalities, one politician and officials working with planning and rescue service have been interviewed. The study covers hazard and risk mapping, follow up of such maps, physical planning and lessons learned from previous events and activities. The final outcome of the research will be a review of what is found to be well functioning, identification of weak points and recommendations for the management of landslides, erosion and flooding. The present results indicate that hazard

  3. Mountain building processes in the Scandinavian Caledonides studied by COSC scientific drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Henning; Juhlin, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) scientific drilling project, located in the Caledonian foreland of Sweden, attempts to sample a continuous section from the allochthons through the basal décollement into the Baltican basement. The primary target of the project is to improve our understanding of mountain building during major continent-continent collision. COSC is located on the Central Caledonian Transect (CCT) in Jämtland, Sweden, a classical locality in the Caledonian mountain belt where nappe emplacement was proposed already 130 years ago. During this long time of research, a wealth of geological and geophysical survey data at different resolution have been acquired. Thus, the CCT is optimal for the integration of scientific work at different scales, from micro-scale investigation on high-resolution borehole sections to orogen-scale geodynamic models. With COSC-1, a first 2.5 km deep fully cored borehole was drilled during 2014 to study in detail a section from a hot allochthon into the underlying thrust zone. Located on the slopes of mountain Åreskutan, the drilled profile through the lower part of Seve Nappe Complex can be extended upwards with good field exposure to the top of Åreskutan, where micro-diamond bearing gneisses were discovered recently. This combined profile was accomplished last year and, at present, the pressure-temperature conditions along it are being established. First results are presented by Holmberg et al. (this session). Comprehensive borehole surveys and geophysical experiments facilitate the integration of borehole data with the regional data sets and provide a better physical characterisation the encountered rock bodies. Of particular interest is here a major shear zone in the lower c. 800 m of the borehole, whose base was not penetrated. It is clearly different and lower grade than the penetrative deformation in the surrounding gneisses and, thus, expected to be younger and, potentially, cutting

  4. Variational inference & deep learning: A new synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kingma, D.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, Variational Inference and Deep Learning: A New Synthesis, we propose novel solutions to the problems of variational (Bayesian) inference, generative modeling, representation learning, semi-supervised learning, and stochastic optimization

  5. Variational inference & deep learning : A new synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, D.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, Variational Inference and Deep Learning: A New Synthesis, we propose novel solutions to the problems of variational (Bayesian) inference, generative modeling, representation learning, semi-supervised learning, and stochastic optimization

  6. Variational inference & deep learning : A new synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, D.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, Variational Inference and Deep Learning: A New Synthesis, we propose novel solutions to the problems of variational (Bayesian) inference, generative modeling, representation learning, semi-supervised learning, and stochastic optimization.

  7. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  8. Does parents' economic, cultural, and social capital explain the social class effect on educational attainment in the Scandinavian mobility regime?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders; Jæger, Mads Meier

    2007-01-01

    for the statistical analysis. Our results are, first, that controlling for the three types of capital we explain a considerable part of the social class effect on educational attainment, and, second, that cultural and social capital are the key predictors of educational attainment.......This paper analyzes how much of the effect of social class on children’s choice of secondary education in Denmark can be decomposed into the influence of parental economic, cultural, and social capital. Following mobility regime theory, we propose that in the Scandinavian mobility regime to which...... Denmark belongs, the effect of social class on educational attainment should be explained primarily by non-economic forms of capital. We use an extremely rich Danish longitudinal survey to construct empirical measures of economic, cultural, and social capital and an extended random effect framework...

  9. The Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial lipid lowering arm: extended observations 2 years after trial closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sever, Peter S; Poulter, Neil R; Dahlof, Bjorn

    2008-01-01

    ASCOT-LLA patients until the end of ASCOT-BPLA. The primary outcome of ASCOT-LLA was combined fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) or non-fatal myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included all coronary events, all cardiovascular events and procedures, fatal and non-fatal stroke, cardiovascular......Aims To determine the cardiovascular benefits in those originally assigned atorvastatin in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-2.2 years after closure of the lipid-lowering arm of the trial (ASCOT-LLA). Methods and results The Blood Pressure Lowering Arm of the ASCOT trial (ASCOT...... mortality, all cause mortality, development of chronic stable angina, heart failure, and peripheral arterial disease. By the end of ASCOT-LLA, there was a 36% relative risk reduction in primary events (n = 254) in favour of atorvastatin [hazard ratio (HR) 0.64, 95% CI: 0.50-0.83, P = 0.0005]. At the end...

  10. Predicting Reading and Spelling Difficulties in Transparent and Opaque Orthographies: A Comparison between Scandinavian and U.S./Australian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnes, Bjarte; Samuelsson, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    In this study, predictors of reading and spelling difficulties among children learning more transparent (Norwegian/Swedish) and less transparent (English) orthographies were examined longitudinally from preschool through Grade 2 using parallel versions of tests. A series of logistic regression analysis indicated three main findings. First, phonological awareness as a predictor of reading difficulties in the Scandinavian sample was time-limited to Grade 1, but remained as a significant predictor in the English-speaking sample. Second, phonological awareness predicted spelling difficulties similarly across orthographies. Third, preschool and kindergarten RAN was a significant predictor of reading and spelling difficulties at both Grades 1 and 2 across orthographies. The authors conclude that phonological awareness diminishes as a predictor of reading difficulties in transparent orthographies after the first years of schooling, that RAN is a better long term predictor of reading difficulties, and that phonological awareness is associated with spelling difficulties similarly in transparent and opaque orthographies. PMID:20440743

  11. Evaluation of the energy and comfort performance of a plus-energy house under Scandinavian winter conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pean, Thibault Quentin; Gennari, Luca; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    cases investigated, combining different set-points (20 to 22°C) and ventilation heat recovery settings. The thermal comfort indoors proved to be satisfactory, depending on the chosen set-point. Up to 92 and 98% of the time was reported within the range 21-25°C (Category I of EN 15251) respectively...... evaluation, these results show an encouraging trend towards achieving an annual positive energy balance as designed for this plus-energy house. The thermal environmental conditions in the semi-outdoor space resulted more comfortable than the outdoors, with reduced wind velocity, protection from rain......A plus-energy house was studied in terms of indoor environmental conditions and energy balance, during Scandinavian winter conditions. The studied building, EMBRACE, is a single-family detached dwelling of 59 m2 with two floors. The house also integrates a semi-outdoor space, covered by a glazed...

  12. When planners deal with change: Stories of Performativity in the politics of urban planning in two Scandinavian cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissandrello, Enza

    planning professionals become carriers of specific abilities that shape the possibilities of action and innovation in urban planning practice. It also argues that planning is performed by a plurality of actors, discourses, stages and politics but that in addition, urban planning proceeds by the acts...... the terrain of changing structural conditions altering current urban planning practice in two Scandinavian cities. Inspired by John Forester, their stories are here as lessons about what planning practitioners do in practice when facing challenges in their work. The aim is to explore an interpretation...... within a set of meanings and forms of legitimation. Across this analytic approach, some dimensions of transitions in urban planning include new institutional conditions and the actions of public planners, their performativity and their role in establishing innovative policy-making and planning practices...

  13. Weapons of Maths Instruction: A Thousand Years of Technological Stasis in Arrowheads from the South Scandinavian Middle Mesolithic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevan Edinborough

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some results from my doctoral research into the evolution of bow-arrow technology using archaeological data from the south Scandinavian Mesolithic (Edinborough 2004. A quantitative approach is used to describe the morphological variation found in samples taken from over 3600 armatures from nine Danish and Swedish lithic assemblages. A linked series of statistical techniques determines the two most significant metric variables across the nine arrowhead assemblages in terms of the cultural transmission of arrowhead technology. The resultant scatterplot uses confidence ellipses to reveal highly distinctive patterns of morphological variation that are related to population-specific technological traditions. A population-level hypothesis of a socially constrained transmission mechanism is presented that may explain the unusually long period of technological stasis demonstrated by six of the nine arrowhead phase-assemblages.

  14. Mapping VIPS concepts for nursing interventions to the ISO reference terminology model for nursing actions: A collaborative Scandinavian analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehnfors, Margareta; Angermo, Lilly Marit; Berring, Lene

    2006-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the coherence between the concepts for nursing interventions in the Swedish VIPS model for nursing recording and the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Actions and to identify areas in the two models for further development. Seven Scandinavian experts...... analyzed the VIPS model's concepts for nursing interventions using prototypical examples of nursing actions, involving 233 units of analyses, and collaborated in mapping the two models. All nursing interventions in the VIPS model comprise actions and targets, but a few lack explicit expressions of means....... In most cases, the recipient of care is implicit. Expressions for the aim of an action are absent from the ISO model. By this mapping we identified areas for future development of the VIPS model and the experience from nursing terminology work in Scandinavia can contribute to the international...

  15. Mapping VIPS Concepts for Nursing Interventions to the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Actions: A Collaborative Scandinavian Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauge Berring, Lene; Ehnfors, Margareta; Angermo, Lilly

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the coherence between the concepts for nursing interventions in the Swedish VIPS model for nursing recording and the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Actions and to identify areas in the two models for further development. Seven Scandinavian experts...... analyzed the VIPS model's concepts for nursing interventions using prototypical examples of nursing actions, involving 233 units of analyses, and collaborated in mapping the two models. All nursing interventions in the VIPS model comprise actions and targets, but a few lack explicit expressions of means....... In most cases, the recipient of care is implicit. Expressions for the aim of an action are absent from the ISO model. By this mapping we identified areas for future development of the VIPS model and the experience from nursing terminology work in Scandinavia can contribute to the international...

  16. Object-Oriented Type Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff; Palsberg, Jens

    1991-01-01

    We present a new approach to inferring types in untyped object-oriented programs with inheritance, assignments, and late binding. It guarantees that all messages are understood, annotates the program with type information, allows polymorphic methods, and can be used as the basis of an op-timizing......-timizing compiler. Types are finite sets of classes and subtyping is set inclusion. Using a trace graph, our algorithm constructs a set of conditional type constraints and computes the least solution by least fixed-point derivation....

  17. Inference in hybrid Bayesian networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre; Rumí, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1980s, Bayesian Networks (BNs) have become increasingly popular for building statistical models of complex systems. This is particularly true for boolean systems, where BNs often prove to be a more efficient modelling framework than traditional reliability-techniques (like fault trees a...... decade's research on inference in hybrid Bayesian networks. The discussions are linked to an example model for estimating human reliability....... and reliability block diagrams). However, limitations in the BNs' calculation engine have prevented BNs from becoming equally popular for domains containing mixtures of both discrete and continuous variables (so-called hybrid domains). In this paper we focus on these difficulties, and summarize some of the last...

  18. Inferring network structure from cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghonge, Sushrut; Vural, Dervis Can

    2017-07-01

    Many physical, biological, and social phenomena can be described by cascades taking place on a network. Often, the activity can be empirically observed, but not the underlying network of interactions. In this paper we offer three topological methods to infer the structure of any directed network given a set of cascade arrival times. Our formulas hold for a very general class of models where the activation probability of a node is a generic function of its degree and the number of its active neighbors. We report high success rates for synthetic and real networks, for several different cascade models.

  19. Type Inference of Turbo Pascal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Ole Ildsgaard; Schwartzbach, Michael I; Askari, Hosein

    1995-01-01

    Type inference is generally thought of as being an exclusive property of the functional programming paradigm. We argue that such a feature may be of significant benefit for also standard imperative languages. We present a working tool (available by WWW) providing these benefits for a full version...... of Turbo Pascal. It has the form of a preprocessor that analyzes programs in which the type annotations are only partial or even absent. The resulting program has full type annotations, will be accepted by the standard Turbo Pascal compiler, and has polymorphic use of procedures resolved by means of code...

  20. Bayesian inference for Hawkes processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl

    The Hawkes process is a practically and theoretically important class of point processes, but parameter-estimation for such a process can pose various problems. In this paper we explore and compare two approaches to Bayesian inference. The first approach is based on the so-called conditional...... intensity function, while the second approach is based on an underlying clustering and branching structure in the Hawkes process. For practical use, MCMC (Markov chain Monte Carlo) methods are employed. The two approaches are compared numerically using three examples of the Hawkes process....

  1. Sex-specific genetic analysis indicates low correlation between demographic and genetic connectivity in the Scandinavian brown bear (Ursus arctos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schregel, Julia; Kopatz, Alexander; Eiken, Hans Geir; Swenson, Jon E; Hagen, Snorre B

    2017-01-01

    The degree of gene flow within and among populations, i.e. genetic population connectivity, may closely track demographic population connectivity. Alternatively, the rate of gene flow may change relative to the rate of dispersal. In this study, we explored the relationship between genetic and demographic population connectivity using the Scandinavian brown bear as model species, due to its pronounced male dispersal and female philopatry. Thus, we expected that females would shape genetic structure locally, whereas males would act as genetic mediators among regions. To test this, we used eight validated microsatellite markers on 1531 individuals sampled noninvasively during country-wide genetic population monitoring in Sweden and Norway from 2006 to 2013. First, we determined sex-specific genetic structure and substructure across the study area. Second, we compared genetic differentiation, migration/gene flow patterns, and spatial autocorrelation results between the sexes both within and among genetic clusters and geographic regions. Our results indicated that demographic connectivity was not a reliable indicator of genetic connectivity. Among regions, we found no consistent difference in long-term gene flow and estimated current migration rates between males and females. Within regions/genetic clusters, only females consistently displayed significant positive spatial autocorrelation, indicating male-biased small-scale dispersal. In one cluster, however, males showed a dispersal pattern similar to females. The Scandinavian brown bear population has experienced substantial recovery over the last decades; however, our results did not show any changes in its large-scale population structure compared to previous studies, suggesting that an increase in population size and dispersal of individuals does not necessary lead to increased genetic connectivity. Thus, we conclude that both genetic and demographic connectivity should be estimated, so as not to make false

  2. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tap as described). 3. In all situations, drink or cook only with water that comes out of the tap cold. Water that comes out of the tap warm or hot can contain much higher levels of lead. Boiling ...

  3. Dopamine, affordance and active inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl J Friston

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level.

  4. Efficient Bayesian inference for natural time series using ARFIMA processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Timothy; Gramacy, Robert; Franzke, Christian; Watkins, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Many geophysical quantities, such as atmospheric temperature, water levels in rivers, and wind speeds, have shown evidence of long memory (LM). LM implies that these quantities experience non-trivial temporal memory, which potentially not only enhances their predictability, but also hampers the detection of externally forced trends. Thus, it is important to reliably identify whether or not a system exhibits LM. We present a modern and systematic approach to the inference of LM. We use the flexible autoregressive fractional integrated moving average (ARFIMA) model, which is widely used in time series analysis, and of increasing interest in climate science. Unlike most previous work on the inference of LM, which is frequentist in nature, we provide a systematic treatment of Bayesian inference. In particular, we provide a new approximate likelihood for efficient parameter inference, and show how nuisance parameters (e.g., short-memory effects) can be integrated over in order to focus on long-memory parameters and hypothesis testing more directly. We illustrate our new methodology on the Nile water level data and the central England temperature (CET) time series, with favorable comparison to the standard estimators [1]. In addition we show how the method can be used to perform joint inference of the stability exponent and the memory parameter when ARFIMA is extended to allow for alpha-stable innovations. Such models can be used to study systems where heavy tails and long range memory coexist. [1] Graves et al, Nonlin. Processes Geophys., 22, 679-700, 2015; doi:10.5194/npg-22-679-2015.

  5. Spontaneous Trait Inferences on Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levordashka, Ana; Utz, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    The present research investigates whether spontaneous trait inferences occur under conditions characteristic of social media and networking sites: nonextreme, ostensibly self-generated content, simultaneous presentation of multiple cues, and self-paced browsing. We used an established measure of trait inferences (false recognition paradigm) and a direct assessment of impressions. Without being asked to do so, participants spontaneously formed impressions of people whose status updates they saw. Our results suggest that trait inferences occurred from nonextreme self-generated content, which is commonly found in social media updates (Experiment 1) and when nine status updates from different people were presented in parallel (Experiment 2). Although inferences did occur during free browsing, the results suggest that participants did not necessarily associate the traits with the corresponding status update authors (Experiment 3). Overall, the findings suggest that spontaneous trait inferences occur on social media. We discuss implications for online communication and research on spontaneous trait inferences.

  6. Type inference for correspondence types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüttel, Hans; Gordon, Andy; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2009-01-01

    We present a correspondence type/effect system for authenticity in a π-calculus with polarized channels, dependent pair types and effect terms and show how one may, given a process P and an a priori type environment E, generate constraints that are formulae in the Alternating Least Fixed......-Point (ALFP) logic. We then show how a reasonable model of the generated constraints yields a type/effect assignment such that P becomes well-typed with respect to E if and only if this is possible. The formulae generated satisfy a finite model property; a system of constraints is satisfiable if and only...... if it has a finite model. As a consequence, we obtain the result that type/effect inference in our system is polynomial-time decidable....

  7. Perceptual inference and autistic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skewes, Joshua C; Jegindø, Else-Marie; Gebauer, Line

    2015-04-01

    Autistic people are better at perceiving details. Major theories explain this in terms of bottom-up sensory mechanisms or in terms of top-down cognitive biases. Recently, it has become possible to link these theories within a common framework. This framework assumes that perception is implicit neural inference, combining sensory evidence with prior perceptual knowledge. Within this framework, perceptual differences may occur because of enhanced precision in how sensory evidence is represented or because sensory evidence is weighted much higher than prior perceptual knowledge. In this preliminary study, we compared these models using groups with high and low autistic trait scores (Autism-Spectrum Quotient). We found evidence supporting the cognitive bias model and no evidence for the enhanced sensory precision model. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Polynomial Regressions and Nonsense Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ventosa-Santaulària

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Polynomial specifications are widely used, not only in applied economics, but also in epidemiology, physics, political analysis and psychology, just to mention a few examples. In many cases, the data employed to estimate such specifications are time series that may exhibit stochastic nonstationary behavior. We extend Phillips’ results (Phillips, P. Understanding spurious regressions in econometrics. J. Econom. 1986, 33, 311–340. by proving that an inference drawn from polynomial specifications, under stochastic nonstationarity, is misleading unless the variables cointegrate. We use a generalized polynomial specification as a vehicle to study its asymptotic and finite-sample properties. Our results, therefore, lead to a call to be cautious whenever practitioners estimate polynomial regressions.

  9. Transdimensional inference in the geosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambridge, M; Bodin, T; Gallagher, K; Tkalcic, H

    2013-02-13

    Seismologists construct images of the Earth's interior structure using observations, derived from seismograms, collected at the surface. A common approach to such inverse problems is to build a single 'best' Earth model, in some sense. This is despite the fact that the observations by themselves often do not require, or even allow, a single best-fit Earth model to exist. Interpretation of optimal models can be fraught with difficulties, particularly when formal uncertainty estimates become heavily dependent on the regularization imposed. Similar issues occur across the physical sciences with model construction in ill-posed problems. An alternative approach is to embrace the non-uniqueness directly and employ an inference process based on parameter space sampling. Instead of seeking a best model within an optimization framework, one seeks an ensemble of solutions and derives properties of that ensemble for inspection. While this idea has itself been employed for more than 30 years, it is now receiving increasing attention in the geosciences. Recently, it has been shown that transdimensional and hierarchical sampling methods have some considerable benefits for problems involving multiple parameter types, uncertain data errors and/or uncertain model parametrizations, as are common in seismology. Rather than being forced to make decisions on parametrization, the level of data noise and the weights between data types in advance, as is often the case in an optimization framework, the choice can be informed by the data themselves. Despite the relatively high computational burden involved, the number of areas where sampling methods are now feasible is growing rapidly. The intention of this article is to introduce concepts of transdimensional inference to a general readership and illustrate with particular seismological examples. A growing body of references provide necessary detail.

  10. Bayesian Inference of High-Dimensional Dynamical Ocean Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Lermusiaux, P. F. J.; Lolla, S. V. T.; Gupta, A.; Haley, P. J., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation addresses a holistic set of challenges in high-dimension ocean Bayesian nonlinear estimation: i) predict the probability distribution functions (pdfs) of large nonlinear dynamical systems using stochastic partial differential equations (PDEs); ii) assimilate data using Bayes' law with these pdfs; iii) predict the future data that optimally reduce uncertainties; and (iv) rank the known and learn the new model formulations themselves. Overall, we allow the joint inference of the state, equations, geometry, boundary conditions and initial conditions of dynamical models. Examples are provided for time-dependent fluid and ocean flows, including cavity, double-gyre and Strait flows with jets and eddies. The Bayesian model inference, based on limited observations, is illustrated first by the estimation of obstacle shapes and positions in fluid flows. Next, the Bayesian inference of biogeochemical reaction equations and of their states and parameters is presented, illustrating how PDE-based machine learning can rigorously guide the selection and discovery of complex ecosystem models. Finally, the inference of multiscale bottom gravity current dynamics is illustrated, motivated in part by classic overflows and dense water formation sites and their relevance to climate monitoring and dynamics. This is joint work with our MSEAS group at MIT.

  11. The importance of learning when making inferences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rieskamp, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    .... The experimental findings of two previous studies on strategy selection are reexamined from a learning perspective, which argues that people learn to select strategies for making probabilistic inferences...

  12. Generic comparison of protein inference engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Manfred; Reiter, Lukas; Hengartner, Michael O; Buhmann, Joachim M; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-04-01

    Protein identifications, instead of peptide-spectrum matches, constitute the biologically relevant result of shotgun proteomics studies. How to appropriately infer and report protein identifications has triggered a still ongoing debate. This debate has so far suffered from the lack of appropriate performance measures that allow us to objectively assess protein inference approaches. This study describes an intuitive, generic and yet formal performance measure and demonstrates how it enables experimentalists to select an optimal protein inference strategy for a given collection of fragment ion spectra. We applied the performance measure to systematically explore the benefit of excluding possibly unreliable protein identifications, such as single-hit wonders. Therefore, we defined a family of protein inference engines by extending a simple inference engine by thousands of pruning variants, each excluding a different specified set of possibly unreliable identifications. We benchmarked these protein inference engines on several data sets representing different proteomes and mass spectrometry platforms. Optimally performing inference engines retained all high confidence spectral evidence, without posterior exclusion of any type of protein identifications. Despite the diversity of studied data sets consistently supporting this rule, other data sets might behave differently. In order to ensure maximal reliable proteome coverage for data sets arising in other studies we advocate abstaining from rigid protein inference rules, such as exclusion of single-hit wonders, and instead consider several protein inference approaches and assess these with respect to the presented performance measure in the specific application context.

  13. Generic Comparison of Protein Inference Engines*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Manfred; Reiter, Lukas; Hengartner, Michael O.; Buhmann, Joachim M.; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-01-01

    Protein identifications, instead of peptide-spectrum matches, constitute the biologically relevant result of shotgun proteomics studies. How to appropriately infer and report protein identifications has triggered a still ongoing debate. This debate has so far suffered from the lack of appropriate performance measures that allow us to objectively assess protein inference approaches. This study describes an intuitive, generic and yet formal performance measure and demonstrates how it enables experimentalists to select an optimal protein inference strategy for a given collection of fragment ion spectra. We applied the performance measure to systematically explore the benefit of excluding possibly unreliable protein identifications, such as single-hit wonders. Therefore, we defined a family of protein inference engines by extending a simple inference engine by thousands of pruning variants, each excluding a different specified set of possibly unreliable identifications. We benchmarked these protein inference engines on several data sets representing different proteomes and mass spectrometry platforms. Optimally performing inference engines retained all high confidence spectral evidence, without posterior exclusion of any type of protein identifications. Despite the diversity of studied data sets consistently supporting this rule, other data sets might behave differently. In order to ensure maximal reliable proteome coverage for data sets arising in other studies we advocate abstaining from rigid protein inference rules, such as exclusion of single-hit wonders, and instead consider several protein inference approaches and assess these with respect to the presented performance measure in the specific application context. PMID:22057310

  14. C. Raudvere & J.P. Schjödt (eds., More Than Mythology – Narratives, Ritual Practices and Regional Distribution in Pre-Christian Scandinavian Religions (Lund: Nordic Academic Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Mustonen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A book review of; Raudvere, Catharina & Schjödt, Jens Peter: More Than Mythology – Narratives, Ritual Practices and Regional Distribution in Pre-Christian Scandinavian Religions

  15. A Unique Opportunity to Study Short and Long Term Consequences in Children Prenatally Exposed to Illicit Drugs and Opioid Maintenance Treatment Using Czech and Scandinavian Registers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrhelík, Roman; Nechanská, Blanka; Mravčík, Viktor; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Lund, Ingunn Olea; Handal, Marte

    2016-09-01

    Licit and illicit drug use in pregnant women constitutes a long lasting and serious problem worldwide. Information on long-term effects of maternal drug use on the child is limited. Nationwide registers provide a great potential to study short and long-term consequences for children exposed to licit and illicit drugs during pregnancy. We discuss this potential, with a special emphasis on exposure to methamphetamine, heroin and prescription drugs used for opioid maintenance treatment (OMT). We also discuss the advantages of register data and of merging such data from different regions. The Czech and Scandinavian registers are largely comparable and provide great opportunities to conduct innovative research. For instance, using Czech and Scandinavian cohorts we can compare groups with similar characteristics, such as mothers in OMT and mothers addicted to other drugs while also controlling for important confounding factors such as health and socio-economic status. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2016.

  16. Water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available , and of the remaining 2,5 percent, some 70 percent is frozen in the polar caps and around 30 percent is present as soil moisture or in underground aquifers. Less than 1 percent is thus accessible for direct use by humans, animals and plants. Consequently... be serviced with harvested water and/or grey water. Conserve and reuse cooling tower water by using efficient systems and strategies. Avoid ?once-through systems? commonly used for evaporation coolers, ice makers, hydraulic equipment, and air compressors...

  17. Scalar Inferences in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, Coralie; Wilson, Deirdre; Happe, Francesca; Noveck, Ira

    2010-01-01

    On being told "John or Mary will come", one might infer that "not both" of them will come. Yet the semantics of "or" is compatible with a situation where both John and Mary come. Inferences of this type, which enrich the semantics of "or" from an "inclusive" to an "exclusive" interpretation, have been extensively studied in linguistic pragmatics.…

  18. Drawing Inferences from a Passage of Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, George R.

    The present series of experiments was designed to examine the factors affecting the ability of people to draw inferences from a passage of text. It was found that, using a true-false recognition test, proportion correct was higher and reaction time shorter on inferred information than on information that was actually presented. This was the case…

  19. Compiling Relational Bayesian Networks for Exact Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred; Chavira, Mark; Darwiche, Adnan

    2004-01-01

    We describe a system for exact inference with relational Bayesian networks as defined in the publicly available \\primula\\ tool. The system is based on compiling propositional instances of relational Bayesian networks into arithmetic circuits and then performing online inference by evaluating and ...

  20. Local and Global Thinking in Statistical Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Dave; Johnston-Wilder, Peter; Ainley, Janet; Mason, John

    2008-01-01

    In this reflective paper, we explore students' local and global thinking about informal statistical inference through our observations of 10- to 11-year-olds, challenged to infer the unknown configuration of a virtual die, but able to use the die to generate as much data as they felt necessary. We report how they tended to focus on local changes…

  1. LAIT: a local ancestry inference toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Daniel; Fang, Zhou; Lin, Jerome; Duan, Qing; Li, Yun; Hu, Ming; Chen, Wei

    2017-09-06

    Inferring local ancestry in individuals of mixed ancestry has many applications, most notably in identifying disease-susceptible loci that vary among different ethnic groups. Many software packages are available for inferring local ancestry in admixed individuals. However, most of these existing software packages require specific formatted input files and generate output files in various types, yielding practical inconvenience. We developed a tool set, Local Ancestry Inference Toolkit (LAIT), which can convert standardized files into software-specific input file formats as well as standardize and summarize inference results for four popular local ancestry inference software: HAPMIX, LAMP, LAMP-LD, and ELAI. We tested LAIT using both simulated and real data sets and demonstrated that LAIT provides convenience to run multiple local ancestry inference software. In addition, we evaluated the performance of local ancestry software among different supported software packages, mainly focusing on inference accuracy and computational resources used. We provided a toolkit to facilitate the use of local ancestry inference software, especially for users with limited bioinformatics background.

  2. Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sanmuga Priya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation through aquatic macrophytes treatment system (AMATS for the removal of pollutants and contaminants from various natural sources is a well established environmental protection technique. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, a worst invasive aquatic weed has been utilised for various research activities over the last few decades. The biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in minimising various contaminants present in the industrial wastewater is well studied. The present review quotes the literatures related to the biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in reducing the concentration of dyestuffs, heavy metals and minimising certain other physiochemical parameters like TSS (total suspended solids, TDS (total dissolved solids, COD (chemical oxygen demand and BOD (biological oxygen demand in textile wastewater. Sorption kinetics through various models, factors influencing the biosorption capacity, and role of physical and chemical modifications in the water hyacinth are also discussed.

  3. Early blood pressure lowering treatment in acute stroke. Ordinal analysis of vascular events in the Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jusufovic, Mirza; Sandset, Else Charlotte; Bath, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Early blood pressure-lowering treatment appears to be beneficial in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage and potentially in ischaemic stroke. We used a new method for analysis of vascular events in the Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial to see if the effect was depend......OBJECTIVE: Early blood pressure-lowering treatment appears to be beneficial in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage and potentially in ischaemic stroke. We used a new method for analysis of vascular events in the Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial to see if the effect...... was dependent on the timing of treatment. METHODS: Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial was a randomized controlled and placebo-controlled trial of candesartan within 30 h of ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. Of 2029 patients, 231 (11.4%) had a vascular event (vascular death, nonfatal stroke or nonfatal...... logistic regression for analysis and adjusted for predefined prognostic variables. RESULTS: Candesartan had no overall effect on vascular events (adjusted common odds ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 0.84-1.47, P = 0.48), and the effects were the same in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Among...

  4. EI: A Program for Ecological Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary King

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The program EI provides a method of inferring individual behavior from aggregate data. It implements the statistical procedures, diagnostics, and graphics from the book A Solution to the Ecological Inference Problem: Reconstructing Individual Behavior from Aggregate Data (King 1997. Ecological inference, as traditionally defined, is the process of using aggregate (i.e., "ecological" data to infer discrete individual-level relationships of interest when individual-level data are not available. Ecological inferences are required in political science research when individual-level surveys are unavailable (e.g., local or comparative electoral politics, unreliable (racial politics, insufficient (political geography, or infeasible (political history. They are also required in numerous areas of ma jor significance in public policy (e.g., for applying the Voting Rights Act and other academic disciplines ranging from epidemiology and marketing to sociology and quantitative history.

  5. A temporal analysis shows major histocompatibility complex loci in the Scandinavian wolf population are consistent with neutral evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, J. M.; Ellegren, H.

    2004-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has an integral role in the immune system, and hence diversity at its genes may be of particular importance for the health of populations. In large populations, balancing selection maintains diversity in MHC genes, but theoretical expectations indicate that this form of selection is absent or inefficient in small populations. We examine the level of diversity at three MHC class II loci in the wolf population of Scandinavia, a population naturally recolonized with a genetic contribution from as few as three founders, and in four neighbouring wolf populations. In the Scandinavian wolf population, two alleles were found for each locus and the distribution of alleles is compatible with their linkage into two haplotypes. Changes in the level of heterozygosity over time since recolonization demonstrate the effects of the proposed arrival of an immigrant wolf. The maintenance of diversity is shown to be compatible with a neutral, random allocation of alleles, in conjunction with crossing between packs. A total of 15 DRB1, seven DQA and 10 DQB1 alleles are found in four neighbouring wolf populations, with substantial sharing across populations. Even in these larger populations, bottlenecks and fragmentation with consequent genetic drift are likely to have resulted in few indicators for balancing selection and significant differentiation of populations. PMID:15539354

  6. High plasma IgE levels within the Scandinavian wolf population, and its implications for mammalian IgE homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledin, Anna; Arnemo, Jon M; Liberg, Olof; Hellman, Lars

    2008-04-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) serves as an important link between innate and adaptive immunity through its ability to bind high affinity receptors on mast cells and basophils. Large differences in IgE levels may here affect this important link, and IgE levels in natural non-domestic animal populations may therefore be very informative concerning the levels of IgE that this system have been balanced against during recent mammalian evolution. However, very few such studies have been performed. Here, we present an analysis of total IgE levels in 65 Scandinavian wolves: 57 free living (wild), and 8 wolves in captivity (Zoo). The 57 wild wolves correspond to approximately 30% of the entire wolf population in Sweden and Norway and thus represent a large fraction of the entire population, making this a unique sample from a wild canine population. The median IgE level in these wolves was 67 microg/ml, which is approximately twice the level seen in domestic dogs and more than 100 times the levels in non-atopic humans. The collected information from domestic and wild populations now indicate that the very low IgE levels observed in man and laboratory rodents are most likely an effect of a life in a relatively parasite free environment, and that total IgE levels under maximally stimulatory (normal) conditions may reach 100-200 microg/ml.

  7. Re-emergence of hereditary polyneuropathy in Scandinavian Alaskan malamute dogs-old enemy or new entity? A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäderlund, Karin Hultin; Rohdin, Cecilia; Berendt, Mette; Stigen, Øyvind; Fredholm, Merete; Espenes, Arild; Bjerkås, Inge; Moe, Lars

    2017-05-02

    A homozygous mutation has been identified in the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in recent cases of polyneuropathy in Alaskan malamute dogs from the Nordic countries and USA. The objective of the present study was to determine if cases diagnosed 30-40 years ago with polyneuropathy in the Alaskan malamute breed in Norway had the same hereditary disease as the recent cases. Fourteen historical cases and 12 recently diagnosed Alaskan malamute dogs with hereditary polyneuropathy, and their parents and littermates (n = 88) were included in this study (total n = 114). After phenotyping of historical and recent cases, NDRG1 genotyping was performed using DNA extracted from archived material from five Norwegian dogs affected by the disease in the late 1970s and 1980s. In addition, pedigrees were analysed. Our study concluded that historical and recent phenotypic polyneuropathy cases were carrying the same NDRG1-mutation. The pedigree analysis showed that all affected Alaskan malamute cases with polyneuropathy could be traced back to one common ancestor of North American origin. By this study, a well-documented example of the silent transmission of recessive disease-causing alleles through many generations is provided, demonstrated by the re-emergence of a phenotypically and genetically uniform entity in the Scandinavian Alaskan malamute population.

  8. Timescales of methane seepage on the Norwegian margin following collapse of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crémière, Antoine; Lepland, Aivo; Chand, Shyam; Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel J; Noble, Stephen R; Martma, Tõnu; Thorsnes, Terje; Sauer, Simone; Brunstad, Harald

    2016-05-11

    Gas hydrates stored on continental shelves are susceptible to dissociation triggered by environmental changes. Knowledge of the timescales of gas hydrate dissociation and subsequent methane release are critical in understanding the impact of marine gas hydrates on the ocean-atmosphere system. Here we report a methane efflux chronology from five sites, at depths of 220-400 m, in the southwest Barents and Norwegian seas where grounded ice sheets led to thickening of the gas hydrate stability zone during the last glaciation. The onset of methane release was coincident with deglaciation-induced pressure release and thinning of the hydrate stability zone. Methane efflux continued for 7-10 kyr, tracking hydrate stability changes controlled by relative sea-level rise, bottom water warming and fluid pathway evolution in response to changing stress fields. The protracted nature of seafloor methane emissions probably attenuated the impact of hydrate dissociation on the climate system.

  9. Linguistic Markers of Inference Generation While Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Virginia; Carlson, Sarah E; Seipel, Ben

    2016-06-01

    Words can be informative linguistic markers of psychological constructs. The purpose of this study is to examine associations between word use and the process of making meaningful connections to a text while reading (i.e., inference generation). To achieve this purpose, think-aloud data from third-fifth grade students ([Formula: see text]) reading narrative texts were hand-coded for inferences. These data were also processed with a computer text analysis tool, Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count, for percentages of word use in the following categories: cognitive mechanism words, nonfluencies, and nine types of function words. Findings indicate that cognitive mechanisms were an independent, positive predictor of connections to background knowledge (i.e., elaborative inference generation) and nonfluencies were an independent, negative predictor of connections within the text (i.e., bridging inference generation). Function words did not provide unique variance towards predicting inference generation. These findings are discussed in the context of a cognitive reflection model and the differences between bridging and elaborative inference generation. In addition, potential practical implications for intelligent tutoring systems and computer-based methods of inference identification are presented.

  10. Statistical inference an integrated Bayesianlikelihood approach

    CERN Document Server

    Aitkin, Murray

    2010-01-01

    Filling a gap in current Bayesian theory, Statistical Inference: An Integrated Bayesian/Likelihood Approach presents a unified Bayesian treatment of parameter inference and model comparisons that can be used with simple diffuse prior specifications. This novel approach provides new solutions to difficult model comparison problems and offers direct Bayesian counterparts of frequentist t-tests and other standard statistical methods for hypothesis testing.After an overview of the competing theories of statistical inference, the book introduces the Bayes/likelihood approach used throughout. It pre

  11. Compiling Relational Bayesian Networks for Exact Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred; Darwiche, Adnan; Chavira, Mark

    2006-01-01

    We describe in this paper a system for exact inference with relational Bayesian networks as defined in the publicly available PRIMULA tool. The system is based on compiling propositional instances of relational Bayesian networks into arithmetic circuits and then performing online inference...... by evaluating and differentiating these circuits in time linear in their size. We report on experimental results showing successful compilation and efficient inference on relational Bayesian networks, whose PRIMULA--generated propositional instances have thousands of variables, and whose jointrees have clusters...

  12. Wetland methane modelling over the Scandinavian Arctic: Performance of current land-surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Garry; Quiquet, Aurélien; Gedney, Nicola; Clark, Douglas; Friend, Andrew; George, Charles; Prigent, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Holocene, Science, 303, 353-356, doi:10.1126/science.1090553, 2004; [3] Zhuang, Q., et al.: CO2 and CH4 exchanges between land ecosystems and the atmosphere in northern high latitudes over the 21st century, Geophysical Research Letters, 33, doi:10.1029/2006gl026972, 2006; [4] Melton, J.R., et al.: Present state of global wetland extent and wetland methane modelling: conclusions from a model inter-comparison project (WETCHIMP), Biogeosciences, 10, 753-788, doi:10.5194/bg-10-753-2013, 2013; [5] Best, M. J., et al.: The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), model description - Part 1: Energy and water fluxes, Geoscientific Model Development, 4, 677-699, doi:10.5194/gmd-4-677-2011, 2011; [6] Clark, D.B., et al.: The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), Model description - Part 2: Carbon fluxes and vegetation. Geoscientific Model Development, 4, 701-722, doi:10.5194/gmd-4-701-2011, 2011; [7] Friend, A.D., and N.Y. Kiang: Land surface model development for the GISS GCM: Effects of improved canopy physiology on simulated climate. J. Climate, 18, 2883-2902, doi:10.1175/JCLI3425.1, 2005; [8] Prigent, C., et al.: Changes in land surface water dynamics since the 1990s and relation to population pressure, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L08403, doi:10.1029/2012GL051276, 2012; [9] O'Shea, S., et al.: Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from the European Arctic wetlands during the MAMM project, paper in preparation.

  13. Phylogeny Inference Based on Spectral Graph Clustering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Zhou, Song-Yu; He, Jian-Guo; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2011-01-01

    ...; this may enlarge the error gradually, and lead to an inaccurate tree topology. In this study, a splitting algorithm is proposed for phylogeny inference by using the spectral graph clustering (SGC) technique...

  14. Experimental evidence for circular inference in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardri, Renaud; Duverne, Sandrine; Litvinova, Alexandra S.; Denève, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a complex mental disorder that may result in some combination of hallucinations, delusions and disorganized thinking. Here SCZ patients and healthy controls (CTLs) report their level of confidence on a forced-choice task that manipulated the strength of sensory evidence and prior information. Neither group's responses can be explained by simple Bayesian inference. Rather, individual responses are best captured by a model with different degrees of circular inference. Circular inference refers to a corruption of sensory data by prior information and vice versa, leading us to `see what we expect' (through descending loops), to `expect what we see' (through ascending loops) or both. Ascending loops are stronger for SCZ than CTLs and correlate with the severity of positive symptoms. Descending loops correlate with the severity of negative symptoms. Both loops correlate with disorganized symptoms. The findings suggest that circular inference might mediate the clinical manifestations of SCZ.

  15. MRBAYES: Bayesian inference of phylogenetic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsenbeck, J P; Ronquist, F

    2001-08-01

    The program MRBAYES performs Bayesian inference of phylogeny using a variant of Markov chain Monte Carlo. MRBAYES, including the source code, documentation, sample data files, and an executable, is available at http://brahms.biology.rochester.edu/software.html.

  16. Surgical intervention for paediatric liver injuries is almost history - a 12-year cohort from a major Scandinavian trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Tomohide; Skattum, Jorunn; Engelsen, Peder; Eken, Torsten; Gaarder, Christine; Naess, Pål Aksel

    2016-11-29

    Although nonoperative management (NOM) has become standard care, optimal treatment of liver injuries in children is still challenging since many of these patients have multiple injuries. Moreover, the role of angiography remains poorly defined, and a high index of suspicion of complications is warranted. This study reviews treatment and outcomes in children with liver injuries at a major Scandinavian trauma centre over a 12-year period. Patients trauma registry and medical records. A total of 66 children were included. The majority was severely injured as reflected by a median injury severity score of 20.5 (mean 22.2). NOM was attempted in 60 (90.9%) patients and was successful in 57, resulting in a NOM success rate of 95.0% [95% CI 89.3 to 100]. Only one of the three NOM failures was liver related, occurred in the early part of the study period, and consisted in operative placement of drains for bile leak. Two (3.0%) patients underwent angiographic embolization (AE). Complications occurred in 18 (27.3% [95 % CI 16.2 to 38.3]) patients. Only 2 (3.0%) patients had liver related complications, in both cases bile leak. Six (9.1%) patients underwent therapeutic laparotomy for non-liver related injuries. Two (3.0%) patients died secondary to traumatic brain injury. This single institution paediatric liver injury cohort confirms high attempted NOM and NOM success rates even in patients with high grade injuries and multiple accompanying injuries. AE can be a useful NOM adjunct in the treatment of paediatric liver injuries, but is seldom indicated. Moreover, bile leak is the most common liver-related complication and the need for liver-related surgery is very infrequent. NOM is the treatment of choice in almost all liver injuries in children, with operative management and interventional radiology very infrequently indicated.

  17. Effect of latitude and mountain height on the timberline (Betula pubescens ssp. czerpanovii elevation along the central Scandinavian mountain range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvid Odland

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previously published isoline maps of Fennoscandian timberlines show that their highest elevations lie in the high mountain areas in central south Norway and from there the limits decrease in all directions. These maps are assumed to show differences in “climatic forest limits”, but the isoline patterns indicate that factors other than climate may be decisive in most of the area. Possibly the effects of ‘massenerhebung’ and the “summit syndrome” may locally have major effects on the timberline elevation. The main aim of the present study is to quantify the effect of latitude and mountain height on the regional variation of mountain birch timberline elevation. The study is a statistical analysis of previous published data on the timberline elevation and nearby mountain height. Selection of the study sites has been stratified to the Scandinavian mountain range (the Scandes from 58 to 71o N where the timberlines reach their highest elevations. The data indicates that only the high mountain massifs in S Norway and N Sweden are sufficiently high to allow birch forests to reach their potential elevations. Stepwise regression shows that latitude explains 70.9% while both latitude and mountain explain together 89.0% of the timberline variation. Where the mountains are low (approximately 1000 m higher than the measured local timberlines effects of the summit syndrome will lower the timberline elevation substantially and climatically determined timberlines will probably not have been reached. This indicates that models of future timberlines and thereby the alpine area extent in a warmer world may result in unrealistic conclusions without taking account of local mountain heights.

  18. Survival of the Scandinavian total ankle replacement (STAR): results of ten to nineteen years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigg, Arno; Germann, Ursula; Huber, Martin; Horisberger, Monika

    2017-07-26

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate survival and clinical outcome of the Scandinavian total ankle replacement (STAR) prosthesis after a minimum of ten years up to a maximum of 19 years. Fifty STAR prostheses in 46 patients with end stage ankle osteoarthritis operated between 1996 and 2006 by the same surgeon (MH) were included. Minimal follow-up was ten years (median 14.6 years, 95% confidence interval [CI] 12.9-16.4). Clinical (Kofoed score) and radiological assessments were taken before the operation and at one, ten (+2), and 16 (±3) years after implantation. The primary endpoint was defined as exchange of the whole prosthesis or conversion to arthrodesis (def. 1), exchange of at least one metallic component (def. 2), or exchange of any component including the inlay (due to breakage or wear) (def. 3). Survival was estimated according to Kaplan-Meier. Further reoperations related to STAR were also recorded. The ten year survival rate was (def. 1) 94% (CI 82-98%), (def. 2) 90% (CI, 77-96%), and (def. 3) 78% (CI 64-87%). The 19-year survival rate was (def. 1) 91% (CI 78-97%), (def. 2) 75% (CI 53-88%), and (def. 3) 55% (CI 34-71%). Considering any re-operations related to STAR, 52% (26/50) of prostheses were affected by re-operations. Mean pre-operative Kofoed score was 49, which improved to 84 after one year (n = 50), to 90 after ten years (n = 46), and to 89 after 16 years (n = 28). The survival rate for def. 1 and 2 was high. However, re-operations occurred in 52% of all STAR prosthesis. Retrospective cohort study, evidence Level 4.

  19. Prognostic factors in patients with metastatic (stage D2) prostate cancer: experience from the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group Study-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, T; Kanagasingam, Y; Kaalhus, O; Tveter, K J; Bryne, M; Skjørten, F; Berner, A; Danielsen, H E

    1997-07-01

    Nuclear texture reflects the overall structures of the chromatin organization. We recently reported the principles and prognostic importance of image analysis of nuclei from metastatic prostate cancer. Immunohistochemical up regulation of the adhesion molecule sialyl Lewis(x) is also reported to be a prognostic parameter. Presently we analyzed statistically the prognostic impact of these 2 new parameters compared to well-known clinical parameters in metastatic prostate cancer. Prognostic factors, such as sedimentation rate, alkaline and acid phosphatases, hemoglobin, testosterone, performance status, pain due to metastasis, T category, histological grade and patient age, were included in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis based on 262 patients from the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group Study-2. Extent of bone lesions, deoxyribonucleic acid ploidy, texture analysis and sialyl Lewis(x) molecules based on subsets of these 262 patients were also analyzed in the same multivariate model. This test identified chromatin texture as the most important factor (p < 0.001), followed by reaction of the oligosaccharide sialyl Lewis(x) (p < 0.01). Among the routine clinical and laboratory data, sedimentation rate, alkaline phosphatase and hemoglobin (p < 0.05) showed prognostic importance. Performance status, pain due to metastasis and extent of bone lesions showed prognostic value in the univariate analysis (p < 0.05). These data indicate that computerized nuclear texture analysis as well as up regulation of sialyl Lewis(x) molecules may be new important prognostic factors in metastatic prostate cancer. Furthermore the prognostic importance of sedimentation rate, alkaline phosphatase and hemoglobin was confirmed.

  20. Scandinavian SSAI clinical practice guideline on choice of first-line vasopressor for patients with acute circulatory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, M H; Claudius, C; Junttila, E; Haney, M; Oscarsson-Tibblin, A; Haavind, A; Perner, A

    2016-11-01

    Adult critically ill patients often suffer from acute circulatory failure, necessitating use of vasopressor therapy. The aim of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (SSAI) task force for Acute Circulatory Failure was to present clinically relevant, evidence-based treatment recommendations on this topic. This guideline was developed according to standards for trustworthy guidelines, including a systematic review of the literature and use of the GRADE methodology for assessment of the quality of evidence and for moving from evidence to recommendations. We assessed the following subpopulations of patients with acute circulatory failure: 1) shock in general, 2) septic shock, 3) cardiogenic shock, 4) hypovolemic shock and 5) other types of shock, including vasodilatory shock. We assessed patient-important outcome measures, including mortality, serious adverse reactions and quality-of-life. For patients with shock in general and those with septic shock, we recommend using norepinephrine rather than dopamine, and we suggest using norepinephrine rather than epinephrine, vasopressin analogues, and phenylephrine. For patients with cardiogenic shock and those with hypovolemic shock, we suggest using norepinephrine rather than dopamine, and we provide no recommendations/suggestions of norepinephrine vs. epinephrine, vasopressin analogues, and phenylephrine. For patients with other types of shock, including vasodilatory shock, we suggest using norepinephrine rather than dopamine, epinephrine, vasopressin analogues, and phenylephrine. We recommend using norepinephrine rather than other vasopressors as first-line treatment for the majority of adult critically ill patients with acute circulatory failure. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  1. Middle Ordovician subduction of continental crust in the Scandinavian Caledonides: an example from Tjeliken, Seve Nappe Complex, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassmer, Kathrin; Klonowska, Iwona; Walczak, Katarzyna; Andersson, Barbro; Froitzheim, Nikolaus; Majka, Jarosław; Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Münker, Carsten; Janák, Marian; Whitehouse, Martin

    2017-12-01

    The Seve Nappe Complex of the Scandinavian Caledonides is thought to be derived from the distal passive margin of Baltica which collided with Laurentia in the Scandian Phase of the Caledonian Orogeny at 430-400 Ma. Parts of the Seve Nappe Complex were affected by pre-Scandian high- and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism, in a tectonic framework that is still unclear, partly due to uncertainties about the exact timing. Previous age determinations yielded between 505 and 446 Ma, with a general trend of older ages in the North (Norrbotten) than in the South (Jämtland). New age determinations were performed on eclogite and garnet-phengite gneiss at Tjeliken in northern Jämtland. Thermodynamic modelling yielded peak metamorphic conditions of 25-27 kbar/680-760 °C for the garnet-phengite gneiss, similar to published peak metamorphic conditions of the eclogite (25-26 kbar/650-700 °C). Metamorphic rims of zircons from the garnet-phengite gneiss were dated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and yielded a concordia age of 458.9 ± 2.5 Ma. Lu-Hf garnet-whole rock dating yielded 458 ± 1.0 Ma for the eclogite. Garnet in the eclogite shows prograde major-element zoning and concentration of Lu in the cores, indicating that this age is related to garnet growth during pressure increase, i.e. subduction. The identical ages from both rock types, coinciding with published Sm-Nd ages from the eclogite, confirm subduction of the Seve Nappe Complex in Northern Jämtland during the Middle Ordovician in a fast subduction-exhumation cycle.

  2. Low cardiac output as physiological phenomenon in hibernating, free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears (Ursus arctos) - an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Peter Godsk; Arnemo, Jon; Swenson, Jon E; Jensen, Jan S; Galatius, Søren; Frøbert, Ole

    2014-09-16

    Despite 5-7 months of physical inactivity during hibernation, brown bears (Ursus arctos) are able to cope with physiological conditions that would be detrimental to humans. During hibernation, the tissue metabolic demands fall to 25% of the active state. Our objective was to assess cardiac function associated with metabolic depression in the hibernating vs. active states in free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears. We performed echocardiography on seven free-ranging brown bears in Dalarna, Sweden, anesthetized with medetomidine-zolazepam-tiletamine-ketamine during winter hibernation in February 2013 and with medetomidine-zolazepam-tiletamine during active state in June 2013. We measured cardiac output noninvasively using estimates of hemodynamics obtained by pulsed wave Doppler echocardiography and 2D imaging. Comparisons were made using paired T-tests. During hibernation, all hemodynamic indices were significantly decreased (hibernating vs. active state): mean heart rate was 26.0 (standard deviation (SD): 5.6) beats per min vs. 75.0 (SD: 17.1) per min (P=0.002), mean stroke volume 32.3 (SD: 5.2) ml vs. 47.1 (SD: 7.9) ml (P=0.008), mean cardiac output 0.86 (SD: 0.31) l/min vs. 3.54 (SD: 1.04) l/min (P=0.003), and mean cardiac index 0.63 (SD: 0.21) l/min/kg vs. 2.45 (SD: 0.52) l/min/ m2 (Pbears during hibernation, despite the absence of atrial arrhythmias and valvular disease. Free-ranging brown bears demonstrate hemodynamics comparable to humans during active state, whereas during hibernation, we documented extremely low-flow hemodynamics. Understanding these physiological changes in bears may help to gain insight into the mechanisms of cardiogenic shock and heart failure in humans.

  3. Review of Inferring Latent Attributes from Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    Ludu, Surabhi Singh

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews literature from 2011 to 2013 on how Latent attributes like gender, political leaning etc. can be inferred from a person's twitter and neighborhood data. Prediction of demographic data can bring value to businesses, can prove instrumental in legal investigation. Moreover, political leanings can be inferred from the wide variety of user data available on-line. The motive of this review is to understand how large data sets can be made from available twitter data. The tweeting ...

  4. Spontaneous Trait Inferences on Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Levordashka, Ana; Utz, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates whether spontaneous trait inferences occur under conditions characteristic of social media and networking sites: nonextreme, ostensibly self-generated content, simultaneous presentation of multiple cues, and self-paced browsing. We used an established measure of trait inferences (false recognition paradigm) and a direct assessment of impressions. Without being asked to do so, participants spontaneously formed impressions of people whose status updates they sa...

  5. Swift: Compiled Inference for Probabilistic Programming Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yi; Li, Lei; Russell, Stuart; Bodik, Rastislav

    2016-01-01

    A probabilistic program defines a probability measure over its semantic structures. One common goal of probabilistic programming languages (PPLs) is to compute posterior probabilities for arbitrary models and queries, given observed evidence, using a generic inference engine. Most PPL inference engines---even the compiled ones---incur significant runtime interpretation overhead, especially for contingent and open-universe models. This paper describes Swift, a compiler for the BLOG PPL. Swift-...

  6. Inferred performance of surface hydraulic barriers from landfill operational data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, B.A. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Austin, TX (United States); Bonaparte, R.; Othman, M.A. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    There are few published data on the field performance of surface hydraulic barriers (SHBs) used in waste containment or remediation applications. In contrast, operational data for liner systems used beneath landfills are widely available. These data are frequently collected and reported as a facility permit condition. This paper uses leachate collection system (LCS) and leak detection system (LDS) liquid flow rate and chemical quality data collected from modem landfill double-liner systems to infer the likely hydraulic performance of SHBs. Operational data for over 200 waste management unit liner systems are currently being collected and evaluated by the authors as part of an ongoing research investigation for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The top liner of the double-liner system for the units is either a geomembrane (GMB) alone, geomembrane overlying a geosynthetic clay liner (GMB/GCL), or geomembrane overlying a compacted clay liner (GMB/CCL). In this paper, select data from the USEPA study are used to: (i) infer the likely efficiencies of SHBs incorporating GMBs and overlain by drainage layers; and (ii) evaluate the effectiveness of SHBs in reducing water infiltration into, and drainage from, the underlying waste (i.e., source control). SHB efficiencies are inferred from calculated landfill liner efficiencies and then used to estimate average water percolation rates through SHBs as a function of site average annual rainfall. The effectiveness of SHBs for source control is investigated by comparing LCS liquid flow rates for open and closed landfill cells. The LCS flow rates for closed cells are also compared to the estimated average water percolation rates through SHBs presented in the paper.

  7. Polynomial Chaos Surrogates for Bayesian Inference

    KAUST Repository

    Le Maitre, Olivier

    2016-01-06

    The Bayesian inference is a popular probabilistic method to solve inverse problems, such as the identification of field parameter in a PDE model. The inference rely on the Bayes rule to update the prior density of the sought field, from observations, and derive its posterior distribution. In most cases the posterior distribution has no explicit form and has to be sampled, for instance using a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. In practice the prior field parameter is decomposed and truncated (e.g. by means of Karhunen- Lo´eve decomposition) to recast the inference problem into the inference of a finite number of coordinates. Although proved effective in many situations, the Bayesian inference as sketched above faces several difficulties requiring improvements. First, sampling the posterior can be a extremely costly task as it requires multiple resolutions of the PDE model for different values of the field parameter. Second, when the observations are not very much informative, the inferred parameter field can highly depends on its prior which can be somehow arbitrary. These issues have motivated the introduction of reduced modeling or surrogates for the (approximate) determination of the parametrized PDE solution and hyperparameters in the description of the prior field. Our contribution focuses on recent developments in these two directions: the acceleration of the posterior sampling by means of Polynomial Chaos expansions and the efficient treatment of parametrized covariance functions for the prior field. We also discuss the possibility of making such approach adaptive to further improve its efficiency.

  8. Strong ground motion inferred from liquefaction caused by the 1811-1812 New Madrid, Missouri, earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Peak ground accelerations (PGAs) in the epicentral region of the 1811–1812 New Madrid, Missouri, earthquakes are inferred from liquefaction to have been no greater than ∼0.35g. PGA is inferred in an 11,380  km2 area in the Lower Mississippi Valley in Arkansas and Missouri where liquefaction was extensive in 1811–1812. PGA was inferred by applying liquefaction probability curves, which were originally developed for liquefaction hazard mapping, to detailed maps of liquefaction by Obermeier (1989). The low PGA is inferred because both a shallow (1.5 m deep) water table and a large moment magnitude (M 7.7) earthquake were assumed in the analysis. If a deep (5.0 m) water table and a small magnitude (M 6.8) earthquake are assumed, the maximum inferred PGA is 1.10g. Both inferred PGA values are based on an assumed and poorly constrained correction for sand aging. If an aging correction is not assumed, then the inferred PGA is no greater than 0.22g. A low PGA value may be explained by nonlinear site response. Soils in the study area have an averageVS30 of 220±15  m/s. A low inferred PGA is consistent with PGA values estimated from ground‐motion prediction equations that have been proposed for the New Madrid seismic zone when these estimates are corrected for nonlinear soil site effects. This application of liquefaction probability curves demonstrates their potential usefulness in paleoseismology.

  9. Estimating uncertainty of inference for validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, Jane M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ross, Timothy J [UNM

    2010-09-30

    We present a validation process based upon the concept that validation is an inference-making activity. This has always been true, but the association has not been as important before as it is now. Previously, theory had been confirmed by more data, and predictions were possible based on data. The process today is to infer from theory to code and from code to prediction, making the role of prediction somewhat automatic, and a machine function. Validation is defined as determining the degree to which a model and code is an accurate representation of experimental test data. Imbedded in validation is the intention to use the computer code to predict. To predict is to accept the conclusion that an observable final state will manifest; therefore, prediction is an inference whose goodness relies on the validity of the code. Quantifying the uncertainty of a prediction amounts to quantifying the uncertainty of validation, and this involves the characterization of uncertainties inherent in theory/models/codes and the corresponding data. An introduction to inference making and its associated uncertainty is provided as a foundation for the validation problem. A mathematical construction for estimating the uncertainty in the validation inference is then presented, including a possibility distribution constructed to represent the inference uncertainty for validation under uncertainty. The estimation of inference uncertainty for validation is illustrated using data and calculations from Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The ICF measurements of neutron yield and ion temperature were obtained for direct-drive inertial fusion capsules at the Omega laser facility. The glass capsules, containing the fusion gas, were systematically selected with the intent of establishing a reproducible baseline of high-yield 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} neutron output. The deuterium-tritium ratio in these experiments was varied to study its influence upon yield. This paper on validation inference is the

  10. Deep Learning for Population Genetic Inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Sheehan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Given genomic variation data from multiple individuals, computing the likelihood of complex population genetic models is often infeasible. To circumvent this problem, we introduce a novel likelihood-free inference framework by applying deep learning, a powerful modern technique in machine learning. Deep learning makes use of multilayer neural networks to learn a feature-based function from the input (e.g., hundreds of correlated summary statistics of data to the output (e.g., population genetic parameters of interest. We demonstrate that deep learning can be effectively employed for population genetic inference and learning informative features of data. As a concrete application, we focus on the challenging problem of jointly inferring natural selection and demography (in the form of a population size change history. Our method is able to separate the global nature of demography from the local nature of selection, without sequential steps for these two factors. Studying demography and selection jointly is motivated by Drosophila, where pervasive selection confounds demographic analysis. We apply our method to 197 African Drosophila melanogaster genomes from Zambia to infer both their overall demography, and regions of their genome under selection. We find many regions of the genome that have experienced hard sweeps, and fewer under selection on standing variation (soft sweep or balancing selection. Interestingly, we find that soft sweeps and balancing selection occur more frequently closer to the centromere of each chromosome. In addition, our demographic inference suggests that previously estimated bottlenecks for African Drosophila melanogaster are too extreme.

  11. Deep Learning for Population Genetic Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Sara; Song, Yun S.

    2016-01-01

    Given genomic variation data from multiple individuals, computing the likelihood of complex population genetic models is often infeasible. To circumvent this problem, we introduce a novel likelihood-free inference framework by applying deep learning, a powerful modern technique in machine learning. Deep learning makes use of multilayer neural networks to learn a feature-based function from the input (e.g., hundreds of correlated summary statistics of data) to the output (e.g., population genetic parameters of interest). We demonstrate that deep learning can be effectively employed for population genetic inference and learning informative features of data. As a concrete application, we focus on the challenging problem of jointly inferring natural selection and demography (in the form of a population size change history). Our method is able to separate the global nature of demography from the local nature of selection, without sequential steps for these two factors. Studying demography and selection jointly is motivated by Drosophila, where pervasive selection confounds demographic analysis. We apply our method to 197 African Drosophila melanogaster genomes from Zambia to infer both their overall demography, and regions of their genome under selection. We find many regions of the genome that have experienced hard sweeps, and fewer under selection on standing variation (soft sweep) or balancing selection. Interestingly, we find that soft sweeps and balancing selection occur more frequently closer to the centromere of each chromosome. In addition, our demographic inference suggests that previously estimated bottlenecks for African Drosophila melanogaster are too extreme. PMID:27018908

  12. Computationally efficient Bayesian inference for inverse problems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzouk, Youssef M.; Najm, Habib N.; Rahn, Larry A.

    2007-10-01

    Bayesian statistics provides a foundation for inference from noisy and incomplete data, a natural mechanism for regularization in the form of prior information, and a quantitative assessment of uncertainty in the inferred results. Inverse problems - representing indirect estimation of model parameters, inputs, or structural components - can be fruitfully cast in this framework. Complex and computationally intensive forward models arising in physical applications, however, can render a Bayesian approach prohibitive. This difficulty is compounded by high-dimensional model spaces, as when the unknown is a spatiotemporal field. We present new algorithmic developments for Bayesian inference in this context, showing strong connections with the forward propagation of uncertainty. In particular, we introduce a stochastic spectral formulation that dramatically accelerates the Bayesian solution of inverse problems via rapid evaluation of a surrogate posterior. We also explore dimensionality reduction for the inference of spatiotemporal fields, using truncated spectral representations of Gaussian process priors. These new approaches are demonstrated on scalar transport problems arising in contaminant source inversion and in the inference of inhomogeneous material or transport properties. We also present a Bayesian framework for parameter estimation in stochastic models, where intrinsic stochasticity may be intermingled with observational noise. Evaluation of a likelihood function may not be analytically tractable in these cases, and thus several alternative Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) schemes, operating on the product space of the observations and the parameters, are introduced.

  13. Phylogeny inference based on spectral graph clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Zhou, Song-Yu; He, Jian-Guo; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2011-04-01

    Phylogeny inference is an importance issue in computational biology. Some early approaches based on characteristics such as the maximum parsimony algorithm and the maximum likelihood algorithm will become intractable when the number of taxonomic units is large. Recent algorithms based on distance data which adopt an agglomerative scheme are widely used for phylogeny inference. However, they have to recursively merge the nearest pair of taxa and estimate a distance matrix; this may enlarge the error gradually, and lead to an inaccurate tree topology. In this study, a splitting algorithm is proposed for phylogeny inference by using the spectral graph clustering (SGC) technique. The SGC algorithm splits graphs by using the maximum cut criterion and circumvents optimization problems through solving a generalized eigenvalue system. The promising features of the proposed algorithm are the following: (i) using a heuristic strategy for constructing phylogenies from certain distance functions, which are not even additive; (ii) distance matrices do not have to be estimated recursively; (iii) inferring a more accurate tree topology than that of the Neighbor-joining (NJ) algorithm on simulated datasets; and (iv) strongly supporting hypotheses induced by other methods for Baculovirus genomes. Our numerical experiments confirm that the SGC algorithm is efficient for phylogeny inference. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  14. Continuity of the Maximum-Entropy Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Weis

    2014-09-01

    We study the inverse problem of inferring the state of a finite-level quantum system from expected values of a fixed set of observables, by maximizing a continuous ranking function. We have proved earlier that the maximum-entropy inference can be a discontinuous map from the convex set of expected values to the convex set of states because the image contains states of reduced support, while this map restricts to a smooth parametrization of a Gibbsian family of fully supported states. Here we prove for arbitrary ranking functions that the inference is continuous up to boundary points. This follows from a continuity condition in terms of the openness of the restricted linear map from states to their expected values. The openness condition shows also that ranking functions with a discontinuous inference are typical. Moreover it shows that the inference is continuous in the restriction to any polytope which implies that a discontinuity belongs to the quantum domain of non-commutative observables and that a geodesic closure of a Gibbsian family equals the set of maximum-entropy states. We discuss eight descriptions of the set of maximum-entropy states with proofs of accuracy and an analysis of deviations.

  15. Deep Learning for Population Genetic Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Sara; Song, Yun S

    2016-03-01

    Given genomic variation data from multiple individuals, computing the likelihood of complex population genetic models is often infeasible. To circumvent this problem, we introduce a novel likelihood-free inference framework by applying deep learning, a powerful modern technique in machine learning. Deep learning makes use of multilayer neural networks to learn a feature-based function from the input (e.g., hundreds of correlated summary statistics of data) to the output (e.g., population genetic parameters of interest). We demonstrate that deep learning can be effectively employed for population genetic inference and learning informative features of data. As a concrete application, we focus on the challenging problem of jointly inferring natural selection and demography (in the form of a population size change history). Our method is able to separate the global nature of demography from the local nature of selection, without sequential steps for these two factors. Studying demography and selection jointly is motivated by Drosophila, where pervasive selection confounds demographic analysis. We apply our method to 197 African Drosophila melanogaster genomes from Zambia to infer both their overall demography, and regions of their genome under selection. We find many regions of the genome that have experienced hard sweeps, and fewer under selection on standing variation (soft sweep) or balancing selection. Interestingly, we find that soft sweeps and balancing selection occur more frequently closer to the centromere of each chromosome. In addition, our demographic inference suggests that previously estimated bottlenecks for African Drosophila melanogaster are too extreme.

  16. Contraceptive non-use and emergency contraceptive use at first sexual intercourse among nearly 12 000 Scandinavian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Sonia; Juul, Kirsten E; Munk, Christian; Hansen, Bo T; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Liaw, Kai-Li; Nygård, Mari; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe recent patterns of contraceptive use at first sexual intercourse and to examine whether selected factors are associated with non-use and emergency contraceptive pill use at first sexual intercourse, among 18- to 26-year-old women from Denmark, Norway and Sweden. This was a population-based, questionnaire study of randomly chosen 18- to 26-year-old Scandinavian women. The prevalence of contraception methods used at first sexual intercourse was calculated. Factors associated with contraceptive non-use and emergency contraceptive pill use at first sexual intercourse were determined using log binomial models. The prevalence of contraceptive non-use and emergency contraceptive pill use was lowest in Denmark (9.6 and 2.1%, respectively) compared with Norway (14.1 and 4.4%) and Sweden (16.6 and 4.5%). The risk of contraceptive non-use increased in women who had first sexual intercourse at or before 14 years of age (13-14 years: prevalence ratio 1.40; 95% confidence interval 1.24-1.58). The risk of both non-use and emergency contraceptive pill use increased when the partner at first sexual intercourse was 20 years or older, and with increasing age difference between the partner and the woman at her first sexual intercourse. Smoking initiation prior to first sexual intercourse increased risk of contraceptive non-use (prevalence ratio 1.70; 95% confidence interval 1.50-1.92), and alcohol initiation prior to first sexual intercourse increased risk of emergency contraceptive pill use at first sexual intercourse (prevalence ratio 1.95; 95% confidence interval 1.49-2.54). Contraceptive non-use at first sexual intercourse was strongly associated with early age at first sexual intercourse. Emergency contraceptive pill and contraceptive non-use at first sexual intercourse were both strongly associated with increasing partner age and an increasing difference in age between the woman and her partner. Hence, young women should be educated to

  17. Middle Ordovician subduction of continental crust in the Scandinavian Caledonides - an example from Tjeliken, Seve Nappe Complex, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassmer, Kathrin; Andersson, Barbro; Klonowska, Iwona; Walczak, Katarzyna; Froitzheim, Nikolaus; Majka, Jarosław; Fonseca, Raul

    2017-04-01

    The Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) in the Scandinavian Caledonides represents the distal part of the margin of Baltica, which was subducted to depth of UHP metamorphism during the Caledonian orogeny. In contrast to the ages determined for the Western Gneiss Complex in Western Norway (ca. 420 - 400 Ma) which is interpreted to represent the subducted Baltican basement , the ages in the SNC and related nappes are overall older (ca. 500-430 Ma), with a general trend of higher ages in the North (Norrbotten) than in the South (Jämtland). As the previously published ages in the SNC are quite diverging it is difficult to reconstruct the tectonometamorphic history of this unit. Therefore exact dating with different methods is necessary to get a better constraint on the exact timing of subduction. We present new age determinations on an eclogite and a garnet-phengite schist from Tjeliken in northern Jämtland, Sweden. There the SNC can be divided into three tectonic units, an Eastern, Middle and Western belt. The locality of Mt. Tjeliken is situated in the Eastern Belt. Thermodynamic modelling of the eclogite yielded a pressure of 25-26 kbar at 650-700 °C (Majka et al. 2014). Previous dating produced diverging ages of 460±4 Ma (Sm-Nd mineral isochrones, Brueckner & Van Roermund 2007) and 446±1 Ma (U-Pb zircon dating, Root & Corfu 2012). In this study metamorphic rims of zircons from the garnet-phengite schist were dated using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and yielded a concordia age of 458.9 ± 2.5 Ma. Lu-Hf garnet-whole rock dating yielded 458.5 ± 1.1 Ma for the eclogite. Garnet in the eclogite shows a prograde major-element zoning and a concentration of Lu in the cores, indicating that this age is related to garnet growth during pressure increase, i.e. subduction. The identical ages from both rock types confirm subduction of the outer margin of Baltica during the Middle Ordovician in a fast subduction-exhumation cycle. The fact that Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf dating yielded

  18. Using Alien Coins to Test Whether Simple Inference Is Bayesian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassey, Peter; Hawkins, Guy E.; Donkin, Chris; Brown, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Reasoning and inference are well-studied aspects of basic cognition that have been explained as statistically optimal Bayesian inference. Using a simplified experimental design, we conducted quantitative comparisons between Bayesian inference and human inference at the level of individuals. In 3 experiments, with more than 13,000 participants, we…

  19. A Learning Algorithm for Multimodal Grammar Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ulizia, A; Ferri, F; Grifoni, P

    2011-12-01

    The high costs of development and maintenance of multimodal grammars in integrating and understanding input in multimodal interfaces lead to the investigation of novel algorithmic solutions in automating grammar generation and in updating processes. Many algorithms for context-free grammar inference have been developed in the natural language processing literature. An extension of these algorithms toward the inference of multimodal grammars is necessary for multimodal input processing. In this paper, we propose a novel grammar inference mechanism that allows us to learn a multimodal grammar from its positive samples of multimodal sentences. The algorithm first generates the multimodal grammar that is able to parse the positive samples of sentences and, afterward, makes use of two learning operators and the minimum description length metrics in improving the grammar description and in avoiding the over-generalization problem. The experimental results highlight the acceptable performances of the algorithm proposed in this paper since it has a very high probability of parsing valid sentences.

  20. Grammatical inference algorithms, routines and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wieczorek, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on grammatical inference, presenting classic and modern methods of grammatical inference from the perspective of practitioners. To do so, it employs the Python programming language to present all of the methods discussed. Grammatical inference is a field that lies at the intersection of multiple disciplines, with contributions from computational linguistics, pattern recognition, machine learning, computational biology, formal learning theory and many others. Though the book is largely practical, it also includes elements of learning theory, combinatorics on words, the theory of automata and formal languages, plus references to real-world problems. The listings presented here can be directly copied and pasted into other programs, thus making the book a valuable source of ready recipes for students, academic researchers, and programmers alike, as well as an inspiration for their further development.>.

  1. Examples in parametric inference with R

    CERN Document Server

    Dixit, Ulhas Jayram

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses examples in parametric inference with R. Combining basic theory with modern approaches, it presents the latest developments and trends in statistical inference for students who do not have an advanced mathematical and statistical background. The topics discussed in the book are fundamental and common to many fields of statistical inference and thus serve as a point of departure for in-depth study. The book is divided into eight chapters: Chapter 1 provides an overview of topics on sufficiency and completeness, while Chapter 2 briefly discusses unbiased estimation. Chapter 3 focuses on the study of moments and maximum likelihood estimators, and Chapter 4 presents bounds for the variance. In Chapter 5, topics on consistent estimator are discussed. Chapter 6 discusses Bayes, while Chapter 7 studies some more powerful tests. Lastly, Chapter 8 examines unbiased and other tests. Senior undergraduate and graduate students in statistics and mathematics, and those who have taken an introductory cou...

  2. Parameter inference with estimated covariance matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellentin, Elena; Heavens, Alan F.

    2016-02-01

    When inferring parameters from a Gaussian-distributed data set by computing a likelihood, a covariance matrix is needed that describes the data errors and their correlations. If the covariance matrix is not known a priori, it may be estimated and thereby becomes a random object with some intrinsic uncertainty itself. We show how to infer parameters in the presence of such an estimated covariance matrix, by marginalizing over the true covariance matrix, conditioned on its estimated value. This leads to a likelihood function that is no longer Gaussian, but rather an adapted version of a multivariate t-distribution, which has the same numerical complexity as the multivariate Gaussian. As expected, marginalization over the true covariance matrix improves inference when compared with Hartlap et al.'s method, which uses an unbiased estimate of the inverse covariance matrix but still assumes that the likelihood is Gaussian.

  3. Composite likelihood method for inferring local pedigrees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ko, Amy; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Pedigrees contain information about the genealogical relationships among individuals and are of fundamental importance in many areas of genetic studies. However, pedigrees are often unknown and must be inferred from genetic data. Despite the importance of pedigree inference, existing methods...... are limited to inferring only close relationships or analyzing a small number of individuals or loci. We present a simulated annealing method for estimating pedigrees in large samples of otherwise seemingly unrelated individuals using genome-wide SNP data. The method supports complex pedigree structures...... such as polygamous families, multi-generational families, and pedigrees in which many of the member individuals are missing. Computational speed is greatly enhanced by the use of a composite likelihood function which approximates the full likelihood. We validate our method on simulated data and show that it can...

  4. Statistical inference based on divergence measures

    CERN Document Server

    Pardo, Leandro

    2005-01-01

    The idea of using functionals of Information Theory, such as entropies or divergences, in statistical inference is not new. However, in spite of the fact that divergence statistics have become a very good alternative to the classical likelihood ratio test and the Pearson-type statistic in discrete models, many statisticians remain unaware of this powerful approach.Statistical Inference Based on Divergence Measures explores classical problems of statistical inference, such as estimation and hypothesis testing, on the basis of measures of entropy and divergence. The first two chapters form an overview, from a statistical perspective, of the most important measures of entropy and divergence and study their properties. The author then examines the statistical analysis of discrete multivariate data with emphasis is on problems in contingency tables and loglinear models using phi-divergence test statistics as well as minimum phi-divergence estimators. The final chapter looks at testing in general populations, prese...

  5. Bayesian Inference Methods for Sparse Channel Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Lovmand

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) with application to radio channel estimation. As opposed to the classical approach for sparse signal representation, we focus on the problem of inferring complex signals. Our investigations within SBL constitute the basis for the development...... of Bayesian inference algorithms for sparse channel estimation. Sparse inference methods aim at finding the sparse representation of a signal given in some overcomplete dictionary of basis vectors. Within this context, one of our main contributions to the field of SBL is a hierarchical representation...... complex prior representation achieve improved sparsity representations in low signalto- noise ratio as opposed to state-of-the-art sparse estimators. This result is of particular importance for the applicability of the algorithms in the field of channel estimation. We then derive various iterative...

  6. Bayesian Inference of Elastic Properties with Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    submitted to Journal Name July 6, 2017 Distribution A. Approved for public release (PA): distribution unlimited. orientation are no longer necessary...θ) is derived here. All derivatives are com-375 puted with the chain rule. P (θ) is assumed equal to one to simplify the376 math (the non-negativity...monte carlo on embedded manifolds,675 Scandinavian Journal of Statistics 40 (2013) 825–845.676 [26] Stan Development Team, Stan Modeling Language

  7. The NIMO Scandinavian Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigstad, Svein Oskar; Haaber, Anne; Bajor, Antal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intravenous iron allows for efficient and well-tolerated treatment in iron deficiency and is routinely used in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Objective: The aims of this study were to determine the probability of relapse of iron deficiency over time and to investigate treatment...... routine, effectiveness, and safety of iron isomaltoside. Methods: A total of 282 patients treated with iron isomaltoside were observed for two treatments or a minimum of one year. Results: Out of 282 patients, 82 had Crohn's disease and 67 had ulcerative colitis. Another 133 patients had chronic blood...... loss, malabsorption, or malignancy. Patients who received an iron isomaltoside dose above 1000 mg had a 65% lower probability of needing retreatment compared with those given 1000 mg. A clinically significant treatment response was shown, but in 71/191 (37%) of patients, anaemia was not corrected...

  8. Housing Culture: Scandinavian Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roesdahl, Else

    2009-01-01

    Artiklen giver en oversigt over både traditioner og nye tendenser i udforskningen af boligkultur i de nordiske lande. Desuden diskuteres konkrete aspekter af moderne forskning på dette felt i Danmark, Norge, Sverige, Island og Grønland. Eksemplerne rækker fra vikingetid til senmiddelalder og...

  9. Introduction: Situating Scandinavian Colonialism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naum, Magdalena; Nordin, Jonas M.

    2013-01-01

    of the riches of the world and of pejorative descriptions of the people outside of Europe. The life, the travels and the writing of Matsson Kiöping encapsulate the essential questions of this book – what was Scandinavia’s place in the European exploration and exploitation in the early modern period? How were...

  10. The Scandinavian regional model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torfing, Jacob; Lidström, Anders; Røiseland, Asbjørn

    2015-01-01

    This article maps how the sub-national regional levels of governance in Denmark, Norway and Sweden have changed from a high degree of institutional convergence to a pattern of institutional divergence. It analyses the similarities and differences in the changes in regional governance and discusse...

  11. Gene-network inference by message passing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, A.; Pagnani, A.; Weigt, M.; Zecchina, R.

    2008-01-01

    The inference of gene-regulatory processes from gene-expression data belongs to the major challenges of computational systems biology. Here we address the problem from a statistical-physics perspective and develop a message-passing algorithm which is able to infer sparse, directed and combinatorial regulatory mechanisms. Using the replica technique, the algorithmic performance can be characterized analytically for artificially generated data. The algorithm is applied to genome-wide expression data of baker's yeast under various environmental conditions. We find clear cases of combinatorial control, and enrichment in common functional annotations of regulated genes and their regulators.

  12. Investigating Mathematics Teachers' Thoughts of Statistical Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Research on statistical cognition and application suggests that statistical inference concepts are commonly misunderstood by students and even misinterpreted by researchers. Although some research has been done on students' misunderstanding or misconceptions of confidence intervals (CIs), few studies explore either students' or mathematics…

  13. Colligation, Or the Logical Inference of Interconnection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Peter

    1998-01-01

    laws or assumptions. Yet interconnection as an abstract concept seems to be without scientific underpinning in pure logic. Adopting a historical viewpoint, our aim is to show that the reasoning of interconnection may be identified with a neglected kind of logical inference, called "colligation...

  14. Colligation or, The Logical Inference of Interconnection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franksen, Ole Immanuel; Falster, Peter

    2000-01-01

    laws or assumptions. Yet interconnection as an abstract concept seems to be without scientific underpinning in oure logic. Adopting a historical viewpoint, our aim is to show that the reasoning of interconnection may be identified with a neglected kind of logical inference, called "colligation...

  15. Ignorability in Statistical and Probabilistic Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2005-01-01

    When dealing with incomplete data in statistical learning, or incomplete observations in probabilistic inference, one needs to distinguish the fact that a certain event is observed from the fact that the observed event has happened. Since the modeling and computational complexities entailed by ma...

  16. The importance of learning when making inferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg Rieskamp

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The assumption that people possess a repertoire of strategies to solve the inference problems they face has been made repeatedly. The experimental findings of two previous studies on strategy selection are reexamined from a learning perspective, which argues that people learn to select strategies for making probabilistic inferences. This learning process is modeled with the strategy selection learning (SSL theory, which assumes that people develop subjective expectancies for the strategies they have. They select strategies proportional to their expectancies, which are updated on the basis of experience. For the study by Newell, Weston, and Shanks (2003 it can be shown that people did not anticipate the success of a strategy from the beginning of the experiment. Instead, the behavior observed at the end of the experiment was the result of a learning process that can be described by the SSL theory. For the second study, by Br"oder and Schiffer (2006, the SSL theory is able to provide an explanation for why participants only slowly adapted to new environments in a dynamic inference situation. The reanalysis of the previous studies illustrates the importance of learning for probabilistic inferences.

  17. Inference and the Introductory Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuch, Maxine; Regan, Matt; Wild, Chris; Budgett, Stephanie; Forbes, Sharleen; Harraway, John; Parsonage, Ross

    2011-01-01

    This article sets out some of the rationale and arguments for making major changes to the teaching and learning of statistical inference in introductory courses at our universities by changing from a norm-based, mathematical approach to more conceptually accessible computer-based approaches. The core problem of the inferential argument with its…

  18. Causal network inference using biochemical kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Chris J; Dondelinger, Frank; Bayani, Nora; Korkola, James; Gray, Joe W; Mukherjee, Sach

    2014-09-01

    Networks are widely used as structural summaries of biochemical systems. Statistical estimation of networks is usually based on linear or discrete models. However, the dynamics of biochemical systems are generally non-linear, suggesting that suitable non-linear formulations may offer gains with respect to causal network inference and aid in associated prediction problems. We present a general framework for network inference and dynamical prediction using time course data that is rooted in non-linear biochemical kinetics. This is achieved by considering a dynamical system based on a chemical reaction graph with associated kinetic parameters. Both the graph and kinetic parameters are treated as unknown; inference is carried out within a Bayesian framework. This allows prediction of dynamical behavior even when the underlying reaction graph itself is unknown or uncertain. Results, based on (i) data simulated from a mechanistic model of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and (ii) phosphoproteomic data from cancer cell lines, demonstrate that non-linear formulations can yield gains in causal network inference and permit dynamical prediction and uncertainty quantification in the challenging setting where the reaction graph is unknown. MATLAB R2014a software is available to download from warwick.ac.uk/chrisoates. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Understanding COBOL systems using inferred types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Deursen (Arie); L.M.F. Moonen (Leon)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIn a typical COBOL program, the data division consists of 50 of the lines of code. Automatic type inference can help to understand the large collections of variable declarations contained therein, showing how variables are related based on their actual usage. The most problematic aspect

  20. Spurious correlations and inference in landscape genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman; Erin L. Landguth

    2010-01-01

    Reliable interpretation of landscape genetic analyses depends on statistical methods that have high power to identify the correct process driving gene flow while rejecting incorrect alternative hypotheses. Little is known about statistical power and inference in individual-based landscape genetics. Our objective was to evaluate the power of causalmodelling with partial...

  1. LINFER: inferring implications from the WALS database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D.

    2008-01-01

    In linguistic typology, implications typically emerge as a result of in-depth study of a few related linguistic parameters. Another way to find implications is to infer them from a typological database with a large number of variables. In this contribution, I discuss the LINFER computer program that

  2. Computational statistics using the Bayesian Inference Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    2013-09-01

    This paper introduces the Bayesian Inference Engine (BIE), a general parallel, optimized software package for parameter inference and model selection. This package is motivated by the analysis needs of modern astronomical surveys and the need to organize and reuse expensive derived data. The BIE is the first platform for computational statistics designed explicitly to enable Bayesian update and model comparison for astronomical problems. Bayesian update is based on the representation of high-dimensional posterior distributions using metric-ball-tree based kernel density estimation. Among its algorithmic offerings, the BIE emphasizes hybrid tempered Markov chain Monte Carlo schemes that robustly sample multimodal posterior distributions in high-dimensional parameter spaces. Moreover, the BIE implements a full persistence or serialization system that stores the full byte-level image of the running inference and previously characterized posterior distributions for later use. Two new algorithms to compute the marginal likelihood from the posterior distribution, developed for and implemented in the BIE, enable model comparison for complex models and data sets. Finally, the BIE was designed to be a collaborative platform for applying Bayesian methodology to astronomy. It includes an extensible object-oriented and easily extended framework that implements every aspect of the Bayesian inference. By providing a variety of statistical algorithms for all phases of the inference problem, a scientist may explore a variety of approaches with a single model and data implementation. Additional technical details and download details are available from http://www.astro.umass.edu/bie. The BIE is distributed under the GNU General Public License.

  3. PAnalyzer: A software tool for protein inference in shotgun proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto Gorka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein inference from peptide identifications in shotgun proteomics must deal with ambiguities that arise due to the presence of peptides shared between different proteins, which is common in higher eukaryotes. Recently data independent acquisition (DIA approaches have emerged as an alternative to the traditional data dependent acquisition (DDA in shotgun proteomics experiments. MSE is the term used to name one of the DIA approaches used in QTOF instruments. MSE data require specialized software to process acquired spectra and to perform peptide and protein identifications. However the software available at the moment does not group the identified proteins in a transparent way by taking into account peptide evidence categories. Furthermore the inspection, comparison and report of the obtained results require tedious manual intervention. Here we report a software tool to address these limitations for MSE data. Results In this paper we present PAnalyzer, a software tool focused on the protein inference process of shotgun proteomics. Our approach considers all the identified proteins and groups them when necessary indicating their confidence using different evidence categories. PAnalyzer can read protein identification files in the XML output format of the ProteinLynx Global Server (PLGS software provided by Waters Corporation for their MSE data, and also in the mzIdentML format recently standardized by HUPO-PSI. Multiple files can also be read simultaneously and are considered as technical replicates. Results are saved to CSV, HTML and mzIdentML (in the case of a single mzIdentML input file files. An MSE analysis of a real sample is presented to compare the results of PAnalyzer and ProteinLynx Global Server. Conclusions We present a software tool to deal with the ambiguities that arise in the protein inference process. Key contributions are support for MSE data analysis by ProteinLynx Global Server and technical replicates

  4. Effects of Scandinavian hydro power on storage needs in a fully renewable European power system for various transmission capacity scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kies, Alexander; Nag, Kabitri; von Bremen, Lueder; Lorenz, Elke; Heinemann, Detlev

    2015-04-01

    can reduce storage needs by up to 50% with respect to stored energy. This requires however large transmission capacities between the major hydro power producers in Scandinavia and the largest consumers of electrical energy in Western Europe. We show how Scandinavian hydro power can reduce storage needs in dependency of the transmission grid for two fully renewable scenarios: The first one has its wind and pv generation capacities distributed according to an empirically derived approach. The second scenario has an optimal spatial distribution to minimize storage needs distribution of wind and pv generation capacities across Europe. We show that in both cases hydro power together with a well developed transmission grid has the potential to contribute a large share to the solution of the generation-consumption mismatch problem. The work is part of the RESTORE 2050 project (BMBF) that investigates the requirements for cross-country grid extensions, usage of storage technologies and capacities and the development of new balancing technologies.

  5. Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC): Scientific objectives for the planned 2.5 km deep COSC-2 borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhlin, Christopher; Anderson, Mark; Dopson, Mark; Lorenz, Henning; Pascal, Christophe; Piazolo, Sandra; Roberts, Nick; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2016-04-01

    The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) scientific drilling project employs two fully cored boreholes for investigating mountain building processes at mid-crustal levels in a deeply eroded Paleozoic collisional orogen of Alpine-Himalayan size. The two COSC boreholes will provide a unique c. 5 km deep composite section from a hot allochthon through the underlying 'colder' nappes, the main décollement and into the basement of the collisional underriding plate. COSC's unprecedented wealth of geophysical field and borehole data combined with the petrology, geochronology and rock physics information obtained from the drill cores will develop into an integrated model for a major collisional mountain belt. This can be utilized as an analogue to better understand similar modern tectonic settings (Himalaya, Izu-Bonin-Mariana, amongst others) and, thus, advance our understanding of such complex systems and how they affect the (human) environment. COSC investigations and drilling activities are focused in the Åre-Mörsil area (Sweden) of central Scandinavia. The first drill hole, COSC-1, was completed in late August 2014 with near 100% core recovery down to 2.5 km. It targeted the high-grade metamorphic Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) and its contact with the underlying allochthon, investigating how this metasedimentary unit, that was initially deeply subducted during orogeny, was exhumed and then, still hot, emplaced as an allochthon onto the foreland of the underriding plate. COSC-2 will investigate the main Caledonian décollement, which is the major detachment that separates the Caledonian allochthons from the autochthonous basement of the Fennoscandian Shield, and the character of the deformation in the basement. Combined seismic, magnetotelluric (MT) and magnetic data provide control on the basement structure and the depth to the main décollement, believed to be hosted in the carbon-rich highly conductive Alum Shale. Key targets are to understand the

  6. Lunar true polar wander inferred from polar hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, M A; Miller, R S; Keane, J T; Laneuville, M; Paige, D A; Matsuyama, I; Lawrence, D J; Crotts, A; Poston, M J

    2016-03-24

    The earliest dynamic and thermal history of the Moon is not well understood. The hydrogen content of deposits near the lunar poles may yield insight into this history, because these deposits (which are probably composed of water ice) survive only if they remain in permanent shadow. If the orientation of the Moon has changed, then the locations of the shadowed regions will also have changed. The polar hydrogen deposits have been mapped by orbiting neutron spectrometers, and their observed spatial distribution does not match the expected distribution of water ice inferred from present-day lunar temperatures. This finding is in contrast to the distribution of volatiles observed in similar thermal environments at Mercury's poles. Here we show that polar hydrogen preserves evidence that the spin axis of the Moon has shifted: the hydrogen deposits are antipodal and displaced equally from each pole along opposite longitudes. From the direction and magnitude of the inferred reorientation, and from analysis of the moments of inertia of the Moon, we hypothesize that this change in the spin axis, known as true polar wander, was caused by a low-density thermal anomaly beneath the Procellarum region. Radiogenic heating within this region resulted in the bulk of lunar mare volcanism and altered the density structure of the Moon, changing its moments of inertia. This resulted in true polar wander consistent with the observed remnant polar hydrogen. This thermal anomaly still exists and, in part, controls the current orientation of the Moon. The Procellarum region was most geologically active early in lunar history, which implies that polar wander initiated billions of years ago and that a large portion of the measured polar hydrogen is ancient, recording early delivery of water to the inner Solar System. Our hypothesis provides an explanation for the antipodal distribution of lunar polar hydrogen, and connects polar volatiles to the geologic and geophysical evolution of the Moon

  7. Inference of facultative mobility in the enigmatic Ediacaran organism Parvancorina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darroch, Simon A F; Rahman, Imran A; Gibson, Brandt; Racicot, Rachel A; Laflamme, Marc

    2017-05-01

    Establishing how Ediacaran organisms moved and fed is critical to deciphering their ecological and evolutionary significance, but has long been confounded by their non-analogue body plans. Here, we use computational fluid dynamics to quantitatively analyse water flow around the Ediacaran taxon Parvancorina, thereby testing between competing models for feeding mode and mobility. The results show that flow was not distributed evenly across the organism, but was directed towards localized areas; this allows us to reject osmotrophy, and instead supports either suspension feeding or detritivory. Moreover, the patterns of recirculating flow differ substantially with orientation to the current, suggesting that if Parvancorina was a suspension feeder, it would have been most efficient if it was able to re-orient itself with respect to current direction, and thus ensure flow was directed towards feeding structures. Our simulations also demonstrate that the amount of drag varied with orientation, indicating that Parvancorina would have greatly benefited from adjusting its position to minimize drag. Inference of facultative mobility in Parvancorina suggests that Ediacaran benthic ecosystems might have possessed a higher proportion of mobile taxa than currently appreciated from trace fossil studies. Furthermore, this inference of movement suggests the presence of musculature or appendages that are not preserved in fossils, but which would noneltheless support a bilaterian affinity for Parvancorina. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Kári á Rógvi, West-Nordic Constitutional Judicial Review: A Comparative Study of Scandinavian Judicial Review and Judicial Reasoning (Copenhagen: Djøf Publishing, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael L. Johnstone

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Review of the following book: Kári á Rógvi, West-Nordic Constitutional Judicial Review: A Comparative Study of Scandinavian Judicial Review and Judicial Reasoning (Copenhagen: Djøf Publishing, 2013. pp. 364, 45.00 GBP (paperback. ISBN: 8757429154

  9. Variants within the calpain-10 gene on chromosome 2q37 (NIDDM1) and relationships to type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and impaired acute insulin secretion among Scandinavian Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren K; Urhammer, Søren A; Berglund, Lars Erik

    2002-01-01

    Variations in the calpain-10 gene (CAPN10) have been identified among Mexican-Americans, and an at-risk haplotype combination (112/121) defined by three polymorphisms, UCSNP-43, -19, and -63, confers increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Here we examine the three polymorphisms in 1,594 Scandinavian ...

  10. Role of blood pressure and other variables in the differential cardiovascular event rates noted in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulter, Neil R; Wedel, Hans; Dahlöf, Björn

    2005-01-01

    Results of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA) show significantly lower rates of coronary and stroke events in individuals allocated an amlodipine-based combination drug regimen than in those allocated an atenolol-based combination drug regimen (HR...

  11. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eFitzgerald

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signalling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behaviour. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings.

  12. Inferences on Children’s Reading Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier González García

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the non-literal information of a text, which can be inferred from key elements or clues offered by the text itself. This kind of text is called implicit text or inference, due to the thinking process that it stimulates. The explicit resources that lead to information retrieval are related to others of implicit information, which have increased their relevance. In this study, during two courses, how two teachers interpret three stories and how they establish a debate dividing the class into three student groups, was analyzed. The sample was formed by two classes of two urban public schools of Burgos capital (Spain, and two of public schools of Tampico (Mexico. This allowed us to observe an increasing percentage value of the group focused in text comprehension, and a lesser percentage of the group perceiving comprehension as a secondary objective.

  13. Pointwise probability reinforcements for robust statistical inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frénay, Benoît; Verleysen, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Statistical inference using machine learning techniques may be difficult with small datasets because of abnormally frequent data (AFDs). AFDs are observations that are much more frequent in the training sample that they should be, with respect to their theoretical probability, and include e.g. outliers. Estimates of parameters tend to be biased towards models which support such data. This paper proposes to introduce pointwise probability reinforcements (PPRs): the probability of each observation is reinforced by a PPR and a regularisation allows controlling the amount of reinforcement which compensates for AFDs. The proposed solution is very generic, since it can be used to robustify any statistical inference method which can be formulated as a likelihood maximisation. Experiments show that PPRs can be easily used to tackle regression, classification and projection: models are freed from the influence of outliers. Moreover, outliers can be filtered manually since an abnormality degree is obtained for each observation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lower complexity bounds for lifted inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    One of the big challenges in the development of probabilistic relational (or probabilistic logical) modeling and learning frameworks is the design of inference techniques that operate on the level of the abstract model representation language, rather than on the level of ground, propositional...... probabilistic relational models. Artificial Intelligence 117, 297–308). However, it is not immediate that these results also apply to the type of modeling languages that currently receive the most attention, i.e., weighted, quantifier-free formulas. In this paper we extend these earlier results, and show...... instances of the model. Numerous approaches for such “lifted inference” techniques have been proposed. While it has been demonstrated that these techniques will lead to significantly more efficient inference on some specific models, there are only very recent and still quite restricted results that show...

  15. Inferring genetic interactions from comparative fitness data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crona, Kristina; Gavryushkin, Alex; Greene, Devin; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2017-12-20

    Darwinian fitness is a central concept in evolutionary biology. In practice, however, it is hardly possible to measure fitness for all genotypes in a natural population. Here, we present quantitative tools to make inferences about epistatic gene interactions when the fitness landscape is only incompletely determined due to imprecise measurements or missing observations. We demonstrate that genetic interactions can often be inferred from fitness rank orders, where all genotypes are ordered according to fitness, and even from partial fitness orders. We provide a complete characterization of rank orders that imply higher order epistasis. Our theory applies to all common types of gene interactions and facilitates comprehensive investigations of diverse genetic interactions. We analyzed various genetic systems comprising HIV-1, the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium vivax, the fungus Aspergillus niger, and the TEM-family of β-lactamase associated with antibiotic resistance. For all systems, our approach revealed higher order interactions among mutations.

  16. Statistical Inference for Partially Observed Diffusion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Christian

    to perform parameter inference in multivariate diffusion models that may be only partially observed. The methodology is applied to the stochastic FitzHugh-Nagumo model and the two-dimensional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Chapter seven focus on parameter identifiability in the aprtially observed Ornstein......-dimensional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck where one coordinate is completely unobserved. This model does not have the Markov property and it makes parameter inference more complicated. Next we take a Bayesian approach and introduce some basic Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. In chapter ve and six we describe an Bayesian method......-Uhlenbeck process, while chapter eight describes the detials of an R-package that was developed in relations to the application of the estimationprocedure of chapters five and six....

  17. Bayesianism and inference to the best explanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriano IRANZO

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bayesianism and Inference to the best explanation (IBE are two different models of inference. Recently there has been some debate about the possibility of “bayesianizing” IBE. Firstly I explore several alternatives to include explanatory considerations in Bayes’s Theorem. Then I distinguish two different interpretations of prior probabilities: “IBE-Bayesianism” (IBE-Bay and “frequentist-Bayesianism” (Freq-Bay. After detailing the content of the latter, I propose a rule for assessing the priors. I also argue that Freq-Bay: (i endorses a role for explanatory value in the assessment of scientific hypotheses; (ii avoids a purely subjectivist reading of prior probabilities; and (iii fits better than IBE-Bayesianism with two basic facts about science, i.e., the prominent role played by empirical testing and the existence of many scientific theories in the past that failed to fulfil their promises and were subsequently abandoned.

  18. Inferring network topology via the propagation process

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, An

    2013-01-01

    Inferring the network topology from the dynamics is a fundamental problem with wide applications in geology, biology and even counter-terrorism. Based on the propagation process, we present a simple method to uncover the network topology. The numerical simulation on artificial networks shows that our method enjoys a high accuracy in inferring the network topology. We find the infection rate in the propagation process significantly influences the accuracy, and each network is corresponding to an optimal infection rate. Moreover, the method generally works better in large networks. These finding are confirmed in both real social and nonsocial networks. Finally, the method is extended to directed networks and a similarity measure specific for directed networks is designed.

  19. Pragmatic Language Interpretation as Probabilistic Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Noah D; Frank, Michael C

    2016-11-01

    Understanding language requires more than the use of fixed conventions and more than decoding combinatorial structure. Instead, comprehenders make exquisitely sensitive inferences about what utterances mean given their knowledge of the speaker, language, and context. Building on developments in game theory and probabilistic modeling, we describe the rational speech act (RSA) framework for pragmatic reasoning. RSA models provide a principled way to formalize inferences about meaning in context; they have been used to make successful quantitative predictions about human behavior in a variety of different tasks and situations, and they explain why complex phenomena, such as hyperbole and vagueness, occur. More generally, they provide a computational framework for integrating linguistic structure, world knowledge, and context in pragmatic language understanding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Working with sample data exploration and inference

    CERN Document Server

    Chaffe-Stengel, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    Managers and analysts routinely collect and examine key performance measures to better understand their operations and make good decisions. Being able to render the complexity of operations data into a coherent account of significant events requires an understanding of how to work well with raw data and to make appropriate inferences. Although some statistical techniques for analyzing data and making inferences are sophisticated and require specialized expertise, there are methods that are understandable and applicable by anyone with basic algebra skills and the support of a spreadsheet package. By applying these fundamental methods themselves rather than turning over both the data and the responsibility for analysis and interpretation to an expert, managers will develop a richer understanding and potentially gain better control over their environment. This text is intended to describe these fundamental statistical techniques to managers, data analysts, and students. Statistical analysis of sample data is enh...

  1. Context recognition for a hyperintensional inference machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duží, Marie; Fait, Michal; Menšík, Marek

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce the algorithm of context recognition in the functional programming language TIL-Script, which is a necessary condition for the implementation of the TIL-Script inference machine. The TIL-Script language is an operationally isomorphic syntactic variant of Tichý's Transparent Intensional Logic (TIL). From the formal point of view, TIL is a hyperintensional, partial, typed λ-calculus with procedural semantics. Hyperintensional, because TIL λ-terms denote procedures (defined as TIL constructions) producing set-theoretic functions rather than the functions themselves; partial, because TIL is a logic of partial functions; and typed, because all the entities of TIL ontology, including constructions, receive a type within a ramified hierarchy of types. These features make it possible to distinguish three levels of abstraction at which TIL constructions operate. At the highest hyperintensional level the object to operate on is a construction (though a higher-order construction is needed to present this lower-order construction as an object of predication). At the middle intensional level the object to operate on is the function presented, or constructed, by a construction, while at the lowest extensional level the object to operate on is the value (if any) of the presented function. Thus a necessary condition for the development of an inference machine for the TIL-Script language is recognizing a context in which a construction occurs, namely extensional, intensional and hyperintensional context, in order to determine the type of an argument at which a given inference rule can be properly applied. As a result, our logic does not flout logical rules of extensional logic, which makes it possible to develop a hyperintensional inference machine for the TIL-Script language.

  2. Inferring ontology graph structures using OWL reasoning

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Miguel Angel

    2018-01-05

    Ontologies are representations of a conceptualization of a domain. Traditionally, ontologies in biology were represented as directed acyclic graphs (DAG) which represent the backbone taxonomy and additional relations between classes. These graphs are widely exploited for data analysis in the form of ontology enrichment or computation of semantic similarity. More recently, ontologies are developed in a formal language such as the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and consist of a set of axioms through which classes are defined or constrained. While the taxonomy of an ontology can be inferred directly from the axioms of an ontology as one of the standard OWL reasoning tasks, creating general graph structures from OWL ontologies that exploit the ontologies\\' semantic content remains a challenge.We developed a method to transform ontologies into graphs using an automated reasoner while taking into account all relations between classes. Searching for (existential) patterns in the deductive closure of ontologies, we can identify relations between classes that are implied but not asserted and generate graph structures that encode for a large part of the ontologies\\' semantic content. We demonstrate the advantages of our method by applying it to inference of protein-protein interactions through semantic similarity over the Gene Ontology and demonstrate that performance is increased when graph structures are inferred using deductive inference according to our method. Our software and experiment results are available at http://github.com/bio-ontology-research-group/Onto2Graph .Onto2Graph is a method to generate graph structures from OWL ontologies using automated reasoning. The resulting graphs can be used for improved ontology visualization and ontology-based data analysis.

  3. Maximum caliber inference of nonequilibrium processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Moritz; Stock, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Thirty years ago, Jaynes suggested a general theoretical approach to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, called maximum caliber (MaxCal) [Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 31, 579 (1980)]. MaxCal is a variational principle for dynamics in the same spirit that maximum entropy is a variational principle for equilibrium statistical mechanics. Motivated by the success of maximum entropy inference methods for equilibrium problems, in this work the MaxCal formulation is applied to the inference of nonequilibrium processes. That is, given some time-dependent observables of a dynamical process, one constructs a model that reproduces these input data and moreover, predicts the underlying dynamics of the system. For example, the observables could be some time-resolved measurements of the folding of a protein, which are described by a few-state model of the free energy landscape of the system. MaxCal then calculates the probabilities of an ensemble of trajectories such that on average the data are reproduced. From this probability distribution, any dynamical quantity of the system can be calculated, including population probabilities, fluxes, or waiting time distributions. After briefly reviewing the formalism, the practical numerical implementation of MaxCal in the case of an inference problem is discussed. Adopting various few-state models of increasing complexity, it is demonstrated that the MaxCal principle indeed works as a practical method of inference: The scheme is fairly robust and yields correct results as long as the input data are sufficient. As the method is unbiased and general, it can deal with any kind of time dependency such as oscillatory transients and multitime decays.

  4. Addressing false discoveries in network inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Tobias; Altmann, Stefan; Geistlinger, Ludwig; Zimmer, Ralf; Küffner, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Experimentally determined gene regulatory networks can be enriched by computational inference from high-throughput expression profiles. However, the prediction of regulatory interactions is severely impaired by indirect and spurious effects, particularly for eukaryotes. Recently, published methods report improved predictions by exploiting the a priori known targets of a regulator (its local topology) in addition to expression profiles. We find that methods exploiting known targets show an unexpectedly high rate of false discoveries. This leads to inflated performance estimates and the prediction of an excessive number of new interactions for regulators with many known targets. These issues are hidden from common evaluation and cross-validation setups, which is due to Simpson's paradox. We suggest a confidence score recalibration method (CoRe) that reduces the false discovery rate and enables a reliable performance estimation. CoRe considerably improves the results of network inference methods that exploit known targets. Predictions then display the biological process specificity of regulators more correctly and enable the inference of accurate genome-wide regulatory networks in eukaryotes. For yeast, we propose a network with more than 22 000 confident interactions. We point out that machine learning approaches outside of the area of network inference may be affected as well. Results, executable code and networks are available via our website http://www.bio.ifi.lmu.de/forschung/CoRe. robert.kueffner@helmholtz-muenchen.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Towards a Faster Randomized Parcellation Based Inference

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyos-Idrobo, Andrés; Varoquaux, Gaël; Thirion, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    International audience; In neuroimaging, multi-subject statistical analysis is an essential step, as it makes it possible to draw conclusions for the population under study. However, the lack of power in neuroimaging studies combined with the lack of stability and sensitivity of voxel-based methods may lead to non-reproducible results. A method designed to tackle this problem is Randomized Parcellation-Based Inference (RPBI), which has shown good empirical performance. Nevertheless, the use o...

  6. Inferring Trust Based on Similarity with TILLIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakolifard, Mozhgan; Herrmann, Peter; Knapskog, Svein J.

    A network of people having established trust relations and a model for propagation of related trust scores are fundamental building blocks in many of today’s most successful e-commerce and recommendation systems. However, the web of trust is often too sparse to predict trust values between non-familiar people with high accuracy. Trust inferences are transitive associations among users in the context of an underlying social network and may provide additional information to alleviate the consequences of the sparsity and possible cold-start problems. Such approaches are helpful, provided that a complete trust path exists between the two users. An alternative approach to the problem is advocated in this paper. Based on collaborative filtering one can exploit the like-mindedness resp. similarity of individuals to infer trust to yet unknown parties which increases the trust relations in the web. For instance, if one knows that with respect to a specific property, two parties are trusted alike by a large number of different trusters, one can assume that they are similar. Thus, if one has a certain degree of trust to the one party, one can safely assume a very similar trustworthiness of the other one. In an attempt to provide high quality recommendations and proper initial trust values even when no complete trust propagation path or user profile exists, we propose TILLIT — a model based on combination of trust inferences and user similarity. The similarity is derived from the structure of the trust graph and users’ trust behavior as opposed to other collaborative-filtering based approaches which use ratings of items or user’s profile. We describe an algorithm realizing the approach based on a combination of trust inferences and user similarity, and validate the algorithm using a real large-scale data-set.

  7. Role of Speaker Cues in Attention Inference

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Joo Lee; Cynthia Breazeal; David DeSteno

    2017-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art approaches to emotion recognition primarily focus on modeling the nonverbal expressions of the sole individual without reference to contextual elements such as the co-presence of the partner. In this paper, we demonstrate that the accurate inference of listeners’ social-emotional state of attention depends on accounting for the nonverbal behaviors of their storytelling partner, namely their speaker cues. To gain a deeper understanding of the role of speaker cues in at...

  8. Variations on Bayesian Prediction and Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-09

    inference using mixtures. Journal of the American Statistical Association 90, 577–588. Ferguson , T. S . (1973). A Bayesian analysis of some...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: A Bayesian approach, based on updating prior information in light of new observations, via Bayes’s formula , has both nice...findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army position, policy or

  9. Thermodynamics of statistical inference by cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Alex H; Fisher, Charles K; Mora, Thierry; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-10-03

    The deep connection between thermodynamics, computation, and information is now well established both theoretically and experimentally. Here, we extend these ideas to show that thermodynamics also places fundamental constraints on statistical estimation and learning. To do so, we investigate the constraints placed by (nonequilibrium) thermodynamics on the ability of biochemical signaling networks to estimate the concentration of an external signal. We show that accuracy is limited by energy consumption, suggesting that there are fundamental thermodynamic constraints on statistical inference.

  10. Causal inference of asynchronous audiovisual speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Magnotti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During speech perception, humans integrate auditory information from the voice with visual information from the face. This multisensory integration increases perceptual precision, but only if the two cues come from the same talker; this requirement has been largely ignored by current models of speech perception. We describe a generative model of multisensory speech perception that includes this critical step of determining the likelihood that the voice and face information have a common cause. A key feature of the model is that it is based on a principled analysis of how an observer should solve this causal inference problem using the asynchrony between two cues and the reliability of the cues. This allows the model to make predictions abut the behavior of subjects performing a synchrony judgment task, predictive power that does not exist in other approaches, such as post hoc fitting of Gaussian curves to behavioral data. We tested the model predictions against the performance of 37 subjects performing a synchrony judgment task viewing audiovisual speech under a variety of manipulations, including varying asynchronies, intelligibility, and visual cue reliability. The causal inference model outperformed the Gaussian model across two experiments, providing a better fit to the behavioral data with fewer parameters. Because the causal inference model is derived from a principled understanding of the task, model parameters are directly interpretable in terms of stimulus and subject properties.

  11. Combinatorics of distance-based tree inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardi, Fabio; Gascuel, Olivier

    2012-10-09

    Several popular methods for phylogenetic inference (or hierarchical clustering) are based on a matrix of pairwise distances between taxa (or any kind of objects): The objective is to construct a tree with branch lengths so that the distances between the leaves in that tree are as close as possible to the input distances. If we hold the structure (topology) of the tree fixed, in some relevant cases (e.g., ordinary least squares) the optimal values for the branch lengths can be expressed using simple combinatorial formulae. Here we define a general form for these formulae and show that they all have two desirable properties: First, the common tree reconstruction approaches (least squares, minimum evolution), when used in combination with these formulae, are guaranteed to infer the correct tree when given enough data (consistency); second, the branch lengths of all the simple (nearest neighbor interchange) rearrangements of a tree can be calculated, optimally, in quadratic time in the size of the tree, thus allowing the efficient application of hill climbing heuristics. The study presented here is a continuation of that by Mihaescu and Pachter on branch length estimation [Mihaescu R, Pachter L (2008) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105:13206-13211]. The focus here is on the inference of the tree itself and on providing a basis for novel algorithms to reconstruct trees from distances.

  12. Intuitive Mechanics: Inferences of Vertical Projectile Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milana Damjenić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Our intuitive knowledge of physics mechanics, i.e. knowledge defined through personal experience about velocity, acceleration, motion causes, etc., is often wrong. This research examined whether similar misconceptions occur systematically in the case of vertical projectiles launched upwards. The first experiment examined inferences of velocity and acceleration of the ball moving vertically upwards, while the second experiment examined whether the mass of the thrown ball and force of the throw have an impact on the inference. The results showed that more than three quarters of the participants wrongly assumed that maximum velocity and peak acceleration did not occur at the initial launch of the projectile. There was no effect of object mass or effect of the force of the throw on the inference relating to the velocity and acceleration of the ball. The results exceed the explanatory reach of the impetus theory, most commonly used to explain the naive understanding of the mechanics of object motion. This research supports that the actions on objects approach and the property transmission heuristics may more aptly explain the dissidence between perceived and actual implications in projectile motion.

  13. Functional neuroanatomy of intuitive physical inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jason; Mikhael, John G; Tenenbaum, Joshua B; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2016-08-23

    To engage with the world-to understand the scene in front of us, plan actions, and predict what will happen next-we must have an intuitive grasp of the world's physical structure and dynamics. How do the objects in front of us rest on and support each other, how much force would be required to move them, and how will they behave when they fall, roll, or collide? Despite the centrality of physical inferences in daily life, little is known about the brain mechanisms recruited to interpret the physical structure of a scene and predict how physical events will unfold. Here, in a series of fMRI experiments, we identified a set of cortical regions that are selectively engaged when people watch and predict the unfolding of physical events-a "physics engine" in the brain. These brain regions are selective to physical inferences relative to nonphysical but otherwise highly similar scenes and tasks. However, these regions are not exclusively engaged in physical inferences per se or, indeed, even in scene understanding; they overlap with the domain-general "multiple demand" system, especially the parts of that system involved in action planning and tool use, pointing to a close relationship between the cognitive and neural mechanisms involved in parsing the physical content of a scene and preparing an appropriate action.

  14. Predictive Bayesian inference and dynamic treatment regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Olli; Arjas, Elja; Stephens, David A; Moodie, Erica E M

    2015-11-01

    While optimal dynamic treatment regimes (DTRs) can be estimated without specification of a predictive model, a model-based approach, combined with dynamic programming and Monte Carlo integration, enables direct probabilistic comparisons between the outcomes under the optimal DTR and alternative (dynamic or static) treatment regimes. The Bayesian predictive approach also circumvents problems related to frequentist estimators under the nonregular estimation problem. However, the model-based approach is susceptible to misspecification, in particular of the "null-paradox" type, which is due to the model parameters not having a direct causal interpretation in the presence of latent individual-level characteristics. Because it is reasonable to insist on correct inferences under the null of no difference between the alternative treatment regimes, we discuss how to achieve this through a "null-robust" reparametrization of the problem in a longitudinal setting. Since we argue that causal inference can be entirely understood as posterior predictive inference in a hypothetical population without covariate imbalances, we also discuss how controlling for confounding through inverse probability of treatment weighting can be justified and incorporated in the Bayesian setting. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Role of Speaker Cues in Attention Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Joo Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Current state-of-the-art approaches to emotion recognition primarily focus on modeling the nonverbal expressions of the sole individual without reference to contextual elements such as the co-presence of the partner. In this paper, we demonstrate that the accurate inference of listeners’ social-emotional state of attention depends on accounting for the nonverbal behaviors of their storytelling partner, namely their speaker cues. To gain a deeper understanding of the role of speaker cues in attention inference, we conduct investigations into real-world interactions of children (5–6 years old storytelling with their peers. Through in-depth analysis of human–human interaction data, we first identify nonverbal speaker cues (i.e., backchannel-inviting cues and listener responses (i.e., backchannel feedback. We then demonstrate how speaker cues can modify the interpretation of attention-related backchannels as well as serve as a means to regulate the responsiveness of listeners. We discuss the design implications of our findings toward our primary goal of developing attention recognition models for storytelling robots, and we argue that social robots can proactively use speaker cues to form more accurate inferences about the attentive state of their human partners.

  16. The occurrence of noncoagulating milk and the association of bovine milk coagulation properties with genetic variants of the caseins in 3 Scandinavian dairy breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Aagaard; Bertelsen, Henriette Pasgaard; Jensen, Hanne Bak

    2013-01-01

    Substantial variation in milk coagulation properties has been observed among dairy cows. Consequently, raw milk from individual cows and breeds exhibits distinct coagulation capacities that potentially affect the technological properties and milk processing into cheese. This variation is largely...... influenced by protein composition, which is in turn affected by underlying genetic polymorphisms in the major milk proteins. In this study, we conducted a large screening on 3 major Scandinavian breeds to resolve the variation in milk coagulation traits and the frequency of milk with impaired coagulation...... properties (noncoagulation). In total, individual coagulation properties were measured on morning milk collected from 1,299 Danish Holstein (DH), Danish Jersey (DJ), and Swedish Red (SR) cows. The 3 breeds demonstrated notable interbreed differences in coagulation properties, with DJ cows exhibiting superior...

  17. How planners' use and non-use of expert knowledge in land use and transport planning affect the goal achievement potential of plans? Experiences from three Scandinavian cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennøy, Aud; Hansson, Lisa; Lissandrello, Enza

    2016-01-01

    problems. This paper examines how planners' use and non-use of expert knowledge affect the content and goal achievement of plans, and discusses how changes in planning practice and research practice can contribute to improve goal achievement potentials. Goal achievement potential refers to whether...... this issue have emerged, but few empirical studies have been presented. The research in this paper involves case studies of strategic plan-making processes in three Scandinavian cities. A main finding is that whether the expert knowledge in question is used or not, and how it is used, indeed affect the goal......, and as arguments for selecting traffic-reducing measures. All examined plans also include strategies reducing their goal achievement potentials. This happens through a mix of mechanisms. When competing objectives or ideas seemingly call for traffic-increasing measures, the planners do not use the expert knowledge...

  18. The traumatised chronic pain patient—Prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder - PTSD and pain sensitisation in two Scandinavian samples referred for pain rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Andersen, Per Grünwald; Vakkala, Merja Annika

    2012-01-01

    wanted to investigate whether specific pain diagnoses were more related to PTSD than others. Moreover, we investigated the possible association of altered sensory processing (hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity) and PTSD. Methods: Data were collected from two Scandinavian multidisciplinary pain centres...... with a non-malign chronic pain condition lasting for at least 6 months (median = 6.0 years). The Harvard Trauma Questionnaire was employed to measure PTSD symptoms, using the DSM-IV criteria. To measure altered sensory processing, anaesthetists performed quantitative sensory testing on admission. Patients......Introduction: Correctly identifying chronic pain patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is important because the comorbidity of a chronic pain condition and PTSD is found to compromise treatment success. In addition, the existence of PTSD is associated with pain sensitisation, elevated...

  19. E-book about E-learning Online Education and Learning Management Systems-Global E-learning in a Scandinavian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur DEMIRAY

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Prior to year 2000 Scandinavian universities offered selected online courses attracting a few pioneering students. Today, even primary schools offer online services to students, teachers and parents. Online education is becoming mainstream education in Scandinavia.A new, comprehensive and innovative book about e-learning is now available in print and online in several electronic formats. The book’s web-site presents tidbits of the content in several electronic formats such as text, audio, speech synthesis and video.Dr. Erwin Wagner, former President of the European Distance Education Network, characterizes the book as interesting, important, innovative, international and impressive. In his foreword, Dr. Wagner states that the “book comprises a rich variety of material,perspectives, insights and assessments. Valid information can be found there for researchers, for students in the field, for teachers, for managers and for politicians who are looking forreliable knowledge”

  20. Effects of candesartan in acute stroke on vascular events during long-term follow-up: results from the Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornslien, Astrid G; Sandset, Else C; Igland, Jannicke; Terént, Andreas; Boysen, Gudrun; Bath, Philip M W; Murray, Gordon D; Berge, Eivind

    2015-08-01

    Randomized-controlled trials have shown no beneficial short-term effects of blood pressure lowering treatment in the acute phase of stroke. We aimed to see whether blood pressure lowering treatment with candesartan in the acute phase can lead to benefits that become apparent over a longer period of follow-up. The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stoke Trial was a randomized- and placebo-controlled trial of candesartan in 2,029 patients with acute stroke and systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg. Trial treatment was given for seven-days, and the primary follow-up period was six-months. We have used the national patient registries and the cause of death registries in the Scandinavian countries to collect data on vascular events and deaths up to three-years from randomization. The primary end-point was the composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death, and we used Cox proportional hazards regression model for analysis. Long-term data were available for 1,256 of the 1,286 patients (98%) from Scandinavia. The risk of the primary composite end-point did not differ significantly between the groups (candesartan 178/632 events, placebo 203/624 events, hazard ratio = 0·87, 95% confidence interval 0·71-1·07). There were also no statistically significant differences for the secondary end-points stroke and all-cause death, or in any of the pre-specified subgroups. Treatment with candesartan in the acute phase of stroke was not associated with clear long-term clinical benefits. This result supports the conclusion from trials with short-term follow-up, that blood pressure lowering treatment with candesartan should not be given routinely to patients with acute stroke and raised blood pressure. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  1. About recent star formation rates inferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerviño, M.; Bongiovanni, A.; Hidalgo, S.

    2017-03-01

    Star Formation Rate (SFR) inferences are based in the so-called constant SFR approximation, where synthesis models are require to provide a calibration; we aims to study the key points of such approximation to produce accurate SFR inferences. We use the intrinsic algebra used in synthesis models, and we explore how SFR can be inferred from the integrated light without any assumption about the underling Star Formation history (SFH). We show that the constant SFR approximation is actually a simplified expression of more deeper characteristics of synthesis models: It is a characterization of the evolution of single stellar populations (SSPs), acting the SSPs as sensitivity curve over different measures of the SFH can be obtained. As results, we find that (1) the best age to calibrate SFR indices is the age of the observed system (i.e. about 13 Gyr for z = 0 systems); (2) constant SFR and steady-state luminosities are not requirements to calibrate the SFR ; (3) it is not possible to define a SFR single time scale over which the recent SFH is averaged, and we suggest to use typical SFR indices (ionizing flux, UV fluxes) together with no typical ones (optical/IR fluxes) to correct the SFR from the contribution of the old component of the SFH, we show how to use galaxy colors to quote age ranges where the recent component of the SFH is stronger/softer than the older component. Particular values of SFR calibrations are (almost) not affect by this work, but the meaning of what is obtained by SFR inferences does. In our framework, results as the correlation of SFR time scales with galaxy colors, or the sensitivity of different SFR indices to sort and long scale variations in the SFH, fit naturally. In addition, the present framework provides a theoretical guideline to optimize the available information from data/numerical experiments to improve the accuracy of SFR inferences. More info en Cerviño, Bongiovanni & Hidalgo A&A 588, 108C (2016)

  2. Statistical Inference at Work: Statistical Process Control as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arthur; Kent, Phillip; Derry, Jan; Noss, Richard; Hoyles, Celia

    2008-01-01

    To characterise statistical inference in the workplace this paper compares a prototypical type of statistical inference at work, statistical process control (SPC), with a type of statistical inference that is better known in educational settings, hypothesis testing. Although there are some similarities between the reasoning structure involved in…

  3. Type Inference for Session Types in the Pi-Calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Eva Fajstrup; Harbo, Jacob Buchreitz; Huttel, Hans

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a direct algorithm for session type inference for the π-calculus. Type inference for session types has previously been achieved by either imposing limitations and restriction on the π-calculus, or by reducing the type inference problem to that for linear types. Our approach...

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Fuzzy Inference Engines in Context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    robotics, pattern recognition, etc. This paper presents a comparative analysis of three fuzzy inference engines, max-product, max-min and root sum in fuzzy controllers using profitability control data. The presented results shows that RSS inference engine gives largest output membership function, while the product inference ...

  5. Uncertainty quantification and inference of Manning's friction coefficients using DART buoy data during the Tōhoku tsunami

    KAUST Repository

    Sraj, Ihab

    2014-11-01

    Tsunami computational models are employed to explore multiple flooding scenarios and to predict water elevations. However, accurate estimation of water elevations requires accurate estimation of many model parameters including the Manning\\'s n friction parameterization. Our objective is to develop an efficient approach for the uncertainty quantification and inference of the Manning\\'s n coefficient which we characterize here by three different parameters set to be constant in the on-shore, near-shore and deep-water regions as defined using iso-baths. We use Polynomial Chaos (PC) to build an inexpensive surrogate for the G. eoC. law model and employ Bayesian inference to estimate and quantify uncertainties related to relevant parameters using the DART buoy data collected during the Tōhoku tsunami. The surrogate model significantly reduces the computational burden of the Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) sampling of the Bayesian inference. The PC surrogate is also used to perform a sensitivity analysis.

  6. Nonparametric inference of network structure and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Tiago P.

    The network structure of complex systems determine their function and serve as evidence for the evolutionary mechanisms that lie behind them. Despite considerable effort in recent years, it remains an open challenge to formulate general descriptions of the large-scale structure of network systems, and how to reliably extract such information from data. Although many approaches have been proposed, few methods attempt to gauge the statistical significance of the uncovered structures, and hence the majority cannot reliably separate actual structure from stochastic fluctuations. Due to the sheer size and high-dimensionality of many networks, this represents a major limitation that prevents meaningful interpretations of the results obtained with such nonstatistical methods. In this talk, I will show how these issues can be tackled in a principled and efficient fashion by formulating appropriate generative models of network structure that can have their parameters inferred from data. By employing a Bayesian description of such models, the inference can be performed in a nonparametric fashion, that does not require any a priori knowledge or ad hoc assumptions about the data. I will show how this approach can be used to perform model comparison, and how hierarchical models yield the most appropriate trade-off between model complexity and quality of fit based on the statistical evidence present in the data. I will also show how this general approach can be elegantly extended to networks with edge attributes, that are embedded in latent spaces, and that change in time. The latter is obtained via a fully dynamic generative network model, based on arbitrary-order Markov chains, that can also be inferred in a nonparametric fashion. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the application of the methods with many empirical networks such as the internet at the autonomous systems level, the global airport network, the network of actors and films, social networks, citations among

  7. Approximate Inference and Deep Generative Models

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Advances in deep generative models are at the forefront of deep learning research because of the promise they offer for allowing data-efficient learning, and for model-based reinforcement learning. In this talk I'll review a few standard methods for approximate inference and introduce modern approximations which allow for efficient large-scale training of a wide variety of generative models. Finally, I'll demonstrate several important application of these models to density estimation, missing data imputation, data compression and planning.

  8. Inclusion principle for statistical inference and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjia

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a general approach for statistical inference and machine learning based on accumulated observational data. We demonstrate that a large class of machine learning problems can be formulated as the general problem of constructing random intervals with pre-specified coverage probabilities for the parameters of the model for the observational data. We show that the construction of such random intervals can be accomplished by comparing the endpoints of random intervals with confidence sequences for the parameters obtained from the observational data. Asymptotic results are obtained for such sequential methods.

  9. Abductive Inference using Array-Based Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Falster, Peter; Møller, Gert L.

    The notion of abduction has found its usage within a wide variety of AI fields. Computing abductive solutions has, however, shown to be highly intractable in logic programming. To avoid this intractability we present a new approach to logicbased abduction; through the geometrical view of data...... employed in array-based logic we embrace abduction in a simple structural operation. We argue that a theory of abduction on this form allows for an implementation which, at runtime, can perform abductive inference quite efficiently on arbitrary rules of logic representing knowledge of finite domains....

  10. Likelihood inference for unions of interacting discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Helisova, K.

    2010-01-01

    This is probably the first paper which discusses likelihood inference for a random set using a germ-grain model, where the individual grains are unobservable, edge effects occur and other complications appear. We consider the case where the grains form a disc process modelled by a marked point...... process, where the germs are the centres and the marks are the associated radii of the discs. We propose to use a recent parametric class of interacting disc process models, where the minimal sufficient statistic depends on various geometric properties of the random set, and the density is specified...

  11. Diatom-inferred depth models in 8 Canadian boreal lakes: inferred changes in the benthic:planktonic depth boundary and implications for assessment of past droughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Kathleen R.; Kingsbury, Melanie V.; Lewis, C. F. Michael; Cumming, Brian F.

    2011-05-01

    Assessment of past drought in boreal regions, a region predicted to be strongly affected by climate warming, can provide insights into future availability of water. However, limited instrumental data and paleoclimatic data are available for this assessment. To address this lack of data in the boreal region of northwest Ontario, a regional study of lakes in the Winnipeg River Drainage Basin was initiated. Diatom-inferred (D-I) depth models were developed based on surface samples collected along a depth gradient within 8 small boreal lakes. Weighted-averaging and modern analog approaches provided robust within-lake depth models for each of the study lakes, with bootstrapped r2 values ranging from 0.90 to 0.98, and root-mean-squared-errors of prediction (RMSEP) between 1.1 and 2.5 m. Large differences in the estimated depth optima for three representative, but common diatom species across our 8 study lakes suggested that within-lake calibration datasets are more appropriate for inferring past drought based in depth models than a regional multi-lake calibration dataset, and that light and related variables are controlling factors governing the maximum depth of benthic taxa. A down-core application of the D-I depth models on a near-shore core from Meekin Lake, retrieved near the present-day ecotone between the benthic and planktonic diatom assemblages indicated highly similar trends in inferred depth ( r = 0.96). The models have significant correlations with other metrics of changes in depth including diatom species richness ( r = 0.74-0.78) and evenness ( r = 0.76-0.8), thereby allowing a check on the strength and direction of the depth inferences down-core. Near-shore cores located near the benthic:planktonic transition is a sensitive region that can provide estimates of past droughts in lakes where such inferences have been difficult to estimate.

  12. Receptive field inference with localized priors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijung Park

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The linear receptive field describes a mapping from sensory stimuli to a one-dimensional variable governing a neuron's spike response. However, traditional receptive field estimators such as the spike-triggered average converge slowly and often require large amounts of data. Bayesian methods seek to overcome this problem by biasing estimates towards solutions that are more likely a priori, typically those with small, smooth, or sparse coefficients. Here we introduce a novel Bayesian receptive field estimator designed to incorporate locality, a powerful form of prior information about receptive field structure. The key to our approach is a hierarchical receptive field model that flexibly adapts to localized structure in both spacetime and spatiotemporal frequency, using an inference method known as empirical Bayes. We refer to our method as automatic locality determination (ALD, and show that it can accurately recover various types of smooth, sparse, and localized receptive fields. We apply ALD to neural data from retinal ganglion cells and V1 simple cells, and find it achieves error rates several times lower than standard estimators. Thus, estimates of comparable accuracy can be achieved with substantially less data. Finally, we introduce a computationally efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm for fully Bayesian inference under the ALD prior, yielding accurate Bayesian confidence intervals for small or noisy datasets.

  13. Inference with the Median of a Prior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad-Djafari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of inference on one of the two parameters of a probability distribution when we have some prior information on a nuisance parameter. When a prior probability distribution on this nuisance parameter is given, the marginal distribution is the classical tool to account for it. If the prior distribution is not given, but we have partial knowledge such as a fixed number of moments, we can use the maximum entropy principle to assign a prior law and thus go back to the previous case. In this work, we consider the case where we only know the median of the prior and propose a new tool for this case. This new inference tool looks like a marginal distribution. It is obtained by first remarking that the marginal distribution can be considered as the mean value of the original distribution with respect to the prior probability law of the nuisance parameter, and then, by using the median in place of the mean.

  14. Facility Activity Inference Using Radiation Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Nageswara S. [ORNL; Ramirez Aviles, Camila A. [ORNL

    2017-11-01

    We consider the problem of inferring the operational status of a reactor facility using measurements from a radiation sensor network deployed around the facility’s ventilation off-gas stack. The intensity of stack emissions decays with distance, and the sensor counts or measurements are inherently random with parameters determined by the intensity at the sensor’s location. We utilize the measurements to estimate the intensity at the stack, and use it in a one-sided Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to infer on/off status of the reactor. We demonstrate the superior performance of this method over conventional majority fusers and individual sensors using (i) test measurements from a network of 21 NaI detectors, and (ii) effluence measurements collected at the stack of a reactor facility. We also analytically establish the superior detection performance of the network over individual sensors with fixed and adaptive thresholds by utilizing the Poisson distribution of the counts. We quantify the performance improvements of the network detection over individual sensors using the packing number of the intensity space.

  15. Fuzzy logic foundations of optimal inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Averkin

    1994-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose to solve the problem of the optimal fuzzy model designing for the dynamic systems controlling, to develop new mathematical models of fuzzy inference, logical schemes of hardware support based on these models, software support, intellectual system based on these models. The proposed schemes will be able to perform an entire inference process required for real--time fuzzy control. Each scheme works independently of the number of control rules in the knowledge base. The necessary accuracy of the output results can be provided. Among the advantages of suggested architectures are: gain in memory size, simplicity in architectural decisions, fast implementation. The proposed intellectual system gives the new approaches to fuzzy logics acquisitionin the ES and FLC, based on t-norms approach. The system is supplied by cognitive graphics interface. The main functions of the system are: visualization of fuzzy logics by multi-color tables, fuzzy logics acquisition, simulation the fuzzy reasoning processes of the system, testing of fuzzy logics.

  16. Quantum Enhanced Inference in Markov Logic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, Peter; Gogolin, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Markov logic networks (MLNs) reconcile two opposing schools in machine learning and artificial intelligence: causal networks, which account for uncertainty extremely well, and first-order logic, which allows for formal deduction. An MLN is essentially a first-order logic template to generate Markov networks. Inference in MLNs is probabilistic and it is often performed by approximate methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Gibbs sampling. An MLN has many regular, symmetric structures that can be exploited at both first-order level and in the generated Markov network. We analyze the graph structures that are produced by various lifting methods and investigate the extent to which quantum protocols can be used to speed up Gibbs sampling with state preparation and measurement schemes. We review different such approaches, discuss their advantages, theoretical limitations, and their appeal to implementations. We find that a straightforward application of a recent result yields exponential speedup compared to classical heuristics in approximate probabilistic inference, thereby demonstrating another example where advanced quantum resources can potentially prove useful in machine learning.

  17. Spatiotemporal patterns of precipitation inferred from streamflow observations across the Sierra Nevada mountain range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Brian; Clark, Martyn P.; Kavetski, Dmitri; Newman, Andrew J.; Hughes, Mimi; McGurk, Bruce; Lundquist, Jessica D.

    2018-01-01

    Given uncertainty in precipitation gauge-based gridded datasets over complex terrain, we use multiple streamflow observations as an additional source of information about precipitation, in order to identify spatial and temporal differences between a gridded precipitation dataset and precipitation inferred from streamflow. We test whether gridded datasets capture across-crest and regional spatial patterns of variability, as well as year-to-year variability and trends in precipitation, in comparison to precipitation inferred from streamflow. We use a Bayesian model calibration routine with multiple lumped hydrologic model structures to infer the most likely basin-mean, water-year total precipitation for 56 basins with long-term (>30 year) streamflow records in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California. We compare basin-mean precipitation derived from this approach with basin-mean precipitation from a precipitation gauge-based, 1/16° gridded dataset that has been used to simulate and evaluate trends in Western United States streamflow and snowpack over the 20th century. We find that the long-term average spatial patterns differ: in particular, there is less precipitation in the gridded dataset in higher-elevation basins whose aspect faces prevailing cool-season winds, as compared to precipitation inferred from streamflow. In a few years and basins, there is less gridded precipitation than there is observed streamflow. Lower-elevation, southern, and east-of-crest basins show better agreement between gridded and inferred precipitation. Implied actual evapotranspiration (calculated as precipitation minus streamflow) then also varies between the streamflow-based estimates and the gridded dataset. Absolute uncertainty in precipitation inferred from streamflow is substantial, but the signal of basin-to-basin and year-to-year differences are likely more robust. The findings suggest that considering streamflow when spatially distributing precipitation in complex terrain

  18. Macroecological Patterns of Resilience Inferred from a Multinational, Synchronized Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier L. Baho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The likelihood of an ecological system to undergo undesired regime shifts is expected to increase as climate change effects unfold. To understand how regional climate settings can affect resilience; i.e., the ability of an ecosystem to tolerate disturbances without changing its original structure and processes, we used a synchronized mesocosm experiment (representative of shallow lakes along a latitudinal gradient. We manipulated nutrient concentrations and water levels in a synchronized mesocosm experiment in different climate zones across Europe involving Sweden, Estonia, Germany, the Czech Republic, Turkey and Greece. We assessed attributes of zooplankton communities that might contribute to resilience under different ecological configurations. We assessed four indicator of relative ecological resilience (cross-scale, within-scale structures, aggregation length and gap size of zooplankton communities, inferred from discontinuity analysis. Similar resilience attributes were found across experimental treatments and countries, except Greece, which experienced severe drought conditions during the experiment. These conditions apparently led to a lower relative resilience in the Greek mesocosms. Our results indicate that zooplankton community resilience in shallow lakes is marginally affected by water level and the studied nutrient range unless extreme drought occurs. In practice, this means that drought mitigation could be especially challenging in semi-arid countries in the future.

  19. Children's inference generation: The role of vocabulary and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Nicola Kate; Cain, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Inferences are crucial to successful discourse comprehension. We assessed the contributions of vocabulary and working memory to inference making in children aged 5 and 6years (n=44), 7 and 8years (n=43), and 9 and 10years (n=43). Children listened to short narratives and answered questions to assess local and global coherence inferences after each one. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) confirmed developmental improvements on both types of inference. Although standardized measures of both vocabulary and working memory were correlated with inference making, multiple regression analyses determined that vocabulary was the key predictor. For local coherence inferences, only vocabulary predicted unique variance for the 6- and 8-year-olds; in contrast, none of the variables predicted performance for the 10-year-olds. For global coherence inferences, vocabulary was the only unique predictor for each age group. Mediation analysis confirmed that although working memory was associated with the ability to generate local and global coherence inferences in 6- to 10-year-olds, the effect was mediated by vocabulary. We conclude that vocabulary knowledge supports inference making in two ways: through knowledge of word meanings required to generate inferences and through its contribution to memory processes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  1. Physical connectivity in the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System inferred from 9 years of ocean color observations

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, I.; Andréfouët, Serge; Hu, C.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Wall, C. C.; Sheng, J.; Hatcher, B. G.

    2009-01-01

    Ocean color images acquired from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) from 1998 to 2006 were used to examine the patterns of physical connectivity between land and reefs, and among reefs in the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS) in the northwestern Caribbean Sea. Connectivity was inferred by tracking surface water features in weekly climatologies and a time series of weekly mean chlorophyll-a concentrations derived from satellite imagery. Frequency of spatial connections b...

  2. PastVision+: Thermovisual Inference of Recent Medicine Intake by Detecting Heated Objects and Cooled Lips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Cooney

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the problem of how a robot can infer what a person has done recently, with a focus on checking oral medicine intake in dementia patients. We present PastVision+, an approach showing how thermovisual cues in objects and humans can be leveraged to infer recent unobserved human–object interactions. Our expectation is that this approach can provide enhanced speed and robustness compared to existing methods, because our approach can draw inferences from single images without needing to wait to observe ongoing actions and can deal with short-lasting occlusions; when combined, we expect a potential improvement in accuracy due to the extra information from knowing what a person has recently done. To evaluate our approach, we obtained some data in which an experimenter touched medicine packages and a glass of water to simulate intake of oral medicine, for a challenging scenario in which some touches were conducted in front of a warm background. Results were promising, with a detection accuracy of touched objects of 50% at the 15 s mark and 0% at the 60 s mark, and a detection accuracy of cooled lips of about 100 and 60% at the 15 s mark for cold and tepid water, respectively. Furthermore, we conducted a follow-up check for another challenging scenario in which some participants pretended to take medicine or otherwise touched a medicine package: accuracies of inferring object touches, mouth touches, and actions were 72.2, 80.3, and 58.3% initially, and 50.0, 81.7, and 50.0% at the 15 s mark, with a rate of 89.0% for person identification. The results suggested some areas in which further improvements would be possible, toward facilitating robot inference of human actions, in the context of medicine intake monitoring.

  3. Human brain lesion-deficit inference remapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Yee-Haur; Husain, Masud; Rees, Geraint; Nachev, Parashkev

    2014-09-01

    Our knowledge of the anatomical organization of the human brain in health and disease draws heavily on the study of patients with focal brain lesions. Historically the first method of mapping brain function, it is still potentially the most powerful, establishing the necessity of any putative neural substrate for a given function or deficit. Great inferential power, however, carries a crucial vulnerability: without stronger alternatives any consistent error cannot be easily detected. A hitherto unexamined source of such error is the structure of the high-dimensional distribution of patterns of focal damage, especially in ischaemic injury-the commonest aetiology in lesion-deficit studies-where the anatomy is naturally shaped by the architecture of the vascular tree. This distribution is so complex that analysis of lesion data sets of conventional size cannot illuminate its structure, leaving us in the dark about the presence or absence of such error. To examine this crucial question we assembled the largest known set of focal brain lesions (n = 581), derived from unselected patients with acute ischaemic injury (mean age = 62.3 years, standard deviation = 17.8, male:female ratio = 0.547), visualized with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and processed with validated automated lesion segmentation routines. High-dimensional analysis of this data revealed a hidden bias within the multivariate patterns of damage that will consistently distort lesion-deficit maps, displacing inferred critical regions from their true locations, in a manner opaque to replication. Quantifying the size of this mislocalization demonstrates that past lesion-deficit relationships estimated with conventional inferential methodology are likely to be significantly displaced, by a magnitude dependent on the unknown underlying lesion-deficit relationship itself. Past studies therefore cannot be retrospectively corrected, except by new knowledge that would render them redundant

  4. Species tree inference by minimizing deep coalescences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuong Than

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In a 1997 seminal paper, W. Maddison proposed minimizing deep coalescences, or MDC, as an optimization criterion for inferring the species tree from a set of incongruent gene trees, assuming the incongruence is exclusively due to lineage sorting. In a subsequent paper, Maddison and Knowles provided and implemented a search heuristic for optimizing the MDC criterion, given a set of gene trees. However, the heuristic is not guaranteed to compute optimal solutions, and its hill-climbing search makes it slow in practice. In this paper, we provide two exact solutions to the problem of inferring the species tree from a set of gene trees under the MDC criterion. In other words, our solutions are guaranteed to find the tree that minimizes the total number of deep coalescences from a set of gene trees. One solution is based on a novel integer linear programming (ILP formulation, and another is based on a simple dynamic programming (DP approach. Powerful ILP solvers, such as CPLEX, make the first solution appealing, particularly for very large-scale instances of the problem, whereas the DP-based solution eliminates dependence on proprietary tools, and its simplicity makes it easy to integrate with other genomic events that may cause gene tree incongruence. Using the exact solutions, we analyze a data set of 106 loci from eight yeast species, a data set of 268 loci from eight Apicomplexan species, and several simulated data sets. We show that the MDC criterion provides very accurate estimates of the species tree topologies, and that our solutions are very fast, thus allowing for the accurate analysis of genome-scale data sets. Further, the efficiency of the solutions allow for quick exploration of sub-optimal solutions, which is important for a parsimony-based criterion such as MDC, as we show. We show that searching for the species tree in the compatibility graph of the clusters induced by the gene trees may be sufficient in practice, a finding that helps

  5. The Oldest Dryas last significant fluctuation of the Scandinavian ice sheet margin in Eastern Baltic and problems of its regional correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saks, T.; Zelcs, V.; Nartiss, M.; Kalvans, A.

    2009-12-01

    Ice marginal formations, glaciotectonic phenomena, directional ice-flow features and new absolute age dating results of the Pleistocene deposits were subjected to systematic analyses and re-interpretation for clarification of deglaciation history, especially on the timing and position of the glacial margin of the Linkuva (North Lithuanian, Haanja, Luga) phase. The oldest Dryas - the last significant fluctuation of the ice margin - locally termed as the Linkuva stage in Latvia, is probably best known deglaciation stage event in south eastern sector of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, yet problems of its cross border correlation are still present. The timing of the North Lithuanian phase occurred at the end of the Oldest Dryas cold stage. Its minimum age is currently dated to 15.9-15.6 ka BP in Latvia (calibrated from 13.2-13.4 ka 14C BP), and correlative to the Haanja stade in Estonia , Middle Lithuanian phase in Lithuania, Slupsk Bank phase in northern Poland, and most likely by Krasnogorodsk phase in Russia. These ages are older than the error-weighted mean age (13.1 ± 0.3 10Be ka) of the North Lithuanian moraine. Here we present re-interpreted map of the Linkuva stage glacial marginal position in the territory of Latvia correlated with adjacent territories. The map is based on cumulative results of the mapping of ice marginal formations and spatial arrangement of streamlined bedforms (drumlins, flutes and megalineations), OSL and radiocarbon data available cosmogenic datings, and previous reconstructions of these stage glacial marginal positions. The results allow: (1) to draw complex interplay of the Scandinavian ice sheet lobate structure during the Linkuva deglaciation phase; (2) to conclude that the fast ice flow in many places with surging pattern were common for ice lobes and tongues; (3) to attest that mapping of the marginal shear moraines can be used as a tool for reconstruction of active ice marginal positions. The results suggest that there is no evidence

  6. Recent progress in recognition of UHP metamorphism in allochthons of the Scandinavian Caledonides (Seve Nappe Complex and Tromsø Nappe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janák, Marian; Ravna, Erling; Majka, Jarosław; Klonowska, Iwona; Kullerud, Kåre; Gee, David; Froitzheim, Nikolaus

    2017-04-01

    During the last ten years, UHP rocks have been discovered within far-travelled allochthons of the Scandinavian Caledonides including the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) of the Middle Allochthon and Tromsø Nappe within the Uppermost Allochthon. The first evidence for UHP conditions in the SNC was documented in a kyanite-bearing eclogite dike within the Friningen garnet peridotite. Subsequently, UHP conditions were determined for phengite eclogite and garnet pyroxenite from Stor Jougdan and pelitic gneisses from Åreskutan. Finally, diamond was found in metasedimentary rocks of the SNC at three localities (Snasahögarna, Åreskutan and most recently near Saxnäs), c. 250 km apart, confirming regional UHP conditions within this allochthon. In the Tromsø Nappe (northern Norway), evidence for UHP metamorphism comes from phengite- and kyanite-bearing eclogites from Tønsvika and Tromsdalstind, and diamond-bearing gneisses from Tønsvika. Microdiamond occurs in-situ as single and composite (mostly with Mg-Fe carbonate) inclusions within garnet and zircon. The calculated P-T conditions for the diamond-bearing samples are 4.1-4.2 GPa/830-840°C (Åreskutan), and 3.5-4.0 GPa/ 750-800°C (Tønsvika), in the diamond stability field. The UHP metamorphism in the SNC and Tromsø Nappe is probably Late Ordovician (c. 460-450 Ma), i.e. c. 40-50 Ma older than that in the Western Gneiss Region of southwestern Norway. Whereas the latter occurred during the collision between Laurentia and Baltica in the Late Silurian to Early Devonian, the processes leading to Ordovician UHP metamorphism occurred during closure of the Iapetus Ocean and are less well understood. The occurrence of two UHP metamorphic events in the Scandinavian Caledonides implies subduction, exhumation, and re-subduction of continental crust. This is an observation that could be of importance for the understanding of orogeny at convergent plate boundaries in general. The following questions remain to be answered: (1) Was UHP

  7. Inferring network connectivity by delayed feedback control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongchuan Yu

    Full Text Available We suggest a control based approach to topology estimation of networks with N elements. This method first drives the network to steady states by a delayed feedback control; then performs structural perturbations for shifting the steady states M times; and finally infers the connection topology from the steady states' shifts by matrix inverse algorithm (M = N or l(1-norm convex optimization strategy applicable to estimate the topology of sparse networks from M << N perturbations. We discuss as well some aspects important for applications, such as the topology reconstruction quality and error sources, advantages and disadvantages of the suggested method, and the influence of (control perturbations, inhomegenity, sparsity, coupling functions, and measurement noise. Some examples of networks with Chua's oscillators are presented to illustrate the reliability of the suggested technique.

  8. Automatic inference of indexing rules for MEDLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shooshan Sonya E

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Indexing is a crucial step in any information retrieval system. In MEDLINE, a widely used database of the biomedical literature, the indexing process involves the selection of Medical Subject Headings in order to describe the subject matter of articles. The need for automatic tools to assist MEDLINE indexers in this task is growing with the increasing number of publications being added to MEDLINE. Methods: In this paper, we describe the use and the customization of Inductive Logic Programming (ILP to infer indexing rules that may be used to produce automatic indexing recommendations for MEDLINE indexers. Results: Our results show that this original ILP-based approach outperforms manual rules when they exist. In addition, the use of ILP rules also improves the overall performance of the Medical Text Indexer (MTI, a system producing automatic indexing recommendations for MEDLINE. Conclusion: We expect the sets of ILP rules obtained in this experiment to be integrated into MTI.

  9. Supplier Selection Using Fuzzy Inference System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hamidreza kadhodazadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Suppliers are one of the most vital parts of supply chain whose operation has significant indirect effect on customer satisfaction. Since customer's expectations from organization are different, organizations should consider different standards, respectively. There are many researches in this field using different standards and methods in recent years. The purpose of this study is to propose an approach for choosing a supplier in a food manufacturing company considering cost, quality, service, type of relationship and structure standards of the supplier organization. To evaluate supplier according to the above standards, the fuzzy inference system has been used. Input data of this system includes supplier's score in any standard that is achieved by AHP approach and the output is final score of each supplier. Finally, a supplier has been selected that although is not the best in price and quality, has achieved good score in all of the standards.

  10. Field dynamics inference via spectral density estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Philipp; Steininger, Theo; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2017-11-01

    Stochastic differential equations are of utmost importance in various scientific and industrial areas. They are the natural description of dynamical processes whose precise equations of motion are either not known or too expensive to solve, e.g., when modeling Brownian motion. In some cases, the equations governing the dynamics of a physical system on macroscopic scales occur to be unknown since they typically cannot be deduced from general principles. In this work, we describe how the underlying laws of a stochastic process can be approximated by the spectral density of the corresponding process. Furthermore, we show how the density can be inferred from possibly very noisy and incomplete measurements of the dynamical field. Generally, inverse problems like these can be tackled with the help of Information Field Theory. For now, we restrict to linear and autonomous processes. To demonstrate its applicability, we employ our reconstruction algorithm on a time-series and spatiotemporal processes.

  11. Inferring Phylogenetic Networks from Gene Order Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Anatolievich Morozov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing algorithms allow us to infer phylogenetic networks from sequences (DNA, protein or binary, sets of trees, and distance matrices, but there are no methods to build them using the gene order data as an input. Here we describe several methods to build split networks from the gene order data, perform simulation studies, and use our methods for analyzing and interpreting different real gene order datasets. All proposed methods are based on intermediate data, which can be generated from genome structures under study and used as an input for network construction algorithms. Three intermediates are used: set of jackknife trees, distance matrix, and binary encoding. According to simulations and case studies, the best intermediates are jackknife trees and distance matrix (when used with Neighbor-Net algorithm. Binary encoding can also be useful, but only when the methods mentioned above cannot be used.

  12. Automatic inference of indexing rules for MEDLINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Névéol, Aurélie; Shooshan, Sonya E; Claveau, Vincent

    2008-11-19

    Indexing is a crucial step in any information retrieval system. In MEDLINE, a widely used database of the biomedical literature, the indexing process involves the selection of Medical Subject Headings in order to describe the subject matter of articles. The need for automatic tools to assist MEDLINE indexers in this task is growing with the increasing number of publications being added to MEDLINE. In this paper, we describe the use and the customization of Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) to infer indexing rules that may be used to produce automatic indexing recommendations for MEDLINE indexers. Our results show that this original ILP-based approach outperforms manual rules when they exist. In addition, the use of ILP rules also improves the overall performance of the Medical Text Indexer (MTI), a system producing automatic indexing recommendations for MEDLINE. We expect the sets of ILP rules obtained in this experiment to be integrated into MTI.

  13. BOOTSTRAP-BASED INFERENCE FOR GROUPED DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Iván Vélez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Grouped data refers to continuous variables that are partitioned in intervals, not necessarily of the same length, to facilitate its interpretation.  Unlike in ungrouped data, estimating simple summary statistics as the mean and mode, or more complex ones as a percentile or the coefficient of variation, is a difficult endeavour in grouped data. When the probability distribution generating the data is unknown, inference in ungrouped data is carried out using parametric or nonparametric resampling methods. However, there are no equivalent methods in the case of grouped data.  Here, a bootstrap-based procedure to estimate the parameters of an unknown distribution based on grouped data is proposed, described and illustrated.

  14. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Colwell, Lucy J; Wingreen, Ned S

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein-protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multi-protein complexes, and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners. Hence, the sequences of interacting partners are correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify which proteins are specific interaction partners from sequence data alone. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer direct couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the three-dimensional structures of proteins from sequences. Building on this approach, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from among the members of two protein families. We assess the algorithm's performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. The algorithm proves successful without any a pri...

  15. Inferring human intentions from the brain data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanek, Konrad

    The human brain is a massively complex organ composed of approximately a hundred billion densely interconnected, interacting neural cells. The neurons are not wired randomly - instead, they are organized in local functional assemblies. It is believed that the complex patterns of dynamic electric...... discharges across the neural tissue are responsible for emergence of high cognitive function, conscious perception and voluntary action. The brain’s capacity to exercise free will, or internally generated free choice, has long been investigated by philosophers, psychologists and neuroscientists. Rather than...... assuming a causal power of conscious will, the neuroscience of volition is based on the premise that "mental states rest on brain processes”, and hence by measuring spatial and temporal correlates of volition in carefully controlled experiments we can infer about their underlying mind processes, including...

  16. Bayesian inference data evaluation and decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Harney, Hanns Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    This new edition offers a comprehensive introduction to the analysis of data using Bayes rule. It generalizes Gaussian error intervals to situations in which the data follow distributions other than Gaussian. This is particularly useful when the observed parameter is barely above the background or the histogram of multiparametric data contains many empty bins, so that the determination of the validity of a theory cannot be based on the chi-squared-criterion. In addition to the solutions of practical problems, this approach provides an epistemic insight: the logic of quantum mechanics is obtained as the logic of unbiased inference from counting data. New sections feature factorizing parameters, commuting parameters, observables in quantum mechanics, the art of fitting with coherent and with incoherent alternatives and fitting with multinomial distribution. Additional problems and examples help deepen the knowledge. Requiring no knowledge of quantum mechanics, the book is written on introductory level, with man...

  17. Automated adaptive inference of phenomenological dynamical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Bryan C.; Nemenman, Ilya

    2015-08-01

    Dynamics of complex systems is often driven by large and intricate networks of microscopic interactions, whose sheer size obfuscates understanding. With limited experimental data, many parameters of such dynamics are unknown, and thus detailed, mechanistic models risk overfitting and making faulty predictions. At the other extreme, simple ad hoc models often miss defining features of the underlying systems. Here we develop an approach that instead constructs phenomenological, coarse-grained models of network dynamics that automatically adapt their complexity to the available data. Such adaptive models produce accurate predictions even when microscopic details are unknown. The approach is computationally tractable, even for a relatively large number of dynamical variables. Using simulated data, it correctly infers the phase space structure for planetary motion, avoids overfitting in a biological signalling system and produces accurate predictions for yeast glycolysis with tens of data points and over half of the interacting species unobserved.

  18. Progression inference for somatic mutations in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif E. Peterson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods were employed to determine progression inference of genomic alterations in commonly occurring cancers. Using cross-sectional TCGA data, we computed evolutionary trajectories involving selectivity relationships among pairs of gene-specific genomic alterations such as somatic mutations, deletions, amplifications, downregulation, and upregulation among the top 20 driver genes associated with each cancer. Results indicate that the majority of hierarchies involved TP53, PIK3CA, ERBB2, APC, KRAS, EGFR, IDH1, VHL, etc. Research into the order and accumulation of genomic alterations among cancer driver genes will ever-increase as the costs of nextgen sequencing subside, and personalized/precision medicine incorporates whole-genome scans into the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  19. Neural representation of probabilities for Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Dylan; Cazettes, Fanny; Wang, Yunyan; Peña, José Luis; Fischer, Brian J

    2015-04-01

    Bayesian models are often successful in describing perception and behavior, but the neural representation of probabilities remains in question. There are several distinct proposals for the neural representation of probabilities, but they have not been directly compared in an example system. Here we consider three models: a non-uniform population code where the stimulus-driven activity and distribution of preferred stimuli in the population represent a likelihood function and a prior, respectively; the sampling hypothesis which proposes that the stimulus-driven activity over time represents a posterior probability and that the spontaneous activity represents a prior; and the class of models which propose that a population of neurons represents a posterior probability in a distributed code. It has been shown that the non-uniform population code model matches the representation of auditory space generated in the owl's external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICx). However, the alternative models have not been tested, nor have the three models been directly compared in any system. Here we tested the three models in the owl's ICx. We found that spontaneous firing rate and the average stimulus-driven response of these neurons were not consistent with predictions of the sampling hypothesis. We also found that neural activity in ICx under varying levels of sensory noise did not reflect a posterior probability. On the other hand, the responses of ICx neurons were consistent with the non-uniform population code model. We further show that Bayesian inference can be implemented in the non-uniform population code model using one spike per neuron when the population is large and is thus able to support the rapid inference that is necessary for sound localization.

  20. Gene expression inference with deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifei; Li, Yi; Narayan, Rajiv; Subramanian, Aravind; Xie, Xiaohui

    2016-06-15

    Large-scale gene expression profiling has been widely used to characterize cellular states in response to various disease conditions, genetic perturbations, etc. Although the cost of whole-genome expression profiles has been dropping steadily, generating a compendium of expression profiling over thousands of samples is still very expensive. Recognizing that gene expressions are often highly correlated, researchers from the NIH LINCS program have developed a cost-effective strategy of profiling only ∼1000 carefully selected landmark genes and relying on computational methods to infer the expression of remaining target genes. However, the computational approach adopted by the LINCS program is currently based on linear regression (LR), limiting its accuracy since it does not capture complex nonlinear relationship between expressions of genes. We present a deep learning method (abbreviated as D-GEX) to infer the expression of target genes from the expression of landmark genes. We used the microarray-based Gene Expression Omnibus dataset, consisting of 111K expression profiles, to train our model and compare its performance to those from other methods. In terms of mean absolute error averaged across all genes, deep learning significantly outperforms LR with 15.33% relative improvement. A gene-wise comparative analysis shows that deep learning achieves lower error than LR in 99.97% of the target genes. We also tested the performance of our learned model on an independent RNA-Seq-based GTEx dataset, which consists of 2921 expression profiles. Deep learning still outperforms LR with 6.57% relative improvement, and achieves lower error in 81.31% of the target genes. D-GEX is available at https://github.com/uci-cbcl/D-GEX CONTACT: xhx@ics.uci.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Synaptic and Nonsynaptic Plasticity Approximating Probabilistic Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Joseph Tully

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain stores and retrieves information by initiating cascades of molecular changes that lead to a diverse repertoire of dynamical phenomena at higher levels of processing. Hebbian plasticity, neuromodulation, and homeostatic synaptic and intrinsic excitability all conspire to form and maintain memories. But it is still unclear how these seemingly redundant mechanisms could jointly orchestrate learning in a more unified system. To address this, we propose a Hebbian learning rule for spiking neurons inspired by Bayesian statistics. Synaptic weights and intrinsic currents are adapted on-line upon arrival of single spikes, which initiate a cascade of temporally interacting memory traces that locally estimate probabilities associated with relative neuronal activation levels. We show that the dynamics of these traces readily demonstrate a spike-timing dependence that stably returns to a set-point over long time scales, and that synaptic learning remains competitive despite this stability. Beyond unsupervised learning, we show how linking the traces with an externally driven signal could enable spike-based reinforcement learning. Neuronally, the traces are represented by an activity-dependent ion channel that is shown to regulate the input received by a postsynaptic cell and generate intrinsic graded persistent firing levels. We perform spike-based Bayesian learning in a simulated inference task using integrate and fire neurons that are Poisson-firing and fluctuation-driven, similar to the preferred regime of cortical neurons. Our results support the view that neurons can represent information in the form of probability distributions and that probabilistic inference can be a functional by-product of coupled synaptic and nonsynaptic mechanisms operating over several timescales. The model provides a biophysical realization of Bayesian computation by reconciling several observed neural phenomena whose functional effects are only partially understood

  2. Climate-induced changes in lake ecosystem structure inferred from coupled neo- and paleoecological approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saros, Jasmine E.; Stone, Jeffery R.; Pederson, Gregory T.; Slemmons, Krista; Spanbauer, Trisha; Schliep, Anna; Cahl, Douglas; Williamson, Craig E.; Engstrom, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Over the 20th century, surface water temperatures have increased in many lake ecosystems around the world, but long-term trends in the vertical thermal structure of lakes remain unclear, despite the strong control that thermal stratification exerts on the biological response of lakes to climate change. Here we used both neo- and paleoecological approaches to develop a fossil-based inference model for lake mixing depths and thereby refine understanding of lake thermal structure change. We focused on three common planktonic diatom taxa, the distributions of which previous research suggests might be affected by mixing depth. Comparative lake surveys and growth rate experiments revealed that these species respond to lake thermal structure when nitrogen is sufficient, with species optima ranging from shallower to deeper mixing depths. The diatom-based mixing depth model was applied to sedimentary diatom profiles extending back to 1750 AD in two lakes with moderate nitrate concentrations but differing climate settings. Thermal reconstructions were consistent with expected changes, with shallower mixing depths inferred for an alpine lake where treeline has advanced, and deeper mixing depths inferred for a boreal lake where wind strength has increased. The inference model developed here provides a new tool to expand and refine understanding of climate-induced changes in lake ecosystems.

  3. Probabilistic logic networks a comprehensive framework for uncertain inference

    CERN Document Server

    Goertzel, Ben; Goertzel, Izabela Freire; Heljakka, Ari

    2008-01-01

    This comprehensive book describes Probabilistic Logic Networks (PLN), a novel conceptual, mathematical and computational approach to uncertain inference. A broad scope of reasoning types are considered.

  4. Parametric statistical inference basic theory and modern approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Zacks, Shelemyahu; Tsokos, C P

    1981-01-01

    Parametric Statistical Inference: Basic Theory and Modern Approaches presents the developments and modern trends in statistical inference to students who do not have advanced mathematical and statistical preparation. The topics discussed in the book are basic and common to many fields of statistical inference and thus serve as a jumping board for in-depth study. The book is organized into eight chapters. Chapter 1 provides an overview of how the theory of statistical inference is presented in subsequent chapters. Chapter 2 briefly discusses statistical distributions and their properties. Chapt

  5. Inferring ancestry from population genomic data and its applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badri ePadhukasahasram

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ancestry inference is a frequently encountered problem and has many applications such as forensic analyses, genetic association studies and personal genomics. The main goal of ancestry inference is to identify an individual’s population of origin based on our knowledge of natural populations. Because both self-reported ancestry in humans or the sampling location of an organism can be inaccurate for this purpose, the use of genetic markers can facilitate accurate and reliable inference of an individual’s ancestral origins. At a higher level, there are two different paradigms in ancestry inference: global ancestry inference which tries to compute the genome wide average of the population contributions and local ancestry inference which tries to identify the regional ancestry of a genomic segment. In this mini review, I describe the numerous approaches that are currently available for both kinds of ancestry inference from population genomic datasets. I first describe the general ideas underlying such inference methods and their relationship to one another. Then, I describe practical applications in which inference of ancestry has proven useful. Lastly, I discuss challenges and directions for future research work in this area.

  6. Dynamic obstacle avoidance using Bayesian Occupancy Filter and approximate inference

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Llamazares, Angel; Ivan, Vladimir; Molinos, Eduardo; Ocaña, Manuel; Vijayakumar, Sethu

    2013-01-01

    .... While several obstacle avoidance systems have been presented in the literature addressing safety and optimality of the robot motion separately, we have applied the approximate inference framework...

  7. Use of and satisfaction with support received among survivors from three Scandinavian countries after the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P O; Rosendal, S; Weisaeth, L; Heir, T

    2011-10-01

    There is limited guidance regarding effective preventions for post-disaster mental health problems and what kind of support is preferred by disaster survivors. To describe the use of and satisfaction with support in three Scandinavian countries after the tsunami and analyzing the association between support and posttraumatic stress reactions. The sample comprises 6772 responders who returned to Scandinavia from the tsunami-struck countries of Southeast Asia in 2004. Most were satisfied with informal support on site. Support from embassies/consulates was not received well, leaving about 64% of the Danes/Norwegians and 73% of the Swedes dissatisfied. After returning home, support from close relatives rendered highest degree of satisfaction. Consultation with general practitioner (GP) was reported by 63% of Norwegians, 40% of Danes, and 16% of Swedes. Most responders (60-77%) were satisfied with their GP, although Norwegians were least satisfied. Using support was associated with higher levels of posttraumatic stress symptoms. Informal support was used to a high degree and rendered considerable satisfaction in all three countries, while the use of and satisfaction with formal support varied more. Lack of satisfaction with embassies and consulates may indicate deficiencies in the authorities' preparedness in assisting disaster stricken citizens abroad. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Conflict-resolution mechanisms maintaining an agricultural system. Early modern local courts as an arena for solving collective-action problems within Scandinavian Civil Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Larsson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid access to low-cost local arenas to resolve conflicts among appropriators is one of the principles that characterise robust common-pool resource (CPR institutions. In spite of this insight, we have little knowledge about how such institutions solved collective-action problems in early modern Scandinavia, when CPRs were an important part of production. Arenas to resolve conflicts among appropriators range from informal meetings among users to formal court cases. This paper focuses on local courts, rather than laws and by-laws, within the Scandinavian legal origin and how these courts developed as arenas for CPR conflict resolution. Court rulings from Leksand Parish in central Sweden were the backbone for this study. The results indicate that access to a low-cost arena was more important to the peasants than rapid access to the courts. Successful conflict resolution could take years to accomplish and it was more important for the court to embed their decisions in people’s minds than to come to a quick resolution. Further, I demonstrate that the court laid the foundation for disputing parties to solve conflicts among themselves. Lay judges – peasants from the region – came to play an important role in conflict resolution. Thus, in the 17th and 18th centuries, the court played a central role in maintaining agricultural CPRs.

  9. Can finasteride reverse the progress of benign prostatic hyperplasia? A two-year placebo-controlled study. The Scandinavian BPH Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J T; Ekman, P; Wolf, H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. To study if placebo-induced improvement in men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is maintained over 2 years, and to study the efficacy and safety from intervention with finasteride 5 mg for 24 months. METHODS. This was a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled ......OBJECTIVES. To study if placebo-induced improvement in men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is maintained over 2 years, and to study the efficacy and safety from intervention with finasteride 5 mg for 24 months. METHODS. This was a multicenter, double-blind, placebo......-controlled study involving 707 patients with moderate symptoms of BPH enrolled at 59 centers in five Scandinavian countries. Following enrollment and a 4-week single-blind placebo run-in period, patients were randomized to receive finasteride 5 mg once daily or placebo for 24 months. Urinary symptoms, urinary flow....... In finasteride-treated patients the total symptom score improved throughout the study, with a significant difference between the two groups at 24 months (P

  10. The probabilistic convolution tree: efficient exact Bayesian inference for faster LC-MS/MS protein inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Serang

    Full Text Available Exact Bayesian inference can sometimes be performed efficiently for special cases where a function has commutative and associative symmetry of its inputs (called "causal independence". For this reason, it is desirable to exploit such symmetry on big data sets. Here we present a method to exploit a general form of this symmetry on probabilistic adder nodes by transforming those probabilistic adder nodes into a probabilistic convolution tree with which dynamic programming computes exact probabilities. A substantial speedup is demonstrated using an illustration example that can arise when identifying splice forms with bottom-up mass spectrometry-based proteomics. On this example, even state-of-the-art exact inference algorithms require a runtime more than exponential in the number of splice forms considered. By using the probabilistic convolution tree, we reduce the runtime to O(k log(k2 and the space to O(k log(k where k is the number of variables joined by an additive or cardinal operator. This approach, which can also be used with junction tree inference, is applicable to graphs with arbitrary dependency on counting variables or cardinalities and can be used on diverse problems and fields like forward error correcting codes, elemental decomposition, and spectral demixing. The approach also trivially generalizes to multiple dimensions.

  11. Making inference from wildlife collision data: inferring predator absence from prey strikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Caley

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife collision data are ubiquitous, though challenging for making ecological inference due to typically irreducible uncertainty relating to the sampling process. We illustrate a new approach that is useful for generating inference from predator data arising from wildlife collisions. By simply conditioning on a second prey species sampled via the same collision process, and by using a biologically realistic numerical response functions, we can produce a coherent numerical response relationship between predator and prey. This relationship can then be used to make inference on the population size of the predator species, including the probability of extinction. The statistical conditioning enables us to account for unmeasured variation in factors influencing the runway strike incidence for individual airports and to enable valid comparisons. A practical application of the approach for testing hypotheses about the distribution and abundance of a predator species is illustrated using the hypothesized red fox incursion into Tasmania, Australia. We estimate that conditional on the numerical response between fox and lagomorph runway strikes on mainland Australia, the predictive probability of observing no runway strikes of foxes in Tasmania after observing 15 lagomorph strikes is 0.001. We conclude there is enough evidence to safely reject the null hypothesis that there is a widespread red fox population in Tasmania at a population density consistent with prey availability. The method is novel and has potential wider application.

  12. Order effects in transitive inference : does the presentation order of social information affect transitive inference in social animals?

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi eHotta; Lyndon Alexander Jordan; Tomohiro eTakeyama; Masanori eKohda

    2015-01-01

    Transitive inference (TI) is the ability to infer social relationships between individuals (e.g., if A < B and B < C, then A < C), and has been documented in a variety of vertebrates. Many studies of TI use the task of inferring social dominance, where a subject animal A first directly interacts with B (e.g., A subordinate to B: A < B), and then indirectly observes the interaction of B and an unknown C (B < C), using both direct and indirect information to infer its own relationship with C (i...

  13. Inferring gene regression networks with model trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar-Ruiz Jesus S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel strategies are required in order to handle the huge amount of data produced by microarray technologies. To infer gene regulatory networks, the first step is to find direct regulatory relationships between genes building the so-called gene co-expression networks. They are typically generated using correlation statistics as pairwise similarity measures. Correlation-based methods are very useful in order to determine whether two genes have a strong global similarity but do not detect local similarities. Results We propose model trees as a method to identify gene interaction networks. While correlation-based methods analyze each pair of genes, in our approach we generate a single regression tree for each gene from the remaining genes. Finally, a graph from all the relationships among output and input genes is built taking into account whether the pair of genes is statistically significant. For this reason we apply a statistical procedure to control the false discovery rate. The performance of our approach, named REGNET, is experimentally tested on two well-known data sets: Saccharomyces Cerevisiae and E.coli data set. First, the biological coherence of the results are tested. Second the E.coli transcriptional network (in the Regulon database is used as control to compare the results to that of a correlation-based method. This experiment shows that REGNET performs more accurately at detecting true gene associations than the Pearson and Spearman zeroth and first-order correlation-based methods. Conclusions REGNET generates gene association networks from gene expression data, and differs from correlation-based methods in that the relationship between one gene and others is calculated simultaneously. Model trees are very useful techniques to estimate the numerical values for the target genes by linear regression functions. They are very often more precise than linear regression models because they can add just different linear

  14. Stochastic Collapsed Variational Bayesian Inference for Latent Dirichlet Allocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foulds, J.; Boyles, L.; DuBois, C.; Smyth, P.; Welling, M.; Dhillon, I.S.; Koren, Y.; Ghani, R.; Senator, T.E.; Bradley, P.; Parekh, R.; He, J.; Grossman, R.L.; Uthurusamy, R.

    2013-01-01

    There has been an explosion in the amount of digital text information available in recent years, leading to challenges of scale for traditional inference algorithms for topic models. Recent advances in stochastic variational inference algorithms for latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) have made it

  15. Inferring Social Disposition by Sound and Surface Appearance in Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ashley B.; Cheries, Erik W.

    2017-01-01

    Adults automatically infer a person's social disposition and future behavior based on the many properties they observe about how they look and sound. The goal of the current study is to explore the developmental origins of this bias. We tested whether 12-month-old infants automatically infer a character's social disposition (e.g., whether they are…

  16. Inference Strategies in Reading Comprehension. Technical Report No. 410.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Linda M.

    A study investigated the inference strategies used by sixth grade students reading narratives, and the results were compared with the inference strategies identified as those used by skilled adult readers. Subjects, 80 sixth grade students from two Canadian urban centers were divided into two groups: 40 high-proficiency readers and 40…

  17. Effects of Inferred Motive on Evaluations of Nonaccommodative Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiorek, Jessica; Giles, Howard

    2012-01-01

    In two studies, we propose, refine, and test a new model of inferred motive predicting of individuals' reactions to nonaccommodation, defined as communicative behavior that is inappropriately adjusted for participants in an interaction. Inferring a negative motive for others' problematic behavior resulted in significantly less positive evaluations…

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Fuzzy Inference Engines in Context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fuzzy inference engine has found successful applications in a wide variety of fields, such as automatic control, data classification, decision analysis, expert engines, time series prediction, robotics, pattern recognition, etc. This paper presents a comparative analysis of three fuzzy inference engines, max-product, max-min ...

  19. The Importance of Statistical Modeling in Data Analysis and Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Derrick, Sr.

    2017-01-01

    Statistical inference simply means to draw a conclusion based on information that comes from data. Error bars are the most commonly used tool for data analysis and inference in chemical engineering data studies. This work demonstrates, using common types of data collection studies, the importance of specifying the statistical model for sound…

  20. The Effect of Gender on the Construction of Backward Inferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Ozler

    2008-01-01

    The main objective in the present study is to examine the effect of gender on primary school students' construction of elaborative backward inferences during text processing. A total of 333 children, aged 10-11 years (n = 158 girls and 175 boys) participated in the study. Each participant completed a backward inference test. The results indicate…