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Sample records for scan pet scan

  1. Lung PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chest PET scan; Lung positron emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging; ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  2. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  3. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  4. Model PET Scan Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Amber; Gazdovich, Jennifer; Redouté, Oriane; Reverte, Juan Manuel; Shelley, Samantha; Todorova, Vesela

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to antimatter and how it, along with other modern physics topics, is utilized in positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It further describes a hands-on activity for students to help them gain an understanding of how PET scans assist in detecting cancer. Modern physics topics provide an exciting way to introduce students to current applications of physics.

  5. First PET scans in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, Sergei

    2003-01-01

    First PET scans in Estonia were performed on 25th November 2002 in North Estonia Regional Hospital, Tallinn. Six patients with melanoma underwent scanning with FDG. This event was a result of thorough extensive preparations first started in 2000 during the European Association of Nuclear Medicine congress in Paris. During the congress first contacts were made with providers of mobile PET units. At the same time negotiations were begun with potential FDG suppliers. For the introduction of PET in Estonia mobile truckmounted scanning technology was chosen due to low level of initial investments. Of particular importance was also availability of maintenance personnel from the device providers. A significant prerequisite was potential availability of FDG from the neighbourhood - Finland and Sweden. The latter avoided the necessity for investments into local cyclotrons and local FDG production. For the first scanning experience the dedicated truckmounted PET-camera Accel, Siemens was brought by the International Hospital Group (IHG, Amersfoort, Netherlands). The device arrived by ferry from Stockholm to Tallinn harbour at 10 o'clock in the morning and left by ferry for Helsinki at 23 o'clock. The team-on-truck consisted of one technician for device operation, two drivers and two company representatives. North Estonia Regional Hospital provided three additional technicians for patient preparation and FDG injection, one nuclear medicine doctor and one specialist of biomedical engineering and medical physics. The FDG was provided by MAP Medical Technologies, Schering, Helsinki, Finland. The shipments were made by air. This was possible due to small distance between Tallinn and Helsinki of approximately 80 km due to the regular flight connections between the two cities. The FDG was shipped in two lots with a time interval of 4 hours. The patient selection was based on clinical and histopathology data. In all six patients the exam was justified for detailied staging and

  6. PET scanning in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodaki, Eirini; Eirini, Liodaki; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Emmanouil, Liodakis; Papadopoulos, Othonas; Othonas, Papadopoulos; Machens, Hans-Günther; Hans-Günther, Machens; Papadopulos, Nikolaos A; Nikolaos, Papadopulos A

    2012-02-01

    In this report we highlight the use of PET scan in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PET scanning is a very important tool in plastic surgery oncology (melanoma, soft-tissue sarcomas and bone sarcomas, head and neck cancer, peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities and breast cancer after breast esthetic surgery), as diagnosis, staging, treatment planning and follow-up of cancer patients is based on imaging. PET scanning seems also to be useful as a flap monitoring system as well as an infection's imaging tool, for example in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. PET also contributes to the understanding of pathophysiology of keloids which remain a therapeutic challenge.

  7. PET scanning in plastic and reconstructive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eirini, L.; Emmanouil, L.; Othonas, P.; Hans-Guenther, M.; Nikolaos, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this report we highlight the use of position emission tomography (PET) scan in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PET scanning is a very important tool in plastic surgery oncology (melanoma, soft-tissue sarcomas and bone sarcomas, head and neck cancer, peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities and breast cancer after breast esthetic surgery), as diagnosis, staging, treatment planning and follow-up of cancer patients is based on imaging. PET scanning seems also to be useful as a flap monitoring system as well as an infection's imaging tool, for example in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. PET also contributes to the understanding of pathophysiology of keloids which remain a therapeutic challenge. (author)

  8. PET scan and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, F.; Lahmi, A.; Rousseau, A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose was the optimization of the radiation protection during examinations with 18 F-FDG, The immediate validation by the D.G.S.N.R., the results of dosimetry (h.p.10 = 12 μ sievert (average value/ technician / day for 6 patients) demonstrate the efficiency of the implemented means. From the very beginning, the installation of a PET-scanner requires a multidisciplinary conception. This essential thought contributes to an optimal radiation protection of the entire personnel of the service. (N.C.)

  9. Guidance for reading FDG PET scans in dementia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, K.

    2014-01-01

    18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful method for detection of disease-related impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neuro degenerative diseases. It is of particular interest for early and differential diagnosis of dementia. Reading FDG PET scans requires training to recognise deviations from normal functional brain anatomy and its variations. This paper provides guidance for displaying FDG PET brain scans in a reproducible manner that allows reliable recognition of characteristic disease-related metabolic changes. It also describes typical findings in Alzheimer’s disease, Frontotemporal Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies and possible confounding factors, such as vascular changes and brain atrophy. It provides a brief overview on findings in other neuro degenerative diseases and addresses the potential and limitations of software packages for comparison of individual scans with reference data.

  10. 18FDG PET scanning of benign and malignant musculoskeletal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, Frieda; Heertum, Ronald van; Manos, Chitra

    2003-01-01

    To describe the technique, applications and advantages of 18 FDG PET scanning in detection, analysis and management of musculoskeletal lesions.Design and patients Forty-five patients (19 males,26 females) aged 9 to 81 years had radiographs, routine radionuclide scans, CT and/or MRI of clinically suspected active benign or malignant musculoskeletal lesions. 18 FDG scans with a Siemens ECAT EXACT 921 dedicated PET unit (Knoxville, Tenn.) and FWH=6 mm images acquired as a 5-6 bed examination (6 min emission and 4 min transmission) used OSEM iterative reconstruction with segmented transmission attenuation correction and a Gaussian filter (cutoff 6.7 mm). Region of interest (ROI) 3 x 3 pixel image analysis based on transverse whole body images (slice thickness 3.37 mm) generated Maximum Standard Uptake Values (Max SUV) with a cutoff of 2.0 used to distinguish benign and malignant lesions. Thirty-nine studies were available for SUV ROI analysis. Overall sensitivity for differentiating malignant from benign osseous and non-osseous lesions was 91.7% (22/24), overall specificity was 100% (11/11) with an accuracy of 91.7%. All aggressive lesions had a Max SUV >2.0. Data separating benign from malignant lesions and aggressive from benign lesions were statistically significant (P 18 FDG PET contributes unique information regarding metabolism of musculoskeletal lesions. By supplying a physiologic basis for more informed treatment and management, it influences prognosis and survival. Moreover, since residual, recurrent or metastatic tumors can be simultaneously documented on a single whole body scan, PET may theoretically prove to be cost-effective. (orig.)

  11. PET Scans Obtained for Evaluation of Cognitive Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Mosconi, Lisa; Ercoli, Linda; Chen, W; Small, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    The degree of intactness of human cognitive functioning for a given individual spans a wide spectrum, ranging from normal to severely demented. The differential diagnosis for the causes of impairment along that spectrum is also wide, and often difficult to distinguish clinically, which has led to an increasing role for neuroimaging tools in that evaluation. The most frequent causes of dementia are neurodegenerative disorders, Alzheimer's disease being the most prevalent among them, and they produce significant alterations in brain metabolism with devastating neuropathologic, economic, social and clinical consequences. These alterations are detectable through positron emission tomography (PET), even in their earliest stages. The most commonly performed PET studies of the brain are carried out with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as the imaged radiopharmaceutical. Such scans have demonstrated diagnostic and prognostic utility in evaluating patients with cognitive impairment, and in distinguishing among primary neurodegenerative disorders and other etiologies for cognitive decline. In addition to focusing upon the effects on cerebral metabolism examined with FDG PET, some other changes occurring in the brains of cognitively impaired patients assessable with other radiotracers will be considered. As preventive and disease-modifying treatments are developed, early detection of accurately diagnosed disease processes facilitated by the use of PET has the potential to substantially impact upon the enormous human toll exacted by these diseases. PMID:18514081

  12. The clinical impact of PET scanning in patients with melanoma: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalff, V.; Hicks, R.J.; Binns, D.S.; Henderson, M.A.; Ainslie, J.; Jenner, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Small series have shown that PET scanning using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), can quite accurately stage patients melanoma. At this Institute these patients are only sent for PET imaging if they have high risk melanomas ( >3 Clarke's grade primaries) or there remains any significant doubt as to their clinical staging or management after the completion of conventional screening. This prospective study examines how PET scan findings influenced the clinical management decisions in 53 patients (29 males, mean age 54±13 yrs: range 31-81 yrs) Referring doctors were asked to indicate reason for the PET scan, stage their patients on the basis of all their current investigations, and to indicate their management plans prior to PET scanning. Follow-up of subsequent patient management at 2-4 weeks post PET scan was then obtained and compared to pre PET plans. PET was used to stage 26 patients, restage 17, follow-up 5, assess recurrence in 3, and other in 2 patients. To date follow-up has shown that in 32/49 (65%) patients PET was used to triage patients to locoregional surgery (10 patients), radical radiotherapy (5 patients), or to continuing follow-up only (17 patients). Three further high risk patients with negative PET scans had sentinel mode biopsy. In only 13 patients was management already determined, with planned treatment being changed in 6. Four patients have not had their post PET scan review yet. To date proven false negative PET scans have occurred in 3 cases, 2 sentinel node biopsies showed microscopic disease, and one scan incorrectly labelled gall-bladder melanoma as hydro-nephrotic kidney. Interestingly in 3 cases, PET discovered other unsuspected tumours (rectum x 2, plasmacytoma). PET scanning has been incorporated into routine management to triage most high risk patients, but it still alters interventions in half of those patients where management has already been planned. PET clearly misses small volume disease, the importance of which is

  13. Detection of Recurrent Cervical Cancer by Whole-body FDG PET Scans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaxin Yang; Jinhui Wang; Zhaohui Zhu; Keng Shen; Bocheng Wang

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the role of whole-body {18F} fluro-2-dexoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scans in the detection of recurrent cervical cancer.METHODS Between June, 2000 and January, 2006, 25 patients had undergone a PET scan at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital to evaluate possible recurrent cervical cancer. All the PET findings were reviewed and compared to available clinical data to classify each PET scan result as a true positive, true negative, false positive, or false negative.RESULTS A total of 38 PET scans were conducted on the 25patients whose median age was 46 years. The Stage distributions were IA (n = 1), IB (n = 11), IIA (n = 5), IIB (n = 4), IIIB (n = 2), WB (n= 1), and unknown Stage (n = 1). There were 22 cases of squamous cell carcinoma and 3 cases of adenocarcinoma resulting in 9 true positive PET scans, 27 true negatives, 2 false positives and no false negatives. The sensitivity of the FDG PET scans for detecting recurrent cervical cancer was 100%, specificity 93.1%, positive predictive value 81.8%, and negative predictive value 100%.CONCLUSION The whole body FDG PET scans are a sensitive and specific imaging modality for the detection of recurrent cervical cancer. However the cost of PET scans is too high at this time. A large prospective study will determine whether this modality should be used routinely and take the place of other imaging methods in the early detection of recurrent cervical carcinoma

  14. F-18 FDG PET scan findings in patients with pulmonary involvement in the hypereosinophilic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-08-15

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is an infiltrative disease of eosinophils affecting multiple organs including the lung. F-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection, making interpretation of whole body PET scan difficult in patients with cancer. This study was to evaluate the PET findings of HES with lung involvement and to find out differential PET features between lung malignancy and HES with lung involvement. F-18 FDG PET and low dose chest CT scan was performed for screening of lung cancer. Eight patients who showed ground-glass attenuation (GGA) and consolidation on chest CT scan with peripheral blood eosinophilia were included in this study. The patients with history of parasite infection, allergy and collagen vascular disease were excluded. CT features and FDG PET findings were meticulously evaluated for the distribution of GGA and consolidation and nodules on CT scan and mean and maximal SUV of abnormalities depicted on F-18 FDG PET scan. In eight patients, follow-up chest CT scan and FDG PET scan were done one or two weeks after initial study. F-18 FDG PET scan identified metabolically active lesions in seven out of eight patients. Maximal SUV was ranged from 2.8 to 10.6 and mean SUV was ranged from 2.2 to 7.2. Remaining one patient had maximal SUV of 1.3. On follow-up FDG PET scan taken on from one to four weeks later showed decreased degree of initially noted FDG uptakes or migration of previously noted abnormal FDG uptakes. Lung involvement in the HES might be identified as abnormal uptake foci on FDG PET scan mimicking lung cancer. Follow-up FDG PET and CT scan for the identification of migration or resolution of abnormalities and decrement of SUV would be of help for the differentiation between lung cancer and HES with lung involvement.

  15. F-18 FDG PET scan findings in patients with pulmonary involvement in the hypereosinophilic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin

    2005-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is an infiltrative disease of eosinophils affecting multiple organs including the lung. F-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection, making interpretation of whole body PET scan difficult in patients with cancer. This study was to evaluate the PET findings of HES with lung involvement and to find out differential PET features between lung malignancy and HES with lung involvement. F-18 FDG PET and low dose chest CT scan was performed for screening of lung cancer. Eight patients who showed ground-glass attenuation (GGA) and consolidation on chest CT scan with peripheral blood eosinophilia were included in this study. The patients with history of parasite infection, allergy and collagen vascular disease were excluded. CT features and FDG PET findings were meticulously evaluated for the distribution of GGA and consolidation and nodules on CT scan and mean and maximal SUV of abnormalities depicted on F-18 FDG PET scan. In eight patients, follow-up chest CT scan and FDG PET scan were done one or two weeks after initial study. F-18 FDG PET scan identified metabolically active lesions in seven out of eight patients. Maximal SUV was ranged from 2.8 to 10.6 and mean SUV was ranged from 2.2 to 7.2. Remaining one patient had maximal SUV of 1.3. On follow-up FDG PET scan taken on from one to four weeks later showed decreased degree of initially noted FDG uptakes or migration of previously noted abnormal FDG uptakes. Lung involvement in the HES might be identified as abnormal uptake foci on FDG PET scan mimicking lung cancer. Follow-up FDG PET and CT scan for the identification of migration or resolution of abnormalities and decrement of SUV would be of help for the differentiation between lung cancer and HES with lung involvement

  16. A prospective study of the clinical impact of PET scanning in lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; Kalff, V.; Binns, D.S.; McManus, M.; Millward, M.; Ball, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: PET scanning using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), has been shown to very accurately stage patients with non-small cell lung cancer. At this Institute these patients are only sent for PET imaging where there remains any significant doubt as to their clinical staging or management after the completion of conventional screening test including CT scanning. This study examines how PET scan findings influenced the clinical management decisions in 45 consecutive patients (26 males, mean age 69±9 yrs: range 36-78 yrs). Referring doctors were asked to indicate reason for the PET scan, stage their patients on the basis of aU their current investigations, including CT scans, and to indicate their management plans prior to PET scanning. Follow-up of subsequent patient management at 2-4 weeks post PET scan was then obtained and compared to pre scan plans. Results:, PET was used to stage 27 patients, restage 8, plan radiotherapy in 4, post treatment follow-up in 3, assess solitary nodules in 2, and as a baseline for experimental therapy in 1. To date follow-up has shown that in 14 (31%) patients PET scanning found new distant abnormalities which caused planned radical surgery or radiotherapy to be changed to palliative treatment only. Following PET findings, which clarified equivocal findings on other imaging modalities 9 patients underwent curative lung surgery. This found localised disease only in the 5 who have had surgery to this time. Similarly 7 patients continued on to have radical radiotherapy. In 3 patients, original treatment protocols changed (smaller radiation portal, surgery after good response to radiotherapy, planned chemotherapy ceased). In 8(18%) patients PET scans did not alter planned therapy. 1 patient awaits follow-up. Conclusions: In carefully selected patients with lung cancer, PET scanning significantly affected management decisions in 82%. It was used not only to spare unnecessary treatment, but also to target treatment appropriate to

  17. Influence of PET/CT-introduction on PET scanning frequency and indications. Results of a multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stergar, H.; Bockisch, A.; Eschmann, S.M.; Krause, B.J.; Roedel, R.; Tiling, R.; Weckesser, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: to evaluate the influence of the introduction of combined PET/CT scanners into clinical routine. This investigation addresses the quantitative changes between PET/CT and stand alone PET. Methods: the study included all examinations performed on stand alone PET- or PET/CT-scanners within 12 month prior to and after implementation of PET/CT. The final data analysis included five university hospitals and a total number of 15 497 exams. We distinguished exams on stand alone tomographs prior to and after installation of the combined device as well as PET/CT scans particularly with regard to disease entities. Various further parameters were investigated. Results: the overall number of PET scans (PET and PET/CT) rose by 146% while the number of scans performed on stand alone scanners declined by 22%. Only one site registered an increase in stand alone PET. The number of exams for staging in oncology increased by 196% while that of cardiac scans decreased by 35% and the number of scans in neurology rose by 47%. The use of scans for radiotherapy planning increased to 7% of all PET/CT studies. The increase of procedures for so-called classic PET oncology indications was moderate compared to the more common tumors. An even greater increase was observed in some rare entities. Conclusions: the introduction of PET/CT led to more than a doubling of overall PET procedures with a main focus on oncology. Some of the observed changes in scanning frequency may be caused by a rising availability of new radiotracers and advancements of competing imaging methods. Nevertheless the evident increase in the use of PET/CT for the most common tumour types demonstrates its expanding role in cancer staging. The combination of molecular and morphologic imaging has not only found its place but is still gaining greater importance with new developments in technology and radiochemistry. (orig.)

  18. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan in the patients with primary or recurrent gynecologic malignancies: clinical experiences with FDG-PET scan in cervical carcinoma of uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hoon

    1998-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan in patients with cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed in 74 patients with cervical carcinoma from March, 1998 to September, 1998. Fourteen cases were done at pretreatment period and sixty cases were done at post-treatment follow up period. In this study, the scans were obtained after bladder emptying by foley catheter insertion and diuretics to reduce the tracer activity in the bladder and improve the images of central lesions. We could find some incidental recurrent or metastatic lesions by FDG-PET scan (at pretreatment; 5 cases, at post-treatment; clinically no evidence of disease; 8 cases). FDG-PET scan had high sensitivity (100%) for central lesions and metastatic lymph nodes of cervical cancer but could not precisely define the anatomic location of the cancer and the sensitivity was not superior than MRI. Earlier detection of metastatic lymph nodes was superior than CT/MRI (sensitivity; 100 %) for metastatic lymph nodes. Also we found 3 double primary cancers incidentally (2 lung cancers and 1 thyroid cancer). In conclusion, FDG-FET scan might be useful for the earlier of hidden lesions that cannot be detected by routine conventional methods and differential diagnosis with radiation fibrosis and benign lymph adenophy.

  19. Role of -FDG PET Scan in Rheumatoid Lung Nodule: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. Chhakchhuak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flourine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT is a useful test for the management of malignant conditions. Inflammatory and infectious processes, however, can cause increased uptake on PET scanning, often causing diagnostic dilemmas. This knowledge is important to the rheumatologist not only because of the inflammatory conditions we treat but also because certain rheumatic diseases impose an increased risk of malignancy either due to the disease itself or as a consequence of medications used to treat the rheumatic diseases. There is an increasing body of evidence investigating the role of PET scans in inflammatory conditions. This paper describes a patient with rheumatoid arthritis who developed pulmonary nodules that showed increased uptake on PET/CT scan and reviews the use of PET scanning in the diagnosis and management of rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Statistical image reconstruction methods for simultaneous emission/transmission PET scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogan, H.; Fessler, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Transmission scans are necessary for estimating the attenuation correction factors (ACFs) to yield quantitatively accurate PET emission images. To reduce the total scan time, post-injection transmission scans have been proposed in which one can simultaneously acquire emission and transmission data using rod sources and sinogram windowing. However, since the post-injection transmission scans are corrupted by emission coincidences, accurate correction for attenuation becomes more challenging. Conventional methods (emission subtraction) for ACF computation from post-injection scans are suboptimal and require relatively long scan times. We introduce statistical methods based on penalized-likelihood objectives to compute ACFs and then use them to reconstruct lower noise PET emission images from simultaneous transmission/emission scans. Simulations show the efficacy of the proposed methods. These methods improve image quality and SNR of the estimates as compared to conventional methods

  1. Cerebral FDG-PET scanning abnormalities in optimally treated HIV patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ase B; Law, Ian; Krabbe, Karen S

    2010-01-01

    with no history of virological failure, a CD4 count above 200 x 106 cells/l and no other co-morbidities. The distribution of the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose metabolism was measured using fluorine-18-flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scanning. The PET scans were evaluated...... in the relative metabolic rate of glucose. Compared to healthy subjects, the patients with abnormal FDG-PET scanning results had a shorter history of known HIV infection, fewer years on antiretroviral therapy and higher levels of circulating TNF alpha and IL-6 (p = 0.08). CONCLUSION: A large proportion...... of optimally treated HIV patients exhibit cerebral FDG-PET scanning abnormalities and elevated TNF alpha and IL-6 levels, which may indicate imminent neuronal damage. The neuroprotective effect of early ARV treatment should be considered in future prospective follow-up studies....

  2. The diagnostic value of PET/CT scanning in patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Roed, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical value of PET/CT as a supplement to FIGO staging in patients with cervical cancer stage >or=1B. METHODS: This prospective study included 120 consecutive patients. After staging, a whole-body PET/CT scan was performed and these examinations were divided into two....../CT scanning for newly diagnosed cervical cancer FIGO stage >or=1B has a high sensitivity and specificity, and can be a valuable supplement to the FIGO staging procedure....

  3. Technical considerations on scanning and image analysis for amyloid PET in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamatsu, Go; Ohnishi, Akihito; Aita, Kazuki; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Senda, Michio; Yamamoto, Yasuji

    2017-01-01

    Brain imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET), can provide essential and objective information for the early and differential diagnosis of dementia. Amyloid PET is especially useful to evaluate the amyloid-β pathological process as a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease. This article reviews critical points about technical considerations on the scanning and image analysis methods for amyloid PET. Each amyloid PET agent has its own proper administration instructions and recommended uptake time, scan duration, and the method of image display and interpretation. In addition, we have introduced general scanning information, including subject positioning, reconstruction parameters, and quantitative and statistical image analysis. We believe that this article could make amyloid PET a more reliable tool in clinical study and practice. (author)

  4. Technical Considerations on Scanning and Image Analysis for Amyloid PET in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Go; Ohnishi, Akihito; Aita, Kazuki; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Yasuji; Senda, Michio

    2017-01-01

    Brain imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET), can provide essential and objective information for the early and differential diagnosis of dementia. Amyloid PET is especially useful to evaluate the amyloid-β pathological process as a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease. This article reviews critical points about technical considerations on the scanning and image analysis methods for amyloid PET. Each amyloid PET agent has its own proper administration instructions and recommended uptake time, scan duration, and the method of image display and interpretation. In addition, we have introduced general scanning information, including subject positioning, reconstruction parameters, and quantitative and statistical image analysis. We believe that this article could make amyloid PET a more reliable tool in clinical study and practice.

  5. The effect, identification and correction of misalignment between PET transmission and emission scans on brain PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangsong; He Zuoxiang; Tang Anwu; Qiao Suixian

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To study the effect of misalignment between PET transmission and emission scans of brain on brain PET imaging, and the Methods to identify and correct it. Methods: 18F-FDG PET imaging was performed on 8 volunteers. The emission images were reconstructed with attenuation correction after some translations and rotations in the x-axis and transverse plane were given, 1 mm and 1 degree each step, respectively. The 3-D volume fusion of PET emission and transmission scans was used to identify the suspected misalignment on 10 18F-FDG PET brain imaging. Three Methods were used to correct the misalignment. First, to quantitate the amount of the misalignment by 3-D volume registration of PET emission and transmission scans, the emission images were reconstructed with corrected translations and rotations in x-direction and transverse plane. Second, the emission images were reconstructed with mathematic calculation of brain attenuation. Third, 18F-FDG PET brain imaging was redone with careful application of laser alignment. Results: The translations greater than 3 mm in x-direction and the rotations greater than 8 degrees in transverse plane could lead to visible artifacts, which were presented with decreasing radioactivity uptake in the cortex of half cerebrum and in the frontal cortex at the side in the translating or rotating direction, respectively. The 3-D volume fusion of PET emission and transmission scans could identify and quantitate the amount of misalignment between PET emission and transmission scans of brain. The PET emission images reconstructed with corrected misalignment and mathematic calculation of brain attenuation were consistent with redone PET brain imaging. Conclusions: The misalignment between PET transmission and emission scans of brain can lead to visible artifacts. The 3-D volume fusion of PET emission and transmission scans can identify and quantitate the amount of the misalignment. The visible artifacts caused by the misalignment can be

  6. The significance of incidental focal colonic 18FDG uptake on PET scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomeusz, Dylan; Schultz, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The incidental discovery of colonic polyps, colonic malignancy, diverticulitis and inflammation during PET scanning is well described. This study is a retrospective review of the incidence and follow up of incidental focal FOG uptake in the colon detected during routine PET scanning. PET scan reports over 12 months were reviewed for the reporting of incidental colonic uptake and then clinical follow up performed in available patient records for the incidence of further colonic investigation and results. In 2008, 1985 PET scans were reported at the Royal Adelaide Hospital for the staging and detection of malignancy. Review of the results show that incidental focal colonic uptake was seen in 27 cases, (II female aged 56-83 years). Follow up colonoscopy was performed in 8 cases and in 4 cases showed tubulovillous adenomas, 7-9 mm in size, in the region of abnormal FOG uptake, I had divetticulae and another focal inflammation. Two colonoscopies revealed no abnormality (25% false negative rate). One patient with Head and Neck cancer did not have colonoscopy but the colonic lesion resolved on a post therapy PET scan. Of the 18 cases that did not have colonoscopic follow up 5 were reported on the PET scan to have diffuse probably physiological caecal activity but 13 had focal lesions in the large bowel. Although incidental colonic lesions were detected in only 1.3% of studies, of those having colonoscopy 75 % had significant findings.

  7. Evaluating FDG uptake changes between pre and post therapy respiratory gated PET scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Yong, Yue; Yap, Jeffrey T.; Killoran, Joseph H.; Allen, Aaron M.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Chen, Aileen B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Whole body (3D) and respiratory gated (4D) FDG-PET/CT scans performed pre-radiotherapy (pre-RT) and post-radiotherapy (post-RT) were analyzed to investigate the impact of 4D PET in evaluating 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake changes due to therapy, relative to traditional 3D PET. Methods and materials: 3D and 4D sequential FDG-PET/CT scans were acquired pre-RT and approximately one month post-RT for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The lesions of high uptake targeted with radiotherapy were identified on the pre-RT scan of each patient. Each lesion on the 3D and each of the five phases of the 4D scan were analyzed using a region of interest (ROI). For each patient the ROIs of the pre-RT scans were used to locate the areas of initial FDG uptake on the post-RT scans following rigid registration. Post-RT ROIs were drawn and the FDG uptake was compared with that of the pre-RT scans. Results: Sixteen distinct lesions from 12 patients were identified and analyzed. Standardized uptake value (SUV) maxima were significantly higher (p-value <0.005) for the lesions as measured on the 4D compared to 3D PET. Comparison of serial pre and post-RT scans showed a mean 62% decrease in SUV with the 3D PET scan (range 36–89%), and a 67% decrease with the 4D PET scan (range 30–89%). The mean absolute difference in SUV change on 3D versus 4D scans was 4.9%, with a range 0–15% (p-value = 0.07). Conclusions: Signal recovery with 4D PET results in higher SUVs when compared to standard 3D PET. Consequently, differences in the evaluation of SUV changes between pre and post-RT plans were observed. Such difference can have a significant impact in PET-based response assessment.

  8. Metal artifact reduction of CT scans to improve PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Vos, Charlotte S.; Arens, Anne I.J.; Hamill, James J.; Hofmann, Christian; Panin, Vladimir Y.; Meeuwis, Antoi P.W.; Visser, Eric P.; De Geus-Oei, Lioe Fee

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, different metal artifact reduction methods have been developed for CT. These methods have only recently been introduced for PET/CT even though they could be beneficial for interpretation, segmentation, and quantification of the PET/CT images. In this study, phantom and patient scans

  9. Metal Artifact Reduction of CT Scans to Improve PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, C.S. van der; Arens, A.I.J.; Hamill, J.J.; Hofmann, C.; Panin, V.Y.; Meeuwis, A.P.W.; Visser, E.P.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, different metal artifact reduction methods have been developed for CT. These methods have only recently been introduced for PET/CT even though they could be beneficial for interpretation, segmentation, and quantification of the PET/CT images. In this study, phantom and patient scans

  10. The impact of PET scanning on management of paediatric oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, E.A.; Barrington, S.F.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Kingston, J.E.; Robinson, R.O.; Ferner, R.E.; Taj, M.; Smith, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Limited information is available on the use of positron emission tomography (PET) in paediatric oncology. The aim of this study was to review the impact of PET on the management of paediatric patients scanned over a 10-year period. One hundred and sixty-five consecutive oncology patients aged 11 months to 17 years were included. Two hundred and thirty-seven scans were performed. Diagnoses included lymphoma (60 patients), central nervous system (CNS) tumour (59), sarcoma (19), plexiform neurofibroma with suspected malignant change (13) and other tumours (14). A questionnaire was sent to the referring clinician to determine whether the PET scan had altered management and whether overall the PET scan was thought to be helpful. One hundred and eighty-nine (80%) questionnaires for 126 patients were returned (63 relating to lymphoma, 62 to CNS tumours, 30 to sarcoma, 16 to plexiform neurofibroma and 18 to other tumours). PET changed disease management in 46 (24%) cases and was helpful in 141 (75%) cases. PET findings were verified by histology, clinical follow-up or other investigations in 141 cases (75%). The returned questionnaires indicated that PET had led to a management change in 20 (32%) lymphoma cases, nine (15%) CNS tumours, four (13%) sarcomas, nine (56%) plexiform neurofibromas and four (22%) cases of other tumours. PET was thought to be helpful in 47 (75%) lymphoma cases, 48 (77%) CNS tumours, 24 (80%) sarcomas, 11 (69%) neurofibromas and 11 (61%) cases of other tumours. PET findings were verified in 44 (70%) lymphoma cases, 53 (85%) CNS tumours, 21 (70%) sarcomas, 12 (75%) neurofibromas and 11 (61%) other tumour cases. PET imaging of children with cancer is accurate and practical. PET alters management and is deemed helpful (with or without management change) in a significant number of patients, and the results are comparable with the figures published for the adult oncology population. (orig.)

  11. The history of cerebral PET scanning: from physiology to cutting-edge technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnow, Leah H; Vaillancourt, David E; Okun, Michael S

    2013-03-05

    To review the discoveries underpinning the introduction of cerebral PET scanning and highlight its modern applications. Important discoveries in neurophysiology, brain metabolism, and radiotracer development in the post-World War II period provided the necessary infrastructure for the first cerebral PET scan. A complete review of the literature was undertaken to search for primary and secondary sources on the history of PET imaging. Searches were performed in PubMed, Google Scholar, and select individual journal Web sites. Written autobiographies were obtained through the Society for Neuroscience Web site at www.sfn.org. A reference book on the history of radiology, Naked to the Bone, was reviewed to corroborate facts and to locate references. The references listed in all the articles and books obtained were reviewed. The neurophysiologic sciences required to build cerebral PET imaging date back to 1878. The last 60 years have produced an evolution of technological advancements in brain metabolism and radiotracer development. These advancements facilitated the development of modern cerebral PET imaging. Several key scientists were involved in critical discoveries and among them were Angelo Mosso, Charles Roy, Charles Sherrington, John Fulton, Seymour Kety, Louis Sokoloff, David E. Kuhl, Gordon L. Brownell, Michael Ter-Pogossian, Michael Phelps, and Edward Hoffman. Neurophysiology, metabolism, and radiotracer development in the postwar era synergized the development of the technology necessary for cerebral PET scanning. Continued use of PET in clinical trials and current developments in PET-CT/MRI hybrids has led to advancement in diagnosis, management, and treatment of neurologic disorders.

  12. False positive and false negative FDG-PET scans in various thoracic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jung Min; Lee, Hyun Ju; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Ho Young; Lee, Jong Jin; Chung, June Key; Im, Jung Gi

    2006-01-01

    Fluorodeoxygucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) is being used more and more to differentiate benign form malignant focal lesions and it has been shown to be more efficacious than conventional chest computed tomography (CT). However, FDG is not a cancer-specific agent, and false positive findings in benign diseases have been reported. Infectious diseases (mycobacterial, fungal, bacterial infection), sarcoidosis, radiation pneumonitis and post-operative surgical conditions have shown intense uptake on PET scan. On the other hand, tumors with low glycolytic activity such as adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, carcinoid tumors, low grade lymphomas and small sized tumors have revealed false negative findings on PET scan, Furthermore, in diseases located near the physiologic uptake sites (heart, bladder, kidney, and liver), FDG-PET should be complemented with other imaging modalities to confirm results and to minimize false negative findings. Familiarity with these false positive and negative findings will help radiologists interpret PET scans more accurately and also will help to determine the significance of the findings. In this review, we illustrate false positive and negative findings of PET scan in a variety of diseases

  13. Intrasubject correlation between static scan and distribution volume images for [11C]flumazenil PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishina, Masahiro; Senda, Michio; Kimura, Yuichi

    2000-01-01

    Accumulation of [ 11 C]flumazenil (FMZ) reflects central nervous system benzodiazepine receptor (BZR). We searched for the optimal time for a static PET scan with FMZ as semi-quantitative imaging of BZR distribution. In 10 normal subjects, a dynamic series of decay-corrected PET scans was performed for 60 minutes, and the arterial blood was sampled during the scan to measure radioactivity and labeled metabolites. We generated 13 kinds of ''static scan'' images from the dynamic scan in each subject, and analyzed the pixel correlation for these images versus distribution volume (DV) images. We also analyzed the time for the [ 11 C]FMZ in plasma and tissue to reach the equilibrium. The intra-subject pixel correlation demonstrated that the static scan'' images for the period centering around 30 minutes post-injection had the strongest linear correlation with the DV image. The ratio of radioactivity in the cortex to that in the plasma reached a peak at 40 minutes after injection. Considering the physical decay and patient burden, we conclude that the decay corrected static scan for [ 11 C]FMZ PET as semi-quantitative imaging of BZR distribution is to be optimally acquired from 20 to 40 minutes after injection. (author)

  14. Feasibility of F-18-FDG PET/CT scan in abdominopelvic regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    F-18-2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan, which simultaneously provides metabolic function and morphology on the same tomographic section, is being the key imaging modality for diagnosis and treatment strategy of makignancies in various organs. FDG PET/CT scanning of the whole body beneficially allows the assessment of primary tumor and regional lymph nodes, and distant metastases and co-existed benign/other malignant lesions, as ''one stop shopping'' fashion. This technique contributes to the selection of the optimal treatment in individual patients, and also can predict histopathologic response to treatment and postoperative/post chemo-radiation therapeutic prognosis. In this paper, we describe the fundamental knowledge required for accurate interpretation of FDG PET/CT scan, and review the utility of this technique for diagnosis and treatment strategy of makignancies in abdominal and pelvic regions. (author)

  15. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  16. 3D quantification of soil structure and functioning based on PET and CT scanning techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbout, Amin

    This thesis explores the potential of PET and CT scanning techniques to quantify and visualize soil structure, root development, and soil/plant interactions. At the investigated scale, these non-invasive and nondestructive techniques have some obvious advantages compared with most other techniques....... The processed measurements show some expected and a few unexpected effects (or lack of effects) on different characteristics of soil structure. The combination of CT and PET scanning in an air plant soil controller system revealed some very interesting research possibilities. Interactions between soil structure...

  17. False Positive Uptake in Bilateral Gynecomastia on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Nair, Bindu P; Pillai, M R A; Madhavan, Jayaprakash

    2017-09-01

    A 66-year-old man on hormonal therapy with prostate cancer was referred for Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan for biochemical recurrence. Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan detected moderate heterogeneous tracer concentration in bilateral breast parenchyma, in addition to the abnormal tracer concentration in enlarged prostate gland, right external iliac lymph node, and sclerotic lesion in L4 vertebra. On clinical examination, he was found to have bilateral gynecomastia. Abnormal concentration of Ga-PSMA in breast cancer is now well known, and in this context, it is important to know that tracer localization can occur in gynecomastia as well, as evidenced in this case.

  18. [Increased glucose uptake by seborrheic keratosis on PET scan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merklen-Djafri, C; Truntzer, P; Hassler, S; Cribier, B

    2017-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an examination based upon the uptake of a radioactive tracer by hypermetabolic cells. It is primarily used in tandem with tomodensitometry (PET-TDM) for cancer staging because of its high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of metastases. However, unusually high uptake may occur with benign tumours, including skin tumours. Herein, we report an extremely rare case of pathological uptake levels resulting from seborrhoeic keratosis. A 55-year-old male patient with oesophageal squamous-cell carcinoma was referred to us following the discovery of an area of high marker uptake following PET-TDM and corresponding to a pigmented skin lesion. No other areas of suspect high uptake were seen. The lesion was surgically excised and histological examination indicated seborrhoeic keratosis. The histological appearance was that of standard seborrhoeic keratosis without any notable mitotic activity. PET-TDM is an examination that enables diagnosis of malignancy. However, rare cases have been described of increased marker uptake by benign cutaneous tumours such as histiocytofibroma, pilomatricoma and condyloma. To date, there have only been only very few cases of increased uptake due to seborrhoeic keratosis. This extremely unusual case of increased glucose uptake in PET-TDM due to seborrhoeic keratosis confirms that the hypermetabolic activity detected by this examination is not necessarily synonymous with malignancy and that confirmation by clinical and histological findings is essential. The reasons for increased metabolic activity within such benign tumours are not known. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigations with FDG-PET Scanning in Prostate Cancer Show Limited Value for Clinical Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, Eeva [Univ. of Turku (Finland). Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy; Hogg, Annette; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney [The Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, East Melbourne, Vic (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging; Frydenberg, Mark [Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Vic (Australia)

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate FDG-PET (fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Twenty-two patients were studied during different disease phases of prostate cancer, for staging or restaging to clarify specific clinical questions. FDG-PET was performed encompassing the thorax, abdomen and pelvis using the Penn PET 300H scanner. Scanning was begun 60 min after {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose marker. Patients were catheterized and administered diuretics to minimize urinary activity. Information obtained with FDG-PET was concordant with findings from other investigations in 7/22 (32%) patients, discordant in 15/22 (68%) patients and equivalent in one patient (4%). PET indicated progressive disease in five patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <4 ng/L. The impact on management of the patients was high in 46% of cases, low in 41% and for 14% there was no impact on management. The accuracy of FDG-PET was 72% (95% CI 50-89) as confirmed by invasive diagnostics/follow-up. FDG-PET can provide useful information and improve the clinician's decision on further management procedures in selected patients with low PSA and bone or lymph node changes. A negative PET scan in prostate cancer should be interpreted with caution.

  20. PET scanning of macrophages in patients with scleroderma fibrosing alveolitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branley, Howard M. [Imperial College London, Hammersmith Campus, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Howard.Branley@whittington.nhs.uk; Bois, Roland M. du; Wells, Athol U. [Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Jones, Hazel A. [Imperial College London, Hammersmith Campus, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Rationale: Assessment of disease activity in fibrosing alveolitis due to systemic sclerosis (FASSc) is difficult without using invasive investigation. A repeatable noninvasive method of assessing disease at a cellular level such as with positron emission tomography (PET) could be of great value in evaluating high-resolution changes in the pathological process. Objectives: To investigate whether the level of inflammatory cell traffic and lung density in FASSc, imaged in vivo by PET, is different to controls and whether they are associated with changes in pulmonary function indices. Methods: We used PET to measure lung density and tissue uptake of {sup 11}C-[R]-PK11195, a ligand that binds to receptors found in abundance in macrophages. Fifteen patients with FASSc were compared to seven controls. Results: A trend of reduced uptake of {sup 11}C-[R]-PK11195 was observed in FASSc patients (P=.09) and correlated inversely with lung density (r=-.62; P<.05), which was significantly elevated in FASSc [0.35{+-}0.02 vs. 0.23{+-}0.02 g/cc (mean{+-}S.E.M.); P<.005]. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that inflammatory cell traffic and lung density can be imaged in vivo in FASSc using PET, and that this approach might be of potential value in understanding, in situ, components of pathogenesis that may have value for prognosis.

  1. PET scanning of macrophages in patients with scleroderma fibrosing alveolitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branley, Howard M.; Bois, Roland M. du; Wells, Athol U.; Jones, Hazel A.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Assessment of disease activity in fibrosing alveolitis due to systemic sclerosis (FASSc) is difficult without using invasive investigation. A repeatable noninvasive method of assessing disease at a cellular level such as with positron emission tomography (PET) could be of great value in evaluating high-resolution changes in the pathological process. Objectives: To investigate whether the level of inflammatory cell traffic and lung density in FASSc, imaged in vivo by PET, is different to controls and whether they are associated with changes in pulmonary function indices. Methods: We used PET to measure lung density and tissue uptake of 11 C-[R]-PK11195, a ligand that binds to receptors found in abundance in macrophages. Fifteen patients with FASSc were compared to seven controls. Results: A trend of reduced uptake of 11 C-[R]-PK11195 was observed in FASSc patients (P=.09) and correlated inversely with lung density (r=-.62; P<.05), which was significantly elevated in FASSc [0.35±0.02 vs. 0.23±0.02 g/cc (mean±S.E.M.); P<.005]. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that inflammatory cell traffic and lung density can be imaged in vivo in FASSc using PET, and that this approach might be of potential value in understanding, in situ, components of pathogenesis that may have value for prognosis

  2. A scanning point source for quality control of FOV uniformity in GC-PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, H.; Minear, G.; Dobrozemsky, G.; Nowotny, R.; Koenig, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: PET imaging with coincidence cameras (GC-PET) requires additional quality control procedures to check the function of coincidence circuitry and detector zoning. In particular, the uniformity response over the field of view needs special attention since it is known that coincidence counting mode may suffer from non-uniformity effects not present in single photon mode. Materials and methods: An inexpensive linear scanner with a stepper motor and a digital interface to a PC with software allowing versatile scanning modes was developed. The scanner is used with a source holder containing a Sodium-22 point source. While moving the source along the axis of rotation of the GC-PET system, a tomographic acquisition takes place. The scan covers the full axial field of view of the 2-D or 3-D scatter frame. Depending on the acquisition software, point source scanning takes place continuously while only one projection is acquired or is done in step-and-shoot mode with the number of positions equal to the number of gantry steps. Special software was developed to analyse the resulting list mode acquisition files and to produce an image of the recorded coincidence events of each head. Results: Uniformity images of coincidence events were obtained after further correction for systematic sensitivity variations caused by acquisition geometry. The resulting images are analysed visually and by calculating NEMA uniformity indices as for a planar flood field. The method has been applied successfully to two different brands of GC-PET capable gamma cameras. Conclusion: Uniformity of GC-PET can be tested quickly and accurately with a routine QC procedure, using a Sodium-22 scanning point source and an inexpensive mechanical scanning device. The method can be used for both 2-D and 3-D acquisition modes and fills an important gap in the quality control system for GC-PET

  3. Comparison of absorbed dose of two protocols of tomographic scanning in PET/CT exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, F.G.

    2017-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) associated with Computed Tomography (CT) allows the fusion of functional and anatomical images. When compared to other diagnostic techniques, PET-CT subjects patients to higher levels of radiation, because two modalities are used in a single exam. In this study, the doses absorbed in 19 patient organs from the tomographic scan were evaluated. Radiochromic films were correctly positioned in the Alderson anthropomorphic simulator, male version. For evaluation, two whole body scan protocols were compared. For evaluation, two whole body scan protocols were compared. An increase of up to 600% in the absorbed dose in the pituitary was observed when the protocols were compared, with the lowest observed increase of approximately 160% for the liver. It is concluded that the dose from CT in patients submitted to PET-CT scanning is higher in the protocol used for diagnosis. Considering the high cost of PET-CT exam, in many cases it is preferable that the CT examination is of diagnostic quality, and not only for anatomical mapping, an argument based on the Principle of Justification

  4. Peritoneal Super Scan on 18F - FDG PET-CT in a Patient of Burkitt's Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shambo Guha; Parida, Girish Kumar; Tripathy, Sarthak; Singhal, Abhinav; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2017-01-01

    Peritoneal lymphomatosis is seen less frequently, but when seen, it is mostly associated with aggressive variants of malignancies. FDG uptake has been reported in peritoneal lymphomatosis both in DLBCL and Burkitt's lymphoma. We report a case of Burkitt's lymphoma with involvement of entire peritoneum, which looks like a "peritoneal super scan" on FDG PET-CT.

  5. Comparison of F-18 FDG PET and I-131 whole body scan in diagnosis of suspicious metastatic thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Ju Won; Chung, June Key

    2005-01-01

    There are several reports about the usefulness of F-18 FDG PET in thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of F-18 FDG PET and I-131 whole body scan in suspicious metastatic thyroid cancer. There were 46 patients (11 men, 35 women; age range, 18-74yr; mean age, 47.3yr) with suspicious metastatic thyroid cancer after total thyroidectomy who performed FDG PET and I-131 scan. The interval of FDG PET and I-131 scan was within 6 months. An overall clinical evaluation was performed including cytology, thyroglobulin level, sonography, MRI and CT. Metastatic regions were divided into four areas: neck, mediastinum, lung and bone. Among 46 patients, the number of patients, metastatic lesions were detected, totaled 36 (78.3%). Twenty-nine patients (63.0%) were detected by FDG PET and 18 patients (39.1%) were detected by I-131 scan. Twenty-one patients were detected in neck by two methods. Nineteen patients (90.5%) were detected by FDG PET and 7 patients (33.3%) were detected by I-131 scan. Eighteen patients were detected in mediastinum by two methods. Ten patients (55.5%) were detected by FDG PET and 10 patients (55.5%) were detected by I-131 scan. Ten patients were detected in lung by two methods. Nine patients (90.0%) were detected by FDG PET and 3 patients (30.0%) were detected by I-131 scan. Three patients were detected in bone by two methods. Three patients (100%) were detected by FDG PET and 0 patients (0%) were detected by I-131 scan. These data indicate that for detecting metastatic lesions, F-18 FDG PET and I-131 whole body scan may provide complementary information. Thus, the combination of FDG PET and I-131 scan is the method of choice for detecting suspicious metastatic thyroid cancer after total thyroidectomy

  6. Derivation of the scan time requirement for maintaining a consistent PET image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Seok-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: the image quality of PET for larger patients is relatively poor, even though the injection dose is optimized considering the NECR characteristics of the PET scanner. This poor image quality is due to the lower level of maximum NECR that can be achieved in these large patients. The aim of this study was to optimize the PET scan time to obtain a consistent PET image quality regardless of the body size, based on the relationship between the patient specific NECR (pNECR) and body weight. Methods: eighty patients (M/F=53/27, body weight: 059 ± 1 kg) underwent whole-body FDG PET scans using a Philips GEMINI GS PET/CT scanner after an injection of 0.14 mCi/kg FDG. The relationship between the scatter fraction (SF) and body weight was determined by repeated Monte Carlo simulations using a NEMA scatter phantom, the size of which varied according to the relationship between the abdominal circumference and body weight. Using this information, the pNECR was calculated from the prompt and delayed PET sinograms to obtain the prediction equation of NECR vs. body weight. The time scaling factor (F TS ) for the scan duration was finally derived to make PET images with equivalent SNR levels. Results: the SF and NECR had the following nonlinear relationships with the body weight: SF=0.15 ⋅ body weight 0.3 and NECR = 421.36 (body weight) −0.84 . The equation derived for F TS was 0.01⋅ body weight + 0.2, which means that, for example, a 120-kg person should be scanned 1.8 times longer than a 70 kg person, or the scan time for a 40-kg person can be reduced by 30%. Conclusion: the equation of the relative time demand derived in this study will be useful for maintaining consistent PET image quality in clinics

  7. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan as preoperative diagnostic tool in cervical cancer stage Ib and IIa: comparison between the results of FDG-PET scan and operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hoon

    1999-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan for routine preoperative diagnostic methods in cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed from March, 1999 to November, 1999. There were 6 stage Ib and 7 IIa patients and all patients were performed radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissections and were evaluated by FDG-PET scan before operation. The mean age of the patients were 50.3 years old. Six cases had lymph node metastases by pelvis MRI, and three cases by FDG-PET scan. We could not find any lymph node metastases at surgery in 3 patients (50.0%) among 6 patients who were diagnosed by nodal metastases by pelvis MRI. And we found 1 patients with nodal metastases who had negative findings by pelvis MRI. By FDG-PET scan, we could find metastases in all positive patients. But we also found 2 additional metastatic cases in the patients with negative findings. In this study, the comparison was very difficult due to the individual differences in the comparison would be made by site-specific not person. The sensitivity of MRI and FDG-PET scan were 50.0% and 30.0%. The specificity were 94.1 % and 95.6%. The positive predictive value were 55.6 % and 50.0 %. In conclusion, we could find any superiority of FDG-PET scan in the diagnosis of lymph node metastases the pelvis MRI. So there are limitations to use the FDG-PET scan in the routine preoperative diagnostic tools in cervical cancer. But if we have more experiences to use the FDG-PET scan such as precise cut-off value of SUV and combination of other imaging technique, the FDG-PET scan are still promising diagnostic tools in cervical cancer.

  8. Renal scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003790.htm Renal scan To use the sharing features on this ... anaphylaxis . Alternative Names Renogram; Kidney scan Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Chernecky CC, ...

  9. CT Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, lung nodules and liver masses Monitor the effectiveness of certain treatments, such as cancer treatment Detect ... scan done in a hospital or an outpatient facility. CT scans are painless and, with newer machines, ...

  10. Scanning electron microscopic study of hazardous waste flakes of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) by aminolysis and ammonolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Alok, E-mail: aljymittal@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology (A Deemed University), Bhopal 462051 (India); Soni, R.K.; Dutt, Krishna; Singh, Swati [Department of Chemistry, Ch. Charan Singh University, Meerut 250004 (India)

    2010-06-15

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste flakes were degraded with aqueous methylamine and aqueous ammonia, respectively at room temperature in the presence and absence of quaternary ammonium salt as a catalyst for different periods of time. The aminolysed and ammonolysed PET samples were investigated for the surface morphology with the help of scanning electron micrograph (SEM). It shows that the semi-crystalline PET waste samples reduce to monodisperse rods before fully degradation to the end products. The presence of the catalyst provides site for degradation of PET waste and enhances the rate of degradation. The SEM shows early developments of fissures in comparison to the one in absence of quaternary ammonium salt used as catalyst.

  11. Scanning electron microscopic study of hazardous waste flakes of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) by aminolysis and ammonolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, Alok; Soni, R.K.; Dutt, Krishna; Singh, Swati

    2010-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste flakes were degraded with aqueous methylamine and aqueous ammonia, respectively at room temperature in the presence and absence of quaternary ammonium salt as a catalyst for different periods of time. The aminolysed and ammonolysed PET samples were investigated for the surface morphology with the help of scanning electron micrograph (SEM). It shows that the semi-crystalline PET waste samples reduce to monodisperse rods before fully degradation to the end products. The presence of the catalyst provides site for degradation of PET waste and enhances the rate of degradation. The SEM shows early developments of fissures in comparison to the one in absence of quaternary ammonium salt used as catalyst.

  12. Clinical Utility of 4D FDG-PET/CT Scans in Radiation Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristophanous, Michalis, E-mail: maristophanous@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Berbeco, Ross I.; Killoran, Joseph H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yap, Jeffrey T. [Department of Radiology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Sher, David J.; Allen, Aaron M.; Larson, Elysia; Chen, Aileen B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The potential role of four-dimensional (4D) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in radiation treatment planning, relative to standard three-dimensional (3D) PET/CT, was examined. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with non-small-cell lung cancer had sequential 3D and 4D [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scans in the treatment position prior to radiation therapy. The gross tumor volume and involved lymph nodes were contoured on the PET scan by use of three different techniques: manual contouring by an experienced radiation oncologist using a predetermined protocol; a technique with a constant threshold of standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than 2.5; and an automatic segmentation technique. For each technique, the tumor volume was defined on the 3D scan (VOL3D) and on the 4D scan (VOL4D) by combining the volume defined on each of the five breathing phases individually. The range of tumor motion and the location of each lesion were also recorded, and their influence on the differences observed between VOL3D and VOL4D was investigated. Results: We identified and analyzed 22 distinct lesions, including 9 primary tumors and 13 mediastinal lymph nodes. Mean VOL4D was larger than mean VOL3D with all three techniques, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01). The range of tumor motion and the location of the tumor affected the magnitude of the difference. For one case, all three tumor definition techniques identified volume of moderate uptake of approximately 1 mL in the hilar region on the 4D scan (SUV maximum, 3.3) but not on the 3D scan (SUV maximum, 2.3). Conclusions: In comparison to 3D PET, 4D PET may better define the full physiologic extent of moving tumors and improve radiation treatment planning for lung tumors. In addition, reduction of blurring from free-breathing images may reveal additional information regarding regional disease.

  13. Neurolymphomatosis detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT scan - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czepczynski, R.; Guzikowska-Ruszkowska, I.; Sowinski, J.

    2008-01-01

    Lymphoma involvement of the peripheral nerves is a rare clinical presentation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman with the defect of peripheral motor neuron admitted for PET/CT scan. The scan disclosed increased 18 F-FDG activity along the brachial and lumbar plexuses together with very intense 18 F-FDG uptake in the cervical lymph node masses. The diagnosis, based on the subsequent histopathologic lymph node examination, was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. (authors)

  14. [Indications and instructions to patients for a positron emission tomography-PET scan. The importance of the hybridic PET/CT-computerised tomography scan and which specialty should be responsible for its function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammaticos, Philip; Datseris, Ioannis; Gerali, Sofia; Papantoniou, Vassilios; Valsamaki, Pipitsa; Boundas, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    Indications and instructions to patients for performing a positron emission tomography - PET scan are mentioned. Although PET camera was developed in 1970 its clinical indications were established in about 1998. The hybridic PET/CT- computerized tomography scanner appeared in 2001 and its clinical indications are still under discussion. These discussions refer to both the use of PET/CT as an acquisition correction and anatomic localization device for PET images (AC/A) and to its use as a diagnostic CT scan (dCT). Most of the patients submitted for a PET scan have already done a dCT scan. This was the case in 286 out of the first 300 patients referred to "Evangelismos" hospital in Athens for a PET scan. These two scans can be matched electronically. Extra cost, space, personnel and radiation absorption dose especially in children, are additional factors to be considered in using the PET/CT scanner. The specialty of Nuclear Medicine is now based on the PET camera, its best part and main equipment for molecular imaging. It is very much easier and faster for a Nuclear Medicine physician who routinely reports tomographic PET and SPET images, to be familiar with the CT images than for a Radiologist to get to "know how" about the PET camera and the whole Nuclear Medicine Department. Nuclear Medicine is about open radiation sources, molecular imaging, specific radio-pharmacology, radiobiology, radiation protection etc, while on the other hand in some countries, Nuclear Physicians have already spent, as part of their official training, six months in a Radiology Department whose function is considered to be at least 25% about the CT scanner. We come to the conclusion that the PET/CT scanner should be under the responsibility of the Nuclear Medicine Department and the Radiologist should act as an advisor.

  15. Functional imaging in differentiating bronchial masses: an initial experience with a combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Jindal, Tarun; Dutta, Roman; Kumar, Rakesh

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the role of combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan in differentiating bronchial tumors observed in contrast enhanced computed tomography scan of chest. Prospective observational study. Place of study: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. 7 patients with bronchial mass detected in computed tomography scan of the chest were included in this study. All patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan, (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan and fiberoptic bronchoscope guided biopsy followed by definitive surgical excision. The results of functional imaging studies were analyzed and the results are correlated with the final histopathology of the tumor. Histopathological examination of 7 bronchial masses revealed carcinoid tumors (2 typical, 1 atypical), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (1), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (1), hamartoma (1), and synovial cell sarcoma (1). The typical carcinoids had mild (18)F-FDG uptake and high (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Atypical carcinoid had moderate uptake of (18)F-FDG and high (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor showed high uptake of (18)F-FDG and no uptake of (68)Ga DOTA-TOC. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma showed mild (18)F-FDG uptake and no (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Hamartoma showed no uptake on either scans. Synovial cell sarcoma showed moderate (18)F-FDG uptake and mild focal (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. This initial experience with the combined use of (18)F-FDG and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan reveals different uptake patterns in various bronchial tumors. Bronchoscopic biopsy will continue to be the gold standard; however, the interesting observations made in this study merits further evaluation of the utility of the combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan in larger number of patients with bronchial masses.

  16. Comparison of SUV and Patlak slope for monitoring of cancer therapy using serial PET scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Nanette M.T.; Sundaram, Senthil K.; Kurdziel, Karen; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Whatley, Millie; Carson, Joann M.; Sellers, David; Libutti, Steven K.; Yang, James C.; Bacharach, Stephen L.

    2003-01-01

    The standardized uptake value (SUV) and the slope of the Patlak plot (K) have both been proposed as indices to monitor the progress of disease during cancer therapy. Although a good correlation has been reported between SUV and K, they are not equivalent, and may not be equally affected by metabolic changes occurring during disease progression or therapy. We wished to compare changes in tumor SUV with changes in K during serial positron emission tomography (PET) scans for monitoring therapy. Thirteen patients enrolled in a protocol to treat renal cell carcinoma metastases were studied. Serial dynamic fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET scans and computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) scans were performed once prior to treatment, once at 36±2 days after the start of treatment, and (in 7/13 subjects, 16/27 lesions) a third time at 92±9 days after the start of treatment. This resulted in a total of 33 scans, and 70 tumor Patlak and SUV values (one value for each lesion at each time point). SUV and K were measured over one to four predefined tumors/patient at each time point. The input function was obtained from regions of interest over the heart, combined, if necessary, with late blood samples. Over all tumors and scans, SUV and K correlated well (r=0.97, P<0.0001). However, change in SUV with treatment over all tumor scan pairs was much less well correlated with the corresponding change in K (r=0.73, P<0.0001). The absolute difference in % change was outside the 95% confidence limits expected from previous variability studies in 6 of 43 pairs of tumor scans, and greater than 50% in 2 of 43 tumor scan pairs. In four of the six cases, the two indices predicted opposing therapeutic outcomes. Similar results were obtained for SUV normalized by body weight or body surface area and for SUVs using mean or maximum count. Changes in CT and MR tumor cross-product dimensions correlated poorly with each other (r=0.47, P=NS), and so could not be used to determine the

  17. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technology in the application of PET/CT whole body scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin Jun; Zhao Zhoushe; Li Hong; Lu Zhe; Wu Wenkai; Guo Qiyong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To improve image quality of low dose CT in whole body PET/CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) technology. Methods: Twice CT scans were performed with GE water model,scan parameters were: 120 kV, 120 and 300 mA respectively. In addition, 30 subjects treated with PET/CT were selected randomly, whole body PET/CT were performed after 18 F-FDG injection of 3.70 MBq/kg, Sharp IR+time of flight + VUE Point HD technology were used for 1.5 min/bed in PET; CT of spiral scan was performed under 120 kV using automatic exposure control technology (30-210 mA, noise index 25). Model and patients whole body CT images were reconstructed with conventional and 40% ASiR methods respectively, and the CT attenuation value and noise index were measured. Results: Research of model and clinical showed that standard deviation of ASiR method in model CT was 33.0% lower than the conventional CT reconstruction method (t =27.76, P<0.01), standard deviation of CT in normal tissues (brain, lung, mediastinum, liver and vertebral body) and lesions (brain, lung, mediastinum, liver and vertebral body) reduced by 21.08% (t =23.35, P<0.01) and 24.43% (t =16.15, P<0.01) respectively, especially for normal liver tissue and liver lesions, standard deviations of CT were reduced by 51.33% (t=34.21, P<0.0) and 49.54% (t=15.21, P<0.01) respectively. Conclusion: ASiR reconstruction method was significantly reduced the noise of low dose CT image and improved the quality of CT image in whole body PET/CT, which seems more suitable for quantitative analysis and clinical applications. (authors)

  18. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET to CT scan in the detection of recurrent colorectal carcinoma - an ROC analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, A.M.; Akhurst, T.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Fitt, G.; Schelleman, T.; Jones, R.; Hannah, A.; Tochon-Danguy, H.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: This study examined 43 scans performed in 40 patients from a group of 93 prospectively enrolled in a trial examining the utility of 18 F-FDG PET in patients with potentially resectable recurrent colorectal cancer. All patients had PET and CT scans prior to surgery, where a total of 84 anatomical regions were biopsied, and 364 regions examined by the surgeons. All PET and CT scans were viewed blinded to clinical and imaging data. The scans were interpreted according to a five-point confidence scale to enable an ROC analysis to be performed. An assessment of the impact of PET over CT in patients was also made. Of the 43 cases PET and CT were concordant in 24 (56%). There were 16 cases where PET added additional diagnostic information to the benefit of the patient (37%), and three (7%) where PET alone would have lead to a potentially negative outcome. The majority of cases where PET performed better were in cases with extrahepatic disease. CT was more sensitive in the detection of pulmonary nodules, although the specificity of CT was less than PET. In conclusion, 18 F-FDG PET performed significantly better than CT both in terms of a regional analysis as well as a patient by patient basis. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  19. Rare Case of Intratracheal Metastasis Detected on 68Ga-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT Scan in a Case of Thyroglobulin Elevated Negative Iodine Scan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Oommen, Karuna Elza; Jayakumar, R

    2018-04-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent completion thyroidectomy with upper tracheal ring resection and right-sided neck dissection for papillary carcinoma of the thyroid infiltrating the trachea and was given I radioiodine treatment. Three years later, she presented with hemoptysis. On evaluation, she had increased serum thyroglobulin and negative iodine scan (TENIS). F-FDG PET/CT scan did not identify any site of disease. One year later, Ga-PSMA scan done revealed a moderate focal tracer-avid intratracheal soft tissue; biopsy revealed it to be metastatic papillary carcinoma of the thyroid. This case kindles the possibility of using Ga-PSMA PET/CT to reveal occult disease in cases of TENIS.

  20. Sequential {sup 123}I-iododexetimide scans in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison with neuroimaging scans (MR imaging and {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Armin [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Comprehensive Epilepsy Service, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Eberl, Stefan; Henderson, David; Beveridge, Scott; Constable, Chris [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Fulham, Michael J. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Kassiou, Michael [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Department of Pharmacology, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Zaman, Aysha [University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lo, Sing Kai [University of Sydney, Institute of International Health, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2005-02-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play an important role in the generation of seizures. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 123}I-iododexetimide (IDEX) depicts tracer uptake by mAChRs. Our aims were to: (a) determine the optimum time for interictal IDEX SPECT imaging; (b) determine the accuracy of IDEX scans in the localisation of seizure foci when compared with video EEG and MR imaging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE); (c) characterise the distribution of IDEX binding in the temporal lobes and (d) compare IDEX SPECT and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in identifying seizure foci. We performed sequential scans using IDEX SPECT imaging at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h in 12 consecutive patients with refractory TLE undergoing assessment for epilepsy surgery. Visual and region of interest analyses of the mesial, lateral and polar regions of the temporal lobes were used to compare IDEX SPECT, FDG PET and MR imaging in seizure onset localisation. The 6-h IDEX scan (92%; {kappa}=0.83, p=0.003) was superior to the 0-h (36%; {kappa}=0.01, p>0.05), 3-h (55%; {kappa}=0.13, p>0.05) and 24-h IDEX scans in identifying the temporal lobe of seizure origin. The 6-h IDEX scan correctly predicted the temporal lobe of seizure origin in two patients who required intracranial EEG recordings to define the seizure onset. Reduced ligand binding was most marked at the temporal pole and mesial temporal structures. IDEX SPECT was superior to interictal FDG PET (75%; {kappa}=0.66, p=0.023) in seizure onset localisation. MR imaging was non-localising in two patients in whom it was normal and in another patient in whom there was bilateral symmetrical hippocampal atrophy. The 6-h IDEX SPECT scan is a viable alternative to FDG PET imaging in seizure onset localisation in TLE. (orig.)

  1. Sequential 123I-iododexetimide scans in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison with neuroimaging scans (MR imaging and 18F-FDG PET imaging)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Armin; Eberl, Stefan; Henderson, David; Beveridge, Scott; Constable, Chris; Fulham, Michael J.; Kassiou, Michael; Zaman, Aysha; Lo, Sing Kai

    2005-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play an important role in the generation of seizures. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 123 I-iododexetimide (IDEX) depicts tracer uptake by mAChRs. Our aims were to: (a) determine the optimum time for interictal IDEX SPECT imaging; (b) determine the accuracy of IDEX scans in the localisation of seizure foci when compared with video EEG and MR imaging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE); (c) characterise the distribution of IDEX binding in the temporal lobes and (d) compare IDEX SPECT and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in identifying seizure foci. We performed sequential scans using IDEX SPECT imaging at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h in 12 consecutive patients with refractory TLE undergoing assessment for epilepsy surgery. Visual and region of interest analyses of the mesial, lateral and polar regions of the temporal lobes were used to compare IDEX SPECT, FDG PET and MR imaging in seizure onset localisation. The 6-h IDEX scan (92%; κ=0.83, p=0.003) was superior to the 0-h (36%; κ=0.01, p>0.05), 3-h (55%; κ=0.13, p>0.05) and 24-h IDEX scans in identifying the temporal lobe of seizure origin. The 6-h IDEX scan correctly predicted the temporal lobe of seizure origin in two patients who required intracranial EEG recordings to define the seizure onset. Reduced ligand binding was most marked at the temporal pole and mesial temporal structures. IDEX SPECT was superior to interictal FDG PET (75%; κ=0.66, p=0.023) in seizure onset localisation. MR imaging was non-localising in two patients in whom it was normal and in another patient in whom there was bilateral symmetrical hippocampal atrophy. The 6-h IDEX SPECT scan is a viable alternative to FDG PET imaging in seizure onset localisation in TLE. (orig.)

  2. Cooperative scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Zukowski (Marcin); P.A. Boncz (Peter); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractData mining, information retrieval and other application areas exhibit a query load with multiple concurrent queries touching a large fraction of a relation. This leads to individual query plans based on a table scan or large index scan. The implementation of this access path in most

  3. Potential for PET scanning as an aid to heat transfer modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samulski, T.V.; Harris, C.; Winget, J.M.; Dewhirst, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) using /sup 68/Ga labelled microspheres (15μ diam.) for quantitative imaging of perfusion is being investigated for its potential to aid in verification of parameter estimation techniques. Such techniques have been used in bioheat transfer modeling where direct measurement of perfusion has not been possible. Perfusion is needed, to utilize bioheat transfer to predict temperatures between measured points during hyperthermia therapy. A preliminary study showing that PET could be used for verification of parameter estimation was done by heating a melanoma in a dog in which multiple thermometry catheters were placed in a central plane. Microspheres were injected at the end of a one hour heat treatment session before power down. CT and PET images of the same plane were aligned so that relative counts/pixel in 2 cm regions of interest of the PET image were measured along several catheter tracks. In all tracks measured an inverse correlation was shown between relative perfusion and temperature along the catheter during thermal steady state. These data strongly imply that PET scans obtained in the manner described bear relevance to bioheat transfer and for verification of perfusion in heated tissues as estimated by heat transfer modeling

  4. Reduction of motion artifacts for PET imaging by respiratory correlated dynamic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, K.-S.; Chen, T.-J.; Chang, C.-C.; Wu, J.; Chen, S.; Wu, L.-C.; Liu, R.-S.

    2006-01-01

    Organ motion caused by respiration is a major challenge in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This work proposes a technique to reduce smearing in PET imaging caused by respiratory motion. Dynamic scanning at 1 frame/s is used. A point source, used as a marker, is attached to the object's abdomen during the scan. The source position in the projection view moves with respiratory motion and can be used to represent the respiratory phase within the time interval in which each frame data are acquired. One hundred and twenty frames are obtained for each study. The range of the positions of the marker is divided into four groups, representing different respiratory phases. The frames in which the organ positions (phases) are the same summed to produce a static sub-sinogram. Each sub-sinogram then undergoes regular image reconstruction to yield a motion-free image. The technique is applied to one volunteer under both free and coached breathing conditions. A parameter called the volume reduction factor is adopted to evaluate the effectiveness of this motion-reduction technique. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed technique effectively reduces motion artifacts in the image. Coached breathing yields better results than free breathing condition. The advantages of this method are that (1) the scanning time remains the same; (2) free breathing is allowed during the acquisition of the image; and (3) no user intervention is required

  5. Radionuclide scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is the production of images of normal and diseased tissues and organs by means of the gamma-ray emissions from radiopharmaceutical agents having specific distributions in the body. The gamma rays are detected at the body surface by a variety of instruments that convert the invisible rays into visible patterns representing the distribution of the radionuclide in the body. The patterns, or images, obtained can be interpreted to provide or to aid diagnoses, to follow the course of disease, and to monitor the management of various illnesses. Scanning is a sensitive technique, but its specificity may be low when interpreted alone. To be used most successfully, radionuclide scanning must be interpreted in conjunction with other techniques, such as bone radiographs with bone scans, chest radiographs with lung scans, and ultrasonic studies with thyroid scans. Interpretation is also enhanced by providing pertinent clinical information because the distribution of radiopharmaceutical agents can be altered by drugs and by various procedures besides physiologic and pathologic conditions. Discussion of the patient with the radionuclide scanning specialist prior to the study and review of the results with that specialist after the study are beneficial

  6. FDG-PET scan in assessing lymphomas and the application of Deauville Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, U.E.K.; Siddiqui, N.; Muzaffar, N.; Farooqui, Z.S.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the role of Fluorine-18-fluorodexoyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) scan in staging and its implications on the treatment of lymphoma, and to study the concordance between visual assessment and Deauville criteria for the interpretation of interim scans. Methods: The prospective single-arm experimental study was conducted at the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital, Lahore, from May 2011 to October 2011. It comprised 53 newly diagnosed lymphoma patients who agreed to participate in the study. All patients underwent scans with contrast-enhanced computerised tomography at baseline. Treatment plan was formulated based on the final stage. Interim scans were acquired after 2 cycles of chemotherapy and were reported using visual criteria and compared with the 5-point Deauville criteria. Score of 1-3 was taken as disease-negative, while 4-5 was taken as disease-positive. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 53 patients, 35 (66%) had Hodgkin's Lymphoma, while 18 (34%) had Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Scans resulted in disease upstaging in 4 (7.5%) patients, and detecting increased disease burden in 12 (23%). On interim scans, complete remission was achieved in 38 (71%) patients (Deauville score 1-3); 12 (23%) showed partial response (Deauville score 4-5); and 3 (6%) had progression. Kappa test was statistically significant (kappa 0.856; p <0.001). Conclusion: The positron emission tomography helped to upstage lymphoma and reflected increased disease burden. The Deauville criteria correlated very well with visual assessment criteria and can be applied in the patient population. (author)

  7. Mycobacterial Infection of the Gallbladder Masquerading as Gallbladder Cancer with a False Positive Pet Scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeeb Majid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated mycobacterial infection of gall bladder is an extremely rare entity. Only anecdotal reports are evident in the literature. A preoperative diagnosis of mycobacterial infection of gallbladder is therefore very difficult. The case of a 72-year-old male who underwent surgery for suspected gallbladder cancer is presented. The diagnosis of cancer was based on radiological findings and an abnormal uptake of fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG on positron emission tomography (PET scan whilst being followed up for colorectal cancer. He underwent cholecystectomy and gallbladder bed resection. Histopathology was consistent with mycobacterial infection of the gallbladder.

  8. Effectiveness of PET Scan in Postoperative Long Term Follow up of Patients with Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla Pekcolaklar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: There is very few data about the use of positron emission tomography [PET] in the long term follow up of patients operated for lung cancer. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of PET scan in detecting distant metastases in the long term follow up of asymptomatic patients operated for non-small cell lung cancer [NSCLC]. Material and Method: PET scan was performed to sixty five asymptomatic patients. The patients who had a positive PET scan for metastasis underwent MRI and/or biopsy to verify metastasis. Result: : Mean age of the patients was 58.09 8.64 [44-82] years, and 57 [87.7 %] of them were male. Forty eight [73.8%] of the patients had epidermoid cell, 15 [23.1%] had adeno and 2 [%3.1] had large cell carcinoma. Postoperative stage of 1 [1.5%] patient was 1A, 14 [21.5%] of them were stage 1B, 1 [1.5%] of them was stage 2A, 27 [41.5%] of them were stage 2B and 22 [33.8%] of them were stage 3A. PET scan detected metastasis in 7 [10.8%] patients. In one patient PET scan was proven to be false positive. Sites of metastases in PET scan were lung in 3 [4.5%] patients, vertebra in 3 [4.6%] patients and tibia in 1 [1.5%] patient. In detecting distant metastases accuracy rate of PET was calculated as 98%, sensitivity was 100%, and specificity was 98%. Discussion: In asymptomatic patients with NSCLC, PET imaging appears to be useful as an alternative to conventional imaging to rule out unsuspected systemic disease in the postoperative long term follow up.

  9. Side-by-side reading of PET and CT scans in oncology: Which patients might profit from integrated PET/CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinartz, Patrick; Wieres, Franz-Josef; Schneider, Wolfram; Schur, Alexander; Buell, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    Most early publications on integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) devices have reported the new scanner generation to be superior to conventional PET. However, few of these studies have analysed the situation where, in addition to PET, a current CT scan is available for side-by-side viewing. This fact is important, because combined PET/CT or a software-based fusion of the two modalities may improve diagnosis only in cases where side-by-side reading of PET and CT data does not lead to a definitive diagnosis. The aim of this study was to analyse which patients will profit from integrated PET/CT in terms of lesion characterization. A total of 328 consecutively admitted patients referred for PET in whom a current CT scan was available were included in the study. The localization of all pathological PET lesions, as well as possible infiltration of adjacent anatomical structures, was assessed. Of 467 pathological lesions, 94.0% were correctly assessed with respect to localization and infiltration by either conventional PET alone (51.6%) or combined reading of PET and the already existing CT scans (42.4%). Hence, in only 6.0% of all lesions, affecting 6.7% of all patients, could evaluation have profited from integrated PET/CT. We conclude that side-by-side viewing of PET and CT scans is essential, as in 42.4% of all cases, combined viewing was important for a correct diagnosis in our series. In up to 6.7% of patients, integrated PET/CT might have given additional information, so that in nearly 50% of patients some form of combined viewing of PET and CT data is needed for accurate lesion characterization. (orig.)

  10. Scanning multiple mice in a small-animal PET scanner: Influence on image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siepel, Francoise J.; Lier, Monique G.J.T.B. van; Chen Mu; Disselhorst, Jonathan A.; Meeuwis, Antoi P.W.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C.; Visser, Eric P.

    2010-01-01

    To achieve high throughput in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET), it may be advantageous to scan more than one animal in the scanner's field of view (FOV) at the same time. However, due to the additional activity and increase of Poisson noise, additional attenuating mass, extra photon scattering, and radial or axial displacement of the animals, a deterioration of image quality can be expected. In this study, the NEMA NU 4-2008 image quality (NU4IQ) phantom and up to three FDG-filled cylindrical 'mouse phantoms' were positioned in the FOV of the Siemens Inveon small-animal PET scanner to simulate scans with multiple mice. Five geometrical configurations were examined. In one configuration, the NU4IQ phantom was scanned separately and placed in the center of the FOV (1C). In two configurations, a mouse phantom was added with both phantoms displaced radially (2R) or axially (2A). In two other configurations, the NU4IQ phantom was scanned along with three mouse phantoms with all phantoms displaced radially (4R), or in a combination of radial and axial displacement (2R2A). Images were reconstructed using ordered subset expectation maximization in 2 dimensions (OSEM2D) and maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction. Image quality parameters were obtained according to the NEMA NU 4-2008 guidelines. Optimum image quality was obtained for the 1C geometry. Image noise increased by the addition of phantoms and was the largest for the 4R configuration. Spatial resolution, reflected in the recovery coefficients for the FDG-filled rods, deteriorated by radial displacement of the NU4IQ phantom (2R, 2R2A, and 4R), most strongly for OSEM2D, and to a smaller extent for MAP reconstructions. Photon scatter, as indicated by the spill-over ratios in the non-radioactive water- and air-filled compartments, increased by the addition of phantoms, most strongly for the 4R configuration. Application of scatter correction substantially lowered the spill-over ratios, but caused an

  11. Comparison of clinical efficacy of second look operation and FDG-PET scan in patients with ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Sang Young

    1999-12-01

    This study is to investigate whether FDG-PET scan can substitute for second look operation in patients with ovarian cancer showing complete response with chemotherapy. From Jan. 1999 to Oct. 1999, 10 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who showed clinical complete response with 6 cycles of combination chemotherapy were registered in KCCH. These patients showed no residual tumors in conventional radiologic imaging studies (CT or MRI), normal tumor marker, no evidence of disease by physical examination. PET scans and second look operation were performed in 10 patients with advanced ovarian cancer (3 patients with stage IIc, 2 patients with stage IIIb, 5 patients with IIIc), who showed complete response with cytoreductive surgery and 6 cycles of post-operative adjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Median age of patients was 45 years, and serous cystadenocarcinoma was most common histologic type. None showed active lesion in pelvis and abdomen with FDG-PET scan (SUV; > 3.5 kg/ml), and I patient showed active lesion in lung field. On second look operations, 5 patients (50%) showed positive result on multiple blind biopsy. The patient with active lesion on FDG-PET scan in lung field confirmed to have metastatic lesions by chest CT scan. In conclusion, FDG-PET scan is not useful for detection of small ovarian cancer lesions in pelvis and abdomen, and cannot substitute for second look operation to determine pathologic complete response

  12. Comparison of clinical efficacy of second look operation and FDG-PET scan in patients with ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang Young

    1999-12-01

    This study is to investigate whether FDG-PET scan can substitute for second look operation in patients with ovarian cancer showing complete response with chemotherapy. From Jan. 1999 to Oct. 1999, 10 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who showed clinical complete response with 6 cycles of combination chemotherapy were registered in KCCH. These patients showed no residual tumors in conventional radiologic imaging studies (CT or MRI), normal tumor marker, no evidence of disease by physical examination. PET scans and second look operation were performed in 10 patients with advanced ovarian cancer (3 patients with stage IIc, 2 patients with stage IIIb, 5 patients with IIIc), who showed complete response with cytoreductive surgery and 6 cycles of post-operative adjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Median age of patients was 45 years, and serous cystadenocarcinoma was most common histologic type. None showed active lesion in pelvis and abdomen with FDG-PET scan (SUV; > 3.5 kg/ml), and I patient showed active lesion in lung field. On second look operations, 5 patients (50%) showed positive result on multiple blind biopsy. The patient with active lesion on FDG-PET scan in lung field confirmed to have metastatic lesions by chest CT scan. In conclusion, FDG-PET scan is not useful for detection of small ovarian cancer lesions in pelvis and abdomen, and cannot substitute for second look operation to determine pathologic complete response.

  13. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from 18 FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Methods: Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. Results: The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain, 0.09 h (liver, 0.007 h (spleen, 0.0006 h (adrenals, 0.013 h (kidneys and 0.005 h (stomach whereas it was 0.189 h (brain, 0.11 h (liver, 0.01 h (spleen, 0.0007 h (adrenals, 0.02 h (kidneys and 0.004 h (stomach in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and

  14. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from (18) FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Aruna; Jaimini, Abhinav; Tripathi, Madhavi; D'Souza, Maria; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Mishra, Anil K; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography) whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain), 0.09 h (liver), 0.007 h (spleen), 0.0006 h (adrenals), 0.013 h (kidneys) and 0.005 h (stomach) whereas it was 0.189 h (brain), 0.11 h (liver), 0.01 h (spleen), 0.0007 h (adrenals), 0.02 h (kidneys) and 0.004 h (stomach) in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and carefully weigh the risk-benefit ratios prior to every 18FDG whole body PET

  15. Impact of Renal Failure on F18-FDG PET/CT Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kode, Vishwajit; Karsch, Holly; Osman, Medhat M; Muzaffar, Razi

    2017-01-01

    The current guidelines for 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose PET/CT scanning do not address potential inaccuracies that may arise due to patients with renal failure. We report a retrospective analysis of standard uptake values (SUVs) in patients with and without renal failure in order to warrant a protocol adjustment. Patients were matched based on age, gender, and BMI all of which are potential effectors on observed SUV. Thirty patients were selected with clinically diagnosed renal failure, of which 12 were on dialysis. All 30 patients had age, gender, and BMI control matches. Blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels were measured within 1 month of the scan to assess renal failure. PET/CT scans for both the renal failure patients and controls were performed 60 min after FDG injection. SUVs were measured by placing circular regions of interest in the right hepatic lobe (LSUV) and left psoas muscle (PSUV). For the 30 renal failure patients, the mean LSUV was 2.77 (SD = 0.57) and PSUV was 1.43 (SD = 0.30) while the controls had mean LSUV 2.74 (SD = 0.50) and PSUV 1.42 (SD = 0.37). The SUVs from both the liver and psoas muscle were not significantly different between the renal failure patients and the normal controls with p values >0.05. In addition, dialysis and gender also had no effect on SUVs. Our data suggest that renal failure patients do not require an adjustment in protocol and the standard protocol times should remain.

  16. Dynamic PET scanning and compartmental model analysis to determine cellular level radiotracer distribution in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.T.; Hubner, K.F.; Goodman, M.M.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to measure tissue radiotracer concentration in vivo. Radiochemical distribution can be determined with compartmental model analysis. A two compartment model describes the kinetics of N-13 ammonia ( 13 NH 3 ) in the myocardium. The model consists of a vascular space, Q 1 and a space for 13 NH 3 bound within the tissue, Q 2 . Differential equations for the model can be written: X(t) = AX(t) + BU( t), Y(t)= CX(t)+ DU(t) (1) where X(t) is a column vector [Q 1 (t); Q 2 (t)], U(t) is the arterial input activity measured from the left ventricular blood pool, and Y(t) is the measured tissue activity using PET. Matrices A, B, C, and D are dependent on physiological parameters describing the kinetics of 13 NH 3 in the myocardium. Estimated parameter matrices in Equation 1 have been validated in dog experiments by measuring myocardial perfusion with dynamic PET scanning and intravenous injection of 13 NH 3 . Tracer concentrations for each compartment can be calculated by direct integration of Equation 1. If the cellular level distribution of each compartment is known, the concentration of tracer within the intracellular and extracellular space can be determined. Applications of this type of modeling include parameter estimation for measurement of physiological processes, organ level dosimetry, and determination of cellular radiotracer distribution

  17. A Japanese nationwide survey on the FDG-PET scans for dementia. Analysis on the predicted costs and benefits of FDG-PET for early diagnosis of Alzheimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Michio; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Ishii, Kazunari

    2003-01-01

    A nation-wide survey was carried out on the FDG-PET scans for the diagnosis of dementia by the FDG-PET Working Group organized by both the Japan Radioisotope Association and the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine. A total of 406 case reports were presented by 15 PET centers for one year. The purpose of the PET scans included early diagnosis of Alzheimer-type Dementia (154 cases, group A) and differential diagnosis of degenerative dementia (144 cases, group B), which was achieved by the PET scan in most cases. The PET scan turned out to allow omitting cerebral blood flow (CBF)-SPECT scans. Since donepezil treatment of the Alzheimer patients prevents the progress of the disease and reduces the care cost, an economic evaluation was performed on the two-year projected cost and benefit of FDG-PET. The reduction of the total cost by incorporating PET into the protocol was predicted to be 61500 yen (group A) and 13700 yen (group B) per person. The increase of the quality adjusted life year (QALY) was predicted to be 0.0442 (group A) and 0.0137 (group B). Therefore, incorporation of PET into the clinical pass was shown to be an economically dominant. As the number of potential subjects for early diagnosis of dementia is estimated to be 9000 across the country every year, PET is expected to increase their quality of life equivalent to 398 intact persons per year while reducing the cost of health care by 554 million yen. (author)

  18. List-Mode PET Motion Correction Using Markerless Head Tracking: Proof-of-Concept With Scans of Human Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Mulnix, Tim

    2013-01-01

    A custom designed markerless tracking system was demonstrated to be applicable for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Precise head motion registration is crucial for accurate motion correction (MC) in PET imaging. State-of-the-art tracking systems applied with PET brain imaging rely...... on markers attached to the patient's head. The marker attachment is the main weakness of these systems. A healthy volunteer participating in a cigarette smoking study to image dopamine release was scanned twice for 2 h with $^{11}{\\rm C}$-racolopride on the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT) PET...... in contrast recovery of small structures....

  19. Histopathological correlation of 11C-choline PET scans for target volume definition in radical prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joe H.; Joon, Daryl Lim; Lee, Sze Ting; Gong, Sylvia J.; Scott, Andrew M.; Davis, Ian D.; Clouston, David; Bolton, Damien; Hamilton, Christopher S.; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of 11 C-choline PET scans in defining dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) for radiotherapy target volume definition. Material and methods: Eight men with prostate cancer who had 11 C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy were studied. Several methods were used to contour the DIL on the PET scans: visual, PET Edge, Region Grow, absolute standardised uptake value (SUV) thresholds and percentage of maximum SUV thresholds. Prostatectomy specimens were sliced in the transverse plane and DILs were delineated on these by a pathologist. These were then compared with the PET scans. The accuracy of correlation was assessed by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the Youden index. Results: The contouring method resulting in both the highest DSC and the highest Youden index was 60% of the maximum SUV (SUV 60% ), with values of 0.64 and 0.51, respectively. However SUV 60% was not statistically significantly better than all of the other methods by either measure. Conclusions: Although not statistically significant, SUV 60% resulted in the best correlation between 11 C-choline PET and pathology amongst all the methods studied. The degree of correlation shown here is consistent with previous studies that have justified using imaging for DIL radiotherapy target volume definition.

  20. Scanning table

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Before the invention of wire chambers, particles tracks were analysed on scanning tables like this one. Today, the process is electronic and much faster. Bubble chamber film - currently available - (links can be found below) was used for this analysis of the particle tracks.

  1. Scan Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Glaz, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for graduate students and researchers in applied probability and statistics, as well as for scientists in biology, computer science, pharmaceutical science and medicine, this title brings together a collection of chapters illustrating the depth and diversity of theory, methods and applications in the area of scan statistics.

  2. SU-F-I-57: Evaluate and Optimize PET Acquisition Overlap in 18F-FDG Oncology Wholebody PET/CT: Can We Scan PET Faster?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Natwa, M; Hall, NC; Knopp, MV; Knopp, MU; Zhang, B; Tung, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The longer patient has to remain on the table during PET imaging, the higher the likelihood of motion artifacts due to patient discomfort. This study was to investigate and optimize PET acquisition overlap in 18F-FDG oncology wholebody PET/CT to speed up PET acquisition and improve patient comfort. Methods: Wholebody 18F-FDG PET/CT of phantoms, 8 pre-clinical patients (beagles) and 5 clinical oncology patients were performed in 90s/bed on a time-of-flight Gemini TF 64 system. Imaging of phantoms and beagles was acquired with reduced PET overlaps (40%, 33%, 27%, 20%, 13% and no overlap) in addition to the system default (53%). In human studies, 1 or 2 reduced overlaps from the listed options were used to acquire PET/CT sweeps right after the default standard of care imaging. Image quality was blindly reviewed using visual scoring criteria and quantitative SUV assessment. NEMA PET sensitivity was performed under different overlaps. Results: All PET exams demonstrated no significant impact on the visual grades for overlaps >20%. Blinded reviews assigned the best visual scores to PET using overlaps 53%–27%. Reducing overlap to 27% for oncology patients (12-bed) saved an average of ∼40% acquisition time (11min) compared to using the default overlap (18min). No significant SUV variances were found when reducing overlap to half of default for cerebellum, lung, heart, aorta, liver, fat, muscle, bone marrow, thighs and target lesions (p>0.05), except expected variability in urinary system. Conclusion: This study demonstrated by combined phantom, pre-clinical and clinical PET/CT scans that PET acquisition overlap in axial of today’s systems can be reduced and optimized. It showed that a reduction of PET acquisition overlap to 27% (half of system default) can be implemented to reduce table time by ∼40% to improve patient comfort and minimize potential motion artifacts, without prominently degrading image quality or compromising PET quantification.

  3. SU-F-I-57: Evaluate and Optimize PET Acquisition Overlap in 18F-FDG Oncology Wholebody PET/CT: Can We Scan PET Faster?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Natwa, M; Hall, NC; Knopp, MV [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Knopp, MU [Pepperdine University, Malibu, CA (United States); Zhang, B; Tung, C [Philips Healthcare, Highland Heights, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The longer patient has to remain on the table during PET imaging, the higher the likelihood of motion artifacts due to patient discomfort. This study was to investigate and optimize PET acquisition overlap in 18F-FDG oncology wholebody PET/CT to speed up PET acquisition and improve patient comfort. Methods: Wholebody 18F-FDG PET/CT of phantoms, 8 pre-clinical patients (beagles) and 5 clinical oncology patients were performed in 90s/bed on a time-of-flight Gemini TF 64 system. Imaging of phantoms and beagles was acquired with reduced PET overlaps (40%, 33%, 27%, 20%, 13% and no overlap) in addition to the system default (53%). In human studies, 1 or 2 reduced overlaps from the listed options were used to acquire PET/CT sweeps right after the default standard of care imaging. Image quality was blindly reviewed using visual scoring criteria and quantitative SUV assessment. NEMA PET sensitivity was performed under different overlaps. Results: All PET exams demonstrated no significant impact on the visual grades for overlaps >20%. Blinded reviews assigned the best visual scores to PET using overlaps 53%–27%. Reducing overlap to 27% for oncology patients (12-bed) saved an average of ∼40% acquisition time (11min) compared to using the default overlap (18min). No significant SUV variances were found when reducing overlap to half of default for cerebellum, lung, heart, aorta, liver, fat, muscle, bone marrow, thighs and target lesions (p>0.05), except expected variability in urinary system. Conclusion: This study demonstrated by combined phantom, pre-clinical and clinical PET/CT scans that PET acquisition overlap in axial of today’s systems can be reduced and optimized. It showed that a reduction of PET acquisition overlap to 27% (half of system default) can be implemented to reduce table time by ∼40% to improve patient comfort and minimize potential motion artifacts, without prominently degrading image quality or compromising PET quantification.

  4. Role of 18F FDG PET scan to localize tumor in patients of oncogenic osteomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, Gaurav; Mukta, K.; Asopa, V.; Varsha, J.; Vijaya, S.; Shah, Nalini S.; Padmavathy, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome of renal phosphate wasting which is usually caused by phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors. Conventional radiologic techniques usually fail to detect these small, slow growing neoplasms located at unusual sites. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of 18 F FDG PET imaging in patients of oncogenic osteomalacia. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients (8 males and 7 females) (mean age: 38.5 ± 12.2 years) with clinical and biochemical evidence of oncogenic osteomalacia were subjected to 'total' whole body 18 F FDG PET scan including both limbs and skull views. The images were reconstructed and the final output was displayed as per the standard institution protocol. Results: 18 F FDG PET imaging localized suspicious hypermetabolic foci of SUVmax ranging from 1.4 to 3.8 (Mean ± S.D.: 2.39 ± 0.63) suggesting presence of occult tumor in 11 of 15 patients. The suspected foci were localized in lower limbs in ten patients and in the petrous temporal region of skull in 1 patient. FDG localized tumors were histopathologically correlated in 6 patients who underwent surgical biopsy/excision after correlative radiological investigations. Four of these patients were cured after surgical excision while partial surgical excision/biopsy was performed in two patients. Conclusions: 18 F FDG PET imaging is a promising technique for detection of occult tumors in patients of oncogenic osteomalacia. It is mandatory to include limbs in the field as these tumors are common in limbs and may be easily missed. Preoperative localization increases odds for cure after surgical removal of tumor

  5. Impact of 18F-FDG PET scan on the prevalence of benign thoracic lesions at surgical resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Mohan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The main utility of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET lies in the staging of lung cancer. However, it can also be used to differentiate indeterminate pulmonary lesions, but its impact on the resection of benign lesions at surgery is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of benign lesions at thoracotomy carried out for suspected lung cancer, before and after the introduction of PET scanning in a large thoracic surgical centre. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed our prospectively recorded surgical database for all consecutive patients undergoing thoracotomy for suspected or proven lung cancer and compared the prevalence of benign lesions in 2 consecutive 2-year groups, before (group I and after (group II the introduction of FDG-PET scan respectively. RESULTS: Surgical resection was performed on 1233 patients during the study period. The prevalence of benign lesions at surgery in groups I and II was similar (44/626 and 41/607, both 7%, and also in group II between those who underwent FDG-PET scan and the remainder (21/301 and 20/306 respectively, both 7%. In group II, of the 21 patients with benign lesions, who underwent FDG-PET, 19 had a false positive scan (mean standardised uptake value 5.3 [range 2.6-12.7]. Of these, 13 and 4 patients respectively had non-diagnostic bronchoscopy and percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsy pre thoracotomy. There was no difference in the proportion of different benign lesions resected between group I and those with FDG-PET in group II. CONCLUSION: The introduction of FDG-PET scanning has not altered the proportion of patients undergoing thoracotomy for ultimately benign lesions, mainly due to the avidity for the isotope of some non-malignant lesions. Such false positive results need to be considered when patients with unconfirmed lung cancer are contemplated for surgical resection.

  6. Impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET scan on the prevalence of benign thoracic lesions at surgical resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Kamlesh; Ledson, Martin J.; Walshaw, Martin J., E-mail: mwalshaw@doctors.org.u [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital (United Kingdom). Dept. of Respiratory Medicine; McShane, James [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital (United Kingdom). Dept. of Audit and Research; Page, Richard [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital (United Kingdom). Dept. of Thoracic Surgery; Irion, Klaus [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology

    2011-09-15

    Objective: the main utility of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) lies in the staging of lung cancer. However, it can also be used to differentiate indeterminate pulmonary lesions, but its impact on the resection of benign lesions at surgery is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of benign lesions at thoracotomy carried out for suspected lung cancer, before and after the introduction of PET scanning in a large thoracic surgical centre. Materials and methods: we reviewed our prospectively recorded surgical database for all consecutive patients undergoing thoracotomy for suspected or proven lung cancer and compared the prevalence of benign lesions in 2 consecutive 2-year groups, before (group I) and after (group II) the introduction of FDG-PET scan respectively. Results: Surgical resection was performed on 1233 patients during the study period. The prevalence of benign lesions at surgery in groups I and II was similar (44/626 and 41/607, both 7%), and also in group II between those who underwent FDG-PET scan and the remainder (21/301 and 20/306 respectively, both 7%). In group II, of the 21 patients with benign lesions, who underwent FDG-PET, 19 had a false positive scan (mean standardised uptake value 5.3 [range 2.6-12.7]). Of these, 13 and 4 patients respectively had non-diagnostic bronchoscopy and percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsy pre thoracotomy. There was no difference in the proportion of different benign lesions resected between group I and those with FDG-PET in group II. Conclusion: the introduction of FDG-PET scanning has not altered the proportion of patients undergoing thoracotomy for ultimately benign lesions, mainly due to the avidity for the isotope of some non-malignant lesions. Such false positive results need to be considered when patients with unconfirmed lung cancer are contemplated for surgical resection. (author)

  7. Impact of 18F-FDG PET scan on the prevalence of benign thoracic lesions at surgical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Kamlesh; Ledson, Martin J.; Walshaw, Martin J.; McShane, James; Page, Richard; Irion, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Objective: the main utility of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) lies in the staging of lung cancer. However, it can also be used to differentiate indeterminate pulmonary lesions, but its impact on the resection of benign lesions at surgery is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of benign lesions at thoracotomy carried out for suspected lung cancer, before and after the introduction of PET scanning in a large thoracic surgical centre. Materials and methods: we reviewed our prospectively recorded surgical database for all consecutive patients undergoing thoracotomy for suspected or proven lung cancer and compared the prevalence of benign lesions in 2 consecutive 2-year groups, before (group I) and after (group II) the introduction of FDG-PET scan respectively. Results: Surgical resection was performed on 1233 patients during the study period. The prevalence of benign lesions at surgery in groups I and II was similar (44/626 and 41/607, both 7%), and also in group II between those who underwent FDG-PET scan and the remainder (21/301 and 20/306 respectively, both 7%). In group II, of the 21 patients with benign lesions, who underwent FDG-PET, 19 had a false positive scan (mean standardised uptake value 5.3 [range 2.6-12.7]). Of these, 13 and 4 patients respectively had non-diagnostic bronchoscopy and percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsy pre thoracotomy. There was no difference in the proportion of different benign lesions resected between group I and those with FDG-PET in group II. Conclusion: the introduction of FDG-PET scanning has not altered the proportion of patients undergoing thoracotomy for ultimately benign lesions, mainly due to the avidity for the isotope of some non-malignant lesions. Such false positive results need to be considered when patients with unconfirmed lung cancer are contemplated for surgical resection. (author)

  8. Scanning holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natali, S.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on the scanning of 1000 holograms taken in HOBC at CERN. Each hologram is triggered by an interaction in the chamber, the primary particles being pions at 340 GeV/c. The aim of the experiment is the study of charm production. The holograms, recorded on 50 mm film with the ''in line'' technique, can be analyzed by shining a parallel expanded laser beam through the film, obtaining immediately above it the real image of the chamber which can then be scanned and measured with a technique half way between emulsions and bubble chambers. The results indicate that holograms can be analyzed as quickly and reliably as in other visual techniques and that to them is open the same order of magnitude of large scale experiments

  9. Self-reported fatigue common among optimally treated HIV patients: no correlation with cerebral FDG-PET scanning abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ase B; Law, Ian; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2006-01-01

    patients (n = 95), known to be HIV positive for 5 years, on anti-retroviral therapy for a minimum of 3 years and with CD4 counts above 0.2 x 10(9) cells/l, completed a validated fatigue inventory, and plasma was analysed for pro-inflammatory markers including tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 6......-PET) scanning. RESULTS: Fifteen percent suffered from severe fatigue, but no association with pro-inflammatory markers was found. About 50% of the FDG-PET-scanned patients showed minor abnormalities in the relative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose. These abnormalities were not associated with fatigue...

  10. Clinical importance of re-interpretation of PET/CT scanning in patients referred to a tertiary care medical centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfgren, Johan; Loft, Annika; Barbosa de Lima, Vinicius Araújo

    2017-01-01

    had an external F-18-FDG PET/CT scan were included. Only information that had been available at the time of the initial reading at the external hospital was available at re-interpretation. Teams with one radiologist and one nuclear medicine physician working side by side performed the re......PURPOSE: To evaluate, in a controlled prospective manner with double-blind read, whether there are differences in interpretations of PET/CT scans at our tertiary medical centre, Rigshospitalet, compared to the external hospitals. METHODS: Ninety consecutive patients referred to our department who...

  11. Computed tomography automatic exposure control techniques in 18F-FDG oncology PET-CT scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iball, Gareth R; Tout, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) automatic exposure control (AEC) systems are now used in all modern PET-CT scanners. A collaborative study was undertaken to compare AEC techniques of the three major PET-CT manufacturers for fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose half-body oncology imaging. An audit of 70 patients was performed for half-body CT scans taken on a GE Discovery 690, Philips Gemini TF and Siemens Biograph mCT (all 64-slice CT). Patient demographic and dose information was recorded and image noise was calculated as the SD of Hounsfield units in the liver. A direct comparison of the AEC systems was made by scanning a Rando phantom on all three systems for a range of AEC settings. The variation in dose and image quality with patient weight was significantly different for all three systems, with the GE system showing the largest variation in dose with weight and Philips the least. Image noise varied with patient weight in Philips and Siemens systems but was constant for all weights in GE. The z-axis mA profiles from the Rando phantom demonstrate that these differences are caused by the nature of the tube current modulation techniques applied. The mA profiles varied considerably according to the AEC settings used. CT AEC techniques from the three manufacturers yield significantly different tube current modulation patterns and hence deliver different doses and levels of image quality across a range of patient weights. Users should be aware of how their system works and of steps that could be taken to optimize imaging protocols.

  12. Bone scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, V.J.

    1989-01-01

    Oftentimes, in managing podiatric complaints, clinical and conventional radiographic techniques are insufficient in determining a patient's problem. This is especially true in the early stages of bone infection. Bone scanning or imaging can provide additional information in the diagnosis of the disorder. However, bone scans are not specific and must be correlated with clinical, radiographic, and laboratory evaluation. In other words, bone scanning does not provide the diagnosis but is an important bit of information aiding in the process of diagnosis. The more useful radionuclides in skeletal imaging are technetium phosphate complexes and gallium citrate. These compounds are administered intravenously and are detected at specific time intervals postinjection by a rectilinear scanner with minification is used and the entire skeleton can be imaged from head to toe. Minification allows visualization of the entire skeleton in a single image. A gamma camera can concentrate on an isolated area. However, it requires multiple views to complete the whole skeletal image. Recent advances have allowed computer augmentation of the data received from radionucleotide imaging. The purpose of this chapter is to present the current radionuclides clinically useful in podiatric patients

  13. Pulmonary aspergilloma: A rare differential diagnosis to lung cancer after positive FDG PET scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Spycher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer-related death, is important to improve morbidity and mortality. Therefore any suspect solitary pulmonary nodule should prompt the pursuit for a definitive histological diagnosis. We describe the case of a 55-years-old male ex-smoker, who was admitted to our hospital due to recurrent hemoptysis and dry cough. A CT scan showed an irregular nodule of increasing size (28 mm in diameter in the left lower lobe (LLL. A whole body PET-CT scan (643 MBq F-18 FDG i.v. was performed and confirmed an avid FDG uptake of the nodule in the LLL, highly suspicious of lung cancer, without any evidence of lymphogenic or hematogenic metastasis. Bronchoscopy was not diagnostic and due to severe adhesions after prior chest trauma and the central location of the nodule, a lobectomy of the LLL was performed. Surprisingly, histology showed a simple aspergilloma located in a circumscribed bronchiectasis with no evidence of malignancy. This is a report of an informative example of an aspergilloma, which presented with symptoms and radiological features of malignant lung cancer.

  14. Early static {sup 18}F-FET-PET scans have a higher accuracy for glioma grading than the standard 20-40 min scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Nathalie L.; Winkelmann, Isabel; Wenter, Vera; Mille, Erik; Todica, Andrei; Brendel, Matthias; Bartenstein, Peter [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Suchorska, Bogdana; Tonn, Joerg-Christian [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany); Schmid-Tannwald, Christine [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); La Fougere, Christian [University of Tuebingen, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Current guidelines for glioma imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) using the amino acid analogue O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) recommend image acquisition from 20-40 min post injection (p.i.). The maximal tumour-to-background evaluation (TBR{sub max}) obtained in these summation images does not enable reliable differentiation between low and high grade glioma (LGG and HGG), which, however, can be achieved by dynamic {sup 18}F-FET-PET. We investigated the accuracy of tumour grading using TBR{sub max} values at different earlier time points after tracer injection. Three hundred and fourteen patients with histologically proven primary diagnosis of glioma (131 LGG, 183 HGG) who had undergone 40-min dynamic {sup 18}F-FET-PET scans were retrospectively evaluated. TBR{sub max} was assessed in the standard 20-40 min summation images, as well as in summation images from 0-10 min, 5-15 min, 5-20 min, and 15-30 min p.i., and kinetic analysis was performed. TBR{sub max} values and kinetic analysis were correlated with histological classification. ROC analyses were performed for each time frame and sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were assessed. TBR{sub max} values in the earlier summation images were significantly better for tumour grading (P < 0.001) when compared to standard 20-40 min scans, with best results for the early 5-15 min scan. This was due to higher TBR{sub max} in the HGG (3.9 vs. 3.3; p < 0.001), while TBR{sub max} remained nearly stable in the LGG (2.2 vs. 2.1). Overall, accuracy increased from 70 % in the 20-40 min analysis to 77 % in the 5-15 min images, but did not reach the accuracy of dynamic analysis (80 %). Early TBR{sub max} assessment (5-15 min p.i.) is more accurate for the differentiation between LGG and HGG than the standard static scan (20-40 min p.i.) mainly caused by the characteristic high {sup 18}F-FET uptake of HGG in the initial phase. Therefore, when dynamic {sup 18}F-FET-PET cannot be performed

  15. Adapting MR-BrainPET scans for comparison with conventional PET: experiences with dynamic FET-PET in brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Herzog, Hans; Kops, Elena Rota; Stoffels, Gabriele; Filss, Christian [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Coenen, Heinrich H; Shah, N Jon; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Imaging results from subsequent measurements (preclinical 3T MR-BrainPET, HR+) are compared. O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) may exhibit non-uniform tracer uptake in gliomas. The aim was to analyse and adapt the physical properties of the scanners and study variations of biological tumour volume (BTV) in early and late FET-PET.

  16. TH-E-BRF-10: Interim Esophageal Cancer Response Assessment Via 18FDG-PET Scanning During Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, K [Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham, NC (United States); Wu, Q; Perez, B; Czito, B; Palta, M; Willett, C; Das, S [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Local failure occurs in a large proportion of esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. The treatment strategy for non-responders could potentially be modified if they are identified during therapy. This work investigates the utility of an interim 18FDG-PET scan acquired during the course of therapy as a predictor of pathological response post-therapy. Methods: Fifteen patients underwent 18FDG-PET scanning prior to radiation therapy (RT) and once during RT, after delivery of ∼32 Gy. The physician-contoured GTV on the planning CT scan was used to automatically segment a PET-based GTV on the pre-RT PET (GTV-pre-PET) as the volume with >40% of the maximum GTV PET SUV value. The pre- and intra-RT CTs were deformably registered to each other to transfer the GTV-pre-PET to the intra-RT PET (GTV-intra-PET). The fractional decrease in the maximum SUV, mean SUV and the SUV to the highest intensity 10% – 90% volumes from GTV-pre-PET to GTV-intra-PET were compared to pathological response assessed at the time of post-RT surgery. Results: Based on post-treatment pathology of 15 patients, 7 were classified as achieving favorable response (treatment effect grade ≤ 1) and 8 as unfavorable response (treatment effect grade > 1). Neither fractional decrease in maximum SUV nor mean SUV were significant between the favorable and unfavorable groups. However, the fractional decrease in SUV20% (SUV to the highest 20% volume) was significant (p = 0.02), with an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve of 0.84. An optimal cutoff value of 0.46 for this metric was able to distinguish between the two groups with 71% sensitivity (favorable) and 88% specificity (unfavorable). Conclusion: The fractional decrease in SUV to the volume with highest 20% intensity from pre- to intra-RT 18FDG-PET imaging may be used to distinguish between favorable and unfavorable responders with high sensitivity and specificity.

  17. TH-E-BRF-10: Interim Esophageal Cancer Response Assessment Via 18FDG-PET Scanning During Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, K; Wu, Q; Perez, B; Czito, B; Palta, M; Willett, C; Das, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Local failure occurs in a large proportion of esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. The treatment strategy for non-responders could potentially be modified if they are identified during therapy. This work investigates the utility of an interim 18FDG-PET scan acquired during the course of therapy as a predictor of pathological response post-therapy. Methods: Fifteen patients underwent 18FDG-PET scanning prior to radiation therapy (RT) and once during RT, after delivery of ∼32 Gy. The physician-contoured GTV on the planning CT scan was used to automatically segment a PET-based GTV on the pre-RT PET (GTV-pre-PET) as the volume with >40% of the maximum GTV PET SUV value. The pre- and intra-RT CTs were deformably registered to each other to transfer the GTV-pre-PET to the intra-RT PET (GTV-intra-PET). The fractional decrease in the maximum SUV, mean SUV and the SUV to the highest intensity 10% – 90% volumes from GTV-pre-PET to GTV-intra-PET were compared to pathological response assessed at the time of post-RT surgery. Results: Based on post-treatment pathology of 15 patients, 7 were classified as achieving favorable response (treatment effect grade ≤ 1) and 8 as unfavorable response (treatment effect grade > 1). Neither fractional decrease in maximum SUV nor mean SUV were significant between the favorable and unfavorable groups. However, the fractional decrease in SUV20% (SUV to the highest 20% volume) was significant (p = 0.02), with an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve of 0.84. An optimal cutoff value of 0.46 for this metric was able to distinguish between the two groups with 71% sensitivity (favorable) and 88% specificity (unfavorable). Conclusion: The fractional decrease in SUV to the volume with highest 20% intensity from pre- to intra-RT 18FDG-PET imaging may be used to distinguish between favorable and unfavorable responders with high sensitivity and specificity

  18. The 3-D alignment of objects in dynamic PET scans using filtered sinusoidal trajectories of sinogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostopoulos, Aristotelis E.; Happonen, Antti P.; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    In this study, our goal is to employ a novel 3-D alignment method for dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Because the acquired data (i.e. sinograms) often contain noise considerably, filtering of the data prior to the alignment presumably improves the final results. In this study, we utilized a novel 3-D stackgram domain approach. In the stackgram domain, the signals along the sinusoidal trajectory signals of the sinogram can be processed separately. In this work, we performed angular stackgram domain filtering by employing well known 1-D filters: the Gaussian low-pass filter and the median filter. In addition, we employed two wavelet de-noising techniques. After filtering we performed alignment of objects in the stackgram domain. The local alignment technique we used is based on similarity comparisons between locus vectors (i.e. the signals along the sinusoidal trajectories of the sinogram) in a 3-D neighborhood of sequences of the stackgrams. Aligned stackgrams can be transformed back to sinograms (Method 1), or alternatively directly to filtered back-projected images (Method 2). In order to evaluate the alignment process, simulated data with different kinds of additive noises were used. The results indicated that the filtering prior to the alignment can be important concerning the accuracy

  19. Early Detection of Brain Pathology Suggestive of Early AD Using Objective Evaluation of FDG-PET Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Patterson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for early detection of AD becomes critical as disease-modifying agents near the marketplace. Here, we present results from a study focused on improvement in detection of metabolic deficits related to neurodegenerative changes consistent with possible early AD with statistical evaluation of FDG-PET brain images. We followed 31 subjects at high risk or diagnosed with MCI/AD for 3 years. 15 met criteria for diagnosis of MCI, and five met criteria for AD. FDG-PET scans were completed at initiation and termination of the study. PET scans were read clinically and also evaluated objectively using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM. Using standard clinical evaluation of the FDG-PET scans, 11 subjects were detected, while 18 were detected using SPM evaluation. These preliminary results indicate that objective analyses may improve detection; however, early detection in at-risk normal subjects remains tentative. Several FDA-approved software packages are available that use objective analyses, thus the capacity exists for wider use of this method for MCI/AD.

  20. A False Positive {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Scan Caused by Breast Silicone Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chao Jung; Lee, Bi Fang; Yao, Wei Jen; Wu, Pei Shan; Chen, Wen Chung; Peng, Shu Lin; Chiu, Nan Tsing [Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, Tainan (Turkmenistan)

    2009-04-15

    We present here the case of a 40-year-old woman with a greater than 10 year prior history of bilateral breast silicone injection and saline bag implantation. Bilateral palpable breast nodules were observed, but the ultrasound scan was suboptimal and the magnetic resonance imaging showed no gadolinium enhanced tumor. The {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan showed a hypermetabolic nodule in the left breast with a 30% increase of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake on the delayed imaging, and this mimicked breast cancer. She underwent a left partial mastectomy and the pathology demonstrated a siliconoma.

  1. Automated measurement of uptake in cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch in full-body FDG PET/CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christian; Sun, Shanhui; Sun, Wenqing; Otis, Justin; Wallace, Audrey; Smith, Brian J; Sunderland, John J; Graham, Michael M; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John M; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate fully automated methods for uptake measurement of cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch in full-body PET/CT scans. Such measurements are of interest in the context of uptake normalization for quantitative assessment of metabolic activity and/or automated image quality control. Cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch regions were segmented with different automated approaches. Cerebella were segmented in PET volumes by means of a robust active shape model (ASM) based method. For liver segmentation, a largest possible hyperellipsoid was fitted to the liver in PET scans. The aortic arch was first segmented in CT images of a PET/CT scan by a tubular structure analysis approach, and the segmented result was then mapped to the corresponding PET scan. For each of the segmented structures, the average standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. To generate an independent reference standard for method validation, expert image analysts were asked to segment several cross sections of each of the three structures in 134 F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT scans. For each case, the true average SUV was estimated by utilizing statistical models and served as the independent reference standard. For automated aorta and liver SUV measurements, no statistically significant scale or shift differences were observed between automated results and the independent standard. In the case of the cerebellum, the scale and shift were not significantly different, if measured in the same cross sections that were utilized for generating the reference. In contrast, automated results were scaled 5% lower on average although not shifted, if FDG uptake was calculated from the whole segmented cerebellum volume. The estimated reduction in total SUV measurement error ranged between 54.7% and 99.2%, and the reduction was found to be statistically significant for cerebellum and aortic arch. With the proposed methods, the authors have demonstrated that

  2. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... head size in children Changes in thinking or behavior Fainting Headache, when you have certain other signs ...

  3. Automated calculation of myocardial external efficiency from a single 11C-acetate PET/CT scan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik

    of this study was to develop and validate an automated method of calculating MEE from a single dynamic 11C-acetate PETscan. Methods: 21 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min 11C-acetate PETscan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint 64 PET/CTscanner. Using cluster analysis, the LV-aortic time-activity curve (TACLV......). Conclusion: Myocardial efficiencycanbe derived directly andautomatically froma single dynamic 11C-acetate PET scan. This eliminates the need for a separate CMR scan and eliminates any potential errors due to different loading conditions between CMR and PETscans.......Background: Dynamic PETwith 11C-acetate can be used to assess myocardial oxygen use which in turn is usedto calculate myocardial external efficiency (MEE), anearly marker of heart failure. MEE is defined as the ratio of total work (TW) and total energy use (TE). Calculation of TW and TE requires...

  4. Forced diuresis and dual-phase 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT scan for restaging of urinary bladder cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harkirat S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The results of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET imaging carried out with the current standard techniques for assessment of urinary tract cancers have been reported to be less than satisfactory because of the urinary excretion of the tracer. Aims: To investigate the role of dual-phase FDG-PET/CT in the restaging of invasive cancers of the urinary bladder, with delayed imaging after forced diuresis and oral hydration as the scanning protocol. Settings and Design: FDG-PET has been considered to be of limited value for the detection of urinary tract cancers because of interference by the FDG excreted in urine. We investigated the efficacy of delayed FDG-PET/CT in the restaging of invasive bladder cancer, with imaging performed after intravenous (IV administration of a potent diuretic and oral hydration. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients with invasive cancer of the urinary bladder were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I (22 patients included cases with invasive bladder cancer who had not undergone cystectomy and group II (seven patients included cases with invasive bladder cancer who had undergone cystectomy and urinary diversion procedure. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scan from the skull base to the mid-thighs 60 min after IV injection of 370 mega-Becquerel (MBq of FDG. Additional delayed images were acquired 60-90 min after IV furosemide and oral hydration. PET/CT data were analyzed as PET and CT images studied separately as well as fused PET/CT images and the findings were recorded. The imaging findings were confirmed by cystoscopy, biopsy or follow-up PET/CT. Results: The technique was successful in achieving adequate washout of urinary FDG and overcame the problems posed by the excess FDG in the urinary tract. Hypermetabolic lesions could be easily detected by PET and precisely localized to the bladder wall, perivesical region and pelvic lymph nodes. PET/CT delayed images were able to

  5. Forced diuresis and dual-phase 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT scan for restaging of urinary bladder cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkirat, S; Anand, SS; Jacob, MJ

    2010-01-01

    The results of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET imaging carried out with the current standard techniques for assessment of urinary tract cancers have been reported to be less than satisfactory because of the urinary excretion of the tracer. To investigate the role of dual-phase FDG-PET/CT in the restaging of invasive cancers of the urinary bladder, with delayed imaging after forced diuresis and oral hydration as the scanning protocol. FDG-PET has been considered to be of limited value for the detection of urinary tract cancers because of interference by the FDG excreted in urine. We investigated the efficacy of delayed FDG-PET/CT in the restaging of invasive bladder cancer, with imaging performed after intravenous (IV) administration of a potent diuretic and oral hydration. Twenty-nine patients with invasive cancer of the urinary bladder were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I (22 patients) included cases with invasive bladder cancer who had not undergone cystectomy and group II (seven patients) included cases with invasive bladder cancer who had undergone cystectomy and urinary diversion procedure. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scan from the skull base to the mid-thighs 60 min after IV injection of 370 mega-Becquerel (MBq) of FDG. Additional delayed images were acquired 60-90 min after IV furosemide and oral hydration. PET/CT data were analyzed as PET and CT images studied separately as well as fused PET/CT images and the findings were recorded. The imaging findings were confirmed by cystoscopy, biopsy or follow-up PET/CT. The technique was successful in achieving adequate washout of urinary FDG and overcame the problems posed by the excess FDG in the urinary tract. Hypermetabolic lesions could be easily detected by PET and precisely localized to the bladder wall, perivesical region and pelvic lymph nodes. PET/CT delayed images were able to demonstrate 16 intravesical lesions (in 13 patients), with excellent clarity. Lymph

  6. Triage of Limited Versus Extensive Disease on 18F-FDG PET/CT Scan in Small Cell lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Riaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is an aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma, which accounts for 10-15% of pulmonary cancers and exhibits early metastatic spread. This study aimed to determine the added value of 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging in tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM staging of SCLC, compared to the conventional computed tomography (CT scan and its potential role as a prognosticator.Methods: This retrospective review was conducted on 23 patients, who were histopathologically diagnosed to have SCLC and referred for undergoing 18F-FDG PET/CT scanning during October 2009-December 2015. The rate of agreement between the CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT findings for TNM staging was calculated using the Cohen’s kappa (κ. The median follow-up time was eight months, ranging 27-3 months. The overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated based on the extent of disease.Results: 19 cases were male and four female with the mean age of 58±9 years. The 18F-FDG PET/CT identified limited and extensive diseases in 2 (8.7% and 21 (91.3% patients, respectively. In addition, the results of the Cohen’s kappa demonstrated a strong (κ=0.82, fair (κ=0.24, and poor (κ=0.12 agreement between the PET/CT and CT findings for determining tumor, node, and metastasis stages, respectively. The 18F-FDG PET/CT scans upstaged disease in 47% of the cases with visceral and osseous metastasis. The disease-free survival rates for the limited and extensive diseases were 100% and 23% within the 12-month follow-up. In addition, 8 (35% patients expired during the follow-up period.Conclusion: Improved nodal and metastatic disease identification highlights the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT scanning in initial staging of SCLC with prognostic implications.

  7. When are false-positive and false-negative 18F'FDG PET scans really false?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binns, D.S.; Hicks, R.J.; Fawcett, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: A 61-year-old male presented with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the base of tongue. In the absence of wider metastatic disease on conventional staging, he was enrolled in a phase I, dose escalation chemoradiotherapy trial. In this study, therapeutic response to radiotherapy combined with cisplatin and a chemotherapeutic agent which specifically targets hypoxic cells (tirapazamine) was evaluated with serial 18 F-FDG PET scans. Baseline 18 F-FDG PET confirmed locally advanced disease, although a previously undetected lower cervical lymph node was identified and included in the radiotherapy portal. Whole-body PET revealed a small metabolically active area adjacent to the right hemidiaphragm. Respiratory gated, high-resolution helical CT failed to find structural evidence of disease and, as a result, the patient was enrolled in the 7 week therapy regime on the assumption that the PET finding was a false-positive result. Repeat 18 F-FDG PET scans at the middle, end and 12 weeks post-treatment showed excellent therapeutic response in the head and neck which was discordant with clinical and CT findings, and resolution of the metabolically active chest lesion. Despite the negative PET scan, persistent clinical and CT evidence of a residual tumour mass suggested a false-negative result and resulted in a neck lymph node dissection. This showed no evidence of malignant cells. Five months following treatment, the patient presented with pleural effusion at the base on the right lung. Subsequent CT scanning showed a small pleural lesion at the site of initial 18 F-FDG uptake. Biopsy confirmed metastatic disease. The apparent transient resolution of 18 F-FDG uptake in the pleural lesion with treatment presumably reflected a combination of reduced metabolic activity and size due to the partial, but not complete, cytotoxic effects of cisplatin. In conclusion, this case emphasizes the importance of pathological review and clinical follow-up in reconciling

  8. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte Dahl; Petersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg

    2018-01-01

    (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. Methods: PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUVmax) by two independent examiners......, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Results: Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed...... in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut...

  9. Value of FDG-PET scans of non-demented patients in predicting rates of future cognitive and functional decline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torosyan, Nare; Mason, Kelsey; Dahlbom, Magnus; Silverman, Daniel H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in predicting subsequent rates of functional and cognitive decline among subjects considered cognitively normal (CN) or clinically diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Analyses of 276 subjects, 92 CN subjects and 184 with MCI, who were enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, were conducted. Functional decline was assessed using scores on the Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ) obtained over a period of 36 months, while cognitive decline was determined using the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. PET images were analyzed using clinically routine brain quantification software. A dementia prognosis index (DPI), derived from a ratio of uptake values in regions of interest known to be hypometabolic in Alzheimer's disease to regions known to be stable, was generated for each baseline FDG-PET scan. The DPI was correlated with change in scores on the neuropsychological examinations to examine the predictive value of baseline FDG-PET. DPI powerfully predicted rate of functional decline among MCI patients (t = 5.75, p < 1.0E-8) and pooled N + MCI patient groups (t = 7.02, p < 1.0E-11). Rate of cognitive decline on MMSE was also predicted by the DPI among MCI (t = 6.96, p < 1.0E-10) and pooled N + MCI (t = 8.78, p < 5.0E-16). Rate of cognitive decline on ADAS-cog was powerfully predicted by the DPI alone among N (p < 0.001), MCI (t = 6.46, p < 1.0E-9) and for pooled N + MCI (t = 8.85, p = 1.1E-16). These findings suggest that an index, derivable from automated regional analysis of brain PET scans, can be used to help predict rates of functional and cognitive deterioration in the years following baseline PET. (orig.)

  10. Modular design of a scanning Gantry for animal SPECT, PET and CT applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, J.A.M.; Lerch, M.; Bourke, J.; Rozenfeld, A.B.; Meikle, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Using the modular design methodology, we have developed a scanning gantry system; custom designed for multi-modality nuclear imaging techniques (NITs) and the CoALA SPECT project. This paper discusses the gantry's flexible modular design and how significant components and functionality have been reused in other medical physics related instrumentation developed at the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong. The gantry is designed to meet the exacting requirements of researchers in new radiotracer development who require accurate functional and anatomical information-the scanning gantry has a linear stepping accuracy of +/-12.5 microns and an angular accuracy of +/-0.03 degree. The scanning gantry is a precision instrument that is also affordable to research groups working in small laboratories or universities. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  11. Role of FDG-PET scans in staging, response assessment, and follow-up care for non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuaron, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Dunphy, Mark [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Rimner, Andreas, E-mail: rimnera@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-01-03

    The integral role of positron-emission tomography (PET) using the glucose analog tracer fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is well established. Evidence is emerging for the role of PET in response assessment to neoadjuvant therapy, combined-modality therapy, and early detection of recurrence. Here, we review the current literature on these aspects of PET in the management of NSCLC. FDG-PET, particularly integrated {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT, scans have become a standard test in the staging of local tumor extent, mediastinal lymph node involvement, and distant metastatic disease in NSCLC. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET sensitivity is generally superior to computed tomography (CT) scans alone. Local tumor extent and T stage can be more accurately determined with FDG-PET in certain cases, especially in areas of post-obstructive atelectasis or low CT density variation. FDG-PET sensitivity is decreased in tumors <1 cm, at least in part due to respiratory motion. False-negative results can occur in areas of low tumor burden, e.g., small lymph nodes or ground-glass opacities. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET-CT nodal staging is more accurate than CT alone, as hilar and mediastinal involvement is often detected first on {sup 18}F-FDG-PET scan when CT criteria for malignant involvement are not met. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET scans have widely replaced bone scintography for assessing distant metastases, except for the brain, which still warrants dedicated brain imaging. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake has also been shown to vary between histologies, with adenocarcinomas generally being less FDG avid than squamous cell carcinomas. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET scans are useful to detect recurrences, but are currently not recommended for routine follow-up. Typically, patients are followed with chest CT scans every 3–6 months, using {sup 18}F-FDG-PET to evaluate equivocal CT findings. As high {sup 18}F-FDG uptake can occur in infectious, inflammatory, and other non-neoplastic conditions

  12. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism: a blinded evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Charlotte Dahl; Petersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Detlefsen, Sönke; Brusgaard, Klaus; Rasmussen, Lars; Melikyan, Maria; Ekström, Klas; Globa, Evgenia; Rasmussen, Annett Helleskov; Hovendal, Claus; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2018-02-01

    Focal congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is curable by surgery, which is why identification of the focal lesion is crucial. We aimed to determine the use of 18F-fluoro-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET/CT vs. 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic-acid-1-Nal3-octreotide (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUV max ) by two independent examiners, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut-off-based evaluation: sensitivity (95% CI) of 1 (0.85-1); specificity of 0.96 (0.82-0.99). The optimal 18F-DOPA PET SUV max ratio cut-off was 1.44 and the optimal 68Ga-DOTANOC PET SUV max cut-off was 6.77 g/ml. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.98 (0.93-1) for 18F-DOPA PET vs. 0.71 (0.43-0.95) for 68Ga-DOTANOC PET (p PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, respectively. 18F-DOPA PET/CT was excellent in predicting focal CHI and superior compared to 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Further use of 68GA-DOTANOC PET/CT in predicting focal CHI is discouraged.

  13. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism. A blinded evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl Christiansen, Charlotte; Helleskov Rasmussen, Annett; Petersen, Henrik; Lerberg Nielsen, Anne; Detlefsen, Soenke; Brusgaard, Klaus; Rasmussen, Lars; Hovendal, Claus; Melikyan, Maria; Ekstroem, Klas; Globa, Evgenia; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2018-01-01

    Focal congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is curable by surgery, which is why identification of the focal lesion is crucial. We aimed to determine the use of 18F-fluoro-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET/CT vs. 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic-acid-1-Nal3 -octreotide (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUV max ) by two independent examiners, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut-off-based evaluation: sensitivity (95% CI) of 1 (0.85-1); specificity of 0.96 (0.82-0.99). The optimal 18F-DOPA PET SUV max ratio cut-off was 1.44 and the optimal 68Ga-DOTANOC PET SUV max cut-off was 6.77 g/ml. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.98 (0.93-1) for 18F-DOPA PET vs. 0.71 (0.43-0.95) for 68Ga-DOTANOC PET (p < 0.03). In patients subjected to surgery, localization of the focal lesion was correct in 91%, and 100%, by 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, respectively. 18F-DOPA PET/CT was excellent in predicting focal CHI and superior compared to 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Further use of 68GA-DOTANOC PET/CT in predicting focal CHI is discouraged. (orig.)

  14. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism. A blinded evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl Christiansen, Charlotte; Helleskov Rasmussen, Annett [Hans Christian Andersen Children' s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Department of Clinical Research, Odense (Denmark); Petersen, Henrik; Lerberg Nielsen, Anne [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark); Detlefsen, Soenke [University of Southern Denmark, Department of Clinical Research, Odense (Denmark); Odense University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Odense (Denmark); Brusgaard, Klaus [Odense University Hospital, Department of Clinical Genetics, Odense (Denmark); Rasmussen, Lars; Hovendal, Claus [Odense University Hospital, Department of Abdominal Surgery, Odense (Denmark); Melikyan, Maria [Endocrine Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ekstroem, Klas [Karolinska Hospital, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Globa, Evgenia [MOH of Ukraine, Ukrainian Center of Endocrine Surgery, Endocrine Organs and Tissue Transplantation, Kyiv (Ukraine); Christesen, Henrik Thybo [Hans Christian Andersen Children' s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Department of Clinical Research, Odense (Denmark); Odense University Hospital, Odense Pancreas Center (OPAC), Odense (Denmark); Odense University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Odense C (Denmark)

    2018-02-15

    Focal congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is curable by surgery, which is why identification of the focal lesion is crucial. We aimed to determine the use of 18F-fluoro-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET/CT vs. 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic-acid-1-Nal3 -octreotide (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) by two independent examiners, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut-off-based evaluation: sensitivity (95% CI) of 1 (0.85-1); specificity of 0.96 (0.82-0.99). The optimal 18F-DOPA PET SUV{sub max} ratio cut-off was 1.44 and the optimal 68Ga-DOTANOC PET SUV{sub max} cut-off was 6.77 g/ml. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.98 (0.93-1) for 18F-DOPA PET vs. 0.71 (0.43-0.95) for 68Ga-DOTANOC PET (p < 0.03). In patients subjected to surgery, localization of the focal lesion was correct in 91%, and 100%, by 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, respectively. 18F-DOPA PET/CT was excellent in predicting focal CHI and superior compared to 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Further use of 68GA-DOTANOC PET/CT in predicting focal CHI is discouraged. (orig.)

  15. Prostate-Specific Antigen and Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity as Threshold Indicators in 11C-Acetate PET/CTAC Scanning for Prostate Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusing, Reginald W.; Peng, Warner; Lai, Sue-Min; Grado, Gordon L.; Holzbeierlein, Jeffrey M.; Thrasher, J. Brantley; Hill, Jacqueline; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to identify which patient characteristics are associated with the highest likelihood of positive findings on 11C-acetate PET/computed tomography attenuation correction (CTAC) (PET/CTAC) scan when imaging for recurrent prostate cancer. Methods From 2007 to 2011, 250 11C-acetate PET/CTAC scans were performed at a single institution on patients with prostate cancer recurrence after surgery, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation. Of these patients, 120 met our inclusion criteria. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between predictability of positive findings and patients’ characteristics, such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at the time of scan, PSA kinetics, Gleason score, staging, and type of treatment before scan. Results In total, 68.3% of the 120 11C-acetate PET/CTAC scans were positive. The percentage of positive scans and PSA at the time of scanning and PSA velocity (PSAV) had positive correlations. The putative sensitivity and specificity were 86.6% and 65.8%, respectively, when a PSA level greater than 1.24 ng/mL was used as the threshold for scanning. The putative sensitivity and specificity were 74% and 75%, respectively, when a PSAV level greater than 1.32 ng/mL/y was used as the threshold. No significant associations were found between scan positivity and age, PSA doubling time, Gleason score, staging, or type of treatment before scanning. Conclusions This retrospective study suggests that threshold models of PSA greater than 1.24 ng/mL or PSAV greater than 1.32 ng/mL per year are independent predictors of positive findings in 11C-acetate PET/CTAC imaging of recurrent prostate cancer. PMID:25036021

  16. Quantitative accuracy of denoising techniques applied to dynamic 82Rb myocardial blood flow PET/CT scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    with suspected ischemic heart disease underwent a dynamic 7 minute 82Rb scan under resting and adenosine induced hyperaemic conditions after injection of 1100 MBq of 82Rb on a GE Discovery 690 PET/CT. Dynamic images were filtered using HighlY constrained backPRojection (HYPR) and a Hotelling filter of which...... the latter was evaluated using a range of 4 to 7 included factors and for both 2D and 3D filtering. Data were analyzed using Cardiac VUer and obtained MBF values were compared with those obtained when no denoising of the dynamic data was performed. Results: Both HYPR and Hotelling denoising could...

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Torso FDG-PET Scans by Using Anatomical Standardization of Normal Cases from Thorough Physical Examinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hara

    Full Text Available Understanding of standardized uptake value (SUV of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET depends on the background accumulations of glucose because the SUV often varies the status of patients. The purpose of this study was to develop a new method for quantitative analysis of SUV of FDG-PET scan images. The method included an anatomical standardization and a statistical comparison with normal cases by using Z-score that are often used in SPM or 3D-SSP approach for brain function analysis. Our scheme consisted of two approaches, which included the construction of a normal model and the determination of the SUV scores as Z-score index for measuring the abnormality of an FDG-PET scan image. To construct the normal torso model, all of the normal images were registered into one shape, which indicated the normal range of SUV at all voxels. The image deformation process consisted of a whole body rigid registration of shoulder to bladder region and liver registration and a non-linear registration of body surface by using the thin-plate spline technique. In order to validate usefulness of our method, we segment suspicious regions on FDG-PET images manually, and obtained the Z-scores of the regions based on the corresponding voxels that stores the mean and the standard deviations from the normal model. We collected 243 (143 males and 100 females normal cases to construct the normal model. We also extracted 432 abnormal spots from 63 abnormal cases (73 cancer lesions to validate the Z-scores. The Z-scores of 417 out of 432 abnormal spots were higher than 2.0, which statistically indicated the severity of the spots. In conclusions, the Z-scores obtained by our computerized scheme with anatomical standardization of torso region would be useful for visualization and detection of subtle lesions on FDG-PET scan images even when the SUV may not clearly show an abnormality.

  18. [Accuracy of attenuation coefficient obtained by 137Cs single-transmission scanning in PET: comparison with conventional germanium line source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Keiichi; Kitamura, Keishi; Mizuta, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Keiji; Murase, Kenya; Senda, Michio

    2006-02-20

    Transmission scanning can be successfully performed with a Cs-137 single-photon-emitting point source for three-dimensional PET imaging. This method was effective for postinjection transmission scanning because of differences in physical energy. However, scatter contamination in the transmission data lowers measured attenuation coefficients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the influence of object scattering by measuring the attenuation coefficients on the transmission images. We also compared the results with the conventional germanium line source method. Two different types of PET scanner, the SET-3000 G/X (Shimadzu Corp.) and ECAT EXACT HR(+) (Siemens/CTI) , were used. For the transmission scanning, the SET-3000 G/X and ECAT HR(+) were the Cs-137 point source and Ge-68/Ga-68 line source, respectively. With the SET-3000 G/X, we performed transmission measurement at two energy gate settings, the standard 600-800 keV as well as 500-800 keV. The energy gate setting of the ECAT HR(+) was 350-650 keV. The effects of scattering in a uniform phantom with different cross-sectional areas ranging from 201 cm(2) to 314 cm(2) to 628 cm(2) (apposition of the two 20 cm diameter phantoms) and 943 cm(2) (stacking of the three 20 cm diameter phantoms) were acquired without emission activity. First, we evaluated the attenuation coefficients of the two different types of transmission scanning using region of interest (ROI) analysis. In addition, we evaluated the attenuation coefficients with and without segmentation for Cs-137 transmission images using the same analysis. The segmentation method was a histogram-based soft-tissue segmentation process that can also be applied to reconstructed transmission images. In the Cs-137 experiment, the maximum underestimation was 3% without segmentation, which was reduced to less than 1% with segmentation at the center of the largest phantom. In the Ge-68/Ga-68 experiment, the difference in mean attenuation

  19. Accuracy of attenuation coefficient obtained by 137Cs single-transmission scanning in PET. Comparison with conventional germanium line source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Keiichi; Shimizu, Keiji; Senda, Michio; Kitamura, Keishi; Mizuta, Tetsuro; Murase, Kenya

    2006-01-01

    Transmission scanning can be successfully performed with a Cs-137 single-photon-emitting point source for three-dimensional PET imaging. This method was effective for postinjection transmission scanning because of differences in physical energy. However, scatter contamination in the transmission data lowers measured attenuation coefficients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the influence of object scattering by measuring the attenuation coefficients on the transmission images. We also compared the results with the conventional germanium line source method. Two different types of PET scanner, the SET-3000 G/X (Shimadzu Corp.) and ECAT EXACT HR + (Siemens/CTI), were used. For the transmission scanning, the SET-3000 G/X and ECAT HR + were the Cs-137 point source and Ge-68/Ga-68 line source, respectively. With the SET-3000 G/X, we performed transmission measurement at two energy gate settings, the standard 600-800 keV as well as 500-800 keV. The energy gate setting of the ECAT HR 2 + was 350-650 keV. The effects of scattering in a uniform phantom with different cross-sectional areas ranging from 201 cm 2 to 314 cm 2 to 628 cm 2 (apposition of the two 20 cm diameter phantoms) and 943 cm 2 (stacking of the three 20 cm diameter phantoms) were acquired without emission activity. First, we evaluated the attenuation coefficients of the two different types of transmission scanning using region of interest (ROI) analysis. In addition, we evaluated the attenuation coefficients with and without segmentation for Cs-137 transmission images using the same analysis. The segmentation method was a histogram-based soft-tissue segmentation process that can also be applied to reconstructed transmission images. In the Cs-137 experiment, the maximum underestimation was 3% without segmentation, which was reduced to less than 1% with segmentation at the center of the largest phantom. In the Ge-68/Ga-68 experiment, the difference in mean attenuation coefficients

  20. Value of FDG-PET scans of non-demented patients in predicting rates of future cognitive and functional decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torosyan, Nare; Mason, Kelsey; Dahlbom, Magnus; Silverman, Daniel H.S. [David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, Ahmanson Translational Imaging Division, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Collaboration: the Alzheimer' sDisease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2017-08-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in predicting subsequent rates of functional and cognitive decline among subjects considered cognitively normal (CN) or clinically diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Analyses of 276 subjects, 92 CN subjects and 184 with MCI, who were enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, were conducted. Functional decline was assessed using scores on the Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ) obtained over a period of 36 months, while cognitive decline was determined using the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. PET images were analyzed using clinically routine brain quantification software. A dementia prognosis index (DPI), derived from a ratio of uptake values in regions of interest known to be hypometabolic in Alzheimer's disease to regions known to be stable, was generated for each baseline FDG-PET scan. The DPI was correlated with change in scores on the neuropsychological examinations to examine the predictive value of baseline FDG-PET. DPI powerfully predicted rate of functional decline among MCI patients (t = 5.75, p < 1.0E-8) and pooled N + MCI patient groups (t = 7.02, p < 1.0E-11). Rate of cognitive decline on MMSE was also predicted by the DPI among MCI (t = 6.96, p < 1.0E-10) and pooled N + MCI (t = 8.78, p < 5.0E-16). Rate of cognitive decline on ADAS-cog was powerfully predicted by the DPI alone among N (p < 0.001), MCI (t = 6.46, p < 1.0E-9) and for pooled N + MCI (t = 8.85, p = 1.1E-16). These findings suggest that an index, derivable from automated regional analysis of brain PET scans, can be used to help predict rates of functional and cognitive deterioration in the years following baseline PET. (orig.)

  1. Preoperative F-18-FDG PET for the detection of metastatic cervical lymph nodes in recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma patients with negative I-131 whole body scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Byung Hyun; Urn, Sang Moo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Guk Haeng; Lee, Yong Sik; Shim, Youn Sang

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET for the detection of metastatic cervical lymph nodes in recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma patients with negative I-131 scan. All patients had total thyroidectomy and following I-131 ablation therapy. In the follow-up period, FDG-PET showed suspected cervical lymph nodes metastases and neck dissection was performed within 3 months after FDG-PET. It had shown for all patients the negative I-131 scan within 3 months before FDG-PET or negative I-131 scan during the period of cervical lymph nodes metastases suspected on the basis of FDG-PET, CT, or ultrasonography until the latest FDG-PET. Preoperative FDG-PET results were compared with the pathologic findings of lymph nodes specimens of 19 papillary thyroid carcinoma patients. Serum Tg, TSH, and Tg antibody levels at the time of latest I-131 scan were reviewed. The size of lymph node was measured by preoperative CT or ultrasonography. In 45 cervical lymph node groups dissected, 31 lymph node groups revealed metastasis. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for metastasis were 74.2% (23 of 31) and 50.0% (7 of 14), respectively. Except for patients with elevated Tg antibody levels, all patients showed the elevated serum Tg levels than normal limits at the TSH of =30uIU/ml. 8 lesions without suspected metastatic findings on FDG-PET revealed metastasis (false negative), and none of them exceeded 8mm in size (4 to 8mm, median= 6mm). On the other hand, 23 true positive lesions on FDG-PET were variable in size (6 to 17mm, median=9mm). FDG-PET is suitable for the detection of metastatic cervical lymph nodes in patients with recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma. However, false positive or false negative should be considered according to the size of lymph node

  2. PET scan perfusion imaging in the Prader-Willi syndrome: new insights into the psychiatric and social disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantoulan, C.; Payoux, P.; Mantoulan, C.; Diene, G.; Glattard, M.; Molinas, C.; Tauber, M.; Payoux, P.; Sevely, A.; Glattard, M.; Roge, B.; Molinas, C.; Tauber, M.; Zilbovicius, M.; Celsis, P.; Celsis, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a rare multisystem genetic disease, leads to severe disabilities, such as morbid obesity, endocrine dysfunctions, psychiatric disorders, and social disturbances. We explored the whole brain of patients with PWS to detect abnormalities that might explain the behavioral and social disturbances, as well as the psychiatric disorders of these patients. Nine patients with PWS (six males, three females; mean age 16.4 years) underwent a positron emission tomography (PET) scan with H(2)(15)O as a tracer to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The images were compared with those acquired from nine controls (six males, three females; mean age 21.2 years). A morphologic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was also performed in PWS patients, and their cognitive and behavioral skills were assessed with Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children III and the Child Behavior Check List (CBCL). The MRI images showed no evident anatomic abnormalities, whereas PET scans revealed hypo-perfused brain regions in PWS patients compared with controls, particularly in the anterior cingulum and superior temporal regions. We observed a significant relationship (P≤0.05) between rCBF in the hypo-perfused regions and CBCL scores. The functional consequences of these perfusion abnormalities in specific brain regions might explain the behavioral and social problems observed in these individuals. (authors)

  3. Prospective evaluation of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan (FDG-PET/CT) for axillary staging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahide; Noguchi, Akinori; Tani, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    Seventy-two patients from 2005 October to 2007 February with operative breast cancer underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan (FDG-PET/CT) of chest and body, ultrasound scan (US) and enhanced computed tomography scan (CT) followed by sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). The results of PET/CT were compared with histopathological diagnosis of SLNB and ALND. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET/CT for detection of axillary lymph node metastases were 61%, 96% and 88%, respectively. Seven false-negative and two false-positive of PET/CT results were found. In patients with false-negative of PET/CT results there are two skin-invasive breast cancer patients and axillary lymph node metastases were detected in three patients with US, in one with CT and in four with SLNB. In clinical method for diagnosis of axillary lymph node metastases SLNB should be recommended because sensitivity of PET/CT for early breast cancer patients were low and positive diagnosis of axillary lymph node metastases with PET needs more than 1 cm size of lesion. PET/CT is useful for not-early breast cancer patients. To decide the operation of axillary lymph node disection needs total diagnosis of US, CT, SLNB and clinical findings. (author)

  4. Influence of scan duration on the accuracy of {beta}-amyloid PET with florbetaben in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiepolt, Solveig; Barthel, Henryk; Butzke, Daniel; Hesse, Swen; Patt, Marianne; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Pharma AG, Global Clinical Development, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Florbetaben is a {beta}-amyloid-targeted PET tracer with significant potential for augmenting the toolbox in the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In dementia imaging, shortening of scan duration may simplify future clinical use. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the effect of scan duration on diagnostic accuracy. PET scans obtained from 25 AD patients and 25 healthy volunteers (HVs) were analysed. In each subject, scans of three different durations (5, 10 and 20 min; all starting 90 min after injection) were obtained, randomized, and visually assessed by three experts blinded to the subject's identity and group affiliation. Presence/absence of {beta}-amyloid and diagnostic confidence (0-100 %) were scored, and 10 % of the scans were re-read. Further, randomly selected datasets of ten AD patients and ten HVs were quantified using an established VOI-based approach and using a voxel-based approach. The sensitivity and specificity of the blinded read were 80 % and 96 %, respectively, for all scan durations. Diagnostic confidence was high (97 {+-} 6 %, 97 {+-} 6 % and 95 {+-} 8 % for the 20-min, 10-min and 5-min scans, respectively; n.s.), as was interreader agreement (kappa{sub 20} {sub min} = 0.94, kappa{sub 10} {sub min} = 0.94, kappa{sub 5} {sub min} = 0.89; n.s.). Intrareader agreement was highest for the 20-min scan (kappa = 1.00) and lower for the 10-min scan (kappa = 0.71) and 5-min scan (kappa = 0.80; p = 0.002 and 0.003 vs. the 20-min scan). For all scan durations, composite SUVRs (Cohen's d effect size 4.5, 3.9 and 4.8 for the 5-min, 10-min and 20-min scans; p < 0.0001 each) and individual brain volumes affected by {beta}-amyloid (Cohen's d effect size 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 for the 5-min, 10-min and 20-min scans; p < 0.005 each) were significantly higher in AD patients than in HVs. Reduction in scan duration did not relevantly affect the accuracy of florbetaben PET scans in discriminating between AD patients

  5. The Cost-Utility Analysis of PET-Scan in Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari Sari, Ali; Ravaghi, Hamid; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Sarvari, Sima

    2013-01-01

    PET scan is a non-invasive, complex and expensive medical imaging technology that is normally used for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases including lung cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the cost effectiveness of this technology in the diagnosis and treatment of non- small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) in Iran. The main electronic databases including The Cochrane Library and Medline were searched to identify available evidence about the performance and effectiveness of technology. A standard decision tree model with seven strategies was used to perform the economic evaluation. Retrieved studies and expert opinion were used to estimate the cost of each treatment strategy in Iran. The costs were divided into three categories including capital costs (depreciation costs of buildings and equipment), staff costs and other expenses (including cost of consumables, running and maintenance costs). The costs were estimated in both IR-Rials and US-Dollars with an exchange rate of 10.000 IR Rials per one US Dollar according to the exchange rate in 2008. The total annual running cost of a PET scan was about 8850 to 13000 million Rials, (0.9 to 1.3 million US$). The average cost of performing a PET scan varied between 3 and 4.5 million Rials (300 to 450US$). The strategies 3 (mediastinoscopy alone) and 7 (mediastinoscopy after PET scan) were more cost-effective than other strategies, especially when the result of the CT-scan performed before PET scan was negative. The technical performance of PET scan is significantly higher than similar technologies for staging and treatment of NSCLC. In addition, it might slightly improve the treatment process and lead to a small level of increase in the quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained by these patients making it cost-effective for the treatment of NSCLC

  6. The Cost-Utility Analysis of PET-Scan in Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari Sari, Ali; Ravaghi, Hamid; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Sarvari, Sima

    2013-06-01

    PET scan is a non-invasive, complex and expensive medical imaging technology that is normally used for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases including lung cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the cost effectiveness of this technology in the diagnosis and treatment of non- small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) in Iran. The main electronic databases including The Cochrane Library and Medline were searched to identify available evidence about the performance and effectiveness of technology. A standard decision tree model with seven strategies was used to perform the economic evaluation. Retrieved studies and expert opinion were used to estimate the cost of each treatment strategy in Iran. The costs were divided into three categories including capital costs (depreciation costs of buildings and equipment), staff costs and other expenses (including cost of consumables, running and maintenance costs). The costs were estimated in both IR-Rials and US-Dollars with an exchange rate of 10.000 IR Rials per one US Dollar according to the exchange rate in 2008. The total annual running cost of a PET scan was about 8850 to 13000 million Rials, (0.9 to 1.3 million US$). The average cost of performing a PET scan varied between 3 and 4.5 million Rials (300 to 450US$). The strategies 3 (mediastinoscopy alone) and 7 (mediastinoscopy after PET scan) were more cost-effective than other strategies, especially when the result of the CT-scan performed before PET scan was negative. The technical performance of PET scan is significantly higher than similar technologies for staging and treatment of NSCLC. In addition, it might slightly improve the treatment process and lead to a small level of increase in the quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained by these patients making it cost-effective for the treatment of NSCLC.

  7. PET/CT scanning guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Xue-lian, E-mail: duxuelian23800@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: melody23800@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Sheng, Xiu-gui, E-mail: jnsd2000@yahoo.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Qing-shui, E-mail: lqs1966@126.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Wang, Cong, E-mail: jnwc1981@hotmail.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Yu, Hao, E-mail: jnyh2200@sina.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical contribution of positron emission tomography using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose and integrated computer tomography (FDG-PET/CT) guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. Materials and methods: Fifty-eight patients with recurrent ovarian cancer from 2003 to 2008 were retrospectively studied. In these patients, 28 received PET/CT guided IMRT (PET/CT-IMRT group), and 30 received CT guided IMRT (CT-IMRT group). Treatment plans, tumor response, toxicities and survival were evaluated. Results: Changes in GTV delineation were found in 10 (35.7%) patients based on PET-CT information compared with CT data, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the metastasis tumor. PET/CT guided IMRT improved tumor response compared to CT-IMRT group (CR: 64.3% vs. 46.7%, P = 0.021; PR: 25.0% vs. 13.3%, P = 0.036). The 3-year overall survival was significantly higher in the PET-CT/IMRT group than control (34.1% vs. 13.2%, P = 0.014). Conclusions: PET/CT guided IMRT in recurrent ovarian cancer patients improved the delineation of GTV and reduce the likelihood of geographic misses and therefore improve the clinical outcome.

  8. [Usefulness of (18)FDG PET-CT scan as a diagnostic tool of fever of unknown origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Acevedo-Báñez, Irene; Martínez-Castillo, Rubén; García-Gutiérrez, Manuel; Tirado-Hospital, Juan Luis; Borrego-Dorado, Isabel

    2015-07-20

    Classic fever of unknown origin (FUO) is defined as the presence of fever greater than 38.3°C of at least 3 weeks with an uncertain diagnosis. Identification of the etiology is crucial in guiding further diagnostic procedures and subsequent patient management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) in the diagnostic orientation of FUO. An observational retrospective study was performed, including 30 consecutive patients who had been studied between March 2010 and September 2013. Twenty-six out of 30 patients (86.67%) had a definitive diagnosis after pathologic confirmation in 15 cases, microbiological findings in one patient and clinical and radiological follow-up in 10 patients (mean: 16.38 months). Among the positive scans, malignancy (n=10), inflammatory (n=8), infectious (n=4) and miscellaneous causes (n=1) were identified. (18)F-FDG PET/CT had a diagnostic accuracy of 90.00%, sensitivity of 88.46% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 76-101), specificity of 100.00% (95% CI 100-100), positive predictive values of 100.00% (95% CI100-100) and negative predictive value of 57.14% (95% CI 20-91). (18)F-FDG PET/CT provided useful for the etiologic diagnosis of FUO, with high sensitivity and specificity. (18)F-FDG PET/CT has an incremental morphological and functional value, especially indicating the best biopsy site. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Interim FDG-PET Scan in Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Hopes and Caveats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. André

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available FDG-PET has recently emerged as an important tool for the management of Hodgkins lymphoma. Although its use for initial staging and response evaluation at the end of treatment is well established, the place of interim PET for response assessment and subsequent treatment tailoring is still quite controversial. The use of interim PET after a few cycles of chemotherapy may allow treatment reduction for good responders, leading to lesser treatment toxicities as well as early treatment adaptation for bad responders with a potential higher chance for cure. Interpretation of interim PET is a rapidly moving field. Actually, visual interpretation is preferred over quantitative interpretation in this situation. The notion of minimal residual uptake emerged for faint persisting FDG uptake, but has evolved during the recent years. Guidelines using mediastinum and liver as references have been proposed at the expert meeting in Deauville 2009. Actually, several trials are ongoing both for localised and advanced disease to evaluate the FDG-PET potential for early treatment monitoring and tailoring. Until the results of these prospective randomized trials become available, treatment changes according to the interim PET results should remain inappropriate and limited to well-conducted clinical trials.

  10. Role of FDG-PET scan in the management of pediatric mature B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. CCHE experience

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel Rahman, Hany; Sedky, Mohamed; Hamoda, Asmaa; Raafat, Tarek; Youssef, Ayda; Omar, Walid; Hassanein, Omneya; Moussa, Emad

    2016-01-01

    Aim of work: To evaluate the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), and predictive values (PV) of PET scan during management of pediatric mature B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) in comparison with conventional computed tomography (CT) scan. Patients and methods: A retrospective study enrolled on pediatric NHL patients at Children Cancer Hospital Egypt (CCHE) during the period from July 2007 to the end of June 2013. Results: For 115 pediatric patients diagnosed with mature B cell NHL, 15...

  11. Optimization of input parameters of supra-threshold stochastic resonance image processing algorithm for the detection of abdomino-pelvic tumors on PET/CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Saroha, Kartik; Patel, C.D.; Bal, C.S.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Administration of diuretics increases the urine output to clear radioactive urine from kidneys and bladder. Hence post-diuretic pelvic PET/CT scan enhances the probability of detection of abdomino-pelvic tumor. However, it causes discomfort in patients and has some side effects also. Application of supra threshold stochastic resonance (SSR) image processing algorithm on Pre-diuretic PET/CT scan may also increase the probability of detection of these tumors. Amount of noise and threshold are two variable parameters that effect the final image quality. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of these two variable parameters on the detection of abdomen-pelvic tumor

  12. Semiautomated segmentation of head and neck cancers in 18F-FDG PET scans: A just-enough-interaction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichel, Reinhard R; Van Tol, Markus; Ulrich, Ethan J; Bauer, Christian; Chang, Tangel; Plichta, Kristin A; Smith, Brian J; Sunderland, John J; Graham, Michael M; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop, validate, and compare a highly computer-aided method for the segmentation of hot lesions in head and neck 18F-FDG PET scans. A semiautomated segmentation method was developed, which transforms the segmentation problem into a graph-based optimization problem. For this purpose, a graph structure around a user-provided approximate lesion centerpoint is constructed and a suitable cost function is derived based on local image statistics. To handle frequently occurring situations that are ambiguous (e.g., lesions adjacent to each other versus lesion with inhomogeneous uptake), several segmentation modes are introduced that adapt the behavior of the base algorithm accordingly. In addition, the authors present approaches for the efficient interactive local and global refinement of initial segmentations that are based on the "just-enough-interaction" principle. For method validation, 60 PET/CT scans from 59 different subjects with 230 head and neck lesions were utilized. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A detailed comparison with the current clinically relevant standard manual segmentation approach was performed based on 2760 segmentations produced by three experts. Segmentation accuracy measured by the Dice coefficient of the proposed semiautomated and standard manual segmentation approach was 0.766 and 0.764, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.2145). However, the intra- and interoperator standard deviations were significantly lower for the semiautomated method. In addition, the proposed method was found to be significantly faster and resulted in significantly higher intra- and interoperator segmentation agreement when compared to the manual segmentation approach. Lack of consistency in tumor definition is a critical barrier for radiation treatment targeting as well as for response assessment in clinical trials and in clinical oncology decision-making. The properties

  13. Semiautomated segmentation of head and neck cancers in 18F-FDG PET scans: A just-enough-interaction approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beichel, Reinhard R., E-mail: reinhard-beichel@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Van Tol, Markus; Ulrich, Ethan J.; Bauer, Christian [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Chang, Tangel; Plichta, Kristin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Sunderland, John J.; Graham, Michael M. [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Sonka, Milan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop, validate, and compare a highly computer-aided method for the segmentation of hot lesions in head and neck 18F-FDG PET scans. Methods: A semiautomated segmentation method was developed, which transforms the segmentation problem into a graph-based optimization problem. For this purpose, a graph structure around a user-provided approximate lesion centerpoint is constructed and a suitable cost function is derived based on local image statistics. To handle frequently occurring situations that are ambiguous (e.g., lesions adjacent to each other versus lesion with inhomogeneous uptake), several segmentation modes are introduced that adapt the behavior of the base algorithm accordingly. In addition, the authors present approaches for the efficient interactive local and global refinement of initial segmentations that are based on the “just-enough-interaction” principle. For method validation, 60 PET/CT scans from 59 different subjects with 230 head and neck lesions were utilized. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A detailed comparison with the current clinically relevant standard manual segmentation approach was performed based on 2760 segmentations produced by three experts. Results: Segmentation accuracy measured by the Dice coefficient of the proposed semiautomated and standard manual segmentation approach was 0.766 and 0.764, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.2145). However, the intra- and interoperator standard deviations were significantly lower for the semiautomated method. In addition, the proposed method was found to be significantly faster and resulted in significantly higher intra- and interoperator segmentation agreement when compared to the manual segmentation approach. Conclusions: Lack of consistency in tumor definition is a critical barrier for radiation treatment targeting as well as for response assessment in clinical trials and in

  14. Bone marrow trephine biopsy in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Comparison with PET-CT scan in 65 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, Sunil; Cabello-García, Dolores; Allende-Riera, Ana; Cárdenas-Negro, Carlos; Raya, José María; Hernández-Garcia, Miguel T

    2018-02-09

    To compare bone marrow biopsy (BMB) and PET/CT in detecting bone marrow involvement in Hodgkin's lymphoma MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 65 patients with both tests in the initial staging or in relapse with special attention to the PET/CT uptake pattern. In 3 patients (4.6%), the BMB showed bone marrow involvement with the PET/CT being positive in them all: 2 with diffuse+multifocal pattern and one diffuse only. In 11 additional patients (total 14/65, 21%), bone marrow involvement was diagnosed by PET/CT because bone marrow uptake was above hepatic one. The pattern was focal only in 2 cases, multifocal in 5, diffuse in 3 and diffuse+multifocal in one. In these last 4 cases the BMB showed an unspecific myelopathy. PET/CT detects all cases with BMB affected and many that escape to biopsy, however when the uptake pattern is diffuse it could be by involvement or reactive hyperplasia and in those cases the BMB should be done. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. F.D.G.-PET scanning in managing patients with lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodet-Milin, C.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.; Salaun, P.Y.; Crespin, C.; Vuillez, J.P.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.

    2009-01-01

    The place of positron emission tomography (PET) in the evaluation of diffuse at big cells B lymphomas and hodgkin lymphomas is validated. The clinical impact of the PET registered in end of therapy development is indisputable. recommendations must be followed for images interpretation. The PET is strongly recommended during the first evaluation of the disease because it is a reference examination that makes easy the interpretation at the end of the therapy and allows to evaluate the extension of the disease with a sensitivity and a specificity superior to the computerized tomography. the prognosis value of intermediate evaluations appears certain in the diffuse at big cells B lymphomas and the hodgkin lymphomas but the impact of an early therapy change induced by PET is still to determine. The criteria of interpretation of early evaluations are to standardize. for the other types of lymphomas, the PET can have an interest to confirm the the localized stages, especially for the follicular lymphomas and direct the biopsy for a patient ill of a low range lymphoma suspect of aggressive change. (N.C.)

  16. Recurrent surgical site infection of the spine diagnosed by dual 18F-NaF-bone PET/CT with early-phase scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Jeong Won; Jeon, Min Hyok; Lee, Sang Mi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old man who showed recurrently elevated level of the serum inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) after spinal operation. He underwent 18 F-flurodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and dual 18 F-sodium-fluoride ( 18 F-NaF) PET/CT with an additional early-phase scan to find a hidden inflammation focus. Only mildly increased 18 F-FDG was found at the surgical site of T11 spine on 18 F-FDG PET/CT. In contrast, dual 18 F-NaF bone PET/CT with early-phase scan demonstrated focal active inflammation at the surgical site of T11 spine. After a revision operation of the T11 spine, serum CRP level decreased to the normal range without any symptom or sign of inflammation. Inflammatory focus in the surgical site of the spine can be detected with using dual 18 F-NaF bone PET/CT scan with early-phase scan. (orig.)

  17. Count-rate analysis from clinical scans in PET with LSO detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonutti, F.; Cattaruzzi, E.; Cragnolini, E.; Floreani, M.; Foti, C.; Malisan, M. R.; Moretti, E.; Geatti, O.; Padovani, R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of optimising the acquisition parameters in positron emission tomography is to improve the quality of the diagnostic images. Optimisation can be done by maximising the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) that in turn depends on the coincidence rate. For each bed position the scanner records coincidences and singles rates. For each patient, the true, random and scattered coincidences as functions of the single count rate(s) are determined by fitting the NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) 70 cm phantom count rate curves to measured clinical points. This enables analytical calculation of the personalised PNECR [pseudo NECR(s)] curve, linked to the NECR curve. For central bed positions, missing activity of ∼70% is estimated to get maximum PNECR (PNECR max ), but the improvement in terms of signal-to-noise ratio would be ∼15%. The correlation between patient weight and PNECR max is also estimated to determine the optimal scan duration of a single bed position as a function of patient weight at the same PNEC. Normalising the counts at PNECR max for the 70 kg patient, the bed duration for a 90 kg patient should be 230 s, which is ∼30% longer. Although the analysis indicates that the fast scanner electronics allow using higher administered activities, this would involve poor improvement in terms of NECR. Instead, attending to higher bed duration for heavier patients may be more useful. (authors)

  18. INTEGRATED PET-CT SCAN IN THE STAGING OF NON SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Ngurah Agus Surya Negara S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Lung cancer is a common disease and is a leading cause of death in many countries. The most kind of lung cancer was Non Small Cell Lung Cancer. The management of lung cancer is directed by an optimal staging of the tumour. On 1998, integrated positron emission tomography (PET-computed tomography (CT was published. PET-CT is an anatomo-metabolic imaging modality that has recently been introduced to clinical practice and combines two different techniques: CT, which provides very detailed anatomic information; and PET, which provides metabolic information. One of the advantages of PET/CT is the improved image interpretation. There wasbetter results for PET/CT in the staging of non small cell lung cancer in comparison with CT nor PET alone. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  19. Radiopharmaceutical scanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This invention is directed to dispersions useful in preparing radiopharmaceutical scanning agents, to technetium labelled dispersions, to methods for preparing such dispersions and to their use as scanning agents

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special ... is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine ...

  1. Nuclear Heart Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Nuclear Heart Scan Nuclear Heart Scan Also known as Nuclear Stress Test , ... Learn More Connect With Us Contact Us Directly Policies Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility ...

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake ... you otherwise, you may resume your normal activities after your nuclear medicine scan. If any special instructions ...

  3. RBC nuclear scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  4. Radiotherapy may induce enhanced uptake on F-18-fluoroestradiol PET scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, C. M.; Veen, van der S. J.; Glaudemans, A. W. J. M.; Schroder, C. P.; de Vries, E. F. J.; Hospers, G. A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Whole body imaging of 18F-fluoroestradiol (FES) uptake combined with positron emission tomography (PET) has been applied for diagnosis and prediction of therapy response in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer patients. A maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 1.5 has

  5. Peritoneal Super Scan on 18F - FDG PET-CT in a Patient of Burkitt's Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shambo Guha; Parida, Girish Kumar; Tripathy, Sarthak; Singhal, Abhinav; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2017-01-01

    Peritoneal lymphomatosis is seen less frequently, but when seen, it is mostly associated with aggressive variants of malignancies. FDG uptake has been reported in peritoneal lymphomatosis both in DLBCL and Burkitt's lymphoma. We report a case of Burkitt's lymphoma with involvement of entire peritoneum, which looks like a “peritoneal super scan” on FDG PET-CT. PMID:28533652

  6. Implementation of true continuous bed motion in 2-D and 3-D whole-body PET scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlbom, M.; Reed, J.; Young, J.

    2001-08-01

    True continuous axial bed motion has been implemented on a high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for use in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) acquisition modes. This has been accomplished by modifications in the bed motion controller firmware and by acquiring data in list mode. The new bed controller firmware was shown to provide an accurate and constant bed speed down to 0.25 mm/s with a moderate patient weight load. The constant bed motion eliminates previously reported dead-time due to bed positioning when using small discrete bed steps. The continuous bed motion was tested on uniform phantoms, in 2-D and 3-D. As a result of the continuous axial motion, a uniform axial sensitivity is achieved. This was also reflected in the reconstructed images, which showed an improvement in axial image uniformity (1.4% for continuous sampling, 5.0% for discrete) as well as an improvement in %SD uniformity in comparison to conventional step-and-shoot acquisitions. The use of the continuous axial motion also provide slight improvements in 2-D emission and transmission scanning, resulting in an overall improved image quality in whole-body PET.

  7. Scanning gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engdahl, L.W.; Batter, J.F. Jr.; Stout, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning system for a gamma camera providing for the overlapping of adjacent scan paths is described. A collimator mask having tapered edges provides for a graduated reduction in intensity of radiation received by a detector thereof, the reduction in intensity being graduated in a direction normal to the scanning path to provide a blending of images of adjacent scan paths. 31 claims, 15 figures

  8. [18F]FDG-PET scan in patients with fasting hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BELOHLAVEK, Otakar; JARUSKOVA, Monika

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that a non-fasting state reduces [18F]FDG-PET quality, but the significance of higher levels of fasting blood glucose has aroused some doubts over time. The aim of this work was to provide further evidence to clarify this issue and its impact on the handling of hyper glycemic patients in daily routine. Muscle and liver standardized uptake values (SUV) and their ratio, tumor SUV and the frequency of positive PET findings were retrospectively analyzed in 116 hyper glycemic (HG) patients (>11 mmol/L), in 116 patients with slightly elevated glycemia (SEG) (5.6-7.0 mmol/L) and in 116 normoglycemic (NG) patients (4.7 mmol/L). No significant difference was found in the muscle to liver ratio, in muscle SUV and in the frequency of positive PET findings among HG, SEG and NG patients. HG patients exhibited ~10% higher liver SUV in comparison to SEG and NG patients; a positive correlation (r=0.2849) was found between liver SUV and blood glucose levels. Significantly higher tumor SUV was present in SEG patients. We did not confirm that hyperglycemia in a fasting state negatively influences the diagnostic quality of [18F]FDG-PET. The positive correlation between liver SUV and blood glucose levels is clinically negligible and might be explained by increased fasting hepatic gluconeogenesis in diabetics. Our data encourage the performance of [18F]FDG-PET investigations under fasting conditions, regardless of the mild to medium elevation of fasting blood glucose level.

  9. An open tool for input function estimation and quantification of dynamic PET FDG brain scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrán, Martín; Martínez, Natalia; Carbajal, Guillermo; Fernández, Alicia; Gómez, Álvaro

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) analysis of clinical studies is mostly restricted to qualitative evaluation. Quantitative analysis of PET studies is highly desirable to be able to compute an objective measurement of the process of interest in order to evaluate treatment response and/or compare patient data. But implementation of quantitative analysis generally requires the determination of the input function: the arterial blood or plasma activity which indicates how much tracer is available for uptake in the brain. The purpose of our work was to share with the community an open software tool that can assist in the estimation of this input function, and the derivation of a quantitative map from the dynamic PET study. Arterial blood sampling during the PET study is the gold standard method to get the input function, but is uncomfortable and risky for the patient so it is rarely used in routine studies. To overcome the lack of a direct input function, different alternatives have been devised and are available in the literature. These alternatives derive the input function from the PET image itself (image-derived input function) or from data gathered from previous similar studies (population-based input function). In this article, we present ongoing work that includes the development of a software tool that integrates several methods with novel strategies for the segmentation of blood pools and parameter estimation. The tool is available as an extension to the 3D Slicer software. Tests on phantoms were conducted in order to validate the implemented methods. We evaluated the segmentation algorithms over a range of acquisition conditions and vasculature size. Input function estimation algorithms were evaluated against ground truth of the phantoms, as well as on their impact over the final quantification map. End-to-end use of the tool yields quantification maps with [Formula: see text] relative error in the estimated influx versus ground truth on phantoms. The main

  10. Radionuclide brain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Dayem, H.

    1992-01-01

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ''allied advances'' with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  11. Radionuclide brain scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Dayem, H

    1993-12-31

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ``allied advances`` with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  12. F18-FDG PET/CT Scanning in Angiosarcoma: Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel TOKMAK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Angiosarcomas are uncommon tumors and constitute less than 5% of all soft tissue sarcomas. They are aggressive tumors with poor prognosis, therefore, it is quite important to determine disease extension and detect local recurrence and/or distant metastases for appropriate therapy management. In this paper, we aimed to demonstrate the potential role of 1F18-FDG PET/CT imaging by reporting two cases with angiosarcoma (MIRT 2011;20:63-66

  13. The role of F18-FDG PET scans in predicting micropapillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, E. H.; Cho, H. J.; Kim, T. S.; Kang, W. J.; Yun, M. J.; Lee, J. D.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate F18-FDG PET in predicting micropapillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness. 41 patients (38 female, mean age 50y) who had PET before total thyroidectomy between 2002.1∼2007.8 were reviewed. Patients with thyroiditis and multiple nodules were excluded. Thyroid nodules were visually analyzed into groups with increased and no FDG uptake. Peak SUV ratio of liver-to-nodule (pSUV ratio) was taken. pSUV ratio was correlated with nodule size and micropapillary cancer aggressiveness. Perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis was used as an indicator of micropapillary cancer aggressiveness 20 patients had 0.89 and nodules with increased FDG uptake, with an average pSUV ratio of 1.67 0.15. 21 patients had nodules that were not visible, average size of 0.66 cm 0.24. FDG uptake and nodule size correlation was with an average size of 0.52 cm significant (p=0.051). The nodules were divided into two groups using a cut-off value of pSUV ratio of 0.9. 19 patients had nodules with a pSUV ratio of 0.9 or higher, and 15 of the 19 patients had perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis. 22 patients had nodules with pSUV ratio lower than 0.9 and 7 of these patients had perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis. Patients with higher pSUV ratio showed more perithyroid extension or LN metastasis than those with lower pSUV ratio (p=0.01). A total of 8 patients had LN metastasis, but none were visualized on PET. Higher FDG uptake seems to be significantly correlated with tumor aggressiveness in micropapillary thyroid carcinomas. But FDG uptakes in primary tumors were also correlated with tumor size. In other words, larger nodules tend to show aggressive behavior in micropapillary thyroid carcinomas and FDG it self may not be an independent factor for tumor aggressiveness. Also, PET shows an extremely poor sensitivity for the detection of LN metastasis. Therefore, PET may not have any role in the evaluation of patients with micropapillary thyroid carcinomas

  14. The role of F18-FDG PET scans in predicting micropapillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, E. H.; Cho, H. J.; Kim, T. S.; Kang, W. J.; Yun, M. J.; Lee, J. D. [Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The purpose is to evaluate F18-FDG PET in predicting micropapillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness. 41 patients (38 female, mean age 50y) who had PET before total thyroidectomy between 2002.1{approx}2007.8 were reviewed. Patients with thyroiditis and multiple nodules were excluded. Thyroid nodules were visually analyzed into groups with increased and no FDG uptake. Peak SUV ratio of liver-to-nodule (pSUV ratio) was taken. pSUV ratio was correlated with nodule size and micropapillary cancer aggressiveness. Perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis was used as an indicator of micropapillary cancer aggressiveness 20 patients had 0.89 and nodules with increased FDG uptake, with an average pSUV ratio of 1.67 0.15. 21 patients had nodules that were not visible, average size of 0.66 cm 0.24. FDG uptake and nodule size correlation was with an average size of 0.52 cm significant (p=0.051). The nodules were divided into two groups using a cut-off value of pSUV ratio of 0.9. 19 patients had nodules with a pSUV ratio of 0.9 or higher, and 15 of the 19 patients had perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis. 22 patients had nodules with pSUV ratio lower than 0.9 and 7 of these patients had perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis. Patients with higher pSUV ratio showed more perithyroid extension or LN metastasis than those with lower pSUV ratio (p=0.01). A total of 8 patients had LN metastasis, but none were visualized on PET. Higher FDG uptake seems to be significantly correlated with tumor aggressiveness in micropapillary thyroid carcinomas. But FDG uptakes in primary tumors were also correlated with tumor size. In other words, larger nodules tend to show aggressive behavior in micropapillary thyroid carcinomas and FDG it self may not be an independent factor for tumor aggressiveness. Also, PET shows an extremely poor sensitivity for the detection of LN metastasis. Therefore, PET may not have any role in the evaluation of patients with micropapillary thyroid carcinomas.

  15. The precision of textural analysis in {sup 18}F-FDG-PET scans of oesophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doumou, Georgia; Siddique, Musib [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Tsoumpas, Charalampos [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, The Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Cook, Gary J. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, The PET Centre, London (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, The Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Clinical PET Centre, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Kings College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Measuring tumour heterogeneity by textural analysis in {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) provides predictive and prognostic information but technical aspects of image processing can influence parameter measurements. We therefore tested effects of image smoothing, segmentation and quantisation on the precision of heterogeneity measurements. Sixty-four {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images of oesophageal cancer were processed using different Gaussian smoothing levels (2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 mm), maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub max}) segmentation thresholds (45 %, 50 %, 55 %, 60 %) and quantisation (8, 16, 32, 64, 128 bin widths). Heterogeneity parameters included grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), grey-level run length matrix (GLRL), neighbourhood grey-tone difference matrix (NGTDM), grey-level size zone matrix (GLSZM) and fractal analysis methods. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for the three processing variables was calculated for each heterogeneity parameter. Most parameters showed poor agreement between different bin widths (CCC median 0.08, range 0.004-0.99). Segmentation and smoothing showed smaller effects on precision (segmentation: CCC median 0.82, range 0.33-0.97; smoothing: CCC median 0.99, range 0.58-0.99). Smoothing and segmentation have only a small effect on the precision of heterogeneity measurements in {sup 18}F-FDG PET data. However, quantisation often has larger effects, highlighting a need for further evaluation and standardisation of parameters for multicentre studies. (orig.)

  16. Objective functions for tomographic reconstruction from randoms-precorrected PET scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, M.; Fessler, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    In PET, usually the data are precorrected for accidental coincidence (AC) events by real-time subtraction of the delayed window coincidences. Randoms subtraction compensates in mean for AC events but destroys the Poisson statistics. Furthermore, for transmission tomography the weighted least-squares (WLS) method leads to systematic biases, especially at low count rates. We propose a new open-quotes shiftedclose quotes Poisson (SP) model for precorrected PET data, which properly matches the first and second order moments of the measurement statistics. Using simulations and analytic approximations, we show that estimators based on the open-quotes ordinaryclose quotes Poisson (OP) model for the precorrected data lead to higher standard deviations than the proposed method. Moreover, if one zero-thresholds the data before applying the maximization algorithm, the OP model results in systematic bias. It is shown that the proposed SP model leads to penalized-likelihood estimates free of systematic bias, even for zero-thresholded data. The proposed SP model does not increase the computation requirements compared to OP model and it is robust to errors in the estimates of the AC event rates

  17. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT for restaging prostate cancer. Results from 4,426 scans in a single-centre patient series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziani, Tiziano; Ceci, Francesco; Polverari, Giulia; Lima, Giacomo Maria; Lodi, Filippo; Fanti, Stefano [S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Castellucci, Paolo [S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, UO Medicina Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe [S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Department of Radiotherapy, Bologna (Italy); Ardizzoni, Andrea [S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Department of Oncology, Bologna (Italy); Schiavina, Riccardo [S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Department of Urology, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT as a diagnostic tool for restaging prostate cancer (PCa), in a large, homogeneous and clinically relevant population of patients with biochemical recurrence (BCR) of PCa after primary therapy. The secondary aim was to assess the best timing for performing {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT during BCR. We retrospectively analysed 9,632 {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT scans performed in our institution for restaging PCa from January 2007 to June 2015. The inclusion criteria were: (1) proven PCa radically treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) or with primary external beam radiotherapy (EBRT); (2) PSA serum values available; (3) proven BCR (PSA >0.2 ng/mL after RP or PSA >2 ng/mL above the nadir after primary EBRT with rising PSA levels). Finally, 3,203 patients with recurrent PCa matching all the inclusion criteria were retrospectively enrolled and 4,426 scans were analysed. Overall, 52.8 % of the {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT scans (2,337/4,426) and 54.8 % of the patients (1,755/3,203) were positive. In 29.4 % of the scans, at least one distant finding was observed. The mean and median PSA values were, respectively, 4.9 and 2.1 ng/mL at the time of the scan (range 0.2 - 50 ng/mL). In our series, 995 scans were performed in patients with PSA levels between 1 and 2 ng/mL. In this subpopulation the positivity rate in the 995 scans was 44.7 %, with an incidence of distant findings of 19.2 % and an incidence of oligometastatic disease (one to three lesions) of 37.7 %. The absolute PSA value at the time of the scan and ongoing androgen deprivation therapy were associated with an increased probability of a positive {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT scan (p < 0.0001). In the ROC analysis, a PSA value of 1.16 ng/mL was the optimal cut-off value. In patients with a PSA value <1.16 ng/mL, 26.8 % of 1,426 {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT scans were positive, with oligometastatic disease in 84.7 % of positive scans. In a large cohort of patients, the feasibility of {sup 11}C

  18. Multiphase CT scanning and different intravenous contrast media concentrations in combined F-18-FDG PET/CT: Effect on quantitative and clinical assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebiere, Marilou, E-mail: Marilou.Rebiere@rwth-aachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Verburg, Frederik A., E-mail: fverburg@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, P. Debeylaan 25, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Palmowski, Moritz, E-mail: mpalmowski@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Krohn, Thomas, E-mail: tkrohn@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus, E-mail: hubertus.pietsch@bayer.com [Contrast Media Research, Bayer Pharma AG, Muellerstr. 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Kuhl, Christiane K., E-mail: ckuhl@ukaachen.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M., E-mail: fmottaghy@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, P. Debeylaan 25, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Behrendt, Florian F., E-mail: fbehrendt@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of multiphase CT scanning and different intravenous contrast media on contrast enhancement, attenuation correction and image quality in combined PET/CT. Material and methods: 140 patients were prospectively enrolled for F-18-FDG-PET/CT including a low-dose unenhanced, arterial and venous contrast enhanced CT. The first (second) 70 patients, received contrast medium with 370 (300) mg iodine/ml. The iodine delivery rate (1.3 mg/s) and total iodine load (44.4 g) were identical for both groups. Contrast enhancement and maximum and mean standardized FDG uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) were determined for the un-enhanced, arterial and venous PET/CT at multiple anatomic sites and PET reconstructions were visually evaluated. Results: Arterial contrast enhancement was significantly higher for the 300 mg/ml contrast medium compared to 370 mg I/ml at all anatomic sites. Venous enhancement was not different between the two contrast media. SUVmean and SUVmax were significantly higher for the contrast enhanced compared to the non-enhanced PET/CT at all anatomic sites (all P < 0.001). Tracer uptake was significantly higher in the arterial than in the venous PET/CT in the arteries using both contrast media (all P < 0.001). No differences in tracer uptake were found between the contrast media (all P > 0.05). Visual assessment revealed no relevant differences between the different PET reconstructions. Conclusions: There is no relevant qualitative influence on the PET scan from the use of different intravenous contrast media in its various phases in combined multiphase PET/CT. For quantitative analysis of tracer uptake it is required to use an identical PET/CT protocol.

  19. Pyelo-cystic Reflux in F-18 FDG PET Scan Due to Ureteral Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyhan, Mehmet [Baskent Univ., Adana (Turkmenistan)

    2013-09-15

    A 72-year-old woman with a history of cervical cancer was treated with brachytherapy and chemotherapy. Combined F-18 FDG PET/CT performed for restaging demonstrated increased FDG uptake in a hypodense cystic lesion at the posterior part of the right renal cortex and a hypermetabolic soft tissue mass at the right parailiac region suggestive of a metastatic lymph node causing ureteral obstruction. There had been no FDG uptake in the cystic lesion on the FDG PET/CT study performed 1 year before. These findings suggest that the increased FDG uptake in the cystic lesion was caused by pyelocystic reflux due to ureteral obstruction secondary to parailiac lymph node metastasis (Figs. 1 and 2). Several renal lesions may have increased metabolism, such as renal cell carcinoma, lymphoma, oncocytoma, adult Wilms' tumor, angiomyolipoma, metastatic lesions, xanthogranulo-matous pyelonephritis and infected cyst. Most of these lesions are solid. Some infected renal cysts may be FDG avid, but in this situation increased FDG uptake is observed on the wall of the cyst. In our case, FDG uptake was seen in the entire cystic lesion. The patient had no symptoms or laboratory findings related to infection. Cysts are the most common space-occupying lesions of the kidney. The vast majority of these are simple cysts that are usually unilateral and solitary. Simple cysts are asymptomatic, except when complications exist such as hemorrhage, infection or rupture. There have been a few reports on spontaneous communications between renal cysts and the pyelocaliceal system, in most cases involving ruptures of the cysts into the pyelocaliceal system due to increased intracystic pressure caused by bleeding or infection of the cyst. In the present case, the cause of the connection between the cystic cavity and the pyelocaliceal system is the increased pressure in the renal pelvic cavity due to the ureteral obstruction secondary to parailiac lymph node metastasis.

  20. Unusual soft tissue uptake of F-18 sodium fluoride in three patients undergoing F-18 NaF PET/CT bone scans for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, Andrew S.; Howard, Brandon A. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Three males aged 71 to 80 years with known stage IV metastatic prostate cancer underwent F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) PET/CT to assess osseous metastatic disease burden and stability. In addition to F-18 NaF avid known osseous metastases, each patient also exhibited increased F-18 NaF activity in soft tissues. The first patient exhibited multiple F-18 NaF avid enlarged retroperitoneal and pelvic lymph nodes on consecutive PET/CT scans. The second patient demonstrated an F-18 NaF avid thyroid nodule on consecutive PET/CT scans. The third patient exhibited increased F-18 NaF activity in a hepatic metastasis.

  1. Selective Nodal Irradiation on Basis of 18FDG-PET Scans in Limited-Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loon, Judith van; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Wanders, Rinus; Boersma, Liesbeth; Simons, Jean; Oellers, Michel; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Hochstenbag, Monique; Bootsma, Gerben; Geraedts, Wiel; Pitz, Cordula; Teule, Jaap; Rhami, Ali; Thimister, Willy; Snoep, Gabriel; Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of selective nodal irradiation on basis of 18 F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans in patients with limited-disease small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) on isolated nodal failure. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was performed of 60 patients with LD-SCLC. Radiotherapy was given to a dose of 45 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy, concurrent with carboplatin and etoposide chemotherapy. Only the primary tumor and the mediastinal lymph nodes involved on the pretreatment PET scan were irradiated. A chest computed tomography (CT) scan was performed 3 months after radiotherapy completion and every 6 months thereafter. Results: A difference was seen in the involved nodal stations between the pretreatment 18 F-deoxyglucose PET scans and computed tomography scans in 30% of patients (95% confidence interval, 20-43%). Of the 60 patients, 39 (65%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 52-76%) developed a recurrence; 2 patients (3%, 95% CI, 1-11%) experienced isolated regional failure. The median actuarial overall survival was 19 months (95% CI, 17-21). The median actuarial progression-free survival was 14 months (95% CI, 12-16). 12% (95% CI, 6-22%) of patients experienced acute Grade 3 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) esophagitis. Conclusion: PET-based selective nodal irradiation for LD-SCLC resulted in a low rate of isolated nodal failures (3%), with a low percentage of acute esophagitis. These findings are in contrast to those from our prospective study of CT-based selective nodal irradiation, which resulted in an unexpectedly high percentage of isolated nodal failures (11%). Because of the low rate of isolated nodal failures and toxicity, we believe that our data support the use of PET-based SNI for LD-SCLC.

  2. An evaluation of the predictive value of mid-treatment 18F-FDG-PET/CT scans in pediatric lymphomas and undefined criteria of abnormality in quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongyun J; Halkar, Raghuveer; Alavi, Abass; Goris, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate quantitative mid-treatment fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT scans in predicting the quantitative result of the end of treatment 18F-FDG PET/CT scan. With approval of Emory's Institutional Review Board, data were extracted from 273 existing 18F-FDG PET/CT scans of 143 pediatric patients performed for evaluation of lymphoma. The inclusion criteria were the availability of an initial staging scan (D0) and a mid-treatment scan after 1 to 3 cycles of chemotherapy (D1) and a post-treatment scan (D2). Absolute and relative changed of D1 compared to D0 were measured and their values in predicting D3 values were determined. Analysis was performed on a lesion basis (N=78) in 18 patients with an average of 4.3 lesions per patients. Results showed that the predictive value depended on the value selected as significant for the predictors (D1 SUV and D1 %SUV), and on the limit between negative and positive selected for the predicted value D2 SUV. If the maximum SUV3.0, the positive predictive value of D1>4 was 100%. In that way outcome was predictable with absolute certainty in as many as 71% of the lesions with a single limit for D1 and D2. In conclusion, in this limited retrospective study the positive predictive value of the mid-treatment scan, was high for the post-treatment result for patient and lesion response seen on D2.

  3. Rapid computation of single PET scan rest-stress myocardial blood flow parametric images by table look up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guehl, Nicolas J; Normandin, Marc D; Wooten, Dustin W; Rozen, Guy; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Shoup, Timothy M; Woo, Jonghye; Ptaszek, Leon M; Fakhri, Georges El; Alpert, Nathaniel M

    2017-09-01

    We have recently reported a method for measuring rest-stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) using a single, relatively short, PET scan session. The method requires two IV tracer injections, one to initiate rest imaging and one at peak stress. We previously validated absolute flow quantitation in ml/min/cc for standard bull's eye, segmental analysis. In this work, we extend the method for fast computation of rest-stress MBF parametric images. We provide an analytic solution to the single-scan rest-stress flow model which is then solved using a two-dimensional table lookup method (LM). Simulations were performed to compare the accuracy and precision of the lookup method with the original nonlinear method (NLM). Then the method was applied to 16 single scan rest/stress measurements made in 12 pigs: seven studied after infarction of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) territory, and nine imaged in the native state. Parametric maps of rest and stress MBF as well as maps of left (f LV ) and right (f RV ) ventricular spill-over fractions were generated. Regions of interest (ROIs) for 17 myocardial segments were defined in bull's eye fashion on the parametric maps. The mean of each ROI was then compared to the rest (K 1r ) and stress (K 1s ) MBF estimates obtained from fitting the 17 regional TACs with the NLM. In simulation, the LM performed as well as the NLM in terms of precision and accuracy. The simulation did not show that bias was introduced by the use of a predefined two-dimensional lookup table. In experimental data, parametric maps demonstrated good statistical quality and the LM was computationally much more efficient than the original NLM. Very good agreement was obtained between the mean MBF calculated on the parametric maps for each of the 17 ROIs and the regional MBF values estimated by the NLM (K 1map LM  = 1.019 × K 1 ROI NLM  + 0.019, R 2  = 0.986; mean difference = 0.034 ± 0.036 mL/min/cc). We developed a table lookup method for fast

  4. Scanning of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robillard, J.

    1977-01-01

    The Centers against cancer of Caen, Angers, Montpellier, Strasbourg and 'the Curie Foundation' have confronted their experience in detection of bone metastases by total body scanning. From the investigation by this procedure, of 1,467 patients with cancer, it results: the confrontation between radio and scanning shows a rate of false positive and false negative identical to the literature ones; the countage scanning allows to reduce the number of false positive; scanning allows to direct bone biopsy and to improve efficiency of histological examination [fr

  5. Prospective evaluation of 68Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT in differentiated thyroid cancer patients with raised thyroglobulin and negative 131I-whole body scan: comparison with 18F-FDG PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, Parveen; Lata, Sneh; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients with negative 131 I-whole body scan (WBS) along with serially increasing serum thyroglobulin (Tg), and compare the same with 18 F-FDG PET-CT. Sixty two DTC patients with serially rising Tg levels and negative 131 I-WBS were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and 18 F-FDG PET-CT within an interval of two weeks. PET-CT analysis was done on a per-patient basis, location wise and lesion wise. All PET-CT lesions were divided into four categories-local, nodal, pulmonary and skeletal. Histopathology and/or serial serum Tg level, clinical and imaging follow up (minimum-1 year) were used as a reference standard. Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT demonstrated disease in 40/62 (65 %) patients and 18 F-FDG PET-CT in 45/62 (72 %) patients, with no significant difference on McNemar analysis (p = 0.226). Per-patient sensitivity and specificity of 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT was 78.4 %, 100 %, and for 18 F-FDG PET-CT was 86.3 %, 90.9 %, respectively. Out of 186 lesions detected by both PET-CTs, 121/186 (65 %) lesions were seen on 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and 168/186 (90.3 %) lesions on 18 F-FDG PET-CT (p 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and 18 F-FDG PET-CT for detection of local disease (k = 0.92), while moderate agreement was noted for nodal and pulmonary disease (k = 0.67). 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT changed management in 21/62 (34 %) patients and 18 F-FDG PET-CT in 17/62 (27 %) patients. Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT is inferior to 18 F-FDG PET-CT on lesion based but not on patient based analysis for detection of recurrent/residual disease in DTC patients with negative WBS scan and elevated serum Tg levels. It can also help in selection of potential candidates for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  6. Scanning laser Doppler vibrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Marie; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    With a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) a vibrating surface is automatically scanned over predefined grid points, and data processed for displaying vibration properties like mode shapes, natural frequencies, damping ratios, and operational deflection shapes. Our SLDV – a PSV-500H from...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ...

  8. Transverse section scanning mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, E.J.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus is described for scanning a transverse, radionuclide scan-field using an array of focussed collimators. The collimators are movable tangentially on rails, driven by a single motor via a coupled screw. The collimators are also movable in a radial direction on rails driven by a step motor via coupled screws and bevel gears. Adjacent bevel gears rotate in opposite directions so adjacent collimators move in radially opposite directions. In use, the focal point of each collimator scans at least half of the scan-field, e.g. a human head located in the central aperture, and the electrical outputs of detectors associated with each collimator are used to determine the distribution of radioactive emission intensity at a number of points in the scan-field. (author)

  9. LIDAR COMBINED SCANNING UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Elizarov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The results of lidar combined scanning unit development for locating leaks of hydrocarbons are presented The unit enables to perform high-speed scanning of the investigated space in wide and narrow angle fields. Method. Scanning in a wide angular field is produced by one-line scanning path by means of the movable aluminum mirror with a frequency of 20Hz and amplitude of 20 degrees of swing. Narrowband scanning is performed along a spiral path by the deflector. The deflection of the beam is done by rotation of the optical wedges forming part of the deflector at an angle of ±50. The control function of the scanning node is performed by a specialized software product written in C# programming language. Main Results. This scanning unit allows scanning the investigated area at a distance of 50-100 m with spatial resolution at the level of 3 cm. The positioning accuracy of the laser beam in space is 15'. The developed scanning unit gives the possibility to browse the entire investigated area for the time not more than 1 ms at a rotation frequency of each wedge from 50 to 200 Hz. The problem of unambiguous definition of the beam geographical coordinates in space is solved at the software level according to the rotation angles of the mirrors and optical wedges. Lidar system coordinates are determined by means of GPS. Practical Relevance. Development results open the possibility for increasing the spatial resolution of scanning systems of a wide range of lidars and can provide high positioning accuracy of the laser beam in space.

  10. The use of PET/CT scanning technique for 3D visualization and quantification of real-time soil/plant interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbout, Amin; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Hansen, Søren Bechmann

    2012-01-01

    to assimilate 11CO2 for 90 min before PET scanning was initiated. We carried out PET scanning for 60 min. Subsequently, the aerial parts of the plant was cut off and the pot was rescanned using a micro-CT scanner to obtain more detailed information on structure of the root system and the growth medium structure...... of the sand. We found the highest concentration of 11C at the position of the main root. The PET images, at different time intervals, showed the translocation and metabolisation of photo-assimilates from top to root. Using the micro-CT scanner (voxel size of 90 μm), we were able to detect roots down to 100 mm...... demonstrated the simultaneous use of PET (positron emission tomography) and CT (X-ray computed tomography) to (a) non-destructively image a whole plant growing in sand, and (b) to link the observed morphology with recently assimilated C. The PET scanner was used to detect and visualize the location...

  11. H2WHOA - 6 to 8 glasses of water an hour: how water can distinguish physiological from pathological uptake in the GIT on PET/CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of water as a negative contrast agent in PET/CT. To determine the amount and timing of water to be administered in order to evaluate specific regions of the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). To evaluate whether the use of a 'bolus' of a large amount of water is effective in distinguishing physiological from pathological 18F-FDG uptake in the GIT. Method: Over the past seven months, patients who were scanned and on review had FDG-avidity in the stomach, or had FDG-avidity of an uncertain aetiology further along the GIT, were selected for further scanning. Depending on the site of FDG uptake, patients were either given 1) 2 glasses of water on the bed immediately before scanning or 2) given 6-8 glasses of water in the space of an hour and a delay preceded before scanning over the GIT. Results: To date, 11 patients who have had 13 FDG PET/CT scans have had further water-enhanced delayed imaging. 8(61.5%) scans proved water to be a useful contrast agent. In 11(84.6%) cases, an appropriate amount and timing of water ingested assisted in further evaluating a specific region. In 7(53.9%) cases a large bolus of water allowed the reporting doctor to effectively distinguish between physiological and pathological uptake in the GIT. Conclusions: Patients with gastric/gastro-oesophageal/pancreatic cancers benefit from imaging with water in the stomach or small bowel. Scanning patients with discrete, FDG uptake in the large bowel following a large 'bolus' of water can help to distinguish physiological from pathological FDG uptake.

  12. Comparison of standardized uptake values measured on 18F-NaF PET/CT scans using three different tube current intensities

    OpenAIRE

    Agnes Araujo Valadares; Paulo Schiavom Duarte; Eduardo Bechtloff Woellner; George Barberio Coura-Filho; Marcelo Tatit Sapienza; Carlos Alberto Buchpiguel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze standardized uptake values (SUVs) using three different tube current intensities for attenuation correction on 18FNaF PET/CT scans. Materials and Methods: A total of 254 18F-NaF PET/CT studies were analyzed using 10, 20 and 30 mAs. The SUVs were calculated in volumes of interest (VOIs) drawn on three skeletal regions, namely, right proximal humeral diaphysis (RH), right proximal femoral diaphysis (RF), and first lumbar vertebra (LV1) in a total of 712 VOIs. The analyses ...

  13. Clinical Usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in papillary thyroid cancer with negative radioiodine scan and elevated thyroglobulin level or positive anti-thyroglobulin antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Su Jung; Jung, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sun Seong; Park, Yun Soo; Lee, Seok Mo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Kyun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Elevated thyroglobulin (Tg) levels, along with a negative radioiodine scan, present a clinical problem for the diagnosis of recurrence in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) patients. The purpose of this study was to assess (1) the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for PTC patients with negative diagnostic radioiodine scan and elevated serum Tg level or positive anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb), and (2) the effect of endogenous thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation (ETS) on detecting recurrence in these circumstances. Eighty-four patients with negative diagnostic radioiodine scan and elevated serum Tg or positive TgAb under ETS were included. Correlation with clinicopathological features and recurrence, detectability of FDG PET/CT and cut-off value of serum Tg for recurrence in PTC patients with these circumstance were assessed. In addition, detectability of F-18 FDG PET/CT under ETS and suppression were compared. In Cox regression analysis, only serum Tg level was significantly associated with recurrence (P<0.001, HR  = 1.13; 95 % CI, 1.061–1.208). The cut-off level of Tg was 21.5 ng/mL (AUC, 0.919; P < 0.001) for discriminating the recurrence in the patients with positive PET/CT finding. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of F-18 FDG PET/CT for detecting recurrence were 64 %, 94 %, 86 %, 81 %, and 83 %. In the analysis of F-18 FDG PET/CT under ETS, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy was 64 %, 94 %, 88 %, 81 % and 83 %. Those under TSH suppression were 67 %, 92 %, 80 %, 85 % and 83 %. F-18 FDG PET/CT, although less sensitive, showed high specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy and therefore can be useful for the patients with negative diagnostic radioiodine scan and elevated serum Tg or positive TgAb. In addition, FDG PET/CT under ETS does not seem to have an additive role in detecting recurrence in these patients.

  14. Laser Scanning in Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Olsson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS to forests has been revolutionary during the last decade. This development was facilitated by combining earlier ranging lidar discoveries [1–5], with experience obtained from full-waveform ranging radar [6,7] to new airborne laser scanning systems which had components such as a GNSS receiver (Global Navigation Satellite System, IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit and a scanning mechanism. Since the first commercial ALS in 1994, new ALS-based forest inventory approaches have been reported feasible for operational activities [8–12]. ALS is currently operationally applied for stand level forest inventories, for example, in Nordic countries. In Finland alone, the adoption of ALS for forest data collection has led to an annual savings of around 20 M€/year, and the work is mainly done by companies instead of governmental organizations. In spite of the long implementation times and there being a limited tradition of making changes in the forest sector, laser scanning was commercially and operationally applied after about only one decade of research. When analyzing high-ranked journal papers from ISI Web of Science, the topic of laser scanning of forests has been the driving force for the whole laser scanning research society over the last decade. Thus, the topic “laser scanning in forests” has provided a significant industrial, societal and scientific impact. [...

  15. Bone scan in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, I.; Peters, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, a survey carried out in 21 countries in Europe showed that bone scintigraphy comprised 16% of all paediatric radioisotope scans. Although the value of bone scans in paediatrics is potentially great, their quality varies greatly, and poor-quality images are giving this valuable technique a bad reputation. The handling of children requires a sensitive staff and the provision of a few simple inexpensive items of distraction. Attempting simply to scan a child between two adult patients in a busy general department is a recipe for an unhappy, uncooperative child with the probable result of poor images. The intravenous injection of isotope should be given adjacent to the gamma camera room, unless dynamic scans are required, so that the child does not associate the camera with the injection. This injection is best carried out by someone competent in paediatric venipunture; the entire procedure should be explained to the child and parent, who should remain with child throughout. It is naive to think that silence makes for a cooperative child. The sensitivity of bone-seeking radioisotope tracers and the marked improvement in gamma camera resolution has allowed the bone scanning to become an integrated technique in the assessment of children suspected of suffering from pathological bone conditions. The tracer most commonly used for routine bone scanning is 99m Tc diphosphonate (MDP); other isotopes used include 99m Tc colloid for bone marrow scans and 67 Ga citrate and 111 In white blood cells ( 111 In WBC) for investigation of inflammatory/infective lesions

  16. Comparison of absorbed dose of two protocols of tomographic scanning in PET/CT exams; Comparação da dose absorvida de dois protocolos de varredura tomográfica em exame de PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, F.G., E-mail: fgpaiva92@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Santana, P.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Mourão Filho, A.P. [Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) associated with Computed Tomography (CT) allows the fusion of functional and anatomical images. When compared to other diagnostic techniques, PET-CT subjects patients to higher levels of radiation, because two modalities are used in a single exam. In this study, the doses absorbed in 19 patient organs from the tomographic scan were evaluated. Radiochromic films were correctly positioned in the Alderson anthropomorphic simulator, male version. For evaluation, two whole body scan protocols were compared. For evaluation, two whole body scan protocols were compared. An increase of up to 600% in the absorbed dose in the pituitary was observed when the protocols were compared, with the lowest observed increase of approximately 160% for the liver. It is concluded that the dose from CT in patients submitted to PET-CT scanning is higher in the protocol used for diagnosis. Considering the high cost of PET-CT exam, in many cases it is preferable that the CT examination is of diagnostic quality, and not only for anatomical mapping, an argument based on the Principle of Justification.

  17. Optimization of transmission-scan time for the FixER method: a MR-based PET attenuation correction with a weak fixed-position external radiation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Kershaw, Jeff; Yoshida, Eiji [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shiraishi, Takahiro [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suga, Mikio [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Center for Frontier Medical Engineering, Chiba University (Japan); Obata, Takayuki [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Taiga [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-07-29

    In recent work, we proposed an MRI-based attenuation-coefficient (μ-value) estimation method that uses a weak fixed-position external radiation source to construct an attenuation map for PET/MRI. In this presentation we refer to this method as FixER, and perform a series of simulations to investigate the duration of the transmission scan required to accurately estimate μ-values.

  18. Head motion evaluation and correction for PET scans with 18F-FDG in the Japanese Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (J-ADNI) multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikari, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Tomoyuki; Makishi, Yoko; Miya, Yukari; Ito, Kengo; Koeppe, Robert A; Senda, Michio

    2012-08-01

    Head motion during 30-min (six 5-min frames) brain PET scans starting 30 min post-injection of FDG was evaluated together with the effect of post hoc motion correction between frames in J-ADNI multicenter study carried out in 24 PET centers on a total of 172 subjects consisting of 81 normal subjects, 55 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 36 mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Based on the magnitude of the between-frame co-registration parameters, the scans were classified into six levels (A-F) of motion degree. The effect of motion and its correction was evaluated using between-frame variation of the regional FDG uptake values on ROIs placed over cerebral cortical areas. Although AD patients tended to present larger motion (motion level E or F in 22 % of the subjects) than MCI (3 %) and normal (4 %) subjects, unignorable motion was observed in a small number of subjects in the latter groups as well. The between-frame coefficient of variation (SD/mean) was 0.5 % in the frontal, 0.6 % in the parietal and 1.8 % in the posterior cingulate ROI for the scans of motion level 1. The respective values were 1.5, 1.4, and 3.6 % for the scans of motion level F, but reduced by the motion correction to 0.5, 0.4 and 0.8 %, respectively. The motion correction changed the ROI value for the posterior cingulate cortex by 11.6 % in the case of severest motion. Substantial head motion occurs in a fraction of subjects in a multicenter setup which includes PET centers lacking sufficient experience in imaging demented patients. A simple frame-by-frame co-registration technique that can be applied to any PET camera model is effective in correcting for motion and improving quantitative capability.

  19. Optimization of transmission-scan time for the FixER method: a MR-based PET attenuation correction with a weak fixed-position external radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Kershaw, Jeff; Yoshida, Eiji; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Suga, Mikio; Obata, Takayuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-01-01

    In recent work, we proposed an MRI-based attenuation-coefficient (μ-value) estimation method that uses a weak fixed-position external radiation source to construct an attenuation map for PET/MRI. In this presentation we refer to this method as FixER, and perform a series of simulations to investigate the duration of the transmission scan required to accurately estimate μ-values.

  20. TU-C-12A-12: Differentiating Bone Lesions and Degenerative Joint Disease in NaF PET/CT Scans Using Machine Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Muzahir, S; Jeraj, R [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Meyer, E [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: [F-18]NaF PET can be used to image bone metastases; however, tracer uptake in degenerative joint disease (DJD) often appears similar to metastases. This study aims to develop and compare different machine learning algorithms to automatically identify regions of [F-18]NaF scans that correspond to DJD. Methods: 10 metastatic prostate cancer patients received whole body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans prior to treatment. Image segmentation resulted in 852 ROIs, 69 of which were identified by a nuclear medicine physician as DJD. For all ROIs, various PET and CT textural features were computed. ROIs were divided into training and testing sets used to train eight different machine learning classifiers. Classifiers were evaluated based on receiver operating characteristics area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV). We also assessed the added value of including CT features in addition to PET features for training classifiers. Results: The training set consisted of 37 DJD ROIs with 475 non-DJD ROIs, and the testing set consisted of 32 DJD ROIs with 308 non-DJD ROIs. Of all classifiers, generalized linear models (GLM), decision forests (DF), and support vector machines (SVM) had the best performance. AUCs of GLM (0.929), DF (0.921), and SVM (0.889) were significantly higher than the other models (p<0.001). GLM and DF, overall, had the best sensitivity, specificity, and PPV, and gave a significantly better performance (p<0.01) than all other models. PET/CT GLM classifiers had higher AUC than just PET or just CT. GLMs built using PET/CT information had superior or comparable sensitivities, specificities and PPVs to just PET or just CT. Conclusion: Machine learning algorithms trained with PET/CT features were able to identify some cases of DJD. GLM outperformed the other classification algorithms. Using PET and CT information together was shown to be superior to using PET or CT features alone. Research supported by the Prostate

  1. TU-C-12A-12: Differentiating Bone Lesions and Degenerative Joint Disease in NaF PET/CT Scans Using Machine Learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Muzahir, S; Jeraj, R; Meyer, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: [F-18]NaF PET can be used to image bone metastases; however, tracer uptake in degenerative joint disease (DJD) often appears similar to metastases. This study aims to develop and compare different machine learning algorithms to automatically identify regions of [F-18]NaF scans that correspond to DJD. Methods: 10 metastatic prostate cancer patients received whole body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans prior to treatment. Image segmentation resulted in 852 ROIs, 69 of which were identified by a nuclear medicine physician as DJD. For all ROIs, various PET and CT textural features were computed. ROIs were divided into training and testing sets used to train eight different machine learning classifiers. Classifiers were evaluated based on receiver operating characteristics area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV). We also assessed the added value of including CT features in addition to PET features for training classifiers. Results: The training set consisted of 37 DJD ROIs with 475 non-DJD ROIs, and the testing set consisted of 32 DJD ROIs with 308 non-DJD ROIs. Of all classifiers, generalized linear models (GLM), decision forests (DF), and support vector machines (SVM) had the best performance. AUCs of GLM (0.929), DF (0.921), and SVM (0.889) were significantly higher than the other models (p<0.001). GLM and DF, overall, had the best sensitivity, specificity, and PPV, and gave a significantly better performance (p<0.01) than all other models. PET/CT GLM classifiers had higher AUC than just PET or just CT. GLMs built using PET/CT information had superior or comparable sensitivities, specificities and PPVs to just PET or just CT. Conclusion: Machine learning algorithms trained with PET/CT features were able to identify some cases of DJD. GLM outperformed the other classification algorithms. Using PET and CT information together was shown to be superior to using PET or CT features alone. Research supported by the Prostate

  2. Comparison between FDG Uptake and Pathologic or Immunohistochemical Parametersin Pre-operative PET/CT Scan of Patient with Primary Colorectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Sae Jung; Chung, Yong An; Maeng, Lee So; Kim, Ki Jun; Sohn, Kyung Myung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Chung, Soo Kyo

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between F-18 FDG uptake of tumor in PET/CT scan and pathological or immunohistochemial parameters of colorectal cancer. 147 colorectal cancer patients who underwent both pre-operative F-18 FDG PET/CT scan and surgery were included. In cases with perceptible FDG uptake in primary tumor, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was calculated. The pathologic results such as site, size, depth of invasion (T stage), growth pattern, differentiation of primary tumor, lymph node metastasis and Dukes-Astler and Coller stage and immunohistochemical markers such as expression of EGFR, MLH1, MSH2 and Ki-67 index were reviewed. 146 out of 147 PET/CT scans with colorectal cancer showed perceptible focal FDG uptake. SUVmax showed mild positive linear correlation with size of primary tumor (r=0.277, p=0.001) and Ki-67 index (r=0.226, p=0.019). No significant difference in F-18 FDG uptake was found according to site, depth of invasion (T stage), growth pattern, differentiation of primary tumor, presence of lymph node metastasis, Dukes-Astler and Coller stage and expression of EGFR. The degree of F-18 FDG uptake in colorectal cancer was associated with the size and the degree of Ki-67 index of primary tumor. It could be thought that FDG uptake of primary tumor has a correlation with macroscopic and microscopic tumor growth

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a thyroid scan is 30 minutes or less. Thyroid Uptake You will be given radioactive iodine ( ... for each thyroid uptake is five minutes or less. top of page What will I experience during ...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluate changes in the gland following medication use, surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy top of page How should ... such as an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated contrast material within the ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. If you had an ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. Actual scanning time for ...

  6. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are given of a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to a multiplexer slip ring means for receiving output from the detectors and enabling interfeed to the image reconstruction station. (U.K.)

  7. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are presented of a tomographic scanning apparatus, its rotational assembly, and the control and circuit elements, with particular reference to the amplifier and multiplexing circuits enabling detector signal calibration. (U.K.)

  8. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification relates to a tomographic scanning apparatus using a fan beam and digital output signal, and particularly to the design of the gas-pressurized ionization detection system. (U.K.)

  9. Pediatric CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are encased in metal and plastic and most often shaped like a box, attached to a ... will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake procedures are painless. ...

  11. Heart CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make to decrease the risk of heart disease. Risks Risks of CT scans include: Being exposed to ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information ...

  13. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  14. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that help physicians diagnose and evaluate medical conditions. These imaging scans use radioactive materials called radiopharmaceuticals or ... or had thyroid cancer. A physician may perform these imaging tests to: determine if the gland is ...

  15. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential ... or imaging device that produces pictures and provides molecular information. The thyroid scan and thyroid uptake provide ...

  16. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Actual scanning time for each thyroid uptake is five minutes or less. top of page What will ... diagnostic procedures have been used for more than five decades, and there are no known long-term ...

  17. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top ... Scan and Uptake Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  18. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information needed to make a diagnosis or to determine appropriate treatment, if any. Nuclear medicine is less expensive and ...

  19. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also called a scintillation ... high as with other imaging techniques, such as CT or MRI. However, nuclear medicine scans are more ...

  20. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as an overactive thyroid gland, a condition called hyperthyroidism , cancer or other growths assess the nature of ... an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated contrast material within the last two ...

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... painless. However, during the thyroid scan, you may feel uncomfortable when lying completely still with your head ... When the radiotracer is given intravenously, you will feel a slight pin prick when the needle is ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scan and thyroid uptake provide information about the structure and function of the thyroid. The thyroid is ... computer, create pictures offering details on both the structure and function of organs and tissues in your ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. If you had an intravenous line ... found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. Actual scanning time for each thyroid ...

  6. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the gland following medication use, surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy top of page How should I prepare? You ... You will receive specific instructions based on the type of scan you are undergoing. top of page ...

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Uptake? A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) ... of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that ...

  9. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification describes a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to the adjustable fan beam and its collimator system, together with the facility for taking a conventional x-radiograph without moving the patient. (U.K.)

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exam of any medications you are taking, including vitamins and herbal supplements. You should also inform them ... of scan you are undergoing. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera ...

  11. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the gland following medication use, surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy top of page How should I prepare? You ... but is often performed on hospitalized patients as well. Thyroid Scan You will be positioned on an ...

  13. Methods for Motion Correction Evaluation Using 18F-FDG Human Brain Scans on a High-Resolution PET Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H.; Sibomana, Merence; Olesen, Oline Vinter

    2012-01-01

    Many authors have reported the importance of motion correction (MC) for PET. Patient motion during scanning disturbs kinetic analysis and degrades resolution. In addition, using misaligned transmission for attenuation and scatter correction may produce regional quantification bias in the reconstr......Many authors have reported the importance of motion correction (MC) for PET. Patient motion during scanning disturbs kinetic analysis and degrades resolution. In addition, using misaligned transmission for attenuation and scatter correction may produce regional quantification bias...... in the reconstructed emission images. The purpose of this work was the development of quality control (QC) methods for MC procedures based on external motion tracking (EMT) for human scanning using an optical motion tracking system. Methods: Two scans with minor motion and 5 with major motion (as reported...... (automated image registration) software. The following 3 QC methods were used to evaluate the EMT and AIR MC: a method using the ratio between 2 regions of interest with gray matter voxels (GM) and white matter voxels (WM), called GM/WM; mutual information; and cross correlation. Results: The results...

  14. Impact of a second FDG PET scan before adjuvant therapy for the early detection of residual/relapsing tumours in high-risk patients with oral cavity cancer and pathological extracapsular spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Kang, Chung-Jan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (China); Fan, Kang-Hsing; Lin, Chien-Yu [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Hung-Ming [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Oncology, Taoyuan (China); Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Taoyuan (China); Hsueh, Chuen; Lee, Li-Yu [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Pathology, Taoyuan (China); Lin, Chih-Hung [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Taoyuan (China); Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Head and Neck Oncology Group, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taoyuan (China)

    2012-06-15

    Extracapsular spread (ECS) to the cervical lymph nodes is a major adverse prognostic factor in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We prospectively examined the value of FDG PET immediately before postoperative radiotherapy/concurrent chemoradiotherapy (pre-RT/CCRT PET) to detect residual/relapsing disease in the early postsurgical follow-up period in high-risk OSCC patients with ECS. We examined 183 high-risk OSCC patients with ECS who underwent preoperative FDG PET/CT for staging purposes. Of these patients, 29 underwent a second pre-RT/CCRT FDG PET/CT scan. The clinical utility of the second FDG PET/CT was examined using Kaplan-Meier curve analysis. Patients who underwent the second FDG PET/CT scan had baseline clinicopathological characteristics similar to those who did not undergo a second scan. Of the patients who underwent the second scan, seven (24 %) had unexpected, newly discovered lesions. Five eventually died of the disease, and two had no evidence of recurrence after a change in RT field and dose. In an event-based analysis at 2 months, rates of neck control (6/29 vs. 6/154, p = 0.001), distant metastases (3/29 vs. 4/154, p = 0.046), and disease-free survival (7/29 vs. 10/154, p = 0.003) were significantly higher in patients who received a second PET scan than in those who did not. The second pre-RT/CCRT PET scan was of particular benefit for detecting new lesions in OSCC patients with both ECS and lymph node standardized uptake value (SUV) of {>=}5.2 in the first PET scan. The present findings support the clinical value of pre-RT/CCRT FDG PET for defining treatment strategy in OSCC patients with both ECS and high nodal SUV, even when FDG PET had already been performed during the initial staging work-up. (orig.)

  15. The Utility and indication of FDG-PET scan in patients with cervical cancer: experience in patients with no evidence of recurrence with conventional radiologic examination and tumor markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hoon

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET(Positron Emission Tomography) scan in patients with clinically no evidence of disease after treatment of cervical cancer. One hundred and one patients with clinically NED(no evidence of disease) state after treatment of cervical cancer underwent PET scan. FDG-PET scan was obtained with a GE Advance Scanner, beginning at 50 minutes after injection of 370-555 MBq(10-15 mCi) of 18F FDG. Regional scan was also obtained with emission image. Uptake exceeding 3.0 SUV was determined as a positive finding. Recurrence was confirmed by CT, MRI, and needle biopsy if possible. Among 101 patients showing no evidence of disease, 17 patients(16.8%) showed abnormal PET scan findings. Clinically, 8 patients(7.9%) were confirmed to have recurrent lesion by CT, MRI or by needle biopsy. PET scan could detect recurrent lesions in the mediastinum or lung(10/17), pelvis(7/17), and supraclavicular lymph node(2/17). The sensitivity and specificity of PET scan in patients with cervical cancer showing no evidence of disease were 100% and 90.3%, respectively. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value and false positive rate were 47.1%, 100% and 52.9%. PET scan could detect 7.9% of early recurrence in patients with cervical cancer with NED status. FDG-PET scan may be a useful method in detecting metastases or recurrence of a cervical cancer showing no evidence of disease by routine conventional imaging studies

  16. Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma: Clinical features, prognostic factors and survival with RCHOP in Arab patients in the PET scan era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Al Shemmari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: PMBCL is a distinct type of nonhodgkins lymphoma with specific clinicopathological features. To clarify clinical features, treatment alternatives and outcomes, we evaluated 28 Arab patients treated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy between 2006 and 2011. Patients and Methods: PMBCL lymphoma patients identified according to WHO classification and treated at KCCC between 2006 and 2011 were included in this study. Demographic and clinical data are presented as means or medians. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Survival rates were compared using the log-rank test. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The median age of the patients was 31 years and the male to female ratio was 2:1. Majority of the patients (75% presented with stage I/II disease. Most had features of local extension like pleural effusion (18% and SVCO (39%. Only 11% of the patients had bone marrow involvement at presentation. 96% of the patients required biopsy from the mediastinal mass either by image guided core biopsy (75% or by surgical biopsy. Most patients were treated by RCHOP and involved field radiotherapy. Patients with positive PET scan after RCHOP chemotherapy received salvage chemotherapy and BEAM autologous marrow transplant. The five year OS for the entire group was 85% while the PFS was 73%. Patients who had PET scan for response evaluation had better OS [P = 0.013] and PFS [P = 0.039] when compared with those patients who received only radiotherapy based on CT scan evaluation. Conclusion: PMBCL is a specific lymphoma entity seen in the young with good survival. The role of PET scan for response evaluation and the type of consolidation therapy needs to be further clarified

  17. Relationship Between the Elevated Muscle FDG Uptake in the Distal Upper Extremities on PET/CT Scan and Prescan Utilization of Mobile Devices in Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xia; Wang, Xuemei; Zhuang, Hongming

    2018-03-01

    It is common to notice increased FDG activity in the muscles of the forearms or hands on PET/CT images. The purpose of this study was to determine relationship between the prevalence of increased FDG activity in the forearms or hands and using mobile devices prior to the FDG PET/CT study. A total of 443 young patients with ages between 5 and 19 years who underwent FDG PET/CT scan were included in this retrospective analysis. All patients had FDG PET/CT with their arms within the field of views. The images were reviewed for elevated activity in the muscles of the distal upper extremities (DUEs), which include forearms and hands. The preimaging questionnaire/interview records regarding using mobile devices prior to FDG PET/CT were also reviewed and compared with the imaging findings. Most patients (72.0% [319/443]) used mobile devices more than 60 minutes in the period of 24 hours prior to the FDG PET/CT study. Elevated uptake in the muscles in the DUEs was observed in 38.6% (123/319) of these patients. In contrast, among 124 patients who did not use the mobile devices or used the mobile device minimally prior to the study, only 6.5% (8/124) of them had elevated FDG activity in the DUEs. The difference persisted following stratification analysis for sex, age, and serum glucose level in our patient population. Increased FDG uptake in the muscles of the DUEs in young patients is commonly seen in those who used mobile devices prior to PET/CT study. Recommendation should be considered to reduce using mobile devices prior to FDG PET/CT study in young patient population.

  18. Evaluation of third treatment week as temporal window for assessing responsiveness on repeated FDG-PET-CT scans in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeroni, M; Uhrdin, J; Carvalho, S; van Elmpt, W; Lambin, P; Dasu, A; Wersäll, P; Toma-Dasu, I

    2018-02-01

    Early assessment of tumour response to treatment with repeated FDG-PET-CT imaging has potential for treatment adaptation but it is unclear what the optimal time window for this evaluation is. Previous studies indicate that changes in SUV mean and the effective radiosensitivity (α eff , accounting for uptake variations and accumulated dose until the second FDG-PET-CT scan) are predictive of 2-year overall survival (OS) when imaging is performed before radiotherapy and during the second week. This study aims to investigate if multiple FDG-PET-derived quantities determined during the third treatment week have stronger predictive power. Twenty-eight lung cancer patients were imaged with FDG-PET-CT before radiotherapy (PET1) and during the third week (PET2). SUV mean , SUV max , SUV peak , MTV41%-50% (Metabolic Tumour Volume), TLG41%-50% (Total Lesion Glycolysis) in PET1 and PET2 and their change (), as well as average α eff (α¯ eff ) and the negative fraction of α eff values [Formula: see text] ) were determined. Correlations were sought between FDG-PET-derived quantities and OS with ROC analysis. Neither SUV mean , SUV max , SUV peak in PET1 and PET2 (AUC = 0.5-0.6), nor their changes (AUC = 0.5-0.6) were significant for outcome prediction purposes. Lack of correlation with OS was also found for α¯ eff (AUC = 0.5) and [Formula: see text] (AUC = 0.5). Threshold-based quantities (MTV41%-50%, TLG41%-50%) and their changes had AUC = 0.5-0.7. P-values were in all cases ≫0.05. The poor OS predictive power of the quantities determined from repeated FDG-PET-CT images indicates that the third week of treatment might not be suitable for treatment response assessment. Comparatively, the second week during the treatment appears to be a better time window. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid dual-injection single-scan 13N-ammonia PET for quantification of rest and stress myocardial blood flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, T C; DiBella, E V R; McGann, C J; Christian, P E; Hoffman, J M; Kadrmas, D J

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of myocardial blood flows at rest and stress using 13 N-ammonia PET is an established method; however, current techniques require a waiting period of about 1 h between scans. The objective of this study was to test a rapid dual-injection single-scan approach, where 13 N-ammonia injections are administered 10 min apart during rest and adenosine stress. Dynamic PET data were acquired in six human subjects using imaging protocols that provided separate single-injection scans as gold standards. Rest and stress data were combined to emulate rapid dual-injection data so that the underlying activity from each injection was known exactly. Regional blood flow estimates were computed from the dual-injection data using two methods: background subtraction and combined modelling. The rapid dual-injection approach provided blood flow estimates very similar to the conventional single-injection standards. Rest blood flow estimates were affected very little by the dual-injection approach, and stress estimates correlated strongly with separate single-injection values (r = 0.998, mean absolute difference = 0.06 ml min -1 g -1 ). An actual rapid dual-injection scan was successfully acquired in one subject and further demonstrates feasibility of the method. This study with a limited dataset demonstrates that blood flow quantification can be obtained in only 20 min by the rapid dual-injection approach with accuracy similar to that of conventional separate rest and stress scans. The rapid dual-injection approach merits further development and additional evaluation for potential clinical use

  20. Preoperative bone scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkes, N.D.; Malmud, L.S.; Caswell, T.; Goldman, L.; Hall, J.; Lauby, V.; Lightfoot, W.; Maier, W.; Rosemond, G.

    1975-01-01

    Strontium nitrate Sr-87m bone scans were made preoperatively in a group of women with suspected breast cancer, 35 of whom subsequently underwent radical mastectomy. In 3 of the 35 (9 percent), the scans were abnormal despite the absence of clinical or roentgenographic evidence of metastatic disease. All three patients had extensive axillary lymph node involvement by tumor, and went on to have additional bone metastases, from which one died. Roentgenograms failed to detect the metastases in all three. Occult bone metastases account in part for the failure of radical mastectomy to cure some patients with breast cancer. It is recommended that all candidates for radical mastectomy have a preoperative bone scan. (U.S.)

  1. Frequency scanning microstrip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Magnus; Jørgensen, Rolf

    1979-01-01

    The principles of using radiating microstrip resonators as elements in a frequency scanning antenna array are described. The resonators are cascade-coupled. This gives a scan of the main lobe due to the phase-shift in the resonator in addition to that created by the transmission line phase......-shift. Experimental results inX-band, in good agreement with the theory, show that it is possible to scan the main lobe an angle ofpm30degby a variation of the frequencypm300MHz, and where the 3 dB beamwidth is less than10deg. The directivity was 14.7 dB, while the gain was 8.1 dB. The efficiency might be improved...

  2. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abele, M.

    1983-01-01

    A computerized tomographic scanning apparatus suitable for diagnosis and for improving target identification in stereotactic neurosurgery is described. It consists of a base, a source of penetrating energy, a detector which produces scanning signals and detector positioning means. A frame with top and bottom arms secures the detector and source to the top and bottom arms respectively. A drive mechanism rotates the frame about an axis along which the frame may also be moved. Finally, the detector may be moved relative to the bottom arm in a direction contrary to the rotation of the frame. (U.K.)

  3. Scanning the phenomenological MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Wuerzinger, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    A framework to perform scans in the 19-dimensional phenomenological MSSM is developed and used to re-evaluate the ATLAS experiments' sensitivity to R-parity-conserving supersymmetry with LHC Run 2 data ($\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV), using results from 14 separate ATLAS searches. We perform a $\\tilde{t}_1$ dedicated scan, only considering models with $m_{\\tilde{t}_1}<1$ TeV, while allowing both a neutralino ($\\tilde{\\chi}_1^0$) and a sneutrino ($\\tilde{\

  4. Calibration of scanning Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast. Additio......This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast...

  5. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  6. Prospective Comparison of F-18 Choline PET/CT Scan Versus Axial MRI for Detecting Bone Metastasis in Biochemically Relapsed Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Huysse

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared fluor-18 choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT and axial skeleton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI prospectively obtained for the detection of bone metastases in non-castrated patients with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer following primary treatment. PET/CT was performed 45 min post-injection of 3–4 MBq/kg F-18 methyl choline. MRI included T1- and fluid sensitive T2-weighted images of the spine and pelvis. Readers were initially blinded from other results and all scans underwent independent double reading. The best valuable comparator (BVC defined the metastatic status. On the basis of the BVC, 15 out of 64 patients presented with 24 bone metastases. On a patient level, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI and PET were not significantly different. On a lesion level, the sensitivity of MRI was significantly better compared to PET, and the specificity did not differ significantly. In conclusion, axial MRI is an interesting screening tool for the detection of bone metastases because of its low probability of false negative results. However, F-18 choline PET is a valuable addition as it can overrule false positive MRI results and detect non-axial metastases.

  7. Comparison between FDG Uptake and Clinicopathologic and Immunohistochemical Parameters in Pre-operative PET/CT Scan of Primary Gastric Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ji; Choi, Woo Hee; Chung, Yong An; Kim, Ki Jun; Maeng, Lee So; Sohn, Kyung Myung; Jung, Hyun Suk; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Chung, Soo Kyo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out what clinicopathologic or immunohistochemical parameter that may affect FDG uptake of primary tumor in PET/CT scan of the gastric carcinoma patient. Eighty-nine patients with stomach cancer who underwent pre-operative FDG PET/CT scans were included. In cases with perceptible FDG uptake in primary tumor, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was calculated. The clinicopathologic results such as depth of invasion (T stage), tumor size, lymph node metastasis, tumor differentiation and Lauren's classification and immunohistochemical markers such as Ki-67 index, expression of p53, EGFR, Cathepsin D, c-erb-B2 and COX-2 were reviewed. Nineteen out of 89 gastric carcinomas showed imperceptible FDG uptake on PET/CT images. In cases with perceptible FDG uptake in primary tumor, SUVmax was significantly higher in T2, T3 and T4 tumors than T1 tumors (5.8±3.1 vs. 3.7±2.1, p=0.002). SUVmax of large tumors (above or equal to 3 cm) was also significantly higher than SUVmax of small ones (less than 3 cm) (5.7±3.2 vs. 3.7±2.0, p=0.002). The intestinal types of gastric carcinomas according to Lauren showed higher FDG uptake compared to the non-intestinal types (5.4±2.8 vs. 3.7±1.3, p=0.003). SUVmax between p53 positive group and negative group was significantly different (6.0±2.8 vs. 4.4±3.0, p=0.035). No significant difference was found in presence of LN metastasis, tumor differentiation, Ki-67 index, and expression of EGFR, Cathepsin D, c-erb-B2 and COX-2. T stage of gastric carcinoma influenced the detectability of gastric cancer on FDG PET/CT scan. When gastric carcinoma was perceptible on PET/CT scan, T stage, size of primary tumor, Lauren's classification and p53 expression were related to degree of FDG uptake in primary tumor

  8. High Dose MicroCT Does Not Contribute Toward Improved MicroPET/CT Image Quantitative Accuracy and Can Limit Longitudinal Scanning of Small Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. McDougald

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining accurate quantitative measurements in preclinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT imaging is of paramount importance in biomedical research and helps supporting efficient translation of preclinical results to the clinic. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1 to investigate the effects of different CT acquisition protocols on PET/CT image quality and data quantification; and (2 to evaluate the absorbed dose associated with varying CT parameters.Methods: An air/water quality control CT phantom, tissue equivalent material phantom, an in-house 3D printed phantom and an image quality PET/CT phantom were imaged using a Mediso nanoPET/CT scanner. Collected data was analyzed using PMOD software, VivoQuant software and National Electric Manufactures Association (NEMA software implemented by Mediso. Measured Hounsfield Unit (HU in collected CT images were compared to the known HU values and image noise was quantified. PET recovery coefficients (RC, uniformity and quantitative bias were also measured.Results: Only less than 2 and 1% of CT acquisition protocols yielded water HU values < −80 and air HU values < −840, respectively. Four out of 11 CT protocols resulted in more than 100 mGy absorbed dose. Different CT protocols did not impact PET uniformity and RC, and resulted in <4% overall bias relative to expected radioactive concentration.Conclusion: Preclinical CT protocols with increased exposure times can result in high absorbed doses to the small animals. These should be avoided, as they do not contributed toward improved microPET/CT image quantitative accuracy and could limit longitudinal scanning of small animals.

  9. The use of 18F-fluoride and 18F-FDG PET scans to assess fracture healing in a rat femur model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, W.K.; Feeley, B.T.; Krenek, L.; Stout, D.B.; Chatziioannou, A.F.; Lieberman, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    Currently available diagnostic techniques can be unreliable in the diagnosis of delayed fracture healing in certain clinical situations, which can lead to increased complication rates and costs to the health care system. This study sought to determine the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) scanning with 18 F-fluoride ion, which localizes in regions of high osteoblastic activity, and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), an indicator of cellular glucose metabolism, in assessing bone healing in a rat femur fracture model. Fractures were created in the femurs of immunocompetent rats. Animals in group I had a fracture produced via a manual three-point bending technique. Group II animals underwent a femoral osteotomy with placement of a 2-mm silastic spacer at the fracture site. Fracture healing was assessed with plain radiographs, 18 F-fluoride, and 18 F-FDG PET scans at 1, 2, 3, and 4-week time points after surgery. Femoral specimens were harvested for histologic analysis and manual testing of torsional and bending strength 4 weeks after surgery. All fractures in group I revealed abundant callus formation and bone healing, while none of the nonunion femurs were healed via assessment with manual palpation, radiographic, and histologic evaluation at the 4-week time point. 18 F-fluoride PET images of group I femurs at successive 1-week intervals revealed progressively increased signal uptake at the union site during fracture repair. In contrast, minimal tracer uptake was seen at the fracture sites in group II at all time points after surgery. Data analysis revealed statistically significant differences in mean signal intensity between groups I and II at each weekly interval. No significant differences between the two groups were seen using 18 F-FDG PET imaging at any time point. This study suggests that 18 F-fluoride PET imaging, which is an indicator of osteoblastic activity in vivo, can identify fracture nonunions at an early time point and may have a role in the

  10. The use of 18F-fluoride and 18F-FDG PET scans to assess fracture healing in a rat femur model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, W. K.; Feeley, B. T.; Krenek, L.; Stout, D. B.; Chatziioannou, A. F.; Lieberman, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Currently available diagnostic techniques can be unreliable in the diagnosis of delayed fracture healing in certain clinical situations, which can lead to increased complication rates and costs to the health care system. This study sought to determine the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) scanning with 18F-fluoride ion, which localizes in regions of high osteoblastic activity, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), an indicator of cellular glucose metabolism, in assessing bone healing in a rat femur fracture model. Methods Fractures were created in the femurs of immuno-competent rats. Animals in group I had a fracture produced via a manual three-point bending technique. Group II animals underwent a femoral osteotomy with placement of a 2-mm silastic spacer at the fracture site. Fracture healing was assessed with plain radiographs, 18F-fluoride, and 18F-FDG PET scans at 1, 2, 3, and 4-week time points after surgery. Femoral specimens were harvested for histologic analysis and manual testing of torsional and bending strength 4 weeks after surgery. Results All fractures in group I revealed abundant callus formation and bone healing, while none of the nonunion femurs were healed via assessment with manual palpation, radiographic, and histologic evaluation at the 4-week time point. 18F-fluoride PET images of group I femurs at successive 1-week intervals revealed progressively increased signal uptake at the union site during fracture repair. In contrast, minimal tracer uptake was seen at the fracture sites in group II at all time points after surgery. Data analysis revealed statistically significant differences in mean signal intensity between groups I and II at each weekly interval. No significant differences between the two groups were seen using 18F-FDG PET imaging at any time point. Conclusion This study suggests that 18F-fluoride PET imaging, which is an indicator of osteoblastic activity in vivo, can identify fracture nonunions at an early time point

  11. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... process that regulates the rate at which the body converts food to energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used to determine the size, shape and position of the thyroid gland. The ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake ...

  13. Dialogue scanning measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodyuk, V.P.; Shkundenkov, V.N.

    1985-01-01

    The main developments of scanning measuring systems intended for mass precision processsing of films in nuclear physics problems and in related fields are reviewed. A special attention is paid to the problem of creation of dialogue systems which permit to simlify the development of control computer software

  14. Scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1970-05-15

    The JSM-11 scanning electron microscope at CRNL has been used extensively for topographical studies of oxidized metals, fracture surfaces, entomological and biological specimens. A non-dispersive X-ray attachment permits the microanalysis of the surface features. Techniques for the production of electron channeling patterns have been developed. (author)

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  16. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales G, R.; Cano P, R.; Mendoza P, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  17. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information. The thyroid scan and thyroid uptake provide information about the structure and function of the thyroid. The thyroid is a gland in the neck that controls metabolism , a chemical process that regulates the rate at which the body ...

  18. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are given of a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to the means of adjusting the apparent gain of the signal processing means for receiving output signals from the detectors, to compensate for drift in the gain characteristics, including means for passing a reference signal. (U.K.)

  19. Stabilized radiographic scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawzi, M.B.

    1979-01-01

    A stable composition useful in preparation of technetium-99m-based radiographic scanning agents has been developed. The composition contains a stabilizing amount of gentisate stabilizer selected from gentisic acid and its soluble pharmaceutically-acceptable salts and esthers. (E.G.)

  20. Scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The principle underlying the design of the scanning electron microscope (SEM), the design and functioning of SEM are described. Its applications in the areas of microcircuitry and materials science are outlined. The development of SEM in India is reviewed. (M.G.B.)

  1. Radiographic scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofe, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A stable radiographic scanning agent on a sup(99m)Tc basis has been developed. The substance contains a pertechnetate reduction agent, tin(II)-chloride, chromium(II)-chloride, or iron(II)-sulphate, as well as an organospecific carrier and ascorbic acid or a pharmacologically admissible salt or ester of ascorbic acid. (VJ) [de

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you: have had any tests, such as an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated ... page How does the procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an image is made by passing x- ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a thyroid scan is 30 minutes or less. Thyroid Uptake You will be given radioactive iodine (I-123 or I-131) in liquid or capsule form to swallow. The thyroid uptake will begin several hours to 24 hours later. Often, two separate uptake ...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated contrast material within the last two months. are taking medications or ingesting other substances that contain iodine , including kelp, seaweed, cough syrups, multivitamins or heart medications. have any ...

  5. Reproducibility of automated simplified voxel-based analysis of PET amyloid ligand [11C]PIB uptake using 30-min scanning data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalto, Sargo; Scheinin, Noora M.; Naagren, Kjell; Rinne, Juha O.; Kemppainen, Nina M.; Kailajaervi, Marita; Leinonen, Mika; Scheinin, Mika

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with 11 C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B ([ 11 C]PIB) enables the quantitation of β-amyloid accumulation in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Voxel-based image analysis techniques conducted in a standard brain space provide an objective, rapid and fully automated method to analyze [ 11 C]PIB PET data. The purpose of this study was to evaluate both region- and voxel-level reproducibility of automated and simplified [ 11 C]PIB quantitation when using only 30 min of imaging data. Six AD patients and four healthy controls were scanned twice with an average interval of 6 weeks. To evaluate the feasibility of short scanning (convenient for AD patients), [ 11 C]PIB uptake was quantitated using 30 min of imaging data (60 to 90 min after tracer injection) for region-to-cerebellum ratio calculations. To evaluate the reproducibility, a test-retest design was used to derive absolute variability (VAR) estimates and intraclass correlation coefficients at both region-of-interest (ROI) and voxel level. The reproducibility both at the region level (VAR 0.9-5.5%) and at the voxel level (VAR 4.2-6.4%) was good to excellent. Based on the variability estimates obtained, power calculations indicated that 90% power to obtain statistically significant difference can be achieved using a sample size of five subjects per group when a 15% change from baseline (increase or decrease) in [ 11 C]PIB accumulation in the frontal cortex is anticipated in one group compared to no change in another group. Our results showed that an automated analysis method based on an efficient scanning protocol provides reproducible results for [ 11 C]PIB uptake and appears suitable for PET studies aiming at the quantitation of amyloid accumulation in the brain of AD patients for the evaluation of progression and treatment effects. (orig.)

  6. SU-F-I-31: Reproducibility of An Automatic Exposure Control Technique in the Low-Dose CT Scan of Cardiac PET/CT Exams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M; Rosica, D; Agarwal, V; Di Carli, M; Dorbala, S [Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Two separate low-dose CT scans are usually performed for attenuation correction of rest and stress N-13 ammonia PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (PET/CT). We utilize an automatic exposure control (AEC) technique to reduce CT radiation dose while maintaining perfusion image quality. Our goal is to assess the reproducibility of displayed CT dose index (CTDI) on same-day repeat CT scans (CT1 and CT2). Methods: Retrospectively, we reviewed CT images of PET/CT studies performed on the same day. Low-dose CT utilized AEC technique based on tube current modulation called Smart-mA. The scan parameters were 64 × 0.625mm collimation, 5mm slice thickness, 0.984 pitch, 1-sec rotation time, 120 kVp, and noise index 50 with a range of 10–200 mA. The scan length matched with PET field of view (FOV) with the heart near the middle of axial FOV. We identified the reference slice number (RS) for an anatomical landmark (carina) and used it to estimate axial shift between two CTs. For patient size, we measured an effective diameter on the reference slice. The effect of patient positioning to CTDI was evaluated using the table height. We calculated the absolute percent difference of the CTDI (%diff) for estimation of the reproducibility. Results: The study included 168 adults with an average body-mass index of 31.72 ± 9.10 (kg/m{sup 2}) and effective diameter was 32.72 ± 4.60 cm. The average CTDI was 1.95 ± 1.40 mGy for CT1 and 1.97 ± 1.42mGy for CT2. The mean %diff was 7.8 ± 6.8%. Linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the table height and %diff CTDI. (r=0.82, p<0.001) Conclusion: We have shown for the first time in human subjects, using two same-day CT images, that the AEC technique in low-dose CT is reproducible within 10% and significantly depends on the patient centering.

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: cyang@tccn.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Tzu-Chi College of Technology, 970, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shu-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Buddhist Tzu-Chi General Hospital, 970, Hualien, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Tzu-Chi College of Technology, 970, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S. P. [Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. Methods: The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. Results: The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Conclusions: Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  8. Prediction of neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy response and survival using pretreatment [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Ji-In; Ha, Seunggyun; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung-Bum; Oh, Heung-Kwon [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Keun-Wook [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye-Seung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho-Young [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate metabolic and textural parameters from pretreatment [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans for the prediction of neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy response and 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). We performed a retrospective review of 74 patients diagnosed with LARC who were initially examined with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT, and who underwent neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy followed by complete resection. The standardized uptake value (mean, peak, and maximum), metabolic volume (MV), and total lesion glycolysis of rectal cancer lesions were calculated using the isocontour method with various thresholds. Using three-dimensional textural analysis, about 50 textural features were calculated for PET images. Response to neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy, as assessed by histological tumour regression grading (TRG) after surgery and 3-year DFS, was evaluated using univariate/multivariate binary logistic regression and univariate/multivariate Cox regression analyses. MVs calculated using the thresholds mean standardized uptake value of the liver + two standard deviations (SDs), and mean standard uptake of the liver + three SDs were significantly associated with TRG. Textural parameters from histogram-based and co-occurrence analysis were significantly associated with TRG. However, multivariate analysis revealed that none of these parameters had any significance. On the other hand, MV calculated using various thresholds was significantly associated with 3-year DFS, and MV calculated using a higher threshold tended to be more strongly associated with 3-year DFS. In addition, textural parameters including kurtosis of the absolute gradient (GrKurtosis) were significantly associated with 3-year DFS. Multivariate analysis revealed that GrKurtosis could be a prognostic factor for 3-year DFS. Metabolic and textural parameters from initial [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans could be indexes to assess

  9. Assessment of cerebral P-glycoprotein expression and function with PET by combined [11C]inhibitor and [11C]substrate scans in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müllauer, Julia; Karch, Rudolf; Bankstahl, Jens P.; Bankstahl, Marion; Stanek, Johann; Wanek, Thomas; Mairinger, Severin; Müller, Markus; Löscher, Wolfgang; Langer, Oliver; Kuntner, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) protects the brain from accumulation of lipophilic compounds by active efflux transport across the blood–brain barrier. Changes in Pgp function/expression may occur in neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease. In this work we investigated the suitability of the radiolabeled Pgp inhibitors [ 11 C]elacridar and [ 11 C]tariquidar to visualize Pgp density in rat brain with PET. Methods: Rats underwent a first PET scan with [ 11 C]elacridar (n = 5) or [ 11 C]tariquidar (n = 6) followed by a second scan with the Pgp substrate (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil after administration of unlabeled tariquidar at a dose which half-maximally inhibits cerebral Pgp (3 mg/kg). Compartmental modeling using an arterial input function and Logan graphical analysis were used to estimate rate constants and volumes of distribution (V T ) of radiotracers in different brain regions. Results: Brain PET signals of [ 11 C]elacridar and [ 11 C]tariquidar were very low (∼ 0.5 standardized uptake value, SUV). There was a significant negative correlation between V T and K 1 (i.e. influx rate constant from plasma into brain) values of [ 11 C]elacridar or [ 11 C]tariquidar and V T and K 1 values of (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil in different brain regions which was consistent with binding of [ 11 C]inhibitors to Pgp and efflux of (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil by Pgp. Conclusion: The small Pgp binding signals obtained with [ 11 C]elacridar and [ 11 C]tariquidar limit the applicability of these tracers to measure cerebral Pgp density. PET tracers with higher (i.e. subnanomolar) binding affinities will be needed to visualize the low density of Pgp in brain

  10. Radiation injury vs. recurrent brain metastasis: combining textural feature radiomics analysis and standard parameters may increase {sup 18}F-FET PET accuracy without dynamic scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Stoffels, Gabriele; Stegmayr, Carina; Neumaier, Bernd [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); Ceccon, Garry [University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Rapp, Marion; Sabel, Michael; Kamp, Marcel A. [Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Department of Neurosurgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Filss, Christian P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Shah, Nadim J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Department of Neurology, Juelich (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Department of Neurology, Juelich (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); University of Cologne, Center of Integrated Oncology (CIO), Cologne (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    We investigated the potential of textural feature analysis of O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) PET to differentiate radiation injury from brain metastasis recurrence. Forty-seven patients with contrast-enhancing brain lesions (n = 54) on MRI after radiotherapy of brain metastases underwent dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET. Tumour-to-brain ratios (TBRs) of {sup 18}F-FET uptake and 62 textural parameters were determined on summed images 20-40 min post-injection. Tracer uptake kinetics, i.e., time-to-peak (TTP) and patterns of time-activity curves (TAC) were evaluated on dynamic PET data from 0-50 min post-injection. Diagnostic accuracy of investigated parameters and combinations thereof to discriminate between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury was compared. Diagnostic accuracy increased from 81 % for TBR{sub mean} alone to 85 % when combined with the textural parameter Coarseness or Short-zone emphasis. The accuracy of TBR{sub max} alone was 83 % and increased to 85 % after combination with the textural parameters Coarseness, Short-zone emphasis, or Correlation. Analysis of TACs resulted in an accuracy of 70 % for kinetic pattern alone and increased to 83 % when combined with TBR{sub max}. Textural feature analysis in combination with TBRs may have the potential to increase diagnostic accuracy for discrimination between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury, without the need for dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET scans. (orig.)

  11. Scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainsbridge, B.

    1994-01-01

    In late 1959, Richard Feynman observed that manoeuvring atoms was something that could be done in principle but has not been done, 'because we are too big'. In 1982, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented and is now a central tool for the construction of nanoscale devices in what was known as molecular engineering, and now, nanotechnology. The principles of the microscope are outlined and references are made to other scanning devices which have evolved from the original invention. The method of employment of the STM as a machine tool is described and references are made to current speculations on applications of the instrument in nanotechnology. A short bibliography on this topic is included. 27 refs., 7 figs

  12. Scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainsbridge, B [Murdoch Univ., WA (Australia). School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

    1994-12-31

    In late 1959, Richard Feynman observed that manoeuvring atoms was something that could be done in principle but has not been done, `because we are too big`. In 1982, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented and is now a central tool for the construction of nanoscale devices in what was known as molecular engineering, and now, nanotechnology. The principles of the microscope are outlined and references are made to other scanning devices which have evolved from the original invention. The method of employment of the STM as a machine tool is described and references are made to current speculations on applications of the instrument in nanotechnology. A short bibliography on this topic is included. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  13. 67Ga lung scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niden, A.H.; Mishkin, F.S.; Khurana, M.M.L.; Pick, R.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with clinical signs of pulmonary embolic disease and lung infiltrates were studied to determine the value of gallium citrate 67 Ga lung scan in differentiating embolic from inflammatory lung disease. In 11 patients without angiographically proved embolism, only seven had corresponding ventilation-perfusion defects compatible with inflammatory disease. In seven of these 11 patients, the 67 Ga concentration indicated inflammatory disease. In the 12 patients with angiographically proved embolic disease, six had corresponding ventilation-perfusion defects compatible with inflammatory disease. None had an accumulation of 67 Ga in the area of pulmonary infiltrate. Thus, ventilation-perfusion lung scans are of limited value when lung infiltrates are present. In contrast, the accumulation of 67 Ga in the lung indicates an inflammatory process. Gallium imaging can help select those patients with lung infiltrates who need angiography

  14. Horizon Scanning for Pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepage-Nefkens, Isabelle; Douw, Karla; Mantjes, GertJan

    for a joint horizon scanning system (HSS).  We propose to create a central “horizon scanning unit” to perform the joint HS activities (a newly established unit, an existing HS unit, or a third party commissioned and financed by the collaborating countries). The unit will be responsible for the identification...... and filtration of new and emerging pharmaceutical products. It will maintain and update the HS database, organise company pipeline meetings, and disseminate the HSS’s outputs.  The HS unit works closely together with the designated national HS experts in each collaborating country. The national HS experts...... will collect country-specific information, liaise between the central HS unit and country-specific clinical and other experts, coordinate the national prioritization process (to select products for early assessment), and communicate the output of the HSS to national decision makers.  The outputs of the joint...

  15. Multichannel scanning spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagutin, A.F.

    1979-01-01

    A spectrophotometer designed in the Crimea astrophysical observatory is described. The spectrophotometer is intended for the installation at the telescope to measure energy distribution in the star spectra in the 3100-8550 A range. The device is made according to the scheme with a fixed diffraction lattice. The choice of the optical kinematic scheme is explained. The main design elements are shown. Some singularities of the scanning drive kinematics are considered. The device performance is given

  16. Scanning drop sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  17. Scanning drop sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Shinde, Aniketa A.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Jones, Ryan J.; Marcin, Martin R.; Mitrovic, Slobodan

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical or electrochemical and photochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  18. IMEF gamma scanning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Sang Yeol; Park, Dae Kyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Ju, Yong Sun; Jeon, Yong Bum

    1997-06-01

    The gamma scanning system which is installed in IMEF is the equipment obtaining the gamma ray spectrum from irradiated fuels. This equipment could afford the useful data relating spent fuels like as burn-up measurements. We describe the specifications of the equipment and its accessories, and also described its operation procedure so that an operator can use this report as the operation procedure. (author). 1 tab., 11 figs., 11 refs.

  19. IMEF gamma scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Sang Yeol; Park, Dae Kyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Ju, Yong Sun; Jeon, Yong Bum.

    1997-06-01

    The gamma scanning system which is installed in IMEF is the equipment obtaining the gamma ray spectrum from irradiated fuels. This equipment could afford the useful data relating spent fuels like as burn-up measurements. We describe the specifications of the equipment and its accessories, and also described its operation procedure so that an operator can use this report as the operation procedure. (author). 1 tab., 11 figs., 11 refs

  20. Scanning unit for collectrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaige, Yves.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns a measurement scanning assembly for collectron type detectors. It is used in measuring the neutron flux in nuclear reactors. As the number of these detectors in a reactor can be very great, they are not usually all connected permanently to the measuring facility but rather in turn by means of a scanning device which carries out, as it were, multiplexing between all the collectrons and the input of a single measuring system. The object of the invention is a scanning assembly which is of relative simplicity through an original organisation. Specifically, according to this organisation, the collectrons outputs are grouped together in bunches, each of these bunches being processed by a multiplexing sub-assembly belonging to a first stage, the different outputs of these multiplexing subassemblies of this first stage being grouped together yet again in bunches processed by multiplexors forming a new stage and so forth. Further, this structure is specially adapted for use with collectrons by utilising a current amplifier at each multiplexing level so that from one end to the other of the multiplexing system, the commutations are carried out on currents and not on voltages [fr

  1. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  2. Evaluation of a short dynamic 18F-fluoride PET/CT scanning method to assess bone metabolic activity in spinal orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Marloes J M; Wierts, Roel; Jutten, Elisabeth M C; Halders, Servé G E A; Willems, Paul C P H; Brans, Boudewijn

    2015-11-01

    A complication after spinal fusion surgery is pseudarthrosis, but its radiological diagnosis is of limited value. (18)F-fluoride PET with its ability to assess bone metabolism activity could be of value. The goal of this study was to assess the clinical feasibility of calculating the static standardized uptake value (SUV) from a short dynamic scan without the use of blood sampling, thereby obtaining all dynamic and static parameters in a scan of only 30 min. This approach was tested on a retrospective patient population with persisting pain after spinal fusion surgery. In 16 patients, SUVs (SUV max, SUV mean) and kinetic parameters (K 1, k 2, k 3, v b, K i,NLR, K 1/k 2, k 3/(k 2 + k 3), K i,patlak) were derived from static and dynamic PET/CT scans of operated and control regions of the spine, after intravenous administration of 156-214 MBq (18)F-fluoride. Parameter differences between control and operated regions, as well as between pseudarthrosis and fused segments were evaluated. SUVmean at 30 and 60 min was calculated from kinetic parameters obtained from the dynamic data set (SUV mean,2TCM). Agreement between measured and calculated SUVs was evaluated through Bland-Altman plots. Overall, statistically significant differences between control and operated regions were observed for SUV max, SUV mean, K i,NLR, K i,patlak, K 1/k 2 and k 3/(k 2 + k 3). Diagnostic CT showed pseudarthrosis in 6/16 patients, while in 10/16 patients, segments were fused. Of all parameters, only those regarding the incorporation of bone [K i,NLR, K i,patlak, k 3/(k 2 + k 3)] differed statistically significant in the intervertebral disc space between the pseudarthrosis and fused patients group. The mean values of the patient-specific blood clearance rate [Formula: see text] differed statistically significant between the pseudarthrosis and the fusion group, with a p value of 0.011. This may correspond with the lack of statistical significance of the SUV values between pseudarthrosis and

  3. Detection of bone metastases in breast cancer patients in the PET/CT era: Do we still need the bone scan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, M; Kupik, O; Karabulut, E; Høilund-Carlsen, P F

    2016-01-01

    To examine the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) for the detection of bone metastasis in breast cancer patients and assess whether whole body bone scan (BS) with (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate provides any additional information. Study group comprised 150 patients, mean age 52 years (range 27-85) with breast cancer, suspected of having bone metastases. All patients had undergone both FDG-PET/CT and BS with or without single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) within a period of 6 weeks. The final diagnosis of bone metastasis was established by histopathological findings, additional imaging, or clinical follow-up longer than 10 months. Cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and carcinoembryogenic antigen (CEA) were measured in all patients. Histologically 83%, 7% and 10% had infiltrating ductal, lobular and mixed carcinoma respectively. Confirmed bone metastases were present in 86 patients (57.3%) and absent in 64 (42.7%). Mean CA15-3 and CEA values in patients with bone metastases were 74.6ng/mL and 60.4U/mL respectively, compared to 21.3ng/mL and 3.2U/mL without metastases (p<0.001). The sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT for the detection of bone metastases was 97.6% compared to 89.5% with SPECT/CT. In 57 patients, FDG-PET/CT correctly identified additional pulmonary, hepatic, nodal and other soft tissue metastases, not detected by BS. Our findings suggest that FDG-PET/CT is superior to BS with or without SPECT/CT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiation injury vs. recurrent brain metastasis: combining textural feature radiomics analysis and standard parameters may increase 18F-FET PET accuracy without dynamic scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Stoffels, Gabriele; Ceccon, Garry; Rapp, Marion; Sabel, Michael; Filss, Christian P; Kamp, Marcel A; Stegmayr, Carina; Neumaier, Bernd; Shah, Nadim J; Langen, Karl-Josef; Galldiks, Norbert

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the potential of textural feature analysis of O-(2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) PET to differentiate radiation injury from brain metastasis recurrence. Forty-seven patients with contrast-enhancing brain lesions (n = 54) on MRI after radiotherapy of brain metastases underwent dynamic 18 F-FET PET. Tumour-to-brain ratios (TBRs) of 18 F-FET uptake and 62 textural parameters were determined on summed images 20-40 min post-injection. Tracer uptake kinetics, i.e., time-to-peak (TTP) and patterns of time-activity curves (TAC) were evaluated on dynamic PET data from 0-50 min post-injection. Diagnostic accuracy of investigated parameters and combinations thereof to discriminate between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury was compared. Diagnostic accuracy increased from 81 % for TBR mean alone to 85 % when combined with the textural parameter Coarseness or Short-zone emphasis. The accuracy of TBR max alone was 83 % and increased to 85 % after combination with the textural parameters Coarseness, Short-zone emphasis, or Correlation. Analysis of TACs resulted in an accuracy of 70 % for kinetic pattern alone and increased to 83 % when combined with TBR max . Textural feature analysis in combination with TBRs may have the potential to increase diagnostic accuracy for discrimination between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury, without the need for dynamic 18 F-FET PET scans. • Textural feature analysis provides quantitative information about tumour heterogeneity • Textural features help improve discrimination between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury • Textural features might be helpful to further understand tumour heterogeneity • Analysis does not require a more time consuming dynamic PET acquisition.

  5. Automatic Ultrasound Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin

    on the user adjustments on the scanner interface to optimize the scan settings. This explains the huge interest in the subject of this PhD project entitled “AUTOMATIC ULTRASOUND SCANNING”. The key goals of the project have been to develop automated techniques to minimize the unnecessary settings...... on the scanners, and to improve the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) in ultrasound by introducing new quantitative measures. Thus, four major issues concerning automation of the medical ultrasound are addressed in this PhD project. They touch upon gain adjustments in ultrasound, automatic synthetic aperture image...

  6. Radiographic scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevan, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to radiodiagnostic agents and more particularly to a composition and method for preparing a highly effective technetium-99m-based bone scanning agent. One deficiency of x-ray examination is the inability of that technique to detect skeletal metastases in their incipient stages. It has been discovered that the methanehydroxydiphosphonate bone mineral-seeking agent is unique in that it provides the dual benefits of sharp radiographic imaging and excellent lesion detection when used with technetium-99m. This agent can also be used with technetium-99m for detecting soft tissue calcification in the manner of the inorganic phosphate radiodiagnostic agents

  7. Spinal CT scan, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections. (Ueda, J.)

  8. Scanning Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1988-01-01

    A confocal color laser microscope which utilizes a three color laser light source (Red: He-Ne, Green: Ar, Blue: Ar) has been developed and is finding useful applications in the semiconductor field. The color laser microscope, when compared to a conventional microscope, offers superior color separation, higher resolution, and sharper contrast. Recently some new functions including a Focus Scan Memory, a Surface Profile Measurement System, a Critical Dimension Measurement system (CD) and an Optical Beam Induced Current Function (OBIC) have been developed for the color laser microscope. This paper will discuss these new features.

  9. Scanning apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunnett, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    A novel method is described for processing the analogue signals from the photomultiplier tubes in a tomographic X-ray scanner. The system produces a series of pulses whose instantaneous frequency depends on the detected intensity of the X-radiation. A timer unit is used to determine the segment scan intervals and also to deduce the average radiation intensity detected during this interval. The overall system is claimed to possess the advantageous properties of low time delay, wide bandwidth and relative low cost. (U.K.)

  10. Low-dose computed tomography scans with automatic exposure control for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tu, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Shu-Hsin

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of automatic exposure control (AEC) in order to optimize low-dose computed tomography (CT) protocols for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). One PET/CT and one SPECT/CT were used to acquire CT images for four anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-year-old, 5-year-old and 10-year-old children and an adult. For the hybrid systems investigated in this study, the radiation dose and image quality of cardiac CT scans performed with AEC activated depend mainly on the selection of a predefined image quality index. Multiple linear regression methods were used to analyse image data from anthropomorphic phantom studies to investigate the effects of body size and predefined image quality index on CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT scans. The regression relationships have a coefficient of determination larger than 0.9, indicating a good fit to the data. According to the regression models, low-dose protocols using the AEC technique were optimized for patients of different ages. In comparison with the standard protocol with AEC activated for adult cardiac examinations used in our clinical routine practice, the optimized paediatric protocols in PET/CT allow 32.2, 63.7 and 79.2% CT dose reductions for anthropomorphic phantoms simulating 10-year-old, 5-year-old and 1-year-old children, respectively. The corresponding results for cardiac SPECT/CT are 8.4, 51.5 and 72.7%. AEC is a practical way to reduce CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT, but the AEC settings should be determined properly for optimal effect. Our results show that AEC does not eliminate the need for paediatric protocols and CT examinations using the AEC technique should be optimized for paediatric patients to reduce the radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable.

  11. NEW SCANNING DEVICE FOR SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPE APPLICATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SAWATZKY, GA; Koops, Karl Richard

    A small, single piezo XYZ translator has been developed. The device has been used as a scanner for a scanning tunneling microscope and has been tested successfully in air and in UHV. Its simple design results in a rigid and compact scanning unit which permits high scanning rates.

  12. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  13. Scanning device for a spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat'ev, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    The invention belongs to scanning devices and is intended for spectrum scanning in spectral devices. The purpose of the invention is broadening of spectral scanning range. The device construction ensures the spectrum scanning range determined from revolution fractions to several revolutions of the monochromator drum head, any number of the drum head revolutions determined by integral number with addition of the drum revolution fractions with high degree of accuracy being possible

  14. Establishing locoregional control of malignant pleural mesothelioma using high-dose radiotherapy and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigen, Malcolm; Lawford, Catherine; Churcher, Katheryn; Zupan, Eddy; Hamilton, Chris; Lee, Sze Ting; Scott, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    The management of malignant pleural mesothelioma represents one of the most challenging issues in oncology, as there is no proven long-term benefit from surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone or in combination. Locoregional progression remains the major cause of death, but radical surgical resection may produce major postoperative morbidity. While radical or postoperative radiotherapy using conventional techniques has resulted in severe toxicity with no impact on survival, recent advances in radiotherapy delivery may be more effective. We treated patients with locally advanced mesothelioma whose tumours had been sub optimally resected with high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to large volumes of one hemithorax, using CT and positron emission tomography (PET) scan-based treatment planning. Clinical outcomes were assessed by determining patterns of failure and metabolic changes in total glycolytic volume (TGV) between pre- and post-irradiation 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans and by recording acute and late toxicity grades. Fourteen patients were analysed with 40 PET scans performed before and up to 4.5 years after radiotherapy. Eleven patients had pleurectomy/decortications, one had an extrapleural pneumonectomy and two had no surgery. Four patients who received chemotherapy had all progressed prior to radiotherapy. After radiotherapy, the in-field local control rate was 71%. No progression occurred in two patients, one was salvaged with further radiotherapy to a new site, four recurred inside the irradiated volume all with concurrent distant metastases and the other seven had distant metastases only. The TGVs were reduced by an average of 67% (range 12–100%) after doses of 45 to 60 Gy to part or all of one hemithorax. There were no serious treatment-related toxicities. Median survival was 25 months from diagnosis and 17 months after starting radiotherapy. We have established that mesothelioma can be

  15. Factors influencing bone scan quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.G.; Shirley, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    A reliable subjective method of assessing bone scan quality is described. A large number of variables which theoretically could influence scan quality were submitted to regression and factor analysis. Obesity, age, sex and abnormality of scan were found to be significant but weak variables. (orig.)

  16. CT scans in encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, Masami; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Iida, Noriyuki; Hisanaga, Manabu; Kinugawa, Kazuhiko

    1980-01-01

    Generally, CT scans reveal a decrease in the volume of the ventricular system, sylvian fissures and cortical sulci in the acute stage of encephalitis, and softening of the cerebral lobes with dilatation of the lateral ventricles and subarachnoidian dilated spaces in the chronic stage. We encountered three cases of encephalitis: mumps (case 1), herpes simplex (case 2), and syphilis (case 3). In case 1, brain edema was seen in the acute stage and brain atrophy in the chronic stage. In case 2, necrosis of the temporal pole, which is pathognomonic in herpes simplex encephalitis, was recognized. And in case 3, multiple lesions whose CT appearance was enhanced by contrast materials were found scattered over the whole brain. These lesions were diagnosed as inflammatory granuloma by histological examination. (author)

  17. Scanning device for scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casale, R.

    1975-01-01

    A device is described for the scintigraphic scanning according to a horizontal plane, comprising: (a) A support provided with two guides horizontally and longitudinally located, one of which is located in the upper part of the support, while the second guide is located in the lower part of the support; (b) A carriage, movable with respect to the support along the two guides, provided in its upper part, projecting above the support, with rolling means suitable to support and to cause to slide along its axis a support rod for the first detector, horizontally and transversely located, said carriage being further provided in its lower part with a recess with possible rolling means suitable to support and to cause to slide along its axis a second support rod for the second detector, said second rod being located parallel to the first rod and below it; (c) One or two support rods for the detectors, the first of said rods being supported above the support in a sliding way along its axis, by the rolling means located in the upper part of the carriage, and the second rod if present is supported slidingly along its axis by the possible rolling means contained in the suitable recess which is provided in the lower part of the carriage, and (d) A vertical shaft supported by said carriage on which is mounted a toothed wheel for each rod, each toothed wheel engaging a positive drive belt or the like, which is connected to each said rod so that rotation of the shaft determines the simultaneous displacement of the two rods along their axes; and single motor means for driving said shaft during a scanning operation. (U.S.)

  18. Scanning the periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, George S; Schoemaker, Paul J H

    2005-11-01

    Companies often face new rivals, technologies, regulations, and other environmental changes that seem to come out of left field. How can they see these changes sooner and capitalize on them? Such changes often begin as weak signals on what the authors call the periphery, or the blurry zone at the edge of an organization's vision. As with human peripheral vision, these signals are difficult to see and interpret but can be vital to success or survival. Unfortunately, most companies lack a systematic method for determining where on the periphery they should be looking, how to interpret the weak signals they see, and how to allocate limited scanning resources. This article provides such a method-a question-based framework for helping companies scan the periphery more efficiently and effectively. The framework divides questions into three categories: learning from the past (What have been our past blind spots? What instructive analogies do other industries offer? Who in the industry is skilled at picking up weak signals and acting on them?); evaluating the present (What important signals are we rationalizing away? What are our mavericks, outliers, complainers, and defectors telling us? What are our peripheral customers and competitors really thinking?); and envisioning the future (What future surprises could really hurt or help us? What emerging technologies could change the game? Is there an unthinkable scenario that might disrupt our business?). Answering these questions is a good first step toward anticipating problems or opportunities that may appear on the business horizon. The article concludes with a self-test that companies can use to assess their need and capability for peripheral vision.

  19. qPET - a quantitative extension of the Deauville scale to assess response in interim FDG-PET scans in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasenclever, Dirk [University of Leipzig, Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology (IMISE), Leipzig (Germany); Kurch, Lars; Georgi, Thomas; Sabri, Osama; Kluge, Regine [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Mauz-Koerholz, Christine; Koerholz, Dieter [University Hospital Halle, Department of Pediatrics, Halle (Germany); Elsner, Andreas [Hermes Medical Solutions AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wallace, Hamish [Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Landman-Parker, Judith [Hopital d' Enfants Armand Trousseau, Paris (France); Moryl-Bujakowska, Angelina [Jagiellonian University Medical College, Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Polish-American Institute of Pediatrics, Krakow (Poland); Cepelova, Michaela [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Faculty Hospital Motol, Prague (Czech Republic); Karlen, Jonas [Karolinska University Hospital, Pediatric Cancer Unit, Astrid Lindgrens Childrens Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Alvarez Fernandez-Teijeiro, Ana [University Hospital Virgen Macarena Avda, Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Sevilla (Spain); Attarbaschi, Andishe [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, St. Anna Children' s Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Fossaa, Alexander [Department of Medical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Rikshospitalet - Radiumhospitalet HF, Oslo (Norway); Pears, Jane [Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin (Ireland); Hraskova, Andrea [University Children' s Hospital, Clinic of Pediatric Oncology, Bratislava (Slovakia); Bergstraesser, Eva [University Children' s Hospital, Department Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Beishuizen, Auke [MC - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Uyttebroeck, Anne [University Hospitals of Leuven, Department of Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Schomerus, Eckhard [University of Odense (OUH), Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, H. C. Andersen Children' s Hospital, Odense (Denmark)

    2014-07-15

    Interim FDG-PET is used for treatment tailoring in lymphoma. Deauville response criteria consist of five ordinal categories based on visual comparison of residual tumor uptake to physiological reference uptakes. However, PET-response is a continuum and visual assessments can be distorted by optical illusions. With a novel semi-automatic quantification tool we eliminate optical illusions and extend the Deauville score to a continuous scale. SUV{sub peak} of residual tumors and average uptake of the liver is measured with standardized volumes of interest. The qPET value is the quotient of these measurements. Deauville scores and qPET-values were determined in 898 pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma patients after two OEPA chemotherapy cycles. Deauville categories translate to thresholds on the qPET scale: Categories 3, 4, 5 correspond to qPET values of 0.95, 1.3 and 2.0, respectively. The distribution of qPET values is unimodal with a peak representing metabolically normal responses and a tail of clearly abnormal outliers. In our patients, the peak is at qPET = 0.95 coinciding with the border between Deauville 2 and 3. qPET cut values of 1.3 or 2 (determined by fitting mixture models) select abnormal metabolic responses with high sensitivity, respectively, specificity. qPET methodology provides semi-automatic quantification for interim FDG-PET response in lymphoma extending ordinal Deauville scoring to a continuous scale. Deauville categories correspond to certain qPET cut values. Thresholds between normal and abnormal response can be derived from the qPET-distribution without need for follow-up data. In our patients, qPET < 1.3 excludes abnormal response with high sensitivity. (orig.)

  20. qPET - a quantitative extension of the Deauville scale to assess response in interim FDG-PET scans in lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenclever, Dirk; Kurch, Lars; Georgi, Thomas; Sabri, Osama; Kluge, Regine; Mauz-Koerholz, Christine; Koerholz, Dieter; Elsner, Andreas; Wallace, Hamish; Landman-Parker, Judith; Moryl-Bujakowska, Angelina; Cepelova, Michaela; Karlen, Jonas; Alvarez Fernandez-Teijeiro, Ana; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Fossaa, Alexander; Pears, Jane; Hraskova, Andrea; Bergstraesser, Eva; Beishuizen, Auke; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Schomerus, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Interim FDG-PET is used for treatment tailoring in lymphoma. Deauville response criteria consist of five ordinal categories based on visual comparison of residual tumor uptake to physiological reference uptakes. However, PET-response is a continuum and visual assessments can be distorted by optical illusions. With a novel semi-automatic quantification tool we eliminate optical illusions and extend the Deauville score to a continuous scale. SUV peak of residual tumors and average uptake of the liver is measured with standardized volumes of interest. The qPET value is the quotient of these measurements. Deauville scores and qPET-values were determined in 898 pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma patients after two OEPA chemotherapy cycles. Deauville categories translate to thresholds on the qPET scale: Categories 3, 4, 5 correspond to qPET values of 0.95, 1.3 and 2.0, respectively. The distribution of qPET values is unimodal with a peak representing metabolically normal responses and a tail of clearly abnormal outliers. In our patients, the peak is at qPET = 0.95 coinciding with the border between Deauville 2 and 3. qPET cut values of 1.3 or 2 (determined by fitting mixture models) select abnormal metabolic responses with high sensitivity, respectively, specificity. qPET methodology provides semi-automatic quantification for interim FDG-PET response in lymphoma extending ordinal Deauville scoring to a continuous scale. Deauville categories correspond to certain qPET cut values. Thresholds between normal and abnormal response can be derived from the qPET-distribution without need for follow-up data. In our patients, qPET < 1.3 excludes abnormal response with high sensitivity. (orig.)

  1. Subject-specific bone attenuation correction for brain PET/MR: can ZTE-MRI substitute CT scan accurately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifé, Maya; Fernandez, Brice; Jaubert, Olivier; Soussan, Michael; Brulon, Vincent; Buvat, Irène; Comtat, Claude

    2017-10-01

    In brain PET/MR applications, accurate attenuation maps are required for accurate PET image quantification. An implemented attenuation correction (AC) method for brain imaging is the single-atlas approach that estimates an AC map from an averaged CT template. As an alternative, we propose to use a zero echo time (ZTE) pulse sequence to segment bone, air and soft tissue. A linear relationship between histogram normalized ZTE intensity and measured CT density in Hounsfield units (HU ) in bone has been established thanks to a CT-MR database of 16 patients. Continuous AC maps were computed based on the segmented ZTE by setting a fixed linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) to air and soft tissue and by using the linear relationship to generate continuous μ values for the bone. Additionally, for the purpose of comparison, four other AC maps were generated: a ZTE derived AC map with a fixed LAC for the bone, an AC map based on the single-atlas approach as provided by the PET/MR manufacturer, a soft-tissue only AC map and, finally, the CT derived attenuation map used as the gold standard (CTAC). All these AC maps were used with different levels of smoothing for PET image reconstruction with and without time-of-flight (TOF). The subject-specific AC map generated by combining ZTE-based segmentation and linear scaling of the normalized ZTE signal into HU was found to be a good substitute for the measured CTAC map in brain PET/MR when used with a Gaussian smoothing kernel of 4~mm corresponding to the PET scanner intrinsic resolution. As expected TOF reduces AC error regardless of the AC method. The continuous ZTE-AC performed better than the other alternative MR derived AC methods, reducing the quantification error between the MRAC corrected PET image and the reference CTAC corrected PET image.

  2. Image registration/fusion software for PET and CT/MRI by using simultaneous emission and transmission scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Keishi; Amano, Masaharu; Sato, Tomohiko; Okumura, Takeshi; Konishi, Norihiro; Komatsu, Masahiko

    2003-01-01

    When PET (positron emission tomography) is used for oncology studies, it is important to register and over-lay PET images with the images of other anatomical modalities, such as those obtained by CT (computed tomography) or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), in order for the lesions to be anatomically located with high accuracy. The Shimadzu SET-2000W Series PET scanners provide simultaneous acquisition of emission and transmission data, which is capable of complete spatial alignment of both functional and attenuation images. This report describes our newly developed image registration/fusion software, which reformats PET emission images to the CT/MRI grid by using the transform matrix obtained by matching PET transmission images with CT/MRI images. Transmission images are registered and fused either automatically or manually, through 3-dimensional rotation and translation, with the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal fused images being monitored on the screen. This new method permits sufficiently accurate registration and efficient data processing with promoting effective use of CT/MRI images of the DICOM format, without using markers in data acquisition or any special equipment, such as a combined PET/CT scanner. (author)

  3. Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma: Clinical features, prognostic factors and survival with RCHOP in Arab patients in the PET scan era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shemmari, Salem; Sankaranarayanan, Sreedharan P; Krishnan, Yamini

    2014-07-01

    PMBCL is a distinct type of nonhodgkins lymphoma with specific clinicopathological features. To clarify clinical features, treatment alternatives and outcomes, we evaluated 28 Arab patients treated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy between 2006 and 2011. PMBCL lymphoma patients identified according to WHO classification and treated at KCCC between 2006 and 2011 were included in this study. Demographic and clinical data are presented as means or medians. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Survival rates were compared using the log-rank test. A P lymphoma entity seen in the young with good survival. The role of PET scan for response evaluation and the type of consolidation therapy needs to be further clarified.

  4. Multisite Thrombus Imaging and Fibrin Content Estimation With a Single Whole-Body PET Scan in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Francesco; Oliveira, Bruno L; Rietz, Tyson A; Rotile, Nicholas J; Naha, Pratap C; Cormode, David P; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian; Caravan, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current diagnostic strategies rely on imaging modalities that are specific for distinct vascular territories, but a thrombus-specific whole-body imaging approach is still missing. Moreover, imaging techniques to assess thrombus composition are underdeveloped, although therapeutic strategies may benefit from such technology. Therefore, our goal was to test whether positron emission tomography (PET) with the fibrin-binding probe (64)Cu-FBP8 allows multisite thrombus detection and fibrin content estimation. Thrombosis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats (n=32) by ferric chloride application on both carotid artery and femoral vein. (64)Cu-FBP8-PET/CT imaging was performed 1, 3, or 7 days after thrombosis to detect thrombus location and to evaluate age-dependent changes in target uptake. Ex vivo biodistribution, autoradiography, and histopathology were performed to validate imaging results. Arterial and venous thrombi were localized on fused PET/CT images with high accuracy (97.6%; 95% confidence interval, 92-100). A single whole-body PET/MR imaging session was sufficient to reveal the location of both arterial and venous thrombi after (64)Cu-FBP8 administration. PET imaging showed that probe uptake was greater in younger clots than in older ones for both arterial and venous thrombosis (P<0.0001). Quantitative histopathology revealed an age-dependent reduction of thrombus fibrin content (P<0.001), consistent with PET results. Biodistribution and autoradiography further confirmed the imaging findings. We demonstrated that (64)Cu-FBP8-PET is a feasible approach for whole-body thrombus detection and that molecular imaging of fibrin can provide, noninvasively, insight into clot composition. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Influence of scanning time window on the binding potentials of dopamine transporter in the brain of healthy volunteers with 11C-CFT PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Chun; Zuo Chuantao; Zhang Zhengwei; Wu Ping; Zhang Huiwei; Guan Yihui

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find the optimal scanning time window and then set up the normal binding potentials (BPs) of 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)-(N- 11 C-methyl) tropane ( 11 C-CFT) DAT PET/CT imaging. Methods: Thirty-one healthy volunteers (20 males, 11 females, average age: (55.7±2.3) years), who all gave written informed consent, were divided into three age and gender-matched groups according to block randomization. Each group underwent static PET/CT scan in different time windows from 40-60 min, 60-80 min to 80-100 min after 11 C-CFT injection. To determine the best scanning time window, the ratios of caudate and putamen of all volunteers were analyzed using automatic ROI method (caudate (putamen)/parieto-occipital cotex-1) and compared by one-way analysis of variance and the least significant difference (LSD) t test. The ratio of the same area between different age-groups and gender-groups was compared with independent two-sample t test. Results: Ratios of left caudate (2.08±0.06, 1.75±0.07 and 1.77±0.12 respectively), right anterior putamen (2.33±0.06, 1.95±0.09 and 2.08±0.12 respectively) and bilateral posterior putamen (left: 1.88±0.66, 1.55±0.88 and 1.72±0.09; right: 1.98±0.07, 1.61±0.09 and 1.69±0.12) were all different in three time windows (F=3.588, 3.345, 4.479, 3.557, all P<0.05). There were significant differences in ratios of left caudate, right anterior and bilateral posterior putamen between 40-60 min and the 60-80 min (all P<0.05), as well as the ratios of left caudate between 40-60 min and the 80-100 min group (P<0.05). While no valid differences in ratios of those areas were shown between the groups of 60-80 min and 80-100 min scanning time window (all P>0.05). DAT densities in right and left side of caudate, anterior and posterior putamen were significantly lower in the group over 60 years of age than those under 60 years (t=-3.260, -3.090, -3.270, -3.190, -2.270, -3.110, all P<0.05), but were not different between gender

  6. Fibroelastic pseudotumor elastofibroma dorsi detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT scan and by postherapy radioiodine SPECT/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oporto, M; Cepa, F; Orta, N; Rubí, S; Navalón, H; Peña, C

    Radioiodine uptake in the thyroid tissue, metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), and in other tissues, depends on the expression of sodium-iodide symporter (NIS). Vascular permeability, effusions, inflammation, and other mechanisms may also play a role in the accumulation of radioactive iodine. A 63-year-old woman underwent radioiodine therapy, as well as a post-therapy whole-body scan, as she was suspected of having lung metastasis from thyroid carcinoma. The scan not only showed uptake at the lung metastasis but also a faint diffuse bilateral uptake in the posterior thorax. On SPECT/CT this uptake was located in a known Elastofibroma Dorsi (ED) previously diagnosed by contrast CT and viewed in a FDG PET/CT. The radioiodine uptake in ED, especially if typical, is not a diagnostic problem in SPECT/CT study, but can be misleading in a study limited to a few planar images, particularly if the uptake occurs asymmetrically, or ED is located in a unsuspected area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. GPR scan assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas M. Abbas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mekaad Radwan monument is situated in the neighborhood of Bab Zuweila in the historical Cairo, Egypt. It was constructed at the middle XVII century (1635 AD. The building has a rectangle shape plan (13 × 6 m with the longitudinal sides approximately WNW-ESE. It comprises three storages namely; the ground floor; the opened floor (RADWAN Bench and the living floor with a total elevation of 15 m above the street level. The building suffers from severe deterioration phenomena with patterns of damage which have occurred over time. These deterioration and damages could be attributed to foundation problems, subsoil water and also to the earthquake that affected the entire Greater Cairo area in October 1992. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR scan was accomplished against the walls of the opened floor (RADWAN Bench to evaluate the hazard impact on the walls textures and integrity. The results showed an anomalous feature through the southern wall of RADWAN Bench. A mathematical model has been simulated to confirm the obtained anomaly and the model response exhibited a good matching with the outlined anomaly.

  8. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  9. Gastrointestinal scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    An easily prepared radiolabeled gastrointestinal scanning agent is described. Technetium-99m has ideal characteristics for imaging the upper and lower GI tract and determining stomach emptying and intestinal transit time when used with an insoluble particulate material. For example, crystalline and amorphous calcium phosphate particles can be effectively labeled in a one-step process using sup(99m)TcO 4 and SnCl 2 . These labeled particles have insignificant mass and when administered orally pass through the GI tract unchanged, without affecting the handling and density of the intestinal contents. Visualization of the esophageal entry into the stomach, the greater and lesser curvatures of the stomach, ejection into the duodenum, and rates of passage through the upper and lower GI tract are obtained. The slurry of sup(99m)TC particulate can be given rectally by enema. Good images of the cecum and the ascending, transverse, and descending colon are obtained. Mucosal folds and the splenic and hepatic flexures are visualized. The resilience of the large intestine is also readily visualized by pneumocolonographic techniques. (author)

  10. FDG PET scans as evaluation of clinical response to dendritic cell vaccination in patients with malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Hendel, Helle W; Johannesen, Helle H

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurements of tumour metabolism by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) have been successfully applied to monitor tumour response after chemo- and chemo-radiotherapy and may not have the same limitations as other morphological imaging techniques. In this st...

  11. The maximum standardized uptake value of 18 F-FDG PET scan to determine prognosis of hormone-receptor positive metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether PET scan maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax could differentiate luminal A from luminal B and help predict the survival of metastatic breast cancer (MBC patients with luminal subtype is still unknown and need to be investigated. Methods 305 MBC patients with luminal subtypes were screened with PET/CT. Eligible patients were prospectively followed up. Results In total, 134 patients were eligible for this study. SUVmax was significantly related to the number of metastatic sites and presence of visceral metastasis on univariate analysis. SUVmax could not effectively differentiate patients with luminal A from luminal B subtype. Although luminal subtype at diagnosis could predict the relapse-free interval, it could not predict progression-free survival (PFS or overall survival (OS after developing relapse. In contrast, SUVmax was predictive of both PFS and OS and this effect was maintained in multivariate COX regression model. Conclusions SUVmax of MBC did not correlate with molecular subtypes of primary tumor. While molecular subtype may be a valuable prognostic factor at primary diagnosis of breast cancer, the SUVmax, rather than molecular subtype, does have a potential to predict independently in multivariate analysis for the PFS and OS in patients with metastatic disease of luminal subtype.

  12. Comparison of standardized uptake values measured on {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT scans using three different tube current intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valadares, Agnes Araujo; Woellner, Eduardo Bechtloff; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto, E-mail: agnesvaladares@me.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Duarte, Paulo Schiavom; Coura-Filho, George Barberio [Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo Octavio Frias de Oliveira (ICESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Objective: to analyze standardized uptake values (SUVs) using three different tube current intensities for attenuation correction on {sup 18}FNaF PET/CT scans. Materials and methods: a total of 254 {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT studies were analyzed using 10, 20 and 30 mAs. The SUVs were calculated in volumes of interest (VOIs) drawn on three skeletal regions, namely, right proximal humeral diaphysis (RH), right proximal femoral diaphysis (RF), and first lumbar vertebra (LV1) in a total of 712 VOIs. The analyses covered 675 regions classified as normal (236 RH, 232 RF, and 207 LV1). Results: mean SUV for each skeletal region was 3.8, 5.4 and 14.4 for RH, RF, and LV1, respectively. As the studies were grouped according to mAs value, the mean SUV values were 3.8, 3.9 and 3.7 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RH region; 5.4, 5.5 and 5.4 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RF region; 13.8, 14.9 and 14.5 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the LV1 region. Conclusion: the three tube current values yielded similar results for SUV calculation. (author)

  13. Comparison of standardized uptake values measured on 18F-NaF PET/CT scans using three different tube current intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valadares, Agnes Araujo; Woellner, Eduardo Bechtloff; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze standardized uptake values (SUVs) using three different tube current intensities for attenuation correction on 18 FNaF PET/CT scans. Materials and methods: a total of 254 18 F-NaF PET/CT studies were analyzed using 10, 20 and 30 mAs. The SUVs were calculated in volumes of interest (VOIs) drawn on three skeletal regions, namely, right proximal humeral diaphysis (RH), right proximal femoral diaphysis (RF), and first lumbar vertebra (LV1) in a total of 712 VOIs. The analyses covered 675 regions classified as normal (236 RH, 232 RF, and 207 LV1). Results: mean SUV for each skeletal region was 3.8, 5.4 and 14.4 for RH, RF, and LV1, respectively. As the studies were grouped according to mAs value, the mean SUV values were 3.8, 3.9 and 3.7 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RH region; 5.4, 5.5 and 5.4 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RF region; 13.8, 14.9 and 14.5 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the LV1 region. Conclusion: the three tube current values yielded similar results for SUV calculation. (author)

  14. Comparison of standardized uptake values measured on F-NaF PET/CT scans using three different tube current intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadares, Agnes Araujo; Duarte, Paulo Schiavom; Woellner, Eduardo Bechtloff; Coura-Filho, George Barberio; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    To analyze standardized uptake values (SUVs) using three different tube current intensities for attenuation correction on (18)FNaF PET/CT scans. A total of 254 (18)F-NaF PET/CT studies were analyzed using 10, 20 and 30 mAs. The SUVs were calculated in volumes of interest (VOIs) drawn on three skeletal regions, namely, right proximal humeral diaphysis (RH), right proximal femoral diaphysis (RF), and first lumbar vertebra (LV1) in a total of 712 VOIs. The analyses covered 675 regions classified as normal (236 RH, 232 RF, and 207 LV1). Mean SUV for each skeletal region was 3.8, 5.4 and 14.4 for RH, RF, and LV1, respectively. As the studies were grouped according to mAs value, the mean SUV values were 3.8, 3.9 and 3.7 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RH region; 5.4, 5.5 and 5.4 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RF region; 13.8, 14.9 and 14.5 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the LV1 region. The three tube current values yielded similar results for SUV calculation.

  15. The maximum standardized uptake value of 18 F-FDG PET scan to determine prognosis of hormone-receptor positive metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian; Hu, Xi-Chun; Jia, Zhen; Ragaz, Joseph; Zhang, Ying-Jian; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Li, Gang; Wang, Bi-Yun; Wang, Zhong-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Whether PET scan maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) could differentiate luminal A from luminal B and help predict the survival of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients with luminal subtype is still unknown and need to be investigated. 305 MBC patients with luminal subtypes were screened with PET/CT. Eligible patients were prospectively followed up. In total, 134 patients were eligible for this study. SUVmax was significantly related to the number of metastatic sites and presence of visceral metastasis on univariate analysis. SUVmax could not effectively differentiate patients with luminal A from luminal B subtype. Although luminal subtype at diagnosis could predict the relapse-free interval, it could not predict progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) after developing relapse. In contrast, SUVmax was predictive of both PFS and OS and this effect was maintained in multivariate COX regression model. SUVmax of MBC did not correlate with molecular subtypes of primary tumor. While molecular subtype may be a valuable prognostic factor at primary diagnosis of breast cancer, the SUVmax, rather than molecular subtype, does have a potential to predict independently in multivariate analysis for the PFS and OS in patients with metastatic disease of luminal subtype

  16. An experimental approach to improve the Monte Carlo modelling of offline PET/CT-imaging of positron emitters induced by scanned proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J; Unholtz, D; Kurz, C; Parodi, K

    2013-01-01

    We report on the experimental campaign carried out at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) to optimize the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of proton-induced positron-emitter production. The presented experimental strategy constitutes a pragmatic inverse approach to overcome the known uncertainties in the modelling of positron-emitter production due to the lack of reliable cross-section data for the relevant therapeutic energy range. This work is motivated by the clinical implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at our facility. Here, the irradiation induced tissue activation in the patient is monitored shortly after the treatment delivery by means of a commercial PET/CT scanner and compared to a MC simulated activity expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment delivery. At HIT, the MC particle transport and interaction code FLUKA is used for the simulation of the expected positron-emitter yield. For this particular application, the code is coupled to externally provided cross-section data of several proton-induced reactions. Studying experimentally the positron-emitting radionuclide yield in homogeneous phantoms provides access to the fundamental production channels. Therefore, five different materials have been irradiated by monoenergetic proton pencil beams at various energies and the induced β + activity subsequently acquired with a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner. With the analysis of dynamically reconstructed PET images, we are able to determine separately the spatial distribution of different radionuclide concentrations at the starting time of the PET scan. The laterally integrated radionuclide yields in depth are used to tune the input cross-section data such that the impact of both the physical production and the imaging process on the various positron-emitter yields is reproduced. The resulting cross-section data sets allow to model the absolute level of measured β + activity induced in the investigated

  17. An experimental approach to improve the Monte Carlo modelling of offline PET/CT-imaging of positron emitters induced by scanned proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J.; Unholtz, D.; Kurz, C.; Parodi, K.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the experimental campaign carried out at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) to optimize the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of proton-induced positron-emitter production. The presented experimental strategy constitutes a pragmatic inverse approach to overcome the known uncertainties in the modelling of positron-emitter production due to the lack of reliable cross-section data for the relevant therapeutic energy range. This work is motivated by the clinical implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at our facility. Here, the irradiation induced tissue activation in the patient is monitored shortly after the treatment delivery by means of a commercial PET/CT scanner and compared to a MC simulated activity expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment delivery. At HIT, the MC particle transport and interaction code FLUKA is used for the simulation of the expected positron-emitter yield. For this particular application, the code is coupled to externally provided cross-section data of several proton-induced reactions. Studying experimentally the positron-emitting radionuclide yield in homogeneous phantoms provides access to the fundamental production channels. Therefore, five different materials have been irradiated by monoenergetic proton pencil beams at various energies and the induced β+ activity subsequently acquired with a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner. With the analysis of dynamically reconstructed PET images, we are able to determine separately the spatial distribution of different radionuclide concentrations at the starting time of the PET scan. The laterally integrated radionuclide yields in depth are used to tune the input cross-section data such that the impact of both the physical production and the imaging process on the various positron-emitter yields is reproduced. The resulting cross-section data sets allow to model the absolute level of measured β+ activity induced in the investigated

  18. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of 18F-CP-18, a potential apoptosis imaging agent, as determined from PET/CT scans in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Mohan; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Walsh, Joseph C; Mocharla, Vani; Fan, Hong; Chaudhary, Ashok; Zhu, Zhihong; Alpaugh, R Katherine; Lango, Miriam N; Yu, Jian Q

    2013-12-01

    (18)F-CP-18, or (18S,21S,24S,27S,30S)-27-(2-carboxyethyl)-21-(carboxymethyl)-30-((2S,3R,4R,5R,6S)-6-((2-(4-(3-F18-fluoropropyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)acetamido)methyl)-3,4,5-trihydroxytetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-carboxamido)-24-isopropyl-18-methyl-17,20,23,26,29-pentaoxo-4,7,10,13-tetraoxa-16,19,22,25,28-pentaazadotriacontane-1,32-dioic acid, is being evaluated as a tissue apoptosis marker for PET imaging. The purpose of this study was to determine the biodistribution and estimate the normal-organ radiation-absorbed doses and effective dose from (18)F-CP-18. Successive whole-body PET/CT scans were obtained at approximately 7, 45, 90, 130, and 170 min after intravenous injection of (18)F-CP-18 in 7 healthy human volunteers. Blood samples and urine were collected between the PET/CT scans, and the biostability of (18)F-CP-18 was assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography. The PET scans were analyzed to determine the radiotracer uptake in different organs. OLINDA/EXM software was used to calculate human radiation doses based on the biodistribution of the tracer. (18)F-CP-18 was 54% intact in human blood at 135 min after injection. The tracer cleared rapidly from the blood pool with a half-life of approximately 30 min. Relatively high (18)F-CP-18 uptake was observed in the kidneys and bladder, with diffuse uptake in the liver and heart. The mean standardized uptake values (SUVs) in the bladder, kidneys, heart, and liver at around 50 min after injection were approximately 65, 6, 1.5, and 1.5, respectively. The calculated effective dose was 38 ± 4 μSv/MBq, with the urinary bladder wall having the highest absorbed dose at 536 ± 61 μGy/MBq using a 4.8-h bladder-voiding interval for the male phantom. For a 1-h voiding interval, these doses were reduced to 15 ± 2 μSv/MBq and 142 ± 15 μGy/MBq, respectively. For a typical injected activity of 555 MBq, the effective dose would be 21.1 ± 2.2 mSv for the 4.8-h interval, reduced to 8.3 ± 1.1 mSv for the 1-h interval

  19. Hyperchromatic laser scanning cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja

    2007-02-01

    In the emerging fields of high-content and high-throughput single cell analysis for Systems Biology and Cytomics multi- and polychromatic analysis of biological specimens has become increasingly important. Combining different technologies and staining methods polychromatic analysis (i.e. using 8 or more fluorescent colors at a time) can be pushed forward to measure anything stainable in a cell, an approach termed hyperchromatic cytometry. For cytometric cell analysis microscope based Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) technologies are ideal as, unlike flow cytometry, they are non-consumptive, i.e. the analyzed sample is fixed on the slide. Based on the feature of relocation identical cells can be subsequently reanalyzed. In this manner data on the single cell level after manipulation steps can be collected. In this overview various components for hyperchromatic cytometry are demonstrated for a SBC instrument, the Laser Scanning Cytometer (Compucyte Corp., Cambridge, MA): 1) polychromatic cytometry, 2) iterative restaining (using the same fluorochrome for restaining and subsequent reanalysis), 3) differential photobleaching (differentiating fluorochromes by their different photostability), 4) photoactivation (activating fluorescent nanoparticles or photocaged dyes), and 5) photodestruction (destruction of FRET dyes). With the intelligent combination of several of these techniques hyperchromatic cytometry allows to quantify and analyze virtually all components of relevance on the identical cell. The combination of high-throughput and high-content SBC analysis with high-resolution confocal imaging allows clear verification of phenotypically distinct subpopulations of cells with structural information. The information gained per specimen is only limited by the number of available antibodies and by sterical hindrance.

  20. Gallium scans in myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swick, H.M.; Preston, D.F.; McQuillen, M.P.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether 67 Ga scans could be used for the detection of thymomas and to investigate the activity of the thymus gland in patients with myasthenia gravis. Scans of the anterior mediastinum proved to be a reliable way to detect thymomas. The scans were positive in eight patients including three with myasthenia gravis and histologically proved thymomas, three others with severe myasthenia gravis and thymic tumors, and two with histologically proved thymomas not associated with myasthenia. Activity on 67 Ga scans was not directly related to the increased activity of the thymus gland that is presumed to be associated with myasthenia gravis

  1. Gallium scans in myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swick, H.M. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington); Preston, D.F.; McQuillen, M.P.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether /sup 67/Ga scans could be used for the detection of thymomas and to investigate the activity of the thymus gland in patients with myasthenia gravis. Scans of the anterior mediastinum proved to be a reliable way to detect thymomas. The scans were positive in eight patients including three with myasthenia gravis and histologically proved thymomas, three others with severe myasthenia gravis and thymic tumors, and two with histologically proved thymomas not associated with myasthenia. Activity on /sup 67/Ga scans was not directly related to the increased activity of the thymus gland that is presumed to be associated with myasthenia gravis. (HLW)

  2. Large Scale Scanning Probe Microscope "Making Shear Force Scanning visible."

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, E.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; van der Veen, Jan T.; van der Veen, J.T.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Wessel, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a demonstration of a scanning probe microscope with shear-force tuning fork feedback. The tuning fork is several centimeters long, and the rigid fiber is replaced by a toothpick. By scaling this demonstration to visible dimensions the accessibility of shear-force scanning and tuning fork

  3. Female patients dosimetry in brain exams with PET/CT scan for diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, P.C.; Mamede, M.; Carvalho, F.M.V.; Mourao, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    Dementia affects over 35 million people worldwide, with strong personal, social and financial impacts. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, accounting for 60-70% of cases, affecting mostly females. Recent technological innovations, using methods of anatomical and functional neuroimaging, with particular emphasis on PET / CT (positron emission tomography with computed tomography associated), have shown excellent prospects for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease represented by Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The use of PET / CT helps diagnosis, but the patients effective dose is higher and directly dependent on the radiopharmaceutical activity and the computed tomographic (CT) protocol used. The aim of this study was evaluated the organs absorbed doses and effective doses in 59 female patients undergoing the PET/CT diagnostic technique. For the measurements of radiation levels from the CT was used TLD100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) Rod detectors inserted in Alderson Randon ® anthropomorphic phantom, which simulates a female pattern, of 155 cm and weight 50 kg, subjected to the same clinical protocol of acquiring patients images. The effective dose resulting from the radiopharmaceutical injected activity was estimated by ICRP106 model using the weight of the patients undergoing to the procedure. The average effective dose due was (7.65 ± 2.22) mSv. The effective dose contribution to the brain and the thyroid due to CT were (2.21 ± 0.38) and (0.72 ± 0.14) mSv, respectively. The use of CT optimized protocols can assist in reducing the dose in this type of procedure. (author)

  4. Female patients dosimetry in brain exams with PET/CT scan for diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, P.C.; Mamede, M.; Carvalho, F.M.V., E-mail: pridili@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mourao, A.P., E-mail: apratabhz@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica, Belo Horionte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica; Oliveira, P.M.C.; Silva, T.A. da, E-mail: pmco@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Dementia affects over 35 million people worldwide, with strong personal, social and financial impacts. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, accounting for 60-70% of cases, affecting mostly females. Recent technological innovations, using methods of anatomical and functional neuroimaging, with particular emphasis on PET / CT (positron emission tomography with computed tomography associated), have shown excellent prospects for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease represented by Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The use of PET / CT helps diagnosis, but the patients effective dose is higher and directly dependent on the radiopharmaceutical activity and the computed tomographic (CT) protocol used. The aim of this study was evaluated the organs absorbed doses and effective doses in 59 female patients undergoing the PET/CT diagnostic technique. For the measurements of radiation levels from the CT was used TLD100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) Rod detectors inserted in Alderson Randon ® anthropomorphic phantom, which simulates a female pattern, of 155 cm and weight 50 kg, subjected to the same clinical protocol of acquiring patients images. The effective dose resulting from the radiopharmaceutical injected activity was estimated by ICRP106 model using the weight of the patients undergoing to the procedure. The average effective dose due was (7.65 ± 2.22) mSv. The effective dose contribution to the brain and the thyroid due to CT were (2.21 ± 0.38) and (0.72 ± 0.14) mSv, respectively. The use of CT optimized protocols can assist in reducing the dose in this type of procedure. (author)

  5. Evaluation of the ICS and DEW scatter correction methods for low statistical content scans in 3D PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sossi, V.; Oakes, T.R.; Ruth, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    The performance of the Integral Convolution and the Dual Energy Window scatter correction methods in 3D PET has been evaluated over a wide range of statistical content of acquired data (1M to 400M events) The order in which scatter correction and detector normalization should be applied has also been investigated. Phantom and human neuroreceptor studies were used with the following figures of merit: axial and radial uniformity, sinogram and image noise, contrast accuracy and contrast accuracy uniformity. Both scatter correction methods perform reliably in the range of number of events examined. Normalization applied after scatter correction yields better radial uniformity and fewer image artifacts

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in STM I, these studies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described in chapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Together, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspects of STM. They provide essential reading and reference material for all students and researchers involved in this field. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in Vol. I, these sudies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described inchapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Togehter, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspcets of STM. They provide essentialreading and reference material for all students and researchers involvedin this field.

  8. Simultaneous emission and transmission scanning in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Kazumi; Kitamura, Keishi; Amano, Masaharu; Miura, Shuichi

    2001-01-01

    Examination by PET (positron emission tomography) scanning, following the dosage of 2-deoxy- 18 F fluoro-D-glucose (FDG), is positively utilized for the diagnosis of cancers, rather than for the purpose of studies. This is because the examination by FDG-PET (PET scanning following the dosage of FDG) ensures higher efficiency in discrimination of cancers, than conventional CT and PET. The method of whole body scanning by PET scanning following the dosage of FDG is effectively utilized not only for discrimination cancers, but also for determining the degree of malignancy of tumors and evaluating the methods of treatment of cancers. In conventional methods for examining the degree of malignancy of tumors and evaluating the methods of cancer treatment, it is necessary to correct for the gamma-ray attenuation, which requires a longer time for examination, increasing the physical and psychological pains of the patients. We have installed the simultaneous emission and transmission scanning capability into the HEADTOME-V of the Shimadzu SET-2000W Series positron emission tomographic scanning instruments, to establish an instrument that permits FDG-PET whole body scanning in actual clinical fields, with minimized physical and psychological pains of patients concerned, yet ensuring an outstandingly high examination efficiency. This report also presents some data obtained by this newly developed instrument and those obtained in practical applications. (author)

  9. An interchangeable scanning Hall probe/scanning SQUID microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Ting; Wu, Sing-Lin; Chen, Tse-Jun; Wang, M. J.; Ling, D. C.; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed a scanning probe microscope for magnetic imaging, which can function as a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) and as a scanning SQUID microscope (SSM). The scanning scheme, applicable to SHPM and SSM, consists of a mechanical positioning (sub) micron-XY stage and a flexible direct contact to the sample without a feedback control system for the Z-axis. With the interchangeable capability of operating two distinct scanning modes, our microscope can incorporate the advantageous functionalities of the SHPM and SSM with large scan range up to millimeter, high spatial resolution (⩽4 μm), and high field sensitivity in a wide range of temperature (4.2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (10 −7 T-1 T). To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, we present magnetic images scanned with SHPM and SSM, including a RbFeB magnet and a nickel grid pattern at room temperature, surface magnetic domain structures of a La 2/3 Ca 1/3 MnO 3 thin film at 77 K, and superconducting vortices in a striped niobium film at 4.2 K

  10. An interchangeable scanning Hall probe/scanning SQUID microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Ting; Wu, Sing-Lin [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Tse-Jun; Wang, M. J. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    We have constructed a scanning probe microscope for magnetic imaging, which can function as a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) and as a scanning SQUID microscope (SSM). The scanning scheme, applicable to SHPM and SSM, consists of a mechanical positioning (sub) micron-XY stage and a flexible direct contact to the sample without a feedback control system for the Z-axis. With the interchangeable capability of operating two distinct scanning modes, our microscope can incorporate the advantageous functionalities of the SHPM and SSM with large scan range up to millimeter, high spatial resolution (⩽4 μm), and high field sensitivity in a wide range of temperature (4.2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (10{sup −7} T-1 T). To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, we present magnetic images scanned with SHPM and SSM, including a RbFeB magnet and a nickel grid pattern at room temperature, surface magnetic domain structures of a La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} thin film at 77 K, and superconducting vortices in a striped niobium film at 4.2 K.

  11. Separation of input function for rapid measurement of quantitative CMRO2 and CBF in a single PET scan with a dual tracer administration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Watabe, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takuya; Iida, Hidehiro

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) images can be quantified using positron emission tomography (PET) by administrating 15 O-labelled water (H 15 2 O) and oxygen ( 15 O 2 ). Conventionally, those images are measured with separate scans for three tracers C 15 O for CBV, H 15 2 O for CBF and 15 O 2 for CMRO 2 , and there are additional waiting times between the scans in order to minimize the influence of the radioactivity from the previous tracers, which results in a relatively long study period. We have proposed a dual tracer autoradiographic (DARG) approach (Kudomi et al 2005), which enabled us to measure CBF, OEF and CMRO 2 rapidly by sequentially administrating H 15 2 O and 15 O 2 within a short time. Because quantitative CBF and CMRO 2 values are sensitive to arterial input function, it is necessary to obtain accurate input function and a drawback of this approach is to require separation of the measured arterial blood time-activity curve (TAC) into pure water and oxygen input functions under the existence of residual radioactivity from the first injected tracer. For this separation, frequent manual sampling was required. The present paper describes two calculation methods: namely a linear and a model-based method, to separate the measured arterial TAC into its water and oxygen components. In order to validate these methods, we first generated a blood TAC for the DARG approach by combining the water and oxygen input functions obtained in a series of PET studies on normal human subjects. The combined data were then separated into water and oxygen components by the present methods. CBF and CMRO 2 were calculated using those separated input functions and tissue TAC. The quantitative accuracy in the CBF and CMRO 2 values by the DARG approach did not exceed the acceptable range, i.e., errors in those values were within 5%, when the area under the curve in the input function of the second tracer

  12. Rapid-scan EPR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sandra S; Shi, Yilin; Woodcock, Lukas; Buchanan, Laura A; McPeak, Joseph; Quine, Richard W; Rinard, George A; Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J; Eaton, Gareth R

    2017-07-01

    In rapid-scan EPR the magnetic field or frequency is repeatedly scanned through the spectrum at rates that are much faster than in conventional continuous wave EPR. The signal is directly-detected with a mixer at the source frequency. Rapid-scan EPR is particularly advantageous when the scan rate through resonance is fast relative to electron spin relaxation rates. In such scans, there may be oscillations on the trailing edge of the spectrum. These oscillations can be removed by mathematical deconvolution to recover the slow-scan absorption spectrum. In cases of inhomogeneous broadening, the oscillations may interfere destructively to the extent that they are not visible. The deconvolution can be used even when it is not required, so spectra can be obtained in which some portions of the spectrum are in the rapid-scan regime and some are not. The technology developed for rapid-scan EPR can be applied generally so long as spectra are obtained in the linear response region. The detection of the full spectrum in each scan, the ability to use higher microwave power without saturation, and the noise filtering inherent in coherent averaging results in substantial improvement in signal-to-noise relative to conventional continuous wave spectroscopy, which is particularly advantageous for low-frequency EPR imaging. This overview describes the principles of rapid-scan EPR and the hardware used to generate the spectra. Examples are provided of its application to imaging of nitroxide radicals, diradicals, and spin-trapped radicals at a Larmor frequency of ca. 250MHz. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PET-scan shows peripherally increased neurokinin 1 receptor availability in chronic tennis elbow: visualizing neurogenic inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Peterson

    Full Text Available In response to pain, neurokinin 1 (NK1 receptor availability is altered in the central nervous system. The NK1 receptor and its primary agonist, substance P, also play a crucial role in peripheral tissue in response to pain, as part of neurogenic inflammation. However, little is known about alterations in NK1 receptor availability in peripheral tissue in chronic pain conditions and very few studies have been performed on human beings. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow were therefore examined by positron emission tomography (PET with the NK1 specific radioligand [(11C]GR205171 before and after treatment with graded exercise. The radioligand signal intensity was higher in the affected arm as compared with the unaffected arm, measured as differences between the arms in volume of voxels and signal intensity of this volume above a reference threshold set as 2.5 SD above mean signal intensity of the unaffected arm before treatment. In the eight subjects examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in all subjects but signal intensity decreased in five and increased in three. In conclusion, NK1 receptors may be activated, or up-regulated in the peripheral, painful tissue of a chronic pain condition. This up-regulation does, however, have moderate correlation to pain ratings. The increased NK1 receptor availability is interpreted as part of ongoing neurogenic inflammation and may have correlation to the pathogenesis of chronic tennis elbow.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00888225 http://clinicaltrials.gov/

  14. SU-D-201-07: Exploring the Utility of 4D FDG-PET/CT Scans in Design of Radiation Therapy Planning Compared with 3D PET/CT: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y [Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Provice (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A method using four-dimensional(4D) PET/CT in design of radiation treatment planning was proposed and the target volume and radiation dose distribution changes relative to standard three-dimensional (3D) PET/CT were examined. Methods: A target deformable registration method was used by which the whole patient’s respiration process was considered and the effect of respiration motion was minimized when designing radiotherapy planning. The gross tumor volume of a non-small-cell lung cancer was contoured on the 4D FDG-PET/CT and 3D PET/CT scans by use of two different techniques: manual contouring by an experienced radiation oncologist using a predetermined protocol; another technique using a constant threshold of standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than 2.5. The target volume and radiotherapy dose distribution between VOL3D and VOL4D were analyzed. Results: For all phases, the average automatic and manually GTV volume was 18.61 cm3 (range, 16.39–22.03 cm3) and 31.29 cm3 (range, 30.11–35.55 cm3), respectively. The automatic and manually volume of merged IGTV were 27.82 cm3 and 49.37 cm3, respectively. For the manual contour, compared to 3D plan the mean dose for the left, right, and total lung of 4D plan have an average decrease 21.55%, 15.17% and 15.86%, respectively. The maximum dose of spinal cord has an average decrease 2.35%. For the automatic contour, the mean dose for the left, right, and total lung have an average decrease 23.48%, 16.84% and 17.44%, respectively. The maximum dose of spinal cord has an average decrease 1.68%. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D PET/CT, 4D PET/CT may better define the extent of moving tumors and reduce the contouring tumor volume thereby optimize radiation treatment planning for lung tumors.

  15. SU-D-201-07: Exploring the Utility of 4D FDG-PET/CT Scans in Design of Radiation Therapy Planning Compared with 3D PET/CT: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A method using four-dimensional(4D) PET/CT in design of radiation treatment planning was proposed and the target volume and radiation dose distribution changes relative to standard three-dimensional (3D) PET/CT were examined. Methods: A target deformable registration method was used by which the whole patient’s respiration process was considered and the effect of respiration motion was minimized when designing radiotherapy planning. The gross tumor volume of a non-small-cell lung cancer was contoured on the 4D FDG-PET/CT and 3D PET/CT scans by use of two different techniques: manual contouring by an experienced radiation oncologist using a predetermined protocol; another technique using a constant threshold of standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than 2.5. The target volume and radiotherapy dose distribution between VOL3D and VOL4D were analyzed. Results: For all phases, the average automatic and manually GTV volume was 18.61 cm3 (range, 16.39–22.03 cm3) and 31.29 cm3 (range, 30.11–35.55 cm3), respectively. The automatic and manually volume of merged IGTV were 27.82 cm3 and 49.37 cm3, respectively. For the manual contour, compared to 3D plan the mean dose for the left, right, and total lung of 4D plan have an average decrease 21.55%, 15.17% and 15.86%, respectively. The maximum dose of spinal cord has an average decrease 2.35%. For the automatic contour, the mean dose for the left, right, and total lung have an average decrease 23.48%, 16.84% and 17.44%, respectively. The maximum dose of spinal cord has an average decrease 1.68%. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D PET/CT, 4D PET/CT may better define the extent of moving tumors and reduce the contouring tumor volume thereby optimize radiation treatment planning for lung tumors

  16. Are environmental scanning units effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbart, C

    1982-06-01

    Many authorities have urged companies to set up environmental scanning to assist corporate planning. Some advocates have recommended a unit at corporate level. This would give breadth of view and penetration into the future. It would arm decision makers with accurate forecasts. The information would be broad in scope and future directed. It could provide also assumptions for long-range planning. The Fahey and King study produced a model of corporate scanning types. The data showed that environmental information was built into the plan. Though the political environment was important, scanning was inadequate. The best location for scanning was not at corporate level and most firms used irregular methods. The Thomas study concluded that effective environmental scanning was permanent and multi level and that 'best practice' was continuous scanning. In 1978 the sample organizations were revisited. Five of the twelve have not changed their practice. The factors which encouraged a continuous model were the attitudes of academics and business media, demonstrated success of the units, the right kind of personnel. Contrary influences were changes in top management, decentralization moves, resource cuts, defining the environment and its significance, the availability of scanning competent personnel, surprise itself, and the availability of alternatives e.g. external forecasts.

  17. Re-scan confocal microscopy: scanning twice for better resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Giulia M R; Breedijk, Ronald M P; Brandt, Rick A J; Zeelenberg, Christiaan H C; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Azar, Leila Nahidi; Hoebe, Ron A; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik M M

    2013-01-01

    We present a new super-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), based on standard confocal microscopy extended with an optical (re-scanning) unit that projects the image directly on a CCD-camera. This new microscope has improved lateral resolution and strongly improved sensitivity while maintaining the sectioning capability of a standard confocal microscope. This simple technology is typically useful for biological applications where the combination high-resolution and high-sensitivity is required.

  18. Scanning by use of TV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevermann, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of TV read out for scanning and measuring holographic pictures seems to give less problems than the use of optical projection as is usual for conventional bubble chamber photos. Whereas the measuring of conventional bubble chamber pictures seems to give no problems, it is not clear whether scanning by use of TV is possible. Therefore scanning pictures from experiment NA16 (taken in LEBC) with TV only was tried using the TV system of ERASME, where the CRT system is used as a camera. It should be mentioned that this system, being a flying spot device, cannot be adapted for holography. (author)

  19. Tomography system having axial scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus has been invented for the transaxial tomographic scanning of a patient to determine mass distribution internal to the patient. A scanning system is provided having a rotatably mounted X-ray radiation source/detector assembly which orbits and scans the patient in plane of orbit. The source provides a plurality of beams of radiation in the orbital plane. Beams pass through the patient to an array of detectors which are spaced in the plane of orbit and respectively aligned with one of the beams. Radiation intensity data is collected at predetermined orientations of each beam-detector pair as the assembly orbits about the patient

  20. Rapid line scan MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frahm, J.; Merboldt, K.D.; Hanicke, W.; Bruhn, H.

    1987-01-01

    Direct MR angiography may be performed using line scan imaging techniques combined with presaturation of stationary spins. Thus, a single line scan echo yields a projection of vessels due to the signal from reflowing unsaturated spins. Reconstruction of an angiographic image is performed line by line at slightly incremented positions. In particular, line scan angiography is direct and fast without a sensitivity to artifacts even for high flow rates. Image resolution and field of view may be chosen without restrictions, and zoom images using enhanced gradients may be recorded without aliasing artifacts. The method is robust with respect to eddy currents and pulsatile flow. Line scan MR angiograms of phantoms, animals, and human volunteers have been recorded using 90 0 radio frequency pulses and gradient-recalled echoes

  1. Security scanning at 35 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Rupert N.; Appleby, Roger; Coward, Peter R.; Kent, P. J.; Price, Sean; Sinclair, Gordon N.; Wasley, Matthew R. M.

    2001-08-01

    It has been known for some time that millimeter waves can pas through clothing. In short range applications such as in the scanning of people for security purposes, operating at Ka band can be an advantage. The penetration through clothing is increased and the cost of the equipment when compared to operation at W band. In this paper a Ka band mechanically scanned imager designed for security scanning is discussed. This imager is based on the folded conical scan technology previously reported. It is constructed from low cost materials such as polystyrene and printed circuit board. The trade off between image spatial resolution and the number of receivers will be described and solutions, which minimize this number discussed.

  2. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - image interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, F.

    1998-01-01

    The basic ideas of image interpretation in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy are presented using simple quantum-mechanical models and supplied with examples of successful application. The importance is stressed of a correct interpretation of this brilliant experimental surface technique

  3. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.; Edwards, R.Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program. 5 claims, 11 figures

  4. Dynamic Flaps Electronic Scan Antenna

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzalez, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A dynamic FLAPS(TM) electronic scan antenna was the focus of this research. The novelty S of this SBIR resides in the use of plasma as the main component of this dynamic X-Band phased S array antenna...

  5. What Is the Best Way to Contour Lung Tumors on PET Scans? Multiobserver Validation of a Gradient-Based Method Using a NSCLC Digital PET Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner-Wasik, Maria; Nelson, Arden D.; Choi, Walter; Arai, Yoshio; Faulhaber, Peter F.; Kang, Patrick; Almeida, Fabio D.; Xiao, Ying; Ohri, Nitin; Brockway, Kristin D.; Piper, Jonathan W.; Nelson, Aaron S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and consistency of a gradient-based positron emission tomography (PET) segmentation method, GRADIENT, compared with manual (MANUAL) and constant threshold (THRESHOLD) methods. Methods and Materials: Contouring accuracy was evaluated with sphere phantoms and clinically realistic Monte Carlo PET phantoms of the thorax. The sphere phantoms were 10–37 mm in diameter and were acquired at five institutions emulating clinical conditions. One institution also acquired a sphere phantom with multiple source-to-background ratios of 2:1, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, and 70:1. One observer segmented (contoured) each sphere with GRADIENT and THRESHOLD from 25% to 50% at 5% increments. Subsequently, seven physicians segmented 31 lesions (7–264 mL) from 25 digital thorax phantoms using GRADIENT, THRESHOLD, and MANUAL. Results: For spheres 20 mm (p < 0.065) and <20 mm (p < 0.015). For digital thorax phantoms, GRADIENT was the most accurate (p < 0.01), with a mean absolute % error in volume of 10.99% (11.9% SD), followed by 25% THRESHOLD at 17.5% (29.4% SD), and MANUAL at 19.5% (17.2% SD). GRADIENT had the least systematic bias, with a mean % error in volume of –0.05% (16.2% SD) compared with 25% THRESHOLD at –2.1% (34.2% SD) and MANUAL at –16.3% (20.2% SD; p value <0.01). Interobserver variability was reduced using GRADIENT compared with both 25% THRESHOLD and MANUAL (p value <0.01, Levene’s test). Conclusion: GRADIENT was the most accurate and consistent technique for target volume contouring. GRADIENT was also the most robust for varying imaging conditions. GRADIENT has the potential to play an important role for tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning and response assessment.

  6. Scan analysis in myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ell, P J [Landesunfallkrankenhaus, Feldkirch (Austria). Inst. fuer Strahlenmedizin

    1976-08-01

    Myocardial scans with sup(99m)Tc-labelled phosphates are reported to be useful in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. A retrospective survey of 205 patients referred for sup(99m)Tc-phophate bone scanning and with no evidence of recent heart disease revealed an occurrence of 10% of false positive images, that is to say, uptake of phosphate in non-infarcted mayocardium. These striking findings stress the need for critical assessment of the usefulness of this diagnostic technique.

  7. What Is the Best Way to Contour Lung Tumors on PET Scans? Multiobserver Validation of a Gradient-Based Method Using a NSCLC Digital PET Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner-Wasik, Maria, E-mail: Maria.Werner-wasik@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nelson, Arden D. [MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Choi, Walter [Department of Radiation Oncology, UPMC Health Systems, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Arai, Yoshio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (Israel); Faulhaber, Peter F. [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Kang, Patrick [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (Israel); Almeida, Fabio D. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ (United States); Xiao, Ying; Ohri, Nitin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brockway, Kristin D.; Piper, Jonathan W.; Nelson, Aaron S. [MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and consistency of a gradient-based positron emission tomography (PET) segmentation method, GRADIENT, compared with manual (MANUAL) and constant threshold (THRESHOLD) methods. Methods and Materials: Contouring accuracy was evaluated with sphere phantoms and clinically realistic Monte Carlo PET phantoms of the thorax. The sphere phantoms were 10-37 mm in diameter and were acquired at five institutions emulating clinical conditions. One institution also acquired a sphere phantom with multiple source-to-background ratios of 2:1, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, and 70:1. One observer segmented (contoured) each sphere with GRADIENT and THRESHOLD from 25% to 50% at 5% increments. Subsequently, seven physicians segmented 31 lesions (7-264 mL) from 25 digital thorax phantoms using GRADIENT, THRESHOLD, and MANUAL. Results: For spheres <20 mm in diameter, GRADIENT was the most accurate with a mean absolute % error in diameter of 8.15% (10.2% SD) compared with 49.2% (51.1% SD) for 45% THRESHOLD (p < 0.005). For larger spheres, the methods were statistically equivalent. For varying source-to-background ratios, GRADIENT was the most accurate for spheres >20 mm (p < 0.065) and <20 mm (p < 0.015). For digital thorax phantoms, GRADIENT was the most accurate (p < 0.01), with a mean absolute % error in volume of 10.99% (11.9% SD), followed by 25% THRESHOLD at 17.5% (29.4% SD), and MANUAL at 19.5% (17.2% SD). GRADIENT had the least systematic bias, with a mean % error in volume of -0.05% (16.2% SD) compared with 25% THRESHOLD at -2.1% (34.2% SD) and MANUAL at -16.3% (20.2% SD; p value <0.01). Interobserver variability was reduced using GRADIENT compared with both 25% THRESHOLD and MANUAL (p value <0.01, Levene's test). Conclusion: GRADIENT was the most accurate and consistent technique for target volume contouring. GRADIENT was also the most robust for varying imaging conditions. GRADIENT has the potential to play an important role for tumor delineation in

  8. Hepatobiliary scan in neonatal Jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahar, Nurun; Hasan, Mizanul; Karim, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Jaundice is more or less common in newborn babies. Through physiological jaundice is most common cause of neonatal jaundice, possibility of obstructive jaundice especially biliary atresia should be kept in mind. Early diagnosis of biliary atresia followed by surgical treatment can save baby's life. Otherwise death is inevitable due to liver failure. Hepatobiliary scan is the imaging study of choice in neonatal jaundice especially when there is persistent conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia. Total 27 newborn babies of suspected biliary atresia, aged 14 days to 4 months were referred to Institute of Nuclear Medicine for Hepatobiliary scan. All of them had high serum bilirubin ranged from 6.0 mg/dl with an average of 9.35 ng/dl serum bilirubin level. Ultrasonography of hepatobiliary system was performed in 14 cases showing normal sized liver in 4 cases and hepatomegaly in 10 cases. Hepatobiliary scan was done with 99m Tc-Mebrofenin (Br IDA) after preparing the baby with phenobarbitone for 3-5 days. 20 (67%) cases were scan positive suggesting biliary atresia (BA) and 7(27%) cases were scan negative. In BA there will be increased hepatic uptake of the radionuclide without any significant excretion even in 24 hours delayed images. Presence of radiotracer in the bowel exclude the diagnosis of BA. Early diagnosis of biliary atresia is very important because in this condition surgery should be performed early (within 60 days of life). Studies suggest that hepatobiliary scan after hepatic stimulation with phenobarbitone for a period of 3-5 days is highly accurate for differentiating biliary atresia from other causes of neonatal jaundice. It is very important to perform hepatobiliary scan in a case of neonatal jaundice to exclude biliary atresia for the sake of baby's life.(author)

  9. PET scan for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radioactive substance (called a tracer) to look for breast cancer. This tracer can help identify areas of cancer ... only after a woman has been diagnosed with breast cancer. It is done to see if the cancer ...

  10. Obstacles to Industrial Implementation of Scanning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders Astrom; Olog Broman; John Graffman; Anders Gronlund; Armas Jappinene; Jari Luostarinen; Jan Nystrom; Daniel L. Schmoldt

    1998-01-01

    Initially the group discussed what is meant by scanning systems. An operational definition was adopted to consider scanning system in the current context to be nontraditional scanning. Where, traditional scanning is defined as scanning that has been industrially operational and relatively common for several years-a mature technology. For example,...

  11. Interesting bone scans - unusual findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, M.; Wadhwa, S.S.; Mansberg, R.; Fernandes, V.B.

    1997-01-01

    A 59-year-old female with carcinoma of the colon and known liver metastatic disease was referred for bone scan to evaluate for bone metastases. Although no bone metastases were found, there was abnormal uptake noted in the liver corresponding to a metastatic calcified lesion. The only other findings were of degenerative disease in the cervical spine, right shoulder and small joints of the hands. A 69-year-old male with carcinoma of the prostate and right side low back pain was referred for bone scan. No focal abnormalities to suggest metastatic disease were identified; findings within the cervical spine, lumber spine and knees were presumed secondary to degenerative disease. Intermittent pain persisted and the patient was referred for a repeat bone scan six months later. Previous scan findings of degenerative disease and no metastatic disease were confirmed; however, closer inspection revealed an enlarged right kidney with significant retention of tracer in the pelvicalyceal system suggesting possible obstruction. A Retrograde pyelogram was performed, and no obvious obstruction demonstrated. As bone scan findings were very suggestive of obstruction, a DTPA scan with lasix was performed showing a dilated right collecting system with no functional obstruction. Given the degree of dilation, it is possible that the patient experiences intermittent PUJ obstruction causing his symptoms. A 33-year-old male with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and viral arthritis was referred for a bone scan. A three phase revealed increased uptake in the region of the knee and leR proximal tibia. Delayed whole body images revealed multiple focal areas of osteoblastic activity in the leR tibia. Abnormal uptake was also seen in the upper third of the leR femur. The remainder of the skeletal survey was normal. X-ray correlation of the leR tibia and femoral findings was undertaken. Combinating unilateral changes on bone scan and X-ray although very suggestive of sclerotic polyostotic

  12. The boundary-scan handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Kenneth P

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at electronics industry professionals, this 4th edition of the Boundary Scan Handbook describes recent changes to the IEEE1149.1 Standard Test Access Port and Boundary-Scan Architecture. This updated edition features new chapters on the possible effects of the changes on the work of the practicing test engineers and the new 1149.8.1 standard. Anyone needing to understand the basics of boundary scan and its practical industrial implementation will need this book. Provides an overview of the recent changes to the 1149.1 standard and the effect of the changes on the work of test engineers;   Explains the new IEEE 1149.8.1 subsidiary standard and applications;   Describes the latest updates on the supplementary IEEE testing standards. In particular, addresses: IEEE Std 1149.1                      Digital Boundary-Scan IEEE Std 1149.4                      Analog Boundary-Scan IEEE Std 1149.6                      Advanced I/O Testing IEEE Std 1149.8.1           �...

  13. CAMAC gamma ray scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Pratt, J.C.; Shunk, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    A flexible gamma-ray scanning system, based on a LeCroy 3500 multichannel analyzer and CAMAC modules, is described. The system is designed for making simultaneous passive and active scans of objects of interest to nuclear safeguards. The scanner is a stepping-motor-driven carriage; the detectors, a bismuth-germanate scintillator and a high-purity germanium detector. A total of sixteen peaks in the two detector-produced spectra can be integrated simultaneously, and any scan can be viewed during data acquisition. For active scanning, the 2615-keV gamma-ray line from a 232 U source and the 4439-keV gamma-ray line from 9 Be(α,n) 12 C were selected. The system can be easily reconfigured to accommodate up to seven detectors because it is based on CAMAC modules and FORTRAN. The system is designed for field use and is easily transported. Examples of passive and active scans are presented

  14. Security scanning at 94GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Rupert N.; Appleby, Roger; Beale, John E.; Coward, Peter R.; Price, Sean

    2006-05-01

    It is well known that millimetre waves can pass through clothing. In short range applications such as in the scanning of people for security purposes, operating at W band can be an advantage. The size of the equipment is decreased when compared to operation at Ka band and the equipments have similar performance. In this paper a W band mechanically scanned imager designed for imaging weapons and contraband hidden under clothing is discussed. This imager is based on a modified folded conical scan technology previously reported. In this design an additional optical element is added to give a Cassegrain configuration in image space. This increases the effective focal length and enables improved sampling of the image and provides more space for the receivers. This imager is constructed from low cost materials such as polystyrene, polythene and printed circuit board materials. The trade off between image spatial resolution and thermal sensitivity is discussed.

  15. Scanning Terahertz Heterodyne Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Peter; Dengler, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Scanning terahertz heterodyne imaging systems are now at an early stage of development. In a basic scanning terahertz heterodyne imaging system, (see Figure 1) two far-infrared lasers generate beams denoted the local-oscillator (LO) and signal that differ in frequency by an amount, denoted the intermediate frequency (IF), chosen to suit the application. The LO beam is sent directly to a mixer as one of two inputs. The signal beam is focused to a spot on or in the specimen. After transmission through or reflection from the specimen, the beams are focused to a spot on a terahertz mixer, which extracts the IF outputs. The specimen is mounted on a translation stage, by means of which the focal spot is scanned across the specimen to build up an image.

  16. Scanning vector Hall probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, V.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Kudela, R.; Bending, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a scanning vector Hall probe microscope for mapping magnetic field vector over magnetic samples. The microscope is based on a micromachined Hall sensor and the cryostat with scanning system. The vector Hall sensor active area is ∼5x5 μm 2 . It is realized by patterning three Hall probes on the tilted faces of GaAs pyramids. Data from these 'tilted' Hall probes are used to reconstruct the full magnetic field vector. The scanning area of the microscope is 5x5 mm 2 , space resolution 2.5 μm, field resolution ∼1 μT Hz -1/2 at temperatures 10-300 K

  17. Footwear scanning systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Justin L.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.

    2017-07-25

    Methods and apparatus for scanning articles, such as footwear, to provide information regarding the contents of the articles are described. According to one aspect, a footwear scanning system includes a platform configured to contact footwear to be scanned, an antenna array configured to transmit electromagnetic waves through the platform into the footwear and to receive electromagnetic waves from the footwear and the platform, a transceiver coupled with antennas of the antenna array and configured to apply electrical signals to at least one of the antennas to generate the transmitted electromagnetic waves and to receive electrical signals from at least another of the antennas corresponding to the electromagnetic waves received by the others of the antennas, and processing circuitry configured to process the received electrical signals from the transceiver to provide information regarding contents within the footwear.

  18. Double-polarizating scanning radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishev, D.N.; Nazyrski, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    The double-polarizating single-channel scanning radiometer comprises the following serial connected parts: a scanning double-polarizating aerial, a block for polarization separation, a radiometer receiver, an analog-to-digit converter and an information flow forming block. The low frequency input of the radiometer receiver is connected with a control block, which is also connected with a first bus of a microprocessor, the second bus of which is connected with the A-D converter. The control input of the scanning double-polarizating aerial is connected with the first microprocessor bus. The control inputs of the block for polarization separation are linked by an electronic switch with the output of the forming block, the input of which is connected to the first input of the control block. The control inputs of the block for polarization separation are connected with the second and the third input of the information flow forming block. 2 cls

  19. Scanning probe microscopy competency development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, M.E.; Reagor, D.W.; Jia, Quan Xi [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project collaborators developed an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-STM) capability, integrated it with existing scanning probe microscopes, and developed new, advanced air-based scanning force techniques (SPMs). Programmatic, basic, and industrially related laboratory research requires the existence of SPMs, as well as expertise capable of providing local nano-scale information. The UHV-STM capability, equipped with load-lock system and several surface science techniques, will allow introduction, examination, and reaction of surfaces prepared under well-controlled vacuum conditions, including the examination of morphology and local bonding associated with the initial stages of film growth under controlled growth conditions. The resulting capabilities will enable the authors to respond to a variety of problems requiring local characterization of conducting and nonconducting surfaces in liquids, air, and UHV.

  20. Producing colour pictures from SCAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robichaud, K.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code SCAN.TSK has been written for use on the Interdata 7/32 minicomputer which will convert the pictures produced by the SCAN program into colour pictures on a colour graphics VDU. These colour pictures are a more powerful aid to detecting errors in the MONK input data than the normal lineprinter pictures. This report is intended as a user manual for using the program on the Interdata 7/32, and describes the method used to produce the pictures and gives examples of JCL, input data and of the pictures that can be produced. (U.K.)

  1. Linking world scan and image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmer, H.; Alcamo, J.; Bollen, J.; Gielen, A.; Gerlach, R.; Den Ouden, A.; Zuidema, G.

    1995-01-01

    In march 1994 the Central Planning Bureau (CPB) in the Hague, the National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (RIVM) in Bilthoven and the Institute of Environmental Studies (IES) in Amsterdam started the first phase of a joint research program aimed at creating integrated scenarios of the global economy, GHG emissions, and climate impacts. The goal of the first phase of this project was to design and test a linked version of the economic model WORLD SCAN of the former, and the climate model IMAGE 2 of the latter institute. This first phase has resulted in the planned test runs with an operational version of the linked models by May 1995. The experiences in the first year were encouraging, both in the scientific and the organizational sense. In a sense, a link was made between scientific disciplines: a coupling of disciplines concerning with global economic development and the global physical climate system is difficult and novel. The goal of the project was to integrate long-term economic developments and effects of climate change. Both the WORLD SCAN model and IMAGE 2 provide a consistent analysis of the global system, but from different perspectives. IMAGE 2 simulates climate change and its effects in a global context but treats the economic system as exogenous. WORLD SCAN covers the world economic system in a consistent manner but does not take into account the global environment. The links are constructed in the area of agriculture and energy. The basic idea is that WORLD SCAN determines demand and supply on economic principles, while IMAGE 2 provides information on changes of land area and average quality of productive land, and other damage costs based on its three sub-systems. The demand for energy is fed into IMAGE 2's Energy Industry subsystem (EIS), which in turn determines emissions of greenhouse gases. Furthermore, some additional output from WORLD SCAN on activity levels, prices and capital structure can be used to determine

  2. Advanced HEDL gamma scan system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.C.; Olson, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    The design of an advanced state-of-the-art gamma scan system built for the purpose of measuring the point-by-point gamma activity of irradiated fuel rods is described. The emphasis of the system design was to achieve the highest rate of throughput with the minimum per rod cost while maintaining system accuracy and reliability. Preliminary tests demonstrate that all system requirements were met or exceeded. The system provides improved throughput, precision, automation, flexibility, and data processing capability over previous gamma scan systems

  3. Electronically-Scanned Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, C. F.; Parra, G. T.; Kauffman, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Sensors not pneumatically switched. Electronic pressure-transducer scanning system constructed in modular form. Pressure transducer modules and analog to digital converter module small enough to fit within cavities of average-sized wind-tunnel models. All switching done electronically. Temperature controlled environment maintained within sensor modules so accuracy maintained while ambient temperature varies.

  4. High Resolution Scanning Ion Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the thesis is the following. The first chapter is an introduction to scanning microscopy, where the path that led to the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is described and the main differences between electrons and ion beams are highlighted. Chapter 2 is what is normally referred to (which I

  5. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made of metal. Objects such as keys or wallets that would be in the area being scanned should be removed. You will ... and are often available in drugstores and on mobile health vans in the community. The pDEXA device is much smaller than ...

  6. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard s...

  7. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  8. Introduction to scanning tunneling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C Julian

    2008-01-01

    The scanning tunneling and the atomic force microscope, both capable of imaging individual atoms, were crowned with the Physics Nobel Prize in 1986, and are the cornerstones of nanotechnology today. This is a thoroughly updated version of this 'bible' in the field.

  9. CT scan of Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, T; Noguchi, S; Nishitani, H [National Sanatorium of Utano, Kyoto (Japan); Kitano, H; Ikegami, Y

    1981-04-01

    In forty-eight patients with Parkinson's disease, we examined the ventricular size and the degree of cortical atrophy which were measured by the photos of CT scan and compared them with their clinical symptoms and side effects of anti-parkinsonian drugs. The ventricular size was expressed as the ventricular ratio which is the percentage of superimposed lateral ventricular area to the white and gray matter area at the slice number 2B of CT scan photos. The degree of the cortical atrophy was expressed as the sulcal numbers which were clearly visualized at the slice number 3B or 4A of CT scan photos. We used the CT scan photos of age-matched other patients which did not show definit central nervous system abnormalities. Our findings were as follows: (1) The ventricular enlargement was observed in the parkinsonian patients who showed dementia and/or Yahr's classification grades IV or V. (2) There was no correlation between the duration of this disease and the L--dopa treatments with the ventricular size and sulcal numbers. (3) The side effects of drugs such as visual hallucination were tended to be observed in the patients who showed the ventricular enlargement. (4) There was no definite correlation between the degree of cortical atrophy with clinical symptoms and side effects of various drugs. These findings suggested that the ventricular enlargement in Parkinson's disease was an important sign of dementia and the tendency of appearance of side effects of various drugs.

  10. Bone scan indications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.F.G. da; Marquiotti, M.

    1986-01-01

    The scintigraphic method is described and a critical analysis of its value in the research of bone metastases is presented. The method validity, the positivity of bone scan for metastases at the first examination and the preferencial distribution metastases in skeleton are related.Bone pain and the results of bone scintigram are correlated. (M.A.C.) [pt

  11. CT scan of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Tetsuro; Noguchi, Sadako; Nishitani, Hiroshi; Kitano, Haruo; Ikegami, Yoshinori.

    1981-01-01

    In forty-eight patients with Parkinson's disease, we examined the ventricular size and the degree of cortical atrophy which were measured by the photos of CT scan and compared them with their clinical symptoms and side effects of anti-parkinsonian drugs. The ventricular size was expressed as the ventricular ratio which is the percentage of superimposed lateral ventricular area to the white and gray matter area at the slice number 2B of CT scan photos. The degree of the cortical atrophy was expressed as the sulcal numbers which were clearly visualized at the slice number 3B or 4A of CT scan photos. We used the CT scan photos of age-matched other patients which did not show definit central nervous system abnormalities. Our findings were as follows: (1) The ventricular enlargement was observed in the parkinsonian patients who showed dementia and/or Yahr's classification grades IV or V. (2) There was no correlation between the duration of this disease and the L--dopa treatments with the ventricular size and sulcal numbers. (3) The side effects of drugs such as visual hallucination were tended to be observed in the patients who showed the ventricular enlargement. (4) There was no definite correlation between the degree of cortical atrophy with clinical symptoms and side effects of various drugs. These findings suggested that the ventricular enlargement in Parkinson's disease was an important sign of dementia and the tendency of appearance of side effects of various drugs. (author)

  12. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stop eating (fast), be on a special diet, or take any medicines before the test. A chest x-ray is usually done before or after a ventilation and perfusion scan. You wear a hospital gown or comfortable clothing that does not have ...

  13. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  14. Dual-time point scanning of integrated FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in non-small cell lung cancer diagnosed as operable by contrast-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Takami, E-mail: takaby@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, Chiba University Hospital, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba City, Chiba-ken 260-8677 (Japan); Motoori, Ken, E-mail: motoorik@faculty.chiba-u.j [Department of Radiology, Chiba University Hospital, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba City, Chiba-ken 260-8677 (Japan); Horikoshi, Takuro, E-mail: taku_steelfish@yahoo.co.j [Department of Radiology, Chiba University Hospital, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba City, Chiba-ken 260-8677 (Japan); Uchiyama, Katsuhiro, E-mail: ka-uchiyama@nifty.co [Diagnostic PET Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Sannoh Medical Center, 166-2 Sannohcho, Inage-ku, Chiba City, Chiba-ken 263-0002 (Japan); Yasufuku, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kyasufuku@faculty.chiba-u.j [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba City, Chiba-ken 260-8670 (Japan); Takiguchi, Yuichi, E-mail: takiguchi@faculty.chiba-u.j [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba City, Chiba-ken 260-8670 (Japan); Takahashi, Fumiaki, E-mail: takahashifu@pharm.kitasato-u.ac.j [Division of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kitasato University, 5-9-1 Shirokane, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8641 (Japan); Kuniyasu, Yoshio, E-mail: kuniyasu@ace.ocn.ne.j [Diagnostic PET Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Sannoh Medical Center, 166-2 Sannohcho, Inage-ku, Chiba City, Chiba-ken 263-0002 (Japan); Ito, Hisao, E-mail: hisao@faculty.chiba-u.j [Department of Radiology, Chiba University Hospital, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba City, Chiba-ken 260-8677 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether dual-time point scanning with integrated fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is useful for evaluation of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in non-small cell lung cancer diagnosed as operable by contrast-enhanced CT. Materials and methods: PET/CT data and pathological findings of 560 nodal stations in 129 patients with pathologically proven non-small cell lung cancer diagnosed as operable by contrast-enhanced CT were reviewed retrospectively. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) on early scans (SUVe) 1 h, and on delayed scans (SUVd) 2 h after FDG injection of each nodal station were measured. Retention index (RI) (%) was calculated by subtracting SUVe from SUVd and dividing by SUVe. Logistic regression analysis was performed with seven kinds of models, consisting of (1) SUVe, (2) SUVd, (3) RI, (4) SUVe and SUVd, (5) SUVe and RI, (6) SUVd and RI, and (7) SUVe, SUVd and RI. The seven derived models were compared by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. k-Fold cross-validation was performed with k values of 5 and 10. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Model (1) including the term of SUVe showed the largest area under the ROC curve among the seven models. The cut-off probability of metastasis of 3.5% with SUVe of 2.5 revealed a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 81% on ROC analysis, and approximately 60% and 80% on k-fold cross-validation. Conclusion: Single scanning of PET/CT is sufficiently useful for evaluating mediastinal and hilar nodes for metastasis.

  15. Dual-time point scanning of integrated FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in non-small cell lung cancer diagnosed as operable by contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Takami; Motoori, Ken; Horikoshi, Takuro; Uchiyama, Katsuhiro; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Kuniyasu, Yoshio; Ito, Hisao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether dual-time point scanning with integrated fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is useful for evaluation of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in non-small cell lung cancer diagnosed as operable by contrast-enhanced CT. Materials and methods: PET/CT data and pathological findings of 560 nodal stations in 129 patients with pathologically proven non-small cell lung cancer diagnosed as operable by contrast-enhanced CT were reviewed retrospectively. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) on early scans (SUVe) 1 h, and on delayed scans (SUVd) 2 h after FDG injection of each nodal station were measured. Retention index (RI) (%) was calculated by subtracting SUVe from SUVd and dividing by SUVe. Logistic regression analysis was performed with seven kinds of models, consisting of (1) SUVe, (2) SUVd, (3) RI, (4) SUVe and SUVd, (5) SUVe and RI, (6) SUVd and RI, and (7) SUVe, SUVd and RI. The seven derived models were compared by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. k-Fold cross-validation was performed with k values of 5 and 10. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Model (1) including the term of SUVe showed the largest area under the ROC curve among the seven models. The cut-off probability of metastasis of 3.5% with SUVe of 2.5 revealed a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 81% on ROC analysis, and approximately 60% and 80% on k-fold cross-validation. Conclusion: Single scanning of PET/CT is sufficiently useful for evaluating mediastinal and hilar nodes for metastasis.

  16. [Scans without Evidence of Dopamine Deficit (SWEDDs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Yohei; Murata, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine transporter (DaT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and [18F]fluoro-L-DOPA ([18F]DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) facilitate the investigation of dopaminergic hypofunction in neurodegenerative diseases. DaT SPECT and [18F]DOPA PET have been adopted as survey tools in clinical trials. In a large study on Parkinson's disease, 4-15% of subjects clinically diagnosed with early-stage Parkinson's disease had normal dopaminergic functional imaging scans. These are called Scans without Evidence of Dopamine Deficit (SWEDDs), and are considered to represent a state different from Parkinson's disease. Neurological diseases that exhibit parkinsonism and have normal dopaminergic cells in the nigrostriatal system (e.g., essential tremor, psychogenic parkinsonism, DOPA-responsive dystonia, vascular parkinsonism, drug-induced parkinsonism, manganism, brain tumor, myoclonus-dystonia (DYT11), and fragile X syndrome) might be diagnosed with SWEDDs. True bradykinesia with fatigue or decrement may be useful for distinguishing between Parkinson's disease and SWEDDs. However, because SWEDDs encompass many diseases, their properties may not be uniform. In this review, we discuss DaT SPECT, the concept of SWEDDs, and differential diagnosis.

  17. Discordant Findings of Skeletal Metastasis Between Tc99m MDP Bone Scans and F18 FDG PET/CT Imaging for Advanced Breast and Lung Cancers—Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wen Chen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, Tc99m methyl diphosphate (MDP bone scintigraphy provides high-sensitivity detection of skeletal metastasis from breast and lung cancers in regular follow-up. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, based on the glucose metabolism of malignant cells, plays a role in describing rumor growth, proliferation of neoplasm and the extent of metastasis. In general, concordant findings of skeletal metastasis are seen on both types of image, especially in cases of breast and lung cancer. However, there were extremely discordant findings of skeletal metastasis between bone scans and F18 FDG PET/CT imaging in two cases among 300 consecutive F18 FDG PET/CT follow-up exams of patients with malignancies, during the past year, in our center. Both cases, one of breast cancer and one of lung cancer, had negative bone scintigraphic findings, but a diffusely high grade of F18 FDG avid marrow infiltration in the axial spine, leading to the diagnosis of stage IV disease in both cases. Owing to variant genetic aberrance of malignance, F18 FDG PET/CT reveals direct evidence of diffuse, rapid neoplasm metabolism in the bone marrow of the spine, but not of secondary osteoblastic reactions in vivo. F18 FDG PET/CT should always be employed in the follow-up of patients with malignancies.

  18. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  19. /sup 67/Ga lung scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niden, A.H.; Mishkin, F.S.; Khurana, M.M.L.; Pick, R.

    1977-03-21

    Twenty-three patients with clinical signs of pulmonary embolic disease and lung infiltrates were studied to determine the value of gallium citrate /sup 67/Ga lung scan in differentiating embolic from inflammatory lung disease. In 11 patients without angiographically proved embolism, only seven had corresponding ventilation-perfusion defects compatible with inflammatory disease. In seven of these 11 patients, the /sup 67/Ga concentration indicated inflammatory disease. In the 12 patients with angiographically proved embolic disease, six had corresponding ventilation-perfusion defects compatible with inflammatory disease. None had an accumulation of /sup 67/Ga in the area of pulmonary infiltrate. Thus, ventilation-perfusion lung scans are of limited value when lung infiltrates are present. In contrast, the accumulation of /sup 67/Ga in the lung indicates an inflammatory process. Gallium imaging can help select those patients with lung infiltrates who need angiography.

  20. Automation of BESSY scanning tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanton, J.; Kesteman, J.

    1981-01-01

    A micro processor M6800 is used for the automation of scanning and premeasuring BESSY tables. The tasks achieved by the micro processor are: 1. control of spooling of the four asynchronous film winding devices and switching on and off the 4 projections lamps, 2. pre-processing of the data coming from a bi-polar coordinates measuring device, 3. bi-directional interchange of informations between the operator, the BESSY table and the DEC PDP 11/34 mini computer controling the scanning operations, 4. control of the magnification on the table by swapping the projection lenses of appropriate focal lengths and the associated light boxes (under development). In connection with point 4, study is being made for the use of BESSY tables for accurate measurements (+/-5 microns), by encoding the displacements of the projections lenses. (orig.)

  1. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Huang, Yunsong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  2. Fast-scan NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaoka, Hideto; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Hirata, Takaaki

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the Fast Recovery (FR) method for fast-scan Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging. The FR method uses a sequence of four radio frequency pulses - alternating selective 90 deg nutation pulses and nonselective 180 deg pulses. One free induction decay (FID) signal and one echo signal are detected and averaged to compute a 2-D image. In the modified FR method, extra 180 deg pulses are applied between 90 deg pulses to cause refocusing and the resultant spin echo signals are averaged to improve the signal to noise ratio. For the FR and modified FR sequences, the macroscopic magnetization is restored to equilibrium quickly and exactly; scan time can consequently be less than that for conventional pulse sequences, such as used in the saturation recovery method, without any penalty in signal to noise ratio. This paper derives expressions for the signal to noise ratio, scan time ratio and contrast noise ratio, compares the FR and modified FR methods with the saturation recovery method and presents experimental results for human body images. In theory and practice, the signal to noise ratio for the FR method is larger than that for the modified FR method. For a given signal to noise ratio the scan time is between one half and one fourth that for the saturation recovery method. The optimum repetition period, T r , is 0.07 ∼ 0.25 s for the FR method, and 0.1 ∼ 0.5 s for the modified FR method. Contrast noise ratio is low for high speed imaging, T r = 0.07 ∼ 0.25 s, but, high contrast noise ratio image is obtained for T r > 0.5 s. (author)

  3. A new ultrasensitive scanning calorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, V V; Brandts, J M; Lin, L N; Brandts, J F

    1997-08-01

    A new ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimeter is described, having a number of novel features arising from integration between hardware and software. It is capable of high performance in either a scanning or isothermal mode of operation. Upscanning is carried out adiabatically while downscanning is nonadiabatic. By using software-controlled signals sent continuously to appropriate hardware devices, it is possible to improve adiabaticity and constancy of scan rate through use of empirical prerun information stored in memory rather than by using feedback systems which respond in real time and generate thermal noise. Also, instrument response time is software-selectable, maximizing performance for both slow- and fast-transient systems. While these and other sophisticated functionalities have been introduced into the instrument to improve performance and data analysis, they are virtually invisible and add no additional complexities into operation of the instrument. Noise and baseline repeatability are an order of magnitude better than published raw data from other instruments so that high-quality results can be obtained on protein solutions, for example, using as little as 50 microg of protein in the sample cell.

  4. New Snail Mail Scanning Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Modernisation does not stop at the CERN postal service (GS/PS). “With more and more digitisation and the prevalence of e-mail throughout the site, we were hoping to provide more timely delivery of letters and make further saving in resources”, said Tueri Datta, head of GS/PS.   Instead of the standard delivery to your P.O. box, the CERN postal service will digitally scan all letters and books up to 100 pages on reception. These scans will subsequently be sent via e-mail to the corresponding recipient as PDF (Portable Data Format - you will need to install “Acrobat Reader” on your PC). Express mail will be handled with priority. Users without a valid CERN mailbox can register at mail.scan.service@cern.ch in order to have their letters read to them via the phone line (we are currently investigating whether we can use the voices of the last five DGs).   This service will start on 1st April 2012 on the Meyrin site and will gradually replace th...

  5. Multiple myeloma: radiology or bone scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, R.C.F.; Owen, J.P.; Proctor, S.J.; Hamilton, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative study of radionuclide bone scanning and skeletal radiology in patients with multiple myeloma revealed four principal findings: (i) There were no cases of negative bone scans with positive skeletal radiographs. (ii) Lytic bone lesions were seriously underestimated by bone scans. (iii) Bone scans tended to pick up lesions in ribs missed on the skeletal surveys. (iv) Patients with bone pain were more likely to have positive bone scans and skeletal radiographs than asymptomatic patients. (author)

  6. Vertical Scan-Conversion for Filling Purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Hersch, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    Conventional scan-conversion algorithms were developed independently of filling algorithms. They cause many problems, when used for filling purposes. However, today's raster printers and plotters require extended use of filling, especially for the generation of typographic characters and graphic line art. A new scan-conversion algorithm, called vertical scan-conversion has been specifically designed to meet the requirements of parity scan line fill algorithms. Vertical scan-conversion ensures...

  7. Preoperative nuclear scans in patients with melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au, F.C.; Maier, W.P.; Malmud, L.S.; Goldman, L.I.; Clark, W.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    One hundred forty-one liver scans, 137 brain scans, and 112 bone scans were performed in 192 patients with clinical Stage 1 melanoma. One liver scan was interpreted as abnormal; liver biopsy of that patient showed no metastasis. There were 11 suggestive liver scans; three of the patients with suggestive liver scans had negative liver biopsies. The remaining eight patients were followed from 4 to 6 years and none of those patients developed clinical evidence of hepatic metastases. All of the brain scans were normal. Five patients had suggestive bone scans and none of those patients had manifested symptoms of osseous metastases with a follow-up of 2 to 4.5 years. This study demonstrates that the use of preoperative liver, brain and bone scan in the evaluation of patients with clinical Stage 1 melanoma is virtually unproductive

  8. Comparison of six methods of segmentation of tumor volume on the 18F-F.D.G. PET scan with reference histological volume in non small cell bronchopulmonary cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venel, Y.; Garhi, H.; Baulieu, J.L.; Prunier-Aesch, C.; Muret, A. de; Barillot, I.

    2008-01-01

    The 18 F-F.D.G. PET has demonstrated its importance in oncology, for initial extension and efficacy of anti tumoral therapeutics. Several studies have attempted to prove its utility to define tumoral volumes for conformational radiotherapy in non small cell lung cancers. Some authors have suggested the use of threshold of tumor intensity uptake with 40 or 50% of maximal intensity. Black et al. have determined contouring with linear regression formula of mean semi-quantitative index of tumor uptake (standard uptake value): SUV threshold = 0.307 Sub average + 0.588. Nestle et al. have taken into account the background noise intensity and mean intensity of the tumor: I threshold = β I average +I noise with β 0.15. Our study was done in collaboration with Inserm U618 team and has compared volumes defined on PET scan defined according to different methods based on intensity or S.U.V. to the tumour volume determined on CT scan by radio physicist. We have compared those volumes with histological volume that we considered for reference. Four patients have been included. They had 18 F-F.D.G. PET scan followed by complete tumoral removal surgery. Specific histological procedure allowed to define complete size of the tumor in re expanded lung. Comparatively to pathology, the volumes obtained using I max 40 and I max 50 are all underestimated. The volumes defined by Black's et al. method are under evaluated for the two largest tumours (15.8% to 22%) and overestimated for the two smallest ones (17.9 to 82.9%). Nestle's et al. method, using β = 0.15, correctly estimates two tumor volumes over 2 cm, but overestimates the two small tumors (79.6 to 124%). Finally, the corrected Nestle's et al. formula (using β = 0.264) overestimates three tumours. Volumes defined on CT scan by radio physicist are correct for one lesion, underestimated for one and overestimated for two other ones (44 and 179.5%). Nestle's et al. method seems to be the most accurate for tumours over 2 cm of

  9. Inclusion of brain in FDG PET/CT scanning techniques in cancer patients: Does it obviate the need for dedicated brain imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purandare, Nilendu C.

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the brain can affect about 10-20% cancer patients. Rising incidence of brain metastases in recent years is related to improved survival rates as a result of advances in cancer therapy and development of more sensitive diagnostic imaging techniques. In patients with extracranial malignancies detection of brain metastases is very important in deciding further diagnostic procedures, planning therapeutic strategies and also to ascertain prognosis. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the modalities which have been traditionally used to assess metastatic disease to the central nervous system. It is generally accepted that MRI (contrast enhanced) is superior to CT scan (contrast enhanced) in the diagnosis of brain metastases. An inherently better soft tissue contrast resolution, stronger contrast enhancement, lack of bone artifacts and partial volume effects and direct multiplanar imaging enables MRI to pick up smaller sized as well as more number of metastases than a CT scan

  10. 18F-FDG PET/CT在结直肠癌术后复发与转移诊断中的应用价值与CEA水平关系的研究%Relationship of the applied value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in postoperative relapse with metastasis of colorectal cancer and CEA levels during PET/CT scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于洪涛; 赵铭; 邢军; 靳宏星; 李耀平

    2013-01-01

      Objective: This work aimed to evaluate the relationship of the diagnostic value of PET/CT in patients with postopera-tive recurrent and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), as well as with different levels of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), during PET/CT scanning. Methods: Data of 75 patients (46 males and 29 females) with suspected recurrent and metastatic CRC were collected. The patients underwent PET/CT examination in Shanxi Provincial Tumor Hospital in Taiyuan. The differences of the PET/CT diagnos-tic values in CEA-positive and CEA-negative patients with recurrent CRC after surgery were retrospectively analyzed and compared. Results: Among the 75 CRC patients, 67 had recurrence and metastasis as confirmed by histopathological diagnosis or clinical fol-low-up data. By contrast, PET/CT examination results revealed 65 cases were true positive (a false positive foci was diagnosed in one of the patients), 8 were true negative, and 2 were false negative. Correspondingly, the sensitivity and degree of accuracy were 97.0%and 96.0%, respectively. The detection rates of PET/CT for the recurrence and metastases were 89.3% in the CEA-positive group and 82.1% in the CEA-negative group. No significant differences were observed between the two groups. Conclusion: CEA levels do not help improve the detection rate of PET/CT in the recurrence and metastasis of CRC. PET/CT imaging has high sensitivity and degree of accuracy in detecting recurrence and metastasis after colon cancer surgery. Therefore, this method is ideal for monitoring relapsed and metastatic foci of postoperative colon cancer cases.%  目的:评价18F-FDG PET/CT显像对结直肠癌患者术后复发与转移的诊断价值与PET/CT检查期间CEA水平之间的关系。方法:收集临床症状、血清CEA水平升高或CT等影像学检查怀疑复发,并因此行PET/CT检查的结直肠癌术后患者75例,其中男性46例,女性29例。回顾性分析比较PET/CT显像的诊断价值

  11. ABS: Sequence alignment by scanning

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal

    2011-08-01

    Sequence alignment is an essential tool in almost any computational biology research. It processes large database sequences and considered to be high consumers of computation time. Heuristic algorithms are used to get approximate but fast results. We introduce fast alignment algorithm, called Alignment By Scanning (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the well-known alignment algorithms, the FASTA (which is heuristic) and the \\'Needleman-Wunsch\\' (which is optimal). The proposed algorithm achieves up to 76% enhancement in alignment score when it is compared with the FASTA Algorithm. The evaluations are conducted using different lengths of DNA sequences. © 2011 IEEE.

  12. ABS: Sequence alignment by scanning

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal; Salama, Khaled N.

    2011-01-01

    Sequence alignment is an essential tool in almost any computational biology research. It processes large database sequences and considered to be high consumers of computation time. Heuristic algorithms are used to get approximate but fast results. We introduce fast alignment algorithm, called Alignment By Scanning (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the well-known alignment algorithms, the FASTA (which is heuristic) and the 'Needleman-Wunsch' (which is optimal). The proposed algorithm achieves up to 76% enhancement in alignment score when it is compared with the FASTA Algorithm. The evaluations are conducted using different lengths of DNA sequences. © 2011 IEEE.

  13. NGA/Insulin receptor scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtaran, A.; Virgolini, I.

    1994-01-01

    Tc-99m-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) is one of the first receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals which specifically recognizes the hepatic binding protein (HBP) located on the surface of the hepatocytes. The exclusive interactin of NGA with HBP provided the basis for a kinetic model for the evaluation hepatocellular function. During the last years we have used NGA in more than 300 patients with various liver diseases including liver cirrhosis (Stages Child A to Child C), viral hepatitis, and carcinomas. In these studies, the calculated HBP densities, after i.v.-injection of Tc-99m-NGA, significantly correlated with the clinical course of the diseases. Furthermore, similar to conventional Tc-colloid, NGA provided excellent demonstration of 'cold spots' for hepatic masses. In a further approach we used another hepatocyte receptor-seeking radioligand, I-123-Tyr-A14- insulin, and found, that its in vitro-binding to hepatocellular carcinomas is greatly enhanced over normal hepatic tissue. On this basis, we developed a double-tracer method using NGA and insulin in a single study. Thus, areas of 'cold spots' identifying hepatic masses on NGA scans, take up I-123-Tyr-A14-insulin immediately after i.v.-injection. This was true for hepatocellular hepatomas, but not for adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, NGA/insulin receptor scanning could be a novel and save method for the demonstration of hepatocellular hepatomas. (author)

  14. Multifunctional scanning ion conductance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ashley; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2017-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a nanopipette-based technique that has traditionally been used to image topography or to deliver species to an interface, particularly in a biological setting. This article highlights the recent blossoming of SICM into a technique with a much greater diversity of applications and capability that can be used either standalone, with advanced control (potential–time) functions, or in tandem with other methods. SICM can be used to elucidate functional information about interfaces, such as surface charge density or electrochemical activity (ion fluxes). Using a multi-barrel probe format, SICM-related techniques can be employed to deposit nanoscale three-dimensional structures and further functionality is realized when SICM is combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), with simultaneous measurements from a single probe opening up considerable prospects for multifunctional imaging. SICM studies are greatly enhanced by finite-element method modelling for quantitative treatment of issues such as resolution, surface charge and (tip) geometry effects. SICM is particularly applicable to the study of living systems, notably single cells, although applications extend to materials characterization and to new methods of printing and nanofabrication. A more thorough understanding of the electrochemical principles and properties of SICM provides a foundation for significant applications of SICM in electrochemistry and interfacial science. PMID:28484332

  15. NGA/Insulin receptor scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtaran, A; Virgolini, I [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Angelberger, P [Ludwig Boltzmann-Institut fuer Nuklearmedizin, Vienna (Austria)

    1994-10-01

    Tc-99m-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) is one of the first receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals which specifically recognizes the hepatic binding protein (HBP) located on the surface of the hepatocytes. The exclusive interactin of NGA with HBP provided the basis for a kinetic model for the evaluation hepatocellular function. During the last years we have used NGA in more than 300 patients with various liver diseases including liver cirrhosis (Stages Child A to Child C), viral hepatitis, and carcinomas. In these studies, the calculated HBP densities, after i.v.-injection of Tc-99m-NGA, significantly correlated with the clinical course of the diseases. Furthermore, similar to conventional Tc-colloid, NGA provided excellent demonstration of `cold spots` for hepatic masses. In a further approach we used another hepatocyte receptor-seeking radioligand, I-123-Tyr-A14- insulin, and found, that its in vitro-binding to hepatocellular carcinomas is greatly enhanced over normal hepatic tissue. On this basis, we developed a double-tracer method using NGA and insulin in a single study. Thus, areas of `cold spots` identifying hepatic masses on NGA scans, take up I-123-Tyr-A14-insulin immediately after i.v.-injection. This was true for hepatocellular hepatomas, but not for adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, NGA/insulin receptor scanning could be a novel and save method for the demonstration of hepatocellular hepatomas. (author).

  16. Isotope scanning for tumor localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-09-15

    At the request of the Government of the United Arab Republic, the Agency provided the services of an expert for the establishment in the UAR of a tumor localization program using photoscanning techniques and appropriate radioactive tracers. Photoscanning is a recently developed technique whereby the differences in isotope concentrations are enhanced on the record, and this facilitates the interpretation of the record. A variety of brain tumors were located, using a suitable radioactive tracer (Hg-203 - labelled Neohydrin) obtained from the USA. In some other investigations, processes in the kidney were scanned. Further, radioactive gold was used to demonstrate the normal and pathological spleen and liver and these tests showed various types of space occupying lesions resulting from malignancy and the parasitic infections endemic to the area. While the localization of brain tumors by scanning techniques is extremely useful, it does not always establish the precise extent of the tumor which should be known at the time of surgery. Dr. Bender, therefore, thought it advisable to instruct personnel in the use of what is known as an in-vivo needle scintillation probe - a technique for the investigation of the isotope concentration in a particular tissue during operation. The necessary instrument was obtained for this purpose and demonstrations were given; one patient was examined in this way at the time of surgery at the University of Alexandria Hospital.

  17. Differential scanning calorimetry of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, C A; Mackey, B M; Parsons, S E

    1986-04-01

    Thermograms obtained by differential scanning calorimetry of a range of bacteria of different heat resistances were compared. Equations were derived to calculate the rate at which the numbers of viable organisms in a calorimeter decline as the temperature is raised at a constant rate. Vegetative bacteria scanned at 10 degrees C min-1 showed multi-peaked thermograms with four major peaks (denoted m, n, p and q) occurring in the regions 68-73, 77-84, 89-99 and 105-110 degrees C respectively. Exceptions were that peak m (the largest peak) occurred at 79-82 degrees C in Bacillus stearothermophilus and an additional peak, r, was detected in Escherichia coli at 119 degrees C. At temperatures below the main peak m there were major differences in thermograms between species. There was a direct relationship between the onset of thermal denaturation and the thermoresistance of different organisms. Heat-sensitive organisms displayed thermogram features which were absent in the more heat-resistant types. When samples were cooled to 5 degrees C and re-heated, a small endothermic peak, pr, was observed at the same temperature as p. Peaks p and pr were identified as the melting endotherms of DNA. In all vegetative organisms examined, maximum death rates, computed from published D and z values, occurred at temperatures above the onset of thermal denaturation, i.e. cell death and irreversible denaturation of cell components occurred within the same temperature range.

  18. CT SCAN EVALUATION OF PULMONARY NODULE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ravi Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lung carcinomas are quite commonly diagnosed. Thanks to the ever increasing smokers’ population. Majority of the city dwellers are at a higher risk of having this disease when compared to the village counterparts. The stigma through which the person and the family have to undergo before confirming the diagnosis is enormous. So the radiographic methods of diagnosing the malignancies have to improve. Before confirming the diagnosis, the radiologists, the treating physicians should be somewhat confident about the diagnosis so as to prepare the patients and their relatives for the most probable diagnosis before the confirmatory report. The confirmatory procedures include the PET scan and the Histopathology. Both are time consuming procedures and in an economy like ours, finding a PET scanning centre is rather difficult. So the most probable diagnosis has to be thought of using minimal resource. This study puts in a sincere effort to understand and evaluate the pulmonary nodule when identified by a CT scan. This paper is intended to help the practicing radiologists and also make life easy for a practicing physician to identify correctly the lesions and also help the patients to prevent further progression of the disease. METHODS The study was a cross-sectional study. The sample size of the study consisted of thirty patients. CT scan was done in thirty patients who were identified to have lung nodules either by other mode of radiological studies or first time identified in a CT scan itself. The study was conducted in Fathima Institute of Medical Sciences, Kadapa. The study was conducted from 2014 to 2015. RESULT Non-solid nodules were more in number when compared to the solid nodules. All the non-solid nodules were confirmed to be adenomas. Eighty percent of the nodules which were more than 8 mm in size were confirmed to be malignant. One hundred percent of the spiculated border on CT was confirmed to be malignant. In the present study

  19. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanning for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although the site of nosocomial sepsis in the critically ill ventilated patient is usually identifiable, it may remain occult, despite numerous investigations. The rapid results and precise anatomical location of the septic source using positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, in combination with computed ...

  20. Mouse manipulation through single-switch scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstien-Adler, Susie; Shein, Fraser; Quintal, Janet; Birch, Shae; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar

    2004-01-01

    Given the current extensive reliance on the graphical user interface, independent access to computer software requires that users be able to manipulate a pointing device of some type (e.g., mouse, trackball) or be able to emulate a mouse by some other means (e.g., scanning). The purpose of the present study was to identify one or more optimal single-switch scanning mouse emulation strategies. Four alternative scanning strategies (continuous Cartesian, discrete Cartesian, rotational, and hybrid quadrant/continuous Cartesian) were selected for testing based on current market availability as well as on theoretical considerations of their potential speed and accuracy. Each strategy was evaluated using a repeated measures study design by means of a test program that permitted mouse emulation via any one of four scanning strategies in a motivating environment; response speed and accuracy could be automatically recorded and considered in view of the motor, cognitive, and perceptual demands of each scanning strategy. Ten individuals whose disabilities required them to operate a computer via single-switch scanning participated in the study. Results indicated that Cartesian scanning was the preferred and most effective scanning strategy. There were no significant differences between results from the Continuous Cartesian and Discrete Cartesian scanning strategies. Rotational scanning was quite slow with respect to the other strategies, although it was equally accurate. Hybrid Quadrant scanning improved access time but at the cost of fewer correct selections. These results demonstrated the importance of testing and comparing alternate single-switch scanning strategies.

  1. Radionuclide scan findings in delayed splenic rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, F.W.; Jackson, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    An initial liver/spleen scan performed on a patient with blunt abdominal trauma was negative 3 days following the accident. A follow-up scan 7 days later showed definite evidence of splenic rupture, proved surgically. The authors conclude that, in such cases, spleen scans may be negative initially because of delayed splenic ruptures

  2. SCANNING AND TRACKING MONITORING APPARATUS AND METHOD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed is a scanning monitoring apparatus for medical imaging, the scanning monitoring apparatus comprising a controller unit and a display, wherein the controller unit during a scanning session is configured to obtain tracking data (102) of a subject in a medical scanner, obtain scanner data ...

  3. Scanning laser polarimetry in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Tanuj; Sharma, Reetika; Angmo, Dewang; Sinha, Gautam; Bhartiya, Shibal; Mishra, Sanjay K; Panda, Anita; Sihota, Ramanjit

    2014-11-01

    Glaucoma is an acquired progressive optic neuropathy which is characterized by changes in the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). White-on-white perimetry is the gold standard for the diagnosis of glaucoma. However, it can detect defects in the visual field only after the loss of as many as 40% of the ganglion cells. Hence, the measurement of RNFL thickness has come up. Optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) are the techniques that utilize the evaluation of RNFL for the evaluation of glaucoma. SLP provides RNFL thickness measurements based upon the birefringence of the retinal ganglion cell axons. We have reviewed the published literature on the use of SLP in glaucoma. This review elucidates the technological principles, recent developments and the role of SLP in the diagnosis and monitoring of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, in the light of scientific evidence so far.

  4. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  5. Radiopharmaceutical agents for skeletal scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, S.E.; Van Aswegen, A.; Loetter, M.G.; Minnaar, P.C.; Otto, A.C.; Goedhals, L.; Dedekind, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    The quality of bone scan images obtained with a locally produced and with an imported radiopharmaceutical bone agent, methylene diphosphonate (MDP), was compared visually. Standard skeletal imaging was carried out on 10 patients using both agents, with a period of 2 to 7 days between studies with alternate agents. Equal amounts of activity were administered for both agents. All images were acquired on Polaroid film for subsequent evaluation. The acquisition time for standard amount of counts per study was recorded. Three physicians with applicable experience evaluated image quality (on a 4 point scale) and detectability of metastasis (on a 3 point scale). There was no statistically significant difference (p 0,05) between the two agents by paired t-test of Hotelling's T 2 analysis. It is concluded that the imaging properties of the locally produced and the imported MDP are similar

  6. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM). In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  7. CT scan of pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakoda, K.; Mukada, K.; Yonezawa, M.; Matsumura, S.; Yoshimoto, H.; Mori, S.; Uozumi, T.

    1981-01-01

    CT scan is an extremely useful, almost harmless means of diagnosing pituitary adenomas. Growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenomas tend to have higher absorption coefficent in plain CT than the nonfunctioning and prolactin (PRL)-secreting adenomas. The absorption coefficent on contrast-enhanced CT does not identify the specific type of adenoma. Ring-like enhancement was observed in five nonfunctioning and four PRL-secreting adenomas with suprasellar extension, while cystic components were observed in four nonfunctioning and four PRL-secreting adenomas. In three of ten cases of PRL-secreting microadenomas, the site corresponding to the adenoma was not enhanced, whereas the normal pituitary was. A correlation exists between the size of PRL-secreting adenoma and the serum PRL level, but not between the size of GH-secreting adenomas and the serum GH level. (orig.)

  8. The utility of bone scans in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, I.; Dorai-Raj, A.; Khoo, K.; Tymans, K.; Brook, A.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Bone scans are the commonest diagnostic imaging services requested by Australian rheumatologists. Medicare figures suggest that an average rheumatologist orders about $50 000 (AUS) of bone scans annually. Aims: To ascertain the reasons why rheumatologists request bone scans and how it affects their patient management. Methods: A two-part prospective survey was administered before and after every bone scan ordered by four rheumatologists over a six-month period in 1996. Results: A total of 136 bone scans were requested (66.2% whole body; 33.8% regional; 6% SPECT). The primary indications for scanning were (1) to confirm a clinical diagnosis (38%); (2) to exclude a diagnosis (34%); (3) to localize site of pain (17%); and (4) to assist in management (6%). The common diseases that rheumatologists were attempting to confirm/exclude with bone scanning were inflammatory arthritis, malignancy, and fracture. However, the commonest provisional and final diagnosis was soft tissue rheumatism (18%) followed by inflammatory arthritis (15%) and osteoarthritis (11%). In 24% of patients with a provisional diagnosis of soft tissue rheumatism the diagnosis was changed by the bone scan. The scan was successful in excluding a diagnosis in 88 per cent where this was the primary indication for the test. It was successful in confirming a diagnosis in 79 per cent where this was the primary indication. In 32 per cent the bone scan altered the clinical diagnosis and in 43 per cent it altered management. The bone scan result prevented further investigations in 60 per cent. Conclusions: The commonest pre-scan and post-scan diagnosis is soft tissue rheumatism. Rheumatologists predominantly request bone scanning to confirm or exclude their clinical suspicion of inflammatory arthritis, malignancy, and fracture. Bone scans were successful in achieving these objectives in at least 79 per cent of cases

  9. Handbook of optical and laser scanning

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Gerald F

    2011-01-01

    From its initial publication titled Laser Beam Scanning in 1985 to Handbook of Optical and Laser Scanning, now in its second edition, this reference has kept professionals and students at the forefront of optical scanning technology. Carefully and meticulously updated in each iteration, the book continues to be the most comprehensive scanning resource on the market. It examines the breadth and depth of subtopics in the field from a variety of perspectives. The Second Edition covers: Technologies such as piezoelectric devices Applications of laser scanning such as Ladar (laser radar) Underwater

  10. Bone scanning in severe external otitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, W.J.; Shary, J.H. III; Nichols, L.T.; Lucente, F.E.

    1986-01-01

    Technetium99 Methylene Diphosphate bone scanning has been considered an early valuable tool to diagnose necrotizing progressive malignant external otitis. However, to our knowledge, no formal studies have actually compared bone scans of otherwise young, healthy patients with severe external otitis to scans of patients with clinical presentation of malignant external otitis. Twelve patients with only severe external otitis were studied with Technetium99 Diphosphate and were compared to known cases of malignant otitis. All scans were evaluated by two neuroradiologists with no prior knowledge of the clinical status of the patients. Nine of the 12 patients had positive bone scans with many scans resembling those reported with malignant external otitis. Interestingly, there was no consistent correlation between the severity of clinical presentation and the amount of Technetium uptake. These findings suggest that a positive bone scan alone should not be interpreted as indicative of malignant external otitis

  11. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically tunneling current

  12. Vacuum scanning capillary photoemission microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseyev, S A; Cherkun, A P; Mironov, B N; Petrunin, V V; Chekalin, S V

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of a conical capillary in a scanning probe microscopy for surface analysis. The probe can measure photoemission from a substrate by transmitting photoelectrons along the capillary as a function of probe position. The technique is demonstrated on a model substrate consisting of a gold reflecting layer on a compact disc which has been illuminated by an unfocused laser beam with a wavelength 400nm, from a femtosecond laser with a beam size of 4mm. A quartz capillary with a 2-µm aperture has been used in the experiments. The period of gold microstructure, shown to be 1.6µ, was measured by the conical probe operating in shear force mode. In shear force regime, the dielectric capillary has been used as a "classical" SPM tip, which provided images reflecting the surface topology. In a photoelectron regime photoelectrons passed through hollow tip and entered a detector. The spatial distribution of the recorded photoelectrons consisted of periodic mountain-valley strips, resembling the surface profile of the sample. Submicron spatial resolution has been achieved. This approach paves the way to study pulsed photodesorption of large organic molecular ions with high spatial and element resolution using the combination of a hollow-tip scanner with time-of-flight technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechberger, W.; Kothleitner, G.; Hofer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has developed into an established technique for chemical and structural analysis of thin specimens in the (scanning) transmission electron microscope (S)TEM. The energy resolution in EELS is largely limited by the stability of the high voltage supply, by the resolution of the spectrometer and by the energy spread of the source. To overcome this limitation a Wien filter monochromator was recently introduced with commercially available STEMs, offering the advantage to better resolve EELS fine structures, which contain valuable bonding information. The method of atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging within an STEM, utilizing a high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) detector can perfectly complement the excellent energy resolution, since EELS spectra can be collected simultaneously. In combination with a monochromator microscope not only high spatial resolution images can be recorded but also high energy resolution EELS spectra are attainable. In this work we investigated the STEM performance of a 200 kV monochromated Tecnai F20 with a high resolution Gatan Imaging Filter (HR-GIF). (author)

  14. Clinical role of skeletal scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ell, P J

    1975-12-01

    Malignant disease very often spreads to the skeleton. This is particularly true for carcinomas of the breast, the lungs, the prostate, and the thyroid. Knowledge of the state of the skeleton in these disorders is therefore desirable since patient management will largely depend on the early detection of bony deposits. Primary bone disease often spreads to soft tissue (lungs), and the early detection of this may alter significantly the therapeutic approach to the primary lesion. Traditionally, x-ray skeletal surveys and serum enzyme measurements provide indices which can be used in the staging of these disorders. Complementary techniques such as mammography, xeroradiography, thermography, and radionuclide imaging have been used to provide further relevant information. A number of benign bone diseases need early assessment in order to institute the best form of treatment. It is of importance to assess the circulation in localized areas of bone and to predict the appearance of avascular necrosis, to understand the healing mechanisms involved in fractures, and to predict the outcome of bone grafting. In this paper the clinical role of bone scanning is reviewed, particular attention being given to the recent advances brought about by the introduction of the /sup 99m/Tc compounds. It is important that the non-specialist should be aware of the great improvement in the results obtained and in the help they can give him in deciding on the best management of each patient as an individual.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This chapter described methods for Scanning Electron Microscopical imaging of bone and bone cells. Backscattered electron (BSE) imaging is by far the most useful in the bone field, followed by secondary electrons (SE) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analytical modes. This chapter considers preparing and imaging samples of unembedded bone having 3D detail in a 3D surface, topography-free, polished or micromilled, resin-embedded block surfaces, and resin casts of space in bone matrix. The chapter considers methods for fixation, drying, looking at undersides of bone cells, and coating. Maceration with alkaline bacterial pronase, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium or potassium hydroxide to remove cells and unmineralised matrix is described in detail. Attention is given especially to methods for 3D BSE SEM imaging of bone samples and recommendations for the types of resin embedding of bone for BSE imaging are given. Correlated confocal and SEM imaging of PMMA-embedded bone requires the use of glycerol to coverslip. Cathodoluminescence (CL) mode SEM imaging is an alternative for visualising fluorescent mineralising front labels such as calcein and tetracyclines. Making spatial casts from PMMA or other resin embedded samples is an important use of this material. Correlation with other imaging means, including microradiography and microtomography is important. Shipping wet bone samples between labs is best done in glycerol. Environmental SEM (ESEM, controlled vacuum mode) is valuable in eliminating -"charging" problems which are common with complex, cancellous bone samples.

  16. Normal bone and soft tissue distribution of fluorine-18-sodium fluoride and artifacts on 18F-NaF PET/CT bone scan: a pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Ismet; Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Sarikaya, Ali; Alfeeli, Mahmoud

    2017-10-01

    Fluorine-18-sodium fluoride (F-NaF) PET/CT is a relatively new and high-resolution bone imaging modality. Since the use of F-NaF PET/CT has been increasing, it is important to accurately assess the images and be aware of normal distribution and major artifacts. In this pictorial review article, we will describe the normal uptake patterns of F-NaF in the bone tissues, particularly in complex structures, as well as its physiologic soft tissue distribution and certain artifacts seen on F-NaF PET/CT images.

  17. Observation of Liver Color Scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Y K; Ahn, S B [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1969-09-15

    In the past few years, scintigraphy has become increasingly important in clinical practice, and the use of a color-printing technique has permitted a more accurate interpretation of the scan image. Our liver color scintigrams consist of 51 hepatomas, 35 liver cirrhosis, 22 liver abscesses, 10 hepatitis and other 13 cases of the liver diseases which were clinically and pathologically diagnosed at Severance Hospital, Yonsei Univ. since Feb. 1969 through Sept. 1969. These scintigrams have been analyzed in terms of various pathologic morphology, such as size, shape, margin of the liver, distribution of radioactivity, and shape of the space occupying lesions. The results are as follows: 1) Enlargement of the liver was the most common finding in the diseased livers. The Rt. lobe enlargement was particularly prominent in the liver abscess. 2) Irregular distribution of radioactivity in the liver (so called mottling) was present in 78% of hepatoma, while it was seen only in 31% of liver abscesses. 3) Liver cirrhosis tends to show perihilar accumulation of the isotope (57%). 4) The deformity of the lower most angle of the Rt. lobe, and the Lt. lateral margin of the Lt. lobe was also impressive throughout the cases (74-95% of all diseased livers). 5) The frequency of visualization of the spleen was influenced by the size of space occupying lesions and the amount of functioning liver. 6) Differentiation between the liver abscess and hepatoma seems to be possible on scintigram, when shape an margin of defect and patterns of distribution of radioactivity in the remaining liver are clearly demonstrated.

  18. Observation of Liver Color Scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Y. K.; Ahn, S. B.

    1969-01-01

    In the past few years, scintigraphy has become increasingly important in clinical practice, and the use of a color-printing technique has permitted a more accurate interpretation of the scan image. Our liver color scintigrams consist of 51 hepatomas, 35 liver cirrhosis, 22 liver abscesses, 10 hepatitis and other 13 cases of the liver diseases which were clinically and pathologically diagnosed at Severance Hospital, Yonsei Univ. since Feb. 1969 through Sept. 1969. These scintigrams have been analyzed in terms of various pathologic morphology, such as size, shape, margin of the liver, distribution of radioactivity, and shape of the space occupying lesions. The results are as follows: 1) Enlargement of the liver was the most common finding in the diseased livers. The Rt. lobe enlargement was particularly prominent in the liver abscess. 2) Irregular distribution of radioactivity in the liver (so called mottling) was present in 78% of hepatoma, while it was seen only in 31% of liver abscesses. 3) Liver cirrhosis tends to show perihilar accumulation of the isotope (57%). 4) The deformity of the lower most angle of the Rt. lobe, and the Lt. lateral margin of the Lt. lobe was also impressive throughout the cases (74-95% of all diseased livers). 5) The frequency of visualization of the spleen was influenced by the size of space occupying lesions and the amount of functioning liver. 6) Differentiation between the liver abscess and hepatoma seems to be possible on scintigram, when shape an margin of defect and patterns of distribution of radioactivity in the remaining liver are clearly demonstrated.

  19. Data acquisition and control for gamma scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, B.K.; Murray, A.S.; Quintana, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    A new computer-based data acquisition and control unit has been installed in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) system for scanning irradiated reactor fuel pins. The scanning mechanism is controlled by a commercial multichannel analyzer via a CAMAC link with an intelligent crate controller. The scanning and control unit consists of three linked LSI-11 computers. The multitasking capability of the commercial operation system allows control decisions to be based upon currently acquiring data

  20. The use of radionuclides in brain scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boasquevisque, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    Brain scanning is easy to perform, safe and well tolerated by the patient. It has a high sensitivity, and accuracy (85-90%) in detecting focal lesions with a minimal size of 1.5-2cm, located superior to the brain stem; however, it lacks specificity. It does not compete with other procedures such as CT scan and angiography bit they rather complement one another. The brain scan is useful as a screening exam. (Author) [pt

  1. Are dual-phase 18F-FDG PET scans necessary in nasopharyngeal carcinoma to assess the primary tumour and loco-regional nodes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chang, Yu-Chen; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Kun-Ju; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Hsu, Ching-Han; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Fu, Ying-Kai; Ng, Shu-Hang

    2005-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to investigate the efficacy of dual-phase positron emission tomography (PET) in evaluating the loco-regional status of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Eighty-four patients with newly diagnosed NPC and a fasting serum glucose level of 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET studies (at 40 min and 3 h after injection of 370 MBq 18 F-FDG) and head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed within 1 week. Diagnostic criteria for NPC comprised the histopathological findings, the joint judgments of the research team and the post-treatment outcome. Each lesion's maximum standardised uptake value (SUV) and retention index were obtained. SUV data were evaluated using a paired test. Receiver operating characteristic curves and calculation of the area under the curve (AUC) determined the discriminative power. 18 F-FDG PET was significantly superior to MRI in identifying lower neck NPC nodal metastasis (AUC: 1 vs 0. 972, P=0.046) and overall loco-regional metastases (AUC: 0.985 vs 0.958, P=0.036). However, 18 F-FDG PET was similar to MRI in detecting primary tumour, as well as retropharyngeal, upper neck and supraclavicular nodal metastases. There was no significant difference between early phase (40 min) and delayed phase (3 h) 18 F-FDG PET in the detection of primary tumours (accuracy: 100% vs 100%) or loco-regional nodal metastasis (AUC: 0.984 vs 0.985, P=0.834). 18 F-FDG PET is superior to MRI in identifying lower neck nodal metastasis of NPC. Additional 3-h 18 F-FDG PET contributes no further information in the detection of primary tumours or loco-regional metastatic nodes in untreated NPC patients. (orig.)

  2. Towards vortex imaging with scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Dan T.

    1994-02-01

    A low temperature, Besocke beetle type scanning tunneling microscope, with a scan range of 10 by 10 microns was built. The scanning tunneling microscope was calibrates for various temperatures and tested on several samples. Gold monolayers evaporated at 400 deg C were resolved and their dynamic behavior observed. Atomic resolution images of graphite were obtained. The scanning tunneling microscope was designed for future applications of vortex imaging in superconductors. The special design considerations for this application are discussed and the physics underlying it reviewed. (author)

  3. Scanning Tunneling Microscope For Use In Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope with subangstrom resolution developed to study surface structures. Although instrument used in air, designed especially for use in vacuum. Scanning head is assembly of small, mostly rigid components made of low-outgassing materials. Includes coarse-positioning mechanical-translation stage, on which specimen mounted by use of standard mounting stub. Tunneling tip mounted on piezoelectric fine-positioning tube. Application of suitable voltages to electrodes on piezoelectric tube controls scan of tunneling tip across surface of specimen. Electronic subsystem generates scanning voltages and collects data.

  4. Human Digital Modeling & Hand Scanning Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory incorporates specialized scanning equipment, computer workstations and software applications for the acquisition and analysis of digitized models of...

  5. Status of automated nuclear scanning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C.; McNeece, J.P.; Ruddy, F.H.

    1983-07-01

    Present day minicomputers and microprocessors enable a range of automation, from partial to total, of tasks once thought beyond approach. The status of three computer controlled systems for quantitative track measurements is reviewed. Two systems, the Hanford optical track scanner (HOTS) and an automated scanning electron microscope (ASEM) are used for scanning solid state track recorders (SSTR). The third systems, the emulsion scanning processor (ESP), is an interactive system used to measure the length of proton tracks in nuclear research emulsions (NRE). Current limitations of these systems for quantitative track scanning are presented. Experimental uncertainties attained with these computer controlled systems are described using results obtained from reactor neutron dosimetry

  6. Potential value of serial cerebral SPECT scanning in the evaluation of psychiatric illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notardonato, H.; Gonzalez-Avilez, A.; Van Heertum, R.L.; O'Connell, R.A.; Yudd, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral SPECT imaging has the potential to make an important contribution to clinical psychiatry. Cerebral SPECT scanning, stimulated by the work with PET, is readily available and much less expensive than PET. This paper reports a case demonstrating the potential value of cerebral SPECT scanning with I-123 IMP, specifically in the serial evaluation of a schizophrenic patient with auditory hallucinations. The initial scan revealed focal areas of increased uptake in the caudate nuclei of the basal ganglia, and in the right temporal lobe. After pharmacological treatment with clinical improvement, the follow-up SPECT scan demonstrated significant improvement in the distribution of the radiopharmaceutical

  7. Water-equivalent oral contrast agents in dual-modality PET/computed tomography scanning: does a little barium make the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, Sonja; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Lauenstein, Thomas C; Bockisch, Andreas; Antoch, Gerald

    2009-03-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the performance of two water-equivalent oral contrast agents [locust bean gum (LBG)-mannitol and VoLumen] concerning their potential to distend the bowel while avoiding contrast-associated artifacts in PET/computed tomography. PET/computed tomography examinations of 30 patients with two different oral contrast agents were reviewed. Bowel distension, intraluminal density, and potential contrast-associated artifacts were assessed for stomach, jejunum, and ileum. Statistical significance was tested by Student's t-test. Distension was slightly better in the stomach with VoLumen as compared with LBG-mannitol whereas LBG-mannitol was found to slightly better distend the small bowel. This difference proved to be statistically significant for the jejunum. A statistically significant difference was detected for intraluminal density with higher densities for VoLumen. This difference, however, did not result in a higher incidence of PET artifacts with VoLumen. LBG-mannitol provides excellent bowel distension, thereby avoiding contrast-associated PET artifacts. If this solution is not available, VoLumen provides a satisfactory alternative for bowel distension without relevant PET artifacts.

  8. F.D.G.-PET scanning in managing patients with lymphoma; La place de la TEP au FDG dans l'evaluation des lymphomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodet-Milin, C.; Kraeber-Bodere, F. [CHU de Nantes, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hotel-Dieu, 44 - Nantes (France); Salaun, P.Y. [CHU de Brest, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 29 - Brest (France); Crespin, C.; Vuillez, J.P. [CHU de Grenoble, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 38 - Grenoble (France); Kraeber-Bodere, F. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 44 - Saint-Herblain (France); CRCNA, Inserm UMR 892, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2009-08-15

    The place of positron emission tomography (PET) in the evaluation of diffuse at big cells B lymphomas and hodgkin lymphomas is validated. The clinical impact of the PET registered in end of therapy development is indisputable. recommendations must be followed for images interpretation. The PET is strongly recommended during the first evaluation of the disease because it is a reference examination that makes easy the interpretation at the end of the therapy and allows to evaluate the extension of the disease with a sensitivity and a specificity superior to the computerized tomography. the prognosis value of intermediate evaluations appears certain in the diffuse at big cells B lymphomas and the hodgkin lymphomas but the impact of an early therapy change induced by PET is still to determine. The criteria of interpretation of early evaluations are to standardize. for the other types of lymphomas, the PET can have an interest to confirm the the localized stages, especially for the follicular lymphomas and direct the biopsy for a patient ill of a low range lymphoma suspect of aggressive change. (N.C.)

  9. Malignant peritoneal esothelioma masqueradesas peritoneal metastasis on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans: A rare diagnosis that should not be missed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claimon, Apichaya; Bang, Ji In; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eui Shin Edmund [Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, WCU Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare but fatal tumor. The clinical presentations and imaging findings are nonspecific and resemble various diseases, including peritoneal metastasis. Imaging findings of MPH on {sup 18}F-{sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) are diverse and not well described. We report the two cases of biopsy-proven MPH using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. In our cases, interesting disease patterns—including MPH arising from visceral peritoneal lining of kidney that suffer from polycystic disease and from the parietal peritoneum beneath the appendectomy scar—were presented. One case showed classical metastases localized within the abdominal cavity; while the other case exhibited the rare pattern of extensive multi-organ metastases. By knowing the possible variations and diagnostic pitfalls of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT findings in MPM, more accurate interpretation of such mysterious cancer is attainable.

  10. Using positron emission tomography (PET) response criteria in solid tumours (PERCIST) 1.0 for evaluation of 2'-deoxy-2'-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose-PET/CT scans to predict survival early during treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fledelius, Joan; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Hjorthaug, Karin; Frøkiaer, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    The demand for early-response evaluation with 2'-deoxy-2'-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (F-18-FDG) positron emission tomography combined with whole body CT (PET/CT) is rapidly growing. This study was initiated to evaluate the applicability of the PET response criteria in solid tumours (PERCIST 1.0) for response evaluation. We performed a retrospective study of 21 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who had undergone both a baseline and a follow-up F-18-FDG-PET/CT scan during their treatments. The scans were performed at our institution in the period September 2009 and March 2011 and were analysed visually and according to PERCIST 1.0 by one board-certified nuclear medicine physician. The response was compared with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The variation in key parameters affecting the F-18-FDG uptake was assessed. A kappa of 0.94 corresponding to an almost perfect agreement was found for the comparison of the visual evaluation with PERCIST. Patients with partial metabolic response and stable metabolic disease (as evaluated by PERCIST 1.0) had statistically significant longer median time to progression: 8.4 months (confidence interval (CI) 5.1-11.8 months) as compared with 2.7 months (CI 0-5.6 months) in patients classified with progression. The variation in uptake time between baseline and follow-up scans was more than the recommended 15 min in 48% of patients. PERCIST 1.0 is readily implementable and highly comparable with visual evaluation of response using early F-18-FDG-PET/CT scanning for locally advanced NSCLC patients. In spite of variations in parameters affecting F-18-FDG uptake, evaluation of F-18-FDG-PET/CT during treatment with PERCIST 1.0 is shown to separate non-responders from responders, each with statistically significant differences in both OS and PFS. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan may be helpful in the case of ductal variant prostate cancer when prostate specific membrane antigen ligand positron emission tomography scan is negative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, Louise M.; Wong, David; Yaxley, John

    2017-01-01

    Gallium-68 prostate specific membrane antigen ligand (Ga-68 PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning is emerging as a useful imaging modality for the staging of suspected and known recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer and in staging of newly diagnosed higher grade prostate cancer. However, we have observed at our institution that in some cases of the more aggressive ductal variant, Ga-68 PSMA uptake has sometimes been poor compared with prominent 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) avidity seen in F-18 FDG PET/CT, which would suggest that FDG PET/CT scans are important in staging of ductal pattern prostate cancer.

  12. The role of FDG-PET/CT in differentiated thyroid cancer patients with negative iodine-131 whole-body scan and elevated anti-Tg level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa, Sertac; Aksoy, Sabire Yılmaz; Vatankulu, Betül; Aliyev, Anar; Uslu, Lebriz; Ozhan, Meftune; Sager, Sait; Halac, Metin; Sonmezoglu, Kerim

    2014-12-01

    In the follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) after a successful total-near total thyroidectomy and I-131 ablation therapy, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (anti-Tg) may be persistently or progressively increased in the patients with an undetectable serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level. In these cases, further investigation was performed to search for recurrence/metastases. The aim of our study was clarifying the role of FDG-PET/CT in detecting recurrence/metastasis in patients with DTC with negative serum Tg and elevated anti-Tg level. A total of 40 patients (32 female, 8 male; mean age: 43.15 years (22-65); mean age at diagnosis: 39.08 (16-64)) with DTC who had undetectable serum Tg and elevated anti-Tg level after a successful initial therapy were included in the study. All of the patients had serum anti-Tg of >40 IU/ml and underwent FDG-PET/CT to search for recurrence/metastasis. Twenty patients (50 %) had recurrence/metastasis on FDG-PET/CT while the other 20 had no pathologic findings. Of the 20 patients who had positive FDG-PET/CT, 12 had a histopathological final diagnosis of which 11 were true positive (TP) and 1 was false positive (FP). On the other hand, 16 of the 40 patients had a histopathological final diagnosis of which 11/16 had TP, 1/16 FP, 3/16 false negative (FN) and 1/16 true negative (TN) findings by PET/CT. The final diagnosis was made by clinical follow-up in the remaining 24 patients. Of these, 8 patients were PET positive, and in 1 (12.5 %) of 8 patients a decrease in serum anti-Tg level, in 2 (25 %) patients a saw-toothed pattern and in 5 (62.5 %) a progressive increase in the serum anti-Tg level were noted during the follow-up. Of the 16 of 24 patients who were diagnosed by clinical follow-up, in 8 a (50 %) decrease in serum anti-Tg level, in 6 (37.5 %) a saw-toothed pattern, and in 2 (12.5 %) a progressively increased anti-Tg level was seen. Of the 40 patients, 14 (35 %) had a diagnosis of recurrence/metastasis finally, with

  13. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth / For Kids / Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands ...

  14. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  15. Automation of scanning technique by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamira, Yahya

    2011-01-01

    The gamma scan technique is a nuclear test allowing the analysis of the internal mechanical properties of distillation columns used in petrochemical industries. Such technique is performed manually. So we propose in this work to automate the gamma scan procedure test by using a PLC. In addition, supervision and data acquisition interfaces are proposed.

  16. Spatial scan statistics using elliptic windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    The spatial scan statistic is widely used to search for clusters in epidemiologic data. This paper shows that the usually applied elimination of secondary clusters as implemented in SatScan is sensitive to smooth changes in the shape of the clusters. We present an algorithm for generation of set...

  17. Spatial scan statistics using elliptic windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2006-01-01

    The spatial scan statistic is widely used to search for clusters. This article shows that the usually applied elimination of secondary clusters as implemented in SatScan is sensitive to smooth changes in the shape of the clusters. We present an algorithm for generation of a set of confocal elliptic...

  18. Security scanning of Web sites at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2010-01-01

    As of early 2010, the CERN Computer Security Team will start regular scanning of all Web sites and Web applications at CERN, visible on the Internet, or on the General Purpose Network (office network). The goal of this scanning is to improve the quality of CERN Web sites. All deficits found will be reported by e-mail to the relevant Web site owners, and must be fixed in a timely manner. Web site owners may also request one-off scans of their Web site or Web application, by sending an e-mail to Computer.Security@cern.ch. These Web scans are designed to limit the impact on the scanned Web sites. Nevertheless, in very rare cases scans may cause undesired side-effects, e.g. generate a large number of log entries, or cause particularly badly designed or less robust Web applications to crash. If a Web site is affected by these security scans, it will also be susceptible to any more aggressive scan that can be performed any time by a malicious attacker. Such Web applications should be fixed, and also additionally...

  19. A Scanning Microwave Radar and Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1995-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Radar and Radiometer (SMRR) is a line scanner featuring a combined radar and radiometer system operating around 35 and 94 GHz. The layout of the SMRR is shown. The 2 offset antenna parabolas scan in synchronism, the receiver antenna has the highest gain in order to ensure...

  20. From Cooperative Scans to Predictive Buffer Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Switakowski; P.A. Boncz (Peter); M. Zukowski (Marcin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn analytical applications, database systems often need to sustain workloads with multiple concurrent scans hitting the same table. The Cooperative Scans (CScans) framework, which introduces an Active Buer Manager (ABM) component into the database architecture, has been the most

  1. Scanning Capacitance Microscopy | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    obtained using scanning capacitance microscopy. Top Right: Image of p-type and n-type material, obtained 'fingers' of light-colored n-type material on a yellow and blue background representing p-type material material, obtained using scanning capacitance microscopy, in a sample semiconductor device; the image shows

  2. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Español Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth / For Kids / Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print en español ...

  3. Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houselt, Arie; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has revolutionized our ability to image, study, and manipulate solid surfaces on the size scale of atoms. One important limitation of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is, however, its poor time resolution. Recording a standard image with a STM typically takes

  4. Full cycle rapid scan EPR deconvolution algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseytlin, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance (RS EPR) is a continuous-wave (CW) method that combines narrowband excitation and broadband detection. Sinusoidal magnetic field scans that span the entire EPR spectrum cause electron spin excitations twice during the scan period. Periodic transient RS signals are digitized and time-averaged. Deconvolution of absorption spectrum from the measured full-cycle signal is an ill-posed problem that does not have a stable solution because the magnetic field passes the same EPR line twice per sinusoidal scan during up- and down-field passages. As a result, RS signals consist of two contributions that need to be separated and postprocessed individually. Deconvolution of either of the contributions is a well-posed problem that has a stable solution. The current version of the RS EPR algorithm solves the separation problem by cutting the full-scan signal into two half-period pieces. This imposes a constraint on the experiment; the EPR signal must completely decay by the end of each half-scan in order to not be truncated. The constraint limits the maximum scan frequency and, therefore, the RS signal-to-noise gain. Faster scans permit the use of higher excitation powers without saturating the spin system, translating into a higher EPR sensitivity. A stable, full-scan algorithm is described in this paper that does not require truncation of the periodic response. This algorithm utilizes the additive property of linear systems: the response to a sum of two inputs is equal the sum of responses to each of the inputs separately. Based on this property, the mathematical model for CW RS EPR can be replaced by that of a sum of two independent full-cycle pulsed field-modulated experiments. In each of these experiments, the excitation power equals to zero during either up- or down-field scan. The full-cycle algorithm permits approaching the upper theoretical scan frequency limit; the transient spin system response must decay within the scan

  5. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  6. Diagnosis of Stomach Carcinoma by Radioisotope Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerniak, P.; Meytes, E.; Sinkover, A.; Bank, H. [Tel-Hashomer Government Hospital, University of Tel Aviv School of Medicine (Israel)

    1969-05-15

    Scanning of the stomach after administration of {sup 131}I and {sup 99m}Tc is presented. Experiments on 20 dogs were performed and 105 patients were examined. The studies with {sup 131}I are only mentioned briefly as they have been summarized in a previous publication and we have concentrated on our experience with {sup 99m}Tc and on stomach carcinoma. The turnover of the nuclide in blood, urine, gastric juice and gastric mucosa was tested: in-vivo and post-operative scannings were performed. The scans are classified in four groups. Carcinoma of the stomach results in space-occupying lesions or foggy scans. A correlation of 85 - 90% between scan results and clinical findings is noted. A special group of 10 volunteers was examined to establish the possibility of a screening examination for the detection of stomach cancer using the technique presented. (author)

  7. Significance of leukocyte scanning in infected endoprostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W.; Pasurka, B.; Boerner, W.

    1989-03-01

    31 patients with suspected septic loosening of an endoprosthesis (hip endoprosthesis n=30; knee endoprosthesis n=1) were examined with leukocyte scans (10 MBq /sup 111/In-oxine: n=22; 300 MBq /sup 99m/Tc-HMPAO: n=9). The results were compared with results of the bacterial growth (n=22), the histology (n=12) and of the bone scans (/sup 99m/Tc-MDP: n=20) which were performed within 4 days. The sensitivity of the bone scan was 100%, the specificity 30% and the diagnostic accuracy regarding a septic loosening of the arthroplasty was 55%. For the leukocyte scans a comparable sensitivity of 100%, but a higher specificity (86%) and accuracy (91%) could be calculated. A false positive leukocyte scan could be observed in a periprosthetic granuloma, an ossifying periarthritis and in a patient with negative bacterial growth with the histological proof of an inflammation.

  8. MR guided spatial normalization of SPECT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, B.; Barnden, L.R.; Kwiatek, R.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In SPECT population studies where magnetic resonance (MR) scans are also available, the higher resolution of the MR scans allows for an improved spatial normalization of the SPECT scans. In this approach, the SPECT images are first coregistered to their corresponding MR images by a linear (affine) transformation which is calculated using SPM's mutual information maximization algorithm. Non-linear spatial normalization maps are then computed either directly from the MR scans using SPM's built in spatial normalization algorithm, or, from segmented TI MR images using DARTEL, an advanced diffeomorphism based spatial normalization algorithm. We compare these MR based methods to standard SPECT based spatial normalization for a population of 27 fibromyalgia patients and 25 healthy controls with spin echo T 1 scans. We identify significant perfusion deficits in prefrontal white matter in FM patients, with the DARTEL based spatial normalization procedure yielding stronger statistics than the standard SPECT based spatial normalization. (author)

  9. SU-F-J-223: Patterns of Failure for Laryngeal Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive IMRT: Comparing Two Different Methods for Determining the Origin of Recurrence From Follow-Up PET/CT Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, P; Guha, C; Tome, W [Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, R; Kalnicki, S; Garg, M [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Vogelius, I [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine patterns of failure in laryngeal cancer treated with definitive IMRT by comparing two different methods for identifying the recurrence epicenter on follow-up PET/CT. Methods: We identified 20 patients treated for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma with definitive IMRT who had loco-regional recurrence diagnosed on PET/CT. Recurrence PET/CT scans were co-registered with the original treatment planning CT using deformable image registration with the VoxAlign deformation engine in MIM Software. Recurrence volumes were delineated on co-registered follow-up scans using a semi-automatic PETedge tool and two separate methods were used to identify the recurrence point of origin: a) Finding the point within the recurrence volume for which the maximum distance to the surface of the surrounding recurrence volume is smaller than for any other point. b) Finding the point within the recurrence volume with the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), without geometric restrictions.For each method the failure pattern was determined as whether the recurrence origin fell within the original high-dose target volumes GTV70, CTV70, PTV70 (receiving 70Gy), intermediate-risk PTV59 (receiving 59.4Gy) or low-risk PTV54 (receiving 54.1Gy), in the original treatment planning CT. Results: 23 primary/nodal recurrences from the 20 patients were analyzed. The three-dimensional distance between the two different origins was on average 10.5mm (std.dev. 10mm). Most recurrences originated in the high-dose target volumes for both methods with 13 (57%) and 11 (48%) in the GTV70 and 20 (87%) and 20 (87%) in the PTV70 for method a) and b), respectively. There was good agreement between the two methods in classifying the origin target volumes with 69% concordance for GTV70, 89% for CTV70 and 100% for PTV70. Conclusion: With strong agreement in patterns of failure between two separate methods for determining recurrence origin, we conclude that most recurrences occurred within the

  10. Pathophysiologic basics and diagnostic limits of conventional bone scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuemichen, C.; Dunkelmann, S.

    2006-01-01

    Normal bone scan demonstrates the physiological regional bone formation rate, which is related to bone remodeling and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Osteotrope radiopharmaceuticals can be used as a perfusion marker as well as a marker of regional bone formation rate. Local hyperperfusion without increased bone formation is seen in disuse atrophy and reflex sympathic dystrophy, which are difficult to discriminate, local hypoperfusion is responsible for false negative results in osteomyelitis. A local increased bone formation rate is the substrate of a positive finding in bone fracture, inflammation, tumors, metastases and other lesions. In direct comparison with other imaging modalities (MRT, scintigraphy with non-osteotrope radiopharmaceutical and PET, but not CT and multislice-CT), planar bone scintigraphy shows an unexpected deficiency in sensitivity, which can be almost or completely overcome by using SPECT or even better 18 F-fluoride PET. These techniques will also improve specificity, which still is a weak point of bone scanning, despite improved imaging performance and a huge experience in this field. The introduction of SPECT/CT und PET/CT in bone scanning will be even more desirable for this reason. (orig.)

  11. Absolute quantification of regional cerebral glucose utilization in mice by 18F-FDG small animal PET scanning and 2-14C-DG autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Hiroshi; Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Modell, Kendra J; Vines, Douglass C; Esaki, Takanori; Cook, Michelle; Seidel, Jurgen; Sokoloff, Louis; Green, Michael V; Innis, Robert B

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of absolute quantification of regional cerebral glucose utilization (rCMR(glc)) in mice by use of (18)F-FDG and a small animal PET scanner. rCMR(glc) determined with (18)F-FDG PET was compared with values determined simultaneously by the autoradiographic 2-(14)C-DG method. In addition, we compared the rCMR(glc) values under isoflurane, ketamine and xylazine anesthesia, and awake states. Immediately after injection of (18)F-FDG and 2-(14)C-DG into mice, timed arterial samples were drawn over 45 min to determine the time courses of (18)F-FDG and 2-(14)C-DG. Animals were euthanized at 45 min and their brain was imaged with the PET scanner. The brains were then processed for 2-(14)C-DG autoradiography. Regions of interest were manually placed over cortical regions on corresponding coronal (18)F-FDG PET and 2-(14)C-DG autoradiographic images. rCMR(glc) values were calculated for both tracers by the autoradiographic 2-(14)C-DG method with modifications for the different rate and lumped constants for the 2 tracers. Average rCMR(glc) values in cerebral cortex with (18)F-FDG PET under normoglycemic conditions (isoflurane and awake) were generally lower (by 8.3%) but strongly correlated with those of 2-(14)C-DG (r(2) = 0.95). On the other hand, under hyperglycemic conditions (ketamine/xylazine) average cortical rCMR(glc) values with (18)F-FDG PET were higher (by 17.3%) than those with 2-(14)C-DG. Values for rCMR(glc) and uptake (percentage injected dose per gram [%ID/g]) with (18)F-FDG PET were significantly lower under both isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine anesthesia than in the awake mice. However, the reductions of rCMR(glc) were markedly greater under isoflurane (by 57%) than under ketamine and xylazine (by 19%), whereas more marked reductions of %ID/g were observed with ketamine/xylazine (by 54%) than with isoflurane (by 37%). These reverse differences between isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine may be due to

  12. RubiShort: Reducing scan time in 82Rb heart scans to minimize movements artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jeppe; Vraa, Kaspar J.; Harms, Hans

    .013x, R2=0.98; %Reversible: y=1.008x, R2=0.95; TPD: y=1.000x, R2=0.99). Conclusion:, Scan time of myocardial perfusion scans using 82Rb can be reduced from 7 min. to 5 min. without loss of quantitative accuracy. Since patient motion is frequent in the last minutes of the scans, scan time reduction...

  13. Prognostic role of metabolic parameters of {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT scan performed during radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Myo; Forstner, Dion [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lin, Peter; Shon, Ivan Ho; Lin, Michael [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Positron Emission Tomography, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lee, Mark T. [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Bray, Victoria; Fowler, Allan [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Chicco, Andrew [Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Positron Emission Tomography, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Tieu, Minh Thi [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Department of Radiation Oncology, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT performed in the third week (iPET) of definitive radiation therapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced mucosal primary head and neck squamous-cell-carcinoma (MPHNSCC). Seventy-two patients with MPHNSCC treated with radical RT underwent staging PET-CT and iPET. The maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesional glycolysis (TLG) of primary tumour (PT) and index node (IN) [defined as lymph node(s) with highest TLG] were analysed, and results were correlated with loco-regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), metastatic failure-free survival(MFFS) and overall survival (OS), using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Optimal cutoffs (OC) were derived from receiver operating characteristic curves: SUV{sub max-PT} = 4.25 g/mL, MTV{sub PT} = 3.3 cm{sup 3}, TLG{sub PT} = 9.4 g, for PT, and SUV{sub max-IN} = 4.05 g/mL, MTV{sub IN} = 1.85 cm{sup 3} and TLG{sub IN} = 7.95 g for IN. Low metabolic values in iPET for PT below OC were associated with statistically significant better LRFS and DFS. TLG was the best predictor of outcome with 2-year LRFS of 92.7 % vs. 71.1 % [p = 0.005, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.03) and MTV (p = 0.022)], DFS of 85.9 % vs. 60.8 % [p = 0.005, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.025) and MTV (p = 0.018)], MFFS of 85.9 % vs. 83.7 % [p = 0.488, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.52) and MTV (p = 0.436)], and OS of 81.1 % vs. 75.0 % [p = 0.279, compared with SUV{sub max} (p = 0.345) and MTV (p = 0.512)]. There were no significant associations between the percentage reduction of primary tumour metabolic parameters and outcomes. In patients with nodal disease, metabolic parameters below OC (for both PT and IN) were significantly associated with all oncological outcomes, while TLG was again the best predictor: LRFS of 84.0 % vs. 55.3 % (p = 0.017), DFS of 79.4 % vs. 38.6 % (p = 0.001), MFFS 86.4 % vs. 68.2 % (p = 0

  14. Gallium-67 citrate scan in extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Wanyu

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Whole-body gallium scan was performed to evaluate the usefulness of gallium scan for detecting extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) lesions. Methods: Thirty-seven patients with extrapulmonary TB were included in this study. Four patients were found to have two lesions. Totally, 41 lesions were identified, including 19 TB arthritis, 8 spinal TB, 5 TB meningitis, 3 TB lymphadenopathy, 2 TB pericarditis, 1 TB peritonitis, 1 intestinal TB, 1 skin TB and 1 renal TB. Results: Of the 41 extrapulmonary TB lesions, gallium scan detected 32 lesions with a sensitivity of 78%. All the patients with TB meningitis showed negative gallium scan. When the five cases of TB meningitis were excluded, the detection sensitivity of gallium scan increased to 88.9% (32/36). Conclusion: Our data revealed that gallium scan is a convenient and useful method for evaluating extrapulmonary TB lesions other than TB-meningitis. We suggest that gallium scan be included in the clinical routine for patients with suspected extrapulmonary TB. (orig.) [de

  15. Precursor and Neutral Loss Scans in an RF Scanning Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Szalwinski, Lucas J.; Schrader, Robert L.; Pirro, Valentina; Hilger, Ryan; Cooks, R. Graham

    2018-03-01

    Methodology for performing precursor and neutral loss scans in an RF scanning linear quadrupole ion trap is described and compared to the unconventional ac frequency scan technique. In the RF scanning variant, precursor ions are mass selectively excited by a fixed frequency resonance excitation signal at low Mathieu q while the RF amplitude is ramped linearly to pass ions through the point of excitation such that the excited ion's m/z varies linearly with time. Ironically, a nonlinear ac frequency scan is still required for ejection of the product ions since their frequencies vary nonlinearly with the linearly varying RF amplitude. In the case of the precursor scan, the ejection frequency must be scanned so that it is fixed on a product ion m/z throughout the RF scan, whereas in the neutral loss scan, it must be scanned to maintain a constant mass offset from the excited precursor ions. Both simultaneous and sequential permutation scans are possible; only the former are demonstrated here. The scans described are performed on a variety of samples using different ionization sources: protonated amphetamine ions generated by nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI), explosives ionized by low-temperature plasma (LTP), and chemical warfare agent simulants sampled from a surface and analyzed with swab touch spray (TS). We lastly conclude that the ac frequency scan variant of these MS/MS scans is preferred due to electronic simplicity. In an accompanying manuscript, we thus describe the implementation of orthogonal double resonance precursor and neutral loss scans on the Mini 12 using constant RF voltage. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Bone scanning in patients with breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Y.; Nishi, T.; Hirose, T.; Schichijo, Y.; Ibukuro, K.

    1985-01-01

    Skeletal imaging using radionuclides has proved to be a sensitive method for the detection of early bony metastases from breast carcinoma. Recent studies have found a relatively low rate of abnormal scans in patients with stage I and II breast cancers, and therefore it is open to question whether bone scanning should be part of the preoperative evaluation of any patient prior to breast surgery. We reviewed our experience with bone scans in 329 patients out of 406 histologically proven breast cancer patients to determine if any or all patients should have this procedure done routinely prior to breast surgery. (orig.) [de

  17. Diagnostic value of the coronary CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Sousuke

    1982-01-01

    Using high-resolution computed tomography, coronary scanning has been made to investigate the radiographical details of the middle and inner ear organs. Twenty patients with chronic otitis media, secondary cholesteatoma, sensorineural hearing loss, facial spasm, and suspected meningitis, were evaluated. In 26 of 40 ears in this series, the coronary scans sharply outlined almost all of the bony structures, and showed also the eardrum as a clearly defined soft tissue, but no abnormal radiographical findings were recognized. In the remaining ears with chronic otitis media, the scans were valuable in demonstration of mucosal thickening, granulation tissue, and destruction of the auditory ossicles. (author)

  18. Bone scan in diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marandian, M.H.; Mortazavi, H.; Behvad, A.; Haghigat, H.; Lessani, M.; Youssefian, B.

    1979-01-01

    Bone scan with Technetium 99m is harmless method of evaluation of skeletal lesions. It is safe in pediatrics age group and it can be used in early diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis. Bone scan differentiate osteomyelitis from cellulitis, and also it may help in diagnosis of subclinical involvement of rheumatoid arthritis, benign and malignant bone tumors, stress fractures and periostitis. We report results of bone scan in 30 pediatrics patients as follow: osteomyelitis 9 cases, cellulitis 4 cases, infectious arthritis 7 cases, tuberculous osteoarthritis 2 cases, rheumatoid arthritis 2 cases, and other different diseases 9 cases [fr

  19. Gamma scanning of the irradiated HANARO fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Kwon Pyo; Lee, K. S.; Park, D. G.; Baik, S. Y.; Song, W. S.; Kim, T. Y.; Seo, C. K.

    1997-02-01

    To conform the burnup state of the fuels, we have transported the irradiated HANARO fuels from the reactor to IMEF (Irradiated Material Examination Facility), and executed gamma scanning for the fuels. By measuring the gamma-rays from the irradiated fuels we could see the features of the relative burnup distributions in the fuel bundles. All of 17 fuel bundles were taken in and out between HANARO and IMEF from March till August in 1996, and we carried out the related regulations. Longitudinal gamma scanning and angular gamma scanning are done for each fuel bundle without dismantlement of the bundles. (author). 5 tabs., 25 figs

  20. Confocal scanning microscope for nuclear photoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batusov, Yu.A.; Kovalev, Yu.S.; Soroko, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the confocal scanning microscope to the objects in the nuclear photoemulsion is described. An array of 27 microtomograms of single silver grain is shown. The cross sections of the same particle track of diameter 1 μm, detected by means of the confocal scanning microscope with open and annular apertures, are presented. It was shown that the confocal scanning microscope opens indeed new opportunities for the nuclear photoemulsion technique to get previously inaccessible information for physics of the short-living particles

  1. Evaluation of dopamine transporters and D2 receptors in hemiparkinsonian rat brains in vivo using consecutive PET scans of [18F]FPCIT and [18F]fallypride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Yong; Kim, Chul Hoon; Jeon, Tae Joo; Cho, Won Gil; Lee, Jin Suk; Lee, Soo Jin; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byoung Soo; Yi, Chi Hoon; Seo, Youngbeom; Yi, Dae Ik; Han, Sang Jin; Lee, Minkyung; Kim, Dong Goo; Lee, Jong Doo; An, Gwangil

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dopaminergic function in unilaterally lesioned 6-OHDA rats by dual PET radioligands: [ 18 F]FPCIT (a dopamine transporter imaging radioligand) and [ 18 F]fallypride (a dopamine D2 receptors imaging radioligand). As a result, the brain uptake of [ 18 F]FPCIT was significantly reduced and that of [ 18 F]fallypride was increased in the ipsilateral striatum (lesion side) of the 6-OHDA rats. These findings implicated that dopamine transporter is down-regulated and dopamine D2 receptor is up-regulated in this hemiparkinsonian rat model. - Highlights: ► The dopaminergic integrity in unilateral 6-OHDA was evaluated by dual PET tracers. ► The brain uptake and BP ND of [ 18 F]FPCIT was greatly decreased. ► The brain uptake and BP ND [ 18 F]fallypride was slightly increased. ► DAT are down-regulated and D2R are up-regulated.

  2. Effective doses associated with the common hybrid scans performed in nuclear medicine to adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho Lopez, C.; Garcia Martinez, M. T.; Martin Vidal, J. F.; Falgas Lacuela, M.; Vercher Conejero, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to outline the effective dose (E) that can be taught in hybrid SPECT-CT scans and PET-CT performed more common in adult patients. E is expressed as the Natural Radiation Equivalent Time (TERN) and consider, for each scan, the percentage of the total dose due to TC.

  3. A High Rigidity and Precision Scanning Tunneling Microscope with Decoupled XY and Z Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Guo, Tengfei; Hou, Yubin; Zhang, Jing; Meng, Wenjie; Lu, Qingyou

    2017-01-01

    A new scan-head structure for the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is proposed, featuring high scan precision and rigidity. The core structure consists of a piezoelectric tube scanner of quadrant type (for XY scans) coaxially housed in a piezoelectric tube with single inner and outer electrodes (for Z scan). They are fixed at one end (called common end). A hollow tantalum shaft is coaxially housed in the XY -scan tube and they are mutually fixed at both ends. When the XY scanner scans, its free end will bring the shaft to scan and the tip which is coaxially inserted in the shaft at the common end will scan a smaller area if the tip protrudes short enough from the common end. The decoupled XY and Z scans are desired for less image distortion and the mechanically reduced scan range has the superiority of reducing the impact of the background electronic noise on the scanner and enhancing the tip positioning precision. High quality atomic resolution images are also shown.

  4. A High Rigidity and Precision Scanning Tunneling Microscope with Decoupled XY and Z Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new scan-head structure for the scanning tunneling microscope (STM is proposed, featuring high scan precision and rigidity. The core structure consists of a piezoelectric tube scanner of quadrant type (for XY scans coaxially housed in a piezoelectric tube with single inner and outer electrodes (for Z scan. They are fixed at one end (called common end. A hollow tantalum shaft is coaxially housed in the XY-scan tube and they are mutually fixed at both ends. When the XY scanner scans, its free end will bring the shaft to scan and the tip which is coaxially inserted in the shaft at the common end will scan a smaller area if the tip protrudes short enough from the common end. The decoupled XY and Z scans are desired for less image distortion and the mechanically reduced scan range has the superiority of reducing the impact of the background electronic noise on the scanner and enhancing the tip positioning precision. High quality atomic resolution images are also shown.

  5. Bone scan and joint scan of hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, N.; Verbeke, S.; Perdrisot, R.; Grilo, R.M.; Quenesson, E.; Bonnet, C.; Vergne, P.; Treves, R.; Bertin, P.; Boutros-Toni, F.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of joint scan and bone scan of hands and feet, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, to localize the altered joints. The sensitivity, the specificity, the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of joint scan were determined in comparison with clinical joint assessment. Fifteen patients (780 joints) were clinically examined (pain and synovitis); during the same day, a bone scan and a joint scan were realized by oxidronate 99m Tc intravenous injection. Patients were scanned 5 minutes (tissual time, T t ) and 3 hours 1/4 (bone time, T 0 ) after the administration. The uptake of the bi-phosphonate was evaluated with a qualitative method using a grey scale. The uptake of 99m Tc oxidronate was quantitated using an extra-articular region of interest. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the scan at Tt were 46%, 96%, 85% et 78%. The same parameters were 75%, 66%, 53% and 84% for the scan realized at T 0 . The joint scan has showed 22% of false positive. These false positives could be a consequence of an earlier detection of joint alterations by scan. The joint scan should forecast the evolution of joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  6. The utility of repeat sestamibi scans in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism after an initial negative scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikram D; Sound, Sara; Okoh, Alexis K; Yazici, Pinar; Yigitbas, Hakan; Neumann, Donald; Doshi, Krupa; Berber, Eren

    2017-06-01

    We analyzed the utility of repeated sestambi scans in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and its effects on operative referral. We carried out a retrospective review of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism who underwent repeated sestambi scans exclusively within our health system between 1996-2015. Patient demographic, presentation, laboratory, imaging, operative, and pathologic data were reviewed. Univariate analysis with JMP Pro v12 was used to identify factors associated with conversion from an initial negative to a subsequent positive scan. After exclusion criteria (including reoperations), we identified 49 patients in whom 59% (n = 29) of subsequent scans remained negative and 41% (n = 20) converted to positive. Factors associated with an initial negative to a subsequent positive scan included classic presentation and second scans with iodine subtraction (P = .04). Nonsurgeons were less likely to order an iodine-subtraction scan (P < .05). Fewer patients with negative imaging were referred to surgery (33% vs 100%, P = .005), and median time to operation after the first negative scan was 25 months (range 1.4-119). Surgeon-performed ultrasonography had greater sensitivity and positive predictive value than repeated sestamibi scans. Negative sestambi scans decreased and delayed operative referral. Consequently, we identified several process improvement initiatives, including education regarding superior institutional imaging. Combining all findings, we created an algorithm for evaluating patients with primary hyperparathyroidism after initially negative sestamibi scans, which incorporates surgeon-performed ultrasonography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prognostic value of metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis in 18F-FDG PET/CT scans in locally advanced breast cancer staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ballvé, A; García García-Esquinas, M; Salsidua-Arroyo, O; Serrano-Palacio, A; García-Sáenz, J A; Ortega Candil, A; Fuentes Ferrer, M E; Rodríguez Rey, C; Román-Santamaría, J M; Moreno, F; Carreras-Delgado, J L

    To determine whether metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) are able to predict recurrence risk in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients. Retrospective study of LABC patients who undertook neoadjuvant, local and adjuvant treatment and follow up. A 18 F-FDG PET/CT study for initial staging was performed analysing in this study different metabolic parameters (MTV, TLG, SUVmax and SUVmed) both in the primary tumour (T) as well as in axillary nodes (N) and whole-body (WB). Forty females were included between January 2010-2011; follow up until January 2015 was completed. The average follow-up was 46 months. Twenty percent presented recurrence: local disease (n=2) and distant metastasis (n=6); 3 patients died (38% of the patients which recurred and 7.5% from the total). SUVmax, MTV and TLG, in T, N and WB, were higher in those patients with recurrence. The MTV and TLG parameters in the tumour (T) were related to the recurrence rate (P=.020 and P=.028, respectively); whereas SUVmax in the lymph nodes (N) was significantly related (P=.008) to the recurrence rate. The best cut-off points to predict recurrence where: MTV T ≥19.3cm 3 , TLG T≥74.4g and SUVmax N≥13.8, being 10-12 times more likely to recidivate when these thresholds where exceeded. Tumour grade was the only clinical-pathological variable which was related to recurrence probability (p=.035). In this study of LABC patients the metabolic parameters which have a better relationship with recurrence rate are: MTV and TLG in the primary tumour, SUVmax in the regional lymph node disease and whole-body PET data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of sequential planar 177Lu-DOTA-TATE dosimetry scans with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT images in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumours undergoing peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainz-Esteban, Aurora; Carril, Jose Manuel; Prasad, Vikas; Schuchardt, Christiane; Zachert, Carolin; Baum, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare sequential 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE planar scans ( 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE) in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumours (NET) acquired during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) for dosimetry purposes with the pre-therapeutic 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE positron emission tomography (PET)/CT ( 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images obtained in the same patients concerning the sensitivity of the different methods. A total of 44 patients (59 ± 11 years old) with biopsy-proven NET underwent 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE imaging within 7.9 ± 7.5 days between the two examinations. 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE planar images were acquired at 0.5, 2, 24, 48 and 72 h post-injection; lesions were given a score from 0 to 4 depending on the uptake of the radiopharmaceutical (0 being lowest and 4 highest). The number of tumour lesions which were identified on 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE scans (in relation to the acquisition time after injection of the therapeutic dose as well as with regard to the body region) was compared to those detected on 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE studies obtained before PRRT. A total of 318 lesions were detected; 280 (88%) lesions were concordant. Among the discordant lesions, 29 were 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE positive and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE negative, whereas 9 were 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE negative and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE positive. The sensitivity, positive predictive value and accuracy for 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE as compared to 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE were 91, 97 and 88%, respectively. Significantly more lesions were seen on the delayed (72 h) 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE images (91%) as compared to the immediate (30 min) images (68%). The highest concordance was observed for bone metastases (97%) and the lowest for head/neck lesions (75%). Concordant lesions (n = 77; mean size 3.8 cm) were significantly larger than discordant lesions (n = 38; mean size 1.6 cm) (p max ). However, concordant liver lesions with a score from 1 to 3 in the 72-h 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE scan had a lower SUV max

  9. Comparison of sequential planar {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE dosimetry scans with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT images in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumours undergoing peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainz-Esteban, Aurora; Carril, Jose Manuel [Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santander (Spain); Prasad, Vikas; Schuchardt, Christiane; Zachert, Carolin; Baum, Richard P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET/CT, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The aim of the study was to compare sequential {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE planar scans ({sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE) in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumours (NET) acquired during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) for dosimetry purposes with the pre-therapeutic {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE positron emission tomography (PET)/CT ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images obtained in the same patients concerning the sensitivity of the different methods. A total of 44 patients (59 {+-} 11 years old) with biopsy-proven NET underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE imaging within 7.9 {+-} 7.5 days between the two examinations. {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE planar images were acquired at 0.5, 2, 24, 48 and 72 h post-injection; lesions were given a score from 0 to 4 depending on the uptake of the radiopharmaceutical (0 being lowest and 4 highest). The number of tumour lesions which were identified on {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE scans (in relation to the acquisition time after injection of the therapeutic dose as well as with regard to the body region) was compared to those detected on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE studies obtained before PRRT. A total of 318 lesions were detected; 280 (88%) lesions were concordant. Among the discordant lesions, 29 were {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE positive and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE negative, whereas 9 were {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE negative and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE positive. The sensitivity, positive predictive value and accuracy for {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE as compared to {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE were 91, 97 and 88%, respectively. Significantly more lesions were seen on the delayed (72 h) {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE images (91%) as compared to the immediate (30 min) images (68%). The highest concordance was observed for bone metastases (97%) and the lowest for head/neck lesions (75%). Concordant lesions (n = 77; mean size 3.8 cm) were significantly larger than discordant lesions (n = 38; mean size 1.6 cm) (p < 0.05). No such significance was

  10. Transverse scan-field imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, F.T.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of an array of opposed pairs of radiation detectors which could be used in tomography or scintiscanning. The opposed detectors scan in opposite tangential directions in a pre-programmed fashion. The associated control system receives the detector outputs into a buffer store and also provides an address for each element of information detected. The addresses are such that information from one buffer store is read into the RAM of a central processing unit in the opposite direction to that from the store associated with the opposite detector, thus effectively reversing the scan direction of one detector of each pair. Also described are the detectors themselves with focussed collimators, the scan drive mechanism, and the method of calculating radioactive emission intensity at discrete points throughout the scan-field. (author)

  11. Diagnostic value of axial CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Sousuke

    1983-01-01

    Axial CT scan was used to investigate the radiological details of the temporal bone of 33 patients with chronic otitis media, secondary cholesteatoma, sensorineural hearing loss, Meniere disease, vertigo, facial spasm, and neoplasma. The axial scans showed anatomic details of the temporal bone, and at the same time clearly demonstrated the extent of the soft-tissue masses in the middle ears, as well as the destructions of the ossicles. Bone changes of the anterior walls of the epitympanum and external auditory meatus were more clearly demonstrated than by coronary CT scan. However, the axial scan had the disadvantages in demonstrating the stapes, crista transversa, and the mastoid portion of the facial canal. (author)

  12. Technical errors in planar bone scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Sleiman Y; Collier, B David; Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Khalil, Magdy M

    2004-09-01

    Optimal technique for planar bone scanning improves image quality, which in turn improves diagnostic efficacy. Because planar bone scanning is one of the most frequently performed nuclear medicine examinations, maintaining high standards for this examination is a daily concern for most nuclear medicine departments. Although some problems such as patient motion are frequently encountered, the degraded images produced by many other deviations from optimal technique are rarely seen in clinical practice and therefore may be difficult to recognize. The objectives of this article are to list optimal techniques for 3-phase and whole-body bone scanning, to describe and illustrate a selection of deviations from these optimal techniques for planar bone scanning, and to explain how to minimize or avoid such technical errors.

  13. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & ... stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means a scanner takes computer pictures of what's going on inside your body. The scan itself ...

  14. Performance of the SRRC scanning photoelectron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, I.-H.; Lee, T.-H.; Yin, G.-C.; Wei, D.-H.; Juang, J.-M.; Dann, T.-E.; Klauser, R.; Chuang, T. J.; Chen, C. T.; Tsang, K.-L.

    2001-07-01

    A scanning photoelectron microscope has been constructed at SRRC. This SPEM system consists primarily of a Fresnel zone plate (ZP) with an order-selection aperture, a flexure scanning stage, a hemispherical electron analyzer, and sample/ZP insertion system. The flexure stage is used to scan the sample. A hemispherical analyzer with Omni V lens and a 16-channel multichannel detector (MCD) is used to collect photoelectrons. A set of 16 photoelectron images at different kinetic energies can be simultaneously acquired in one single scan. The data acquisition system is designed to collect up to 32 images concurrently, including 16 MCD signals, total electron yield and transmitted photon flux. The design and some initial test results of this SPEM station are presented and discussed.

  15. Performance of the SRRC scanning photoelectron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, I.-H.; Lee, T.-H.; Yin, G.-C.; Wei, D.-H.; Juang, J.-M.; Dann, T.-E.; Klauser, R.; Chuang, T.J.; Chen, C.T.; Tsang, K.-L.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning photoelectron microscope has been constructed at SRRC. This SPEM system consists primarily of a Fresnel zone plate (ZP) with an order-selection aperture, a flexure scanning stage, a hemispherical electron analyzer, and sample/ZP insertion system. The flexure stage is used to scan the sample. A hemispherical analyzer with Omni V lens and a 16-channel multichannel detector (MCD) is used to collect photoelectrons. A set of 16 photoelectron images at different kinetic energies can be simultaneously acquired in one single scan. The data acquisition system is designed to collect up to 32 images concurrently, including 16 MCD signals, total electron yield and transmitted photon flux. The design and some initial test results of this SPEM station are presented and discussed

  16. Minimising medically unwarranted computed tomography scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    As computed tomography (CT) is such a superb diagnostic tool and individual CT risks are small, whenever a CT scan is clinically warranted, the CT benefit/risk balance is by far in the patient’s favour. However, if a CT scan is not clinically warranted, this balance shifts dramatically. It is likely that at least 25% of CT scans fall into this latter category, in that they could either be replaced with alternative imaging modalities or could be avoided entirely. Use of clinical decision rules for CT usage represents a powerful approach for slowing down the increase in CT usage, because they have the potential to overcome some of the major factors that result in some CT scans being undertaken when they may not be clinically helpful.

  17. Laser scanning of experimental solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunkett, B. C.; Lasswell, P. G.

    1980-01-01

    A description is presented of a laser scanning instrument which makes it possible to display and measure the spatial response of a solar cell. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of generated micrographs in the isolation of flaws and features of the cell. The laser scanner system uses a 4 mW, CW helium-neon laser, operating a wavelength of 0.633 micrometers. The beam is deflected by two mirror galvanometers arranged to scan in orthogonal directions. After being focused on the solar cell by the beam focusing lens, the moving light spot raster scans the specimen. The current output of the photovoltaic device under test, as a function of the scan dot position, can be displayed in several modes. The laser scanner has proved to be a very useful diagnostic tool in optimizing the process design of transparent metal film photovoltaic devices on Zn3P2, a relatively new photovoltaic material.

  18. Electron Beam Scanning in Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Yves; Herer, Arnold

    1996-05-01

    Scanned electron beams are used within many industries for applications such as sterilization of medical disposables, crosslinking of wire and cables insulating jackets, polymerization and degradation of resins and biomaterials, modification of semiconductors, coloration of gemstones and glasses, removal of oxides from coal plant flue gasses, and the curing of advanced composites and other molded forms. X-rays generated from scanned electron beams make yet other applications, such as food irradiation, viable. Typical accelerators for these applications range in beam energy from 0.5MeV to 10 MeV, with beam powers between 5 to 500kW and scanning widths between 20 and 300 cm. Since precise control of dose delivery is required in many of these applications, the integration of beam characteristics, product conveyance, and beam scanning mechanisms must be well understood and optimized. Fundamental issues and some case examples are presented.

  19. Multicolor Scanning Laser Imaging in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad S Z; Carrim, Zia Iqbal

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common cause of blindness in individuals younger than 60 years. Screening for retinopathy is undertaken using conventional color fundus photography and relies on the identification of hemorrhages, vascular abnormalities, exudates, and cotton-wool spots. These can sometimes be difficult to identify. Multicolor scanning laser imaging, a new imaging modality, may have a role in improving screening outcomes, as well as facilitating treatment decisions. Observational case series comprising two patients with known diabetes who were referred for further examination after color fundus photography revealed abnormal findings. Multicolor scanning laser imaging was undertaken. Features of retinal disease from each modality were compared. Multicolor scanning laser imaging provides superior visualization of retinal anatomy and pathology, thereby facilitating risk stratification and treatment decisions. Multicolor scanning laser imaging is a novel imaging technique offering the potential for improving the reliability of screening for diabetic retinopathy. Validation studies are warranted.

  20. Performance of the SRRC scanning photoelectron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, I H; Yin, G C; Wei, D H; Juang, J M; Dann, T E; Klauser, R; Chuang, T J; Chen, C T; Tsang, K L

    2001-01-01

    A scanning photoelectron microscope has been constructed at SRRC. This SPEM system consists primarily of a Fresnel zone plate (ZP) with an order-selection aperture, a flexure scanning stage, a hemispherical electron analyzer, and sample/ZP insertion system. The flexure stage is used to scan the sample. A hemispherical analyzer with Omni V lens and a 16-channel multichannel detector (MCD) is used to collect photoelectrons. A set of 16 photoelectron images at different kinetic energies can be simultaneously acquired in one single scan. The data acquisition system is designed to collect up to 32 images concurrently, including 16 MCD signals, total electron yield and transmitted photon flux. The design and some initial test results of this SPEM station are presented and discussed.

  1. Scanning probe lithography for nanoimprinting mould fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Gang; Xie Guoyong; Zhang Yongyi; Zhang Guoming; Zhang Yingying; Carlberg, Patrick; Zhu Tao; Liu Zhongfan

    2006-01-01

    We propose a rational fabrication method for nanoimprinting moulds by scanning probe lithography. By wet chemical etching, different kinds of moulds are realized on Si(110) and Si(100) surfaces according to the Si crystalline orientation. The structures have line widths of about 200 nm with a high aspect ratio. By reactive ion etching, moulds with patterns free from the limitation of Si crystalline orientation are also obtained. With closed-loop scan control of a scanning probe microscope, the length of patterned lines is more than 100 μm by integrating several steps of patterning. The fabrication process is optimized in order to produce a mould pattern with a line width about 10 nm. The structures on the mould are further duplicated into PMMA resists through the nanoimprinting process. The method of combining scanning probe lithography with wet chemical etching or reactive ion etching (RIE) provides a resistless route for the fabrication of nanoimprinting moulds

  2. Study of 67Ga scan in sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lijun; Qu Wanyin; Liu Xiuqin

    1997-01-01

    Gallium scan and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme assay (SACE) were compared in patients with sarcoidosis. The examination of 67 Ga scan, SACE determination, pulmonary function test, chest CT and chest X-ray in 24 cases with sarcoidosis were studied. The results revealed that 4 of 24 cases had obviously high uptake of 67 Ga exceeding hepatic activity (3+) in clinical active stage, 3 patients had resembling the Greek letter lambda, symmetrically located in bilateral hilar lymph nodes, and among them two had an uptake of 67 Ga in the bilateral lacrimal and parotid gland simulating 'Panda Face'. 8 of 20 cases with inactive sarcoidosis had an abnormal 67 Ga scan (1+). In those patients with normal SACE level but increased uptake of 67 Ga, active stage of disease was demonstrated and steroid therapy was indicated. Gallium scan is a valuable method for the staging of its activity and evaluation of the therapeutic effect in the follow-up patients with sarcoidosis

  3. Magnetic scanning of LWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiarman, S.; Moodenbaugh, A.

    1980-01-01

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are available both for fresh and spent fuel, but generally are too time consuming and do not uniquely identify an assembly. A new method is reported to obtain a signature from a magnetic scan of each assembly. This scan is an NDA technique that detects magnetic inclusions. It is potentially fast (5 min/assembly), and may provide a unique signature from the magnetic properties of each fuel assembly

  4. Admittance Scanning for Whole Column Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamos, Brian N; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2017-07-05

    Whole column detection (WCD) is as old as chromatography itself. WCD requires an ability to interrogate column contents from the outside. Other than the obvious case of optical detection through a transparent column, admittance (often termed contactless conductance) measurements can also sense changes in the column contents (especially ionic content) from the outside without galvanic contact with the solution. We propose here electromechanically scanned admittance imaging and apply this to open tubular (OT) chromatography. The detector scans across the column; the length resolution depends on the scanning velocity and the data acquisition frequency, ultimately limited by the physical step resolution (40 μm in the present setup). Precision equal to this step resolution was observed for locating an interface between two immiscible liquids inside a 21 μm capillary. Mechanically, the maximum scanning speed was 100 mm/s, but at 1 kHz sampling rate and a time constant of 25 ms, the highest practical scan speed (no peak distortion) was 28 mm/s. At scanning speeds of 0, 4, and 28 mm/s, the S/N for 180 pL (zone length of 1.9 mm in a 11 μm i.d. column) of 500 μM KCl injected into water was 6450, 3850, and 1500, respectively. To facilitate constant and reproducible contact with the column regardless of minor variations in outer diameter, a double quadrupole electrode system was developed. Columns of significant length (>1 m) can be readily scanned. We demonstrate its applicability with both OT and commercial packed columns and explore uniformity of retention along a column, increasing S/N by stopped-flow repeat scans, etc. as unique applications.

  5. An image scanning device using radiating energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Daniel.

    1976-01-01

    Said invention relates to an image scanning device using radiating energy. More particularly, it relates to a device for generating a scanning beam of rectangular cross section from a γ or X-ray source. Said invention can be applied to radiographic units of the 'microdose' type used by airline staffs and others for the fast efficient inspection of luggage and parcels in view of detecting hidden things [fr

  6. Thalassemia paravertebral tumors and bone marrow scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huglo, D.; Rose, C.; Deveaux, M.; Bauters, F.; Marchandise, X.

    1995-01-01

    Two first cousins with thalassemia and with a paravertebral mass had had an indium 111 chloride bone marrow scan. Result of scan influenced therapy: medical treatment in one case where an extramedullary erythropoiesis was confirmed, surgical treatment in the other case. The use of dual-isotope SPECT (indium 111 chloride, HDP -99 Tc) constitutes a contribution to the establishment of diagnosis of extramedullary erythropoiesis, giving to bone marrow scintigraphy a merited importance, avoiding the biopsy. (authors). 15 refs., 5 figs

  7. Linking IMAGE 2 and WORLD SCAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelauff, G.; Geurts, B.; Gielen, A.; Den Ouden, A.; Alcamo, J.; Gerlagh, R.

    1995-01-01

    The links between the climate model IMAGE 2 and the economic model WORLD SCAN, which are set up to obtain an integrated scenario instrument for comprehensive and consistent climate-economy scenarios, are presented and discussed. The links are made with respect to energy (in WORLD SCAN) and agriculture (in IMAGE 2), thus providing a consistent linkage with feedbacks running both ways. 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Computer graphic display of cardiac CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.; Carlsson, E.

    1982-01-01

    In order to improve spatial conception and quantitative assessment of the cardiac structures based on cardiac computed tomography, methods for computer graphic display were developed. Excised hearts and living dogs with myocardial infarctions were subjected to CT scanning. The data on the scanner tapes were processed to provide isodensity plots, linear section plots, time-weighted integrated isodensity plots as well as topographical density displays and three-dimensional spatial reconstructions of single and multi-layer scans. (orig.)

  9. Radionuclide bone scanning of medullary chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, T.M.; Chew, F.S.; Manaster, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    Technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate bone scans of 18 medullary chondrosarcomas of bone were correlated with pathologic macrosections of the resected tumors. There was increased scan intake by all 18 tumors, and the uptake in 15 scans corresponded accurately to the anatomic extent of the tumors. Only three scans displayed increased uptake beyond the true tumor margins; thus, the ''extended pattern of uptake'' beyond the true tumor extent is much less common in medullary chondrosarcomas than in many other primary bone tumors. Therefore, increased uptake beyond the apparent radiographic margin of the tumor suggests possible occult tumor spread. Pathologically, there was intense reactive new bone formation and hyperemia around the periphery of all 18 tumors, and there were foci of enchondral ossification, hyperemia, or calcification within the tumor itself in nearly every tumor. Three scans displayed less uptake in the center of the tumors than around their peripheries. One of these tumors was necrotic in the center, but the other two were pathologically no different from tumors that displayed homogenous uptake on the scan

  10. Radionuclide bone scanning of medullary chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, T.M.; Chew, F.S.; Manaster, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate bone scans of 18 medullary chondrosarcomas of bone were correlated with pathologic macrosections of the resected tumors. There was increased scan uptake by all 18 tumors, and the uptake in 15 scans corresponded accurately to the anatomic extent of the tumors. Only three scans displayed increased uptake beyond the true tumor margins; thus, the extended pattern of uptake beyond the true tumor extent is much less common in medullary chondrosarcomas than in many other primary bone tumors. Therefore, increased uptake beyond the apparent radiographic margin of the tumor suggests possible occult tumor spread. Pathologically, there was intense reactive new bone formation and hyperemia around the periphery of all 18 tumors, and there were foci of enchondral ossification, hyperemia, or calcification within the tumor itself in nearly every tumor. Three scans displayed less uptake in the center of the tumors than around their peripheries. One of these tumors was necrotic in the center, but the other two were pathologically no different from tumors that displayed homogeneous uptake on the scan

  11. Role of bone scan in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Young

    2003-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases can be categorized by pathology into several specific types of musculoskeletal problems, including synovitis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis), enthesopathy (e.g. ankylosing spondylitis) and cartilage degeneration (e.g. osteoarthritis). Skeletal radiographs have contributed to the diagnosis of these articular diseases, and some disease entities need typical radiographic changes as a factor of the diagnostic criteria. However, they sometimes show normal radiographic findings in the early stage of disease, when there is demineralization of less than 30-50%. Bone scans have also been used in arthritis, but not widely because the findings are nonspecific and it is thought that bone scans do not add significant information to routine radiography. Bone scans do however play a different role than simple radiography, and it is a complementary imaging method in the course of management of arthritis. The image quality of bone scans can be improved by obtaining regional views and images under al pin-hole collimator, and through a variety of scintigraphic techniques including the three phase bone scan and bone SPECT. Therefore, bone scans could improve the diagnostic value, and answer multiple clinical questions, based on the pathophysiology of various forms of arthritis

  12. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R.; Ding, Jilai; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2017-03-01

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. “Archimedean” spirals, with a constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials.

  13. Detection of Arthritis by Joint Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxfield, W. S. [Dept, of Radiology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Weiss, T. E.; Tutton, R. H.; Hidalgo, J. U. [Ochsner Clinic and Ochsner Foundation Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1969-05-15

    Detection and identification of early arthritis is frequently difficult with routine methods. Several tracers, {sup 131}I human serum albumin (25 {mu}Ci/10 lb), {sup 99m}Tc human serum albumin (1-3 mCi), {sup 131}I iodipamide (40 {mu}Ci/10 lb), and {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate (10 mCi), have been employed for joint scanning to detect synovitis produced by arthritis in joints of the extremities. When administered intravenously, the 25% increase in localization of these tracers in the synovial membrane, if there is active synovitis, can be demonstrated by scintillation scanning. This ability to detect synovitis at an early stage enables the joint scan to show areas of active synovitis not demonstrated on roentgenograms. The scan may objectively confirm or disprove questionable physical findings. From this standpoint the technique has been useful in determining whether joint pain is functional or due to arthritis as a negative localization tends to rule out active synovitis as the cause of the pain. The scan demonstration of a positive localization of the tracer in several joints when only one area is symptomatic is evidence that joint pain is due to systemic disease. The short half-life tracera permit serial studies to follow the course of an arthritis process. Use of {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate and an Anger camera have made joint scanning a practical technique for clinical use. A review of the accuracy of joint scanning in 130 cases as compared to roentgenograms is presented. (author)

  14. Special raster scanning for reduction of charging effects in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Oho, Eisaku

    2014-01-01

    A special raster scanning (SRS) method for reduction of charging effects is developed for the field of SEM. Both a conventional fast scan (horizontal direction) and an unusual scan (vertical direction) are adopted for acquiring raw data consisting of many sub-images. These data are converted to a proper SEM image using digital image processing techniques. About sharpness of the image and reduction of charging effects, the SRS is compared with the conventional fast scan (with frame-averaging) and the conventional slow scan. Experimental results show the effectiveness of SRS images. By a successful combination of the proposed scanning method and low accelerating voltage (LV)-SEMs, it is expected that higher-quality SEM images can be more easily acquired by the considerable reduction of charging effects, while maintaining the resolution. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Scan path entropy and Arrow plots: Capturing scanning behavior of multiple observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignace T C Hooge

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Designers of visual communication material want their material to attract and retain attention. In marketing research, heat maps, dwell time, and time to AOI first hit are often used as evaluation parameters. Here we present two additional measures 1 scan path entropy to quantify gaze guidance and 2 the arrow plot to visualize the average scan path. Both are based on string representations of scan paths. The latter also incorporates transition matrices and time required for 50% of the observers to first hit AOIs (T50. The new measures were tested in an eye tracking study (48 observers, 39 advertisements. Scan path entropy is a sensible measure for gaze guidance and the new visualization method reveals aspects of the average scan path and gives a better indication in what order global scanning takes place.

  16. Bone scans in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: local experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiong, S.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) tops the list of malignancy in Malaysia and ranks first in male malignancy in the state of Sarawak. The majority of the NPC patients presented in the advanced stages and often with distal metastasis usually to the bones. In our local hospital is the new practice of bone scan using Tc99 started last year. Over a period of 9 months from July 2003 to March 2004, 41 NPC patients had the bone scans and our experience in these are reviewed and presented. Method: The NPC patients are selected consecutively including both new and treated patients. The scanner used is Siemen E.cam plus and Technecium (Tc99) the radio-active isotope used. The scan images are read and reported by qualified and trained Radiologists. The bone scans are requested from the ENT Specialist of the ENT department of the Hospital. The bone scan reports are checked by the ENT Specialists and the decisions made as to clinical correlation and further definitive imaging studies. Results: 41 NPC patients were included in the studies, 29 newly diagnosed and bone-canned before treatment started and 12 treated of which 3 being diagnosed having recurrent NPC. Of the 29 newly diagnosed patients, one was found true positive bone scan having increased radio-tracer uptake and confirmed Xray imagings. 3 of the treated patients had true positive bone scan with increased radio-tracer uptake and confirmed Xray imagings. Hence a total of 4 out of the 41 patients (9.8%) had bone metastasis on positive bone scans. Of the 29 newly diagnosed patients, 14 were found false positive bone scan having increased radio-tracer uptake but no confirmed X ray imagings. 4 of the treated patients had false positive bone scan with increased radio-tracer uptake but no confirmed X ray imagings. Hence a total of 18 out of the 41 patients (44%) had no bone metastasis on positive bone scans. There were 6 patients with symptoms referable to the bones' distal to the head and 2 had true positive bone

  17. Postprocessing Algorithm for Driving Conventional Scanning Tunneling Microscope at Fast Scan Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Xianqi; Chen, Yunmei; Park, Jewook; Li, An-Ping; Zhang, X-G

    2017-01-01

    We present an image postprocessing framework for Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) to reduce the strong spurious oscillations and scan line noise at fast scan rates and preserve the features, allowing an order of magnitude increase in the scan rate without upgrading the hardware. The proposed method consists of two steps for large scale images and four steps for atomic scale images. For large scale images, we first apply for each line an image registration method to align the forward and backward scans of the same line. In the second step we apply a "rubber band" model which is solved by a novel Constrained Adaptive and Iterative Filtering Algorithm (CIAFA). The numerical results on measurement from copper(111) surface indicate the processed images are comparable in accuracy to data obtained with a slow scan rate, but are free of the scan drift error commonly seen in slow scan data. For atomic scale images, an additional first step to remove line-by-line strong background fluctuations and a fourth step of replacing the postprocessed image by its ranking map as the final atomic resolution image are required. The resulting image restores the lattice image that is nearly undetectable in the original fast scan data.

  18. Postprocessing Algorithm for Driving Conventional Scanning Tunneling Microscope at Fast Scan Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an image postprocessing framework for Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM to reduce the strong spurious oscillations and scan line noise at fast scan rates and preserve the features, allowing an order of magnitude increase in the scan rate without upgrading the hardware. The proposed method consists of two steps for large scale images and four steps for atomic scale images. For large scale images, we first apply for each line an image registration method to align the forward and backward scans of the same line. In the second step we apply a “rubber band” model which is solved by a novel Constrained Adaptive and Iterative Filtering Algorithm (CIAFA. The numerical results on measurement from copper(111 surface indicate the processed images are comparable in accuracy to data obtained with a slow scan rate, but are free of the scan drift error commonly seen in slow scan data. For atomic scale images, an additional first step to remove line-by-line strong background fluctuations and a fourth step of replacing the postprocessed image by its ranking map as the final atomic resolution image are required. The resulting image restores the lattice image that is nearly undetectable in the original fast scan data.

  19. Bone scan and red blood cell scan in a patient with epidermal naevus syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.; Wolf, F.; Stosiek, N.; Peters, K.P.

    1990-01-01

    A bone scan and red blood cell scan in the rare epidermal naevus syndrome, associated with multiple haemangiomes of the bone and hypophosphataemic osteomalacia in a 20-year-old man are reported. The typical pattern of osteomalacia on the bone scan was associated with lesions of increased bone metabolism in the peripheral bones. The haemangiomas did not pool labelled red blood cells. Thus, the bone scan seems to be suited for diagnosing the complete extent of haemangiomas in bone, but they could not be specifically proven by red blood cell pooling. (orig.)

  20. Scanning-time evaluation of Digimarc Barcode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Rebecca; Pinard, Dan; Weaver, Matt; Alattar, Adnan

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a speed comparison between the use of Digimarc® Barcodes and the Universal Product Code (UPC) for customer checkout at point of sale (POS). The recently introduced Digimarc Barcode promises to increase the speed of scanning packaged goods at POS. When this increase is exploited by workforce optimization systems, the retail industry could potentially save billions of dollars. The Digimarc Barcode is based on Digimarc's watermarking technology, and it is imperceptible, very robust, and does not require any special ink, material, or printing processes. Using an image-based scanner, a checker can quickly scan consumer packaged goods (CPG) embedded with the Digimarc Barcode without the need to reorient the packages with respect to the scanner. Faster scanning of packages saves money and enhances customer satisfaction. It reduces the length of the queues at checkout, reduces the cost of cashier labor, and makes self-checkout more convenient. This paper quantifies the increase in POS scanning rates resulting from the use of the Digimarc Barcode versus the traditional UPC. It explains the testing methodology, describes the experimental setup, and analyzes the obtained results. It concludes that the Digimarc Barcode increases number of items per minute (IPM) scanned at least 50% over traditional UPC.

  1. Human performance in radiological survey scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.S.; Abelquist, E.W.

    1998-03-01

    The probability of detecting residual contamination in the field using portable radiological survey instruments depends not only on the sensitivity of the instrumentation used in scanning, but also on the surveyor's performance. This report provides a basis for taking human performance into account in determining the minimum level of activity detectable by scanning. A theoretical framework was developed (based on signal detection theory) which allows influences on surveyors to be anticipated and understood, and supports a quantitative assessment of performance. The performance of surveyors under controlled yet realistic field conditions was examined to gain insight into the task and to develop means of quantifying performance. Then, their performance was assessed under laboratory conditions to quantify more precisely their ability to make the required discriminations. The information was used to characterize surveyors' performance in the scanning task and to provide a basis for predicting levels of radioactivity that are likely to be detectable under various conditions by surveyors using portable survey instruments

  2. Scanning laser microscope for imaging nanostructured superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takekazu; Arai, Kohei; Akita, Yukio; Miyanari, Mitsunori; Minami, Yusuke; Yotsuya, Tsutomu; Kato, Masaru; Satoh, Kazuo; Uno, Mayumi; Shimakage, Hisashi; Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    The nanofabrication of superconductors yields various interesting features in superconducting properties. A variety of different imaging techniques have been developed for probing the local superconducting profiles. A scanning pulsed laser microscope has been developed by the combination of the XYZ piezo-driven stages and an optical fiber with an aspheric focusing lens. The scanning laser microscope is used to understand the position-dependent properties of a superconducting MgB 2 stripline of length 100 μm and width of 3 μm under constant bias current. Our results show that the superconducting stripline can clearly be seen in the contour image of the scanning laser microscope on the signal voltage. It is suggested from the observed image that the inhomogeneity is relevant in specifying the operating conditions such as detection efficiency of the sensor.

  3. Scanning probe microscopy experiments in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobek, Tanja; Reiter, Michael; Heckl, Wolfgang M.

    2004-01-01

    The scanning probe microscopy setups are small, lightweight and do not require vacuum or high voltage supply. In addition, samples can be investigated directly without further preparation. Therefore, these techniques are well-suited for applications in space, in particular, for operation on the International Space Station (ISS) or for high resolution microscopy on planetary missions. A feasibility study for a scanning tunneling microscopy setup was carried out on a parabolic flight campaign in November 2001 in order to test the technical setup for microgravity applications. With a pocket-size design microscope, a graphite surface was imaged under ambient conditions. Atomic resolution was achieved although the quality of the images was inferior in comparison to laboratory conditions. Improvements for future scanning probe microscopy experiments in microgravity are suggested

  4. The new scanning nuclear microprobe in Uppsala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, T.; Nystroem, J.; Lindh, U.

    1991-01-01

    During 1989/90 a scanning microprobe, developed for 2-4 MeV protons and submicron resolution, is being installed at the EN-tandem accelerator at the The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden. The probe-forming units (object diaphragm, aperture diaphragm and triplet of spark-eroded quadrupoles), the scanning unit of current-controlled ferrite cores and a current digitizer are of Oxford design. The other parts are commercial products or are constructed by ourselves. The latter includes the equipment for optical alignment by interference, a feedback-controlled magnetic beam steerer and stabiliser, a fast beam deflector, specially designed mechanical vibration reducers and dedicated AT expansion cards for scanning control and data acquisition. (orig.)

  5. Scanning laser microscope for imaging nanostructured superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takekazu; Arai, Kohei; Akita, Yukio; Miyanari, Mitsunori; Minami, Yusuke; Yotsuya, Tsutomu; Kato, Masaru; Satoh, Kazuo; Uno, Mayumi; Shimakage, Hisashi; Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen

    2010-10-01

    The nanofabrication of superconductors yields various interesting features in superconducting properties. A variety of different imaging techniques have been developed for probing the local superconducting profiles. A scanning pulsed laser microscope has been developed by the combination of the XYZ piezo-driven stages and an optical fiber with an aspheric focusing lens. The scanning laser microscope is used to understand the position-dependent properties of a superconducting MgB 2 stripline of length 100 μm and width of 3 μm under constant bias current. Our results show that the superconducting stripline can clearly be seen in the contour image of the scanning laser microscope on the signal voltage. It is suggested from the observed image that the inhomogeneity is relevant in specifying the operating conditions such as detection efficiency of the sensor.

  6. Cooling system for baby EBM scanning device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Halim Baijan; Muhammad Zahidee Taat; Abu Bakar Ghazali; Mohd Rizal Md Chulan; Rokiah Mohd Sabri; Leo Kwee Wah; Mohd Rizal Ibrahim; Lojius Lombigit; Azaman Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Heat exchange of the scanning window of baby EBM is a critical factor for maintaining the integrity of the window material structure. As the titanium foil which was used as the scanning window, the maximum temperature accepted for the foil should be 200 degree C. This paper will discuss a simple method of Bernoulli principle to obtain the correct air blower capacity in order to reduce the heat of the scanning window of Baby EBM. It was found that the required air pressure and air speed of the blower are 2613.6 Pascal and 237.6 m3/h respectively for the electron accelerator of 0.14 MeV energy and 10 mA beam current. (Author)

  7. Optical vortex scanning inside the Gaussian beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masajada, J; Leniec, M; Augustyniak, I

    2011-01-01

    We discussed a new scanning method for optical vortex-based scanning microscopy. The optical vortex is introduced into the incident Gaussian beam by a vortex lens. Then the beam with the optical vortex is focused by an objective and illuminates the sample. By changing the position of the vortex lens we can shift the optical vortex position at the sample plane. By adjusting system parameters we can get 30 times smaller shift at the sample plane compared to the vortex lens shift. Moreover, if the range of vortex shifts is smaller than 3% of the beam radius in the sample plane the amplitude and phase distribution around the phase dislocation remains practically unchanged. Thus we can scan the sample topography precisely with an optical vortex

  8. Value of gallbladder B-scan ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrisky, J; Lindstrom, R R; Herman, M W; Castagna, J; Sarti, D

    1975-05-01

    The gallbladder B-scans of 20 patients who had subsequent surgery were separated into three categories based upon certain sonographic criteria. Our data, in this limited series, revealed gallbladder pathology in each patient who had any one or combination of the following scan characteristics: (1) internal echos, (2) irregular wall, or (3) absence of recognizable gallbladder sonolucency. The category which demonstrated a normal sonographic gallbladder, namely a smooth wall and no internal echos, contained a number of false negatives which proved to have either small stone cholelithiasis or extraphepatic ductal obstruction. Within the described limitations, the B-scan can be a valuable test in confirming the significance of a radiographically nonvisualized gallbladder or in detecting a biliary tract lesion in a patient with a disease entity that precludes radiographic visualization by conventional techniques.

  9. Polarized differential-phase laser scanning microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou Chien; Lyu, C.-W.; Peng, L.-C.

    2001-01-01

    A polarized differential-phase laser scanning microscope, which combines a polarized optical heterodyne Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a differential amplifier to scan the topographic image of a surface, is proposed. In the experiment the differential amplifier, which acts as a PM-AM converter, in the experiment, converting phase modulation (PM) into amplitude modulation (AM). Then a novel, to our knowledge, phase demodulator was proposed and implemented for the differential-phase laser scanning microscope. An optical grating (1800 lp/mm) was imaged. The lateral and the depth resolutions of the imaging system were 0.5 μm and 1 nm, respectively. The detection accuracy, which was limited by the reflectivity variation of the test surface, is discussed

  10. Molecular excited states from the SCAN functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, David J.; Peach, Michael J. G.

    2018-06-01

    The performance of the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalised gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional is investigated for the calculation of time-dependent density-functional theory molecular excitation energies of local, charge-transfer and Rydberg character, together with the excited ? potential energy curve in H2. The SCAN results frequently resemble those obtained using a global hybrid functional, with either a standard or increased fraction of exact orbital exchange. For local excitations, SCAN can exhibit significant triplet instability problems, resulting in imaginary triplet excitation energies for a number of cases. The Tamm-Dancoff approximation offers a simple approach to improve the situation, but the excitation energies are still significantly underestimated. Understanding the origin of these (near)-triplet instabilities may provide useful insight into future functional development.

  11. Human performance in radiological survey scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Abelquist, E.W. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The probability of detecting residual contamination in the field using portable radiological survey instruments depends not only on the sensitivity of the instrumentation used in scanning, but also on the surveyor`s performance. This report provides a basis for taking human performance into account in determining the minimum level of activity detectable by scanning. A theoretical framework was developed (based on signal detection theory) which allows influences on surveyors to be anticipated and understood, and supports a quantitative assessment of performance. The performance of surveyors under controlled yet realistic field conditions was examined to gain insight into the task and to develop means of quantifying performance. Then, their performance was assessed under laboratory conditions to quantify more precisely their ability to make the required discriminations. The information was used to characterize surveyors` performance in the scanning task and to provide a basis for predicting levels of radioactivity that are likely to be detectable under various conditions by surveyors using portable survey instruments.

  12. MutScan: fast detection and visualization of target mutations by scanning FASTQ data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shifu; Huang, Tanxiao; Wen, Tiexiang; Li, Hong; Xu, Mingyan; Gu, Jia

    2018-01-22

    Some types of clinical genetic tests, such as cancer testing using circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), require sensitive detection of known target mutations. However, conventional next-generation sequencing (NGS) data analysis pipelines typically involve different steps of filtering, which may cause miss-detection of key mutations with low frequencies. Variant validation is also indicated for key mutations detected by bioinformatics pipelines. Typically, this process can be executed using alignment visualization tools such as IGV or GenomeBrowse. However, these tools are too heavy and therefore unsuitable for validating mutations in ultra-deep sequencing data. We developed MutScan to address problems of sensitive detection and efficient validation for target mutations. MutScan involves highly optimized string-searching algorithms, which can scan input FASTQ files to grab all reads that support target mutations. The collected supporting reads for each target mutation will be piled up and visualized using web technologies such as HTML and JavaScript. Algorithms such as rolling hash and bloom filter are applied to accelerate scanning and make MutScan applicable to detect or visualize target mutations in a very fast way. MutScan is a tool for the detection and visualization of target mutations by only scanning FASTQ raw data directly. Compared to conventional pipelines, this offers a very high performance, executing about 20 times faster, and offering maximal sensitivity since it can grab mutations with even one single supporting read. MutScan visualizes detected mutations by generating interactive pile-ups using web technologies. These can serve to validate target mutations, thus avoiding false positives. Furthermore, MutScan can visualize all mutation records in a VCF file to HTML pages for cloud-friendly VCF validation. MutScan is an open source tool available at GitHub: https://github.com/OpenGene/MutScan.

  13. Incidental apical disease at CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLoud, T.C.; Satoh, K.; Shepard, J.O.; Moore, E.H.; Kosiuk, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Apical caps are commonly noted on standard radiographs. This paper determines how often abnormalities in the extreme apex of the lung could be identified on CT scans obtained for other reasons. A total of 158 consecutive CT scans were reviewed prospectively. Excluded were patients with obvious upper lobe pleural or parenchymal disease. Apical abnormalities were identified in 74 (46.8%) of the 158 cases. The prevalence increased with age (19% in the 8-39-year age group and 82% in patients older than 80 years). Opacities were unilateral in 44.5% and bilateral in 55.5%. The most common abnormality was linear opacities (95%)

  14. Indigenous development of scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambastha, K.P.; Chaudhari, Y.V.; Pal, Suvadip; Tikaria, Amit; Pious, Lizy; Dubey, B.P.; Chadda, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a precision instrument and plays very important role in scientific studies. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre has taken up the job of development of SEM indigenously. Standard and commercially available components like computer, high voltage power supply, detectors etc. shall be procured from market. Focusing and scanning coils, vacuum chamber, specimen stage, control hardware and software etc. shall be developed at BARC with the help of Indian industry. Procurement, design and fabrication of various parts of SEM are in progress. (author)

  15. Scanning laser ophthalmoscope design with adaptive optics

    OpenAIRE

    Laut, SP; Jones, SM; Olivier, SS; Werner, JS

    2005-01-01

    A design for a high-resolution scanning instrument is presented for in vivo imaging of the human eye at the cellular scale. This system combines adaptive optics technology with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) to image structures with high lateral (∼2 μm) resolution. In this system, the ocular wavefront aberrations that reduce the resolution of conventional SLOs are detected by a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor, and compensated with two deformable mirrors in a closed-loop for dynamic cor...

  16. Developments in Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Taras; Chu, Ricky; David, Nigel; Broun, David

    2009-05-01

    Low temperature scanning Hall probe microscopy is a sensitive means of imaging magnetic structures with high spatial resolution and magnetic flux sensitivity approaching that of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device. We have developed a scanning Hall probe microscope with novel features, including highly reliable coarse positioning, in situ optimization of sensor-sample alignment and capacitive transducers for linear, long range positioning measurement. This has been motivated by the need to reposition accurately above fabricated nanostructures such as small superconducting rings. Details of the design and performance will be presented as well as recent progress towards time-resolved measurements with sub nanosecond resolution.

  17. Bone scan features in spontaneous knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattimo, A; Merlo, F; Bertelli, P; Burroni, L

    1992-01-01

    In 21 patients with "spontaneous" knee pain, 99mTc-MDP bone scan was found to be more sensitive than clinical and radiographic examination in detecting alterations of the joint components. These alterations were shown by increased radionuclide uptake in the compartments where pain was present, which was most commonly the medial femorotibial compartment, although the femoropatellar compartment was also frequently affected. The authors conclude that bone scan should be the first imaging study performed on the knee in order to establish if further tests are necessary.

  18. What expects orthopedic surgeon from bone scan?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, B.; Cazenave, A.

    2003-01-01

    The isotope bone scan continues to be one of the 'lost widely performed nuclear medicine investigations. Beyond the common clinical indication like detection of skeletal metastases, bone scan use is increasing in benign orthopedic conditions, and after orthopedic surgery, despite development of new investigations modalities (US, MRI). Three (or two) phase bone scintigraphy, Single Photon Emission Computer Tomography have increased its value and provided new clinical roles. This review emphasizes through some practical clinical examples how to increase diagnostic value of the method and to offer an adapted response to the orthopedic surgeon's attempts. (author)

  19. Radiochemicals used to scan the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for heart scanning using 201 Tl and /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate are discussed. Thallium-201, produced artificially in a cyclotron, concentrates in normal heart muscle but not in abnormal tissue. Technetium-99m is deposited in mitochondria of heart cells that are irreversibly damaged. The combined use of 201 Tl and /sup 99m/Tc makes it possible to identify regions of recent heart damage as well as older heart damage. Advantages of using 129 Cs for heart scanning are also discussed

  20. Gallium-67 citrate scan in extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Wanyu [Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Hsieh Jihfang [Chi-Mei Foundation Hospital, Tainan (Taiwan)

    1999-07-01

    Aim: Whole-body gallium scan was performed to evaluate the usefulness of gallium scan for detecting extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) lesions. Methods: Thirty-seven patients with extrapulmonary TB were included in this study. Four patients were found to have two lesions. Totally, 41 lesions were identified, including 19 TB arthritis, 8 spinal TB, 5 TB meningitis, 3 TB lymphadenopathy, 2 TB pericarditis, 1 TB peritonitis, 1 intestinal TB, 1 skin TB and 1 renal TB. Results: Of the 41 extrapulmonary TB lesions, gallium scan detected 32 lesions with a sensitivity of 78%. All the patients with TB meningitis showed negative gallium scan. When the five cases of TB meningitis were excluded, the detection sensitivity of gallium scan increased to 88.9% (32/36). Conclusion: Our data revealed that gallium scan is a convenient and useful method for evaluating extrapulmonary TB lesions other than TB-meningitis. We suggest that gallium scan be included in the clinical routine for patients with suspected extrapulmonary TB. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Es wurden Ganzkoerper-Gallium-Szintigramme angefertigt, um den Nutzen der Gallium-Szintigraphie zur Erfassung von extrapulmonalen Tuberkuloseherden (TB) zu erfassen. Methoden: 37 Patienten mit extrapulmonaler TB wurden eingeschlossen. 4 Patienten hatten 2 Laesionen. Insgesamt wurden 41 Laesionen identifiziert, hierunter 19 TB-Arthritis, 8 spinale TB, 5 TB-Meningitis, 3 TB-Lymphadenopathie, 2 TB-Perikarditis, 1 TB-Peritonitis, 1 intestinale TB, 1 Haut-TB und eine Nieren-TB. Ergebnisse: Von den 41 extrapulmonalen TB-Herden erfasste die Gallium-Szintigraphie 32 Herde mit einer Sensitivitaet von 78%. Alle Patienten mit TB-Meningitis zeigten einen negativen Gallium-Scan. Wenn die 5 Faelle mit TB-Meningitis ausgeschlossen wurden, stieg die Sensitivititaet der Gallium-Szintigraphie auf 88,9% (32/36). Schlussfolgerung: Die Daten zeigen, dass die Gallium-Szintigraphie eine einfache und nuetzliche Methode zur Erfassung extrapulmonaler TB-Herde ist