WorldWideScience

Sample records for scaling function expansion

  1. Application of wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation method to MOX fuel problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.

    2012-01-01

    More and more MOX fuels are used in all over the world in the past several decades. Compared with UO 2 fuel, it contains some new features. For example, the neutron spectrum is harder and more resonance interference effects within the resonance energy range are introduced because of more resonant nuclides contained in the MOX fuel. In this paper, the wavelets scaling function expansion method is applied to study the resonance behavior of plutonium isotopes within MOX fuel. Wavelets scaling function expansion continuous-energy self-shielding method is developed recently. It has been validated and verified by comparison to Monte Carlo calculations. In this method, the continuous-energy cross-sections are utilized within resonance energy, which means that it's capable to solve problems with serious resonance interference effects without iteration calculations. Therefore, this method adapts to treat the MOX fuel resonance calculation problem natively. Furthermore, plutonium isotopes have fierce oscillations of total cross-section within thermal energy range, especially for 240 Pu and 242 Pu. To take thermal resonance effect of plutonium isotopes into consideration the wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation code WAVERESON is enhanced by applying the free gas scattering kernel to obtain the continuous-energy scattering source within thermal energy range (2.1 eV to 4.0 eV) contrasting against the resonance energy range in which the elastic scattering kernel is utilized. Finally, all of the calculation results of WAVERESON are compared with MCNP calculation. (authors)

  2. Expansions for Coulomb wave functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, J.

    1969-01-01

    In this paper we derive a number of expansions for Whittaker functions, regular and irregular Coulomb wave functions. The main result consists of a new expansion for the irregular Coulomb wave functions of orders zero and one in terms of regular Coulomb wave functions. The latter expansions are

  3. Estimates of expansion time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expansion of a spacefaring civilization show that descendants of that civilization should be found near virtually every useful star in the Galaxy in a time much less than the current age of the Galaxy. Only extreme assumptions about local population growth rates, emigration rates, or ship ranges can slow or halt an expansion. The apparent absence of extraterrestrials from the solar system suggests that no such civilization has arisen in the Galaxy. 1 figure

  4. Composite asymptotic expansions and scaling wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panton, Ronald L

    2007-03-15

    In this article, the assumptions and reasoning that yield composite asymptotic expansions for wall turbulence are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the scaling quantities that are used to render the variables non-dimensional and of order one. An asymptotic expansion is proposed for the streamwise Reynolds stress that accounts for the active and inactive turbulence by using different scalings. The idea is tested with the data from the channel flows and appears to have merit.

  5. Expansion of passive safety function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inai, Nobuhiko; Nei, Hiromichi; Kumada, Toshiaki.

    1995-01-01

    Expansion of the use of passive safety functions is proposed. Two notions are presented. One is that, in the design of passive safety nuclear reactors where aversion of active components is stressed, some active components are purposely introduced, by which a system is built in such a way that it behaves in an apparently passive manner. The second notion is that, instead of using a passive safety function alone, a passive safety function is combined with some active components, relating the passivity in the safety function with enhanced controllability in normal operation. The nondormant system which the authors propose is one example of the first notion. This is a system in which a standby safety system is a portion of the normal operation system. An interpretation of the nondormant system via synergetics is made. As an example of the second notion, a PIUS density lock aided with active components is proposed and is discussed

  6. Dressed skeleton expansion and the coupling scale ambiguity problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Hung Jung.

    1992-09-01

    Perturbative expansions in quantum field theories are usually expressed in powers of a coupling constant. In principle, the infinite sum of the expansion series is independent of the renormalization scale of the coupling constant. In practice, there is a remnant dependence of the truncated series on the renormalization scale. This scale ambiguity can severely restrict the predictive power of theoretical calculations. The dressed skeleton expansion is developed as a calculational method which avoids the coupling scale ambiguity problem. In this method, physical quantities are expressed as functional expansions in terms of a coupling vertex function. The arguments of the vertex function are given by the physical momenta of each process. These physical momenta effectively replace the unspecified renormalization scale and eliminate the ambiguity problem. This method is applied to various field theoretical models and its main features and limitations are explored. For quantum chromodynamics, an expression for the running coupling constant of the three-gluon vertex is obtained. The effective coupling scale of this vertex is shown to be essentially given by μ 2 ∼ Q min 2 Q med 2 /Q max 2 where Q min 2 Q med 2 /Q max 2 are respectively the smallest, the next-to-smallest and the largest scale among the three gluon virtualities. This functional form suggests that the three-gluon vertex becomes non-perturbative at asymmetric momentum configurations. Implications for four-jet physics is discussed

  7. Discrete expansions of continuum functions. General concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, J.; Ershov, S.N.; Gareev, F.A.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    Different discrete expansions of the continuum wave functions are considered: pole expansion (according to the Mittag-Lefler theorem), Weinberg states. The general property of these groups of states is their completeness in the finite region of space. They satisfy the Schroedinger type equations and are matched with free solutions of the Schroedinger equation at the boundary. Convergence of expansions for the S matrix, the Green functions and the continuous-spectrum wave functions is studied. A new group of states possessing the best convergence is introduced

  8. Oblique photon expansion of QED structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahine, C.

    1986-01-01

    In the oblique photon expansion, the collinear part of photon emission is summed up to all orders in perturbation theory. The number of oblique or non-collinear photons is the expansion order. Unlike in perturbation theory, every term of the expansion is both infrared finite and gauge invariant. The zero oblique photon contribution to the electromagnetic structure tensor in QED is computed in detail. The behaviors of the structure functions F1 and F2 are discussed in the soft and ultra-soft limits

  9. Discrete expansions of continuum wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, J.; Ershov, S.N.; Gareev, F.A.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1980-01-01

    Different methods of expanding continuum wave functions in terms of discrete basis sets are discussed. The convergence properties of these expansions are investigated, both from a mathematical and a numerical point of view, for the case of potentials of Woods-Saxon and square well type. (orig.)

  10. Expansion of continuum functions on resonance wave functions and amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, J.; Gareev, F.A.; Gizzatkulov, M.H.; Goncharov, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    To overcome difficulties encountered with wave functions of continuum spectrum (for example, in a shell model with continuum) the pole expansion (by the Mittag-Leffler theorem) of wave functions, scattering amplitudes and the Green functions with positive energies are considered. It is shown that resonance functions (the Gamov functions) form a complete set over which the continuum functions could be expanded. The general view of these expansions for final potentials and for the Coulomb repulsion potential are obtained and discussed. It is shown that the application of the method to nuclear structure calculations leads to simple algebraic equations

  11. Temporal quadratic expansion nodal Green's function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Cong; Jing Xingqing; Xu Xiaolin

    2000-01-01

    A new approach is presented to efficiently solve the three-dimensional space-time reactor dynamics equation which overcomes the disadvantages of current methods. In the Temporal Quadratic Expansion Nodal Green's Function Method (TQE/NGFM), the Quadratic Expansion Method (QEM) is used for the temporal solution with the Nodal Green's Function Method (NGFM) employed for the spatial solution. Test calculational results using TQE/NGFM show that its time step size can be 5-20 times larger than that of the Fully Implicit Method (FIM) for similar precision. Additionally, the spatial mesh size with NGFM can be nearly 20 times larger than that using the finite difference method. So, TQE/NGFM is proved to be an efficient reactor dynamics analysis method

  12. Auxiliary basis expansions for large-scale electronic structure calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yousung; Sodt, Alex; Gill, Peter M W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2005-05-10

    One way to reduce the computational cost of electronic structure calculations is to use auxiliary basis expansions to approximate four-center integrals in terms of two- and three-center integrals, usually by using the variationally optimum Coulomb metric to determine the expansion coefficients. However, the long-range decay behavior of the auxiliary basis expansion coefficients has not been characterized. We find that this decay can be surprisingly slow. Numerical experiments on linear alkanes and a toy model both show that the decay can be as slow as 1/r in the distance between the auxiliary function and the fitted charge distribution. The Coulomb metric fitting equations also involve divergent matrix elements for extended systems treated with periodic boundary conditions. An attenuated Coulomb metric that is short-range can eliminate these oddities without substantially degrading calculated relative energies. The sparsity of the fit coefficients is assessed on simple hydrocarbon molecules and shows quite early onset of linear growth in the number of significant coefficients with system size using the attenuated Coulomb metric. Hence it is possible to design linear scaling auxiliary basis methods without additional approximations to treat large systems.

  13. Edgeworth expansion for functionals of continuous diffusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podolskij, Mark; Yoshida, Nakahiro

    This paper presents new results on the Edgeworth expansion for high frequency functionals of continuous diffusion processes. We derive asymptotic expansions for weighted functionals of the Brownian motion and apply them to provide the Edgeworth expansion for power variation of diffusion processes....... Our methodology relies on martingale embedding, Malliavin calculus and stable central limit theorems for semimartingales. Finally, we demonstrate the density expansion for studentized statistics of power variations.......This paper presents new results on the Edgeworth expansion for high frequency functionals of continuous diffusion processes. We derive asymptotic expansions for weighted functionals of the Brownian motion and apply them to provide the Edgeworth expansion for power variation of diffusion processes...

  14. Parabolic cyclinder functions : examples of error bounds for asymptotic expansions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Vidunas; N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractSeveral asymptotic expansions of parabolic cylinder functions are discussedand error bounds for remainders in the expansions are presented. Inparticular Poincaré-type expansions for large values of the argument$z$ and uniform expansions for large values of the parameter areconsidered.

  15. Density-functional expansion methods: Grand challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2012-03-01

    We discuss the source of errors in semiempirical density functional expansion (VE) methods. In particular, we show that VE methods are capable of well-reproducing their standard Kohn-Sham density functional method counterparts, but suffer from large errors upon using one or more of these approximations: the limited size of the atomic orbital basis, the Slater monopole auxiliary basis description of the response density, and the one- and two-body treatment of the core-Hamiltonian matrix elements. In the process of discussing these approximations and highlighting their symptoms, we introduce a new model that supplements the second-order density-functional tight-binding model with a self-consistent charge-dependent chemical potential equalization correction; we review our recently reported method for generalizing the auxiliary basis description of the atomic orbital response density; and we decompose the first-order potential into a summation of additive atomic components and many-body corrections, and from this examination, we provide new insights and preliminary results that motivate and inspire new approximate treatments of the core-Hamiltonian.

  16. Multiple-scale approach for the expansion scaling of superfluid quantum gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusquiza, I. L.; Valle Basagoiti, M. A.; Modugno, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a general method, based on a multiple-scale approach, for deriving the perturbative solutions of the scaling equations governing the expansion of superfluid ultracold quantum gases released from elongated harmonic traps. We discuss how to treat the secular terms appearing in the usual naive expansion in the trap asymmetry parameter ε and calculate the next-to-leading correction for the asymptotic aspect ratio, with significant improvement over the previous proposals.

  17. Neural substrate expansion for the restoration of brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chiao Isaac Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoring neurological and cognitive function in individuals who have suffered brain damage is one of the principal objectives of modern translational neuroscience. Electrical stimulation approaches, such as deep-brain stimulation, have achieved the most clinical success, but they ultimately may be limited by the computational capacity of the residual cerebral circuitry. An alternative strategy is brain substrate expansion, in which the computational capacity of the brain is augmented through the addition of new processing units and the reconstitution of network connectivity. This latter approach has been explored to some degree using both biological and electronic means but thus far has not demonstrated the ability to reestablish the function of large-scale neuronal networks. In this review, we contend that fulfilling the potential of brain substrate expansion will require a significant shift from current methods that emphasize direct manipulations of the brain (e.g., injections of cellular suspensions and the implantation of multi-electrode arrays to the generation of more sophisticated neural tissues and neural-electric hybrids in vitro that are subsequently transplanted into the brain. Drawing from neural tissue engineering, stem cell biology, and neural interface technologies, this strategy makes greater use of the manifold techniques available in the laboratory to create biocompatible constructs that recapitulate brain architecture and thus are more easily recognized and utilized by brain networks.

  18. Perceptual scale expansion: an efficient angular coding strategy for locomotor space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgin, Frank H; Li, Zhi

    2011-08-01

    Whereas most sensory information is coded on a logarithmic scale, linear expansion of a limited range may provide a more efficient coding for the angular variables important to precise motor control. In four experiments, we show that the perceived declination of gaze, like the perceived orientation of surfaces, is coded on a distorted scale. The distortion seems to arise from a nearly linear expansion of the angular range close to horizontal/straight ahead and is evident in explicit verbal and nonverbal measures (Experiments 1 and 2), as well as in implicit measures of perceived gaze direction (Experiment 4). The theory is advanced that this scale expansion (by a factor of about 1.5) may serve a functional goal of coding efficiency for angular perceptual variables. The scale expansion of perceived gaze declination is accompanied by a corresponding expansion of perceived optical slants in the same range (Experiments 3 and 4). These dual distortions can account for the explicit misperception of distance typically obtained by direct report and exocentric matching, while allowing for accurate spatial action to be understood as the result of calibration.

  19. Graph approach to the gradient expansion of density functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, P.M.; Nalewajski, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    A graph representation of terms in the gradient expansion of the kinetic energy density functional is presented. They briefly discuss the implications of the virial theorem for the graph structure and relations between possible graphs at a given order of expansion

  20. Off-diagonal series expansion for quantum partition functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Itay

    2018-05-01

    We derive an integral-free thermodynamic perturbation series expansion for quantum partition functions which enables an analytical term-by-term calculation of the series. The expansion is carried out around the partition function of the classical component of the Hamiltonian with the expansion parameter being the strength of the off-diagonal, or quantum, portion. To demonstrate the usefulness of the technique we analytically compute to third order the partition functions of the 1D Ising model with longitudinal and transverse fields, and the quantum 1D Heisenberg model.

  1. Generation Expansion Planning Considering Integrating Large-scale Wind Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chunyu; Ding, Yi; Østergaard, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    necessitated the inclusion of more innovative and sophisticated approaches in power system investment planning. A bi-level generation expansion planning approach considering large-scale wind generation was proposed in this paper. The first phase is investment decision, while the second phase is production...... optimization decision. A multi-objective PSO (MOPSO) algorithm was introduced to solve this optimization problem, which can accelerate the convergence and guarantee the diversity of Pareto-optimal front set as well. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed bi-level planning approach and the MOPSO...

  2. Jacobian elliptic function expansion solutions of nonlinear stochastic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Caimin; Xia Zunquan; Tian Naishuo

    2005-01-01

    Jacobian elliptic function expansion method is extended and applied to construct the exact solutions of the nonlinear Wick-type stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) and some new exact solutions are obtained via this method and Hermite transformation

  3. Negative thermal expansion in functional materials: controllable thermal expansion by chemical modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Hu, Lei; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2015-06-07

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) is an intriguing physical property of solids, which is a consequence of a complex interplay among the lattice, phonons, and electrons. Interestingly, a large number of NTE materials have been found in various types of functional materials. In the last two decades good progress has been achieved to discover new phenomena and mechanisms of NTE. In the present review article, NTE is reviewed in functional materials of ferroelectrics, magnetics, multiferroics, superconductors, temperature-induced electron configuration change and so on. Zero thermal expansion (ZTE) of functional materials is emphasized due to the importance for practical applications. The NTE functional materials present a general physical picture to reveal a strong coupling role between physical properties and NTE. There is a general nature of NTE for both ferroelectrics and magnetics, in which NTE is determined by either ferroelectric order or magnetic one. In NTE functional materials, a multi-way to control thermal expansion can be established through the coupling roles of ferroelectricity-NTE, magnetism-NTE, change of electron configuration-NTE, open-framework-NTE, and so on. Chemical modification has been proved to be an effective method to control thermal expansion. Finally, challenges and questions are discussed for the development of NTE materials. There remains a challenge to discover a "perfect" NTE material for each specific application for chemists. The future studies on NTE functional materials will definitely promote the development of NTE materials.

  4. Multipole expansion of vertex functions with two final particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daumens, Michel

    1977-01-01

    The expansions of the usual vertex functions are generalized to the vertex functions with two final particles. For four vector functions, expressions are similar to those of Chew, Goldberger, Low and Nambu, and of Adler and the consequences of the isobaric model are studied [fr

  5. Improved wave functions for large-N expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbo, T.; Sukhatme, U.

    1985-01-01

    Existing large-N expansions of radial wave functions phi/sub n/,l(r) are only accurate near the minimum of the effective potential. Within the framework of the shifted 1/N expansion, we use known analytic results to motivate a simple modification so that the improved wave functions are accurate over a wide range of r and any choice of quantum numbers n and l. It is shown that these wave functions yield simple and accurate analytic expressions for certain quantities of interest in quarkonium physics

  6. Conformal four point functions and the operator product expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, F.A.; Osborn, H.

    2001-01-01

    Various aspects of the four point function for scalar fields in conformally invariant theories are analysed. This depends on an arbitrary function of two conformal invariants u,v. A recurrence relation for the function corresponding to the contribution of an arbitrary spin field in the operator product expansion to the four point function is derived. This is solved explicitly in two and four dimensions in terms of ordinary hypergeometric functions of variables z,x which are simply related to u,v. The operator product expansion analysis is applied to the explicit expressions for the four point function found for free scalar, fermion and vector field theories in four dimensions. The results for four point functions obtained by using the AdS/CFT correspondence are also analysed in terms of functions related to those appearing in the operator product discussion

  7. Asymptotic Expansions of Generalized Nevanlinna Functions and their Spectral Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derkach, Vladimir; Hassi, Seppo; de Snoo, Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    Asymptotic expansions of generalized Nevanlinna functions Q are investigated by means of a factorization model involving a part of the generalized zeros and poles of nonpositive type of the function Q. The main results in this paper arise from the explicit construction of maximal Jordan chains in

  8. Fourier expansions and multivariable Bessel functions concerning radiation programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Richetta, M.; Torre, A.; Chiccoli, C.; Lorenzutta, S.; Maino, G.

    1996-01-01

    The link between generalized Bessel functions and other special functions is investigated using the Fourier series and the generalized Jacobi-Anger expansion. A new class of multivariable Hermite polynomials is then introduced and their relevance to physical problems discussed. As an example of the power of the method, applied to radiation physics, we analyse the role played by multi-variable Bessel functions in the description of radiation emitted by a charge constrained to a nonlinear oscillation. (author)

  9. Asymptotic expansions of Mathieu functions in wave mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, G.; Kuriyan, M.

    1976-01-01

    Solutions of the radial Schroedinger equation containing a polarization potential r -4 are expanded in a form appropriate for large values of r. These expansions of the Mathieu functions are used in association with the numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation to impose the asymptotic boundary condition in the case of bound states, and to extract phase shifts in the case of scattering states

  10. Multipole expansion of vertex functions in an arbitrary frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daumens, Michel

    1977-01-01

    Vertex functions are expanded on the bases of tensor spherical harmonics and tensor multipoles. The coefficients of the expansions are rotational invariant form factors. The relations with those defined in particular frames by Durand, De Celles and Marr, and by De Rafael are exhibited. Finally multipolar form factors are built which are irreducible under pure Lorentz transformations [fr

  11. The linear potential propagator via wave function expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassar, Antonio B.; Cattani, Mauro S.D.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluate the quantum propagator for the motion of a particle in a linear potential via a recently developed formalism [A.B. Nassar et al., Phys. Rev. E56, 1230, (1997)]. In this formalism, the propagator comes about as a type of expansion of the wave function over the space of the initial velocities. (author)

  12. Recurrence formulas for evaluating expansion series of depletion functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukadin, Z.

    1991-01-01

    A high-accuracy analytical method for solving the depletion equations for chains of radioactive nuclides is based on the formulation of depletion functions. When all the arguments of the depletion function are too close to each other, series expansions of the depletion function have to be used. However, the high-accuracy series expressions for the depletion functions of high index become too complicated. Recursion relations are derived which enable an efficient high-accuracy evaluation of the depletion functions with high indices. (orig.) [de

  13. General post-Minkowskian expansion of time transfer functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teyssandier, Pierre; Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe Le

    2008-01-01

    Modeling most of the tests of general relativity requires us to know the function relating light travel time to the coordinate time of reception and to the spatial coordinates of the emitter and the receiver. We call such a function the reception time transfer function. Of course, an emission time transfer function may as well be considered. We present here a recursive procedure enabling us to expand each time transfer function into a perturbative series of ascending powers of the Newtonian gravitational constant G (general post-Minkowskian expansion). Our method is self-sufficient in the sense that neither the integration of null geodesic equations nor the determination of Synge's world function is necessary. To illustrate the method, the time transfer function of a three-parameter family of static, spherically symmetric metrics is derived within the post-linear approximation

  14. General post-Minkowskian expansion of time transfer functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teyssandier, Pierre; Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe Le [Departement Systemes de Reference Temps et Espace, CNRS/UMR 8630, Observatoire de Paris, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2008-07-21

    Modeling most of the tests of general relativity requires us to know the function relating light travel time to the coordinate time of reception and to the spatial coordinates of the emitter and the receiver. We call such a function the reception time transfer function. Of course, an emission time transfer function may as well be considered. We present here a recursive procedure enabling us to expand each time transfer function into a perturbative series of ascending powers of the Newtonian gravitational constant G (general post-Minkowskian expansion). Our method is self-sufficient in the sense that neither the integration of null geodesic equations nor the determination of Synge's world function is necessary. To illustrate the method, the time transfer function of a three-parameter family of static, spherically symmetric metrics is derived within the post-linear approximation.

  15. Mapping Thermal Expansion Coefficients in Freestanding 2D Materials at the Nanometer Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuan; Yasaei, Poya; Jokisaari, Jacob; Öǧüt, Serdar; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Klie, Robert F.

    2018-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and their heterostructures, exhibit great potential for a variety of applications, such as transistors, spintronics, and photovoltaics. While the miniaturization offers remarkable improvements in electrical performance, heat dissipation and thermal mismatch can be a problem in designing electronic devices based on two-dimensional materials. Quantifying the thermal expansion coefficient of 2D materials requires temperature measurements at nanometer scale. Here, we introduce a novel nanometer-scale thermometry approach to measure temperature and quantify the thermal expansion coefficients in 2D materials based on scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy to determine the energy shift of the plasmon resonance peak of 2D materials as a function of sample temperature. By combining these measurements with first-principles modeling, the thermal expansion coefficients (TECs) of single-layer and freestanding graphene and bulk, as well as monolayer MoS2 , MoSe2 , WS2 , or WSe2 , are directly determined and mapped.

  16. Nucleon structure functions from lattice operator product expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, A.J.; Somfleth, K.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). CSSM, Dept. of Physics; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe (Japan); Perlt, H.; Schiller, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Div.; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Deep-inelastic scattering, in the laboratory and on the lattice, is most instructive for understanding how the nucleon is built from quarks and gluons. The long-term goal is to compute the associated structure functions from first principles. So far this has been limited to model calculations. In this Letter we propose a new method to compute the structure functions directly from the virtual, all-encompassing Compton amplitude, utilizing the operator product expansion. This overcomes issues of renormalization and operator mixing, which so far have hindered lattice calculations of power corrections and higher moments.

  17. Nucleon structure functions from lattice operator product expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, A.J.; Somfleth, K.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M.; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A.

    2017-03-01

    Deep-inelastic scattering, in the laboratory and on the lattice, is most instructive for understanding how the nucleon is built from quarks and gluons. The long-term goal is to compute the associated structure functions from first principles. So far this has been limited to model calculations. In this Letter we propose a new method to compute the structure functions directly from the virtual, all-encompassing Compton amplitude, utilizing the operator product expansion. This overcomes issues of renormalization and operator mixing, which so far have hindered lattice calculations of power corrections and higher moments.

  18. Nucleon Structure Functions from Operator Product Expansion on the Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, A J; Horsley, R; Nakamura, Y; Perlt, H; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Schiller, A; Somfleth, K; Young, R D; Zanotti, J M

    2017-06-16

    Deep-inelastic scattering, in the laboratory and on the lattice, is most instructive for understanding how the nucleon is built from quarks and gluons. The long-term goal is to compute the associated structure functions from first principles. So far this has been limited to model calculations. In this Letter we propose a new method to compute the structure functions directly from the virtual, all-encompassing Compton amplitude, utilizing the operator product expansion. This overcomes issues of renormalization and operator mixing, which so far have hindered lattice calculations of power corrections and higher moments.

  19. Gravity waves as a probe of the Hubble expansion rate during an electroweak scale phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Zhou Peng

    2010-01-01

    Just as big bang nucleosynthesis allows us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was around 1 MeV, the measurement of gravity waves from electroweak scale first order phase transitions may allow us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was at the electroweak scale. We compute the simple transformation rule for the gravity wave spectrum under the scaling transformation of the Hubble expansion rate. We then apply this directly to the scenario of quintessence kination domination and show how gravity wave spectra would shift relative to Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and Big Bang Observer projected sensitivities.

  20. Derivation of the density functional theory from the cluster expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, J Y

    2003-09-26

    The density functional theory is derived from a cluster expansion by truncating the higher-order correlations in one and only one term in the kinetic energy. The formulation allows self-consistent calculation of the exchange correlation effect without imposing additional assumptions to generalize the local density approximation. The pair correlation is described as a two-body collision of bound-state electrons, and modifies the electron- electron interaction energy as well as the kinetic energy. The theory admits excited states, and has no self-interaction energy.

  1. Converting Hangar High Expansion Foam Systems to Prevent Cockpit Damage: Full-Scale Validation Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AFCEC-CO-TY-TR-2018-0001 CONVERTING HANGAR HIGH EXPANSION FOAM SYSTEMS TO PREVENT COCKPIT DAMAGE: FULL-SCALE VALIDATION TESTS Gerard G...manufacturer, or otherwise does not constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation , or approval by the United States Air Force. The views and...09-2017 Final Test Report May 2017 Converting Hangar High Expansion Foam Systems to Prevent Cockpit Damage: Full-Scale Validation Tests N00173-15-D

  2. A nonlinear analytic function expansion nodal method for transient calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Han Gyn; Park, Sang Yoon; Cho, Byung Oh; Zee, Sung Quun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The nonlinear analytic function expansion nodal (AFEN) method is applied to the solution of the time-dependent neutron diffusion equation. Since the AFEN method requires both the particular solution and the homogeneous solution to the transient fixed source problem, the derivation of the solution method is focused on finding the particular solution efficiently. To avoid complicated particular solutions, the source distribution is approximated by quadratic polynomials and the transient source is constructed such that the error due to the quadratic approximation is minimized, In addition, this paper presents a new two-node solution scheme that is derived by imposing the constraint of current continuity at the interface corner points. The method is verified through a series of application to the NEACRP PWR rod ejection benchmark problems. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  3. A nonlinear analytic function expansion nodal method for transient calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Han Gyn; Park, Sang Yoon; Cho, Byung Oh; Zee, Sung Quun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    The nonlinear analytic function expansion nodal (AFEN) method is applied to the solution of the time-dependent neutron diffusion equation. Since the AFEN method requires both the particular solution and the homogeneous solution to the transient fixed source problem, the derivation of the solution method is focused on finding the particular solution efficiently. To avoid complicated particular solutions, the source distribution is approximated by quadratic polynomials and the transient source is constructed such that the error due to the quadratic approximation is minimized, In addition, this paper presents a new two-node solution scheme that is derived by imposing the constraint of current continuity at the interface corner points. The method is verified through a series of application to the NEACRP PWR rod ejection benchmark problems. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  4. Measuring Cosmic Expansion and Large Scale Structure with Destiny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Lauer, Tod R.

    2007-01-01

    Destiny is a simple, direct, low cost mission to determine the properties of dark energy by obtaining a cosmologically deep supernova (SN) type Ia Hubble diagram and by measuring the large-scale mass power spectrum over time. Its science instrument is a 1.65m space telescope, featuring a near-infrared survey camera/spectrometer with a large field of view. During its first two years, Destiny will detect, observe, and characterize 23000 SN Ia events over the redshift interval 0.4Destiny will be used in its third year as a high resolution, wide-field imager to conduct a weak lensing survey covering >lo00 square degrees to measure the large-scale mass power spectrum. The combination of surveys is much more powerful than either technique on its own, and will have over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than will be provided by ongoing ground-based projects.

  5. Analytic function expansion nodal method for nuclear reactor core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Hae Man

    1995-02-01

    In most advanced nodal methods the transverse integration is commonly used to reduce the multi-dimensional diffusion equation into equivalent one- dimensional diffusion equations when derving the nodal coupling equations. But the use of the transverse integration results in some limitations. The first limitation is that the transverse leakage term which appears in the transverse integration procedure must be appropriately approximated. The second limitation is that the one-dimensional flux shapes in each spatial direction resulted from the nodal calculation are not accurate enough to be directly used in reconstructing the pinwise flux distributions. Finally the transverse leakage defined for a non-rectangular node such as a hexagonal node or a triangular node is too complicated to be easily handled and may contain non-physical singular terms of step-function and delta-function types. In this thesis, the Analytic Function Expansion Nodal (AFEN) method and its two variations : the Polynomial Expansion Nodal (PEN) method and the hybrid of the AFEN and PEN methods, have been developed to overcome the limitations of the transverse integration procedure. All of the methods solve the multidimensional diffusion equation without the transverse integration. The AFEN method which we believe is the major contribution of this study to the reactor core analysis expands the homogeneous flux distributions within a node in non-separable analytic basis functions satisfying the neutron diffusion equations at any point of the node and expresses the coefficients of the flux expansion in terms of the nodal unknowns which comprise a node-average flux, node-interface fluxes, and corner-point fluxes. Then, the nodal coupling equations composed of the neutron balance equations, the interface current continuity equations, and the corner-point leakage balance equations are solved iteratively to determine all the nodal unknowns. Since the AFEN method does not use the transverse integration in

  6. Asymptotics and Numerics of Polynomials Used in Tricomi and Buchholz Expansions of Kummer functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. López; N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractExpansions in terms of Bessel functions are considered of the Kummer function ${}_1F_1(a;c,z)$ (or confluent hypergeometric function) as given by Tricomi and Buchholz. The coefficients of these expansions are polynomials in the parameters of the Kummer function and the asymptotic

  7. Expansion of a function about a displaced centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, M.A.

    1981-07-01

    We review the progress recently made in obtaining closed form expressions for the expansion of general orbitals about a displaced centre and establish the equivalence between different expansions. We also examine how these expressions do have the desired limit as the displacement approaches zero. (author)

  8. The Role of Remote Sensing for Understanding Large-Scale Rubber Concession Expansion in Southern Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutlu Özdoğan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global demand for natural rubber began in the mid-2000s and led to large-scale expansion of plantations in Laos until rubber latex prices declined greatly beginning in 2011. The expansion of rubber did not, however, occur uniformly across the country. While the north and central Laos experienced mostly local and smallholder plantations, rubber expansion in the south was dominated by transnational companies from Vietnam, China and Thailand through large-scale land concessions, often causing conflicts with local communities. In this study we use satellite remote sensing to identify and map the expansion of large-scale rubber plantations in Champasak Province—the first area in southern Laos to host large-scale rubber development—and document the biophysical impacts on the local landscape, which of course is linked to social impacts on local people. Our study demonstrates that the expansion of rubber in the province was rapid and did not always conform to approved concession area locations. The mono-culture nature of rubber plantations also had the effect of homogenizing the landscape, eclipsing the changes caused by local populations. We argue that by providing a relatively inexpensive way to track the expansion of rubber plantations over space and time, remote sensing has the potential to provide advocates and other civil society groups with data that might otherwise remain limited to the restricted domains of state regulation and private sector reporting. However, we also caution that while remote sensing has the potential to provide strong public evidence about plantation expansion, access to and control of this information ultimately determines its value.

  9. Some Consequences of the Expansion of the Universe on Small Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunian, H. A.

    2017-12-01

    The possibility of detecting the accelerated expansion of the universe at all its points is examined. Observational data indicative of Hubble expansion on small scales are adduced for this purpose. The validity of current opinion on the equilibrium of systems of cosmic objects is also discussed. It is noted that this opinion is a simple consequence of the unproved Kant-Laplace hypothesis on the formation of cosmic objects and systems of them. It is proposed that a system attached to the cosmological horizon be used as a reference system. It is noted that all points on this sphere are an initial point from which expansion of the observed universe of the given observer began. The numerical value of the acceleration obtained in this way is almost the same as the anomalous acceleration found by space probes.

  10. Exact series expansions, recurrence relations, properties and integrals of the generalized exponential integral functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altac, Zekeriya

    2007-01-01

    Generalized exponential integral functions (GEIF) are encountered in multi-dimensional thermal radiative transfer problems in the integral equation kernels. Several series expansions for the first-order generalized exponential integral function, along with a series expansion for the general nth order GEIF, are derived. The convergence issues of these series expansions are investigated numerically as well as theoretically, and a recurrence relation which does not require derivatives of the GEIF is developed. The exact series expansions of the two dimensional cylindrical and/or two-dimensional planar integral kernels as well as their spatial moments have been explicitly derived and compared with numerical values

  11. On the divergence of gradient expansions for kinetic energy functionals in the potential functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, Alexey; Jovanovic, Raka; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H

    2016-01-01

    We consider the density of a fermionic system as a functional of the potential, in one-dimensional case, where it is approximated by the Thomas–Fermi term plus semiclassical corrections through the gradient expansion. We compare this asymptotic series with the exact answer for the case of the harmonic oscillator and the Morse potential. It is found that the leading (Thomas–Fermi) term is in agreement with the exact density, but the subdominant term does not agree in terms of the asymptotic behavior because of the presence of oscillations in the exact density, but their absence in the gradient expansion. However, after regularization of the density by convolution with a Gaussian, the agreement can be established even in the subdominant term. Moreover, it is found that the expansion is always divergent, and its terms grow proportionally to the factorial function of the order, similar to the well-known divergence of perturbation series in field theory and the quantum anharmonic oscillator. Padé–Hermite approximants allow summation of the series, and one of the branches of the approximants agrees with the density. (paper)

  12. Functional perturbative RG and CFT data in the ϵ -expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, A.; Safari, M.; Vacca, G. P.

    2018-01-01

    We show how the use of standard perturbative RG in dimensional regularization allows for a renormalization group-based computation of both the spectrum and a family of coefficients of the operator product expansion (OPE) for a given universality class. The task is greatly simplified by a straight......We show how the use of standard perturbative RG in dimensional regularization allows for a renormalization group-based computation of both the spectrum and a family of coefficients of the operator product expansion (OPE) for a given universality class. The task is greatly simplified...... several results for the whole family of renormalizable multi-critical models ϕ2 n. Whenever comparison is possible our RG results explicitly match the ones recently derived in CFT frameworks....

  13. GMP-compliant isolation and large-scale expansion of bone marrow-derived MSC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Fekete

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC have gained importance in tissue repair, tissue engineering and in immunosupressive therapy during the last years. Due to the limited availability of MSC in the bone marrow, ex vivo amplification prior to clinical application is requisite to obtain therapeutic applicable cell doses. Translation of preclinical into clinical-grade large-scale MSC expansion necessitates precise definition and standardization of all procedural parameters including cell seeding density, culture medium and cultivation devices. While xenogeneic additives such as fetal calf serum are still widely used for cell culture, its use in the clinical context is associated with many risks, such as prion and viral transmission or adverse immunological reactions against xenogeneic components. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We established animal-free expansion protocols using platelet lysate as medium supplement and thereby could confirm its safety and feasibility for large-scale MSC isolation and expansion. Five different GMP-compliant standardized protocols designed for the safe, reliable, efficient and economical isolation and expansion of MSC was performed and MSC obtained were analyzed for differentiation capacity by qPCR and histochemistry. Expression of standard MSC markers as defined by the International Society for Cellular Therapy as well as expression of additional MSC markers and of various chemokine and cytokine receptors was analysed by flow cytometry. Changes of metabolic markers and cytokines in the medium were addressed using the LUMINEX platform. CONCLUSIONS: The five different systems for isolation and expansion of MSC described in this study are all suitable to produce at least 100 millions of MSC, which is commonly regarded as a single clinical dose. Final products are equal according to the minimal criteria for MSC defined by the ISCT. We showed that chemokine and integrin receptors analyzed had the same expression pattern

  14. Quantum field theory in the presence of a medium: Green's function expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kheirandish, Fardin [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Shahreza-Branch, Shahreza (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Shahriar [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Starting from a Lagrangian and using functional-integration techniques, series expansions of Green's function of a real scalar field and electromagnetic field, in the presence of a medium, are obtained. The parameter of expansion in these series is the susceptibility function of the medium. Relativistic and nonrelativistic Langevin-type equations are derived. Series expansions for Lifshitz energy in finite temperature and for an arbitrary matter distribution are derived. Covariant formulations for both scalar and electromagnetic fields are introduced. Two illustrative examples are given.

  15. Functional nanometer-scale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tsz On Mario

    Nanometer-scale structures have properties that are fundamentally different from their bulk counterparts. Much research effort has been devoted in the past decades to explore new fabrication techniques, model the physical properties of these structures, and construct functional devices. The ability to manipulate and control the structure of matter at the nanoscale has made many new classes of materials available for the study of fundamental physical processes and potential applications. The interplay between fabrication techniques and physical understanding of the nanostructures and processes has revolutionized the physical and material sciences, providing far superior properties in materials for novel applications that benefit society. This thesis consists of two major aspects of my graduate research in nano-scale materials. In the first part (Chapters 3--6), a comprehensive study on the nanostructures based on electrospinning and thermal treatment is presented. Electrospinning is a well-established method for producing high-aspect-ratio fibrous structures, with fiber diameter ranging from 1 nm--1 microm. A polymeric solution is typically used as a precursor in electrospinning. In our study, the functionality of the nanostructure relies on both the nanostructure and material constituents. Metallic ions containing precursors were added to the polymeric precursor following a sol-gel process to prepare the solution suitable for electrospinning. A typical electrospinning process produces as-spun fibers containing both polymer and metallic salt precursors. Subsequent thermal treatments of the as-spun fibers were carried out in various conditions to produce desired structures. In most cases, polymer in the solution and the as-spun fibers acted as a backbone for the structure formation during the subsequent heat treatment, and were thermally removed in the final stage. Polymers were also designed to react with the metallic ion precursors during heat treatment in some

  16. Validation of the Early Functional Abilities scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Ingrid; Kreiner, Svend; Engberg, Aase W

    2018-01-01

    model item analysis. A secondary objective was to examine the relationship between the Early Functional Abilities scale and the Functional Independence Measurement™, in order to establish the criterion validity of the Early Functional Abilities scale and to compare the sensitivity of measurements using......), facio-oral, sensorimotor and communicative/cognitive functions. Removal of one item from the sensorimotor scale confirmed unidimensionality for each of the 4 subscales, but not for the entire scale. The Early Functional Abilities subscales are sensitive to differences between patients in ranges in which......OBJECTIVE: The Early Functional Abilities scale assesses the restoration of brain function after brain injury, based on 4 dimensions. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the validity, objectivity, reliability and measurement precision of the Early Functional Abilities scale by Rasch...

  17. Renormalization group, operator product expansion and anomalous scaling in models of turbulent advection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, N V

    2006-01-01

    Recent progress on the anomalous scaling in models of turbulent heat and mass transport is reviewed with the emphasis on the approach based on the field-theoretic renormalization group (RG) and operator product expansion (OPE). In that approach, the anomalous scaling is established as a consequence of the existence in the corresponding field-theoretic models of an infinite number of 'dangerous' composite fields (operators) with negative critical dimensions, which are identified with the anomalous exponents. This allows one to calculate the exponents in a systematic perturbation expansion, similar to the ε expansion in the theory of critical phenomena. The RG and OPE approach is presented in a self-contained way for the example of a passive scalar field (temperature, concentration of an impurity, etc) advected by a self-similar Gaussian velocity ensemble with vanishing correlation time, the so-called Kraichnan's rapid-change model, where the anomalous exponents are known up to order O(ε 3 ). Effects of anisotropy, compressibility and the correlation time of the velocity field are discussed. Passive advection by non-Gaussian velocity field governed by the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation and passively advected vector (e.g. magnetic) fields are considered

  18. A New Form of the Spherical Expansion of Zonal Functions and Fourier Transforms of SO(d-Finite Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Bezubik

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents recent results obtained by the authors (partly in collaboration with A. Dabrowska concerning expansions of zonal functions on Euclidean spheres into spherical harmonics and some applications of such expansions for problems involving Fourier transforms of functions with rotational symmetry. The method used to derive the expansion formula is based entirely on differential methods and completely avoids the use of various integral identities commonly used in this context. Some new identities for the Fourier transform are derived and as a byproduct seemingly new recurrence relations for the classical Bessel functions are obtained.

  19. Expansion of infinite series containing modified Bessel functions of the second kind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fucci, Guglielmo; Kirsten, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze general infinite sums containing modified Bessel functions of the second kind. In particular we present a method for the construction of a proper asymptotic expansion for such series valid when one of the parameters in the argument of the modified Bessel function of the second kind is small compared to the others. We apply the results obtained for the asymptotic expansion to specific problems that arise in the ambit of quantum field theory. (paper)

  20. Patterns of coordinated cortical remodeling during adolescence and their associations with functional specialization and evolutionary expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiras, Aristeidis; Toledo, Jon B; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Davatzikos, Christos

    2017-03-28

    During adolescence, the human cortex undergoes substantial remodeling to support a rapid expansion of behavioral repertoire. Accurately quantifying these changes is a prerequisite for understanding normal brain development, as well as the neuropsychiatric disorders that emerge in this vulnerable period. Past accounts have demonstrated substantial regional heterogeneity in patterns of brain development, but frequently have been limited by small samples and analytics that do not evaluate complex multivariate imaging patterns. Capitalizing on recent advances in multivariate analysis methods, we used nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to uncover coordinated patterns of cortical development in a sample of 934 youths ages 8-20, who completed structural neuroimaging as part of the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort. Patterns of structural covariance (PSCs) derived by NMF were highly reproducible over a range of resolutions, and differed markedly from common gyral-based structural atlases. Moreover, PSCs were largely symmetric and showed correspondence to specific large-scale functional networks. The level of correspondence was ordered according to their functional role and position in the evolutionary hierarchy, being high in lower-order visual and somatomotor networks and diminishing in higher-order association cortex. Furthermore, PSCs showed divergent developmental associations, with PSCs in higher-order association cortex networks showing greater changes with age than primary somatomotor and visual networks. Critically, such developmental changes within PSCs were significantly associated with the degree of evolutionary cortical expansion. Together, our findings delineate a set of structural brain networks that undergo coordinated cortical thinning during adolescence, which is in part governed by evolutionary novelty and functional specialization.

  1. Fast evaluation of nonlinear functionals of tensor product wavelet expansions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab, C.; Stevenson, R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract For a nonlinear functional f, and a function u from the span of a set of tensor product interpolets, it is shown how to compute the interpolant of f (u) from the span of this set of tensor product interpolets in linear complexity, assuming that the index set has a certain multiple tree

  2. The P(phi)2 Green's functions; asymptotic perturbation expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimock, J.

    1976-01-01

    The real time Green's functions in the P(phi) 2 quantum field theory are infinitely differentiable functions of the coupling constant lambda up to and including lamba=0. It follows that the perturbation series are asymptotic as lambda→0 + . (Auth.)

  3. Line Capacity Expansion and Transmission Switching in Power Systems With Large-Scale Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Jonas Christoffer; Bronmo, Geir; Philpott, Andy B.

    2013-01-01

    In 2020 electricity production from wind power should constitute nearly 50% of electricity demand in Denmark. In this paper we look at optimal expansion of the transmission network in order to integrate 50% wind power in the system, while minimizing total fixed investment cost and expected cost...... of power generation. We allow for active switching of transmission elements to reduce congestion effects caused by Kirchhoff's voltage law. Results show that actively switching transmission lines may yield a better utilization of transmission networks with large-scale wind power and increase wind power...

  4. Regge expansion of a casual spectral function in electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.A.; Taha, M.O.

    1975-01-01

    The conjecture that a term in the Regge espansion of the Deser-Gilbert-Sudarshan spectral function in electroproduction may identically vanish is investigated. It is shown that this conjecture does not appear to be in agreement with experiment

  5. Expansion of Sobolev functions in series in Laguerre polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selyakov, K.I.

    1985-01-01

    The solution of the integral equation for the Sobolev functions is represented in the form of series in Laguerre polynomials. The coefficients of these series are simultaneously the coefficients of the power series for the Ambartsumyan-Chandrasekhar H functions. Infinite systems of linear algebraic equations with Toeplitz matrices are given for the coefficients of the series. Numerical results and approximate expressions are given for the case of isotropic scattering

  6. Efficient molecular density functional theory using generalized spherical harmonics expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lu; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel; Belloni, Luc

    2017-09-07

    We show that generalized spherical harmonics are well suited for representing the space and orientation molecular density in the resolution of the molecular density functional theory. We consider the common system made of a rigid solute of arbitrary complexity immersed in a molecular solvent, both represented by molecules with interacting atomic sites and classical force fields. The molecular solvent density ρ(r,Ω) around the solute is a function of the position r≡(x,y,z) and of the three Euler angles Ω≡(θ,ϕ,ψ) describing the solvent orientation. The standard density functional, equivalent to the hypernetted-chain closure for the solute-solvent correlations in the liquid theory, is minimized with respect to ρ(r,Ω). The up-to-now very expensive angular convolution products are advantageously replaced by simple products between projections onto generalized spherical harmonics. The dramatic gain in speed of resolution enables to explore in a systematic way molecular solutes of up to nanometric sizes in arbitrary solvents and to calculate their solvation free energy and associated microscopic solvent structure in at most a few minutes. We finally illustrate the formalism by tackling the solvation of molecules of various complexities in water.

  7. The Expansion of Criminal Control: A Critical to Feather Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariel Muraro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to relate the theories of punishment, retributive and preventive, with the criminological discourse, and make brief notes about the negative theories and criticism of the sentence. The article begins by making a few notes on the mass incarceration of the phenomenon, then going to discuss and present the form of action of the police state. Then they present the theories of punishment under the critical perspective, and then work the two main critical theories of punishment, thus treating the position Prof. Eugenio Raúl Zaffaroni and Prof. Juarez Cirino dos Santos. These presentations and discussions have left the critical discourse, not taking our work as end revisit the theoretical construction of the functions of the pen, just to demonstrate how the discourse of shame built by criminal law legitimizes selective and violent actions of the penal system.

  8. multi scale analysis of a function by neural networks elementary derivatives functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikhi, A.; Gougam, A.; Chafa, F.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the wavelet network has been introduced as a special neural network supported by the wavelet theory . Such networks constitute a tool for function approximation problems as it has been already proved in reference . Our present work deals with this model, treating a multi scale analysis of a function. We have then used a linear expansion of a given function in wavelets, neglecting the usual translation parameters. We investigate two training operations. The first one consists on an optimization of the output synaptic layer, the second one, optimizing the output function with respect to scale parameters. We notice a temporary merging of the scale parameters leading to some interesting results : new elementary derivatives units emerge, representing a new elementary task, which is the derivative of the output task

  9. Trinucleon wave functions from separable expansions of the N-N interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birrell, N.D.

    1976-09-01

    This work is intended to determine whether a separable expansion for the N-N interaction can be used to obtain trinucleon wave functions of high quality. The expansions used in the study are the Unitary Pole expansion of Harms, Afnan and Read, and the expansion of Adhikari and Sloan. We first compare the calculation of the RSC potential Triton binding energy with the two methods, and find that the results agree quite closely. However, while it is found necessary to use t-matrix perturbation theory to obtain the UPE result, such is not the case with the ASE, thus offering a considerable improvement on the previously used method. We then proceed to calculate the L-S coupling probabilities for the wave function, and in so doing, discover a source of inaccuracy in the work of other authors. We also find that the UPE and ASE give probabilities in good agreement with one another. The calculation of the He 3 charge form factor turns out to be the most critical judge of the accuracy of the wave function. Although both expansions give quite satisfactory results for the charge form factor, those obtained with the ASE are exceptionally pleasing. We finally apply both methods to the OBEP of Holinde and Machleidt, and find that the UPE is quite unsuitable for such application. The ASE, however, once again gives very good results, indicating the high quality of the trinucleon wave function obtained with it. (author)

  10. Large-scale in vitro expansion of polyclonal human switched-memory B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Néron

    Full Text Available Polyclonal preparations of therapeutic immunoglobulins, namely intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg, are essential in the treatment of immunodeficiency and are increasingly used for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Currently, patients' accessibility to IVIg depends exclusively upon volunteer blood donations followed by the fractionation of pooled human plasma obtained from thousands of individuals. Presently, there are no in vitro cell culture procedures allowing the preparation of polyclonal human antibodies. All in vitro human therapeutic antibodies that are currently generated are based on monoclonal antibodies, which are mostly issued from genetic engineering or single cell antibody technologies. Here, we describe an in vitro cell culture system, using CD40-CD154 interactions, that leads to a 1×10(6-fold expansion of switched memory B lymphocytes in approximately 50 days. These expanded cells secrete polyclonal IgG, which distribution into IgG(1, IgG(2, IgG(3 and IgG(4 is similar to that of normal human serum. Such in vitro generated IgG showed relatively low self-reactivity since they interacted moderately with only 24 human antigens among a total of 9484 targets. Furthermore, up to one liter of IgG secreting cells can be produced in about 40 days. This experimental model, providing large-scale expansion of human B lymphocytes, represents a critical step toward the in vitro production of polyclonal human IgG and a new method for the ex vivo expansion of B cells for therapeutic purposes.

  11. Microscopically based energy density functionals for nuclei using the density matrix expansion. II. Full optimization and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Pérez, R.; Schunck, N.; Dyhdalo, A.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Bogner, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    Background: Energy density functional methods provide a generic framework to compute properties of atomic nuclei starting from models of nuclear potentials and the rules of quantum mechanics. Until now, the overwhelming majority of functionals have been constructed either from empirical nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme or Gogny forces, or from systematic gradient-like expansions in the spirit of the density functional theory for atoms. Purpose: We seek to obtain a usable form of the nuclear energy density functional that is rooted in the modern theory of nuclear forces. We thus consider a functional obtained from the density matrix expansion of local nuclear potentials from chiral effective field theory. We propose a parametrization of this functional carefully calibrated and validated on selected ground-state properties that is suitable for large-scale calculations of nuclear properties. Methods: Our energy functional comprises two main components. The first component is a non-local functional of the density and corresponds to the direct part (Hartree term) of the expectation value of local chiral potentials on a Slater determinant. Contributions to the mean field and the energy of this term are computed by expanding the spatial, finite-range components of the chiral potential onto Gaussian functions. The second component is a local functional of the density and is obtained by applying the density matrix expansion to the exchange part (Fock term) of the expectation value of the local chiral potential. We apply the UNEDF2 optimization protocol to determine the coupling constants of this energy functional. Results: We obtain a set of microscopically constrained functionals for local chiral potentials from leading order up to next-to-next-to-leading order with and without three-body forces and contributions from Δ excitations. These functionals are validated on the calculation of nuclear and neutron matter, nuclear mass tables, single-particle shell structure

  12. Expanded functional diversity of shaker K(+ channels in cnidarians is driven by gene expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Jegla

    Full Text Available The genome of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis (starlet sea anemone provides a molecular genetic view into the first nervous systems, which appeared in a late common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Nematostella has a surprisingly large and diverse set of neuronal signaling genes including paralogs of most neuronal signaling molecules found in higher metazoans. Several ion channel gene families are highly expanded in the sea anemone, including three subfamilies of the Shaker K(+ channel gene family: Shaker (Kv1, Shaw (Kv3 and Shal (Kv4. In order to better understand the physiological significance of these voltage-gated K(+ channel expansions, we analyzed the function of 18 members of the 20 gene Shaker subfamily in Nematostella. Six of the Nematostella Shaker genes express functional homotetrameric K(+ channels in vitro. These include functional orthologs of bilaterian Shakers and channels with an unusually high threshold for voltage activation. We identified 11 Nematostella Shaker genes with a distinct "silent" or "regulatory" phenotype; these encode subunits that function only in heteromeric channels and serve to further diversify Nematostella Shaker channel gating properties. Subunits with the regulatory phenotype have not previously been found in the Shaker subfamily, but have evolved independently in the Shab (Kv2 family in vertebrates and the Shal family in a cnidarian. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that regulatory subunits were present in ancestral cnidarians, but have continued to diversity at a high rate after the split between anthozoans and hydrozoans. Comparison of Shaker family gene complements from diverse metazoan species reveals frequent, large scale duplication has produced highly unique sets of Shaker channels in the major metazoan lineages.

  13. Estimates of radiation over clouds and dust aerosols: Optimized number of terms in phase function expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Shouguo; Xie Yu; Yang Ping; Weng Fuzhong; Liu Quanhua; Baum, Bryan; Hu Yongxiang

    2009-01-01

    The bulk-scattering properties of dust aerosols and clouds are computed for the community radiative transfer model (CRTM) that is a flagship effort of the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA). The delta-fit method is employed to truncate the forward peaks of the scattering phase functions and to compute the Legendre expansion coefficients for re-constructing the truncated phase function. Use of more terms in the expansion gives more accurate re-construction of the phase function, but the issue remains as to how many terms are necessary for different applications. To explore this issue further, the bidirectional reflectances associated with dust aerosols, water clouds, and ice clouds are simulated with various numbers of Legendre expansion terms. To have relative numerical errors smaller than 5%, the present analyses indicate that, in the visible spectrum, 16 Legendre polynomials should be used for dust aerosols, while 32 Legendre expansion terms should be used for both water and ice clouds. In the infrared spectrum, the brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere are computed by using the scattering properties of dust aerosols, water clouds and ice clouds. Although small differences of brightness temperatures compared with the counterparts computed with 4, 8, 128 expansion terms are observed at large viewing angles for each layer, it is shown that 4 terms of Legendre polynomials are sufficient in the radiative transfer computation at infrared wavelengths for practical applications.

  14. The propagator for the step potential and delta function potential using the path decomposition expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yearsley, James M [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-18

    We present a derivation of the propagator for a particle in the presence of the step and delta function potentials. These propagators are known, but we present a direct path integral derivation, based on the path decomposition expansion and the Brownian motion definition of the path integral. The derivation exploits properties of the Catalan numbers, which enumerate certain classes of lattice paths.

  15. Functional expansion for evolution operators in a system of many fermions with many conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrios, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    We present a mean field expansion for many body system, using integral functionals. The problem is formulated as a initial conditions one and it is studied the effective dynamics of the body density with given initial conditions. (M.W.O.) [pt

  16. Scaling function, spectral function and nucleon momentum distribution in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.N.; Ivanov, M.V.; Caballero, J.A.; Barbaro, M.B.; Udias, J.M.; Moya de Guerra, E.; Donnelly, T.W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find a good simultaneous description of the spectral function and the momentum distribution in relation to the realistic scaling function obtained from inclusive electron-nuclei scattering experiments. We start with a modified Hartree-Fock spectral function in which the energy dependent part (δ-function) is replaced by the Gaussian distributions with hole state widths as free parameters. We calculate the scaling function and the nucleon momentum distribution on the basis of the spectral function constructed in this way, trying to find a good description of the experimental data. The obtained scaling function has a weak asymmetry and the momentum distribution has not got a high-momentum tail in the case when harmonic-oscillator single-particle wave functions are used. So, to improve the behavior of the momentum distribution we used the basis of natural orbitals (NO) in which short-range correlations are partly incorporated. The results for the scaling function show again a weak asymmetry, but in this case the momentum distribution has a high-momentum tail. As a next step we include final-state interactions (FSI) in the calculations to reproduce the experimentally observed asymmetry of the scaling function. (author)

  17. Changes in dental care access upon health care benefit expansion to include scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jun Hyup; Park, Sujin; Kim, Tae-Il

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a policy change to expand Korean National Health Insurance (KNHI) benefit coverage to include scaling on access to dental care at the national level. A nationally representative sample of 12,794 adults aged 20 to 64 years from Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (2010-2014) was analyzed. To examine the effect of the policy on the outcomes of interest (unmet dental care needs and preventive dental care utilization in the past year), an estimates-based probit model was used, incorporating marginal effects with a complex sampling structure. The effect of the policy on individuals depending on their income and education level was also assessed. Adjusting for potential covariates, the probability of having unmet needs for dental care decreased by 6.1% and preventative dental care utilization increased by 14% in the post-policy period compared to those in the pre-policy period (2010, 2012). High income and higher education levels were associated with fewer unmet dental care needs and more preventive dental visits. The expansion of coverage to include scaling demonstrated to have a significant association with decreasing unmet dental care needs and increasing preventive dental care utilization. However, the policy disproportionately benefited certain groups, in contrast with the objective of the policy to benefit all participants in the KNHI system.

  18. What can asymptotic expansions tell us about large-scale quasi-geostrophic anticyclonic vortices?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stegner

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the large-scale quasi-geostrophic anticyclonic vortices is studied in the framework of the baratropic rotating shallow- water equations on the β-plane. A systematic approach based on the multiplescale asymptotic expansions is used leading to a hierarchy of governing equations for the large-scale vortices depending on their characteristic size, velocity and a free surface elevation. Among them are the Charney-Obukhov equation, the intermediate geostrophic model equation, the frontal dynamics equation and some new nonlinear quasi-geostrophic equation. We are looking for steady-drifting axisymmetric anticyclonic solutions and find them in a consistent way only in this last equation. These solutions are soliton-like in the sense that the effects of weak non-linearity and dispersion balance each other. The same regimes on the paraboloidal β-plane are studied, all giving a negative result in what concerns the axisymmetric steady solutions, except for a strong elevation case where any circular profile is found to be steadily propagating within the accuracy of the approximation.

  19. Multi-function nuclear weight scale system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Mingquan; Sun Jinhua; Jia Changchun; Wang Mingqian; Tang Ke

    1998-01-01

    The author introduces the methods to contrive the hardware and software of a Multi-function Nuclear Weight Scale System based on the communication contract in compliance with RS485 between a master (industrial control computer 386) and a slave (single chip 8098) and its main functions

  20. Functional differential equation approach to the large N expansion and mean field perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, C.M.; Cooper, F.

    1985-01-01

    An apparent difference between formulating mean field perturbation theory for lambdaphi 4 field theory via path integrals or via functional differential equations when there are external sources present is shown not to exist when mean field theory is considered as the N = 1 limit of the 0(N)lambdaphi 4 field theory. A simply method is given for determining the 1/N expansion for the Green's functions in the presence of external sources by directly solving the functional differential equations order by order in 1/N. The 1/N expansion for the effective action GAMMA(phi,chi) is obtained by directly integrating the functional differential equations for the fields phi and chi (equivalent1/2lambda/Nphi/sub α/phi/sup α/-μ 2 ) in the presence of two external sources j = -deltaGAMMA/deltaphi, S = -deltaGAMMA/deltachi

  1. Collisionless coupling of a high- β expansion to an ambient, magnetized plasma. I. Rayleigh model and scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Jeffrey

    2018-04-01

    The dynamics of a magnetized, expanding plasma with a high ratio of kinetic energy density to ambient magnetic field energy density, or β, are examined by adapting a model of gaseous bubbles expanding in liquids as developed by Lord Rayleigh. New features include scale magnitudes and evolution of the electric fields in the system. The collisionless coupling between the expanding and ambient plasma due to these fields is described as well as the relevant scaling relations. Several different responses of the ambient plasma to the expansion are identified in this model, and for most laboratory experiments, ambient ions should be pulled inward, against the expansion due to the dominance of the electrostatic field.

  2. Linear scaling of density functional algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stechel, E.B.; Feibelman, P.J.; Williams, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient density functional algorithm (DFA) that scales linearly with system size will revolutionize electronic structure calculations. Density functional calculations are reliable and accurate in determining many condensed matter and molecular ground-state properties. However, because current DFA's, including methods related to that of Car and Parrinello, scale with the cube of the system size, density functional studies are not routinely applied to large systems. Linear scaling is achieved by constructing functions that are both localized and fully occupied, thereby eliminating the need to calculate global eigenfunctions. It is, however, widely believed that exponential localization requires the existence of an energy gap between the occupied and unoccupied states. Despite this, the authors demonstrate that linear scaling can still be achieved for metals. Using a linear scaling algorithm, they have explicitly constructed localized, almost fully occupied orbitals for the quintessential metallic system, jellium. The algorithm is readily generalizable to any system geometry and Hamiltonian. They will discuss the conceptual issues involved, convergence properties and scaling for their new algorithm

  3. Covariant spectator theory of $np$ scattering:\\\\ Effective range expansions and relativistic deuteron wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz Gross, Alfred Stadler

    2010-09-01

    We present the effective range expansions for the 1S0 and 3S1 scattering phase shifts, and the relativistic deuteron wave functions that accompany our recent high precision fits (with \\chi^2/N{data} \\simeq 1) to the 2007 world np data below 350 MeV. The wave functions are expanded in a series of analytical functions (with the correct asymptotic behavior at both large and small arguments) that can be Fourier-transformed from momentum to coordinate space and are convenient to use in any application. A fortran subroutine to compute these wave functions can be obtained from the authors.

  4. Wigner expansions for partition functions of nonrelativistic and relativistic oscillator systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylka, Christian; Vojta, Guenter

    1993-01-01

    The equilibrium quantum statistics of various anharmonic oscillator systems including relativistic systems is considered within the Wigner phase space formalism. For this purpose the Wigner series expansion for the partition function is generalized to include relativistic corrections. The new series for partition functions and all thermodynamic potentials yield quantum corrections in terms of powers of h(sup 2) and relativistic corrections given by Kelvin functions (modified Hankel functions) K(sub nu)(mc(sup 2)/kT). As applications, the symmetric Toda oscillator, isotonic and singular anharmonic oscillators, and hindered rotators, i.e. oscillators with cosine potential, are addressed.

  5. Analytic structure and power series expansion of the Jost function for the two-dimensional problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakityansky, S A; Elander, N

    2012-01-01

    For a two-dimensional quantum-mechanical problem, we obtain a generalized power series expansion of the S-matrix that can be done near an arbitrary point on the Riemann surface of the energy, similar to the standard effective-range expansion. In order to do this, we consider the Jost function and analytically factorize its momentum dependence that causes the Jost function to be a multi-valued function. The remaining single-valued function of the energy is then expanded in the power series near an arbitrary point in the complex energy plane. A systematic and accurate procedure has been developed for calculating the expansion coefficients. This makes it possible to obtain a semi-analytic expression for the Jost function (and therefore for the S-matrix) near an arbitrary point on the Riemann surface and use it, for example, to locate the spectral points (bound and resonant states) as the S-matrix poles. The method is applied to a model similar to those used in the theory of quantum dots. (paper)

  6. Scaling-Up the Functional Diagnostic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Functional diagnostic systems received a lot of attention in the last decade. They have proven their powerful for diagnosis the new faults of some complex systems. But, they still have some complexity in both the representation and reasoning about the large-scale systems. This paper introduces a new functional diagnostic system that can divide its small functions into main and auxiliary ones. This process enables the diagnostic system to scale -up the representation of the tested system and simplify the diagnostic mechanism tasks. Thus, it can improve both the representation and reasoning complexity. Also,it can decrease the required analysis, cost, and time. Proposed system can be applied for a wide area of the large-scale systems. It has been proven its acceptance to be applied practically for the Complex real-time systems

  7. Polynomial expansion of the precoder for power minimization in large-scale MIMO systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sifaou, Houssem

    2016-07-26

    This work focuses on the downlink of a single-cell large-scale MIMO system in which the base station equipped with M antennas serves K single-antenna users. In particular, we are interested in reducing the implementation complexity of the optimal linear precoder (OLP) that minimizes the total power consumption while ensuring target user rates. As most precoding schemes, a major difficulty towards the implementation of OLP is that it requires fast inversions of large matrices at every new channel realizations. To overcome this issue, we aim at designing a linear precoding scheme providing the same performance of OLP but with lower complexity. This is achieved by applying the truncated polynomial expansion (TPE) concept on a per-user basis. To get a further leap in complexity reduction and allow for closed-form expressions of the per-user weighting coefficients, we resort to the asymptotic regime in which M and K grow large with a bounded ratio. Numerical results are used to show that the proposed TPE precoding scheme achieves the same performance of OLP with a significantly lower implementation complexity. © 2016 IEEE.

  8. Spatial and topographic trends in forest expansion and biomass change, from regional to local scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buma, Brian; Barrett, Tara M

    2015-09-01

    Natural forest growth and expansion are important carbon sequestration processes globally. Climate change is likely to increase forest growth in some regions via CO2 fertilization, increased temperatures, and altered precipitation; however, altered disturbance regimes and climate stress (e.g. drought) will act to reduce carbon stocks in forests as well. Observations of asynchrony in forest change is useful in determining current trends in forest carbon stocks, both in terms of forest density (e.g. Mg ha(-1) ) and spatially (extent and location). Monitoring change in natural (unmanaged) areas is particularly useful, as while afforestation and recovery from historic land use are currently large carbon sinks, the long-term viability of those sinks depends on climate change and disturbance dynamics at their particular location. We utilize a large, unmanaged biome (>135 000 km(2) ) which spans a broad latitudinal gradient to explore how variation in location affects forest density and spatial patterning: the forests of the North American temperate rainforests in Alaska, which store >2.8 Pg C in biomass and soil, equivalent to >8% of the C in contiguous US forests. We demonstrate that the regional biome is shifting; gains exceed losses and are located in different spatio-topographic contexts. Forest gains are concentrated on northerly aspects, lower elevations, and higher latitudes, especially in sheltered areas, whereas loss is skewed toward southerly aspects and lower latitudes. Repeat plot-scale biomass data (n = 759) indicate that within-forest biomass gains outpace losses (live trees >12.7 cm diameter, 986 Gg yr(-1) ) on gentler slopes and in higher latitudes. This work demonstrates that while temperate rainforest dynamics occur at fine spatial scales (biomass accumulation suggest the potential for relatively rapid biome shifts and biomass changes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Finite-temperature correlation function for the one-dimensional quantum Ising model:The virial expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, S. A.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2006-06-01

    We rewrite the exact expression for the finite-temperature two-point correlation function for the magnetization as a partition function of some field theory. This removes singularities and provides a convenient form to develop a virial expansion (expansion in powers of the soliton density).

  10. Aft-body loading function for penetrators based on the spherical cavity-expansion approximation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longcope, Donald B., Jr.; Warren, Thomas Lynn; Duong, Henry

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we develop an aft-body loading function for penetration simulations that is based on the spherical cavity-expansion approximation. This loading function assumes that there is a preexisting cavity of radius a{sub o} before the expansion occurs. This causes the radial stress on the cavity surface to be less than what is obtained if the cavity is opened from a zero initial radius. This in turn causes less resistance on the aft body as it penetrates the target which allows for greater rotation of the penetrator. Results from simulations are compared with experimental results for oblique penetration into a concrete target with an unconfined compressive strength of 23 MPa.

  11. Functional Materials Produced On An Industrial Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barska Justyna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a wide range of applications of functional materials and a scale of their current industrial production. These are the materials which have specific characteristics, thanks to which they became virtually indispensable in certain constructional solutions. Their basic characteristics, properties, methods of production and use as smart materials were described.

  12. Numerical studies of the g-hartree density functional in the Thomas-Fermi scaling limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millack, T.; Weymans, G.

    1986-02-01

    Methods of finite temperature quantum field theory are used to construct the g-Hartree density functional for atoms. Low and high temperature expansions are discussed in detail. Numerical studies for atomic ground-state configurations are presented in the Thomas-Fermi-Scaling limit. (orig.)

  13. Hadronic wave functions at short distances and the operator product expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Lepage, G.P.

    1980-01-01

    The operator product expansion, of appropriate products of quark fields, is used to find the anamalous dimensions which control the short distance behavior of hadronic wave functions. This vehavior in turn controls the high-Q 2 limit of hadronic form factors. In particular, we relate each anamalous dimension of the nonsinglet structure functions to a corresponding logarithmic correction factor to the nominal αsub(s)(Q 2 )/Q 2 fall off of meson form factors. Unlike the case of deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering, the operator product necessary here involves extra terms which do not contribute to forward matrix elements. (orig.)

  14. Functional perturbative RG and CFT data in the ε-expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codello, A. [Southern Denmark Univ., Odense (Denmark). CP3-Origins; INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Safari, M. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dipt di Fisica e Astronomia; Vacca, G.P. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Zanusso, O. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Jena Univ. (Germany). Theoretisch-Physikalisches Inst.

    2018-01-15

    We show how the use of standard perturbative RG in dimensional regularization allows for a renormalization group-based computation of both the spectrum and a family of coefficients of the operator product expansion (OPE) for a given universality class. The task is greatly simplified by a straightforward generalization of perturbation theory to a functional perturbative RG approach. We illustrate our procedure in the ε-expansion by obtaining the next-to-leading corrections for the spectrum and the leading corrections for the OPE coefficients of Ising and Lee-Yang universality classes and then give several results for the whole family of renormalizable multi-critical models φ{sup 2n}. Whenever comparison is possible our RG results explicitly match the ones recently derived in CFT frameworks. (orig.)

  15. Wrapping interactions and the genus expansion of the 2-point function of composite operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieg, Christoph; Torrielli, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of wrapping interactions for a general class of theories with color degrees of freedom, including N=4 SYM. Wrapping interactions arise in the genus expansion of the 2-point function of composite operators as finite size effects that start to appear at a certain order in the coupling constant at which the range of the interaction is equal to the length of the operators. We analyze in detail the relevant genus expansions, and introduce a strategy to single out the wrapping contributions, based on adding spectator fields. We use a toy model to demonstrate our procedure, performing all computations explicitly. Although completely general, our treatment should be particularly useful for applications to the recent problem of wrapping contributions in some checks of the AdS/CFT correspondence

  16. Analysis of water hammer in pipelines by partial fraction expansion of transfer function in frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun Shin; Lee, Wook Ryun; Oh, Ki Yong; Kim, Bong Ki

    2010-01-01

    Understanding water hammer is very important to the prevention of excessive pressure build-up in pipelines. Many researchers have studied this phenomenon, drawing effective solutions through the time- and frequency-domain approaches. For the purposes of enhancing the advantages of the frequency-domain approach and, thereby, rendering investigations of the dynamic characteristics of pipelines more effective, we propose partial fraction expansion of the transfer function between the unsteady flow source and a given section. We simulate the proposed approach using a vibration element inserted into a simple pipeline, deducing much useful physical information pertaining to pipeline design. We conclude that locating the resonance of the vibration element between the first and second resonances of the pipeline can mitigate the excessive pressure build-up attendant on the occurrence of water hammer. Our method of partial fraction expansion is expected to be useful and effective in analyses of unsteady flows in pipelines

  17. Value of large scale expansion of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in a compartmentalised gas-permeable bag: interests for adoptive immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has emerged as an effective treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma. However, there are several logistical and safety concerns associated with large-scale ex vivo expansion of tumour-specific T lymphocytes for widespread availability of ACT for cancer patients. To address these problems we developed a specific compartmentalised bag allowing efficient expansion of tumour-specific T lymphocytes in an easy handling, closed system. Methods Starting from lymph nodes from eight melanoma patients, we performed a side-by-side comparison of Tumour-Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TIL) produced after expansion in the compartmentalised bag versus TIL produced using the standard process in plates. Proliferation yield, viability, phenotype and IFNγ secretion were comparatively studied. Results We found no differences in proliferation yield and cell viability between both TIL production systems. Moreover, each of the cell products complied with our defined release criteria before being administered to the patient. The phenotype analysis indicated that the compartmentalised bag favours the expansion of CD8+ cells. Finally, we found that TIL stimulated in bags were enriched in reactive CD8+ T cells when co-cultured with the autologous melanoma cell line. Conclusions The stimulation of TIL with feeder cells in the specifically designed compartmentalised bag can advantageously replace the conventional protocol using plates. In particular, the higher expansion rate of reactive CD8+ T cells could have a significant impact for ACT. PMID:21575188

  18. Geometrical scaling in charm structure function ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.; Rezaei, B.

    2014-01-01

    By using a Laplace-transform technique, we solve the next-to-leading-order master equation for charm production and derive a compact formula for the ratio R c =F L cc ¯ /F 2 cc ¯ , which is useful for extracting the charm structure function from the reduced charm cross section, in particular, at DESY HERA, at small x. Our results show that this ratio is independent of x at small x. In this method of determining the ratios, we apply geometrical scaling in charm production in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Our analysis shows that the renormalization scales have a sizable impact on the ratio R c at high Q 2 . Our results for the ratio of the charm structure functions are in a good agreement with some phenomenological models

  19. Thermal expansion of an amorphous alloy. Reciprocal-space versus real-space distribution functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Inoue, Akihisa

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the relation between the change in the position of the first X-ray diffraction maximum in reciprocal space and the first maximum of the distribution function in real space for the Ge 50 Al 40 Cr 10 amorphous alloy. It is also shown that the first diffraction maximum of the interference function carries the most significant information about the interatomic distances in real space while the subsequent peaks of the interference function are responsible for the shoulders of the main peak of the real-space distribution function. The results are used to support validity of the method previously used to monitor thermal expansion of the glassy alloys using an X-ray diffraction profile

  20. Operator expansions in the minimal subtraction scheme. II. Explicit formulas for coefficient functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetyrkin, K.G.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown in an arbitrary model that the coefficient functions of the operator expansion (renormalized in the minimal subtraction scheme) are finite. Explicit formulas convenient for calculating them in practice are obtained. The gluing method and the formalism of the R* operation are used to transform the formulas in such a way that the coefficient functions can be expressed in terms of ordinary diagrams containing neither nonstandard propagators nor an additional loop integration. An important feature of the representation for the coefficient functions is that the R* operation, which subtracts simultaneously the ultraviolet and infrared divergences, guarantees the existence of the coefficient functions in the limit when the dimensional regularization is lifted without any restrictions

  1. More on zeta-function regularization of high-temperature expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actor, A.

    1987-01-01

    A recent paper using the Riemann ζ-function to regularize the (divergent) coefficients occurring in the high-temperature expansions of one-loop thermodynamic potentials is extended. This method proves to be a powerful tool for converting Dirichlet-type series Σ m a m (x i )/m s into power series in the dimensionless parameters x i . The coefficients occurring in the power series are (proportional to) ζ-functions evaluated away from their poles - this is where the regularization occurs. High-temperature expansions are just one example of this highly-nontrivial rearrangement of Dirichlet series into power series form. We discuss in considerable detail series in which a m (x i ) is a product of trigonometric, algebraic and Bessel function factors. The ζ-function method is carefully explained, and a large number of new formulae are provided. The means to generalize these formulae are also provided. Previous results on thermodynamic potentials are generalized to include a nonzero constant term in the gauge potential (time component) which can be used to probe the electric sector of temperature gauge theories. (author)

  2. A new approach to stochastic transport via the functional Volterra expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziya Akcasu, A.; Corngold, N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a new algorithm (FDA) for the calculation of the mean and the variance of the flux in stochastic transport when the transport equation contains a spatially random parameter θ(r), such as the density of the medium. The approach is based on the renormalized functional Volterra expansion of the flux around its mean. The attractive feature of the approach is that it explicitly displays the functional dependence of the flux on the products of θ(r i ), and hence enables one to take ensemble averages directly to calculate the moments of the flux in terms of the correlation functions of the underlying random process. The renormalized deterministic transport equation for the mean flux has been obtained to the second order in θ(r), and a functional relationship between the variance and the mean flux has been derived to calculate the variance to this order. The feasibility and accuracy of FDA has been demonstrated in the case of stochastic diffusion, using the diffusion equation with a spatially random diffusion coefficient. The connection of FDA with the well-established approximation schemes in the field of stochastic linear differential equations, such as the Bourret approximation, developed by Van Kampen using cumulant expansion, and by Terwiel using projection operator formalism, which has recently been extended to stochastic transport by Corngold. We hope that FDA's potential will be explored numerically in more realistic applications of the stochastic transport. (authors)

  3. Semi-quartic force fields retrieved from multi-mode expansions: Accuracy, scaling behavior, and approximations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Rauhut, Guntram, E-mail: rauhut@theochem.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-04-21

    Semi-quartic force fields (QFF) rely on a Taylor-expansion of the multi-dimensional Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface (PES) and are frequently used within the calculation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies based on 2nd order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2). As such they are usually determined by differentiation of the electronic energy with respect to the nuclear coordinates. Alternatively, potential energy surfaces can be expanded in terms of multi-mode expansions, which typically do not require any derivative techniques. The computational effort to retrieve QFF from size-reduced multi-mode expansions has been studied and has been compared with standard Taylor-expansions. As multi-mode expansions allow for the convenient introduction of subtle approximations, these will be discussed in some detail. In addition, a preliminary study about the applicability of a generalized Duschinsky transformation to QFFs is provided. This transformation allows for the efficient evaluation of VPT2 frequencies of isotopologues from the PES of the parent compound and thus avoids the recalculation of PESs in different axes systems.

  4. POLYGALACTURONASE INVOLVED IN EXPANSION1 functions in cell elongation and flower development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chaowen; Somerville, Chris; Anderson, Charles T

    2014-03-01

    Pectins are acidic carbohydrates that comprise a significant fraction of the primary walls of eudicotyledonous plant cells. They influence wall porosity and extensibility, thus controlling cell and organ growth during plant development. The regulated degradation of pectins is required for many cell separation events in plants, but the role of pectin degradation in cell expansion is poorly defined. Using an activation tag screen designed to isolate genes involved in wall expansion, we identified a gene encoding a putative polygalacturonase that, when overexpressed, resulted in enhanced hypocotyl elongation in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We named this gene POLYGALACTURONASE INVOLVED IN EXPANSION1 (PGX1). Plants lacking PGX1 display reduced hypocotyl elongation that is complemented by transgenic PGX1 expression. PGX1 is expressed in expanding tissues throughout development, including seedlings, roots, leaves, and flowers. PGX1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) localizes to the apoplast, and heterologously expressed PGX1 displays in vitro polygalacturonase activity, supporting a function for this protein in apoplastic pectin degradation. Plants either overexpressing or lacking PGX1 display alterations in total polygalacturonase activity, pectin molecular mass, and wall composition and also display higher proportions of flowers with extra petals, suggesting PGX1's involvement in floral organ patterning. These results reveal new roles for polygalacturonases in plant development.

  5. Spherical cavity-expansion forcing function in PRONTO 3D for application to penetration problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, T.L.; Tabbara, M.R.

    1997-05-01

    In certain penetration events the primary mode of deformation of the target can be approximated by known analytical expressions. In the context of an analysis code, this approximation eliminates the need for modeling the target as well as the need for a contact algorithm. This technique substantially reduces execution time. In this spirit, a forcing function which is derived from a spherical-cavity expansion analysis has been implemented in PRONTO 3D. This implementation is capable of computing the structural and component responses of a projectile due to three dimensional penetration events. Sample problems demonstrate good agreement with experimental and analytical results.

  6. Asymptotic expansion of a partition function related to the sinh-model

    CERN Document Server

    Borot, Gaëtan; Kozlowski, Karol K

    2016-01-01

    This book elaborates on the asymptotic behaviour, when N is large, of certain N-dimensional integrals which typically occur in random matrices, or in 1+1 dimensional quantum integrable models solvable by the quantum separation of variables. The introduction presents the underpinning motivations for this problem, a historical overview, and a summary of the strategy, which is applicable in greater generality. The core aims at proving an expansion up to o(1) for the logarithm of the partition function of the sinh-model. This is achieved by a combination of potential theory and large deviation theory so as to grasp the leading asymptotics described by an equilibrium measure, the Riemann-Hilbert approach to truncated Wiener-Hopf in order to analyse the equilibrium measure, the Schwinger-Dyson equations and the boostrap method to finally obtain an expansion of correlation functions and the one of the partition function. This book is addressed to researchers working in random matrices, statistical physics or integra...

  7. Note on asymptotic series expansions for the derivative of the Hurwitz zeta function and related functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudaz, S.

    1990-01-01

    Asymptotic series for the Hurwitz zeta function, its derivative, and related functions (including the Riemann zeta function of odd integer argument) are derived as an illustration of a simple, direct method of broad applicability, inspired by the calculus of finite differences

  8. Scale Expansion of Community Investigations and Integration of the Effects of Abiotic and Biotic Processes on Maintenance of Species Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on the maintenance of diversity patterns from regional to local scales is dispersed among academic fields due to the local focus of community ecology. To better understand these patterns, the study of ecological communities needs to be expanded to larger scales and the various processes affecting them need to be integrated using a suitable quantitative method. We determined a range of communities on a flora-subregional scale in Yunnan province, China (383210.02 km2. A series of species pools were delimited from the regional to plot scales. Plant diversity was evaluated and abiotic and biotic processes identified at each pool level. The species pool effect was calculated using an innovative model, and the contribution of these processes to the maintenance of plant species diversity was determined and integrated: climate had the greatest effect at the flora-subregional scale, with historical and evolutionary processes contributing ∼11%; climate and human disturbance had the greatest effect at the local site pool scale; competition exclusion and stress limitation explained strong filtering at the successional stage pool scale; biotic processes contributed more on the local community scale than on the regional scale. Scale expansion combined with the filtering model approach solves the local problem in community ecology.

  9. Broad-scale lake expansion and flooding inundates essential wood bison habitat in northwestern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, J. M.; Korosi, J.; Thienpont, J. R.; Pisaric, M. F.; Kokelj, S.; Smol, J. P.; Simpson, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change-induced landscape alterations have consequences for vulnerable wildlife. In high-latitude regions, dramatic changes in water levels have been linked to climate warming. While most attention has focused on shrinking Arctic lakes, here, we document the opposite scenario: extensive lake expansion in Canada's Northwest Territories that has implications for the conservation of ecologically-important wood bison. We quantified lake area changes since 1986 using remote sensing techniques, and recorded a net gain of > 500 km2, from 5.7% to 11% total water coverage. Inter-annual variability in water level was significantly correlated to the Pacific/North American pattern teleconnection and the summer sea surface temperature anomaly. Historical reconstructions using proxy data archived in dated sediment cores showed that recent lake expansion is outside the range of natural variability of these ecosystems over at least the last 300 years. Lake expansion resulted in increased allochthonous carbon transport, as shown unequivocally by increases in lignin-derived phenols, but with a greater proportional increase in the contribution of organic matter from phytoplankton, as a result of increased open-water habitat. We conclude that complex hydrological changes occurring as a result of recent climatic change have resulted in rapid and widespread lake expansion that may significantly affect at-risk wildlife populations. This study is based on results we reported in Nature Communications in 2017 (DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14510).

  10. The Zernike expansion--an example of a merit function for 2D/3D registration based on orthogonal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuo; Kettenbach, Joachim; Hinterleitner, Isabella; Bergmann, Helmar; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Current merit functions for 2D/3D registration usually rely on comparing pixels or small regions of images using some sort of statistical measure. Problems connected to this paradigm the sometimes problematic behaviour of the method if noise or artefacts (for instance a guide wire) are present on the projective image. We present a merit function for 2D/3D registration which utilizes the decomposition of the X-ray and the DRR under comparison into orthogonal Zernike moments; the quality of the match is assessed by an iterative comparison of expansion coefficients. Results in a imaging study on a physical phantom show that--compared to standard cross--correlation the Zernike moment based merit function shows better robustness if histogram content in images under comparison is different, and that time expenses are comparable if the merit function is constructed out of a few significant moments only.

  11. The plasma transport equations derived by multiple time-scale expansions and turbulent transport. I. General theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edenstrasser, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple time-scale derivative expansion scheme is applied to the dimensionless Fokker--Planck equation and to Maxwell's equations, where the parameter range of a typical fusion plasma was assumed. Within kinetic theory, the four time scales considered are those of Larmor gyration, particle transit, collisions, and classical transport. The corresponding magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) time scales are those of ion Larmor gyration, Alfven, MHD collision, and resistive diffusion. The solution of the zeroth-order equations results in the force-free equilibria and ideal Ohm's law. The solution of the first-order equations leads under the assumption of a weak collisional plasma to the ideal MHD equations. On the MHD-collision time scale, not only the full set of the MHD transport equations is obtained, but also turbulent terms, where the related transport quantities are one order in the expansion parameter larger than those of classical transport. Finally, at the resistive diffusion time scale the known transport equations are arrived at including, however, also turbulent contributions. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  12. Thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal expansion of fuel pellet is an important property which limits the lifetime of the fuels in reactors, because it affects both the pellet and cladding mechanical interaction and the gap conductivity. By fitting a number of available measured data, recommended equations have been presented and successfully used to estimate thermal expansion coefficient of the nuclear fuel pellet. However, due to large scatter of the measured data, non-consensus data have been omitted in formulating the equations. Also, the equation is strongly governed by the lack of appropriate experimental data. For those reasons, it is important to develop theoretical methodologies to better describe thermal expansion behaviour of nuclear fuel. In particular, first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations have been certainly contributed to predict reliable thermal expansion without fitting the measured data. Furthermore, the two theoretical techniques have improved on understanding the change of fuel dimension by describing the atomic-scale processes associated with lattice expansion in the fuels. (author)

  13. Critical node treatment in the analytic function expansion method for Pin Power Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Z.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Pin Power Reconstruction (PPR) was implemented in PARCS using the eight term analytic function expansion method (AFEN). This method has been demonstrated to be both accurate and efficient. However, similar to all the methods involving analytic functions, such as the analytic node method (ANM) and AFEN for nodal solution, the use of AFEN for PPR also has potential numerical issue with critical nodes. The conventional analytic functions are trigonometric or hyperbolic sine or cosine functions with an angular frequency proportional to buckling. For a critic al node the buckling is zero and the sine functions becomes zero, and the cosine function become unity. In this case, the eight terms of the analytic functions are no longer distinguishable from ea ch other which makes their corresponding coefficients can no longer be determined uniquely. The mode flux distribution of critical node can be linear while the conventional analytic functions can only express a uniform distribution. If there is critical or near critical node in a plane, the reconstructed pin power distribution is often be shown negative or very large values using the conventional method. In this paper, we propose a new method to avoid the numerical problem wit h critical nodes which uses modified trigonometric or hyperbolic sine functions which are the ratio of trigonometric or hyperbolic sine and its angular frequency. If there are no critical or near critical nodes present, the new pin power reconstruction method with modified analytic functions are equivalent to the conventional analytic functions. The new method is demonstrated using the L336C5 benchmark problem. (authors)

  14. Critical node treatment in the analytic function expansion method for Pin Power Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Z. [Rice University, MS 318, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Xu, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Case Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Downar, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Pin Power Reconstruction (PPR) was implemented in PARCS using the eight term analytic function expansion method (AFEN). This method has been demonstrated to be both accurate and efficient. However, similar to all the methods involving analytic functions, such as the analytic node method (ANM) and AFEN for nodal solution, the use of AFEN for PPR also has potential numerical issue with critical nodes. The conventional analytic functions are trigonometric or hyperbolic sine or cosine functions with an angular frequency proportional to buckling. For a critic al node the buckling is zero and the sine functions becomes zero, and the cosine function become unity. In this case, the eight terms of the analytic functions are no longer distinguishable from ea ch other which makes their corresponding coefficients can no longer be determined uniquely. The mode flux distribution of critical node can be linear while the conventional analytic functions can only express a uniform distribution. If there is critical or near critical node in a plane, the reconstructed pin power distribution is often be shown negative or very large values using the conventional method. In this paper, we propose a new method to avoid the numerical problem wit h critical nodes which uses modified trigonometric or hyperbolic sine functions which are the ratio of trigonometric or hyperbolic sine and its angular frequency. If there are no critical or near critical nodes present, the new pin power reconstruction method with modified analytic functions are equivalent to the conventional analytic functions. The new method is demonstrated using the L336C5 benchmark problem. (authors)

  15. A direct method to transform between expansions in the configuration state function and Slater determinant bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    A novel algorithm is introduced for the transformation of wave functions between the bases of Slater determinants (SD) and configuration state functions (CSF) in the genealogical coupling scheme. By modifying the expansion coefficients as each electron is spin-coupled, rather than performing a single many-electron transformation, the large transformation matrix that plagues previous approaches is avoided and the required number of operations is drastically reduced. As an example of the efficiency of the algorithm, the transformation for a configuration with 30 unpaired electrons and singlet spin is discussed. For this case, the 10 × 10 6 coefficients in the CSF basis is obtained from the 150 × 10 6 coefficients in the SD basis in 1 min, which should be compared with the seven years that the previously employed method is estimated to require

  16. Low-temperature expansions and correlation functions of the Z3-chiral Potts model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, N.S.; Honecker, A.

    1993-04-01

    Using perturbative methods we derive new results for the spectrum and correlation functions of the general Z 3 -chiral Potts quantum chain in the massive low-temperature phase. Explicit calculations of the ground state energy and the first excitations in the zero momentum sector give excellent approximations and confirm the general statement that the spectrum in the low-temperature phase of general Z n -spin quantum chains is identical to one in the high-temperature phase where the role of charge and boundary conditions are interchanged. Using a perturbative expansion of the ground state for the Z 3 model we are able to gain some insight in correlation functions. We argue that they might be oscillating and give estimates for the oscillation length as well as the correlation length. (orig.)

  17. Scaling behavior of ground-state energy cluster expansion for linear polyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, L. L.; Wu, Jian; Klein, D. J.; Schmalz, T. G.; Bytautas, L.

    Ground-state energies for linear-chain polyenes are additively expanded in a sequence of terms for chemically relevant conjugated substructures of increasing size. The asymptotic behavior of the large-substructure limit (i.e., high-polymer limit) is investigated as a means of characterizing the rapidity of convergence and consequent utility of this energy cluster expansion. Consideration is directed to computations via: simple Hückel theory, a refined Hückel scheme with geometry optimization, restricted Hartree-Fock self-consistent field (RHF-SCF) solutions of fixed bond-length Parisier-Parr-Pople (PPP)/Hubbard models, and ab initio SCF approaches with and without geometry optimization. The cluster expansion in what might be described as the more "refined" approaches appears to lead to qualitatively more rapid convergence: exponentially fast as opposed to an inverse power at the simple Hückel or SCF-Hubbard levels. The substructural energy cluster expansion then seems to merit special attention. Its possible utility in making accurate extrapolations from finite systems to extended polymers is noted.

  18. Modeling and solving a large-scale generation expansion planning problem under uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Shan; Ryan, Sarah M. [Iowa State University, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Ames (United States); Watson, Jean-Paul [Sandia National Laboratories, Discrete Math and Complex Systems Department, Albuquerque (United States); Woodruff, David L. [University of California Davis, Graduate School of Management, Davis (United States)

    2011-11-15

    We formulate a generation expansion planning problem to determine the type and quantity of power plants to be constructed over each year of an extended planning horizon, considering uncertainty regarding future demand and fuel prices. Our model is expressed as a two-stage stochastic mixed-integer program, which we use to compute solutions independently minimizing the expected cost and the Conditional Value-at-Risk; i.e., the risk of significantly larger-than-expected operational costs. We introduce stochastic process models to capture demand and fuel price uncertainty, which are in turn used to generate trees that accurately represent the uncertainty space. Using a realistic problem instance based on the Midwest US, we explore two fundamental, unexplored issues that arise when solving any stochastic generation expansion model. First, we introduce and discuss the use of an algorithm for computing confidence intervals on obtained solution costs, to account for the fact that a finite sample of scenarios was used to obtain a particular solution. Second, we analyze the nature of solutions obtained under different parameterizations of this method, to assess whether the recommended solutions themselves are invariant to changes in costs. The issues are critical for decision makers who seek truly robust recommendations for generation expansion planning. (orig.)

  19. Effect of surface tension and coefficient of thermal expansion in 30 nm scale nanoimprinting with two flexible polymer molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Kwan; Cho, Hye Sung; Jung, Ho-Sup; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Lim, Kipil; Kim, Ki-Bum; Choi, Dae-Geun; Jeong, Jun-Ho

    2012-01-01

    We report on nanoimprinting of polymer thin films at 30 nm scale resolution using two types of ultraviolet (UV)-curable, flexible polymer molds: perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and polyurethane acrylate (PUA). It was found that the quality of nanopatterning at the 30 nm scale is largely determined by the combined effects of surface tension and the coefficient of thermal expansion of the polymer mold. In particular, the polar component of surface tension may play a critical role in clean release of the mold, as evidenced by much reduced delamination or broken structures for the less polarized PFPE mold when patterning a relatively hydrophilic PMMA film. In contrast, such problems were not notably observed with a relatively hydrophobic PS film for both polymer molds. In addition, the demolding characteristic was also influenced by the coefficient of thermal expansion so that no delamination or uniformity problems were observed when patterning a UV-curable polymer film at room temperature. These results suggest that a proper polymeric mold material needs to be chosen for patterning polymer films under different surface properties and processing conditions, providing insights into how a clean demolding characteristic can be obtained at 30 nm scale nanopatterning. (paper)

  20. Nutrient regulation by continuous feeding removes limitations on cell yield in the large-scale expansion of Mammalian cell spheroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley P Weegman

    Full Text Available Cellular therapies are emerging as a standard approach for the treatment of several diseases. However, realizing the promise of cellular therapies across the full range of treatable disorders will require large-scale, controlled, reproducible culture methods. Bioreactor systems offer the scale-up and monitoring needed, but standard stirred bioreactor cultures do not allow for the real-time regulation of key nutrients in the medium. In this study, β-TC6 insulinoma cells were aggregated and cultured for 3 weeks as a model of manufacturing a mammalian cell product. Cell expansion rates and medium nutrient levels were compared in static, stirred suspension bioreactors (SSB, and continuously fed (CF SSB. While SSB cultures facilitated increased culture volumes, no increase in cell yields were observed, partly due to limitations in key nutrients, which were consumed by the cultures between feedings, such as glucose. Even when glucose levels were increased to prevent depletion between feedings, dramatic fluctuations in glucose levels were observed. Continuous feeding eliminated fluctuations and improved cell expansion when compared with both static and SSB culture methods. Further improvements in growth rates were observed after adjusting the feed rate based on calculated nutrient depletion, which maintained physiological glucose levels for the duration of the expansion. Adjusting the feed rate in a continuous medium replacement system can maintain the consistent nutrient levels required for the large-scale application of many cell products. Continuously fed bioreactor systems combined with nutrient regulation can be used to improve the yield and reproducibility of mammalian cells for biological products and cellular therapies and will facilitate the translation of cell culture from the research lab to clinical applications.

  1. Nutrient Regulation by Continuous Feeding Removes Limitations on Cell Yield in the Large-Scale Expansion of Mammalian Cell Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weegman, Bradley P.; Nash, Peter; Carlson, Alexandra L.; Voltzke, Kristin J.; Geng, Zhaohui; Jahani, Marjan; Becker, Benjamin B.; Papas, Klearchos K.; Firpo, Meri T.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular therapies are emerging as a standard approach for the treatment of several diseases. However, realizing the promise of cellular therapies across the full range of treatable disorders will require large-scale, controlled, reproducible culture methods. Bioreactor systems offer the scale-up and monitoring needed, but standard stirred bioreactor cultures do not allow for the real-time regulation of key nutrients in the medium. In this study, β-TC6 insulinoma cells were aggregated and cultured for 3 weeks as a model of manufacturing a mammalian cell product. Cell expansion rates and medium nutrient levels were compared in static, stirred suspension bioreactors (SSB), and continuously fed (CF) SSB. While SSB cultures facilitated increased culture volumes, no increase in cell yields were observed, partly due to limitations in key nutrients, which were consumed by the cultures between feedings, such as glucose. Even when glucose levels were increased to prevent depletion between feedings, dramatic fluctuations in glucose levels were observed. Continuous feeding eliminated fluctuations and improved cell expansion when compared with both static and SSB culture methods. Further improvements in growth rates were observed after adjusting the feed rate based on calculated nutrient depletion, which maintained physiological glucose levels for the duration of the expansion. Adjusting the feed rate in a continuous medium replacement system can maintain the consistent nutrient levels required for the large-scale application of many cell products. Continuously fed bioreactor systems combined with nutrient regulation can be used to improve the yield and reproducibility of mammalian cells for biological products and cellular therapies and will facilitate the translation of cell culture from the research lab to clinical applications. PMID:24204645

  2. Satellite orbits perturbed by direct solar radiation pressure: general expansion of the disturbing function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, S.

    1977-01-01

    An expression is derived for the solar radiation pressure disturbing function on an Earth satellite orbit which takes into account the variation of the solar radiation flux with distance from the Sun's centre and the absorption of radiation by the satellite. This expression is then expanded in terms of the Keplerian elements of the satellite and solar orbits using Kaula's method (Astr. J.; 67:300 (1962)). The Kaula inclination functions are replaced by an equivalent set of modified Allan (Proc. R. Soc. A.; 288:60 (1965)) inclination functions. The resulting expression reduces to the form commonly used in solar radiation pressure perturbation studies (e.g. Aksnes, Cel. Mech.; 13:89 (1976)), when certain terms are neglected. If, as happens quite often in practice, a satellite's orbit is in near-resonance with certain of these neglected terms, these near-resonant terms can cause changes in the satellite's orbital elements comparable to those produced by the largest term in Aksnes's expression. A new expression for the solar radiation pressure disturbing function expansion is suggested for use in future studies of satellite orbits perturbed by solar radiation pressure. (author)

  3. Partition function expansion on region graphs and message-passing equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Haijun; Wang, Chuang; Xiao, Jing-Qing; Bi, Zedong

    2011-01-01

    Disordered and frustrated graphical systems are ubiquitous in physics, biology, and information science. For models on complete graphs or random graphs, deep understanding has been achieved through the mean-field replica and cavity methods. But finite-dimensional 'real' systems remain very challenging because of the abundance of short loops and strong local correlations. A statistical mechanics theory is constructed in this paper for finite-dimensional models based on the mathematical framework of the partition function expansion and the concept of region graphs. Rigorous expressions for the free energy and grand free energy are derived. Message-passing equations on the region graph, such as belief propagation and survey propagation, are also derived rigorously. (letter)

  4. Studies on the Zeroes of Bessel Functions and Methods for Their Computation: IV. Inequalities, Estimates, Expansions, etc., for Zeros of Bessel Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimov, M. K.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series of survey articles concerning zeros of Bessel functions and methods for their computation. Various inequalities, estimates, expansions, etc. for positive zeros are analyzed, and some results are described in detail with proofs.

  5. High-Order Analytic Expansion of Disturbing Function for Doubly Averaged Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Ito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Terms in the analytic expansion of the doubly averaged disturbing function for the circular restricted three-body problem using the Legendre polynomial are explicitly calculated up to the fourteenth order of semimajor axis ratio (α between perturbed and perturbing bodies in the inner case (α1. The expansion outcome is compared with results from numerical quadrature on an equipotential surface. Comparison with direct numerical integration of equations of motion is also presented. Overall, the high-order analytic expansion of the doubly averaged disturbing function yields a result that agrees well with the numerical quadrature and with the numerical integration. Local extremums of the doubly averaged disturbing function are quantitatively reproduced by the high-order analytic expansion even when α is large. Although the analytic expansion is not applicable in some circumstances such as when orbits of perturbed and perturbing bodies cross or when strong mean motion resonance is at work, our expansion result will be useful for analytically understanding the long-term dynamical behavior of perturbed bodies in circular restricted three-body systems.

  6. The Personal Selling Ethics Scale: Revisions and Expansions for Teaching Sales Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoho, Casey; Heinze, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    The field of sales draws a large number of marketing graduates. Sales curricula used within today's marketing programs should include rigorous discussions of sales ethics. The Personal Selling Ethics Scale (PSE) provides an analytical tool for assessing and discussing students' ethical sales sensitivities. However, since the scale fails to address…

  7. Almost Automorphic Functions on the Quantum Time Scale and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongkun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We first propose two types of concepts of almost automorphic functions on the quantum time scale. Secondly, we study some basic properties of almost automorphic functions on the quantum time scale. Then, we introduce a transformation between functions defined on the quantum time scale and functions defined on the set of generalized integer numbers; by using this transformation we give equivalent definitions of almost automorphic functions on the quantum time scale; following the idea of the transformation, we also give a concept of almost automorphic functions on more general time scales that can unify the concepts of almost automorphic functions on almost periodic time scales and on the quantum time scale. Finally, as an application of our results, we establish the existence of almost automorphic solutions of linear and semilinear dynamic equations on the quantum time scale.

  8. Accurate double many-body expansion potential energy surface of HS2A2A′) by scaling the external correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lu-Lu; Song Yu-Zhi; Gao Shou-Bao; Zhang Yuan; Meng Qing-Tian

    2016-01-01

    A globally accurate single-sheeted double many-body expansion potential energy surface is reported for the first excited state of HS 2 by fitting the accurate ab initio energies, which are calculated at the multireference configuration interaction level with the aug-cc-pV Q Z basis set. By using the double many-body expansion-scaled external correlation method, such calculated ab initio energies are then slightly corrected by scaling their dynamical correlation. A grid of 2767 ab initio energies is used in the least-square fitting procedure with the total root-mean square deviation being 1.406 kcal·mol −1 . The topographical features of the HS 2 (A 2 A′) global potential energy surface are examined in detail. The attributes of the stationary points are presented and compared with the corresponding ab initio results as well as experimental and other theoretical data, showing good agreement. The resulting potential energy surface of HS 2 (A 2 A′) can be used as a building block for constructing the global potential energy surfaces of larger S/H molecular systems and recommended for dynamic studies on the title molecular system. (paper)

  9. An extinction scale-expansion unit for the Beckman DK2 spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, M.

    1967-01-01

    The paper describes a simple but accurate unit for the Beckman DK2 recording spectrophotometer, whereby any 0·1 section of the extinction (`absorbance') scale may be expanded tenfold, while preserving complete linearity in extinction. PMID:6048800

  10. Applying the expansion method in hierarchical functions to the solution of Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabundjian, Gaiane

    1999-01-01

    This work presents a novel numeric method, based on the finite element method, applied for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluids in two dimensions in laminar flow. The method is based on the expansion of the variables in almost hierarchical functions. The used expansion functions are based on Legendre polynomials, adjusted in the rectangular elements in a such a way that corner, side and area functions are defined. The order of the expansion functions associated with the sides and with the area of the elements can be adjusted to the necessary or desired degree. This novel numeric method is denominated by Hierarchical Expansion Method. In order to validate the proposed numeric method three well-known problems of the literature in two dimensions are analyzed. The results show the method capacity in supplying precise results. From the results obtained in this thesis it is possible to conclude that the hierarchical expansion method can be applied successfully for the solution of fluid dynamic problems that involve incompressible fluids. (author)

  11. Expansion of the wilderness values scale with three sub-scales: Personal maintenance, expression and learning, and societal maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy M. Schuster; Ken Cordell; Gary T. Green

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to expand the wilderness value scale administered in the 1994 and 2000 versions of the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment using questions included in the 2003 NSRE. A data set of 1,900 cases was randomly split in half. Validity of the additional questions was tested using principal component analysis, a confirmatory...

  12. Exchange splitting of the interaction energy and the multipole expansion of the wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gniewek, Piotr, E-mail: pgniewek@tiger.chem.uw.edu.pl; Jeziorski, Bogumił, E-mail: jeziorsk@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-10-21

    The exchange splitting J of the interaction energy of the hydrogen atom with a proton is calculated using the conventional surface-integral formula J{sub surf}[Φ], the volume-integral formula of the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory J{sub SAPT}[Φ], and a variational volume-integral formula J{sub var}[Φ]. The calculations are based on the multipole expansion of the wave function Φ, which is divergent for any internuclear distance R. Nevertheless, the resulting approximations to the leading coefficient j{sub 0} in the large-R asymptotic series J(R) = 2e{sup −R−1}R(j{sub 0} + j{sub 1}R{sup −1} + j{sub 2}R{sup −2} + ⋯) converge with the rate corresponding to the convergence radii equal to 4, 2, and 1 when the J{sub var}[Φ], J{sub surf}[Φ], and J{sub SAPT}[Φ] formulas are used, respectively. Additionally, we observe that also the higher j{sub k} coefficients are predicted correctly when the multipole expansion is used in the J{sub var}[Φ] and J{sub surf}[Φ] formulas. The symmetry adapted perturbation theory formula J{sub SAPT}[Φ] predicts correctly only the first two coefficients, j{sub 0} and j{sub 1}, gives a wrong value of j{sub 2}, and diverges for higher j{sub n}. Since the variational volume-integral formula can be easily generalized to many-electron systems and evaluated with standard basis-set techniques of quantum chemistry, it provides an alternative for the determination of the exchange splitting and the exchange contribution of the interaction potential in general.

  13. Towards all-order Laurent expansion of generalized hypergeometric functions around rational values of parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalmykov, M.Yu.; Kniehl, B.A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-07-15

    We prove the following theorems: 1) The Laurent expansions in {epsilon} of the Gauss hypergeometric functions {sub 2}F{sub 1}(I{sub 1}+a{epsilon},I{sub 2}+b{epsilon};I{sub 3}+(p)/(q)+c{epsilon};z), {sub 2}F{sub 1}(I{sub 1}+(p)/(q)+a{epsilon},I{sub 2}+(p/q)+b{epsilon};I{sub 3}+(p)/(q)+c{epsilon};z) and {sub 2}F{sub 1}(I{sub 1}+(p)/(q)+ a{epsilon},I{sub 2}+b{epsilon};I{sub 3}+(p)/(q)+c{epsilon};z), where I{sub 1},I{sub 2},I{sub 3},p,q are arbitrary integers, a,b,c are arbitrary numbers and {epsilon} is an infinitesimal parameter, are expressible in terms of multiple polylogarithms of q-roots of unity with coefficients that are ratios of polynomials; 2) The Laurent expansion of the Gauss hypergeometric function {sub 2}F{sub 1}(I{sub 1}+(p)/(q)+a{epsilon},I{sub 2}+b{epsilon};I{sub 3}+c{epsilon};z) is expressible in terms of multiple polylogarithms of q-roots of unity times powers of logarithm with coefficients that are ratios of polynomials; 3) The multiple inverse rational sums {sigma}{sup {infinity}}{sub j=1}({gamma}(j))/({gamma}(1+j-(p)/(q))) (z{sup j})/(j{sup c}) S{sub a{sub 1}}(j-1).. S{sub a{sub p}}(j-1) and the multiple rational sums {sigma}{sup {infinity}}{sub j=1} ({gamma}(j+(p)/(q)))/({gamma}(1+j)) (z{sup j})/(j{sup c}) S{sub a{sub 1}}(j-1).. S{sub a{sub p}}(j-1), where S{sub a}(j)={sigma}{sup j}{sub k=1}(1)/(k{sup a}) is a harmonic series and c is an arbitrary integer, are expressible in terms of multiple polylogarithms; 4) The generalized hypergeometric functions {sub p}F{sub p.1}((vector)A+(vector)a{epsilon};(vector)B+(vector)b{epsilon},(p)/(q)+B{sub p-1};z) and {sub p}F{sub p-1}((vector)A+(vector)a{epsilon},(p)/(q)+A{sub p};(vector)B+(vector)b{epsilon};z) are expressible in terms of multiple polylogarithms with coefficients that are ratios of polynomials. (orig.)

  14. A new diffusion nodal method based on analytic basis function expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, J.M.; Cho, N.Z.

    1993-01-01

    The transverse integration procedure commonly used in most advanced nodal methods results in some limitations. The first is that the transverse leakage term that appears in the transverse integration procedure must be appropriately approximated. In most advanced nodal methods, this term is expanded in a quadratic polynomial. The second arises when reconstructing the pinwise flux distribution within a node. The available one-dimensional flux shapes from nodal calculation in each spatial direction cannot be used directly in the flux reconstruction. Finally, the transverse leakage defined for a hexagonal node becomes so complicated as not to be easily handled and contains nonphysical singular terms. In this paper, a new nodal method called the analytic function expansion nodal (AFEN) method is described for both the rectangular geometry and the hexagonal geometry in order to overcome these limitations. This method does not solve the transverse-integrated one-dimensional diffusion equations but instead solves directly the original multidimensional diffusion equation within a node. This is a accomplished by expanding the solution (or the intranodal homogeneous flux distribution) in terms of nonseparable analytic basis functions satisfying the diffusion equation at any point in the node

  15. Scramjet test flow reconstruction for a large-scale expansion tube, Part 2: axisymmetric CFD analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildfind, D. E.; Jacobs, P. A.; Morgan, R. G.; Chan, W. Y. K.; Gollan, R. J.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the second part of a study aiming to accurately characterise a Mach 10 scramjet test flow generated using a large free-piston-driven expansion tube. Part 1 described the experimental set-up, the quasi-one-dimensional simulation of the full facility, and the hybrid analysis technique used to compute the nozzle exit test flow properties. The second stage of the hybrid analysis applies the computed 1-D shock tube flow history as an inflow to a high-fidelity two-dimensional-axisymmetric analysis of the acceleration tube. The acceleration tube exit flow history is then applied as an inflow to a further refined axisymmetric nozzle model, providing the final nozzle exit test flow properties and thereby completing the analysis. This paper presents the results of the axisymmetric analyses. These simulations are shown to closely reproduce experimentally measured shock speeds and acceleration tube static pressure histories, as well as nozzle centreline static and impact pressure histories. The hybrid scheme less successfully predicts the diameter of the core test flow; however, this property is readily measured through experimental pitot surveys. In combination, the full test flow history can be accurately determined.

  16. Tailored functional materials with controlled thermal expansion and excellent thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korb, G.; Sebo, P.

    1997-01-01

    Engineering materials are mainly used for structures. Therefore high-strength, stiffness and sufficient toughness are of prime importance. For a long time engineers thought first in terms of metals. Material scientists developed alloys tailored to the needs of industry. Ceramics are known to be brittle and therefore not suitable in the first place for structural application under stress. Polymers with their low modulus became attractive when reinforced with high-strength fibres. Composites processed by polymer, metal or ceramic matrices and high-strength reinforcements have been introduced into many sectors of industry. Engineering materials for structural applications fulfil a function: they withstand high stresses, temperatures, fatigue, creep etc. But usually we do not call them functional materials. Functional materials serve applications apart from classical engineering fields. Electricity conducting materials, semi conductors, memory alloys and many others are called functional materials. Because of the fact that the basic physical properties cannot be changed in single-phase materials, the combination of two and more materials with different properties lead to components with new and tailored properties. A few techniques for preparation are described as powder metallurgy, infiltration of prepegs and compaction of precoated fibres/particles. The lecture is focusing on carbon fibre/particle reinforced Metal Matrix Materials. The achievable properties, in particular the thermal conductivity originating from the base materials is depending on the orientation of the fibres and interfacial contacts in the composite. The carefully controlled expansion behaviour is the most important property to use the material as a heat sink in electronic assemblies. (author)

  17. Reciprocal expansion of modified Bessel function in simple fractions and obtaining general summation relationships containing its zeros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherstyukov, V. B.; Sumin, E. V.

    2017-12-01

    Modified Bessel functions of the first kind Iv (z) (Infeld functions) where v > -1 are considered. Due to the constraint on the parameter v, all zeros of the function Iv (z) except z = 0 are simple, located on the imaginary axis by symmetric pairs and form an infinite countable set. On the basis on previous research of the authors dealing with general Bessel functions of the first kind Jv (z), a question about reciprocal expansion 1/Iv (z) in series of simple fractions of a certain structure (Krein’s series) is studied. The general formulas to calculate of special infinite sums containing degrees of Infeld function zeros are an important consequence of obtained expansion in simple fractions of the value 1/Iv (z) with any v > -1. The possibility of concrete definition of established summation relationships at different values of parameters and their connection with analogous relationships for the Bessel functions of the first kind Jv (z) is discussed.

  18. The resonance expansion for the Green's function of the Schroedinger and wave equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albeverio, S.; Aix-Marseille-2 Univ., 13 - Marseille; Hoeegh-Krohn, R.; Oslo Univ.

    1984-01-01

    We give a survey of some recent mathematical work on resonances, in particular on perturbation series, low energy expansions and on resonances for point interactions. Expansions of the kernels of esup(-it)√sup(H+) and esup(-itH) in terms of resonances are also given (where Hsub(+) is the positive part of the Hamiltonian). (orig.)

  19. Two-Body Orbit Expansion Due to Time-Dependent Relative Acceleration Rate of the Cosmological Scale Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By phenomenologically assuming a slow temporal variation of the percent acceleration rate S̈S -1 of the cosmic scale factor S(t, it is shown that the orbit of a local binary undergoes a secular expansion. To first order in the power expansion of S̈S -1 around the present epoch t0, a non-vanishing shift per orbit (Δr of the two-body relative distance r occurs for eccentric trajectories. A general relativistic expression, which turns out to be cubic in the Hubble parameter H0 at the present epoch, is explicitly calculated for it in the case of matter-dominated epochs with Dark Energy. For a highly eccentric Oort comet orbit with period Pb ≈ 31 Myr, the general relativistic distance shift per orbit turns out to be of the order of (Δr ≈ 70 km. For the Large Magellanic Cloud, assumed on a bound elliptic orbit around the Milky Way, the shift per orbit is of the order of (Δr ≈ 2–4 pc. Our result has a general validity since it holds in any cosmological model admitting the Hubble law and a slowly varying S̈S-1(t. More generally, it is valid for an arbitrary Hooke-like extra-acceleration whose “elastic” parameter κ is slowly time-dependent, irrespectively of the physical mechanism which may lead to it. The coefficient κ1 of the first-order term of the power expansion of κ(t can be preliminarily constrained in a model-independent way down to a κ1 ≲ 2 x 10-13 year-3 level from latest Solar System’s planetary observations. The radial velocities of the double lined spectroscopic binary ALPHA Cen AB yield κ1 ≲ 10-8 year-3.

  20. The exponential function expansion of the intra-nodal cross sections for the spectral history gradient correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J. Y.; Noh, J. M.; Cheong, H. K.; Choo, H. K.

    1998-01-01

    In order to simplify the previous spectral history effect correction based on the polynomial expansion nodal method, a new spectral history effect correction is proposed. The new spectral history correction eliminates four microscopic depletion points out of total 13 depletion points in the previous correction by approximating the group cross sections with exponential function. The neutron flux to homogenize the group cross sections for the correction of the spectral history effect is calculated by the analytic function expansion nodal method in stead of the conventional polynomial expansion nodal method. This spectral history correction model is verified against the three MOX benchmark cores: a checkerboard type, a small core with 25 fuel assemblies, and a large core with 177 fuel assemblies. The benchmark results prove that this new spectral history correction model is superior to the previous one even with the reduced number of the local microscopic depletion points

  1. Three-scale expansion of the solution of MHD and Reynolds equations for tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.P.; Omel'yanov, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    An asymptotic solution of the magnetohydrodynamic equations is constructed. The three scales asymptotic solution describes the non-linear evolution of small, rapidly varying perturbations of equilibrium. It is shown, that an anisotropic coherent structure appears in the linear nonstability situation, and the structures evolution directs to energy interaction between high-frequency and low-frequency waves. The closed system of MHD Reynolds equations for anisotropic structure is derived

  2. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.; Raju, Muralikrishna; Watson, Valerie J.; Stack, Andrew G.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10-5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g-1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g-1) had a negative rise potential (-31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to -6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. These results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  3. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-12-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10-5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g-1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g-1) had a negative rise potential (-31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to -6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. These results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  4. Output Tracking Control of Switched Hybrid Systems: A Fliess Functional Expansion Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghua He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The output tracking problem is investigated for a nonlinear affine system with multiple modes of continuous control inputs. We convert the family of nonlinear affine systems under consideration into a switched hybrid system by introducing a multiple-valued logic variable. The Fliess functional expansion is adopted to express the input and output relationship of the switched hybrid system. The optimal switching control is determined for a multiple-step output tracking performance index. The proposed approach is applied to a multitarget tracking problem for a flight vehicle aiming for one real target with several decoys flying around it in the terminal guidance course. These decoys appear as apparent targets and have to be distinguished with the approaching of the flight vehicle. The guidance problem of one flight vehicle versus multiple apparent targets should be considered if no large miss distance might be caused due to the limitation of the flight vehicle maneuverability. The target orientation at each time interval is determined. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Computation of the modified Bessel function of the third kind of imaginary orders: uniform Airy-type asymptotic expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gil (Amparo); J. Segura (Javier); N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe use of a uniform Airy-type asymptotic expansion for the computation of the modified Bessel functions of the third kind of imaginary orders ($K_{ia}(x)$) near the transition point $x=a$, is discussed. In [2], an algorithm for the evaluation of $K_{ia}(x)$ was presented, which made use

  6. Perturbative expansion of the QCD Adler function improved by renormalization-group summation and analytic continuation in the Borel plane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abbas, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Caprini, I.; Fischer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2013), "014008-1"-"014008-14" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : perturbative expansion * Borel transformation * Adler function Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 4.864, year: 2013

  7. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul, E-mail: tavan@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Lehrstuhl für BioMolekulare Optik, Ludig–Maximilians Universität München, Oettingenstr. 67, 80538 München (Germany)

    2015-11-14

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved—up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  8. Recovering functions from the spherical mean transform with data on an ellipse using eigenfunction expansion in elliptical coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Yehonatan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a new inversion procedure for recovering functions, defined on R2 , from the spherical mean transform, which integrates functions on a prescribed family Λ of circles, where Λ consists of circles whose centers belong to a given ellipse E on the plane. The method presented here follows the same procedure which was used by Norton (J Acoust Soc Am 67:1266-1273, 1980) for recovering functions in case where Λ consists of circles with centers on a circle. However, at some point we will have to modify the method in [24] by using expansion in elliptical coordinates, rather than spherical coordinates, in order to solve the more generalized elliptical case. We will rely on a recent result obtained by Cohl and Volkmer (J Phys A Math Theor 45:355204, 2012) for the eigenfunction expansion of the Bessel function in elliptical coordinates.

  9. Frame scaling function sets and frame wavelet sets in Rd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhanwei; Hu Guoen; Wu Guochang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we classify frame wavelet sets and frame scaling function sets in higher dimensions. Firstly, we obtain a necessary condition for a set to be the frame wavelet sets. Then, we present a necessary and sufficient condition for a set to be a frame scaling function set. We give a property of frame scaling function sets, too. Some corresponding examples are given to prove our theory in each section.

  10. Extended Jacobi Elliptic Function Rational Expansion Method and Its Application to (2+1)-Dimensional Stochastic Dispersive Long Wave System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Lina; Zhang Hongqing

    2007-01-01

    In this work, by means of a generalized method and symbolic computation, we extend the Jacobi elliptic function rational expansion method to uniformly construct a series of stochastic wave solutions for stochastic evolution equations. To illustrate the effectiveness of our method, we take the (2+1)-dimensional stochastic dispersive long wave system as an example. We not only have obtained some known solutions, but also have constructed some new rational formal stochastic Jacobi elliptic function solutions.

  11. New calibration methodology for calorimetric determination of isobaric thermal expansivity of liquids as a function of temperature and pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navia, Paloma; Troncoso, Jacobo [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias de Ourense, Campus As Lagoas, 32004 Ourense (Spain); Romani, Luis [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias de Ourense, Campus As Lagoas, 32004 Ourense (Spain)], E-mail: romani@uvigo.es

    2008-11-15

    A new method for determining isobaric thermal expansivity of liquids as a function of temperature and pressure through calorimetric measurements against pressure is described. It is based on a previously reported measurement technique, but due to the different kind of calorimeter and experimental set up, a new calibration procedure was developed. Two isobaric thermal expansivity standards are needed; in this work, with a view on the quality of the available literature data, hexane and water are chosen. The measurements were carried out in the temperature and pressure intervals (278.15 to 348.15) K and (0.5 to 55) MPa for a set of liquids, and experimental values are compared with the available literature data in order to evaluate the precision of the experimental procedure. The analysis of the results reveals that the proposed methodology is highly accurate for isobaric thermal expansivity determination, and it allows obtaining a precise characterisation of the temperature and pressure dependence of this thermodynamic coefficient.

  12. New calibration methodology for calorimetric determination of isobaric thermal expansivity of liquids as a function of temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navia, Paloma; Troncoso, Jacobo; Romani, Luis

    2008-01-01

    A new method for determining isobaric thermal expansivity of liquids as a function of temperature and pressure through calorimetric measurements against pressure is described. It is based on a previously reported measurement technique, but due to the different kind of calorimeter and experimental set up, a new calibration procedure was developed. Two isobaric thermal expansivity standards are needed; in this work, with a view on the quality of the available literature data, hexane and water are chosen. The measurements were carried out in the temperature and pressure intervals (278.15 to 348.15) K and (0.5 to 55) MPa for a set of liquids, and experimental values are compared with the available literature data in order to evaluate the precision of the experimental procedure. The analysis of the results reveals that the proposed methodology is highly accurate for isobaric thermal expansivity determination, and it allows obtaining a precise characterisation of the temperature and pressure dependence of this thermodynamic coefficient

  13. orthogonal and scaling transformations of quadratic functions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    functions of sub-problems of various nonlinear programming problems that employ methods such as sequential quadratic programming and trust-region methods (Sorensen, 1982; Eldersveld,. 1991; Nocedal and Wright, 1999). Various problems in Algebra, Functional Analysis,. Analytic Geometry and Computational Mathe-.

  14. Multiscale functions, scale dynamics, and applications to partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresson, Jacky; Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Modeling phenomena from experimental data always begins with a choice of hypothesis on the observed dynamics such as determinism, randomness, and differentiability. Depending on these choices, different behaviors can be observed. The natural question associated to the modeling problem is the following: "With a finite set of data concerning a phenomenon, can we recover its underlying nature? From this problem, we introduce in this paper the definition of multi-scale functions, scale calculus, and scale dynamics based on the time scale calculus [see Bohner, M. and Peterson, A., Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications (Springer Science & Business Media, 2001)] which is used to introduce the notion of scale equations. These definitions will be illustrated on the multi-scale Okamoto's functions. Scale equations are analysed using scale regimes and the notion of asymptotic model for a scale equation under a particular scale regime. The introduced formalism explains why a single scale equation can produce distinct continuous models even if the equation is scale invariant. Typical examples of such equations are given by the scale Euler-Lagrange equation. We illustrate our results using the scale Newton's equation which gives rise to a non-linear diffusion equation or a non-linear Schrödinger equation as asymptotic continuous models depending on the particular fractional scale regime which is considered.

  15. Functional cortical mapping of scale illusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li-qun; Kuriki, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    We have studied cortical activation using 1.5 T fMRI during 'Scale Illusion', a kind of auditory illusion, in which subjects perceive smooth melodies while listening to dichotic irregular pitch sequences consisting of scale tones, in repeated phrases composed of eight tones. Four male and four female subjects listened to different stimuli, that including illusion-inducing tone sequence, monaural tone sequence and perceived pitch sequence with a control of white noises delivered to the right and left ears in random order. 32 scans with a repetition time (TR) 3 s Between 3 s interval for each type of the four stimuli were performed. In BOLD signals, activation was observed in the prefrontal and temporal cortices, parietal lobule and occipital areas by first-level group analysis. However, there existed large intersubject variability such that systematic tendency of the activation was not clear. The study will be continued to obtain larger number of subjects for group analysis. (author)

  16. Developing knowledge level scale of functional foods: Validity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to develop a scale to determine the knowledge levels of University students on functional foods and to investigate the validity and reliability of the scale. The research was conducted on 417 (209 girls and 208 boys) undergraduate students in Selcuk University regarding functional foods.

  17. On soft limits of large-scale structure correlation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagunski, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale structure surveys have the potential to become the leading probe for precision cosmology in the next decade. To extract valuable information on the cosmological evolution of the Universe from the observational data, it is of major importance to derive accurate theoretical predictions for the statistical large-scale structure observables, such as the power spectrum and the bispectrum of (dark) matter density perturbations. Hence, one of the greatest challenges of modern cosmology is to theoretically understand the non-linear dynamics of large-scale structure formation in the Universe from first principles. While analytic approaches to describe the large-scale structure formation are usually based on the framework of non-relativistic cosmological perturbation theory, we pursue another road in this thesis and develop methods to derive generic, non-perturbative statements about large-scale structure correlation functions. We study unequal- and equal-time correlation functions of density and velocity perturbations in the limit where one of their wavenumbers becomes small, that is, in the soft limit. In the soft limit, it is possible to link (N+1)-point and N-point correlation functions to non-perturbative 'consistency conditions'. These provide in turn a powerful tool to test fundamental aspects of the underlying theory at hand. In this work, we first rederive the (resummed) consistency conditions at unequal times by using the so-called eikonal approximation. The main appeal of the unequal-time consistency conditions is that they are solely based on symmetry arguments and thus are universal. Proceeding from this, we direct our attention to consistency conditions at equal times, which, on the other hand, depend on the interplay between soft and hard modes. We explore the existence and validity of equal-time consistency conditions within and beyond perturbation theory. For this purpose, we investigate the predictions for the soft limit of the

  18. On soft limits of large-scale structure correlation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagunski, Laura

    2016-08-15

    Large-scale structure surveys have the potential to become the leading probe for precision cosmology in the next decade. To extract valuable information on the cosmological evolution of the Universe from the observational data, it is of major importance to derive accurate theoretical predictions for the statistical large-scale structure observables, such as the power spectrum and the bispectrum of (dark) matter density perturbations. Hence, one of the greatest challenges of modern cosmology is to theoretically understand the non-linear dynamics of large-scale structure formation in the Universe from first principles. While analytic approaches to describe the large-scale structure formation are usually based on the framework of non-relativistic cosmological perturbation theory, we pursue another road in this thesis and develop methods to derive generic, non-perturbative statements about large-scale structure correlation functions. We study unequal- and equal-time correlation functions of density and velocity perturbations in the limit where one of their wavenumbers becomes small, that is, in the soft limit. In the soft limit, it is possible to link (N+1)-point and N-point correlation functions to non-perturbative 'consistency conditions'. These provide in turn a powerful tool to test fundamental aspects of the underlying theory at hand. In this work, we first rederive the (resummed) consistency conditions at unequal times by using the so-called eikonal approximation. The main appeal of the unequal-time consistency conditions is that they are solely based on symmetry arguments and thus are universal. Proceeding from this, we direct our attention to consistency conditions at equal times, which, on the other hand, depend on the interplay between soft and hard modes. We explore the existence and validity of equal-time consistency conditions within and beyond perturbation theory. For this purpose, we investigate the predictions for the soft limit of the

  19. Cys-X scanning for expansion of active-site residues and modulation of catalytic functions in a glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrgård, Malena A; Hellman, Ulf; Mannervik, Bengt

    2011-05-13

    We propose Cys-X scanning as a semisynthetic approach to engineer the functional properties of recombinant proteins. As in the case of Ala scanning, key residues in the primary structure are identified, and one of them is replaced by Cys via site-directed mutagenesis. The thiol of the residue introduced is subsequently modified by alternative chemical reagents to yield diverse Cys-X mutants of the protein. This chemical approach is orthogonal to Ala or Cys scanning and allows the expansion of the repertoire of amino acid side chains far beyond those present in natural proteins. In its present application, we have introduced Cys-X residues in human glutathione transferase (GST) M2-2, replacing Met-212 in the substrate-binding site. To achieve selectivity of the modifications, the Cys residues in the wild-type enzyme were replaced by Ala. A suite of simple substitutions resulted in a set of homologous Met derivatives ranging from normethionine to S-heptyl-cysteine. The chemical modifications were validated by HPLC and mass spectrometry. The derivatized mutant enzymes were assayed with alternative GST substrates representing diverse chemical reactions: aromatic substitution, epoxide opening, transnitrosylation, and addition to an ortho-quinone. The Cys substitutions had different effects on the alternative substrates and differentially enhanced or suppressed catalytic activities depending on both the Cys-X substitution and the substrate assayed. As a consequence, the enzyme specificity profile could be changed among the alternative substrates. The procedure lends itself to large-scale production of Cys-X modified protein variants.

  20. Design and analysis of a small-scale natural gas liquefaction process adopting single nitrogen expansion with carbon dioxide pre-cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Zongming; Cui, Mengmeng; Xie, Ying; Li, Chunlin

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of energy consumption and environmental protection concerns, it is of enormous economic and environmental values for the development of stranded gas. As a means for exploitation and transportation of stranded gas to market, a novel small-scale liquefaction process adopting single nitrogen expansion with carbon dioxide pre-cooling is put up with in this paper. Taking unit energy consumption as the target function, Aspen HYSYS is employed to simulate and optimize the process to achieve the liquefaction rate of 0.77 with unit energy consumption of 9.90 kW/kmol/h. Furthermore, the adaptability of this process under different pressure, temperature and compositions of feed gas is studied. Based on the optimization results, the exergy losses of main equipment in the process are evaluated and analyzed in details. With compact device, safety operation, simple capability, this liquefaction process proves to be suitable for the development of small gas reserves, satellite distribution fields of gas or coalbed methane fields. - Highlights: •A novel small-scale liquefaction process used in stranded gas is designed. •The adaptability of this process under different pressure, temperature and compositions of feed gas is studied. •The exergy analysis of main equipment in the process is analyzed

  1. Design and analysis of a small-scale natural gas liquefaction process adopting single nitrogen expansion with carbon dioxide pre-cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Zongming; Cui, Mengmeng; Xie, Ying; Li, Chunlin

    2014-03-01

    With the growth of energy consumption and environmental protection concerns, it is of enormous economic and environmental values for the development of stranded gas. As a means for exploitation and transportation of stranded gas to market, a novel small-scale liquefaction process adopting single nitrogen expansion with carbon dioxide pre-cooling is put up with in this paper. Taking unit energy consumption as the target function, Aspen HYSYS is employed to simulate and optimize the process to achieve the liquefaction rate of 0.77 with unit energy consumption of 9.90 kW/kmol/h. Furthermore, the adaptability of this process under different pressure, temperature and compositions of feed gas is studied. Based on the optimization results, the exergy losses of main equipment in the process are evaluated and analyzed in details. With compact device, safety operation, simple capability, this liquefaction process proves to be suitable for the development of small gas reserves, satellite distribution fields of gas or coalbed methane fields. - Highlights: •A novel small-scale liquefaction process used in stranded gas is designed. •The adaptability of this process under different pressure, temperature and compositions of feed gas is studied. •The exergy analysis of main equipment in the process is analyzed.

  2. Comparative and functional triatomine genomics reveals reductions and expansions in insecticide resistance-related gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Lucila; Lavore, Andrés; Sierra, Ivana; Palacio, Victorio; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús; Latorre-Estivalis, José Manuel; Mougabure-Cueto, Gaston; Francini, Flavio; Lorenzo, Marcelo G; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; Ons, Sheila; Rivera-Pomar, Rolando V

    2017-02-01

    Triatomine insects are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that is the causative agent of Chagas' disease. This is a neglected disease affecting approximately 8 million people in Latin America. The existence of diverse pyrethroid resistant populations of at least two species demonstrates the potential of triatomines to develop high levels of insecticide resistance. Therefore, the incorporation of strategies for resistance management is a main concern for vector control programs. Three enzymatic superfamilies are thought to mediate xenobiotic detoxification and resistance: Glutathione Transferases (GSTs), Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and Carboxyl/Cholinesterases (CCEs). Improving our knowledge of key triatomine detoxification enzymes will strengthen our understanding of insecticide resistance processes in vectors of Chagas' disease. The discovery and description of detoxification gene superfamilies in normalized transcriptomes of three triatomine species: Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma infestans and Triatoma pallidipennis is presented. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of these superfamilies among the triatomine transcriptomes and the genome of Rhodnius prolixus, also a triatomine vector of Chagas' disease, and other well-studied insect genomes was performed. The expression pattern of detoxification genes in R. prolixus transcriptomes from key organs was analyzed. The comparisons reveal gene expansions in Sigma class GSTs, CYP3 in CYP superfamily and clade E in CCE superfamily. Moreover, several CYP families identified in these triatomines have not yet been described in other insects. Conversely, several groups of insecticide resistance related enzymes within each enzyme superfamily are reduced or lacking in triatomines. Furthermore, our qRT-PCR results showed an increase in the expression of a CYP4 gene in a T. infestans population resistant to pyrethroids. These results could point to an involvement of metabolic detoxification mechanisms on the high

  3. Comparative and functional triatomine genomics reveals reductions and expansions in insecticide resistance-related gene families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucila Traverso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Triatomine insects are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that is the causative agent of Chagas' disease. This is a neglected disease affecting approximately 8 million people in Latin America. The existence of diverse pyrethroid resistant populations of at least two species demonstrates the potential of triatomines to develop high levels of insecticide resistance. Therefore, the incorporation of strategies for resistance management is a main concern for vector control programs. Three enzymatic superfamilies are thought to mediate xenobiotic detoxification and resistance: Glutathione Transferases (GSTs, Cytochromes P450 (CYPs and Carboxyl/Cholinesterases (CCEs. Improving our knowledge of key triatomine detoxification enzymes will strengthen our understanding of insecticide resistance processes in vectors of Chagas' disease.The discovery and description of detoxification gene superfamilies in normalized transcriptomes of three triatomine species: Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma infestans and Triatoma pallidipennis is presented. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of these superfamilies among the triatomine transcriptomes and the genome of Rhodnius prolixus, also a triatomine vector of Chagas' disease, and other well-studied insect genomes was performed. The expression pattern of detoxification genes in R. prolixus transcriptomes from key organs was analyzed. The comparisons reveal gene expansions in Sigma class GSTs, CYP3 in CYP superfamily and clade E in CCE superfamily. Moreover, several CYP families identified in these triatomines have not yet been described in other insects. Conversely, several groups of insecticide resistance related enzymes within each enzyme superfamily are reduced or lacking in triatomines. Furthermore, our qRT-PCR results showed an increase in the expression of a CYP4 gene in a T. infestans population resistant to pyrethroids. These results could point to an involvement of metabolic detoxification mechanisms

  4. Tyrosine kinase receptor RON functions downstream of the erythropoietin receptor to induce expansion of erythroid progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker, Emile; van Dijk, Thamar; Parren-van Amelsvoort, Martine; Grossmann, Katja S.; Schaeper, Ute; Toney-Earley, Kenya; Waltz, Susan E.; Löwenberg, Bob; von Lindern, Marieke

    2004-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is required for cell survival during differentiation and for progenitor expansion during stress erythropoiesis. Although signaling pathways may couple directly to docking sites on the EPO receptor (EpoR), additional docking molecules expand the signaling platform of the

  5. Scramjet test flow reconstruction for a large-scale expansion tube, Part 1: quasi-one-dimensional modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildfind, D. E.; Jacobs, P. A.; Morgan, R. G.; Chan, W. Y. K.; Gollan, R. J.

    2017-11-01

    Large-scale free-piston driven expansion tubes have uniquely high total pressure capabilities which make them an important resource for development of access-to-space scramjet engine technology. However, many aspects of their operation are complex, and their test flows are fundamentally unsteady and difficult to measure. While computational fluid dynamics methods provide an important tool for quantifying these flows, these calculations become very expensive with increasing facility size and therefore have to be carefully constructed to ensure sufficient accuracy is achieved within feasible computational times. This study examines modelling strategies for a Mach 10 scramjet test condition developed for The University of Queensland's X3 facility. The present paper outlines the challenges associated with test flow reconstruction, describes the experimental set-up for the X3 experiments, and then details the development of an experimentally tuned quasi-one-dimensional CFD model of the full facility. The 1-D model, which accurately captures longitudinal wave processes, is used to calculate the transient flow history in the shock tube. This becomes the inflow to a higher-fidelity 2-D axisymmetric simulation of the downstream facility, detailed in the Part 2 companion paper, leading to a validated, fully defined nozzle exit test flow.

  6. Scramjet test flow reconstruction for a large-scale expansion tube, Part 1: quasi-one-dimensional modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildfind, D. E.; Jacobs, P. A.; Morgan, R. G.; Chan, W. Y. K.; Gollan, R. J.

    2018-07-01

    Large-scale free-piston driven expansion tubes have uniquely high total pressure capabilities which make them an important resource for development of access-to-space scramjet engine technology. However, many aspects of their operation are complex, and their test flows are fundamentally unsteady and difficult to measure. While computational fluid dynamics methods provide an important tool for quantifying these flows, these calculations become very expensive with increasing facility size and therefore have to be carefully constructed to ensure sufficient accuracy is achieved within feasible computational times. This study examines modelling strategies for a Mach 10 scramjet test condition developed for The University of Queensland's X3 facility. The present paper outlines the challenges associated with test flow reconstruction, describes the experimental set-up for the X3 experiments, and then details the development of an experimentally tuned quasi-one-dimensional CFD model of the full facility. The 1-D model, which accurately captures longitudinal wave processes, is used to calculate the transient flow history in the shock tube. This becomes the inflow to a higher-fidelity 2-D axisymmetric simulation of the downstream facility, detailed in the Part 2 companion paper, leading to a validated, fully defined nozzle exit test flow.

  7. An extended Jacobi elliptic function rational expansion method and its application to (2+1)-dimensional dispersive long wave equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qi; Chen Yong; Zhang Hongqing

    2005-01-01

    With the aid of computerized symbolic computation, a new elliptic function rational expansion method is presented by means of a new general ansatz, in which periodic solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations that can be expressed as a finite Laurent series of some of 12 Jacobi elliptic functions, is more powerful than exiting Jacobi elliptic function methods and is very powerful to uniformly construct more new exact periodic solutions in terms of rational formal Jacobi elliptic function solution of nonlinear partial differential equations. As an application of the method, we choose a (2+1)-dimensional dispersive long wave equation to illustrate the method. As a result, we can successfully obtain the solutions found by most existing Jacobi elliptic function methods and find other new and more general solutions at the same time. Of course, more shock wave solutions or solitary wave solutions can be gotten at their limit condition

  8. An antisymmetric psychometric function on a logarithmic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    This very brief report introduces a psychometric function, very suitable for psychophysical data that displays Weber-like behaviour, because it is antisymmetric on a logarithmic scale. © 2011 a Pion publication.

  9. Economies of scale in the Korean district heating system: A variable cost function approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sun-Young; Lee, Kyoung-Sil; Yoo, Seung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the cost efficiency of South Korea’s district heating (DH) system by using a variable cost function and cost-share equation. We employ a seemingly unrelated regression model, with quarterly time-series data from the Korea District Heating Corporation (KDHC)—a public utility that covers about 59% of the DH system market in South Korea—over the 1987–2011 period. The explanatory variables are price of labor, price of material, capital cost, and production level. The results indicate that economies of scale are present and statistically significant. Thus, expansion of its DH business would allow KDHC to obtain substantial economies of scale. According to our forecasts vis-à-vis scale economies, the KDHC will enjoy cost efficiency for some time yet. To ensure a socially efficient supply of DH, it is recommended that the KDHC expand its business proactively. With regard to informing policy or regulations, our empirical results could play a significant role in decision-making processes. - Highlights: • We examine economies of scale in the South Korean district heating sector. • We focus on Korea District Heating Corporation (KDHC), a public utility. • We estimate a translog cost function, using a variable cost function. • We found economies of scale to be present and statistically significant. • KDHC will enjoy cost efficiency and expanding its supply is socially efficient.

  10. A scaling study of the step scaling function of quenched QCD with improved gauge actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, S.; Aoki, S.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K-I.; Ishizuka, N.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kanaya, K.; Kaneko, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Okawa, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.

    2005-01-01

    We study the scaling behavior of the step scaling function for SU(3) gauge theory, employing the Iwasaki gauge action and the Luescher-Weisz gauge action. In particular, we test the choice of boundary counter terms and apply a perturbative procedure for removal of lattice artifacts for the simulation results in the extrapolation procedure. We confirm the universality of the step scaling functions at both weak and strong coupling regions. We also measure the low energy scale ratio with the Iwasaki action, and confirm its universality

  11. The nonlocal operator expansion for structure functions of e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balitsky, I.I.; Braun, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Wilson operator expansion is generalized to inclusive particle production in e + e - annihilation. This turns out to be possible at the price of doubling the number of quantum quark and gluon fields in a similar fashion that gives rise to the Keldysh technique for nonequilibrium processes. Well-known results on the leading logarithmic contributions to inclusive production are reproduced as the one-loop evolution of the string operator of the leading twist. The general structure of the power corrections 1/Q 2 is outlined. (orig.)

  12. Bessel function expansion to reduce the calculation time and memory usage for cylindrical computer-generated holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Yusuke; Barada, Daisuke; Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2017-07-10

    This study proposes a method to reduce the calculation time and memory usage required for calculating cylindrical computer-generated holograms. The wavefront on the cylindrical observation surface is represented as a convolution integral in the 3D Fourier domain. The Fourier transformation of the kernel function involving this convolution integral is analytically performed using a Bessel function expansion. The analytical solution can drastically reduce the calculation time and the memory usage without any cost, compared with the numerical method using fast Fourier transform to Fourier transform the kernel function. In this study, we present the analytical derivation, the efficient calculation of Bessel function series, and a numerical simulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the analytical solution through comparisons of calculation time and memory usage.

  13. Landscape scale assessment of ecosystem goods and services and the extent, location, and magnitude of urban-suburban expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human development adjoining coastal cities is the prevalent force changing the Anthropocene landscape. The extent, location, and magnitude of urban-suburban expansion can drastically modify how important features of ecosystems are effected. These effects are best summarized usin...

  14. Functional and Structural Characterization of a Receptor-Like Kinase Involved in Germination and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen; Liang, Shan; Song, Wen; Lin, Guangzhong; Wang, Weiguang; Zhang, Heqiao; Han, Zhifu; Chai, Jijie

    2017-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs) are widespread in different plant species and play important roles in growth and development. Germination inhibition is vital for the completion of seed maturation and cell expansion is a fundamental cellular process driving plant growth. Here, we report genetic and structural characterizations of a functionally uncharacterized LRR-RLK, named GRACE (Germination Repression and Cell Expansion receptor-like kinase). Overexpression of GRACE in Arabidopsis exhibited delayed germination, enlarged cotyledons, rosette leaves and stubbier petioles. Conversely, these phenotypes were reversed in the T-DNA insertion knock-down mutant grace-1 plants. A crystal structure of the extracellular domain of GRACE (GRACE-LRR) determined at the resolution of 3.0 Å revealed that GRACE-LRR assumed a right-handed super-helical structure with an island domain (ID). Structural comparison showed that structure of the ID in GRACE-LRR is strikingly different from those observed in other LRR-RLKs. This structural observation implies that GRACE might perceive a new ligand for signaling. Collectively, our data support roles of GRACE in repressing seed germination and promoting cell expansion of Arabidopsis, presumably by perception of unknown ligand(s). PMID:29213277

  15. Test Review: Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allee-Smith, Paula J.; Winters, Rebecca R.; Drake, Amanda; Joslin, Amanda K.

    2013-01-01

    The Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS), authored by Russell A. Barkley and published by Guilford in 2011, is an individually administered assessment tool that may be used to evaluate adults ages 18 to 81. The purpose of this measure is to screen those who may be experiencing executive functioning (EF) deficits in…

  16. Ex Vivo Expansion of Functional Human UCB-HSCs/HPCs by Coculture with AFT024-hkirre Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muti ur Rehman Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kiaa1867 (human Kirre, hKirre has a critical role in brain development and/or maintenance of the glomerular slit diaphragm in kidneys. Murine homolog of this gene, mKirre expressed in OP9 and AFT024 cells could support hematopoietic stem cells/hematopoietic progenitor cells (HSC/HPC expansion in vitro. HKirre is also expressed in human FBMOB-hTERT cell line and fetal liver fibroblast-like cells but its function has remained unclear. In this paper, we cloned a hKirre gene from human fetal liver fibroblast-like cells and established a stably overexpressing hKirre-AFT024 cell line. Resultant cells could promote self-renewal and ex vivo expansion of HSCs/HPCs significantly higher than AFT024-control cells transformed with mock plasmid. The Expanded human umbilical cord blood (hUCB CD34+ cells retained the capacity of multipotent differentiation as long as 8 weeks and successfully repopulated the bone marrow of sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice, which demonstrated the expansion of long-term primitive transplantable HSCs/HPCs. Importantly, hkirre could upregulate the expressions of Wnt-5A, BMP4, and SDF-1 and downregulate TGF-β with other hematopoietic growth factors. By SDS-PAGE and Western Blot analysis, a ~89 kDa protein in total lysate of AFT024-hKirre was identified. Supernatants from AFT024-hkirre could also support CD34+CD38− cells expansion. These results demonstrated that the AFT024-hKirre cells have the ability to efficiently expand HSCs/HPCs.

  17. Modified scaling function projective synchronization of chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yu-Hua; Zhou Wu-Neng; Fang Jian-An

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates a kind of modified scaling function projective synchronization of uncertain chaotic systems using an adaptive controller. The given scaling function in the new method can be an equilibrium point, a periodic orbit, or even a chaotic attractor in the phase space. Based on LaSalle's invariance set principle, the adaptive control law is derived to make the states of two chaotic systems function projective synchronized. Some numerical examples are also given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. (general)

  18. Expansion and Functional Divergence of AP2 Group Genes in Spermatophytes Determined by Molecular Evolution and Arabidopsis Mutant Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengkai Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The APETALA2 (AP2 genes represent the AP2 group within a large group of DNA-binding proteins called AP2/EREBP. The AP2 gene is functional and necessary for flower development, stem cell maintenance, and seed development, whereas the other members of AP2 group redundantly affect flowering time. Here we study the phylogeny of AP2 group genes in spermatophytes. Spermatophyte AP2 group genes can be classified into AP2 and TOE types, six clades, and we found that the AP2 group homologs in gymnosperms belong to the AP2 type, whereas TOE types are absent, which indicates the AP2 type gene are more ancient and TOE type was split out of AP2 type and losing the major function. In Brassicaceae, the expansion of AP2 and TOE type lead to the gene number of AP2 group were up to six. Purifying selection appears to have been the primary driving force of spermatophyte AP2 group evolution, although positive selection occurred in the AP2 clade. The transition from exon to intron of AtAP2 in Arabidopsis mutant leads to the loss of gene function and the same situation was found in AtTOE2. Combining this evolutionary analysis and published research, the results suggest that typical AP2 group genes may first appear in gymnosperms and diverged in angiosperms, following expansion of group members and functional differentiation. In angiosperms, AP2 genes (AP2 clade inherited key functions from ancestors and other genes of AP2 group lost most function but just remained flowering time controlling in gene formation. In this study, the phylogenies of AP2 group genes in spermatophytes was analyzed, which supported the evidence for the research of gene functional evolution of AP2 group.

  19. Long-Term Reserve Expansion of Power Systems With High Wind Power Penetration Using Universal Generating Function Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DING, YI; Wang, Peng; Goel, Lalit

    2010-01-01

    from long term planning point of view utilizing universal generating function (UGF) methods. The reliability models of wind farms and conventional generators are represented as the correspondin UGFs and the special operators for these UGFs are defined to evaluate the customer and the system...... reliabilities. The effect of transmission network on customer reliabilities is also considered in the system UGF. The power output models of wind turbine generators in a wind farm considering wind speed correlation and un-correlation are developed, respectively. A reliability-based reserve expansion method...

  20. Mass spectra and wave functions of meson systems and the covariant oscillator quark model as an expansion basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Ryuichi; Ishida, Shin; Wada, Hiroaki; Yamada, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Motoo

    1999-01-01

    We examine mass spectra and wave functions of the nn-bar, cc-bar and bb-bar meson systems within the framework of the covariant oscillator quark model with the boosted LS-coupling scheme. We solve nonperturbatively an eigenvalue problem for the squared-mass operator, which incorporates the four-dimensional color-Coulomb-type interaction, by taking a set of covariant oscillator wave functions as an expansion basis. We obtain mass spectra of these meson systems, which reproduce quite well their experimental behavior. The resultant manifestly covariant wave functions, which are applicable to analyses of various reaction phenomena, are given. Our results seem to suggest that the present model may be considered effectively as a covariant version of the nonrelativistic linear-plus-Coulomb potential quark model. (author)

  1. Nonperturbative Series Expansion of Green's Functions: The Anatomy of Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering in the Doped Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2017-12-01

    We present a nonperturbative, divergence-free series expansion of Green's functions using effective operators. The method is especially suited for computing correlators of complex operators as a series of correlation functions of simpler forms. We apply the method to study low-energy excitations in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) in doped one- and two-dimensional single-band Hubbard models. The RIXS operator is expanded into polynomials of spin, density, and current operators weighted by fundamental x-ray spectral functions. These operators couple to different polarization channels resulting in simple selection rules. The incident photon energy dependent coefficients help to pinpoint main RIXS contributions from different degrees of freedom. We show in particular that, with parameters pertaining to cuprate superconductors, local spin excitation dominates the RIXS spectral weight over a wide doping range in the cross-polarization channel.

  2. First non-zero terms for the Taylor expansion at 1 of the Conway potential function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buryak, A.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Conway potential function ∇ L (t 1,...,t l ) of an ordered oriented link L = L 1 ∪ L 2 ∪ ... ∪ L l ⊂ S 3 is considered. In general, this function is not determined by the linking numbers and the Conway potential functions of the components. However, the first two nonzero terms of the Taylor

  3. Effect of shocks on film cooling of a full scale turbojet exhaust nozzle having an external expansion surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straight, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Cooling is one of the critical technologies for efficient design of exhaust nozzles, especially for the developing technology of nonaxisymmetric (2D) nozzles for future aircraft applications. Several promising 2D nozzle designs have external expansion surfaces which need to be cooled. Engine data are scarce, however, on nozzle cooling effectiveness in the supersonic flow environment (with shocks) that exists along external expansion surfaces. This paper will present experimental film cooling data obtained during exploratory testing with an axisymmetric plug nozzle having external expansion and installed on an afterburning turbojet engine in an altitude test facility. The data obtained shows that the shocks and local hot gas stream conditions have a marked effect on film cooling effectiveness. An existing film cooling correlation is adequate at some operating conditions but inadequate at other conditions such as in separated flow regions resulting from shock-boundary-layer interactions.

  4. Sub-50 nm Scale to Micrometer Scale Soft Lithographic Patterning of Functional Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, A.

    2011-01-01

    This PhD thesis addresses two major issues: 1) Fabricating nanometer-scale patterns of functional materials, 2) Extending the applicability of soft lithographic processes to a wide range of functional materials on conventional silicon substrates and flexible plastic substrates. This thesis describes

  5. A novel conceptual design of parallel nitrogen expansion liquefaction process for small-scale LNG (liquefied natural gas) plant in skid-mount packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Tianbiao; Ju, Yonglin

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of unconventional natural gas is still a great challenge for China due to its distribution locations and small reserves. Thus, liquefying the unconventional natural gas by using small-scale LNG plant in skid-mount packages is a good choice with great economic benefits. A novel conceptual design of parallel nitrogen expansion liquefaction process for small-scale plant in skid-mount packages has been proposed. It first designs a process configuration. Then, thermodynamic analysis of the process is conducted. Next, an optimization model with genetic algorithm method is developed to optimize the process. Finally, the flexibilities of the process are tested by two different feed gases. In conclusion, the proposed parallel nitrogen expansion liquefaction process can be used in small-scale LNG plant in skid-mount packages with high exergy efficiency and great economic benefits. - Highlights: • A novel design of parallel nitrogen expansion liquefaction process is proposed. • Genetic algorithm is applied to optimize the novel process. • The unit energy consumption of optimized process is 0.5163 kWh/Nm 3 . • The exergy efficiency of the optimized case is 0.3683. • The novel process has a good flexibility for different feed gas conditions

  6. A comparison of two nodal codes : Advanced nodal code (ANC) and analytic function expansion nodal (AFEN) code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, S.K.; Hah, C.J.; Lee, H.C.; Kim, Y.H.; Cho, N.Z.

    1996-01-01

    Modern nodal methods usually employs the transverse integration technique in order to reduce a multi-dimensional diffusion equation to one-dimensional diffusion equations. The use of the transverse integration technique requires two major approximations such as a transverse leakage approximation and a one-dimensional flux approximation. Both the transverse leakage and the one-dimensional flux are approximated by polynomials. ANC (Advanced Nodal Code) developed by Westinghouse employs a modern nodal expansion method for the flux calculation, the equivalence theory for the homogenization error reduction and a group theory for pin power recovery. Unlike the conventional modern nodal methods, AFEN (Analytic Function Expansion Nodal) method expands homogeneous flux distributions within a node into non-separable analytic basis functions, which eliminate two major approximations of the modern nodal methods. A comparison study of AFEN with ANC has been performed to see the applicability of AFEN to commercial PWR and different types of reactors such as MOX fueled reactor. The qualification comparison results demonstrate that AFEN methodology is accurate enough to apply for commercial PWR analysis. The results show that AFEN provides very accurate results (core multiplication factor and assembly power distribution) for cores that exhibit strong flux gradients as in a MOX loaded core. (author)

  7. Functional Independent Scaling Relation for ORR/OER Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rune; Hansen, Heine Anton; Dickens, Colin F.

    2016-01-01

    reactions. Here, we show that the oxygen-oxygen bond in the OOH* intermediate is, however, not well described with the previously used class of exchange-correlation functionals. By quantifying and correcting the systematic error, an improved description of gaseous peroxide species versus experimental data...... and a reduction in calculational uncertainty is obtained. For adsorbates, we find that the systematic error largely cancels the vdW interaction missing in the original determination of the scaling relation. An improved scaling relation, which is fully independent of the applied exchange-correlation functional...

  8. Inhomogeneous thermal expansion of metallic glasses in atomic-scale studied by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghvaei, Amir Hossein, E-mail: amirtaghvaei@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakur Shahabi, Hamed [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Bednarčik, Jozef [Photon Science DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Eckert, Jürgen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-28

    Numerous investigations have demonstrated that the elastic strain in metallic glasses subjected to mechanical loading could be inhomogeneous in the atomic-scale and it increases with distance from an average atom and eventually reaches the macroscopic strain at larger inter-atomic distances. We have observed a similar behavior for the thermal strain imposed by heating of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles below the glass transition temperature by analysis of the scattering data obtained by in-situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results imply that the volumetric thermal strains calculated from the shift in position of the principal diffraction maximum and reduced pair correlation function (PDF) peaks are in good agreement for the length scales beyond 0.6 nm, corresponding to the atoms located over the third near-neighbor shell. However, smaller and even negative volumetric thermal strains have been calculated based on the shifts in the positions of the second and first PDF peaks, respectively. The structural changes of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles are accompanied by decreasing the average coordination number of the first near-neighbor shell, which manifests the occurrence of local changes in the short-range order upon heating. It is believed that the detected length-scale dependence of the volumetric thermal strain is correlated with the local atomic rearrangements taking place in the topologically unstable regions of the glass governed by variations in the atomic-level stresses.

  9. Comparison of Conjugate Gradient Density Matrix Search and Chebyshev Expansion Methods for Avoiding Diagonalization in Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Kevin R.; Daniels, Andrew D.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-01-01

    We report a comparison of two linear-scaling methods which avoid the diagonalization bottleneck of traditional electronic structure algorithms. The Chebyshev expansion method (CEM) is implemented for carbon tight-binding calculations of large systems and its memory and timing requirements compared to those of our previously implemented conjugate gradient density matrix search (CG-DMS). Benchmark calculations are carried out on icosahedral fullerenes from C60 to C8640 and the linear scaling memory and CPU requirements of the CEM demonstrated. We show that the CPU requisites of the CEM and CG-DMS are similar for calculations with comparable accuracy.

  10. Diagrammatic expansion for positive spectral functions beyond GW: Application to vertex corrections in the electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanucci, G.; Pavlyukh, Y.; Uimonen, A.-M.; van Leeuwen, R.

    2014-09-01

    We present a diagrammatic approach to construct self-energy approximations within many-body perturbation theory with positive spectral properties. The method cures the problem of negative spectral functions which arises from a straightforward inclusion of vertex diagrams beyond the GW approximation. Our approach consists of a two-step procedure: We first express the approximate many-body self-energy as a product of half-diagrams and then identify the minimal number of half-diagrams to add in order to form a perfect square. The resulting self-energy is an unconventional sum of self-energy diagrams in which the internal lines of half a diagram are time-ordered Green's functions, whereas those of the other half are anti-time-ordered Green's functions, and the lines joining the two halves are either lesser or greater Green's functions. The theory is developed using noninteracting Green's functions and subsequently extended to self-consistent Green's functions. Issues related to the conserving properties of diagrammatic approximations with positive spectral functions are also addressed. As a major application of the formalism we derive the minimal set of additional diagrams to make positive the spectral function of the GW approximation with lowest-order vertex corrections and screened interactions. The method is then applied to vertex corrections in the three-dimensional homogeneous electron gas by using a combination of analytical frequency integrations and numerical Monte Carlo momentum integrations to evaluate the diagrams.

  11. Overcoming the bottleneck of platelet lysate supply in large-scale clinical expansion of adipose-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glovinski, Peter Viktor; Herly, Mikkel; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2017-01-01

    , we tested PLs prepared via three methods from outdated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates (PCs) to establish an efficient and feasible expansion of ASCs for clinical use. METHODS: PLs were prepared by the freeze-thaw method from freshly drawn platelets or from outdated buffy coat-derived PCs...

  12. Correlation between isothermal expansion and functional properties change of the Fe81B13Si4C2 amorphous alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalezić-Glišović A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural changes effect on functional properties of ribbon shaped samples of the Fe81B13Si4C2 amorphous alloy during annealing process was investigated in this paper. Differential scanning calorimetry method has shown that this alloy crystallizes in one stage, in temperature range from room temperature up to 700°C. Structural relaxation process was investigated by sensitive dilatation method in nonisothermal and isothermal conditions. It has been shown that structural relaxation process occurs in two stages by measuring thermal expansion at constant temperatures of t1=420°C, t2 = 440°C and t3 = 460°C. The first stage is characterized by linear logarithmic dependence of thermal expansion upon time at constant temperature. The second stage of structural relaxation process is characterized by linear dependence of isothermal expansion upon the square root of process time. These results imply that the first stage of structural relaxation process is a rapid kinetic process, while the second stage of structural relaxation process is a slow diffusion process. The rate constants k11 = 2,27⋅10- 3 s-1, k12 = 2,79⋅10-3 s-1, k13 = 3,6⋅10-3 s-1, k21 = 0,67⋅10-4 s-1, k22 = 3,72⋅10-4 s-1, k23 = 21,53⋅10-4 s-1 and activation energies E1 = 48,64 kJ/mol and E2 = 366, 23 kJ/mol were determined for both stages of structural relaxation process. The distinct correlation between structural relaxation process and magnetic susceptibility relative change was determined by thermomagnetic measurements. It has been shown that magnetic susceptibility can be increased by up to 80%, by convenient annealings after structural relaxation process, at magnetic field intensity of 8 kA/m.

  13. Expansion of X-ray form factor for close shell using uncorrelated wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AL-Robayi, Enas M. [Babylon University , College of Science for Women, laser Physics Department, Hilla (Iraq)

    2013-12-16

    The atomic scattering factor has been studied for Be+ve, and B+2ve ions using the uncorrelated wave function (Hartree-Fock (HF)) for inter particle electronic shells. The physical importance of this factor appears in its relation to several important atomic properties as, the coherent scattering intensity, the total scattering intensity, the incoherent scattering function, the coherent scattering cross section, the total incoherent cross section, the nuclear magnetic shielding constant, the geometrical structure factor. Also there is one atomic properties the one particle radial density distribution function D(r)has been studied using the partitioning technique.

  14. Development of a scale of executive functioning for the RBANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert J; Kitchen Andren, Katherine A; Tolle, Kathryn A

    2018-01-01

    The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) is a cognitive battery that contains scales of several cognitive abilities, but no scale in the instrument is exclusively dedicated to executive functioning. Although the subtests allow for observation of executive-type errors, each error is of fairly low base rate, and healthy and clinical normative data are lacking on the frequency of these types of errors, making their significance difficult to interpret in isolation. The aim of this project was to create an RBANS executive errors scale (RBANS EE) with items comprised of qualitatively dysexecutive errors committed throughout the test. Participants included Veterans referred for outpatient neuropsychological testing. Items were initially selected based on theoretical literature and were retained based on item-total correlations. The RBANS EE (a percentage calculated by dividing the number of dysexecutive errors by the total number of responses) was moderately related to each of seven established measures of executive functioning and was strongly predictive of dichotomous classification of executive impairment. Thus, the scale had solid concurrent validity, justifying its use as a supplementary scale. The RBANS EE requires no additional administration time and can provide a quantified measure of otherwise unmeasured aspects of executive functioning.

  15. On the spherical harmonic expansion of the neutron angular distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depken, Sven

    1959-03-15

    The neutron (one-velocity) angular distribution function is expanded in terms of spherical harmonic tensors. The solution to the equations of the moments is given explicitly and the result is applied to the plane, spherical and cylinder symmetrical cases.

  16. On the spherical harmonic expansion of the neutron angular distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depken, Sven

    1959-03-01

    The neutron (one-velocity) angular distribution function is expanded in terms of spherical harmonic tensors. The solution to the equations of the moments is given explicitly and the result is applied to the plane, spherical and cylinder symmetrical cases

  17. Information filtering via a scaling-based function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Chen, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Finding a universal description of the algorithm optimization is one of the key challenges in personalized recommendation. In this article, for the first time, we introduce a scaling-based algorithm (SCL) independent of recommendation list length based on a hybrid algorithm of heat conduction and mass diffusion, by finding out the scaling function for the tunable parameter and object average degree. The optimal value of the tunable parameter can be abstracted from the scaling function, which is heterogeneous for the individual object. Experimental results obtained from three real datasets, Netflix, MovieLens and RYM, show that the SCL is highly accurate in recommendation. More importantly, compared with a number of excellent algorithms, including the mass diffusion method, the original hybrid method, and even an improved version of the hybrid method, the SCL algorithm remarkably promotes the personalized recommendation in three other aspects: solving the accuracy-diversity dilemma, presenting a high novelty, and solving the key challenge of cold start problem.

  18. Robust determination of the chemical potential in the pole expansion and selected inversion method for solving Kohn-Sham density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Weile; Lin, Lin

    2017-10-01

    Fermi operator expansion (FOE) methods are powerful alternatives to diagonalization type methods for solving Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT). One example is the pole expansion and selected inversion (PEXSI) method, which approximates the Fermi operator by rational matrix functions and reduces the computational complexity to at most quadratic scaling for solving KSDFT. Unlike diagonalization type methods, the chemical potential often cannot be directly read off from the result of a single step of evaluation of the Fermi operator. Hence multiple evaluations are needed to be sequentially performed to compute the chemical potential to ensure the correct number of electrons within a given tolerance. This hinders the performance of FOE methods in practice. In this paper, we develop an efficient and robust strategy to determine the chemical potential in the context of the PEXSI method. The main idea of the new method is not to find the exact chemical potential at each self-consistent-field (SCF) iteration but to dynamically and rigorously update the upper and lower bounds for the true chemical potential, so that the chemical potential reaches its convergence along the SCF iteration. Instead of evaluating the Fermi operator for multiple times sequentially, our method uses a two-level strategy that evaluates the Fermi operators in parallel. In the regime of full parallelization, the wall clock time of each SCF iteration is always close to the time for one single evaluation of the Fermi operator, even when the initial guess is far away from the converged solution. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method using examples with metallic and insulating characters, as well as results from ab initio molecular dynamics.

  19. Discrete imaging models for three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography using radially symmetric expansion functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Schoonover, Robert W; Su, Richard; Oraevsky, Alexander; Anastasio, Mark A

    2014-05-01

    Optoacoustic tomography (OAT), also known as photoacoustic tomography, is an emerging computed biomedical imaging modality that exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles. Iterative image reconstruction algorithms that are based on discrete imaging models are actively being developed for OAT due to their ability to improve image quality by incorporating accurate models of the imaging physics, instrument response, and measurement noise. In this work, we investigate the use of discrete imaging models based on Kaiser-Bessel window functions for iterative image reconstruction in OAT. A closed-form expression for the pressure produced by a Kaiser-Bessel function is calculated, which facilitates accurate computation of the system matrix. Computer-simulation and experimental studies are employed to demonstrate the potential advantages of Kaiser-Bessel function-based iterative image reconstruction in OAT.

  20. Capacity Expansion and Reliability Evaluation on the Networks Flows with Continuous Stochastic Functional Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hamzezadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In many systems such as computer network, fuel distribution, and transportation system, it is necessary to change the capacity of some arcs in order to increase maximum flow value from source s to sink t, while the capacity change incurs minimum cost. In real-time networks, some factors cause loss of arc’s flow. For example, in some flow distribution systems, evaporation, erosion or sediment in pipes waste the flow. Here we define a real capacity, or the so-called functional capacity, which is the operational capacity of an arc. In other words, the functional capacity of an arc equals the possible maximum flow that may pass through the arc. Increasing the functional arcs capacities incurs some cost. There is a certain resource available to cover the costs. First, we construct a mathematical model to minimize the total cost of expanding the functional capacities to the required levels. Then, we consider the loss of flow on each arc as a stochastic variable and compute the system reliability.

  1. Coiled-Coil Proteins Facilitated the Functional Expansion of the Centrosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Michael; Hyman, Anthony A.; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing existing proteins for new cellular functions is recognized as a main mechanism of evolutionary innovation, but its role in organelle evolution is unclear. Here, we explore the mechanisms that led to the evolution of the centrosome, an ancestral eukaryotic organelle that expanded its functional repertoire through the course of evolution. We developed a refined sequence alignment technique that is more sensitive to coiled coil proteins, which are abundant in the centrosome. For proteins with high coiled-coil content, our algorithm identified 17% more reciprocal best hits than BLAST. Analyzing 108 eukaryotic genomes, we traced the evolutionary history of centrosome proteins. In order to assess how these proteins formed the centrosome and adopted new functions, we computationally emulated evolution by iteratively removing the most recently evolved proteins from the centrosomal protein interaction network. Coiled-coil proteins that first appeared in the animal–fungi ancestor act as scaffolds and recruit ancestral eukaryotic proteins such as kinases and phosphatases to the centrosome. This process created a signaling hub that is crucial for multicellular development. Our results demonstrate how ancient proteins can be co-opted to different cellular localizations, thereby becoming involved in novel functions. PMID:24901223

  2. Improved Green’s function measurement for hybridization expansion quantum Monte Carlo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Augustinský, Pavel; Kuneš, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 184, č. 9 (2013), s. 2119-2126 ISSN 0010-4655 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : continuous time quantum Monte Carlo method * Green function estimator Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 2.407, year: 2013

  3. Off The Scale - Expansion or Development? A Small Town within a Metropolitan Zone as an Alternative Place of Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz-Wróbel, Agnieszka

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this paper is to point out the types of spatial changes that the small towns located in Krakow’s range of influence are currently undergoing, as well as what are the consequences of the various types of changes in these towns. The author asks the question whether the current changes seen in small towns that are under the influence of Krakow can be described as sustainable development - at the basis of which is the increasing of the quality of the functional and spatial structure of a town while preserving its qualities and character - or, on the contrary, that it is more appropriate to describe the changes in the spatial structure of towns as an expansion, which is related only to an increase in their surface area or an increase in the density of their built environment? An attempt has also been made to determine the cause of these changes. An analysis of a set of towns in terms of their accessibility in relation to Krakow, as well as the demographic changes in towns in recent years, has been carried out. This research was useful in determining the dynamic of urban changes or their stagnation. Afterwards, groups of towns with varying degrees of transformation (towns that have been intensively transformed, towns with a balanced degree of spatial changes and towns which remain on the side-lines) were established. In addition, various forms of changes were defined - ranging from cities which register an increase in attractiveness and the changes that it brings while preserving their qualities in accordance with the principles of sustainable development, to settlements which are losing their small-town character as a result of intensive change, at the same time undergoing unification both in terms of space and form of use. From among the groups of towns, example which most fully illustrate the varying degrees and character of the changes of small towns in the area of Krakow has been selected. Based on the research that has been conducted, we can state

  4. An Examination of Psychometric Properties of Positive Functional Attitudes Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saide Umut ZEYBEK

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the applicability of Coping Attitudes Scale: Measure of Positive Attitudes in Depression (CAS among Turkish young adult community sample and determine the psychometric properties (validity and reliability of this scale. This study was conducted with 419 students attending different departments in Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Faculty of Education in the spring semester of academic year of 2015-2016. Positive Functional Attitudes Scale, Beck Depression Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Automatic Thoughts Scale, Positivity Scale and Developed Automatic Thoughts Scale.were used as data collection tools. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA were used for investigation of the psychometric properties of the PFAS. Also, criterion-related validity, test-retest validity, and internal consistency were used calculated. The CFA results showed that standardized item estimates of the CAS ranged between 0.45 and 0.47. Also the CFA results showed that the original factor structure of the PFAS confirmed on the Turkish sample. internal consistency was calculated using the total community sample’s PFAS score. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient ort he total scale (.93 was high. Test-retest results of the subscales were 0.76. The findings showed that factor structures of the PFAS’ life perspective, personal accomplishment, positive future, self-worth, coping with problems had psychometric quality in Turkish version. As a result of the study, the Turkish version of PFAS has good validity and reliability for young adult community sample. [JCBPR 2017; 6(2.000: 59-66

  5. Expansion of the Kano model to identify relevant customer segments and functional requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlason, Reynir Smari; Stefansson, Arnaldur Smari; Wietz, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The Kano model of customer satisfaction has been widely used to analyse perceived needs of customers. The model provides product developers valuable information about if, and then how much a given functional requirement (FR) will impact customer satisfaction if implemented within a product, system...... or a service. A current limitation of the Kano model is that it does not allow developers to visualise which combined sets of FRs would provide the highest satisfaction between different customer segments. In this paper, a stepwise method to address this particular shortcoming is presented. First......, a traditional Kano analysis is conducted for the different segments of interest. Second, for each FR, relationship functions are integrated between x=0 and x=1. Third, integrals are inserted into a combination matrix crossing segments and FRs, where FRs with the highest sum across the chosen segments...

  6. Molecular evolution and the role of oxidative stress in the expansion and functional diversification of cytosolic glutathione transferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos Vítor

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytosolic glutathione transferases (cGST are a large group of ubiquitous enzymes involved in detoxification and are well known for their undesired side effects during chemotherapy. In this work we have performed thorough phylogenetic analyses to understand the various aspects of the evolution and functional diversification of cGSTs. Furthermore, we assessed plausible correlations between gene duplication and substrate specificity of gene paralogs in humans and selected species, notably in mammalian enzymes and their natural substrates. Results We present a molecular phylogeny of cytosolic GSTs that shows that several classes of cGSTs are more ubiquitous and thus have an older ancestry than previously thought. Furthermore, we found that positive selection is implicated in the diversification of cGSTs. The number of duplicate genes per class is generally higher for groups of enzymes that metabolize products of oxidative damage. Conclusions 1 Protection against oxidative stress seems to be the major driver of positive selection in mammalian cGSTs, explaining the overall expansion pattern of this subfamily; 2 Given the functional redundancy of GSTs that metabolize xenobiotic chemicals, we would expect the loss of gene duplicates, but by contrast we observed a gene expansion of this family, which likely has been favored by: i the diversification of endogenous substrates; ii differential tissue expression; and iii increased specificity for a particular molecule; 3 The increased availability of sequence data from diversified taxa is likely to continue to improve our understanding of the early origin of the different cGST classes.

  7. Properties of the Magnitude Terms of Orthogonal Scaling Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Peter C; Havlicek, Joseph P; Acton, Scott T; Hossack, John A

    2010-09-01

    The spectrum of the convolution of two continuous functions can be determined as the continuous Fourier transform of the cross-correlation function. The same can be said about the spectrum of the convolution of two infinite discrete sequences, which can be determined as the discrete time Fourier transform of the cross-correlation function of the two sequences. In current digital signal processing, the spectrum of the contiuous Fourier transform and the discrete time Fourier transform are approximately determined by numerical integration or by densely taking the discrete Fourier transform. It has been shown that all three transforms share many analogous properties. In this paper we will show another useful property of determining the spectrum terms of the convolution of two finite length sequences by determining the discrete Fourier transform of the modified cross-correlation function. In addition, two properties of the magnitude terms of orthogonal wavelet scaling functions are developed. These properties are used as constraints for an exhaustive search to determine an robust lower bound on conjoint localization of orthogonal scaling functions.

  8. Development of large-scale functional brain networks in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh Supekar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of large-scale functional organization of the human brain is not well understood. Here we use network analysis of intrinsic functional connectivity to characterize the organization of brain networks in 23 children (ages 7-9 y and 22 young-adults (ages 19-22 y. Comparison of network properties, including path-length, clustering-coefficient, hierarchy, and regional connectivity, revealed that although children and young-adults' brains have similar "small-world" organization at the global level, they differ significantly in hierarchical organization and interregional connectivity. We found that subcortical areas were more strongly connected with primary sensory, association, and paralimbic areas in children, whereas young-adults showed stronger cortico-cortical connectivity between paralimbic, limbic, and association areas. Further, combined analysis of functional connectivity with wiring distance measures derived from white-matter fiber tracking revealed that the development of large-scale brain networks is characterized by weakening of short-range functional connectivity and strengthening of long-range functional connectivity. Importantly, our findings show that the dynamic process of over-connectivity followed by pruning, which rewires connectivity at the neuronal level, also operates at the systems level, helping to reconfigure and rebalance subcortical and paralimbic connectivity in the developing brain. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of network analysis of brain connectivity to elucidate key principles underlying functional brain maturation, paving the way for novel studies of disrupted brain connectivity in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism.

  9. Development of large-scale functional brain networks in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supekar, Kaustubh; Musen, Mark; Menon, Vinod

    2009-07-01

    The ontogeny of large-scale functional organization of the human brain is not well understood. Here we use network analysis of intrinsic functional connectivity to characterize the organization of brain networks in 23 children (ages 7-9 y) and 22 young-adults (ages 19-22 y). Comparison of network properties, including path-length, clustering-coefficient, hierarchy, and regional connectivity, revealed that although children and young-adults' brains have similar "small-world" organization at the global level, they differ significantly in hierarchical organization and interregional connectivity. We found that subcortical areas were more strongly connected with primary sensory, association, and paralimbic areas in children, whereas young-adults showed stronger cortico-cortical connectivity between paralimbic, limbic, and association areas. Further, combined analysis of functional connectivity with wiring distance measures derived from white-matter fiber tracking revealed that the development of large-scale brain networks is characterized by weakening of short-range functional connectivity and strengthening of long-range functional connectivity. Importantly, our findings show that the dynamic process of over-connectivity followed by pruning, which rewires connectivity at the neuronal level, also operates at the systems level, helping to reconfigure and rebalance subcortical and paralimbic connectivity in the developing brain. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of network analysis of brain connectivity to elucidate key principles underlying functional brain maturation, paving the way for novel studies of disrupted brain connectivity in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism.

  10. Research on AutoCAD secondary development and function expansion based on VBA technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runmei; Gu, Yehuan

    2017-06-01

    AutoCAD is the most widely used drawing tool among the similar design drawing products. In the process of drawing different types of design drawings of the same product, there are a lot of repetitive and single work contents. The traditional manual method uses a drawing software AutoCAD drawing graphics with low efficiency, high error rate and high input cost shortcomings and many more. In order to solve these problems, the design of the parametric drawing system of the hot-rolled I-beam (steel beam) cross-section is completed by using the VBA secondary development tool and the Access database software with large-capacity storage data, and the analysis of the functional extension of the plane drawing and the parametric drawing design in this paper. For the secondary development of AutoCAD functions, the system drawing work will be simplified and work efficiency also has been greatly improved. This introduction of parametric design of AutoCAD drawing system to promote the industrial mass production and related industries economic growth rate similar to the standard I-beam hot-rolled products.

  11. Interleukin 21 and its receptor are involved in NK cell expansion and regulation of lymphocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish-Novak, J; Dillon, S R; Nelson, A; Hammond, A; Sprecher, C; Gross, J A; Johnston, J; Madden, K; Xu, W; West, J; Schrader, S; Burkhead, S; Heipel, M; Brandt, C; Kuijper, J L; Kramer, J; Conklin, D; Presnell, S R; Berry, J; Shiota, F; Bort, S; Hambly, K; Mudri, S; Clegg, C; Moore, M; Grant, F J; Lofton-Day, C; Gilbert, T; Rayond, F; Ching, A; Yao, L; Smith, D; Webster, P; Whitmore, T; Maurer, M; Kaushansky, K; Holly, R D; Foster, D

    2000-11-02

    Cytokines are important in the regulation of haematopoiesis and immune responses, and can influence lymphocyte development. Here we have identified a class I cytokine receptor that is selectively expressed in lymphoid tissues and is capable of signal transduction. The full-length receptor was expressed in BaF3 cells, which created a functional assay for ligand detection and cloning. Conditioned media from activated human CD3+ T cells supported proliferation of the assay cell line. We constructed a complementary DNA expression library from activated human CD3+ T cells, and identified a cytokine with a four-helix-bundle structure using functional cloning. This cytokine is most closely related to IL2 and IL15, and has been designated IL21 with the receptor designated IL21 R. In vitro assays suggest that IL21 has a role in the proliferation and maturation of natural killer (NK) cell populations from bone marrow, in the proliferation of mature B-cell populations co-stimulated with anti-CD40, and in the proliferation of T cells co-stimulated with anti-CD3.

  12. DGDFT: A massively parallel method for large scale density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao

    2015-09-28

    We describe a massively parallel implementation of the recently developed discontinuous Galerkin density functional theory (DGDFT) method, for efficient large-scale Kohn-Sham DFT based electronic structure calculations. The DGDFT method uses adaptive local basis (ALB) functions generated on-the-fly during the self-consistent field iteration to represent the solution to the Kohn-Sham equations. The use of the ALB set provides a systematic way to improve the accuracy of the approximation. By using the pole expansion and selected inversion technique to compute electron density, energy, and atomic forces, we can make the computational complexity of DGDFT scale at most quadratically with respect to the number of electrons for both insulating and metallic systems. We show that for the two-dimensional (2D) phosphorene systems studied here, using 37 basis functions per atom allows us to reach an accuracy level of 1.3 × 10(-4) Hartree/atom in terms of the error of energy and 6.2 × 10(-4) Hartree/bohr in terms of the error of atomic force, respectively. DGDFT can achieve 80% parallel efficiency on 128,000 high performance computing cores when it is used to study the electronic structure of 2D phosphorene systems with 3500-14 000 atoms. This high parallel efficiency results from a two-level parallelization scheme that we will describe in detail.

  13. DGDFT: A massively parallel method for large scale density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wei, E-mail: whu@lbl.gov; Yang, Chao, E-mail: cyang@lbl.gov [Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lin, Lin, E-mail: linlin@math.berkeley.edu [Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    We describe a massively parallel implementation of the recently developed discontinuous Galerkin density functional theory (DGDFT) method, for efficient large-scale Kohn-Sham DFT based electronic structure calculations. The DGDFT method uses adaptive local basis (ALB) functions generated on-the-fly during the self-consistent field iteration to represent the solution to the Kohn-Sham equations. The use of the ALB set provides a systematic way to improve the accuracy of the approximation. By using the pole expansion and selected inversion technique to compute electron density, energy, and atomic forces, we can make the computational complexity of DGDFT scale at most quadratically with respect to the number of electrons for both insulating and metallic systems. We show that for the two-dimensional (2D) phosphorene systems studied here, using 37 basis functions per atom allows us to reach an accuracy level of 1.3 × 10{sup −4} Hartree/atom in terms of the error of energy and 6.2 × 10{sup −4} Hartree/bohr in terms of the error of atomic force, respectively. DGDFT can achieve 80% parallel efficiency on 128,000 high performance computing cores when it is used to study the electronic structure of 2D phosphorene systems with 3500-14 000 atoms. This high parallel efficiency results from a two-level parallelization scheme that we will describe in detail.

  14. DGDFT: A massively parallel method for large scale density functional theory calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Chao; Lin, Lin

    2015-01-01

    We describe a massively parallel implementation of the recently developed discontinuous Galerkin density functional theory (DGDFT) method, for efficient large-scale Kohn-Sham DFT based electronic structure calculations. The DGDFT method uses adaptive local basis (ALB) functions generated on-the-fly during the self-consistent field iteration to represent the solution to the Kohn-Sham equations. The use of the ALB set provides a systematic way to improve the accuracy of the approximation. By using the pole expansion and selected inversion technique to compute electron density, energy, and atomic forces, we can make the computational complexity of DGDFT scale at most quadratically with respect to the number of electrons for both insulating and metallic systems. We show that for the two-dimensional (2D) phosphorene systems studied here, using 37 basis functions per atom allows us to reach an accuracy level of 1.3 × 10 −4 Hartree/atom in terms of the error of energy and 6.2 × 10 −4 Hartree/bohr in terms of the error of atomic force, respectively. DGDFT can achieve 80% parallel efficiency on 128,000 high performance computing cores when it is used to study the electronic structure of 2D phosphorene systems with 3500-14 000 atoms. This high parallel efficiency results from a two-level parallelization scheme that we will describe in detail

  15. Density Functional Theory and Materials Modeling at Atomistic Length Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapan K. Ghosh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We discuss the basic concepts of density functional theory (DFT as applied to materials modeling in the microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic length scales. The picture that emerges is that of a single unified framework for the study of both quantum and classical systems. While for quantum DFT, the central equation is a one-particle Schrodinger-like Kohn-Sham equation, the classical DFT consists of Boltzmann type distributions, both corresponding to a system of noninteracting particles in the field of a density-dependent effective potential, the exact functional form of which is unknown. One therefore approximates the exchange-correlation potential for quantum systems and the excess free energy density functional or the direct correlation functions for classical systems. Illustrative applications of quantum DFT to microscopic modeling of molecular interaction and that of classical DFT to a mesoscopic modeling of soft condensed matter systems are highlighted.

  16. Explanatory Factors of the Expansion of Recreation Function on the Bank of Danube River in Budapest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pál Szabó

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In a city's development a river and riverbank played important role, however in recent decades the functions of them have changed, transformed, especially in major cities in the more developed countries, so the city administration was faced with a new phenomenon and geographical space: the changing riverbanks, and the utilization, development, revitalization of them has become a key issue. The various real processes showed the direction that these areas should be provided to the people, and the recreation service will be important for the local residents and tourists. Overall, the urban waterfront development is an increasingly important researched topic and policy. The question is: can we realize it in Budapest also nowadays? In recent years, those processes took place in Budapest, which resulted in an increasing utilization of the Danube and its banks for recreational functions. On the one hand, local social and economic processes have led to the waterfront sites released, on the other hand the needs of the residential population and tourists using the river and the riverside for recreational purposes have increased, and thirdly, the new city administration decided to renew the banks of the Danube, mainly to create new recreational areas. In this paper, we analyze these three factors, focusing on a past short period, because there is an exceptional cohesion between the processes, the needs and the new development goals. Two case studies are in the paper also: the Margaret Island as the oldest traditional recreational area in Budapest, and the Kopaszi-dam, as the newest and successful recreational area of Budapest. The analysis of the processes is based on data and literature, the analysis of the needs is based on a survey, and the analysis of the goals is based on the different development documents.

  17. On equivalence of high temperature series expansion and coupling parameter series expansion in thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sai Venkata Ramana, A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling parameter series expansion and the high temperature series expansion in the thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids are shown to be equivalent if the interaction potential is pairwise additive. As a consequence, for the class of fluids with the potential having a hardcore repulsion, if the hard-sphere fluid is chosen as reference system, the terms of coupling parameter series expansion for radial distribution function, direct correlation function, and Helmholtz free energy follow a scaling law with temperature. The scaling law is confirmed by application to square-well fluids

  18. Applying circuit theory for corridor expansion and management at regional scales: tiling, pinch points, and omnidirectional connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pelletier

    Full Text Available Connectivity models are useful tools that improve the ability of researchers and managers to plan land use for conservation and preservation. Most connectivity models function in a point-to-point or patch-to-patch fashion, limiting their use for assessing connectivity over very large areas. In large or highly fragmented systems, there may be so many habitat patches of interest that assessing connectivity among all possible combinations is prohibitive. To overcome these conceptual and practical limitations, we hypothesized that minor adaptation of the Circuitscape model can allow the creation of omnidirectional connectivity maps illustrating flow paths and variations in the ease of travel across a large study area. We tested this hypothesis in a 24,300 km(2 study area centered on the Montérégie region near Montréal, Québec. We executed the circuit model in overlapping tiles covering the study region. Current was passed across the surface of each tile in orthogonal directions, and then the tiles were reassembled to create directional and omnidirectional maps of connectivity. The resulting mosaics provide a continuous view of connectivity in the entire study area at the full original resolution. We quantified differences between mosaics created using different tile and buffer sizes and developed a measure of the prominence of seams in mosaics formed with this approach. The mosaics clearly show variations in current flow driven by subtle aspects of landscape composition and configuration. Shown prominently in mosaics are pinch points, narrow corridors where organisms appear to be required to traverse when moving through the landscape. Using modest computational resources, these continuous, fine-scale maps of nearly unlimited size allow the identification of movement paths and barriers that affect connectivity. This effort develops a powerful new application of circuit models by pinpointing areas of importance for conservation, broadening the

  19. MicroRNA-155 Modulates Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease by Impacting T Cell Expansion, Migration, and Effector Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzer, Nina C; Snyder, Katiri; Meng, Xiamoei; Taylor, Patricia A; Efebera, Yvonne A; Devine, Steven M; Blazar, Bruce R; Garzon, Ramiro; Ranganathan, Parvathi

    2018-06-15

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is a small noncoding RNA critical for the regulation of inflammation as well as innate and adaptive immune responses. MiR-155 has been shown to be dysregulated in both donor and recipient immune cells during acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). We previously reported that miR-155 is upregulated in donor T cells of mice and humans with aGVHD and that mice receiving miR-155-deficient (miR155 -/- ) splenocytes had markedly reduced aGVHD. However, molecular mechanisms by which miR-155 modulates T cell function in aGVHD have not been fully investigated. We identify that miR-155 expression in both donor CD8 + T cells and conventional CD4 + CD25 - T cells is pivotal for aGVHD pathogenesis. Using murine aGVHD transplant experiments, we show that miR-155 strongly impacts alloreactive T cell expansion through multiple distinct mechanisms, modulating proliferation in CD8 + donor T cells and promoting exhaustion in donor CD4 + T cells in both the spleen and colon. Additionally, miR-155 drives a proinflammatory Th1 phenotype in donor T cells in these two sites, and miR-155 -/- donor T cells are polarized toward an IL-4-producing Th2 phenotype. We further demonstrate that miR-155 expression in donor T cells regulates CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine-dependent migration. Notably, we show that miR-155 expression is crucial for donor T cell infiltration into multiple target organs. These findings provide further understanding of the role of miR-155 in modulating aGVHD through T cell expansion, effector cytokine production, and migration. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Coarse grid simulation of bed expansion characteristics of industrial-scale gas–solid bubbling fluidized beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; van der Hoef, Martin Anton; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Two-fluid modeling of the hydrodynamics of industrial-scale gas-fluidized beds proves a long-standing challenge for both engineers and scientists. In this study, we suggest a simple method to modify currently available drag correlations to allow for the effect of unresolved sub-grid scale

  1. Revisiting the Fourier expansion of Mie scattering matrices in generalized spherical functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghavi, Suniti

    2014-01-01

    Mie computations of the scattering properties of large particles are a time consuming step in the radiative transfer modeling of aerosol and clouds. Currently, there exist two methods based on the use of spherical functions for computing the Fourier moments of the phase matrix of a given spherical particle or particulate polydispersion: The first, developed over the years before being presented in a convenient form by Siewert [31], required an intermediate computation of the phase matrix over which numerical integration was performed to deliver the required Fourier components. The second, suggested by Domke [9], promised a direct computation of the Fourier moments using Wigner 3-j symbols. While the former was relatively easy to implement and is thus the most commonly used to date, its numerical implementation using an arbitrary user choice of angular quadrature (NAI-1) can produce inaccurate results. Numerical integration using quadrature points as recommended by de Rooij and van der Stap [5] (NAI-2) delivers accurate results with high computational efficiency. Domke's method enables a direct computation of the exact number of required Fourier components. However, the original manuscript contained several misprints, many of which were subsequently corrected by de Rooij and van der Stap [5]. Unfortunately, the main recurrence relationship used in Domke [9] remained uncorrected. In this paper, the corrected relationship is presented along with other minor corrections. de Rooij and van der Stap [5] had found the straightforward application of Domke's method viable only for size parameters smaller than ∼120 due to issues involving computer storage. A means of implementing the corrected Domke formalism using precomputed tabulations of Wigner 3-j symbols (PCW) is presented here, making it more computationally economical and applicable over much broader particle size ranges. The accuracy of PCW is only limited by machine precision. For a single particle, NAI-2 is found

  2. Spanish juniper gain expansion opportunities by counting on a functionally diverse dispersal assemblage community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano-Ávila, Gema; Pías, Beatriz; Sanz-Pérez, Virginia; Virgós, Emilio; Escudero, Adrián; Valladares, Fernando

    2013-10-01

    Seed dispersal is typically performed by a diverse array of species assemblages with different behavioral and morphological traits which determine dispersal quality (DQ, defined as the probability of recruitment of a dispersed seed). Fate of ecosystems to ongoing environmental changes is critically dependent on dispersal and mainly on DQ in novel scenarios. We assess here the DQ, thus the multiplicative effect of germination and survival probability to the first 3 years of life, for seeds dispersed by several bird species (Turdus spp.) and carnivores (Vulpes vulpes, Martes foina) in mature woodland remnants of Spanish juniper (Juniperus thurifera) and old fields which are being colonized by this species. Results showed that DQ was similar in mature woodlands and old fields. Germination rate for seeds dispersed by carnivores (11.5%) and thrushes (9.12%) was similar, however, interacted with microhabitat suitability. Seeds dispersed by carnivores reach the maximum germination rate on shrubs (16%), whereas seeds dispersed by thrushes did on female juniper canopies (15.5) indicating that each group of dispersers performed a directed dispersal. This directional effect was diluted when survival probability was considered: thrushes selected smaller seeds which had higher mortality in the seedling stage (70%) in relation to seedlings dispersed by carnivores (40%). Overall, thrushes resulted low-quality dispersers which provided a probability or recruitment of 2.5%, while a seed dispersed by carnivores had a probability of recruitment of 6.5%. Our findings show that generalist dispersers (i.e., carnivores) can provide a higher probability of recruitment than specialized dispersers (i.e., Turdus spp.). However, generalist species are usually opportunistic dispersers as their role as seed dispersers is dependent on the availability of trophic resources and species feeding preferences. As a result, J. thurifera dispersal community is composed by two functional groups of

  3. The Minimum Data Set 3.0 Cognitive Function Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S; Dosa, David; Wysocki, Andrea; Mor, Vincent

    2017-09-01

    The Minimum Data Set (MDS) 3.0 introduced the Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS), a short performance-based cognitive screener for nursing home (NH) residents. Not all residents are able to complete the BIMS and are consequently assessed by staff. We designed a Cognitive Function Scale (CFS) integrating self-report and staff-report data and present evidence of the scale's construct validity. A retrospective cohort study. The subjects consisted of 3 cohorts: (1) long-stay NH residents (N=941,077) and (2) new admissions (N=2,066,580) during 2011-2012, and (3) residents with the older MDS 2.0 assessment in 2010 and the newer MDS 3.0 assessment (n=688,511). MDS 3.0 items were used to create a single, integrated 4-category hierarchical CFS that was compared with residents' prior MDS 2.0 Cognitive Performance Scale scores and other concurrent MDS 3.0 measures of construct validity. The new CFS suggests that 28% of the long-stay cohort in 2011-2012 were cognitively intact, 22% were mildly impaired, 33% were moderately impaired, and 17% were severely impaired. For the admission cohort, the CFS noted 56% as cognitively intact, 23% as mildly impaired, 17% as moderately impaired, and 4% as severely impaired. The CFS corresponded closely with residents' prior MDS 2.0 Cognitive Performance Scale scores and with performance of Activities of Daily Living, and nurses' judgments of function and behavior in both the admission and long-stay cohorts. The new CFS is valuable to researchers as it provides a single, integrated measure of NH residents' cognitive function, regardless of the mode of assessment.

  4. Information filtering via a scaling-based function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Qiu

    Full Text Available Finding a universal description of the algorithm optimization is one of the key challenges in personalized recommendation. In this article, for the first time, we introduce a scaling-based algorithm (SCL independent of recommendation list length based on a hybrid algorithm of heat conduction and mass diffusion, by finding out the scaling function for the tunable parameter and object average degree. The optimal value of the tunable parameter can be abstracted from the scaling function, which is heterogeneous for the individual object. Experimental results obtained from three real datasets, Netflix, MovieLens and RYM, show that the SCL is highly accurate in recommendation. More importantly, compared with a number of excellent algorithms, including the mass diffusion method, the original hybrid method, and even an improved version of the hybrid method, the SCL algorithm remarkably promotes the personalized recommendation in three other aspects: solving the accuracy-diversity dilemma, presenting a high novelty, and solving the key challenge of cold start problem.

  5. A comparative study of scale-adaptive and large-eddy simulations of highly swirling turbulent flow through an abrupt expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadi, Ardalan; Nilsson, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    The strongly swirling turbulent flow through an abrupt expansion is investigated using highly resolved LES and SAS, to shed more light on the stagnation region and the helical vortex breakdown. The vortex breakdown in an abrupt expansion resembles the so-called vortex rope occurring in hydro power draft tubes. It is known that the large-scale helical vortex structures can be captured by regular RANS turbulence models. However, the spurious suppression of the small-scale structures should be avoided using less diffusive methods. The present work compares LES and SAS results with the experimental measurement of Dellenback et al. (1988). The computations are conducted using a general non-orthogonal finite-volume method with a fully collocated storage available in the OpenFOAM-2.1.x CFD code. The dynamics of the flow is studied at two Reynolds numbers, Re=6.0×10 4 and Re=10 5 , at the almost constant high swirl numbers of Sr=1.16 and Sr=1.23, respectively. The time-averaged velocity and pressure fields and the root mean square of the velocity fluctuations, are captured and investigated qualitatively. The flow with the lower Reynolds number gives a much weaker outburst although the frequency of the structures seems to be constant for the plateau swirl number

  6. Regional-Scale Drivers of Forest Structure and Function in Northwestern Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Mark A.; Asner, Gregory P.; Anderson, Christopher B.; Martin, Roberta E.; Knapp, David E.; Tupayachi, Raul; Perez, Eneas; Elespuru, Nydia; Alonso, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Field studies in Amazonia have found a relationship at continental scales between soil fertility and broad trends in forest structure and function. Little is known at regional scales, however, about how discrete patterns in forest structure or functional attributes map onto underlying edaphic or geological patterns. We collected airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data and VSWIR (Visible to Shortwave Infrared) imaging spectroscopy measurements over 600 km2 of northwestern Amazonian lowland forests. We also established 83 inventories of plant species composition and soil properties, distributed between two widespread geological formations. Using these data, we mapped forest structure and canopy reflectance, and compared them to patterns in plant species composition, soils, and underlying geology. We found that variations in soils and species composition explained up to 70% of variation in canopy height, and corresponded to profound changes in forest vertical profiles. We further found that soils and plant species composition explained more than 90% of the variation in canopy reflectance as measured by imaging spectroscopy, indicating edaphic and compositional control of canopy chemical properties. We last found that soils explained between 30% and 70% of the variation in gap frequency in these forests, depending on the height threshold used to define gaps. Our findings indicate that a relatively small number of edaphic and compositional variables, corresponding to underlying geology, may be responsible for variations in canopy structure and chemistry over large expanses of Amazonian forest. PMID:25793602

  7. Regional-scale drivers of forest structure and function in northwestern Amazonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Higgins

    Full Text Available Field studies in Amazonia have found a relationship at continental scales between soil fertility and broad trends in forest structure and function. Little is known at regional scales, however, about how discrete patterns in forest structure or functional attributes map onto underlying edaphic or geological patterns. We collected airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging data and VSWIR (Visible to Shortwave Infrared imaging spectroscopy measurements over 600 km2 of northwestern Amazonian lowland forests. We also established 83 inventories of plant species composition and soil properties, distributed between two widespread geological formations. Using these data, we mapped forest structure and canopy reflectance, and compared them to patterns in plant species composition, soils, and underlying geology. We found that variations in soils and species composition explained up to 70% of variation in canopy height, and corresponded to profound changes in forest vertical profiles. We further found that soils and plant species composition explained more than 90% of the variation in canopy reflectance as measured by imaging spectroscopy, indicating edaphic and compositional control of canopy chemical properties. We last found that soils explained between 30% and 70% of the variation in gap frequency in these forests, depending on the height threshold used to define gaps. Our findings indicate that a relatively small number of edaphic and compositional variables, corresponding to underlying geology, may be responsible for variations in canopy structure and chemistry over large expanses of Amazonian forest.

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis, Lineage-Specific Expansion and Functional Divergence of seed dormancy 4-Like Genes in Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saminathan Subburaj

    Full Text Available The rice gene seed dormancy 4 (OsSdr4 functions in seed dormancy and is a major factor associated with pre-harvest sprouting (PHS. Although previous studies of this protein family were reported for rice and other species, knowledge of the evolution of genes homologous to OsSdr4 in plants remains inadequate. Fifty four Sdr4-like (hereafter designated Sdr4L genes were identified in nine plant lineages including 36 species. Phylogenetic analysis placed these genes in eight subfamilies (I-VIII. Genes from the same lineage clustered together, supported by analysis of conserved motifs and exon-intron patterns. Segmental duplications were present in both dicot and monocot clusters, while tandemly duplicated genes occurred only in monocot clusters indicating that both tandem and segmental duplications contributed to expansion of the grass I and II subfamilies. Estimation of the approximate ages of the duplication events indicated that ancestral Sdr4 genes evolved from a common angiosperm ancestor, about 160 million years ago (MYA. Moreover, diversification of Sdr4L genes in mono and dicot plants was mainly associated with genome-wide duplication and speciation events. Functional divergence was observed in all subfamily pairs, except IV/VIIIa. Further analysis indicated that functional constraints between subfamily pairs I/II, I/VIIIb, II/VI, II/VIIIb, II/IV, and VI/VIIIb were statistically significant. Site and branch-site model analyses of positive selection suggested that these genes were under strong adaptive selection pressure. Critical amino acids detected for both functional divergence and positive selection were mostly located in the loops, pointing to functional importance of these regions in this protein family. In addition, differential expression studies by transcriptome atlas of 11 Sdr4L genes showed that the duplicated genes may have undergone divergence in expression between plant species. Our findings showed that Sdr4L genes are

  9. Molecular-Scale Electronics: From Concept to Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dong; Wang, Xiaolong; Jia, Chuancheng; Lee, Takhee; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-04-13

    Creating functional electrical circuits using individual or ensemble molecules, often termed as "molecular-scale electronics", not only meets the increasing technical demands of the miniaturization of traditional Si-based electronic devices, but also provides an ideal window of exploring the intrinsic properties of materials at the molecular level. This Review covers the major advances with the most general applicability and emphasizes new insights into the development of efficient platform methodologies for building reliable molecular electronic devices with desired functionalities through the combination of programmed bottom-up self-assembly and sophisticated top-down device fabrication. First, we summarize a number of different approaches of forming molecular-scale junctions and discuss various experimental techniques for examining these nanoscale circuits in details. We then give a full introduction of characterization techniques and theoretical simulations for molecular electronics. Third, we highlight the major contributions and new concepts of integrating molecular functionalities into electrical circuits. Finally, we provide a critical discussion of limitations and main challenges that still exist for the development of molecular electronics. These analyses should be valuable for deeply understanding charge transport through molecular junctions, the device fabrication process, and the roadmap for future practical molecular electronics.

  10. Clonal expansion of genome-intact HIV-1 in functionally polarized Th1 CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guinevere Q; Orlova-Fink, Nina; Einkauf, Kevin; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Sun, Xiaoming; Harrington, Sean; Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Hua, Stephane; Chen, Hsiao-Rong; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Reddy, Kavidha; Dong, Krista; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D; Rosenberg, Eric S; Yu, Xu G; Lichterfeld, Mathias

    2017-06-30

    HIV-1 causes a chronic, incurable disease due to its persistence in CD4+ T cells that contain replication-competent provirus, but exhibit little or no active viral gene expression and effectively resist combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). These latently infected T cells represent an extremely small proportion of all circulating CD4+ T cells but possess a remarkable long-term stability and typically persist throughout life, for reasons that are not fully understood. Here we performed massive single-genome, near-full-length next-generation sequencing of HIV-1 DNA derived from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ex vivo-isolated CD4+ T cells, and subsets of functionally polarized memory CD4+ T cells. This approach identified multiple sets of independent, near-full-length proviral sequences from cART-treated individuals that were completely identical, consistent with clonal expansion of CD4+ T cells harboring intact HIV-1. Intact, near-full-genome HIV-1 DNA sequences that were derived from such clonally expanded CD4+ T cells constituted 62% of all analyzed genome-intact sequences in memory CD4 T cells, were preferentially observed in Th1-polarized cells, were longitudinally detected over a duration of up to 5 years, and were fully replication- and infection-competent. Together, these data suggest that clonal proliferation of Th1-polarized CD4+ T cells encoding for intact HIV-1 represents a driving force for stabilizing the pool of latently infected CD4+ T cells.

  11. Fuel Thermal Expansion (FTHEXP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reymann, G.A.

    1978-07-01

    A model is presented which deals with dimensional changes in LWR fuel pellets caused by changes in temperature. It is capable of dealing with any combination of UO 2 and PuO 2 in solid, liquid or mixed phase states, and includes expansion due to the solid-liquid phase change. The function FTHEXP models fuel thermal expansion as a function of temperature, fraction of PuO 2 , and the fraction of fuel which is molten

  12. Nitrogen-Related Constraints of Carbon Uptake by Large-Scale Forest Expansion: Simulation Study for Climate Change and Management Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracher, Daniela

    2017-11-01

    Increase of forest areas has the potential to increase the terrestrial carbon (C) sink. However, the efficiency for C sequestration depends on the availability of nutrients such as nitrogen (N), which is affected by climatic conditions and management practices. In this study, I analyze how N limitation affects C sequestration of afforestation and how it is influenced by individual climate variables, increased harvest, and fertilizer application. To this end, JSBACH, the land component of the Earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology is applied in idealized simulation experiments. In those simulations, large-scale afforestation increases the terrestrial C sink in the 21st century by around 100 Pg C compared to a business as usual land-use scenario. N limitation reduces C sequestration roughly by the same amount. The relevance of compensating effects of uptake and release of carbon dioxide by plant productivity and soil decomposition, respectively, gets obvious from the simulations. N limitation of both fluxes compensates particularly in the tropics. Increased mineralization under global warming triggers forest expansion, which otherwise is restricted by N availability. Due to compensating higher plant productivity and soil respiration, the global net effect of warming for C sequestration is however rather small. Fertilizer application and increased harvest enhance C sequestration as well as boreal expansion. The additional C sequestration achieved by fertilizer application is offset to a large part by additional emissions of nitrous oxide.

  13. The zero-dimensional O(N) vector model as a benchmark for perturbation theory, the large-N expansion and the functional renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keitel, Jan; Bartosch, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    We consider the zero-dimensional O(N) vector model as a simple example to calculate n-point correlation functions using perturbation theory, the large-N expansion and the functional renormalization group (FRG). Comparing our findings with exact results, we show that perturbation theory breaks down for moderate interactions for all N, as one should expect. While the interaction-induced shift of the free energy and the self-energy are well described by the large-N expansion even for small N, this is not the case for higher order correlation functions. However, using the FRG in its one-particle irreducible formalism, we see that very few running couplings suffice to get accurate results for arbitrary N in the strong coupling regime, outperforming the large-N expansion for small N. We further remark on how the derivative expansion, a well-known approximation strategy for the FRG, reduces to an exact method for the zero-dimensional O(N) vector model. (paper)

  14. Adler function and Bjorken polarized sum rule: Perturbation expansions in powers of the S U (Nc) conformal anomaly and studies of the conformal symmetry limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetič, Gorazd; Kataev, A. L.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a new form of analytical perturbation theory expansion in the massless S U (Nc) theory, for the nonsinglet part of the e+e--annihilation to hadrons Adler function Dn s and of the Bjorken sum rule of the polarized lepton-hadron deep-inelastic scattering Cns B j p, and demonstrate its validity at the O (αs4)-level at least. It is a two-fold series in powers of the conformal anomaly and of S U (Nc) coupling αs. Explicit expressions are obtained for the {β }-expanded perturbation coefficients at O (αs4) level in MS ¯ scheme, for both considered physical quantities. Comparisons of the terms in the {β }-expanded coefficients are made with the corresponding terms obtained by using extra gluino degrees of freedom, or skeleton-motivated expansion, or Rδ-scheme motivated expansion in the Principle of Maximal Conformality. Relations between terms of the {β }-expansion for the Dn s- and Cns B j p-functions, which follow from the conformal symmetry limit and its violation, are presented. The relevance to the possible new analyses of the experimental data for the Adler function and Bjorken sum rule is discussed.

  15. Development of an assessment of functioning scale for prison environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Deborah; Wakai, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a global assessment of functioning (GAF), modified from the DSM Axis V GAF for the prison environment. Focus groups, which were conducted with 36 correctional officers and clinicians in two prisons, provided descriptions of behavior in prison settings to re-align the GAF scale. Face validity was established. It was found that Habitation/Behavior, Social, and Symptoms emerged as important domains of functioning in prison. Gender differences were noted with regard to cleanliness, relationships and coping strategies. The cut-off score was identified at a score where offenders were unable to participate in a disciplinary process due to their mental illness. The structure of prison alters human functioning, requiring different assessment language and ratings to measure perceived behavioral norms and/or expectations. Front-line staff need the ability to observe and communicate behavioral changes quickly and accurately in a prison environment without undue burden upon their workload. This assessment was modified by front-line staff specifically for the prison environment to document quick and frequent assessments of observed changes over time in the offender population.

  16. Development of a code in three-dimensional cylindrical geometry based on analytic function expansion nodal (AFEN) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joo Hee

    2006-02-01

    There is growing interest in developing pebble bed reactors (PBRs) as a candidate of very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTRs). Until now, most existing methods of nuclear design analysis for this type of reactors are base on old finite-difference solvers or on statistical methods. But for realistic analysis of PBRs, there is strong desire of making available high fidelity nodal codes in three-dimensional (r,θ,z) cylindrical geometry. Recently, the Analytic Function Expansion Nodal (AFEN) method developed quite extensively in Cartesian (x,y,z) geometry and in hexagonal-z geometry was extended to two-group (r,z) cylindrical geometry, and gave very accurate results. In this thesis, we develop a method for the full three-dimensional cylindrical (r,θ,z) geometry and implement the method into a code named TOPS. The AFEN methodology in this geometry as in hexagonal geometry is 'robus' (e.g., no occurrence of singularity), due to the unique feature of the AFEN method that it does not use the transverse integration. The transverse integration in the usual nodal methods, however, leads to an impasse, that is, failure of the azimuthal term to be transverse-integrated over r-z surface. We use 13 nodal unknowns in an outer node and 7 nodal unknowns in an innermost node. The general solution of the node can be expressed in terms of that nodal unknowns, and can be updated using the nodal balance equation and the current continuity condition. For more realistic analysis of PBRs, we implemented em Marshak boundary condition to treat the incoming current zero boundary condition and the partial current translation (PCT) method to treat voids in the core. The TOPS code was verified in the various numerical tests derived from Dodds problem and PBMR-400 benchmark problem. The results of the TOPS code show high accuracy and fast computing time than the VENTURE code that is based on finite difference method (FDM)

  17. Butterfly effects: novel functional materials inspired from the wings scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wang; Gu, Jiajun; Liu, Qinglei; Su, Huilan; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2014-10-07

    Through millions of years of evolutionary selection, nature has created biological materials with various functional properties for survival. Many complex natural architectures, such as shells, bones, and honeycombs, have been studied and imitated in the design and fabrication of materials with enhanced hardness and stiffness. Recently, more and more researchers have started to research the wings of butterflies, mostly because of their dazzling colors. It was found that most of these iridescent colors are caused by periodic photonic structures on the scales that make up the surfaces of these wings. These materials have recently become a focus of multidiscipline research because of their promising applications in the display of structural colors, and in advanced sensors, photonic crystals, and solar cells. This paper review aims to provide a perspective overview of the research inspired by these wing structures in recent years.

  18. Scaling root processes based on plant functional traits (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissenstat, D. M.; McCormack, M. L.; Gaines, K.; Adams, T.

    2013-12-01

    There are great challenges to scaling root processes as variation across species and variation of a particular species over different spatial and temporal scales is poorly understood. We have examined tree species variation using multispecies plantings, often referred to by ecologists as 'common gardens'. Choosing species with wide variation in growth rate, root morphology (diameter, branching intensity) and root chemistry (root N and Ca concentration), we found that variation in root lifespan was well correlated with plant functional traits across 12 species. There was also evidence that localized liquid N addition could increase root lifespan and localized water addition diminished root lifespan over untreated controls, with effects strongest in the species of finest root diameter. In an adjacent forest, we have also seen tree species variation in apparent depth of rooting using water isotopes. In particular species of wood anatomy that was ring porous (e.g. oaks) typically had the deepest rooting depth, whereas those that had either diffuse-porous sapwood (maples) or tracheid sapwood (pines) were shallower rooted. These differences in rooting depth were related to sap flux of trees during and immediately after periods of drought. The extent that the patterns observed in central Pennsylvania are modulated by environment or indicative of other plant species will be discussed.

  19. The Expansion and Functional Diversification of the Mammalian Ribonuclease A Superfamily Epitomizes the Efficiency of Multigene Families at Generating Biological Novelty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Stephen M.; Cho, Soochin

    2013-01-01

    The ribonuclease (RNase) A superfamily is a vertebrate-specific gene family. Because of a massive expansion that occurred during the early mammalian evolution, extant mammals in general have much more RNase genes than nonmammalian vertebrates. Mammalian RNases have been associated with diverse physiological functions including digestion, cytotoxicity, angiogenesis, male reproduction, and host defense. However, it is still uncertain when their expansion occurred and how a wide array of functions arose during their evolution. To answer these questions, we generate a compendium of all RNase genes identified in 20 complete mammalian genomes including the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. Using this, we delineate 13 ancient RNase gene lineages that arose before the divergence between the monotreme and the other mammals (∼220 Ma). These 13 ancient gene lineages are differentially retained in the 20 mammals, and the rate of protein sequence evolution is highly variable among them, which suggest that they have undergone extensive functional diversification. In addition, we identify 22 episodes of recent expansion of RNase genes, many of which have signatures of adaptive functional differentiation. Exemplifying this, bursts of gene duplication occurred for the RNase1, RNase4, and RNase5 genes of the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), which might have contributed to the species’ effective defense against heavier pathogen loads caused by its communal roosting behavior. Our study illustrates how host-defense systems can generate new functions efficiently by employing a multigene family, which is crucial for a host organism to adapt to its ever-changing pathogen environment. PMID:24162010

  20. Radial expansion for spinning conformal blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    This paper develops a method to compute any bosonic conformal block as a series expansion in the optimal radial coordinate introduced by Hogervorst and Rychkov. The method reduces to the known result when the external operators are all the same scalar operator, but it allows to compute conformal blocks for external operators with spin. Moreover, we explain how to write closed form recursion relations for the coefficients of the expansions. We study three examples of four point functions in detail: one vector and three scalars; two vectors and two scalars; two spin 2 tensors and two scalars. Finally, for the case of two external vectors, we also provide a more efficient way to generate the series expansion using the analytic structure of the blocks as a function of the scaling dimension of the exchanged operator.

  1. Polymer density functional theory approach based on scaling second-order direct correlation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2006-06-01

    A second-order direct correlation function (DCF) from solving the polymer-RISM integral equation is scaled up or down by an equation of state for bulk polymer, the resultant scaling second-order DCF is in better agreement with corresponding simulation results than the un-scaling second-order DCF. When the scaling second-order DCF is imported into a recently proposed LTDFA-based polymer DFT approach, an originally associated adjustable but mathematically meaningless parameter now becomes mathematically meaningful, i.e., the numerical value lies now between 0 and 1. When the adjustable parameter-free version of the LTDFA is used instead of the LTDFA, i.e., the adjustable parameter is fixed at 0.5, the resultant parameter-free version of the scaling LTDFA-based polymer DFT is also in good agreement with the corresponding simulation data for density profiles. The parameter-free version of the scaling LTDFA-based polymer DFT is employed to investigate the density profiles of a freely jointed tangent hard sphere chain near a variable sized central hard sphere, again the predictions reproduce accurately the simulational results. Importance of the present adjustable parameter-free version lies in its combination with a recently proposed universal theoretical way, in the resultant formalism, the contact theorem is still met by the adjustable parameter associated with the theoretical way.

  2. Large-scale functional purification of recombinant HIV-1 capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdeleine Hung

    Full Text Available During human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 virion maturation, capsid proteins undergo a major rearrangement to form a conical core that protects the viral nucleoprotein complexes. Mutations in the capsid sequence that alter the stability of the capsid core are deleterious to viral infectivity and replication. Recently, capsid assembly has become an attractive target for the development of a new generation of anti-retroviral agents. Drug screening efforts and subsequent structural and mechanistic studies require gram quantities of active, homogeneous and pure protein. Conventional means of laboratory purification of Escherichia coli expressed recombinant capsid protein rely on column chromatography steps that are not amenable to large-scale production. Here we present a function-based purification of wild-type and quadruple mutant capsid proteins, which relies on the inherent propensity of capsid protein to polymerize and depolymerize. This method does not require the packing of sizable chromatography columns and can generate double-digit gram quantities of functionally and biochemically well-behaved proteins with greater than 98% purity. We have used the purified capsid protein to characterize two known assembly inhibitors in our in-house developed polymerization assay and to measure their binding affinities. Our capsid purification procedure provides a robust method for purifying large quantities of a key protein in the HIV-1 life cycle, facilitating identification of the next generation anti-HIV agents.

  3. A Scale Elasticity Measure for Directional Distance Function and its Dual: Theory and DEA Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin Zelenyuk

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we focus on scale elasticity measure based on directional distance function for multi-output-multi-input technologies, explore its fundamental properties and show its equivalence with the input oriented and output oriented scale elasticity measures. We also establish duality relationship between the scale elasticity measure based on the directional distance function with scale elasticity measure based on the profit function. Finally, we discuss the estimation issues of the scale...

  4. Extension of the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method: third-order expansion of the density functional theory total energy and introduction of a modified effective coulomb interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Yu, Haibo; York, Darrin; Cui, Qiang; Elstner, Marcus

    2007-10-25

    The standard self-consistent-charge density-functional-tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method (Phys. Rev. B 1998, 58, 7260) is derived by a second-order expansion of the density functional theory total energy expression, followed by an approximation of the charge density fluctuations by charge monopoles and an effective damped Coulomb interaction between the atomic net charges. The central assumptions behind this effective charge-charge interaction are the inverse relation of atomic size and chemical hardness and the use of a fixed chemical hardness parameter independent of the atomic charge state. While these approximations seem to be unproblematic for many covalently bound systems, they are quantitatively insufficient for hydrogen-bonding interactions and (anionic) molecules with localized net charges. Here, we present an extension of the SCC-DFTB method to incorporate third-order terms in the charge density fluctuations, leading to chemical hardness parameters that are dependent on the atomic charge state and a modification of the Coulomb scaling to improve the electrostatic treatment within the second-order terms. These modifications lead to a significant improvement in the description of hydrogen-bonding interactions and proton affinities of biologically relevant molecules.

  5. About Ganoderma boninense in oil palm plantations of Sumatra and peninsular Malaysia: Ancient population expansion, extensive gene flow and large scale dispersion ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercière, Maxime; Boulord, Romain; Carasco-Lacombe, Catherine; Klopp, Christophe; Lee, Yang-Ping; Tan, Joon-Sheong; Syed Alwee, Sharifah S R; Zaremski, Alba; De Franqueville, Hubert; Breton, Frédéric; Camus-Kulandaivelu, Létizia

    Wood rot fungi form one of the main classes of phytopathogenic fungus. The group includes many species, but has remained poorly studied. Many species belonging to the Ganoderma genus are well known for causing decay in a wide range of tree species around the world. Ganoderma boninense, causal agent of oil palm basal stem rot, is responsible for considerable yield losses in Southeast Asian oil palm plantations. In a large-scale sampling operation, 357 sporophores were collected from oil palm plantations spread over peninsular Malaysia and Sumatra and genotyped using 11 SSR markers. The genotyping of these samples made it possible to investigate the population structure and demographic history of G. boninense across the oldest known area of interaction between oil palm and G. boninense. Results show that G. boninense possesses a high degree of genetic diversity and no detectable genetic structure at the scale of Sumatra and peninsular Malaysia. The fact that few duplicate genotypes were found in several studies including this one supports the hypothesis of spore dispersal in the spread of G. boninense. Meanwhile, spatial autocorrelation analysis shows that G. boninense is able to disperse across both short and long distances. These results bring new insight into mechanisms by which G. boninense spreads in oil palm plantations. Finally, the use of approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) modelling indicates that G. boninense has undergone a demographic expansion in the past, probably before the oil palm was introduced into Southeast Asia. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Urban scaling and the production function for cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, José; Bettencourt, Luís M A; Strumsky, Deborah; West, Geoffrey B

    2013-01-01

    The factors that account for the differences in the economic productivity of urban areas have remained difficult to measure and identify unambiguously. Here we show that a microscopic derivation of urban scaling relations for economic quantities vs. population, obtained from the consideration of social and infrastructural properties common to all cities, implies an effective model of economic output in the form of a Cobb-Douglas type production function. As a result we derive a new expression for the Total Factor Productivity (TFP) of urban areas, which is the standard measure of economic productivity per unit of aggregate production factors (labor and capital). Using these results we empirically demonstrate that there is a systematic dependence of urban productivity on city population size, resulting from the mismatch between the size dependence of wages and labor, so that in contemporary US cities productivity increases by about 11% with each doubling of their population. Moreover, deviations from the average scale dependence of economic output, capturing the effect of local factors, including history and other local contingencies, also manifest surprising regularities. Although, productivity is maximized by the combination of high wages and low labor input, high productivity cities show invariably high wages and high levels of employment relative to their size expectation. Conversely, low productivity cities show both low wages and employment. These results shed new light on the microscopic processes that underlie urban economic productivity, explain the emergence of effective aggregate urban economic output models in terms of labor and capital inputs and may inform the development of economic theory related to growth.

  7. Large-scale expansion of human skin-derived precursor cells (hSKPs) in stirred suspension bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrao, Denver C; Boon, Kathryn; Borys, Breanna; Sinha, Sarthak; Kumar, Ranjan; Biernaskie, Jeff; Kallos, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Human skin-derived precursor cells (hSKPs) are multipotent adult stem cells found in the dermis of human skin. Incorporation of hSKPs into split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs), the current gold standard to treat severe burns or tissue resections, has been proposed as a treatment option to enhance skin wound healing and tissue function. For this approach to be clinically viable substantial quantities of hSKPs are required, which is the rate-limiting step, as only a few thousand hSKPs can be isolated from an autologous skin biopsy without causing donor site morbidity. In order to produce sufficient quantities of clinically viable cells, we have developed a bioprocess capable of expanding hSKPs as aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors (SSBs). In this study, we found hSKPs from adult donors to expand significantly more (P skin biopsy without causing donor site morbidity. At 60 rpm, aggregates were markedly smaller and did not experience oxygen diffusional limitations, as seen in hSKPs cultured at 40 rpm. While hSKPs also grew at 80 rpm (0.74 Pa) and 100 rpm (1 Pa), they produced smaller aggregates due to high shear stress. The pH of the media in all the SSBs was closer to biological conditions and significantly different (P skin wounds. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2725-2738. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. On the Equisummability of Hermite and Fourier Expansions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove an equisummability result for the Fourier expansions and Hermite expansions as well as special Hermite expansions. We also prove the uniform boundedness of the Bochner-Riesz means associated to the Hermite expansions for polyradial functions.

  9. On soft limits of large-scale structure correlation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Konstandin, Thomas; Porto, Rafael A.; Sagunski, Laura

    2014-11-01

    We study soft limits of correlation functions for the density and velocity fields in the theory of structure formation. First, we rederive the (resummed) consistency conditions at unequal times using the eikonal approximation. These are solely based on symmetry arguments and are therefore universal. Then, we explore the existence of equal-time relations in the soft limit which, on the other hand, depend on the interplay between soft and hard modes. We scrutinize two approaches in the literature: The time-flow formalism, and a background method where the soft mode is absorbed into a locally curved cosmology. The latter has been recently used to set up (angular averaged) 'equal-time consistency relations'. We explicitly demonstrate that the time-flow relations and 'equal-time consistency conditions' are only fulfilled at the linear level, and fail at next-to-leading order for an Einstein de-Sitter universe. While applied to the velocities both proposals break down beyond leading order, we find that the 'equal-time consistency conditions' quantitatively approximates the perturbative results for the density contrast. Thus, we generalize the background method to properly incorporate the effect of curvature in the density and velocity fluctuations on short scales, and discuss the reasons behind this discrepancy. We conclude with a few comments on practical implementations and future directions.

  10. Scaling functions for the O(4) model in d=3 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Jens; Klein, Bertram

    2008-01-01

    A nonperturbative renormalization group approach is used to calculate scaling functions for an O(4) model in d=3 dimensions in the presence of an external symmetry-breaking field. These scaling functions are important for the analysis of critical behavior in the O(4) universality class. For example, the finite-temperature phase transition in QCD with two flavors is expected to fall into this class. Critical exponents are calculated in local-potential approximation. Parametrizations of the scaling functions for the order parameter and for the longitudinal susceptibility are given. Relations from universal scaling arguments between these scaling functions are investigated and confirmed. The expected asymptotic behavior of the scaling functions predicted by Griffiths is observed. Corrections to the scaling behavior at large values of the external field are studied qualitatively. These scaling corrections can become large, which might have implications for the scaling analysis of lattice QCD results.

  11. Lace expansion for dummies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolthausen, Erwin; Van Der Hofstad, Remco; Kozma, Gady

    2018-01-01

    We show Green's function asymptotic upper bound for the two-point function of weakly self-Avoiding walk in d >4, revisiting a classic problem. Our proof relies on Banach algebras to analyse the lace-expansion fixed point equation and is simpler than previous approaches in that it avoids Fourier

  12. Large-Scale Functional Brain Network Abnormalities in Alzheimer’s Disease: Insights from Functional Neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford C. Dickerson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI (fMRI studies of mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD have begun to reveal abnormalities in large-scale memory and cognitive brain networks. Since the medial temporal lobe (MTL memory system is a site of very early pathology in AD, a number of studies have focused on this region of the brain. Yet it is clear that other regions of the large-scale episodic memory network are affected early in the disease as well, and fMRI has begun to illuminate functional abnormalities in frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices as well in MCI and AD. Besides predictable hypoactivation of brain regions as they accrue pathology and undergo atrophy, there are also areas of hyperactivation in brain memory and cognitive circuits, possibly representing attempted compensatory activity. Recent fMRI data in MCI and AD are beginning to reveal relationships between abnormalities of functional activity in the MTL memory system and in functionally connected brain regions, such as the precuneus. Additional work with “resting state” fMRI data is illuminating functional-anatomic brain circuits and their disruption by disease. As this work continues to mature, it will likely contribute to our understanding of fundamental memory processes in the human brain and how these are perturbed in memory disorders. We hope these insights will translate into the incorporation of measures of task-related brain function into diagnostic assessment or therapeutic monitoring, which will hopefully one day be useful for demonstrating beneficial effects of treatments being tested in clinical trials.

  13. Expansion and functional properties of extruded snacks enriched with nutrition sources from food processing by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkerd, Sopida; Wanlapa, Sorada; Puttanlek, Chureerat; Uttapap, Dudsadee; Rungsardthong, Vilai

    2016-01-01

    Rich sources of protein and dietary fiber from food processing by-products, defatted soybean meal, germinated brown rice meal, and mango peel fiber, were added to corn grit at 20 % (w/w) to produce fortified extruded snacks. Increase of total dietary fiber from 4.82 % (wb) to 5.92-17.80 % (wb) and protein from 5.03 % (wb) to 5.46-13.34 % were observed. The product indicated high expansion and good acceptance tested by sensory panels. There were 22.33-33.53 and 5.30-11.53 fold increase in the phenolics and antioxidant activity in the enriched snack products. The effects of feed moisture content, screw speed, and barrel temperature on expansion and nutritional properties of the extruded products were investigated by using response surface methodology. Regression equations describing the effect of each variable on the product responses were obtained. The snacks extruded with feed moisture 13-15 % (wb) and extrusion temperature at 160-180 °C indicated the products with high preference in terms of expansion ratio between insoluble dietary fiber and soluble dietary fiber balance. The results showed that the by-products could be successfully used for nutritional supplemented expanded snacks.

  14. Convergent sum of gradient expansion of the kinetic-energy density functional up to the sixth order term using Padé approximant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, A.; Alharbi, F. H.; Jovanovic, R.; Kais, S.

    2016-04-01

    The gradient expansion of the kinetic energy density functional, when applied to atoms or finite systems, usually grossly overestimates the energy in the fourth order and generally diverges in the sixth order. We avoid the divergence of the integral by replacing the asymptotic series including the sixth order term in the integrand by a rational function. Padé approximants show moderate improvements in accuracy in comparison with partial sums of the series. The results are discussed for atoms and Hooke’s law model for two-electron atoms.

  15. Expansion dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, J.

    1985-10-01

    A quantum dynamical model is suggested which describes the expansion and disassembly phase of highly excited compounds formed in energetic heavy-ion collisions. First applications in two space and one time dimensional model world are discussed and qualitatively compared to standard freeze-out concepts. (orig.)

  16. expansion method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of a system under investigation is to model the system in terms of some ... The organization of the paper is as follows: In §2, a brief account of the (G /G)- expansion ...... It is interesting to note that from the general results, one can easily recover.

  17. Renormalizations and operator expansion in sigma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terentyev, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    The operator expansion (OPE) is studied for the Green function at x 2 → 0 (n(x) is the dynamical field ofσ-model) in the framework of the two-dimensional σ-model with the O(N) symmetry group at large N. As a preliminary step we formulate the renormalization scheme which permits introduction of an arbitrary intermediate scale μ 2 in the framework of 1/N expansion and discuss factorization (separation) of small (p μ) momentum region. It is shown that definition of composite local operators and coefficient functions figuring in OPE is unambiguous only in the leading order in 1/N expansion when dominant are the solutions with extremum of action. Corrections of order f(μ 2 )/N (here f(μ 2 ) is the effective interaction constant at the point μ 2 ) in composite operators and coefficient functions essentially depend on factorization method of high and low momentum regions. It is shown also that contributions to the power corrections of order m 2 x 2 f(μ 2 )/N in the Green function (here m is the dynamical mass-scale factor in σ-model) arise simultaneously from two sources: from the mean vacuum value of the composite operator n ∂ 2 n and from the hard particle contributions in the coefficient function of unite operator. Due to the analogy between σ-model and QCD the obtained result indicates theoretical limitations to the sum rule method in QCD. (author)

  18. Large-scale functional MRI analysis to accumulate knowledge on brain functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    How can we accumulate knowledge on brain functions? How can we leverage years of research in functional MRI to analyse finer-grained psychological constructs, and build a comprehensive model of the brain? Researchers usually rely on single studies to delineate brain regions recruited by mental processes. They relate their findings to previous works in an informal way by defining regions of interest from the literature. Meta-analysis approaches provide a more principled way to build upon the literature. This thesis investigates three ways to assemble knowledge using activation maps from a large amount of studies. First, we present an approach that uses jointly two similar fMRI experiments, to better condition an analysis from a statistical standpoint. We show that it is a valuable data-driven alternative to traditional regions of interest analyses, but fails to provide a systematic way to relate studies, and thus does not permit to integrate knowledge on a large scale. Because of the difficulty to associate multiple studies, we resort to using a single dataset sampling a large number of stimuli for our second contribution. This method estimates functional networks associated with functional profiles, where the functional networks are interacting brain regions and the functional profiles are a weighted set of cognitive descriptors. This work successfully yields known brain networks and automatically associates meaningful descriptions. Its limitations lie in the unsupervised nature of this method, which is more difficult to validate, and the use of a single dataset. It however brings the notion of cognitive labels, which is central to our last contribution. Our last contribution presents a method that learns functional atlases by combining several datasets. [Henson 2006] shows that forward inference, i.e. the probability of an activation given a cognitive process, is often not sufficient to conclude on the engagement of brain regions for a cognitive process

  19. Expansion and functional properties of extruded snacks enriched with nutrition sources from food processing by-products

    OpenAIRE

    Korkerd, Sopida; Wanlapa, Sorada; Puttanlek, Chureerat; Uttapap, Dudsadee; Rungsardthong, Vilai

    2015-01-01

    Rich sources of protein and dietary fiber from food processing by-products, defatted soybean meal, germinated brown rice meal, and mango peel fiber, were added to corn grit at 20 % (w/w) to produce fortified extruded snacks. Increase of total dietary fiber from 4.82 % (wb) to 5.92–17.80 % (wb) and protein from 5.03 % (wb) to 5.46–13.34 % were observed. The product indicated high expansion and good acceptance tested by sensory panels. There were 22.33–33.53 and 5.30–11.53 fold increase in the ...

  20. Orthogonal and Scaling Transformations of Quadratic Functions with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we present a non-singular transformation that can reduce a given quadratic function defined on Rn to another simpler quadratic function and study the impact of the transformation in relation to the problem of minimization of the function. In particular, we construct a non-singular transformation that can reduce a ...

  1. Traits Without Borders:Integrating Functional Diversity Across Scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carmona, C. P.; de Bello, Francesco; Mason, N. W. H.; Lepš, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 5 (2016), s. 382-394 ISSN 0169-5347 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/12/1296; GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : functional trait * functional diversity * functional niche Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 15.268, year: 2016

  2. Characteristic functions of scale mixtures of multivariate skew-normal distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyoung-Moon; Genton, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    We obtain the characteristic function of scale mixtures of skew-normal distributions both in the univariate and multivariate cases. The derivation uses the simple stochastic relationship between skew-normal distributions and scale mixtures of skew

  3. A Scale Elasticity Measure for Directional Distance Function and its Dual

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin Zelenyuk

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a scale elasticity measure based on directional distance function for multi-output-multi-input technologies and explore its fundamental properties. Specifically, we derive necessary and sufficient condition for equivalence of the scale elasticity measure based on the directional distance function with the input oriented and output oriented scale elasticity measures. We also establish duality relationship between the scale elasticity measure based on the directional ...

  4. Resonant state expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, P.

    1993-02-01

    The completeness properties of the discrete set of bound state, virtual states and resonances characterizing the system of a single nonrelativistic particle moving in a central cutoff potential is investigated. From a completeness relation in terms of these discrete states and complex scattering states one can derive several Resonant State Expansions (RSE). It is interesting to obtain purely discrete expansion which, if valid, would significantly simplify the treatment of the continuum. Such expansions can be derived using Mittag-Leffler (ML) theory for a cutoff potential and it would be nice to see if one can obtain the same expansions starting from an eigenfunction theory that is not restricted to a finite sphere. The RSE of Greens functions is especially important, e.g. in the continuum RPA (CRPA) method of treating giant resonances in nuclear physics. The convergence of RSE is studied in simple cases using square well wavefunctions in order to achieve high numerical accuracy. Several expansions can be derived from each other by using the theory of analytic functions and one can the see how to obtain a natural discretization of the continuum. Since the resonance wavefunctions are oscillating with an exponentially increasing amplitude, and therefore have to be interpreted through some regularization procedure, every statement made about quantities involving such states is checked by numerical calculations.Realistic nuclear wavefunctions, generated by a Wood-Saxon potential, are used to test also the usefulness of RSE in a realistic nuclear calculation. There are some fundamental differences between different symmetries of the integral contour that defines the continuum in RSE. One kind of symmetry is necessary to have an expansion of the unity operator that is idempotent. Another symmetry must be used if we want purely discrete expansions. These are found to be of the same form as given by ML. (29 refs.)

  5. Conformal expansions and renormalons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathsman, J.

    2000-02-07

    The coefficients in perturbative expansions in gauge theories are factorially increasing, predominantly due to renormalons. This type of factorial increase is not expected in conformal theories. In QCD conformal relations between observables can be defined in the presence of a perturbative infrared fixed-point. Using the Banks-Zaks expansion the authors study the effect of the large-order behavior of the perturbative series on the conformal coefficients. The authors find that in general these coefficients become factorially increasing. However, when the factorial behavior genuinely originates in a renormalon integral, as implied by a postulated skeleton expansion, it does not affect the conformal coefficients. As a consequence, the conformal coefficients will indeed be free of renormalon divergence, in accordance with previous observations concerning the smallness of these coefficients for specific observables. The authors further show that the correspondence of the BLM method with the skeleton expansion implies a unique scale-setting procedure. The BLM coefficients can be interpreted as the conformal coefficients in the series relating the fixed-point value of the observable with that of the skeleton effective charge. Through the skeleton expansion the relevance of renormalon-free conformal coefficients extends to real-world QCD.

  6. Signatures of non-universal large scales in conditional structure functions from various turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Daniel B; Voth, Greg A; Bewley, Gregory P; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gibert, Mathieu; Xu Haitao; Gylfason, Ármann; Mydlarski, Laurent; Yeung, P K

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic comparison of conditional structure functions in nine turbulent flows. The flows studied include forced isotropic turbulence simulated on a periodic domain, passive grid wind tunnel turbulence in air and in pressurized SF 6 , active grid wind tunnel turbulence (in both synchronous and random driving modes), the flow between counter-rotating discs, oscillating grid turbulence and the flow in the Lagrangian exploration module (in both constant and random driving modes). We compare longitudinal Eulerian second-order structure functions conditioned on the instantaneous large-scale velocity in each flow to assess the ways in which the large scales affect the small scales in a variety of turbulent flows. Structure functions are shown to have larger values when the large-scale velocity significantly deviates from the mean in most flows, suggesting that dependence on the large scales is typical in many turbulent flows. The effects of the large-scale velocity on the structure functions can be quite strong, with the structure function varying by up to a factor of 2 when the large-scale velocity deviates from the mean by ±2 standard deviations. In several flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are similar at all the length scales we measured, indicating that the large-scale effects are scale independent. In a few flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are larger on the smallest length scales. (paper)

  7. Multidisciplinary Delphi Development of a Scale to Evaluate Team Function in Obstetric Emergencies: The PETRA Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Mrinalini; Hoppe, David; Monks, David; Cooke, Mary Ellen; Sharples, Lynn; Windrim, Rory

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new interdisciplinary teamwork scale, the Perinatal Emergency: Team Response Assessment (PETRA), for the management of obstetric crises, through consensus agreement of obstetric caregivers. This prospective study was performed using expert consensus, based on a Delphi method. The study investigators developed a new PETRA tool, specifically related to obstetric crisis management, based on the existing literature and discussions among themselves. The scale was distributed to a selected panel of experts in the field for the Delphi process. After each round of Delphi, every component of the scale was analyzed quantitatively by the percentage of agreement ratings and each comment reviewed by the blinded investigators. The assessment scale was then modified, with components of less than 80% agreement removed from the scale. The process was repeated on three occasions to reach a consensus and final PETRA scale. Fourteen of 24 invited experts participated in the Delphi process. The original PETRA scale included six categories and 48 items, one global scale item, and a 3-point rubric for rating. The overall percentage agreement by experts in the first, second, and third rounds was 95.0%, 93.2%, and 98.5%, respectively. The final scale after the third round of Delphi consisted of the following seven categories: shared mental model, communication, situational awareness, leadership, followership, workload management, and positive/effective behaviours and attitudes. There were 34 individual items within these categories, each with a 5-point rating rubric (1 = unacceptable to 5 = perfect). Using a structured Delphi method, we established the face and content validity of this assessment scale that focuses on important aspects of interdisciplinary teamwork in the management of obstetric crises. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada

  8. Thermal expansion of coking coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlik, M.; Klimek, J. (Vyzkumny a Zkusebni Ustav Nova Hut, Ostrava (Czechoslovakia))

    1992-12-01

    Analyzes expansion of coal mixtures in coke ovens during coking. Methods for measuring coal expansion on both a laboratory and pilot plant scale are comparatively evaluated. The method, developed, tested and patented in Poland by the Institute for Chemical Coal Processing in Zabrze (Polish standard PN-73/G-04522), is discussed. A laboratory device developed by the Institute for measuring coal expansion is characterized. Expansion of black coal from 10 underground mines in the Ostrava-Karvina coal district and from 9 coal mines in the Upper Silesia basin in Poland is comparatively evaluated. Investigations show that coal expansion reaches a maximum for coal types with a volatile matter ranging from 20 to 25%. With increasing volatile matter in coal, its expansion decreases. Coal expansion increases with increasing swelling index. Coal expansion corresponds with coal dilatation. With increasing coal density its expansion increases. Coal mixtures should be selected in such a way that their expansion does not cause a pressure exceeding 40 MPa. 11 refs.

  9. Application of a Multi-Scale form of Terzaghi’s Effective Stress Principle for Unsaturated Expansive Clays to Simulate Hydro-Mechanical Behavior During Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainka Julia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed multi-scale form of Terzaghi’s effective stress principle for unsaturated swelling clays that was rigorously derived by periodic homogenization starting from micro- and nano-mechanical analyses is applied to numerically simulate one-dimensional swelling pressure tests of compacted bentonites during hydration. The total macroscopic stress captures the coupling between disjoining forces at the nanoscopic scale of clay platelets and capillary effects at the microscopic scale of clay aggregates over the entire water content range. The numerical results allow to draw conclusions on the water transfer mechanism between inter- and intra-aggregate pores during hydration and consequently on the evolution of the external swelling pressure resulting from the competition between capillary and disjoining forces. In addition, such application highlights the abilities and the limits of the electrical double-layer theory to compute the disjoining pressure in the nano-pores. For large platelet distances, in the range of osmotic swelling, the nature of the disjoining pressure is electro-chemical and can be computed from Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Conversely, at small distances, in the crystalline swelling, a solvation component has to be added to account for the molecular nature of the solvent. As a first improvement of the nano-scale description the solvent is treated as a hard sphere fluid using Density Functional Theory.

  10. Development of a neutronics code based on analytic function expansion nodal method for pebble-type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nam Zin; Lee, Joo Hee; Lee, Jae Jun; Yu, Hui; Lee, Gil Soo [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Tehcnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    There is growing interest in developing Pebble Bed Reactors(PBRs) as a candidate of Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactors(VHTRs). Until now, most existing methods of nuclear design analysis for this type of reactors are base on old finite-difference solvers or on statistical methods. And other existing nodal cannot be adapted for this kind of reactors because of transverse integration problem. In this project, we developed the TOPS code in three dimensional cylindrical geometry based on Analytic Function Expansion Nodal (AFEN) method developed at KAIST. The TOPS code showed better results in computing time than FDM and MCNP. Also TOPS showed very accurate results in reactor analysis.

  11. Development of a neutronics code based on analytic function expansion nodal method for pebble-type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nam Zin; Lee, Joo Hee; Lee, Jae Jun; Yu, Hui; Lee, Gil Soo

    2006-03-01

    There is growing interest in developing Pebble Bed Reactors(PBRs) as a candidate of Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactors(VHTRs). Until now, most existing methods of nuclear design analysis for this type of reactors are base on old finite-difference solvers or on statistical methods. And other existing nodal cannot be adapted for this kind of reactors because of transverse integration problem. In this project, we developed the TOPS code in three dimensional cylindrical geometry based on Analytic Function Expansion Nodal (AFEN) method developed at KAIST. The TOPS code showed better results in computing time than FDM and MCNP. Also TOPS showed very accurate results in reactor analysis

  12. A low-energy β-function in a finite super-Yang-Mills model with multiple mass scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.; Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    We compute the one-loop contribution to the low-energy light-fermion gauge coupling in a finite supersymmetric gauge theory with two mass scales: a heavy mass that breaks an initial N=4 supersymmetry down to N=2, but respects the finiteness, and a light mass that, for simplicity, is set to zero. We find that coupling grows with the mass of the heavy intermediate states. Hence the latter do not decouple at low energies, leading to large logarithms that invalidate low-energy perturbation theory. Consequently, further manipulations are required to obtain a meaningful perturbative expansion. Enforcing decoupling through finite renormalizations, that absorb the heavy mass effects into a redefinition of the parameters of the lagrangian, introduces an arbitrary subtraction mass μ. The requirement that the S-matrix elements be independent of μ leads to a non-trivial renormalization-group equation for the low-energy theory, with a non-vanishing β-function. (orig.)

  13. Low-energy. beta. -function in a finite super-Yang-Mills model with multiple mass scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.; Helayel-Neto, J.A. (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy))

    1985-02-14

    We compute the one-loop contribution to the low-energy light-fermion gauge coupling in a finite supersymmetric gauge theory with two mass scales: a heavy mass that breaks an initial N=4 supersymmetry down to N=2, but respects the finiteness, and a light mass that, for simplicity, is set to zero. We find that coupling grows with the mass of the heavy intermediate states. Hence the latter do not decouple at low energies, leading to large logarithms that invalidate low-energy perturbation theory. Consequently, further manipulations are required to obtain a meaningful perturbative expansion. Enforcing decoupling through finite renormalizations, that absorb the heavy mass effects into a redefinition of the parameters of the lagrangian, introduces an arbitrary subtraction mass ..mu... The requirement that the S-matrix elements be independent of ..mu.. leads to a non-trivial renormalization-group equation for the low-energy theory, with a non-vanishing ..beta..-function.

  14. On locally uniformly linearizable high breakdown location and scale functionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, P.L.

    1998-01-01

    This article gives two constructions of a weighted mean which has a large domain, is affinely equivariant, has a locally high breakdown point and is locally uniformly linearizable. One construction is based on $M$-functionals with smooth defining $\\psi$- and $\\chi$ -functions which are used to

  15. Quality of Life Scale: A Measure of Function for People with Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality Of Life Scale A Measure Of Function For People With Pain 0 Non-functioning 1 2 3 4 ... the week Active on weekends 9 10 Normal Quality of Life Work/volunteer/be active eight hours daily Take ...

  16. Deep inelastic singlet structure functions and scaling violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen-zhu, Li; Bing-xun, Hu

    1984-02-01

    The flavour singlet structure functions of deep inelastic scattering processes can yield more decisive tests of QCD than the non-singlet. We give analytical expression for flavour singlet structure functions through analysing the lepton-nucleon deep inelastic scattering processes by means of QCD and using Jacobi polynomials. This expression contains 4 to 5 parameters and shows the changes of the singlet structure functions with x and Q/sup 2/ very well. In QCD leading order, the conclusion is in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  17. Modulated Hermite series expansions and the time-bandwidth product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinker, den A.C.; Sarroukh, B.E.

    2000-01-01

    The harmonically modulated Hermite series constitute an orthonormal basis in the Hilbert space of square-integrable functions. This basis comprises three free parameters, namely a translation, a modulation, and a scale factor. In practical situations, we are interested in series expansions that are

  18. Virial Expansion Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  19. Modeling Asymmetric Flow of Viscoelastic Fluid in Symmetric Planar Sudden Expansion Geometry Based on User-Defined Function in FLUENT CFD Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ying Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Through embedding an in-house subroutine into FLUENT code by utilizing the functionalization of user-defined function provided by the software, a new numerical simulation methodology on viscoelastic fluid flows has been established. In order to benchmark this methodology, numerical simulations under different viscoelastic fluid solution concentrations (with solvent viscosity ratio varied from 0.2 to 0.9, extensibility parameters (100≤L2≤500, Reynolds numbers (0.1 ≤ Re ≤ 100, and Weissenberg numbers (0 ≤ Wi ≤ 20 are conducted on unsteady laminar flows through a symmetric planar sudden expansion with expansion ratio of 1: 3 for viscoelastic fluid flows. The constitutive model used to describe the viscoelastic effect of viscoelastic fluid flow is FENE-P (finitely extensive nonlinear elastic-Peterlin model. The numerical simulation results show that the influences of elasticity, inertia, and concentration on the flow bifurcation characteristics are more significant than those of extensibility. The present simulation results including the critical Reynolds number for which the flow becomes asymmetric, vortex size, bifurcation diagram, velocity distribution, streamline, and pressure loss show good agreements with some published results. That means the newly established method based on FLUENT software platform for simulating peculiar flow behaviors of viscoelastic fluid is credible and suitable for the study of viscoelastic fluid flows.

  20. Characteristic functions of scale mixtures of multivariate skew-normal distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyoung-Moon

    2011-08-01

    We obtain the characteristic function of scale mixtures of skew-normal distributions both in the univariate and multivariate cases. The derivation uses the simple stochastic relationship between skew-normal distributions and scale mixtures of skew-normal distributions. In particular, we describe the characteristic function of skew-normal, skew-t, and other related distributions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  1. Allometric scaling of kidney function in green iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lara K; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2004-07-01

    Numerous physiological parameters, such as metabolic rate and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), are allometrically related to body mass. Whereas the interspecific relationships between metabolic rate and body mass have been extensively studied in vertebrates, intraspecific studies of renal function have been limited. Therefore, kidney function was studied in 16 green iguanas, (Iguana iguana; 322-4764 g), by using nuclear scintigraphy to measure the renal uptake of 99mTc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA), following either intravenous or intraosseous administration. Route of 99mTc-DTPA administration did not affect the percentage of the dose that accumulated in the kidney (P > 0.05). Renal uptake of 99mTc-DTPA was related to body mass (W, g) as: %Dose Kidney (min-1) = 11.09W(-0.235). Although not directly measured, the apparent renal clearance of 99mTc-DTPA could be described as: Renal CL 99mTc-DTPA (ml.min-1) = 0.005W(0.759), and the mass exponent did not differ from either the 2/3 or 3/4 values (P > 0.05). The similarity of the mass exponents relating both renal function and metabolic rate to body mass suggests a common mechanism underlying these allometric relationships. As this study also demonstrated that renal scintigraphy can be used to quantify kidney function in iguanas, this technique may be a useful research and diagnostic tool.

  2. A scale purification procedure for evaluation of differential item functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalid, Muhammad Naveed; Glas, Cornelis A.W.

    2014-01-01

    Item bias or differential item functioning (DIF) has an important impact on the fairness of psychological and educational testing. In this paper, DIF is seen as a lack of fit to an item response (IRT) model. Inferences about the presence and importance of DIF require a process of so-called test

  3. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radivojac, P.; Clark, W.T.; Oron, T.R.; Schnoes, A.M.; Wittkop, T.; Kourmpetis, Y.A.I.; Dijk, van A.D.J.; Friedberg, I.

    2013-01-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be

  4. Magnetic properties of spinels GeNi2-xCoxO4 systems: Green's function and high-temperature series expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Grini, A.; Salmi, S.; Masrour, R.; Hamedoun, M.; Bouslykhane, K.; Marzouk, A.; Hourmatallah, A.; Benzakour, N.

    2018-06-01

    The Green's function theory and high-temperature series expansions technical have been developed for magnetic systems GeNi2-xCoxO4. We have applied the Green's function theory to evaluate thermal magnetization and magnetic susceptibility for different values of magnetic field and dilution x, considering all components of the magnetization when an external magnetic field is applied in (x,z)-plane. The second theory combined with the Padé approximants method for a randomly diluted Heisenberg magnet is used to deduce the magnetic phase diagram of GeNi2 - xCoxO4 systems. The critical exponents ? and ? and associated with the magnetic susceptibility ? and the correlation length ξ, respectively, have been deduced. The theoretical results are compared with those given by magnetic measurements.

  5. On Soft Limits of Large-Scale Structure Correlation Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Konstandin, Thomas; Porto, Rafael A.; Sagunski, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We study soft limits of correlation functions for the density and velocity fields in the theory of structure formation. First, we re-derive the (resummed) consistency conditions at unequal times using the eikonal approximation. These are solely based on symmetry arguments and are therefore universal. Then, we explore the existence of equal-time relations in the soft limit which, on the other hand, depend on the interplay between soft and hard modes. We scrutinize two approaches in the literat...

  6. Expansions of tau hadronic spectral function moments in a nonpower QCD perturbation theory with tamed large order behavior

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abbas, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Caprini, I.; Fischer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 3 (2013), "034026-1"-"034026-16" ISSN 1550-7998 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Borel transformation * asymptotic series * Adler function Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 4.864, year: 2013

  7. Examining the Functional Specification of Two-Parameter Model under Location and Scale Parameter Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashima, Takahiro

    2006-01-01

    The functional specification of mean-standard deviation approach is examined under location and scale parameter condition. Firstly, the full set of restrictions imposed on the mean-standard deviation function under the location and scale parameter condition are made clear. Secondly, the examination based on the restrictions mentioned in the previous sentence derives the new properties of the mean-standard deviation function on the applicability of additive separability and the curvature of ex...

  8. Large-Scale Functional Brain Network Reorganization During Taoist Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Tun; Li, Chia-Wei; Vértes, Petra E; Wu, Changwei Wesley; Achard, Sophie; Hsieh, Chao-Hsien; Liou, Chien-Hui; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Bullmore, Edward T

    2016-02-01

    Meditation induces a distinct and reversible mental state that provides insights into brain correlates of consciousness. We explored brain network changes related to meditation by graph theoretical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Eighteen Taoist meditators with varying levels of expertise were scanned using a within-subjects counterbalanced design during resting and meditation states. State-related differences in network topology were measured globally and at the level of individual nodes and edges. Although measures of global network topology, such as small-worldness, were unchanged, meditation was characterized by an extensive and expertise-dependent reorganization of the hubs (highly connected nodes) and edges (functional connections). Areas of sensory cortex, especially the bilateral primary visual and auditory cortices, and the bilateral temporopolar areas, which had the highest degree (or connectivity) during the resting state, showed the biggest decrease during meditation. Conversely, bilateral thalamus and components of the default mode network, mainly the bilateral precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex, had low degree in the resting state but increased degree during meditation. Additionally, these changes in nodal degree were accompanied by reorganization of anatomical orientation of the edges. During meditation, long-distance longitudinal (antero-posterior) edges increased proportionally, whereas orthogonal long-distance transverse (right-left) edges connecting bilaterally homologous cortices decreased. Our findings suggest that transient changes in consciousness associated with meditation introduce convergent changes in the topological and spatial properties of brain functional networks, and the anatomical pattern of integration might be as important as the global level of integration when considering the network basis for human consciousness.

  9. Expansion in the presence of FGF-2 enhances the functional development of cartilaginous tissues engineered using infrapatellar fat pad derived MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, C T; Kelly, D J

    2012-07-01

    MSCs from non-cartilaginous knee joint tissues such as the infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) and synovium possess significant chondrogenic potential and provide a readily available and clinically feasible source of chondroprogenitor cells. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) has been shown to be a potent mitotic stimulator during ex vivo expansion of MSCs, as well as regulating their subsequent differentiation potential. The objective of this study was to investigate the longer term effects of FGF-2 expansion on the functional development of cartilaginous tissues engineered using MSCs derived from the IFP. IFP MSCs were isolated and expanded to passage 2 in a standard media formulation with or without FGF-2 (5 ng/ml) supplementation. Expanded cells were encapsulated in agarose hydrogels, maintained in chondrogenic media for 42 days and analysed to determine their mechanical properties and biochemical composition. Culture media, collected at each feed, was also analysed for biochemical constituents. MSCs expanded in the presence of FGF-2 proliferated more rapidly, with higher cell yields and lower population doubling times. FGF-2 expanded MSCs generated the most mechanically functional tissue. Matrix accumulation was dramatically higher after 21 days for FGF-2 expanded MSCs, but decreased between day 21 and 42. By day 42, FGF-2 expanded MSCs had still accumulated ∼1.4 fold higher sGAG and ∼1.7 fold higher collagen compared to control groups. The total amount of sGAG synthesised (retained in hydrogels and released into the media) was ∼2.4 fold higher for FGF-2 expanded MSCs, with only ∼25% of the total amount generated being retained within the constructs. Further studies are required to investigate whether IFP derived MSCs have a diminished capacity to synthesise other matrix components important in the aggregation, assembly and retention of proteoglycans. In conclusion, expanding MSCs in the presence of FGF-2 rapidly accelerates chondrogenesis in 3D agarose

  10. The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive-Plus (ADAS-Cog-Plus): an expansion of the ADAS-Cog to improve responsiveness in MCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Jeannine; Carvalho, Janessa O; Potter, Guy G; Thames, April; Zelinski, Elizabeth; Crane, Paul K; Gibbons, Laura E

    2012-12-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) is widely used in AD, but may be less responsive to change when used in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Participants from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative were administered a neuropsychological battery and 1.5 T MRI scans over 2-3 years. Informants were queried regarding functional impairments. Some participants had lumbar punctures to obtain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We added executive functioning (EF) and functional ability (FA) items to the ADAS-Cog to generate candidate augmented measures. We calibrated these candidates using baseline data (n = 811) and selected the best candidate that added EF items alone and that added EF and FA items. We selected candidates based on their responsiveness over three years in a training sample of participants with MCI (n = 160). We compared traditional ADAS-Cog scores with the two candidates based on their responsiveness in a validation sample of participants with MCI (n = 234), ability to predict conversion to dementia (n = 394), strength of association with baseline MRI (n = 394) and CSF biomarkers (n = 193). The selected EF candidate added category fluency (ADAS Plus EF), and the selected EF and FA candidate added category fluency, Digit Symbol, Trail Making, and five items from the Functional Assessment Questionnaire (ADAS Plus EF&FA). The ADAS Plus EF& FA performed as well as or better than traditional ADAS-Cog scores. Adding EF and FA items to the ADAS-Cog may improve responsiveness among people with MCI without impairing validity.

  11. Local-scaling density-functional method: Intraorbit and interorbit density optimizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Ludena, E.V.

    1991-01-01

    The recently proposed local-scaling density-functional theory provides us with a practical method for the direct variational determination of the electron density function ρ(r). The structure of ''orbits,'' which ensures the one-to-one correspondence between the electron density ρ(r) and the N-electron wave function Ψ({r k }), is studied in detail. For the realization of the local-scaling density-functional calculations, procedures for intraorbit and interorbit optimizations of the electron density function are proposed. These procedures are numerically illustrated for the helium atom in its ground state at the beyond-Hartree-Fock level

  12. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-07

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well.

  13. Assessing Impairment of Executive Function and Psychomotor Speed in Premanifest and Manifest Huntington's Disease Gene-expansion Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unmack Larsen, Ida; Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Gade, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) and psychomotor speed (PMS) has been widely studied in Huntington's disease (HD). Most studies have focused on finding markers of disease progression by comparing group means at different disease stages. Our aim was to investigate performances on nine measures of EF and PMS...

  14. Uniform functional structure across spatial scales in an intertidal benthic assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, R S K; Hamylton, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the causes of the remarkable similarity of emergent assemblage properties that has been demonstrated across disparate intertidal seagrass sites and assemblages, this study examined whether their emergent functional-group metrics are scale related by testing the null hypothesis that functional diversity and the suite of dominant functional groups in seagrass-associated macrofauna are robust structural features of such assemblages and do not vary spatially across nested scales within a 0.4 ha area. This was carried out via a lattice of 64 spatially referenced stations. Although densities of individual components were patchily dispersed across the locality, rank orders of importance of the 14 functional groups present, their overall functional diversity and evenness, and the proportions of the total individuals contained within each showed, in contrast, statistically significant spatial uniformity, even at areal scales functional groups in their geospatial context also revealed weaker than expected levels of spatial autocorrelation, and then only at the smaller scales and amongst the most dominant groups, and only a small number of negative correlations occurred between the proportional importances of the individual groups. In effect, such patterning was a surface veneer overlying remarkable stability of assemblage functional composition across all spatial scales. Although assemblage species composition is known to be homogeneous in some soft-sediment marine systems over equivalent scales, this combination of patchy individual components yet basically constant functional-group structure seems as yet unreported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Isotropic Negative Thermal Expansion Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lingling; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2016-07-13

    Negative thermal expansion materials are important and desirable in science and engineering applications. However, natural materials with isotropic negative thermal expansion are rare and usually unsatisfied in performance. Here, we propose a novel method to achieve two- and three-dimensional negative thermal expansion metamaterials via antichiral structures. The two-dimensional metamaterial is constructed with unit cells that combine bimaterial strips and antichiral structures, while the three-dimensional metamaterial is fabricated by a multimaterial 3D printing process. Both experimental and simulation results display isotropic negative thermal expansion property of the samples. The effective coefficient of negative thermal expansion of the proposed models is demonstrated to be dependent on the difference between the thermal expansion coefficient of the component materials, as well as on the circular node radius and the ligament length in the antichiral structures. The measured value of the linear negative thermal expansion coefficient of the three-dimensional sample is among the largest achieved in experiments to date. Our findings provide an easy and practical approach to obtaining materials with tunable negative thermal expansion on any scale.

  16. Exact low-temperature series expansion for the partition function of the zero-field Ising model on the infinite square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudem, Grzegorz; Fronczak, Agata; Fronczak, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we provide the exact expression for the coefficients in the low-temperature series expansion of the partition function of the two-dimensional Ising model on the infinite square lattice. This is equivalent to exact determination of the number of spin configurations at a given energy. With these coefficients, we show that the ferromagnetic–to–paramagnetic phase transition in the square lattice Ising model can be explained through equivalence between the model and the perfect gas of energy clusters model, in which the passage through the critical point is related to the complete change in the thermodynamic preferences on the size of clusters. The combinatorial approach reported in this article is very general and can be easily applied to other lattice models. PMID:27721435

  17. Investigation of Solitary wave solutions for Vakhnenko-Parkes equation via exp-function and Exp(-ϕ(ξ))-expansion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshid, Harun-Or; Kabir, Md Rashed; Bhowmik, Rajandra Chadra; Datta, Bimal Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have described two dreadfully important methods to solve nonlinear partial differential equations which are known as exp-function and the exp(-ϕ(ξ)) -expansion method. Recently, there are several methods to use for finding analytical solutions of the nonlinear partial differential equations. The methods are diverse and useful for solving the nonlinear evolution equations. With the help of these methods, we are investigated the exact travelling wave solutions of the Vakhnenko- Parkes equation. The obtaining soliton solutions of this equation are described many physical phenomena for weakly nonlinear surface and internal waves in a rotating ocean. Further, three-dimensional plots of the solutions such as solitons, singular solitons, bell type solitary wave i.e. non-topological solitons solutions and periodic solutions are also given to visualize the dynamics of the equation.

  18. The grand partition function Z (α,β) of a quantum system is studied, using diagrammatic representations of the perturbation expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominicis, C. de

    1961-01-01

    The grand partition function Z (α,β) of a quantum system is studied, using diagrammatic representations of the perturbation expansion. For a fermions system, it is possible to show, by proper resummation, without approximations but under some 'regularity hypothesis', that Log Z (α,β) takes a form where, besides trivial dependences, α and β only appear through a statistical factor F k - = [1 + e -α+βε k 0 -βW k ] -1 . W k is a (real) self-consistent potential, generalized to all orders and can be defined by a stationary condition on Log Z (α,β) under variations of F k - . The thermodynamical quantities take a form analogous to the expressions Landau introduced for the Fermi liquids. The zero temperature limit (for isotropic systems) gives back Goldstone expressions for the ground state of a system. (author) [fr

  19. A Genome-Scale Resource for the Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Pruneda-Paz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extensive transcriptional networks play major roles in cellular and organismal functions. Transcript levels are in part determined by the combinatorial and overlapping functions of multiple transcription factors (TFs bound to gene promoters. Thus, TF-promoter interactions provide the basic molecular wiring of transcriptional regulatory networks. In plants, discovery of the functional roles of TFs is limited by an increased complexity of network circuitry due to a significant expansion of TF families. Here, we present the construction of a comprehensive collection of Arabidopsis TFs clones created to provide a versatile resource for uncovering TF biological functions. We leveraged this collection by implementing a high-throughput DNA binding assay and identified direct regulators of a key clock gene (CCA1 that provide molecular links between different signaling modules and the circadian clock. The resources introduced in this work will significantly contribute to a better understanding of the transcriptional regulatory landscape of plant genomes.

  20. Characterization of the mycobacterial acyl-CoA carboxylase holo complexes reveals their functional expansion into amino acid catabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias T Ehebauer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biotin-mediated carboxylation of short-chain fatty acid coenzyme A esters is a key step in lipid biosynthesis that is carried out by multienzyme complexes to extend fatty acids by one methylene group. Pathogenic mycobacteria have an unusually high redundancy of carboxyltransferase genes and biotin carboxylase genes, creating multiple combinations of protein/protein complexes of unknown overall composition and functional readout. By combining pull-down assays with mass spectrometry, we identified nine binary protein/protein interactions and four validated holo acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. We investigated one of these--the AccD1-AccA1 complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with hitherto unknown physiological function. Using genetics, metabolomics and biochemistry we found that this complex is involved in branched amino-acid catabolism with methylcrotonyl coenzyme A as the substrate. We then determined its overall architecture by electron microscopy and found it to be a four-layered dodecameric arrangement that matches the overall dimensions of a distantly related methylcrotonyl coenzyme A holo complex. Our data argue in favor of distinct structural requirements for biotin-mediated γ-carboxylation of α-β unsaturated acid esters and will advance the categorization of acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. Knowledge about the underlying structural/functional relationships will be crucial to make the target category amenable for future biomedical applications.

  1. Spanish adaptation of the internal functioning of the Work Teams Scale (QFI-22).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficapal-Cusí, Pilar; Boada-Grau, Joan; Torrent-Sellens, Joan; Vigil-Colet, Andreu

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this article is to develop the Spanish adaptation of the internal functioning of Work Teams Scale (QFI-22). The scale was adapted from the French version, and was applied to a sample of 1,055 employees working for firms operating in Spain. The article analyses the internal structure (exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis) and internal consistency, and provides convergent validity evidence of the scale. The QFI-22 scale shows the same internal structure as the original. Factor analysis confirmed the existence of two factors: interpersonal support and team work management, with good internal consistency coefficients (α1 = .93, α2 = .92). Regarding validity evidence, the QFI-22 scale has significant correlations with other correlates and alternative scales used for comparison purposes. The two factors correlated positively with team vision, participation safety, task orientation and support for innovation (Team Climate Inventory, TCI scale), with progressive culture (Organisational Culture, X-Y scale), and with creating change, customer focus and organisational learning (Denison Organizational Culture Survey, DOCS scale). In contrast, the two factors correlated negatively with traditional culture (X-Y scale). The QFI-22 scale is a useful instrument for assessing the internal functioning of work teams.

  2. Translation, cultural adaptation and reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire for Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Chiari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To translate, to perform a cultural adaptation of and to test the reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire for Brazil. METHODS: First, the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire was translated into Portuguese and was then back-translated into French. These translations were reviewed by a committee to establish a Brazilian version of the questionnaire to be tested. The validity and reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire was evaluated. Patients of both sexes, who were aged 18 to 60 years and presented with rheumatoid arthritis affecting their hands, were interviewed. The patients were initially interviewed by two observers and were later interviewed by a single rater. First, the Visual Analogue Scale for hand pain, the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Disability questionnaire and the Health Assessment Questionnaire were administered. The third administration of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale was performed fifteen days after the first administration. Ninety patients were assessed in the present study. RESULTS: Two questions were modified as a result of the assessment of cultural equivalence. The Cronbach's alpha value for this assessment was 0.93. The intraclass intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients were 0.76 and 0.96, respectively. The Spearman's coefficient indicated that there was a low level of correlation between the Cochin Hand Functional Scale and the Visual Analogue Scale for pain (0.46 and that there was a moderate level of correlation of the Cochin Scale with the Health Assessment Questionnaire (0.66 and with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (0.63. The average administration time for the Cochin Scale was three minutes. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale was successfully translated and adapted, and this version exhibited good internal consistency, reliability and construct validity.

  3. A non-JKL density matrix functional for intergeminal correlation between closed-shell geminals from analysis of natural orbital configuration interaction expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2018-03-14

    Almost all functionals that are currently used in density matrix functional theory have been created by some a priori ansatz that generates approximations to the second-order reduced density matrix (2RDM). In this paper, a more consistent approach is used: we analyze the 2RDMs (in the natural orbital basis) of rather accurate multi-reference configuration interaction expansions for several small molecules (CH 4 , NH 3 , H 2 O, FH, and N 2 ) and use the knowledge gained to generate new functionals. The analysis shows that a geminal-like structure is present in the 2RDMs, even though no geminal theory has been applied from the onset. It is also shown that the leading non-geminal dynamical correlation contributions are generated by a specific set of double excitations. The corresponding determinants give rise to non-JKL (non Coulomb/Exchange like) multipole-multipole dispersive attractive terms between geminals. Due to the proximity of the geminals, these dispersion terms are large and cannot be omitted, proving pure JKL functionals to be essentially deficient. A second correction emerges from the observation that the "normal" geminal-like exchange between geminals breaks down when one breaks multiple bonds. This problem can be fixed by doubling the exchange between bond broken geminals, effectively restoring the often physically correct high-spin configurations on the bond broken fragments. Both of these corrections have been added to the commonly used antisymmetrized product of strongly orthogonal geminals functional. The resulting non-JKL functional Extended Löwdin-Shull Dynamical-Multibond is capable of reproducing complete active space self-consistent field curves, in which one active orbital is used for each valence electron.

  4. A non-JKL density matrix functional for intergeminal correlation between closed-shell geminals from analysis of natural orbital configuration interaction expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, R.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2018-03-01

    Almost all functionals that are currently used in density matrix functional theory have been created by some a priori ansatz that generates approximations to the second-order reduced density matrix (2RDM). In this paper, a more consistent approach is used: we analyze the 2RDMs (in the natural orbital basis) of rather accurate multi-reference configuration interaction expansions for several small molecules (CH4, NH3, H2O, FH, and N2) and use the knowledge gained to generate new functionals. The analysis shows that a geminal-like structure is present in the 2RDMs, even though no geminal theory has been applied from the onset. It is also shown that the leading non-geminal dynamical correlation contributions are generated by a specific set of double excitations. The corresponding determinants give rise to non-JKL (non Coulomb/Exchange like) multipole-multipole dispersive attractive terms between geminals. Due to the proximity of the geminals, these dispersion terms are large and cannot be omitted, proving pure JKL functionals to be essentially deficient. A second correction emerges from the observation that the "normal" geminal-like exchange between geminals breaks down when one breaks multiple bonds. This problem can be fixed by doubling the exchange between bond broken geminals, effectively restoring the often physically correct high-spin configurations on the bond broken fragments. Both of these corrections have been added to the commonly used antisymmetrized product of strongly orthogonal geminals functional. The resulting non-JKL functional Extended Löwdin-Shull Dynamical-Multibond is capable of reproducing complete active space self-consistent field curves, in which one active orbital is used for each valence electron.

  5. Scale Economies and Industry Agglomeration Externalities: A Dynamic Cost Function Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Donald S. Siegel; Catherine J. Morrison Paul

    1999-01-01

    Scale economies and agglomeration externalities are alleged to be important determinants of economic growth. To assess these effects, the authors outline and estimate a microfoundations model based on a dynamic cost function specification. This model provides for the separate identification of the impacts of externalities and cyclical utilization on short- and long-run scale economies and input substitution patterns. The authors find that scale economies are prevalent in U.S manufacturing; co...

  6. Reliability of the EK scale, a functional test for non-ambulatory persons with Duchenne dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Birgit F.; Hyde, Sylvia A.; Attermann, Jørn

    2002-01-01

    The EK {Egen Klassifikation} scale was developed to assess overall functional ability in the non-ambulatory stage of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of the EK scale. Six subjects with DMD, selected as representative of the entire range...

  7. The MIMIC Method with Scale Purification for Detecting Differential Item Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Shih, Ching-Lin; Yang, Chih-Chien

    2009-01-01

    This study implements a scale purification procedure onto the standard MIMIC method for differential item functioning (DIF) detection and assesses its performance through a series of simulations. It is found that the MIMIC method with scale purification (denoted as M-SP) outperforms the standard MIMIC method (denoted as M-ST) in controlling…

  8. Effects of wave function correlations on scaling violation in quasi-free electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornow, V.; Drechsel, D.; Orlandini, G.; Traini, M.

    1981-01-01

    The scaling law in quasi-free electron scattering is broken due to the existence of exchange forces, leading to a finite mean value of the scaling variable anti y. This effect is considerably increased by wave function correlations, in particular by tensor correlations, similar to the case of the photonuclear enhancement factor k. (orig.)

  9. Measuring Functional Creativity: Non-Expert Raters and the Creative Solution Diagnosis Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropley, David H.; Kaufman, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The Creative Solution Diagnosis Scale (CSDS) is a 30-item scale based on a core of four criteria: Relevance & Effectiveness, Novelty, Elegance, and Genesis. The CSDS offers potential for the consensual assessment of functional product creativity. This article describes an empirical study in which non-expert judges rated a series of mousetrap…

  10. Brief Assessment of Motor Function: Content Validity and Reliability of the Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintas, Holly Lea; Parks, Rebecca; Don, Sarah; Gerber, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Content validity and reliability of the Brief Assessment of Motor Function (BAMF) Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale (UEGMS) were evaluated in this prospective, descriptive study. The UEGMS is one of five BAMF ordinal scales designed for quick documentation of gross, fine, and oral motor skill levels. Designed to be independent of age and…

  11. Smoothed Conditional Scale Function Estimation in AR(1-ARCH(1 Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lema Logamou Seknewna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the Smoothed Conditional Scale Function for time series was taken out under the conditional heteroscedastic innovations by imitating the kernel smoothing in nonparametric QAR-QARCH scheme. The estimation was taken out based on the quantile regression methodology proposed by Koenker and Bassett. And the proof of the asymptotic properties of the Conditional Scale Function estimator for this type of process was given and its consistency was shown.

  12. Creation and Initial Validation of the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M; Namasivayam-MacDonald, Ashwini M; Guida, Brittany T; Cichero, Julie A; Duivestein, Janice; Hanson, Ben; Lam, Peter; Riquelme, Luis F

    2018-05-01

    To assess consensual validity, interrater reliability, and criterion validity of the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale, a new functional outcome scale intended to capture the severity of oropharyngeal dysphagia, as represented by the degree of diet texture restriction recommended for the patient. Participants assigned International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale scores to 16 clinical cases. Consensual validity was measured against reference scores determined by an author reference panel. Interrater reliability was measured overall and across quartile subsets of the dataset. Criterion validity was evaluated versus Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) scores assigned by survey respondents to the same case scenarios. Feedback was requested regarding ease and likelihood of use. Web-based survey. Respondents (N=170) from 29 countries. Not applicable. Consensual validity (percent agreement and Kendall τ), criterion validity (Spearman rank correlation), and interrater reliability (Kendall concordance and intraclass coefficients). The International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale showed strong consensual validity, criterion validity, and interrater reliability. Scenarios involving liquid-only diets, transition from nonoral feeding, or trial diet advances in therapy showed the poorest consensus, indicating a need for clear instructions on how to score these situations. The International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale showed greater sensitivity than the FOIS to specific changes in diet. Most (>70%) respondents indicated enthusiasm for implementing the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale. This initial validation study suggests that the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale has strong consensual and criterion validity and can be used reliably by clinicians

  13. Overcoming the bottleneck of platelet lysate supply in large-scale clinical expansion of adipose-derived stem cells: A comparison of fresh versus three types of platelet lysates from outdated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovinski, Peter V; Herly, Mikkel; Mathiasen, Anders B; Svalgaard, Jesper D; Borup, Rehannah; Talman, Maj-Lis M; Elberg, Jens J; Kølle, Stig-Frederik T; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Platelet lysates (PL) represent a promising replacement for xenogenic growth supplement for adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) expansions. However, fresh platelets from human blood donors are not clinically feasible for large-scale cell expansion based on their limited supply. Therefore, we tested PLs prepared via three methods from outdated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates (PCs) to establish an efficient and feasible expansion of ASCs for clinical use. PLs were prepared by the freeze-thaw method from freshly drawn platelets or from outdated buffy coat-derived PCs stored in the platelet additive solution, InterSol. Three types of PLs were prepared from outdated PCs with platelets suspended in either (1) InterSol (not manipulated), (2) InterSol + supplemented with plasma or (3) plasma alone (InterSol removed). Using these PLs, we compared ASC population doubling time, cell yield, differentiation potential and cell surface markers. Gene expression profiles were analyzed using microarray assays, and growth factor concentrations in the cell culture medium were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Of the three PL compositions produced from outdated PCs, removal of Intersol and resuspension in plasma prior to the first freezing process was overall the best. This specific outdated PL induced ASC growth kinetics, surface markers, plastic adherence and differentiation potentials comparable with PL from fresh platelets. ASCs expanded in PL from fresh versus outdated PCs exhibited different expressions of 17 overlapping genes, of which 10 were involved in cellular proliferation, although not significantly reflected by cell growth. Only minor differences in growth factor turnover were observed. PLs from outdated platelets may be an efficient and reliable source of human growth supplement allowing for large-scale ASC expansion for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  14. Development and Psychometric Properties of the OCD Family Functioning (OFF) Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S. Evelyn; Hu, Yu-Pei; Hezel, Dianne M.; Proujansky, Rachel; Lamstein, Abby; Walsh, Casey; Ben-Joseph, Elana Pearl; Gironda, Christina; Jenike, Michael; Geller, Daniel A.; Pauls, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) influences not only patients but also family members. Although the construct of family accommodation has received attention in OCD literature, no measures of overall family functioning are currently available. The OCD Family Functioning (OFF) Scale was developed to explore the context, extent, and perspectives of functional impairment in families affected by OCD. It is a three-part, self-report measure capturing independent perspectives of patients and relatives. A total of 400 subjects were enrolled between 2008 and 2010 from specialized OCD clinics and OCD research studies. Psychometric properties of this scale were examined including internal consistency, test–retest reliability, convergent and divergent validity, and exploratory factor analyses. Both patient and relative versions of the OFF Scale demonstrated excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient = 0.96). The test–retest reliability was also adequate (ICC = 0.80). Factor analyses determined that the OFF Scale comprises a family functioning impairment factor and four OCD symptom factors that were consistent with previously reported OCD symptom dimension studies. The OFF Scale demonstrated excellent convergent validity with the Family Accommodation Scale and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Information gathered regarding emotional impact and family role-specific impairment was novel and not captured by other examined scales. The OFF Scale is a reliable and valid instrument for the clinical and research assessment of family functioning in pediatric and adult OCD. This will facilitate the exploration of family functioning impairment as a potential risk factor, as a moderator and as a treatment outcome measure in OCD. PMID:21553962

  15. Studies on combined model based on functional objectives of large scale complex engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuting, Wang; Jingchun, Feng; Jiabao, Sun

    2018-03-01

    As various functions were included in large scale complex engineering, and each function would be conducted with completion of one or more projects, combined projects affecting their functions should be located. Based on the types of project portfolio, the relationship of projects and their functional objectives were analyzed. On that premise, portfolio projects-technics based on their functional objectives were introduced, then we studied and raised the principles of portfolio projects-technics based on the functional objectives of projects. In addition, The processes of combined projects were also constructed. With the help of portfolio projects-technics based on the functional objectives of projects, our research findings laid a good foundation for management of large scale complex engineering portfolio management.

  16. The function of communities in protein interaction networks at multiple scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Nick S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If biology is modular then clusters, or communities, of proteins derived using only protein interaction network structure should define protein modules with similar biological roles. We investigate the link between biological modules and network communities in yeast and its relationship to the scale at which we probe the network. Results Our results demonstrate that the functional homogeneity of communities depends on the scale selected, and that almost all proteins lie in a functionally homogeneous community at some scale. We judge functional homogeneity using a novel test and three independent characterizations of protein function, and find a high degree of overlap between these measures. We show that a high mean clustering coefficient of a community can be used to identify those that are functionally homogeneous. By tracing the community membership of a protein through multiple scales we demonstrate how our approach could be useful to biologists focusing on a particular protein. Conclusions We show that there is no one scale of interest in the community structure of the yeast protein interaction network, but we can identify the range of resolution parameters that yield the most functionally coherent communities, and predict which communities are most likely to be functionally homogeneous.

  17. Bayesian Estimation of the Scale Parameter of Inverse Weibull Distribution under the Asymmetric Loss Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Yahgmaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes different methods of estimating the scale parameter in the inverse Weibull distribution (IWD. Specifically, the maximum likelihood estimator of the scale parameter in IWD is introduced. We then derived the Bayes estimators for the scale parameter in IWD by considering quasi, gamma, and uniform priors distributions under the square error, entropy, and precautionary loss functions. Finally, the different proposed estimators have been compared by the extensive simulation studies in corresponding the mean square errors and the evolution of risk functions.

  18. x- and xi-scaling of the Nuclear Structure Function at Large x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrington, J.; Armstrong, C. S.; Averett, T.; Baker, O. K.; Bever, L. de; Bochna, C. W.; Boeglin, W.; Bray, B.; Carlini, R. D.; Collins, G.; Cothran, C.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Dunne, J. A.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Filippone, B. W.; Honegger, A.; Hughes, E. W.; Jensen, J.; Jourdan, J.; Keppel, C. E.; Koltenuk, D. M.; Lindgren, R.; Lung, A.; Mack, D. J.; McCarthy, J.; McKeown, R. D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J. H.; Mkrtchyan, H. G.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Petitjean, T.; Rondon, O.; Sick, I.; Smith, C.; Terburg, B.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wood, S. A.; Yan, C.; Zhao, J.; Zihlmann, B.

    2001-01-01

    Inclusive electron scattering data are presented for 2 H and Fe targets at an incident electron energy of 4.045 GeV for a range of momentum transfers from Q 2 = 1 to 7 (GeV/c) 2 . Data were taken at Jefferson Laboratory for low values of energy loss, corresponding to values of Bjorken x greater than or near 1. The structure functions do not show scaling in x in this range, where inelastic scattering is not expected to dominate the cross section. The data do show scaling, however, in the Nachtmann variable ξ. This scaling may be the result of Bloom Gilman duality in the nucleon structure function combined with the Fermi motion of the nucleons in the nucleus. The resulting extension of scaling to larger values of ξ opens up the possibility of accessing nuclear structure functions in the high-x region at lower values of Q 2 than previously believed

  19. Reliability of the EK scale, a functional test for non-ambulatory persons with Duchenne dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Birgit F.; Hyde, Sylvia A.; Attermann, Jørn

    2002-01-01

    of functional ability seen in the nonambulatory phase of the disease, were video recorded and assessed using the EK scale. The assessment required both interview and performance of functional activities. The video records were shown to 17 healthcare professionals comprising seven three physiotherapy students...

  20. New parametrization for the scale dependent growth function in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, James B.; Dutta, Sourish; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2009-01-01

    We study the scale-dependent evolution of the growth function δ(a,k) of cosmological perturbations in dark energy models based on general relativity. This scale dependence is more prominent on cosmological scales of 100h -1 Mpc or larger. We derive a new scale-dependent parametrization which generalizes the well-known Newtonian approximation result f 0 (a)≡(dlnδ 0 /dlna)=Ω(a) γ (γ=(6/11) for ΛCDM) which is a good approximation on scales less than 50h -1 Mpc. Our generalized parametrization is of the form f(a)=(f 0 (a)/1+ξ(a,k)), where ξ(a,k)=(3H 0 2 Ω 0m )/(ak 2 ). We demonstrate that this parametrization fits the exact result of a full general relativistic evaluation of the growth function up to horizon scales for both ΛCDM and dynamical dark energy. In contrast, the scale independent parametrization does not provide a good fit on scales beyond 5% of the horizon scale (k≅0.01h -1 Mpc).

  1. The three-point function as a probe of models for large-scale structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frieman, J.A.; Gaztanaga, E.

    1993-01-01

    The authors analyze the consequences of models of structure formation for higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions in the mildly non-linear regime. Several variations of the standard Ω = 1 cold dark matter model with scale-invariant primordial perturbations have recently been introduced to obtain more power on large scales, R p ∼20 h -1 Mpc, e.g., low-matter-density (non-zero cosmological constant) models, open-quote tilted close-quote primordial spectra, and scenarios with a mixture of cold and hot dark matter. They also include models with an effective scale-dependent bias, such as the cooperative galaxy formation scenario of Bower, et al. The authors show that higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions can provide a useful test of such models and can discriminate between models with true large-scale power in the density field and those where the galaxy power arises from scale-dependent bias: a bias with rapid scale-dependence leads to a dramatic decrease of the hierarchical amplitudes Q J at large scales, r approx-gt R p . Current observational constraints on the three-point amplitudes Q 3 and S 3 can place limits on the bias parameter(s) and appear to disfavor, but not yet rule out, the hypothesis that scale-dependent bias is responsible for the extra power observed on large scales

  2. TESTING THE EFFECTS OF EXPANSION ON SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vech, Daniel; Chen, Christopher H K

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-spacecraft approach to test the predictions of recent studies on the effect of solar wind expansion on the radial spectral, variance, and local 3D anisotropies of the turbulence. We found that on small scales (5000–10,000 km) the power levels of the B-trace structure functions do not depend on the sampling direction with respect to the radial suggesting that on this scale the effect of expansion is small possibly due to fast turbulent timescales. On larger scales (110–135 R E ), the fluctuations of the radial magnetic field component are reduced by ∼20% compared to the transverse (perpendicular to radial) ones, which could be due to expansion confining the fluctuations into the plane perpendicular to radial. For the local 3D spectral anisotropy, the B-trace structure functions showed dependence on the sampling direction with respect to radial. The anisotropy in the perpendicular plane is reduced when the increments are taken perpendicular with respect to radial, which could be an effect of expansion.

  3. TESTING THE EFFECTS OF EXPANSION ON SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vech, Daniel; Chen, Christopher H K, E-mail: dvech@umich.edu [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-20

    We present a multi-spacecraft approach to test the predictions of recent studies on the effect of solar wind expansion on the radial spectral, variance, and local 3D anisotropies of the turbulence. We found that on small scales (5000–10,000 km) the power levels of the B-trace structure functions do not depend on the sampling direction with respect to the radial suggesting that on this scale the effect of expansion is small possibly due to fast turbulent timescales. On larger scales (110–135 R{sub E}), the fluctuations of the radial magnetic field component are reduced by ∼20% compared to the transverse (perpendicular to radial) ones, which could be due to expansion confining the fluctuations into the plane perpendicular to radial. For the local 3D spectral anisotropy, the B-trace structure functions showed dependence on the sampling direction with respect to radial. The anisotropy in the perpendicular plane is reduced when the increments are taken perpendicular with respect to radial, which could be an effect of expansion.

  4. Cycle expansions: From maps to turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Y.

    2010-03-01

    We present a derivation, a physical explanation and applications of cycle expansions in different dynamical systems, ranging from simple one-dimensional maps to turbulence in fluids. Cycle expansion is a newly devised powerful tool for computing averages of physical observables in nonlinear chaotic systems which combines many innovative ideas developed in dynamical systems, such as hyperbolicity, invariant manifolds, symbolic dynamics, measure theory and thermodynamic formalism. The concept of cycle expansion has a deep root in theoretical physics, bearing a close analogy to cumulant expansion in statistical physics and effective action functional in quantum field theory, the essence of which is to represent a physical system in a hierarchical way by utilizing certain multiplicative structures such that the dominant parts of physical observables are captured by compact, maneuverable objects while minor detailed variations are described by objects with a larger space and time scale. The technique has been successfully applied to many low-dimensional dynamical systems and much effort has recently been made to extend its use to spatially extended systems. For one-dimensional systems such as the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, the method turns out to be very effective while for more complex real-world systems including the Navier-Stokes equation, the method is only starting to yield its first fruits and much more work is needed to enable practical computations. However, the experience and knowledge accumulated so far is already very useful to a large set of research problems. Several such applications are briefly described in what follows. As more research effort is devoted to the study of complex dynamics of nonlinear systems, cycle expansion will undergo a fast development and find wide applications.

  5. Charged Particles Multiplicity and Scaling Violation of Fragmentation Functions in Electron-Positron Annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaffary, Tooraj

    2016-01-01

    By the use of data from the annihilation process of electron-positron in AMY detector at 60 GeV center of mass energy, charged particles multiplicity distribution is obtained and fitted with the KNO scaling. Then, momentum spectra of charged particles and momentum distribution with respect to the jet axis are obtained, and the results are compared to the different models of QCD; also, the distribution of fragmentation functions and scaling violations are studied. It is being expected that the scaling violations of the fragmentation functions of gluon jets are stronger than the quark ones. One of the reasons for such case is that splitting function of quarks is larger than splitting function of gluon.

  6. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  7. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2011-12-22

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor\\'s frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  8. Brazilian Portuguese transcultural adaptation of Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS)

    OpenAIRE

    Godoy, Victor Polignano; Mata, Fernanda Gomes Da; Conde, Bárbara Romaneli; Souza, Caroline Antunes de Oliveira e; Martins, Ana Luiza Guimarães; Mattos, Paulo; Miranda, Débora Marques de; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Considering the importance of Executive Functions to clinical and nonclinical situations, Barkley proposed a new theory of executive functioning based on an evolutionary neuropsychological perspective and clinical research using large samples of clinical and community identified adults and children as well as children with ADHD followed to adulthood. Objective The present study aims to adapt the Barkley Deficits in Executive Functions Scales (BDEFS) to Brazilian Portug...

  9. Inference of functional properties from large-scale analysis of enzyme superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana D; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2012-01-02

    As increasingly large amounts of data from genome and other sequencing projects become available, new approaches are needed to determine the functions of the proteins these genes encode. We show how large-scale computational analysis can help to address this challenge by linking functional information to sequence and structural similarities using protein similarity networks. Network analyses using three functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies illustrate the use of these approaches for facile updating and comparison of available structures for a large superfamily, for creation of functional hypotheses for metagenomic sequences, and to summarize the limits of our functional knowledge about even well studied superfamilies.

  10. Inference of Functional Properties from Large-scale Analysis of Enzyme Superfamilies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana D.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2012-01-01

    As increasingly large amounts of data from genome and other sequencing projects become available, new approaches are needed to determine the functions of the proteins these genes encode. We show how large-scale computational analysis can help to address this challenge by linking functional information to sequence and structural similarities using protein similarity networks. Network analyses using three functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies illustrate the use of these approaches for facile updating and comparison of available structures for a large superfamily, for creation of functional hypotheses for metagenomic sequences, and to summarize the limits of our functional knowledge about even well studied superfamilies. PMID:22069325

  11. Understanding the Functionality of Human Activity Hotspots from Their Scaling Pattern Using Trajectory Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Jia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human activity hotspots are the clusters of activity locations in space and time, and a better understanding of their functionality would be useful for urban land use planning and transportation. In this article, using trajectory data, we aim to infer the functionality of human activity hotspots from their scaling pattern in a reliable way. Specifically, a large number of stopping locations are extracted from trajectory data, which are then aggregated into activity hotspots. Activity hotspots are found to display scaling patterns in terms of the sublinear scaling relationships between the number of stopping locations and the number of points of interest (POIs, which indicates economies of scale of human interactions with urban land use. Importantly, this scaling pattern remains stable over time. This finding inspires us to devise an allometric ruler to identify the activity hotspots, whose functionality could be reliably estimated using the stopping locations. Thereafter, a novel Bayesian inference model is proposed to infer their urban functionality, which examines the spatial and temporal information of stopping locations covering 75 days. Experimental results suggest that the functionality of identified activity hotspots are reliably inferred by stopping locations, such as the railway station.

  12. Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that ...

  13. Advanced methodology for generation expansion planning including interconnected systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, M; Yokoyama, R; Yasuda, K [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Sasaki, H [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Ogimoto, K [Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews advanced methodology for generation expansion planning including interconnected systems developed in Japan, putting focus on flexibility and efficiency in a practical application. First, criteria for evaluating flexibility of generation planning considering uncertainties are introduced. Secondly, the flexible generation mix problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization with more than two objective functions. The multi-objective optimization problem is then transformed into a single objective problem by using the weighting method, to obtain the Pareto optimal solution, and solved by a dynamics programming technique. Thirdly, a new approach for electric generation expansion planning of interconnected systems is presented, based on the Benders Decomposition technique. That is, large scale generation problem constituted by the general economic load dispatch problem, and several sub problems which are composed of smaller scale isolated system generation expansion plans. Finally, the generation expansion plan solved by an artificial neural network is presented. In conclusion, the advantages and disadvantages of this method from the viewpoint of flexibility and applicability to practical generation expansion planning are presented. (author) 29 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Hypersonic expansion of the Fokker--Planck equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Feria, R.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study of the hypersonic limit of a heavy species diluted in a much lighter gas is made via the Fokker--Planck equation governing its velocity distribution function. In particular, two different hypersonic expansions of the Fokker--Planck equation are considered, differing from each other in the momentum equation of the heavy gas used as the basis of the expansion: in the first of them, the pressure tensor is neglected in that equation while, in the second expansion, the pressure tensor term is retained. The expansions are valid when the light gas Mach number is O(1) or larger and the difference between the mean velocities of light and heavy components is small compared to the light gas thermal speed. They can be applied away from regions where the spatial gradient of the distribution function is very large, but it is not restricted with respect to the temporal derivative of the distribution function. The hydrodynamic equations corresponding to the lowest order of both expansions constitute two different hypersonic closures of the moment equations. For the subsequent orders in the expansions, closed sets of moment equations (hydrodynamic equations) are given. Special emphasis is made on the order of magnitude of the errors of the lowest-order hydrodynamic quantities. It is shown that if the heat flux vanishes initially, these errors are smaller than one might have expected from the ordinary scaling of the hypersonic closure. Also it is found that the normal solution of both expansions is a Gaussian distribution at the lowest order

  15. The brief family relationship scale: a brief measure of the relationship dimension in family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Carlotta Ching Ting; Allen, James; Henry, David

    2014-02-01

    The Relationship dimension of the Family Environment Scale, which consists of the Cohesion, Expressiveness, and Conflict subscales, measures a person's perception of the quality of his or her family relationship functioning. This study investigates an adaptation of the Relationship dimension of the Family Environment Scale for Alaska Native youth. The authors tested the adapted measure, the Brief Family Relationship Scale, for psychometric properties and internal structure with 284 12- to 18-year-old predominately Yup'ik Eskimo Alaska Native adolescents from rural, remote communities. This non-Western cultural group is hypothesized to display higher levels of collectivism traditionally organized around an extended kinship family structure. Results demonstrate a subset of the adapted items function satisfactorily, a three-response alternative format provided meaningful information, and the subscale's underlying structure is best described through three distinct first-order factors, organized under one higher order factor. Convergent and discriminant validity of the Brief Family Relationship Scale was assessed through correlational analysis.

  16. A Rating Scale for the Functional Assessment of Patients with Familial Dysautonomia (Riley Day Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B.; Rolnitzky, Linda; von Simson, Gabrielle Gold; Berlin, Dena; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop a reliable rating scale to assess functional capacity in children with familial dysautonomia, evaluate changes over time and determine whether severity within a particular functional category at a young age affected survival. Study design Ten functional categories were retrospectively assessed in 123 patients with familial dysautonomia at age 7 years ± 6 months. Each of the ten Functional Severity Scale (FuSS) categories (motor development, cognitive ability, psychological status, expressive speech, balance, oral coordination, frequency of dysautonomic crisis, respiratory, cardiovascular and nutritional status) was scored from 1 (worst or severely affected) to 5 (best or no impairment). Changes over time were analyzed further in 22 of the 123 patients who were also available at ages 17 and 27 years. Results Severely impaired cardiovascular function and high frequency of dysautonomic crisis negatively affected survival (p<0.005 and p<0.001, respectively). In the 22 individuals followed up to age 27 years, psychological status significantly worsened (p=0.01), and expressive speech improved (p=0.045). From age 17 to 27 years, balance worsened markedly (p =0.048). Conclusion The FuSS scale is a reliable tool to measure functional capacity in patients with familial dysautonomia. The scale may prove useful in providing prognosis and as a complementary endpoint in clinical trials. PMID:22727867

  17. Functional ability among elderly people in three service settings: the discriminatory power of a new functional ability scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, K; Holstein, B E

    1998-01-01

    The purpose is to assess the discriminatory power of the Avlund scales: (1) by assessing the ability of the scales to discriminate between three different populations of elderly people, and (2) by studying groups with a poor fit between use of formal home care and functional ability. The study...... included (A) all residents in new sheltered housing facilities (response rate 68%, n = 102), (B) a random sample of users of home care (response rate 67%, n = 435), and (C) a random sample of individuals not using home care (response rate 74%, n = 501). All participants were 60+ years old. Data were...

  18. Time Scale Inequalities of the Ostrowski Type for Functions Differentiable on the Coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eze R. Nwaeze

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2016, some inequalities of the Ostrowski type for functions (of two variables differentiable on the coordinates were established. In this paper, we extend these results to an arbitrary time scale by means of a parameter λ∈0,1. The aforementioned results are regained for the case when the time scale T=R. Besides extension, our results are employed to the continuous and discrete calculus to get some new inequalities in this direction.

  19. On approach to double asymptotic scaling at low x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, D.K.

    1994-10-01

    We obtain the finite x correlations to the gluon structure function which exhibits double asymptotic scaling at low x. The technique used is the GLAP equation for gluon approximated at low x by a Taylor expansion. (author). 27 refs

  20. Functional evaluation of pedotransfer functions derived from different scales of data collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, A.; Schaap, M.G.; Wösten, J.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Estimation of soil hydraulic properties by pedotransfer functions (PTFs) can be an alternative to troublesome and expensive measurements. New approaches to develop PTFs are continuously being introduced, however, PTF applicability in locations other than those of data collection has been rarely

  1. A low-energy β-function in a finite super-Yang-Mills model with multiple mass scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.; Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1984-08-01

    We compute the one-loop contribution to the low-energy light-fermion gauge coupling in a finite supersymmetric gauge theory with two mass scales: a heavy mass that breaks an initial N=4 supersymmetry down to N=2, but respects the finiteness, and a light mass that, for simplicity, is set to zero. We find that the coupling grows with the mass of the heavy intermediate states. Hence the latter do not decouple at low energies, leading to large logarithms that invalidate low-energy perturbation theory. Consequently, further manipulations are required to obtain a meaningful perturbative expansion. Enforcing decoupling through finite renormalizations, that absorb the heavy mass effects into a redefinition of the parameters of the Lagrangian, introduces an arbitrary subtraction mass μ. The requirement that the S-matrix elements be independent of μ leads to a non-trivial renormalization-group equation for the low-energy theory, with a non-vanishing β-function. (author)

  2. Relationship Between the Functional Status Scale and the Pediatric Overall Performance Category and Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scales FREE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Murray M.; Holubkov, Richard; Funai, Tomohiko; Clark, Amy; Moler, Frank; Shanley, Thomas; Meert, Kathy; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Carcillo, Joseph; Berger, John T.; Doctor, Allan; Berg, Robert A.; Dalton, Heidi; Wessel, David L.; Harrison, Rick E.; Dean, J. Michael; Jenkins, Tammara L.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Functional status assessment methods are important as outcome measures for pediatric critical care studies. Objective To investigate the relationships between the 2 functional status assessment methods appropriate for large-sample studies, the Functional Status Scale (FSS) and the Pediatric Overall Performance Category and Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (POPC/PCPC) scales. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective cohort study with random patient selection at 7 sites and 8 children’s hospitals with general/medical and cardiac/cardiovascular pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Participants included all PICU patients younger than 18 years. Main Outcomes and Measures Functional Status Scale and POPC/PCPC scores determined at PICU admission (baseline) and PICU discharge. We investigated the association between the baseline and PICU discharge POPC/PCPC scores and the baseline and PICU discharge FSS scores, the dispersion of FSS scores within each of the POPC/PCPC ratings, and the relationship between the FSS neurologic components (FSS-CNS) and the PCPC. Results We included 5017 patients. We found a significant (P < .001) difference between FSS scores in each POPC or PCPC interval, with an FSS score increase with each worsening POPC/PCPC rating. The FSS scores for the good and mild disability POPC/PCPC ratings were similar and increased by 2 to 3 points for the POPC/PCPC change from mild to moderate disability, 5 to 6 points for moderate to severe disability, and 8 to 9 points for severe disability to vegetative state or coma. The dispersion of FSS scores within each POPC and PCPC rating was substantial and increased with worsening POPC and PCPC scores. We also found a significant (P < .001) difference between the FSS-CNS scores between each of the PCPC ratings with increases in the FSS-CNS score for each higher PCPC rating. Conclusions and Relevance The FSS and POPC/PCPC system

  3. Operator expansion in σ-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terent'ev, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    The operator expansion is studied in two dimensional σ-model with O(N) symmetry group at large values of N for the Green function at x 2 → 0 (Here n(x) is the dynamical field of σ-model). As a preliminary step the renormalization scheme is formulated in framework of I/N expansion where the intermediate scale μ 2 is introdused and regions of large (p > μ) and small (p 2 )/N in composite operators (here f(μ 2 ) is the effective coupling constant at the point μ 2 ) and the corrections of order of m 2 x 2 f(μ 2 )/N in the coefficient functions (here m is the dynamical mass-scale factor of σ-model) decisively depend on the recipe of factorization of small and large momenta regions. Due to the analogy between σ-model and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) the obtained result indicates the theoretical limitations to the accuracy of sum rule method in QCD

  4. Planetary Nebulae in the Solar Neighbourhood: Statistics, Distance Scale and Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, David J.

    2008-07-01

    An accurate census of the nearest planetary nebulae (PNe) is needed for calculations of the total number, space density, scale height, and birth rate of PNe in the Galaxy, to understand the dynamics of an evolving nebula and its relationship to the cooling history of the central star, and also to provide an unbiased sample to investigate the frequency of binary central stars and their role in the formation and shaping of these objects. This study presents the most refined volume-limited survey of PNe known to date. Integrated H-alpha fluxes for over 400 mostly evolved PNe are presented, based primarily on data from the Southern H-alpha Sky Survey Atlas (SHASSA) and the Virginia Tech Spectral-Line Survey (VTSS). Aperture photometry on the digital images was performed to extract H-alpha+[NII] fluxes. The [NII] contribution was then de-convolved using literature data, new data from slit spectra, or spectrophotometric data from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) also obtained as part of this project. Comparison with previous work shows that the flux scale presented here has no significant zero-point error. The H-alpha fluxes are used to determine new Zanstra temperatures for those PNe with accurate central star photometry, calculating surface-brightness distances for each PN in the sample, and in conjunction with accurate [OIII] fluxes, new absolute PN magnitudes for delineating the faint end of the PN luminosity function. A spectroscopic survey of a range of MASH PNe is also presented. New emission-line intensities for 60 PNe are given, including a preliminary discussion of the chemical abundances of this sample. New distances have been determined for a large number of PNe, by either critically examining the literature, or by deriving new extinction and kinematic distances where suitable. For all PNe not amenable to these approaches, distances were estimated from a new H-alpha surface brightness-radius (SB-r) relation. The Hα SB-r relation covers >6 dex in SB, and

  5. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Adaptive Functions of Music Listening Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny M. Groarke

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Music listening may serve many adaptive functions in everyday life. However, studies examining the relationship between the functions of music listening (FML and wellbeing outcomes have produced mixed findings. The purpose of this study is to develop a new measure to assess music listening functions that is psychometrically robust, and suitable for outcomes-based research on music listening and wellbeing. Scale items were developed based on a literature review and a prior qualitative enquiry. The items were reviewed by four content experts in music psychology and scale development. Scale structure was investigated by EFA and CFA in two large samples of participants (N = 1,191, 17–66 years, M = 22.04, SD = 6.23, 326 males. Tests of dimensionality revealed a 46-item scale with 11 factors for the Adaptive Functions of Music Listening (AFML scale. Namely, Stress Regulation, Anxiety Regulation, Anger Regulation, Loneliness Regulation, Rumination, Reminiscence, Strong Emotional Experiences, Awe and Appreciation, Cognitive Regulation, Identity, and Sleep FML. The scale and its subscales possess good internal consistency and construct validity. In line with theory and research on gender differences in FML, scores on factors representing affect regulation FML were significantly higher among female respondents. Supporting the concurrent validity of the AFML scale, factors were positively correlated with an existing measure of the FML—the Music USE questionnaire. Further evidence of construct validity derives from positive associations between affect regulation factor scores and level of reappraisal, and lack of association with suppression, as measured by the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire. Consistent with the view that adaptive FML are positively related to wellbeing, a number of factors, affect regulation factors in particular, were significantly positively correlated with subjective, psychological, and social wellbeing measures across two cross

  6. [Upper limb functional assessment scale for children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Spinal muscular atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Raúl G; Lucero, Nayadet; Solares, Carmen; Espinoza, Victoria; Moscoso, Odalie; Olguín, Polín; Muñoz, Karin T; Rosas, Ricardo

    2016-08-16

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes significant disability and progressive functional impairment. Readily available instruments that assess functionality, especially in advanced stages of the disease, are required to monitor the progress of the disease and the impact of therapeutic interventions. To describe the development of a scale to evaluate upper limb function (UL) in patients with DMD and SMA, and describe its validation process, which includes self-training for evaluators. The development of the scale included a review of published scales, an exploratory application of a pilot scale in healthy children and those with DMD, self-training of evaluators in applying the scale using a handbook and video tutorial, and assessment of a group of children with DMD and SMA using the final scale. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach and Kendall concordance and with intra and inter-rater test-retest, and validity with concordance and factorial analysis. A high level of reliability was observed, with high internal consistency (Cronbach α=0.97), and inter-rater (Kendall W=0.96) and intra-rater concordance (r=0.97 to 0.99). The validity was demonstrated by the absence of significant differences between results by different evaluators with an expert evaluator (F=0.023, P>.5), and by the factor analysis that showed that four factors account for 85.44% of total variance. This scale is a reliable and valid tool for assessing UL functionality in children with DMD and SMA. It is also easily implementable due to the possibility of self-training and the use of simple and inexpensive materials. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Adaptive Functions of Music Listening Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groarke, Jenny M; Hogan, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Music listening may serve many adaptive functions in everyday life. However, studies examining the relationship between the functions of music listening (FML) and wellbeing outcomes have produced mixed findings. The purpose of this study is to develop a new measure to assess music listening functions that is psychometrically robust, and suitable for outcomes-based research on music listening and wellbeing. Scale items were developed based on a literature review and a prior qualitative enquiry. The items were reviewed by four content experts in music psychology and scale development. Scale structure was investigated by EFA and CFA in two large samples of participants ( N = 1,191, 17-66 years, M = 22.04, SD = 6.23, 326 males). Tests of dimensionality revealed a 46-item scale with 11 factors for the Adaptive Functions of Music Listening (AFML) scale. Namely, Stress Regulation, Anxiety Regulation, Anger Regulation, Loneliness Regulation, Rumination, Reminiscence, Strong Emotional Experiences, Awe and Appreciation, Cognitive Regulation, Identity , and Sleep FML. The scale and its subscales possess good internal consistency and construct validity. In line with theory and research on gender differences in FML, scores on factors representing affect regulation FML were significantly higher among female respondents. Supporting the concurrent validity of the AFML scale, factors were positively correlated with an existing measure of the FML-the Music USE questionnaire. Further evidence of construct validity derives from positive associations between affect regulation factor scores and level of reappraisal, and lack of association with suppression, as measured by the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire. Consistent with the view that adaptive FML are positively related to wellbeing, a number of factors, affect regulation factors in particular, were significantly positively correlated with subjective, psychological, and social wellbeing measures across two cross-sectional studies.

  8. Advanced Connectivity Analysis (ACA): a Large Scale Functional Connectivity Data Mining Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Nixon, Erika; Herskovits, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to study functional connectivity is of great importance to understand normal development and function as well as a host of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Seed-based analysis is one of the most widely used rs-fMRI analysis methods. Here we describe a freely available large scale functional connectivity data mining software package called Advanced Connectivity Analysis (ACA). ACA enables large-scale seed-based analysis and brain-behavior analysis. It can seamlessly examine a large number of seed regions with minimal user input. ACA has a brain-behavior analysis component to delineate associations among imaging biomarkers and one or more behavioral variables. We demonstrate applications of ACA to rs-fMRI data sets from a study of autism.

  9. Development of a Multidimensional Functional Health Scale for Older Adults in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Fanzhen; Han, Yaofeng; Chen, Junze; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Manqiong; Alicia Hong, Y; Fang, Ya

    2016-05-01

    A first step to achieve successful aging is assessing functional wellbeing of older adults. This study reports the development of a culturally appropriate brief scale (the Multidimensional Functional Health Scale for Chinese Elderly, MFHSCE) to assess the functional health of Chinese elderly. Through systematic literature review, Delphi method, cultural adaptation, synthetic statistical item selection, Cronbach's alpha and confirmatory factor analysis, we conducted development of item pool, two rounds of item selection, and psychometric evaluation. Synthetic statistical item selection and psychometric evaluation was processed among 539 and 2032 older adults, separately. The MFHSCE consists of 30 items, covering activities of daily living, social relationships, physical health, mental health, cognitive function, and economic resources. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.92, and the comparative fit index was 0.917. The MFHSCE has good internal consistency and construct validity; it is also concise and easy to use in general practice, especially in communities in China.

  10. Soil Functional Mapping: A Geospatial Framework for Scaling Soil Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change is dramatically altering biogeochemical cycles in most terrestrial ecosystems, particularly the cycles of water and carbon (C). These changes will affect myriad ecosystem processes of importance, including plant productivity, C exports to aquatic systems, and terrestrial C storage. Soil C storage represents a critical feedback to climate change as soils store more C than the atmosphere and aboveground plant biomass combined. While we know plant and soil C cycling are strongly coupled with soil moisture, substantial unknowns remain regarding how these relationships can be scaled up from soil profiles to ecosystems. This greatly limits our ability to build a process-based understanding of the controls on and consequences of climate change at regional scales. In an effort to address this limitation we: (1) describe an approach to classifying soils that is based on underlying differences in soil functional characteristics and (2) examine the utility of this approach as a scaling tool that honors the underlying soil processes. First, geospatial datasets are analyzed in the context of our current understanding of soil C and water cycling in order to predict soil functional units that can be mapped at the scale of ecosystems or watersheds. Next, the integrity of each soil functional unit is evaluated using available soil C data and mapping units are refined as needed. Finally, targeted sampling is conducted to further differentiate functional units or fill in any data gaps that are identified. Completion of this workflow provides new geospatial datasets that are based on specific soil functions, in this case the coupling of soil C and water cycling, and are well suited for integration with regional-scale soil models. Preliminary results from this effort highlight the advantages of a scaling approach that balances theory, measurement, and modeling.

  11. The pion structure function and scale breaking in Drell-Yan processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.

    1979-01-01

    By use of the formalism of QCD, the structure functions of the nucleon and the pion obtained at Q 2 = m 2 sub(psi) is extended to higher values of Q 2 . These structure functions are then used to obtain predictions of scale-breaking effects in Drell-Yan lepton-pair production for both nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleon cases. A comparison with recent experimental data is also presented. (author)

  12. Scale-Dependence of Processes Structuring Dung Beetle Metacommunities Using Functional Diversity and Community Deconstruction Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Pedro Giovâni; Hernández, Malva Isabel Medina

    2015-01-01

    Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass) for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae) community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in the distribution

  13. Finite-size scaling functions for directed polymers confined between attracting walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owczarek, A L [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Prellberg, T [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Rechnitzer, A [Department of Mathematics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2 (Canada)

    2008-01-25

    The exact solution of directed self-avoiding walks confined to a slit of finite width and interacting with the walls of the slit via an attractive potential has been recently calculated. The walks can be considered to model the polymer-induced steric stabilization and sensitized flocculation of colloidal dispersions. The large-width asymptotics led to a phase diagram different to that of a polymer attached to, and attracted to, a single wall. The question that arises is: Can one interpolate between the single wall and two wall cases? In this paper, we calculate the exact scaling functions for the partition function by considering the two variable asymptotics of the partition function for simultaneous large length and large width. Consequently, we find the scaling functions for the force induced by the polymer on the walls. We find that these scaling functions are given by elliptic {theta} functions. In some parts of the phase diagram there is more a complex crossover between the single wall and two wall cases and we elucidate how this happens.

  14. On genus expansion of superpolynomials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironov, Andrei, E-mail: mironov@itep.ru [Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); ITEP, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Morozov, Alexei, E-mail: morozov@itep.ru [ITEP, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Sleptsov, Alexei, E-mail: sleptsov@itep.ru [ITEP, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Quantum Topology, Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk 454001 (Russian Federation); KdVI, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smirnov, Andrey, E-mail: asmirnov@math.columbia.edu [ITEP, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); Columbia University, Department of Mathematics, New York (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Recently it was shown that the (Ooguri–Vafa) generating function of HOMFLY polynomials is the Hurwitz partition function, i.e. that the dependence of the HOMFLY polynomials on representation R is naturally captured by symmetric group characters (cut-and-join eigenvalues). The genus expansion and expansion through Vassiliev invariants explicitly demonstrate this phenomenon. In the present paper we claim that the superpolynomials are not functions of such a type: symmetric group characters do not provide an adequate linear basis for their expansions. Deformation to superpolynomials is, however, straightforward in the multiplicative basis: the Casimir operators are β-deformed to Hamiltonians of the Calogero–Moser–Sutherland system. Applying this trick to the genus and Vassiliev expansions, we observe that the deformation is fully straightforward only for the thin knots. Beyond the family of thin knots additional algebraically independent terms appear in the Vassiliev and genus expansions. This can suggest that the superpolynomials do in fact contain more information about knots than the colored HOMFLY and Kauffman polynomials. However, even for the thin knots the beta-deformation is non-innocent: already in the simplest examples it seems inconsistent with the positivity of colored superpolynomials in non-(anti)symmetric representations, which also happens in I. Cherednik's (DAHA-based) approach to the torus knots.

  15. Scaling for deuteron structure functions in a relativistic light-front model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyzou, W.N.; Gloeckle, W.

    1996-01-01

    Scaling limits of the structure functions [B.D. Keister, Phys. Rev. C 37, 1765 (1988)], W 1 and W 2 , are studied in a relativistic model of the two-nucleon system. The relativistic model is defined by a unitary representation, U(Λ,a), of the Poincaracute e group which acts on the Hilbert space of two spinless nucleons. The representation is in Dirac close-quote s [P.A.M. Dirac, Rev. Mod. Phys. 21, 392 (1949)] light-front formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics and is designed to give the experimental deuteron mass and n-p scattering length. A model hadronic current operator that is conserved and covariant with respect to this representation is used to define the structure tensor. This work is the first step in a relativistic extension of the results of Hueber, Gloeckle, and Boemelburg. The nonrelativistic limit of the model is shown to be consistent with the nonrelativistic model of Hueber, Gloeckle, and Boemelburg. [D. Hueber et al. Phys. Rev. C 42, 2342 (1990)]. The relativistic and nonrelativistic scaling limits, for both Bjorken and y scaling are compared. The interpretation of y scaling in the relativistic model is studied critically. The standard interpretation of y scaling requires a soft wave function which is not realized in this model. The scaling limits in both the relativistic and nonrelativistic case are related to probability distributions associated with the target deuteron. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. Use of Gilliam Asperger's disorder scale in differentiating high and low functioning autism and ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L; Murray, Michael J; Morrow, Jill D; Yurich, Kirsten K L; Cothren, Shiyoko; Purichia, Heather; Bouder, James N

    2011-02-01

    Little is known about the validity of Gilliam Asperger's Disorder Scale (GADS), although it is widely used. This study of 199 children with high functioning autism or Asperger's disorder, 195 with low functioning autism, and 83 with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) showed high classification accuracy (autism vs. ADHD) for clinicians' GADS Quotients (92%), and somewhat lower accuracy (77%) for parents' Quotients. Both children with high and low functioning autism had clinicians' Quotients (M=99 and 101, respectively) similar to the Asperger's Disorder mean of 100 for the GADS normative sample. Children with high functioning autism scored significantly higher on the cognitive patterns subscale than children with low functioning autism, and the latter had higher scores on the remaining subscales: social interaction, restricted patterns of behavior, and pragmatic skills. Using the clinicians' Quotient and Cognitive Patterns score, 70% of children were correctly identified as having high or low functioning autism or ADHD.

  17. Combining agreement and frequency rating scales to optimize psychometrics in measuring behavioral health functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Ni, Pengsheng; Chan, Leighton; Rasch, Elizabeth K; Jette, Alan M

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this article was to investigate optimal functioning of using frequency vs. agreement rating scales in two subdomains of the newly developed Work Disability Functional Assessment Battery: the Mood & Emotions and Behavioral Control scales. A psychometric study comparing rating scale performance embedded in a cross-sectional survey used for developing a new instrument to measure behavioral health functioning among adults applying for disability benefits in the United States was performed. Within the sample of 1,017 respondents, the range of response category endorsement was similar for both frequency and agreement item types for both scales. There were fewer missing values in the frequency items than the agreement items. Both frequency and agreement items showed acceptable reliability. The frequency items demonstrated optimal effectiveness around the mean ± 1-2 standard deviation score range; the agreement items performed better at the extreme score ranges. Findings suggest an optimal response format requires a mix of both agreement-based and frequency-based items. Frequency items perform better in the normal range of responses, capturing specific behaviors, reactions, or situations that may elicit a specific response. Agreement items do better for those whose scores are more extreme and capture subjective content related to general attitudes, behaviors, or feelings of work-related behavioral health functioning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Validation of the Dutch functional, communicative and critical health literacy scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Hilderink-Koertshuis, Rianne T.E.; Klaase, Joost M.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2012-01-01

    Objective: While most existing health literacy (HL) measures focus primarily on reading comprehension, the functional, communicative and critical HL scales from Ishikawa et al. [19] aim to measure a broader HL spectrum. The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Dutch

  19. Levels of Personality Functioning Scale Self-Report Validation Journal of Personality Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Good, Evan; Hopwood, Christopher; Morey, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Validation of the Levels of Personality Functioning Scale - Self-Report. Results suggest that the measure has a robust single dimension and that it correlates in a very general manner with a wide range of maladaptive personality variables, consistent with its purpose as a measure of non-specific personality pathology.

  20. A simulation study provided sample size guidance for differential item functioning (DIF) studies using short scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Neil W.; Fayers, Peter M.; Bottomley, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analyses are increasingly used to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments, which often include relatively short subscales. Computer simulations were used to explore how various factors including scale length affect analysis of DIF by ordinal...... logistic regression....

  1. Prediction of spatially variable unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using scaled particle-size distribution functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasta, P.; Romano, N.; Assouline, S; Vrugt, J.A.; Hopmans, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous scaling of soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions provides an effective means to characterize the heterogeneity and spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties in a given study area. The statistical significance of this approach largely depends on the number of

  2. Predicting ecosystem functioning from plant traits: Results from a multi-scale ecophsiological modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van M.T.

    2007-01-01

    Ecosystem functioning is the result of processes working at a hierarchy of scales. The representation of these processes in a model that is mathematically tractable and ecologically meaningful is a big challenge. In this paper I describe an individual based model (PLACO¿PLAnt COmpetition) that

  3. The blepharospasm disability scale: an instrument for the assessment of functional health in blepharospasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, R.; de Haan, R.; Aramideh, M.; Speelman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Assessment of the functional status in patients with blepharospasm is of major importance for clinical practice and outcome studies. The Blepharospasm Disability Scale (BDS) is specifically directed to measure the disability in these patients. The metric properties of this instrument were evaluated.

  4. Validation of the fatigue scale for motor and cognitive functions in a danish multiple sclerosis cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oervik, M. S.; Sejbaek, T.; Penner, I. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Our objective was to validate the Danish translation of the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions (FSMC) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Materials and methods A Danish MS cohort (n = 84) was matched and compared to the original German validation cohort (n = 309) and a he......Background Our objective was to validate the Danish translation of the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions (FSMC) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Materials and methods A Danish MS cohort (n = 84) was matched and compared to the original German validation cohort (n = 309...... positive correlations between the two fatigue scales implied high convergent validity (total scores: r = 0.851, p gender). Correcting for depression did not result in any significant adjustments of the correlations...

  5. Hartle-Hawking wave function and large-scale power suppression of CMB*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeom Dong-han

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this presentation, we first describe the Hartle-Hawking wave function in the Euclidean path integral approach. After we introduce perturbations to the background instanton solution, following the formalism developed by Halliwell-Hawking and Laflamme, one can obtain the scale-invariant power spectrum for small-scales. We further emphasize that the Hartle-Hawking wave function can explain the large-scale power suppression by choosing suitable potential parameters, where this will be a possible window to confirm or falsify models of quantum cosmology. Finally, we further comment on possible future applications, e.g., Euclidean wormholes, which can result in distinct signatures to the power spectrum.

  6. High-resolution respirometry of fine-needle muscle biopsies in pre-manifest Huntington's disease expansion mutation carriers shows normal mitochondrial respiratory function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Buck

    Full Text Available Alterations in mitochondrial respiration are an important hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD, one of the most common monogenetic causes of neurodegeneration. The ubiquitous expression of the disease causing mutant huntingtin gene raises the prospect that mitochondrial respiratory deficits can be detected in skeletal muscle. While this tissue is readily accessible in humans, transgenic animal models offer the opportunity to cross-validate findings and allow for comparisons across organs, including the brain. The integrated respiratory chain function of the human vastus lateralis muscle was measured by high-resolution respirometry (HRR in freshly taken fine-needle biopsies from seven pre-manifest HD expansion mutation carriers and nine controls. The respiratory parameters were unaffected. For comparison skeletal muscle isolated from HD knock-in mice (HdhQ111 as well as a broader spectrum of tissues including cortex, liver and heart muscle were examined by HRR. Significant changes of mitochondrial respiration in the HdhQ knock-in mouse model were restricted to the liver and the cortex. Mitochondrial mass as quantified by mitochondrial DNA copy number and citrate synthase activity was stable in murine HD-model tissue compared to control. mRNA levels of key enzymes were determined to characterize mitochondrial metabolic pathways in HdhQ mice. We demonstrated the feasibility to perform high-resolution respirometry measurements from small human HD muscle biopsies. Furthermore, we conclude that alterations in respiratory parameters of pre-manifest human muscle biopsies are rather limited and mirrored by a similar absence of marked alterations in HdhQ skeletal muscle. In contrast, the HdhQ111 murine cortex and liver did show respiratory alterations highlighting the tissue specific nature of mutant huntingtin effects on respiration.

  7. Validation of the German Version of the Social Functioning Scale (SFS for schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jona R Iffland

    Full Text Available Deficits in social functioning are a core symptom of schizophrenia and an important criterion for evaluating the success of treatment. However, there is little agreement regarding its measurement. A common, often cited instrument for assessing self-reported social functioning is the Social Functioning Scale (SFS. The study aimed to investigate the reliability and validity of the German translation. 101 patients suffering from schizophrenia (SZ and 101 matched controls (C (60 male / 41 female, 35.8 years in both groups completed the German version. In addition, demographic, clinical, and functional data were collected. Internal consistency was investigated calculating Cronbach's alpha for SFS full scale (α: .81 and all subscales (α: .59-.88. Significant bivariate correlation coefficients were found between all subscales as well as between all subscales and full scale (p <.01. For the total sample, principal component analysis gave evidence to prefer a single-factor solution (eigenvalue ≥ 1 accounting for 48.5 % of the variance. For the subsamples, a two-component solution (SZ; 57.0 % and a three-component solution (C; 65.6 % fitted best, respectively. For SZ and C, significant associations were found between SFS and external criteria. The main factor "group" emerged as being significant. C showed higher values on both subscales and full scale. The sensitivity of the SFS was examined using discriminant analysis. 86.5% of the participants could be categorized correctly to their actual group. The German translation of the SFS turned out to be a reliable and valid questionnaire comparable to the original English version. This is in line with Spanish and Norwegian translations of the SFS. Concluding, the German version of the SFS is well suited to become a useful and practicable instrument for the assessment of social functioning in both clinical practice and research. It accomplishes commonly used external assessment scales.

  8. Development of a multidimensional balance scale for use with functionally independent older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Debra J; Lucchese, Nicole; Wiersma, Lenny D

    2006-11-01

    To develop and evaluate the validity and reliability of a multidimensional balance scale-the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) scale-suitable for use with functionally independent older adults. Psychometric evaluation of the scale's content and convergent validity, test-retest and intra- and interrater reliability, and internal rater consistency. Urban community. Forty-six community-residing older adults (mean +/- standard deviation, 75 +/- 6.2 y), with (n = 31) and without identified balance problems (n = 15), participated in the study. Four physical therapists with expertise in the assessment and treatment of balance disorders in older adults also participated in the content validity and/or reliability phases of the study. Not applicable. Spearman rank correlation coefficients for convergent validity, test-retest, intra- and interrater reliability, and homogeneity coefficient values for rater consistency. Test-retest reliability for the total balance scale score was high (rho = .96). Interrater reliability for total score ranged from .94 to .97 whereas intrarater reliability coefficients ranged from .97 to 1.00. Homogeneity (H) coefficients were greater than .90 for 6 of the 10 individual test items and all 10 test items had H coefficients of greater than .75 for both rating sessions. Preliminary results suggest that the FAB scale is a valid and reliable assessment tool that is suitable for use with functionally independent older adults residing in the community.

  9. Skin and scales of teleost fish: Simple structure but high performance and multiple functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernerey, Franck J.; Barthelat, Francois

    2014-08-01

    Natural and man-made structural materials perform similar functions such as structural support or protection. Therefore they rely on the same types of properties: strength, robustness, lightweight. Nature can therefore provide a significant source of inspiration for new and alternative engineering designs. We report here some results regarding a very common, yet largely unknown, type of biological material: fish skin. Within a thin, flexible and lightweight layer, fish skins display a variety of strain stiffening and stabilizing mechanisms which promote multiple functions such as protection, robustness and swimming efficiency. We particularly discuss four important features pertaining to scaled skins: (a) a strongly elastic tensile behavior that is independent from the presence of rigid scales, (b) a compressive response that prevents buckling and wrinkling instabilities, which are usually predominant for thin membranes, (c) a bending response that displays nonlinear stiffening mechanisms arising from geometric constraints between neighboring scales and (d) a robust structure that preserves the above characteristics upon the loss or damage of structural elements. These important properties make fish skin an attractive model for the development of very thin and flexible armors and protective layers, especially when combined with the high penetration resistance of individual scales. Scaled structures inspired by fish skin could find applications in ultra-light and flexible armor systems, flexible electronics or the design of smart and adaptive morphing structures for aerospace vehicles.

  10. Scaling exponents of the velocity structure functions in the interplanetary medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Carbone

    Full Text Available We analyze the scaling exponents of the velocity structure functions, obtained from the velocity fluctuations measured in the interplanetary space plasma. Using the expression for the energy transfer rate which seems the most relevant in describing the evolution of the pseudo-energy densities in the interplanetary medium, we introduce an energy cascade model derived from a simple fragmentation process, which takes into account the intermittency effect. In the absence and in the presence of the large-scale magnetic field decorrelation effect the model reduces to the fluid and the hydromagnetic p-model, respectively. We show that the scaling exponents of the q-th power of the velocity structure functions, as obtained by the model in the absence of the decorrelation effect, furnishes the best-fit to the data analyzed from the Voyager 2 velocity field measurements at 8.5 AU. Our results allow us to hypothesize a new kind of scale-similarity for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence when the decorrelation effect is at work, related to the fourth-order velocity structure function.

  11. Brazilian Portuguese transcultural adaptation of Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Polignano Godoy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the importance of Executive Functions to clinical and nonclinical situations, Barkley proposed a new theory of executive functioning based on an evolutionary neuropsychological perspective and clinical research using large samples of clinical and community identified adults and children as well as children with ADHD followed to adulthood. Objective The present study aims to adapt the Barkley Deficits in Executive Functions Scales (BDEFS to Brazilian Portuguese and also assess its construct validity in a sample of normal Brazilian adults. Methods The original version of scale was adapted to Brazilian Portuguese according to the guideline from the ISPOR Task Force. To assess the semantic equivalence between the original and adapted version, both of them were applied into a sample of 25 Brazilian bilingual adults. Finally, 60 Brazilian adults completed the BDEFS and the Brazilian versions of Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11 and Adult Self-Report Scale (ASRS-18 to assess convergent validity. Results The BDEFS Brazilian Portuguese version has semantic correspondence with the original version indicating that the adaptation procedure was successful. The BDEFS correlated significantly with the impulsivity and attention scores from the BIS-11 and ASRS-18 supporting its construct validity. Cronbach’s alpha (α = 0.961 indicated that the BDEFS translated version has satisfactory internal consistency. Discussion Together, these findings indicate the successful adaptation of the BDEFS to Brazilian Portuguese and support its utility in that population.

  12. Building a Laboratory-Scale Biogas Plant and Verifying its Functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleman, Tomáš; Fiala, Jozef; Blinová, Lenka; Gerulová, Kristína

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the process of building a laboratory-scale biogas plant and verifying its functionality. The laboratory-scale prototype was constructed in the Department of Safety and Environmental Engineering at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, of the Slovak University of Technology. The Department has already built a solar laboratory to promote and utilise solar energy, and designed SETUR hydro engine. The laboratory is the next step in the Department's activities in the field of renewable energy sources and biomass. The Department is also involved in the European Union project, where the goal is to upgrade all existed renewable energy sources used in the Department.

  13. Anomalous scaling of structure functions and dynamic constraints on turbulence simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakhot, Victor; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2006-12-01

    The connection between anomalous scaling of structure functions (intermittency) and numerical methods for turbulence simulations is discussed. It is argued that the computational work for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of fully developed turbulence increases as Re 4 , and not as Re 3 expected from Kolmogorov's theory, where Re is a large-scale Reynolds number. Various relations for the moments of acceleration and velocity derivatives are derived. An infinite set of exact constraints on dynamically consistent subgrid models for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) is derived from the Navier-Stokes equations, and some problems of principle associated with existing LES models are highlighted. (author)

  14. ONETEP: linear-scaling density-functional theory with plane-waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, P D; Mostof, A A; Skylaris, C-K; Payne, M C

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a general overview of the methodology implemented in onetep (Order-N Electronic Total Energy Package), a parallel density-functional theory code for largescale first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations. The distinctive features of onetep are linear-scaling in both computational effort and resources, obtained by making well-controlled approximations which enable simulations to be performed with plane-wave accuracy. Titanium dioxide clusters of increasing size designed to mimic surfaces are studied to demonstrate the accuracy and scaling of onetep

  15. Determination of αS from scaling violations of truncated moments of structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, Stefano; Latorre, J.I.; Magnea, Lorenzo; Piccione, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    We determine the strong coupling α S (M Z ) from scaling violations of truncated moments of the nonsinglet deep inelastic structure function F 2 . Truncated moments are determined from BCDMS and NMC data using a neural network parametrization which retains the full experimental information on errors and correlations. Our method minimizes all sources of theoretical uncertainty and bias which characterize extractions of α S from scaling violations. We obtain α S (M Z )=0.124 +0.004 -0.007 (exp.) +0.003 -0.004 (th.)

  16. A practical deca-gram scale ring expansion of (R)-(-)-carvone to (R)-(+)-3-methyl-6-isopropenyl-cyclohept-3-enone-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Leandro de C; Desiderá, André L; de Oliveira, Kleber T; Newton, Sean; Ley, Steven V; Brocksom, Timothy J

    2015-07-28

    A route to enantiopure (R)-(+)-3-methyl-6-isopropenyl-cyclohept-3-enone-1, an intermediate for terpenoids, has been developed and includes a highly chemo- and regioselective Tiffeneau-Demjanov reaction. Starting from readily available (R)-(-)-carvone, this robust sequence is available on a deca-gram scale and uses flow chemistry for the initial epoxidation reaction. The stereochemistry of the addition of two nucleophiles to the carbonyl group of (R)-(-)-carvone has been determined by X-ray diffraction studies and chemical correlation.

  17. Local Fitting of the Kohn-Sham Density in a Gaussian and Plane Waves Scheme for Large-Scale Density Functional Theory Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golze, Dorothea; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Hutter, Jürg

    2017-05-09

    A local resolution-of-the-identity (LRI) approach is introduced in combination with the Gaussian and plane waves (GPW) scheme to enable large-scale Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations. In GPW, the computational bottleneck is typically the description of the total charge density on real-space grids. Introducing the LRI approximation, the linear scaling of the GPW approach with respect to system size is retained, while the prefactor for the grid operations is reduced. The density fitting is an O(N) scaling process implemented by approximating the atomic pair densities by an expansion in one-center fit functions. The computational cost for the grid-based operations becomes negligible in LRIGPW. The self-consistent field iteration is up to 30 times faster for periodic systems dependent on the symmetry of the simulation cell and on the density of grid points. However, due to the overhead introduced by the local density fitting, single point calculations and complete molecular dynamics steps, including the calculation of the forces, are effectively accelerated by up to a factor of ∼10. The accuracy of LRIGPW is assessed for different systems and properties, showing that total energies, reaction energies, intramolecular and intermolecular structure parameters are well reproduced. LRIGPW yields also high quality results for extended condensed phase systems such as liquid water, ice XV, and molecular crystals.

  18. Local-scale Partitioning of Functional and Phylogenetic Beta Diversity in a Tropical Tree Assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Swenson, Nathan G; Zhang, Guocheng; Ci, Xiuqin; Cao, Min; Sha, Liqing; Li, Jie; Ferry Slik, J W; Lin, Luxiang

    2015-08-03

    The relative degree to which stochastic and deterministic processes underpin community assembly is a central problem in ecology. Quantifying local-scale phylogenetic and functional beta diversity may shed new light on this problem. We used species distribution, soil, trait and phylogenetic data to quantify whether environmental distance, geographic distance or their combination are the strongest predictors of phylogenetic and functional beta diversity on local scales in a 20-ha tropical seasonal rainforest dynamics plot in southwest China. The patterns of phylogenetic and functional beta diversity were generally consistent. The phylogenetic and functional dissimilarity between subplots (10 × 10 m, 20 × 20 m, 50 × 50 m and 100 × 100 m) was often higher than that expected by chance. The turnover of lineages and species function within habitats was generally slower than that across habitats. Partitioning the variation in phylogenetic and functional beta diversity showed that environmental distance was generally a better predictor of beta diversity than geographic distance thereby lending relatively more support for deterministic environmental filtering over stochastic processes. Overall, our results highlight that deterministic processes play a stronger role than stochastic processes in structuring community composition in this diverse assemblage of tropical trees.

  19. Chromatic Derivatives, Chromatic Expansions and Associated Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ignjatovic, Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the basic properties of chromatic derivatives and chromatic expansions and provides an appropriate motivation for introducing these notions. Chromatic derivatives are special, numerically robust linear differential operators which correspond to certain families of orthogonal polynomials. Chromatic expansions are series of the corresponding special functions, which possess the best features of both the Taylor and the Shannon expansions. This makes chromatic derivatives and ...

  20. Temperature expansions for magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cangemi, D.; Dunne, G.

    1996-01-01

    We derive finite temperature expansions for relativistic fermion systems in the presence of background magnetic fields, and with nonzero chemical potential. We use the imaginary-time formalism for the finite temperature effects, the proper-time method for the background field effects, and zeta function regularization for developing the expansions. We emphasize the essential difference between even and odd dimensions, focusing on 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions. We concentrate on the high temperature limit, but we also discuss the T=0 limit with nonzero chemical potential. Copyright copyright 1996 Academic Press, Inc

  1. A New Functional Health Literacy Scale for Japanese Young Adults Based on Item Response Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubakita, Takashi; Kawazoe, Nobuo; Kasano, Eri

    2017-03-01

    Health literacy predicts health outcomes. Despite concerns surrounding the health of Japanese young adults, to date there has been no objective assessment of health literacy in this population. This study aimed to develop a Functional Health Literacy Scale for Young Adults (funHLS-YA) based on item response theory. Each item in the scale requires participants to choose the most relevant term from 3 choices in relation to a target item, thus assessing objective rather than perceived health literacy. The 20-item scale was administered to 1816 university students and 1751 responded. Cronbach's α coefficient was .73. Difficulty and discrimination parameters of each item were estimated, resulting in the exclusion of 1 item. Some items showed different difficulty parameters for male and female participants, reflecting that some aspects of health literacy may differ by gender. The current 19-item version of funHLS-YA can reliably assess the objective health literacy of Japanese young adults.

  2. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of als Functional Rating Scale-Revised in Portuguese language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Keyte; Pereira, Cecília; Pavan, Karina; Valério, Berenice Cataldo Oliveira

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study is the cross-cultural, as well as to validate in Portuguese language the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale - Revised (ALSFRS-R). We performed a prospective study of individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) clinically defined. The scale, after obtaining the final version in Portuguese, was administered in 22 individuals and three weeks after re-applied. There were no significant differences between the application and reapplication of the scale (p=0.069). The linear regression and internal consistency measured by Pearson correlation and alpha Conbrach were significant with r=0.975 e alpha=0.934. The reliability test-retest demonstrated by intraclass correlation coefficient was strong with ICC=0.975. Therefore, this version proved to be applicable, reliable and easy to be conducted in clinical practice and research.

  3. Energetics and Structural Characterization of the large-scale Functional Motion of Adenylate Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formoso, Elena; Limongelli, Vittorio; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Adenylate Kinase (AK) is a signal transducing protein that regulates cellular energy homeostasis balancing between different conformations. An alteration of its activity can lead to severe pathologies such as heart failure, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A comprehensive elucidation of the large-scale conformational motions that rule the functional mechanism of this enzyme is of great value to guide rationally the development of new medications. Here using a metadynamics-based computational protocol we elucidate the thermodynamics and structural properties underlying the AK functional transitions. The free energy estimation of the conformational motions of the enzyme allows characterizing the sequence of events that regulate its action. We reveal the atomistic details of the most relevant enzyme states, identifying residues such as Arg119 and Lys13, which play a key role during the conformational transitions and represent druggable spots to design enzyme inhibitors. Our study offers tools that open new areas of investigation on large-scale motion in proteins.

  4. Continental-scale effects of nutrient pollution on stream ecosystem functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Guy; Gessner, Mark O; Giller, Paul S; Gulis, Vladislav; Hladyz, Sally; Lecerf, Antoine; Malmqvist, Björn; McKie, Brendan G; Tiegs, Scott D; Cariss, Helen; Dobson, Mike; Elosegi, Arturo; Ferreira, Verónica; Graça, Manuel A S; Fleituch, Tadeusz; Lacoursière, Jean O; Nistorescu, Marius; Pozo, Jesús; Risnoveanu, Geta; Schindler, Markus; Vadineanu, Angheluta; Vought, Lena B-M; Chauvet, Eric

    2012-06-15

    Excessive nutrient loading is a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide that leads to profound changes in aquatic biodiversity and biogeochemical processes. Systematic quantitative assessment of functional ecosystem measures for river networks is, however, lacking, especially at continental scales. Here, we narrow this gap by means of a pan-European field experiment on a fundamental ecosystem process--leaf-litter breakdown--in 100 streams across a greater than 1000-fold nutrient gradient. Dramatically slowed breakdown at both extremes of the gradient indicated strong nutrient limitation in unaffected systems, potential for strong stimulation in moderately altered systems, and inhibition in highly polluted streams. This large-scale response pattern emphasizes the need to complement established structural approaches (such as water chemistry, hydrogeomorphology, and biological diversity metrics) with functional measures (such as litter-breakdown rate, whole-system metabolism, and nutrient spiraling) for assessing ecosystem health.

  5. Multi-scale coding of genomic information: From DNA sequence to genome structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneodo, Alain; Vaillant, Cedric; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Francoise; D'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how chromatin is spatially and dynamically organized in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and how this affects genome functions is one of the main challenges of cell biology. Since the different orders of packaging in the hierarchical organization of DNA condition the accessibility of DNA sequence elements to trans-acting factors that control the transcription and replication processes, there is actually a wealth of structural and dynamical information to learn in the primary DNA sequence. In this review, we show that when using concepts, methodologies, numerical and experimental techniques coming from statistical mechanics and nonlinear physics combined with wavelet-based multi-scale signal processing, we are able to decipher the multi-scale sequence encoding of chromatin condensation-decondensation mechanisms that play a fundamental role in regulating many molecular processes involved in nuclear functions.

  6. Validity of the German Version of the Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance 10 Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Härdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance 10 Test (CS-PFP 10 quantitatively assesses physical functional performance in older adults who have a broad range of physical functional ability. This study assessed the validity and reliability of the CS-PFP 10 German version. Methods. Forward-translations and backtranslations as well as cultural adaptions of the test were conducted. Participants were German-speaking Swiss community-dwelling adults aged 64 and older. Concurrent validity was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients between CS-PFP 10 and gait velocity, Timed Up and Go Test, hand grip strength, SF-36 physical function domain, and Freiburger Physical Activity Questionnaire. Internal consistency was calculated by Cronbach’s alpha. Results. Backtranslation and cultural adaptions were accepted by the CS-PFP 10 developer. CS-PFP 10 total score and subscores (upper body strength, upper body flexibility, lower body strength, balance and coordination, and endurance correlated significantly with all measures of physical function tested. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach’s alpha 0.95–0.98. Conclusion. The CS-PFP 10 German version is valid and reliable for measuring physical functional performance in German-speaking Swiss community-dwelling older adults. Quantifying physical function is essential for clinical practice and research and provides meaningful insight into physical functional performance of older adults. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01539200.

  7. A full scale approximation of covariance functions for large spatial data sets

    KAUST Repository

    Sang, Huiyan

    2011-10-10

    Gaussian process models have been widely used in spatial statistics but face tremendous computational challenges for very large data sets. The model fitting and spatial prediction of such models typically require O(n 3) operations for a data set of size n. Various approximations of the covariance functions have been introduced to reduce the computational cost. However, most existing approximations cannot simultaneously capture both the large- and the small-scale spatial dependence. A new approximation scheme is developed to provide a high quality approximation to the covariance function at both the large and the small spatial scales. The new approximation is the summation of two parts: a reduced rank covariance and a compactly supported covariance obtained by tapering the covariance of the residual of the reduced rank approximation. Whereas the former part mainly captures the large-scale spatial variation, the latter part captures the small-scale, local variation that is unexplained by the former part. By combining the reduced rank representation and sparse matrix techniques, our approach allows for efficient computation for maximum likelihood estimation, spatial prediction and Bayesian inference. We illustrate the new approach with simulated and real data sets. © 2011 Royal Statistical Society.

  8. Susceptibility of functional impairment scales to noncredible responses in the clinical evaluation of adult ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuermaier, Anselm B M; Tucha, Oliver; Koerts, Janneke; Butzbach, Marah; Weisbrod, Matthias; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Tucha, Lara

    2018-05-01

    A growing body of research questions the reliance of symptom self-reports in the clinical evaluation of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adulthood. A recent study suggested that also impairment reports are vulnerable to noncredible responses, as derived from a simulation design using a global functional impairment scale. The present study aims to add evidence to this issue, by using an ADHD specific impairment scale in a simulation design on large samples. Impairment ratings on the Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale (WFIRS) of 62 patients with ADHD were compared to 142 healthy individuals who were instructed to show normal behavior. Furthermore, impairment ratings of patients with ADHD were compared to ratings of 330 healthy individuals who were randomly assigned to one of four simulation conditions that were instructed to complete the scale as if they had ADHD. Patients with ADHD reported higher levels of impairment than the healthy control group in all domains of life. Furthermore, individuals instructed to feign ADHD indicated higher levels of impairments in most domains of life compared to control participants and genuine patients with ADHD. The group differences between individuals feigning ADHD and individuals with genuine ADHD, however, were only small to moderate. Further analyses revealed that the WFRIS was not useful to successfully differentiate genuine from feigned ADHD. The present study confirms the conclusion that self-reported impairments are susceptible to noncredible responses and should be used with caution in the clinical evaluation of adult ADHD.

  9. A full scale approximation of covariance functions for large spatial data sets

    KAUST Repository

    Sang, Huiyan; Huang, Jianhua Z.

    2011-01-01

    Gaussian process models have been widely used in spatial statistics but face tremendous computational challenges for very large data sets. The model fitting and spatial prediction of such models typically require O(n 3) operations for a data set of size n. Various approximations of the covariance functions have been introduced to reduce the computational cost. However, most existing approximations cannot simultaneously capture both the large- and the small-scale spatial dependence. A new approximation scheme is developed to provide a high quality approximation to the covariance function at both the large and the small spatial scales. The new approximation is the summation of two parts: a reduced rank covariance and a compactly supported covariance obtained by tapering the covariance of the residual of the reduced rank approximation. Whereas the former part mainly captures the large-scale spatial variation, the latter part captures the small-scale, local variation that is unexplained by the former part. By combining the reduced rank representation and sparse matrix techniques, our approach allows for efficient computation for maximum likelihood estimation, spatial prediction and Bayesian inference. We illustrate the new approach with simulated and real data sets. © 2011 Royal Statistical Society.

  10. Continental-Scale Effects of Nutrient Pollution on Stream Ecosystem Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward , Guy; Gessner , Mark O.; Giller , Paul S.; Gulis , Vladislav; Hladyz , Sally; Lecerf , Antoine; Malmqvist , Björn; McKie , Brendan G.; Tiegs , Scott D.; Cariss , Helen; Dobson , Mike; Elosegi , Arturo; Ferreira , Veronica; Graça , Manuel A. S.; Fleituch , Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Excessive nutrient loading is a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide that leads to profound changes in aquatic biodiversity and biogeochemical processes. Systematic quantitative assessment of functional ecosystem measures for river networks is, however, lacking, especially at continental scales. Here, we narrow this gap by means of a pan-European field experiment on a fundamental ecosystem process--leaf-litter breakdown--in 100 streams across a greater than 100...

  11. Resistance scaling function for two-dimensional superconductors and Monte Carlo vortex-fluctuation simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnhagen, P.; Weber, H.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the Ginsburg-Landau Coulomb-gas model for vortex fluctuations is described and compared to the measured resistance scaling function for two-dimensional superconductors. This constitutes a new, more direct way of confirming the vortex-fluctuation explanation for the resistive tail of high-sheet-resistance superconducting films. The Monte Carlo data obtained indicate a striking accordance between theory and experiments

  12. Further developments and field deployment of phosphorus functionalized polymeric scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, Malcolm J.; Thornton, Alex R.; Wylde, Jonathan J.; Strachan, Catherine J.; Moir, Gordon [Clariant Oil Services, Muttenz (Switzerland); Goulding, John [John Goulding Consultancy, York (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    As the oil and gas industry strives to replace ageing, environmentally undesirable scale inhibitors there is an ever increasing use of polymeric inhibitors. The incorporation of phosphorous functionality into a polymer backbone has been shown to improve inhibition efficiency, enhance adsorption characteristics and allow the polymer concentration to be analyzed by elemental phosphorus. It is known that some phosphorus tagged polymers can be problematic to analyze in oil field brines as they typically have a low phosphorus content which is difficult to determine from the background. The development of novel phosphorus functionalized polymeric scale inhibitors was previously described (IBP3530-10). This paper follows the development of the inhibitor class. Utilizing extensive laboratory testing the interactive nature of the scale inhibitors and reservoir lithology was studied. These novel phosphorus functionalized inhibitors were compared to a number of other available scale inhibitors. The incorporation of phosphorus functionality into polymeric inhibitors can be expensive utilizing traditional methods as the phosphorus containing monomers are the financially limiting factor. These are typically vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA), or vinyl diphosphonic acid (VDPA). The novel phosphorus functionalized monomers utilized herein are simpler to manufacture allowing higher phosphorus content within the polymer backbone. The addition of phosphorus into a polymer backbone has previously been known to exacerbate analysis issues in some commercially available scale inhibitors. This is due to incomplete polymerization reactions leaving free and/or inorganic phosphorus containing moieties which can interfere with the analysis, or low levels of phosphorus within end-capped polymers can make it difficult to determine the active concentration accurately within field brines which contain many impuritie. Polymeric inhibitors are known to contain a range of molecular weights with varying

  13. Negative thermal expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.O.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discovery of negative thermal expansion over an unprecedented temperature range in ZrW 2 O 8 (which contracts continuously on warming from below 2 K to above 1000 K) has stimulated considerable interest in this unusual phenomenon. Negative and low thermal expansion materials have a number of important potential uses in ceramic, optical and electronic applications. We have now found negative thermal expansion in a large new family of materials with the general formula A 2 (MO 4 ) 3 . Chemical substitution dramatically influences the thermal expansion properties of these materials allowing the production of ceramics with negative, positive or zero coefficients of thermal expansion, with the potential to control other important materials properties such as refractive index and dielectric constant. The mechanism of negative thermal expansion and the phase transitions exhibited by this important new class of low-expansion materials will be discussed. (orig.)

  14. Scale-up of nature’s tissue weaving algorithms to engineer advanced functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Joanna L.; Knothe, Lillian E.; Whan, Renee M.; Knothe, Ulf; Tate, Melissa L. Knothe

    2017-01-01

    We are literally the stuff from which our tissue fabrics and their fibers are woven and spun. The arrangement of collagen, elastin and other structural proteins in space and time embodies our tissues and organs with amazing resilience and multifunctional smart properties. For example, the periosteum, a soft tissue sleeve that envelops all nonarticular bony surfaces of the body, comprises an inherently “smart” material that gives hard bones added strength under high impact loads. Yet a paucity of scalable bottom-up approaches stymies the harnessing of smart tissues’ biological, mechanical and organizational detail to create advanced functional materials. Here, a novel approach is established to scale up the multidimensional fiber patterns of natural soft tissue weaves for rapid prototyping of advanced functional materials. First second harmonic generation and two-photon excitation microscopy is used to map the microscopic three-dimensional (3D) alignment, composition and distribution of the collagen and elastin fibers of periosteum, the soft tissue sheath bounding all nonarticular bone surfaces in our bodies. Then, using engineering rendering software to scale up this natural tissue fabric, as well as multidimensional weaving algorithms, macroscopic tissue prototypes are created using a computer-controlled jacquard loom. The capacity to prototype scaled up architectures of natural fabrics provides a new avenue to create advanced functional materials.

  15. The Backscattering Phase Function for a Sphere with a Two-Scale Relief of Rough Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klass, E. V.

    2017-12-01

    The backscattering of light from spherical surfaces characterized by one and two-scale roughness reliefs has been investigated. The analysis is performed using the three-dimensional Monte-Carlo program POKS-RG (geometrical-optics approximation), which makes it possible to take into account the roughness of objects under study by introducing local geometries of different levels. The geometric module of the program is aimed at describing objects by equations of second-order surfaces. One-scale roughness is set as an ensemble of geometric figures (convex or concave halves of ellipsoids or cones). The two-scale roughness is modeled by convex halves of ellipsoids, with surface containing ellipsoidal pores. It is shown that a spherical surface with one-scale convex inhomogeneities has a flatter backscattering phase function than a surface with concave inhomogeneities (pores). For a sphere with two-scale roughness, the dependence of the backscattering intensity is found to be determined mostly by the lower-level inhomogeneities. The influence of roughness on the dependence of the backscattering from different spatial regions of spherical surface is analyzed.

  16. Disjoint sum expansion method in FTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan Keqiang

    1987-01-01

    An expansion formula for transforming boolean algebraic expressions into disjoint form was proved. Based on this expansion formula, a method for transforming system failure function into disjoint form was devised. The fact that the expansion can be done for several elements simulatneously makes the method flexible and fast. Some examples from fault tree analysis (FTA) and network analysis were examined by the new method to show its algorithm and its merit. Besides, by means of the proved expansion formula some boolean algebraic relations can proved very easily

  17. Thermal expansion of L-ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaï, B.; Barrio, M.; Tamarit, J.-Ll.; Céolin, R.; Rietveld, I. B.

    2017-04-01

    The specific volume of vitamin C has been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction as a function of temperature from 110 K up to complete degradation around 440 K. Its thermal expansion is relatively small in comparison with other organic compounds with an expansivity α v of 1.2(3) × 10-4 K-1. The structure consists of strongly bound molecules in the ac plane through a dense network of hydrogen bonds. The thermal expansion is anisotropic. Along the b axis, the expansion has most leeway and is about 10 times larger than in the other directions.

  18. Thermal expansion of doped lanthanum gallates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Since the components are in intimate mechanical contact, any stress generated due to their thermal expansion mis- match during thermal cycling could lead to catastrophic failure of the cell. The functional materials must have similar thermal expansions to avoid mechanical stresses. Hence it is useful to study the thermal ...

  19. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, E W; Payne, M C; Ratcliff, L E; Haynes, P D; Hine, N D M

    2016-01-01

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree with those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. Finally, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable. (paper)

  20. The warm dark matter halo mass function below the cut-off scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Raul E.; Hahn, Oliver; Abel, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Warm dark matter (WDM) cosmologies are a viable alternative to the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario. Unfortunately, an accurate scrutiny of the WDM predictions with N-body simulations has proven difficult due to numerical artefacts. Here, we report on cosmological simulations that, for the first time, are devoid of those problems, and thus are able to accurately resolve the WDM halo mass function well below the cut-off. We discover a complex picture, with perturbations at different evolutionary stages populating different ranges in the halo mass function. On the smallest mass scales we can resolve, identified objects are typically centres of filaments that are starting to collapse. On intermediate mass scales, objects typically correspond to fluctuations that have collapsed and are in the process of relaxation, whereas the high-mass end is dominated by objects similar to haloes identified in CDM simulations. We then explicitly show how the formation of low-mass haloes is suppressed, which translates into a strong cut-off in the halo mass function. This disfavours some analytic formulations that predict a halo mass function that would extend well below the free streaming mass. We argue for a more detailed exploration of the formation of the smallest structures expected to form in a given cosmology, which, we foresee, will advance our overall understanding of structure formation.

  1. Using scale and feather traits for module construction provides a functional approach to chicken epidermal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Weier; Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2017-11-01

    Gene co-expression network analysis has been a research method widely used in systematically exploring gene function and interaction. Using the Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) approach to construct a gene co-expression network using data from a customized 44K microarray transcriptome of chicken epidermal embryogenesis, we have identified two distinct modules that are highly correlated with scale or feather development traits. Signaling pathways related to feather development were enriched in the traditional KEGG pathway analysis and functional terms relating specifically to embryonic epidermal development were also enriched in the Gene Ontology analysis. Significant enrichment annotations were discovered from customized enrichment tools such as Modular Single-Set Enrichment Test (MSET) and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). Hub genes in both trait-correlated modules showed strong specific functional enrichment toward epidermal development. Also, regulatory elements, such as transcription factors and miRNAs, were targeted in the significant enrichment result. This work highlights the advantage of this methodology for functional prediction of genes not previously associated with scale- and feather trait-related modules.

  2. Community functional responses to soil and climate at multiple spatial scales: when does intraspecific variation matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Siefert

    Full Text Available Despite increasing evidence of the importance of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities, its role in community trait responses to environmental variation, particularly along broad-scale climatic gradients, is poorly understood. We analyzed functional trait variation among early-successional herbaceous plant communities (old fields across a 1200-km latitudinal extent in eastern North America, focusing on four traits: vegetative height, leaf area, specific leaf area (SLA, and leaf dry matter content (LDMC. We determined the contributions of species turnover and intraspecific variation to between-site functional dissimilarity at multiple spatial scales and community trait responses to edaphic and climatic factors. Among-site variation in community mean trait values and community trait responses to the environment were generated by a combination of species turnover and intraspecific variation, with species turnover making a greater contribution for all traits. The relative importance of intraspecific variation decreased with increasing geographic and environmental distance between sites for SLA and leaf area. Intraspecific variation was most important for responses of vegetative height and responses to edaphic compared to climatic factors. Individual species displayed strong trait responses to environmental factors in many cases, but these responses were highly variable among species and did not usually scale up to the community level. These findings provide new insights into the role of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities and the factors controlling its relative importance. The contribution of intraspecific variation to community trait responses was greatest at fine spatial scales and along edaphic gradients, while species turnover dominated at broad spatial scales and along climatic gradients.

  3. Introduction of Functional Structures in Nano-Scales into Engineering Polymer Films Using Radiation Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Y., E-mail: maekawa.yasunari@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Quantum Beam Science Directorate, High Performance Polymer Group, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma-ken 370-1292 (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Introduction of functional regions in nanometer scale in polymeric films using γ-rays, EB, and ion beams are proposed. Two approaches to build nano-scale functional domains in polymer substrates are proposed: 1) Radiation-induced grafting to transfer nano-scale polymer crystalline structures (morphology), acting as a nano-template, to nano-scale graft polymer regions. The obtained polymers with nano structures can be applied to high performance polymer membranes. 2) Fabrication of nanopores and functional domains in engineering plastic films using ion beams, which deposit the energy in very narrow region of polymer films. Hydrophilic grafting polymers are introduced into hydrophobic fluorinated polymers, cross-linked PTFE (cPTFE) and aromatic hydrocarbon polymer, poly(ether ether ketone (PEEK), which is known to have lamella and crystallite in the polymer films. Then, the hierarchical structures of graft domains are analyzed by a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. From these analyses, the different structures and the different formation of graft domains were observed in fluorinated and hydrocarbon polymer substrates. the grafted domains in the cPTFE film, working as an ion channel, grew as covering the crystallite and the size of domain seems to be similar to that of crystallite. On the other hand, the PEEK-based PEM has a smaller domain size and it seems to grow independently on the crystallites of PEEK substrate. For nano-fabrication of polymer films using heavy ion beams, the energy distribution in radial direction, which is perpendicular to ion trajectory, is mainly concerned. For penumbra, we re-estimated effective radius of penumbra, in which radiation induced grafting took place, for several different ion beams. We observed the different diameters of the ion channels consisting of graft polymers. The channel sizes were quite in good agreement with the effective penumbra which possess the absorption doses more than 1 kGy. (author)

  4. Study of multi-functional precision optical measuring system for large scale equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Lao, Dabao; Zhou, Weihu; Zhang, Wenying; Jiang, Xingjian; Wang, Yongxi

    2017-10-01

    The effective application of high performance measurement technology can greatly improve the large-scale equipment manufacturing ability. Therefore, the geometric parameters measurement, such as size, attitude and position, requires the measurement system with high precision, multi-function, portability and other characteristics. However, the existing measuring instruments, such as laser tracker, total station, photogrammetry system, mostly has single function, station moving and other shortcomings. Laser tracker needs to work with cooperative target, but it can hardly meet the requirement of measurement in extreme environment. Total station is mainly used for outdoor surveying and mapping, it is hard to achieve the demand of accuracy in industrial measurement. Photogrammetry system can achieve a wide range of multi-point measurement, but the measuring range is limited and need to repeatedly move station. The paper presents a non-contact opto-electronic measuring instrument, not only it can work by scanning the measurement path but also measuring the cooperative target by tracking measurement. The system is based on some key technologies, such as absolute distance measurement, two-dimensional angle measurement, automatically target recognition and accurate aiming, precision control, assembly of complex mechanical system and multi-functional 3D visualization software. Among them, the absolute distance measurement module ensures measurement with high accuracy, and the twodimensional angle measuring module provides precision angle measurement. The system is suitable for the case of noncontact measurement of large-scale equipment, it can ensure the quality and performance of large-scale equipment throughout the process of manufacturing and improve the manufacturing ability of large-scale and high-end equipment.

  5. Introduction of Functional Structures in Nano-Scales into Engineering Polymer Films Using Radiation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction of functional regions in nanometer scale in polymeric films using γ-rays, EB, and ion beams are proposed. Two approaches to build nano-scale functional domains in polymer substrates are proposed: 1) Radiation-induced grafting to transfer nano-scale polymer crystalline structures (morphology), acting as a nano-template, to nano-scale graft polymer regions. The obtained polymers with nano structures can be applied to high performance polymer membranes. 2) Fabrication of nanopores and functional domains in engineering plastic films using ion beams, which deposit the energy in very narrow region of polymer films. Hydrophilic grafting polymers are introduced into hydrophobic fluorinated polymers, cross-linked PTFE (cPTFE) and aromatic hydrocarbon polymer, poly(ether ether ketone (PEEK), which is known to have lamella and crystallite in the polymer films. Then, the hierarchical structures of graft domains are analyzed by a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. From these analyses, the different structures and the different formation of graft domains were observed in fluorinated and hydrocarbon polymer substrates. the grafted domains in the cPTFE film, working as an ion channel, grew as covering the crystallite and the size of domain seems to be similar to that of crystallite. On the other hand, the PEEK-based PEM has a smaller domain size and it seems to grow independently on the crystallites of PEEK substrate. For nano-fabrication of polymer films using heavy ion beams, the energy distribution in radial direction, which is perpendicular to ion trajectory, is mainly concerned. For penumbra, we re-estimated effective radius of penumbra, in which radiation induced grafting took place, for several different ion beams. We observed the different diameters of the ion channels consisting of graft polymers. The channel sizes were quite in good agreement with the effective penumbra which possess the absorption doses more than 1 kGy. (author)

  6. A summation procedure for expansions in orthogonal polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibotti, C.R.; Grinstein, F.F.

    1977-01-01

    Approximants to functions defined by formal series expansions in orthogonal polynomials are introduced. They are shown to be convergent even out of the elliptical domain where the original expansion converges

  7. Umbilical cord blood regulatory T-cell expansion and functional effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor family members OX40 and 4-1BB expressed on artificial antigen-presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker-Murray, Paul; Porter, Stephen B.; Merkel, Sarah C.; Londer, Aryel; Taylor, Dawn K.; Bina, Megan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rubinstein, Pablo; Van Rooijen, Nico; Golovina, Tatiana N.; Suhoski, Megan M.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Wagner, John E.; June, Carl H.; Riley, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we showed that human umbilical cord blood (UCB) regulatory T cells (Tregs) could be expanded approximately 100-fold using anti-CD3/28 monoclonal antibody (mAb)–coated beads to provide T-cell receptor and costimulatory signals. Because Treg numbers from a single UCB unit are limited, we explored the use of cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) preloaded with anti-CD3/28 mAbs to achieve higher levels of Treg expansion. Compared with beads, aAPCs had similar expansion properties while significantly increasing transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secretion and the potency of Treg suppressor function. aAPCs modified to coexpress OX40L or 4-1BBL expanded UCB Tregs to a significantly greater extent than bead- or nonmodified aAPC cultures, reaching mean expansion levels exceeding 1250-fold. Despite the high expansion and in contrast to studies using other Treg sources, neither OX40 nor 4-1BB signaling of UCB Tregs reduced in vitro suppression. UCB Tregs expanded with 4-1BBL expressing aAPCs had decreased levels of proapoptotic bim. UCB Tregs expanded with nonmodified or modified aAPCs versus beads resulted in higher survival associated with increased Treg persistence in a xeno-geneic graft-versus-host disease lethality model. These data offer a novel approach for UCB Treg expansion using aAPCs, including those coexpressing OX40L or 4-1BBL. PMID:18645038

  8. Continental-scale patterns of canopy tree composition and function across Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Steege, Hans; Pitman, Nigel C. A.; Phillips, Oliver L.; Chave, Jerome; Sabatier, Daniel; Duque, Alvaro; Molino, Jean-François; Prévost, Marie-Françoise; Spichiger, Rodolphe; Castellanos, Hernán; von Hildebrand, Patricio; Vásquez, Rodolfo

    2006-09-01

    The world's greatest terrestrial stores of biodiversity and carbon are found in the forests of northern South America, where large-scale biogeographic patterns and processes have recently begun to be described. Seven of the nine countries with territory in the Amazon basin and the Guiana shield have carried out large-scale forest inventories, but such massive data sets have been little exploited by tropical plant ecologists. Although forest inventories often lack the species-level identifications favoured by tropical plant ecologists, their consistency of measurement and vast spatial coverage make them ideally suited for numerical analyses at large scales, and a valuable resource to describe the still poorly understood spatial variation of biomass, diversity, community composition and forest functioning across the South American tropics. Here we show, by using the seven forest inventories complemented with trait and inventory data collected elsewhere, two dominant gradients in tree composition and function across the Amazon, one paralleling a major gradient in soil fertility and the other paralleling a gradient in dry season length. The data set also indicates that the dominance of Fabaceae in the Guiana shield is not necessarily the result of root adaptations to poor soils (nodulation or ectomycorrhizal associations) but perhaps also the result of their remarkably high seed mass there as a potential adaptation to low rates of disturbance.

  9. Expansion joints for LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzenus, M.; Hundhausen, W.; Jansing, W.

    1979-10-15

    This discourse recounts efforts put into the SNR-2 project; specifically the development of compensation devices. The various prototypes of these compensation devices are described and the state of development reviewed. The expansion joints were developed on the basis of specific design criteria whereby differentiation is made between expansion joints of small and large nominal diameter. Expansion joints for installation in the sodium-filled primary piping are equipped with safety bellows in addition to the actual working bellows.

  10. Large-scale functional networks connect differently for processing words and symbol strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeström, Mia; Vartiainen, Johanna; Kujala, Jan; Salmelin, Riitta

    2018-01-01

    Reconfigurations of synchronized large-scale networks are thought to be central neural mechanisms that support cognition and behavior in the human brain. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings together with recent advances in network analysis now allow for sub-second snapshots of such networks. In the present study, we compared frequency-resolved functional connectivity patterns underlying reading of single words and visual recognition of symbol strings. Word reading emphasized coherence in a left-lateralized network with nodes in classical perisylvian language regions, whereas symbol processing recruited a bilateral network, including connections between frontal and parietal regions previously associated with spatial attention and visual working memory. Our results illustrate the flexible nature of functional networks, whereby processing of different form categories, written words vs. symbol strings, leads to the formation of large-scale functional networks that operate at distinct oscillatory frequencies and incorporate task-relevant regions. These results suggest that category-specific processing should be viewed not so much as a local process but as a distributed neural process implemented in signature networks. For words, increased coherence was detected particularly in the alpha (8-13 Hz) and high gamma (60-90 Hz) frequency bands, whereas increased coherence for symbol strings was observed in the high beta (21-29 Hz) and low gamma (30-45 Hz) frequency range. These findings attest to the role of coherence in specific frequency bands as a general mechanism for integrating stimulus-dependent information across brain regions.

  11. Polylogs, thermodynamics and scaling functions of one-dimensional quantum many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, X-W; Batchelor, M T

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the thermodynamics of one-dimensional Lieb-Liniger bosons can be accurately calculated in analytic fashion using the polylog function in the framework of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz. The approach does away with the need to numerically solve the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (Yang-Yang) equation. The expression for the equation of state allows the exploration of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid physics and quantum criticality in an archetypical quantum system. In particular, the low-temperature phase diagram is obtained, along with the scaling functions for the density and compressibility. It has been shown recently by Guan and Ho (arXiv:1010.1301) that such scaling can be used to map out the criticality of ultracold fermionic atoms in experiments. We show here how to map out quantum criticality for Lieb-Liniger bosons. More generally, the polylog function formalism can be applied to a wide range of Bethe ansatz integrable quantum many-body systems which are currently of theoretical and experimental interest, such as strongly interacting multi-component fermions, spinor bosons and mixtures of bosons and fermions. (fast track communication)

  12. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  13. Large-scale gene function analysis with the PANTHER classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Huaiyu; Muruganujan, Anushya; Casagrande, John T; Thomas, Paul D

    2013-08-01

    The PANTHER (protein annotation through evolutionary relationship) classification system (http://www.pantherdb.org/) is a comprehensive system that combines gene function, ontology, pathways and statistical analysis tools that enable biologists to analyze large-scale, genome-wide data from sequencing, proteomics or gene expression experiments. The system is built with 82 complete genomes organized into gene families and subfamilies, and their evolutionary relationships are captured in phylogenetic trees, multiple sequence alignments and statistical models (hidden Markov models or HMMs). Genes are classified according to their function in several different ways: families and subfamilies are annotated with ontology terms (Gene Ontology (GO) and PANTHER protein class), and sequences are assigned to PANTHER pathways. The PANTHER website includes a suite of tools that enable users to browse and query gene functions, and to analyze large-scale experimental data with a number of statistical tests. It is widely used by bench scientists, bioinformaticians, computer scientists and systems biologists. In the 2013 release of PANTHER (v.8.0), in addition to an update of the data content, we redesigned the website interface to improve both user experience and the system's analytical capability. This protocol provides a detailed description of how to analyze genome-wide experimental data with the PANTHER classification system.

  14. FuncTree: Functional Analysis and Visualization for Large-Scale Omics Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeru Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Exponential growth of high-throughput data and the increasing complexity of omics information have been making processing and interpreting biological data an extremely difficult and daunting task. Here we developed FuncTree (http://bioviz.tokyo/functree, a web-based application for analyzing and visualizing large-scale omics data, including but not limited to genomic, metagenomic, and transcriptomic data. FuncTree allows user to map their omics data onto the "Functional Tree map", a predefined circular dendrogram, which represents the hierarchical relationship of all known biological functions defined in the KEGG database. This novel visualization method allows user to overview the broad functionality of their data, thus allowing a more accurate and comprehensive understanding of the omics information. FuncTree provides extensive customization and calculation methods to not only allow user to directly map their omics data to identify the functionality of their data, but also to compute statistically enriched functions by comparing it to other predefined omics data. We have validated FuncTree's analysis and visualization capability by mapping pan-genomic data of three different types of bacterial genera, metagenomic data of the human gut, and transcriptomic data of two different types of human cell expression. All three mapping strongly confirms FuncTree's capability to analyze and visually represent key functional feature of the omics data. We believe that FuncTree's capability to conduct various functional calculations and visualizing the result into a holistic overview of biological function, would make it an integral analysis/visualization tool for extensive omics base research.

  15. Functional inference of complex anatomical tendinous networks at a macroscopic scale via sparse experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Anupam; Lipson, Hod; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2012-01-01

    In systems and computational biology, much effort is devoted to functional identification of systems and networks at the molecular-or cellular scale. However, similarly important networks exist at anatomical scales such as the tendon network of human fingers: the complex array of collagen fibers that transmits and distributes muscle forces to finger joints. This network is critical to the versatility of the human hand, and its function has been debated since at least the 16(th) century. Here, we experimentally infer the structure (both topology and parameter values) of this network through sparse interrogation with force inputs. A population of models representing this structure co-evolves in simulation with a population of informative future force inputs via the predator-prey estimation-exploration algorithm. Model fitness depends on their ability to explain experimental data, while the fitness of future force inputs depends on causing maximal functional discrepancy among current models. We validate our approach by inferring two known synthetic Latex networks, and one anatomical tendon network harvested from a cadaver's middle finger. We find that functionally similar but structurally diverse models can exist within a narrow range of the training set and cross-validation errors. For the Latex networks, models with low training set error [functional structure of complex anatomical networks. This work expands current bioinformatics inference approaches by demonstrating that sparse, yet informative interrogation of biological specimens holds significant computational advantages in accurate and efficient inference over random testing, or assuming model topology and only inferring parameters values. These findings also hold clues to both our evolutionary history and the development of versatile machines.

  16. Differences between child and adult large-scale functional brain networks for reading tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Gao, Yue; Di, Qiqi; Hu, Jiali; Lu, Chunming; Nan, Yun; Booth, James R; Liu, Li

    2018-02-01

    Reading is an important high-level cognitive function of the human brain, requiring interaction among multiple brain regions. Revealing differences between children's large-scale functional brain networks for reading tasks and those of adults helps us to understand how the functional network changes over reading development. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 17 adults (19-28 years old) and 16 children (11-13 years old), and graph theoretical analyses to investigate age-related changes in large-scale functional networks during rhyming and meaning judgment tasks on pairs of visually presented Chinese characters. We found that: (1) adults had stronger inter-regional connectivity and nodal degree in occipital regions, while children had stronger inter-regional connectivity in temporal regions, suggesting that adults rely more on visual orthographic processing whereas children rely more on auditory phonological processing during reading. (2) Only adults showed between-task differences in inter-regional connectivity and nodal degree, whereas children showed no task differences, suggesting the topological organization of adults' reading network is more specialized. (3) Children showed greater inter-regional connectivity and nodal degree than adults in multiple subcortical regions; the hubs in children were more distributed in subcortical regions while the hubs in adults were more distributed in cortical regions. These findings suggest that reading development is manifested by a shift from reliance on subcortical to cortical regions. Taken together, our study suggests that Chinese reading development is supported by developmental changes in brain connectivity properties, and some of these changes may be domain-general while others may be specific to the reading domain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Function Self-Efficacy Scale-FSES: Development, Evaluation, and Contribution to Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovel, Hava; Carmel, Sara

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Function Self-Efficacy Scale (FSES) for assessing the degree of confidence in self-functioning while facing decline in health and function (DHF). The FSES was evaluated in two studies of older Israelis, aged 75+ years. Data were collected by structured home interviews. Exploratory factor analyses conducted in both studies clearly revealed two underlying factors: emotion self-efficacy and action self-efficacy. Confirmatory factor analyses resulted in acceptable model fit criteria. The shortened final 13-item FSES had good internal consistency and satisfactory criterion and convergent validity. Multiple regression analyses, conducted to predict subjective well-being in each of the studies, showed that function self-efficacy had a positive and significant contribution to the explanation of well-being, while controlling for general self-efficacy, self-rated health, and sociodemographic variables. We propose that appropriate interventions can strengthen function self-efficacy, thus improving the well-being of elderly persons and their ability to cope with DHF. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Scale breaking parton fragmentation functions, analytical parametrizations and comparison with charged multiplicities in e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlt, H.

    1980-01-01

    Scale breaking quark and gluon fragmentation functions obtained by solving numerically Altarelli-Parisi type equations are presented. Analytical parametrizations are given for the fragmentation of u and d quarks into pions. The calculated Q 2 dependent fragmentation functions are compared with experimental data. With these scale breaking fragmentation functions the average charged multiplicity is calculated in e + e - annihilation, which rises with energy more than logarithmically and is in good agreement with experiment. (author)

  19. Large-scale brain network coupling predicts acute nicotine abstinence effects on craving and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Caryn; Gu, Hong; Loughead, James; Ruparel, Kosha; Yang, Yihong; Stein, Elliot A

    2014-05-01

    Interactions of large-scale brain networks may underlie cognitive dysfunctions in psychiatric and addictive disorders. To test the hypothesis that the strength of coupling among 3 large-scale brain networks--salience, executive control, and default mode--will reflect the state of nicotine withdrawal (vs smoking satiety) and will predict abstinence-induced craving and cognitive deficits and to develop a resource allocation index (RAI) that reflects the combined strength of interactions among the 3 large-scale networks. A within-subject functional magnetic resonance imaging study in an academic medical center compared resting-state functional connectivity coherence strength after 24 hours of abstinence and after smoking satiety. We examined the relationship of abstinence-induced changes in the RAI with alterations in subjective, behavioral, and neural functions. We included 37 healthy smoking volunteers, aged 19 to 61 years, for analyses. Twenty-four hours of abstinence vs smoking satiety. Inter-network connectivity strength (primary) and the relationship with subjective, behavioral, and neural measures of nicotine withdrawal during abstinence vs smoking satiety states (secondary). The RAI was significantly lower in the abstinent compared with the smoking satiety states (left RAI, P = .002; right RAI, P = .04), suggesting weaker inhibition between the default mode and salience networks. Weaker inter-network connectivity (reduced RAI) predicted abstinence-induced cravings to smoke (r = -0.59; P = .007) and less suppression of default mode activity during performance of a subsequent working memory task (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, r = -0.66, P = .003; posterior cingulate cortex, r = -0.65, P = .001). Alterations in coupling of the salience and default mode networks and the inability to disengage from the default mode network may be critical in cognitive/affective alterations that underlie nicotine dependence.

  20. Wilson expansion in the minimal subtraction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    The small distance expansion of the product of composite fields is constructed for an arbitrary renormalization procedure of the type of minimal subtraction scheme. Coefficient functions of the expansion are expressed explicitly through the Green functions of composite fields. The expansion has the explicity finite form: the ultraviolet (UV) divergences of the coefficient functions and composite fields are removed by the initial renormalization procedure while the infrared (IR) divergences in massless diagrams with nonvanishing contribution into the coefficient functions are removed by the R-operation which is the IR part of the R-operation. The latter is the generalization of the dimensional renormalization in the case when both UV and IR divergences are present. To derive the expansion, a ''pre-subtracting operator'' is introduced and formulas of the counter-term technique are exploited

  1. Surface critical behavior and scaling functions for the three-dimensional mean spherical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Magdy E. [Mathematics Department, Ar' ar Teacher College, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (Saudi Arabia) and Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University (Egypt)]. E-mail: aminmagdy@yahoo.com

    2006-10-09

    The d-dimensional mean spherical model on a fully finite L{sup d} simple cubic lattice with Neumann-Dirichlet boundary conditions is considered in the presence of a surface external fields acting at the surfaces bounding the system. Exact calculations are evaluated for the fully finite system and in the case of a film geometry Lx{approx}{sup d-1}. Critical finite-size scaling functions both for the specific heat and the mean-square magnetization are derived and investigated close to and below the bulk critical temperature K{sub c}.

  2. Bridging scales from molecular simulations to classical thermodynamics: density functional theory of capillary condensation in nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neimark, Alexander V; Ravikovitch, Peter I; Vishnyakov, Aleksey

    2003-01-01

    With the example of the capillary condensation of Lennard-Jones fluid in nanopores ranging from 1 to 10 nm, we show that the non-local density functional theory (NLDFT) with properly chosen parameters of intermolecular interactions bridges the scale gap from molecular simulations to macroscopic thermodynamics. On the one hand, NLDFT correctly approximates the results of Monte Carlo simulations (shift of vapour-liquid equilibrium, spinodals, density profiles, adsorption isotherms) for pores wider than about 2 nm. On the other hand, NLDFT smoothly merges (above 7-10 nm) with the Derjaguin-Broekhoff-de Boer equations which represent augmented Laplace-Kelvin equations of capillary condensation and desorption

  3. Minimization of Linear Functionals Defined on| Solutions of Large-Scale Discrete Ill-Posed Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elden, Lars; Hansen, Per Christian; Rojas, Marielba

    2003-01-01

    The minimization of linear functionals de ned on the solutions of discrete ill-posed problems arises, e.g., in the computation of con dence intervals for these solutions. In 1990, Elden proposed an algorithm for this minimization problem based on a parametric-programming reformulation involving...... the solution of a sequence of trust-region problems, and using matrix factorizations. In this paper, we describe MLFIP, a large-scale version of this algorithm where a limited-memory trust-region solver is used on the subproblems. We illustrate the use of our algorithm in connection with an inverse heat...

  4. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V; Rooney, William D; Garzotto, Mark G; Springer, Charles S

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (K(trans)) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  5. Operator expansion at short distance in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubschmid, W [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Mallik, S [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Kernphysik

    1982-11-01

    We present a method of calculating coefficients of gluon operators in the operator product expansion of two-point functions at short distance. It is based on a short-distance expansion of the singular part of the quark propagator in the gluon field, the latter being treated as external. We verify in full generality that the spin zero, gluon operator of dimension six does not contribute to the two-point functions of quark bilinears.

  6. Effect of nanometer scale surface roughness of titanium for osteoblast function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Migita

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness is an important property for metallic materials used in medical implants or other devices. The present study investigated the effects of surface roughness on cellular function, namely cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation potential. Titanium (Ti discs, with a hundred nanometer- or nanometer-scale surface roughness (rough and smooth Ti surface, respectively were prepared by polishing with silicon carbide paper. MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblast-like cells were cultured on the discs, and their attachment, spreading area, proliferation, and calcification were analyzed. Cells cultured on rough Ti discs showed reduced attachment, proliferation, and calcification ability suggesting that the surface inhibited osteoblast function. The findings can provide a basis for improving the biocompatibility of medical devices.

  7. Cross-Cultural adaptation of the General Functioning Scale of the Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Pires

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the process of cross-cultural adaptation of the General Functioning Scale of the Family, a subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device, for the Brazilian population. METHODS The General Functioning Scale of the Family was translated into Portuguese and administered to 500 guardians of children in the second grade of elementary school in public schools of Sao Gonçalo, Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil. The types of equivalences investigated were: conceptual and of items, semantic, operational, and measurement. The study involved discussions with experts, translations and back-translations of the instrument, and psychometric assessment. Reliability and validity studies were carried out by internal consistency testing (Cronbach’s alpha, Guttman split-half correlation model, Pearson correlation coefficient, and confirmatory factor analysis. Associations between General Functioning of the Family and variables theoretically associated with the theme (father’s or mother’s drunkenness and violence between parents were estimated by odds ratio. RESULTS Semantic equivalence was between 90.0% and 100%. Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.79 to 0.81, indicating good internal consistency of the instrument. Pearson correlation coefficient ranged between 0.303 and 0.549. Statistical association was found between the general functioning of the family score and the theoretically related variables, as well as good fit quality of the confirmatory analysis model. CONCLUSIONS The results indicate the feasibility of administering the instrument to the Brazilian population, as it is easy to understand and a good measurement of the construct of interest.

  8. Insulator function and topological domain border strength scale with architectural protein occupancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromosome conformation capture studies suggest that eukaryotic genomes are organized into structures called topologically associating domains. The borders of these domains are highly enriched for architectural proteins with characterized roles in insulator function. However, a majority of architectural protein binding sites localize within topological domains, suggesting sites associated with domain borders represent a functionally different subclass of these regulatory elements. How topologically associating domains are established and what differentiates border-associated from non-border architectural protein binding sites remain unanswered questions. Results By mapping the genome-wide target sites for several Drosophila architectural proteins, including previously uncharacterized profiles for TFIIIC and SMC-containing condensin complexes, we uncover an extensive pattern of colocalization in which architectural proteins establish dense clusters at the borders of topological domains. Reporter-based enhancer-blocking insulator activity as well as endogenous domain border strength scale with the occupancy level of architectural protein binding sites, suggesting co-binding by architectural proteins underlies the functional potential of these loci. Analyses in mouse and human stem cells suggest that clustering of architectural proteins is a general feature of genome organization, and conserved architectural protein binding sites may underlie the tissue-invariant nature of topologically associating domains observed in mammals. Conclusions We identify a spectrum of architectural protein occupancy that scales with the topological structure of chromosomes and the regulatory potential of these elements. Whereas high occupancy architectural protein binding sites associate with robust partitioning of topologically associating domains and robust insulator function, low occupancy sites appear reserved for gene-specific regulation within topological domains. PMID

  9. Convergence of mayer expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brydges, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The tree graph bound of Battle and Federbush is extended and used to provide a simple criterion for the convergence of (iterated) Mayer expansions. As an application estimates on the radius of convergence of the Mayer expansion for the two-dimensional Yukawa gas (nonstable interaction) are obtained

  10. Does Cosmological Scale Expansion Explain the Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masreliez, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The idea of the creation of the world has been central in Western civilization since the earliest recorded history some 6000 years ago and it still prevails, supported by religious dogma. If the creation idea is wrong and the universe is eternal we might wonder why science has not yet revealed this fundamental truth. To understand why, we have to review how the Big Bang theory came to be the dominant cosmological paradigm in spite of many clear indications that the theory might be fundamentally flawed.

  11. Launch and Functional Considerations Guiding the Scaling and Design of Rigid Inflatable Habitat Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) has a long history of projects that involve design of space structures, including habitats for low-Earth orbit (LEO) and planetary applications. Most of these facilities and component systems are planned to comply with size, geometry and mass restrictions imposed by the Space Shuttle Orbiter's payload and lift/landing abort restrictions. These constraints limit launch elements to approximately 15 ft. diameter, 40 ft. long cylindrical dimensions weighing no more than approximately 25 metric tons. It is clear that future success of commercial space programs such as tourism will hinge upon the availability of bigger and more efficient Earth to LEO launch vehicles which can greatly reduce transportation and operational costs. This will enable development and utilization of larger habitat modules and other infrastructure elements which can be deployed with fewer launches and on-orbit assembly procedures. The sizing of these new heavy lift launchers should be scaled to optimize habitat functionality and efficiency, just as the habitat designs must consider optimization of launch vehicle economy. SICSA's planning studies address these vehicle and habitat optimization priorities as parallel and interdependent considerations. The allowable diameter of habitat modules established by launch vehicle capacity dictates functionally acceptable internal configuration options. Analyses of these options relative to practical dimensions for Earth-to-orbit launch vehicle scaling were conducted for two general schemes. The "bologna slice" configuration stacks the floors within a predominately cylindrical or spherical envelope, producing circular areas. The "banana split" approach divides a cylindrical module longitudinally, creating floors that are generally rectangular in shape. The assessments established minimum sizes for reasonable utility and efficiency. The bologna slice option. This configuration is only acceptable

  12. Strategies for Directing the Structure and Function of 3D Collagen Biomaterials across Length Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Brandan D.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen type I is a widely used natural biomaterial that has found utility in a variety of biological and medical applications. Its well characterized structure and role as an extracellular matrix protein make it a highly relevant material for controlling cell function and mimicking tissue properties. Collagen type I is abundant in a number of tissues, and can be isolated as a purified protein. This review focuses on hydrogel biomaterials made by reconstituting collagen type I from a solubilized form, with an emphasis on in vitro studies in which collagen structure can be controlled. The hierarchical structure of collagen from the nanoscale to the macroscale is described, with an emphasis on how structure is related to function across scales. Methods of reconstituting collagen into hydrogel materials are presented, including molding of macroscopic constructs, creation of microscale modules, and electrospinning of nanoscale fibers. The modification of collagen biomaterials to achieve desired structures and functions is also addressed, with particular emphasis on mechanical control of collagen structure, creation of collagen composite materials, and crosslinking of collagenous matrices. Biomaterials scientists have made remarkable progress in rationally designing collagen-based biomaterials and in applying them to both the study of biology and for therapeutic benefit. This broad review illustrates recent examples of techniques used to control collagen structure, and to thereby direct its biological and mechanical functions. PMID:24012608

  13. Scaling A Moment-Rate Function For Small To Large Magnitude Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Ralph; Ji, Chen

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1980's seismologists have recognized that peak ground acceleration (PGA) and peak ground velocity (PGV) scale differently with magnitude for large and moderate earthquakes. In a recent paper (Archuleta and Ji, GRL 2016) we introduced an apparent moment-rate function (aMRF) that accurately predicts the scaling with magnitude of PGA, PGV, PWA (Wood-Anderson Displacement) and the ratio PGA/2πPGV (dominant frequency) for earthquakes 3.3 ≤ M ≤ 5.3. This apparent moment-rate function is controlled by two temporal parameters, tp and td, which are related to the time for the moment-rate function to reach its peak amplitude and the total duration of the earthquake, respectively. These two temporal parameters lead to a Fourier amplitude spectrum (FAS) of displacement that has two corners in between which the spectral amplitudes decay as 1/f, f denotes frequency. At higher or lower frequencies, the FAS of the aMRF looks like a single-corner Aki-Brune omega squared spectrum. However, in the presence of attenuation the higher corner is almost certainly masked. Attempting to correct the spectrum to an Aki-Brune omega-squared spectrum will produce an "apparent" corner frequency that falls between the double corner frequency of the aMRF. We reason that the two corners of the aMRF are the reason that seismologists deduce a stress drop (e.g., Allmann and Shearer, JGR 2009) that is generally much smaller than the stress parameter used to produce ground motions from stochastic simulations (e.g., Boore, 2003 Pageoph.). The presence of two corners for the smaller magnitude earthquakes leads to several questions. Can deconvolution be successfully used to determine scaling from small to large earthquakes? Equivalently will large earthquakes have a double corner? If large earthquakes are the sum of many smaller magnitude earthquakes, what should the displacement FAS look like for a large magnitude earthquake? Can a combination of such a double-corner spectrum and random

  14. Effect of Exercise Counseling on Functional Scales Quality of Life in Women with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shobeyri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer and the most lethal malignancy among women in the world. Diagnosis, treatment, and treatment complications incur physical, mental and social complications, and consequently reduce the quality of life in these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise counseling on functional scales in women with breast cancer. Materials & Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 60 women with breast cancer selected in cancer treatment centers in Hamadan city. Participants were randomly allocated to exercise counseling group (n=30 and control group (n=30. The intervention included two weeks of exercise counseling in the gym and eight weeks of training at home. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, QLQ-C30 and QLQ BR-23. Data were analyzed in SPSS.20, using &chi2 Fisher’s exact test, t-test, ANCOVA at a confidence level of p0.05. Conclusion: The functional scales of exercise counseling had a positive effect on the quality of life of women with breast cancer, and led to a significant improvement in patients. This method can be used as a part of the routine therapeutic measures for these patients.

  15. Scaling functions for the Inverse Compressibility near the QCD critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Roy

    2017-09-01

    The QCD phase diagram can be mapped out by studying fluctuations and their response to changes in the temperature and baryon chemical potential. Theoretical studies indicate that the cumulant ratios Cn /Cm used to characterize the fluctuation of conserved charges, provide a valuable probe of deconfinement and chiral dynamics, as well as for identifying the position of the critical endpoint (CEP) in the QCD phase diagram. The ratio C1 /C2 , which is linked to the inverse compressibility, vanishes at the CEP due to the divergence of the net quark number fluctuations at the critical point belonging to the Z(2) universality class. Therefore, it's associated scaling function can give insight on the location of the critical end point, as well as the critical exponents required to assign its static universality class. Scaling functions for the ratio C1 /C2 , obtained from net-proton multiplicity distributions for a broad range of collision centralities in Au+Au (√{sNN} = 7.7 - 200 GeV) collisions will be presented and discussed.

  16. Construction and pilot assessment of the Lower Limb Function Assessment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allart, Etienne; Paquereau, Julie; Rogeau, Caroline; Daveluy, Walter; Kozlowski, Odile; Rousseaux, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Stroke often leads to upright standing and walking impairments. Clinical assessments do not sufficiently address ecological aspects and the patient's subjective evaluation of function. To perform a pilot assessment of the psychometric properties of the Lower Limb-Function Assessment Scale (LL-FAS). The LL-FAS includes 30 items assessing the patient's perception (in a questionnaire) and the examiner's perception (in a practical test) of upright standing and walking impairments and their impact on activities of daily living. We analyzed the LL-FAS's reliability, construct validity, internal consistency, predictive validity and feasibility. Thirty-five stroke patients were included. The scale's mean ± SD completion time was 25 ± 6 min. Intra-observer reliability was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC >0.82). Interobserver reliability was moderate (0.67 0.9) and predictive validity were excellent. The LL-FAS showed fair psychometric properties in this pilot study and may be of value for evaluating post-stroke lower limb impairment.

  17. Cost function estimates, scale economies and technological progress in the Turkish electricity generation sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali Akkemik, K.

    2009-01-01

    Turkish electricity sector has undergone significant institutional changes since 1984. The recent developments since 2001 including the setting up of a regulatory agency to undertake the regulation of the sector and increasing participation of private investors in the field of electricity generation are of special interest. This paper estimates cost functions and investigates the degree of scale economies, overinvestment, and technological progress in the Turkish electricity generation sector for the period 1984-2006 using long-run and short-run translog cost functions. Estimations were done for six groups of firms, public and private. The results indicate existence of scale economies throughout the period of analysis, hence declining long-run average costs. The paper finds empirical support for the Averch-Johnson effect until 2001, i.e., firms overinvested in an environment where there are excess returns to capital. But this effect was reduced largely after 2002. Technological progress deteriorated slightly from 1984-1993 to 1994-2001 but improved after 2002. Overall, the paper found that regulation of the market under the newly established regulating agency after 2002 was effective and there are potential gains from such regulation. (author)

  18. An Evaluation of the Texas Functional Living Scale's Latent Structure and Subscales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, David Andrés; Soble, Jason R; Marceaux, Janice C; McCoy, Karin J M

    2017-02-01

    Performance-based functional assessment is a critical component of neuropsychological practice. The Texas Functional Living Scale (TFLS) has promise given its brevity, nationally representative norms, and co-norming with Wechsler scales. However, its subscale structure has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the TFLS in a mixed clinical sample (n = 197). Reliability and convergent and discriminant validity coefficients were calculated with neurocognitive testing and collateral reports and factor analysis was performed. The Money and Calculation subscale had the best psychometric properties of the subscales. The evidence did not support solitary interpretation of the Time subscale. A three-factor latent structure emerged representing memory and semantic retrieval, performance and visual scanning, and financial calculation. This study added psychometric support for interpretation of the TFLS total score and some of its subscales. Study limitations included sample characteristics (e.g., gender ratio) and low power for collateral report analyses. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Musculoskeletal determinants of pelvic sucker function in Hawaiian stream gobiid fishes: interspecific comparisons and allometric scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maie, Takashi; Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Blob, Richard W

    2013-07-01

    Gobiid fishes possess a distinctive ventral sucker, formed from fusion of the pelvic fins. This sucker is used to adhere to a wide range of substrates including, in some species, the vertical cliffs of waterfalls that are climbed during upstream migrations. Previous studies of waterfall-climbing goby species have found that pressure differentials and adhesive forces generated by the sucker increase with positive allometry as fish grow in size, despite isometry or negative allometry of sucker area. To produce such scaling patterns for pressure differential and adhesive force, waterfall-climbing gobies might exhibit allometry for other muscular or skeletal components of the pelvic sucker that contribute to its adhesive function. In this study, we used anatomical dissections and modeling to evaluate the potential for allometric growth in the cross-sectional area, effective mechanical advantage (EMA), and force generating capacity of major protractor and retractor muscles of the pelvic sucker (m. protractor ischii and m. retractor ischii) that help to expand the sealed volume of the sucker to produce pressure differentials and adhesive force. We compared patterns for three Hawaiian gobiid species: a nonclimber (Stenogobius hawaiiensis), an ontogenetically limited climber (Awaous guamensis), and a proficient climber (Sicyopterus stimpsoni). Scaling patterns were relatively similar for all three species, typically exhibiting isometric or negatively allometric scaling for the muscles and lever systems examined. Although these scaling patterns do not help to explain the positive allometry of pressure differentials and adhesive force as climbing gobies grow, the best climber among the species we compared, S. stimpsoni, does exhibit the highest calculated estimates of EMA, muscular input force, and output force for pelvic sucker retraction at any body size, potentially facilitating its adhesive ability. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Thermal Expansion Of Feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, G. L.; Medford, A.; Conlon, M.

    2009-12-01

    Hovis and others (1) investigated the thermal expansion of natural and synthetic AlSi3 feldspars and demonstrated that the coefficient of thermal expansion (α) decreases significantly, and linearly, with increasing room-temperature volume (VRT). In all such feldspars, therefore, chemical expansion limits thermal expansion. The scope of this work now has been broadened to include plagioclase and Ba-K feldspar crystalline solutions. X-ray powder diffraction data have been collected between room temperature and 925 °C on six plagioclase specimens ranging in composition from anorthite to oligoclase. When combined with thermal expansion data for albite (2,3,4) a steep linear trend of α as a function of VRT emerges, reflecting how small changes in composition dramatically affect expansion behavior. The thermal expansion data for five synthetic Ba-K feldspars ranging in composition from 20 to 100 mole percent celsian, combined with data for pure K-feldspar (3,4), show α-VRT relationships similar in nature to the plagioclase series, but with a slope and intercept different from the latter. Taken as a group all Al2Si2 feldspars, including anorthite and celsian from the present study along with Sr- (5) and Pb-feldspar (6) from other workers, show very limited thermal expansion that, unlike AlSi3 feldspars, has little dependence on the divalent-ion (or M-) site occupant. This apparently is due to the necessitated alternation of Al and Si in the tetrahedral sites of these minerals (7), which in turn locks the tetrahedral framework and makes the M-site occupant nearly irrelevant to expansion behavior. Indeed, in feldspar series with coupled chemical substitution it is the change away from a 1:1 Al:Si ratio that gives feldspars greater freedom to expand. Overall, the relationships among α, chemical composition, and room-temperature volume provide useful predictive tools for estimating feldspar thermal expansion and give insight into the controls of expansion behavior in

  1. Spectral analysis of structure functions and their scaling exponents in forced isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz; McComb, W. David; Yoffe, Samuel; Berera, Arjun

    2014-11-01

    The pseudospectral method, in conjunction with a new technique for obtaining scaling exponents ζn from the structure functions Sn (r) , is presented as an alternative to the extended self-similarity (ESS) method and the use of generalized structure functions. We propose plotting the ratio | Sn (r) /S3 (r) | against the separation r in accordance with a standard technique for analysing experimental data. This method differs from the ESS technique, which plots the generalized structure functions Gn (r) against G3 (r) , where G3 (r) ~ r . Using our method for the particular case of S2 (r) we obtain the new result that the exponent ζ2 decreases as the Taylor-Reynolds number increases, with ζ2 --> 0 . 679 +/- 0 . 013 as Rλ --> ∞ . This supports the idea of finite-viscosity corrections to the K41 prediction for S2, and is the opposite of the result obtained by ESS. The pseudospectral method permits the forcing to be taken into account exactly through the calculation of the energy input in real space from the work spectrum of the stirring forces. The combination of the viscous and the forcing corrections as calculated by the pseudospectral method is shown to account for the deviation of S3 from Kolmogorov's ``four-fifths''-law at all scales. This work has made use of the resources provided by the UK supercomputing service HECToR, made available through the Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility (ECDF). A. B. is supported by STFC, S. R. Y. and M. F. L. are funded by EPSRC.

  2. Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, M.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Luo, J.; Carley, J.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Gentry, T.J.; Gu, B.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Criddle, C.S.; Zhou, J.

    2010-02-15

    A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 {micro}gl{sup -1}) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions.

  3. Fission gas retention and axial expansion of irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.; Johanson, E.W.

    1986-05-01

    Out-of-reactor experiments utilizing direct electrical heating and infrared heating techniques were performed on irradiated metallic fuel. The results indicate accelerated expansion can occur during thermal transients and that the accelerated expansion is driven by retained fission gases. The results also demonstrate gas retention and, hence, expansion behavior is a function of axial position within the pin

  4. Ex vivo expansion of CD3depleted cord blood-MNCs in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells; an appropriate strategy to provide functional NK cells applicable for cellular therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehteramolsadat Hosseini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering umbilical cord blood (UCB as a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells, we introduced a cost-effective approach to expand CD3depleted UCB-MNCs into functional NK cells. CD3depleted UCB-MNCs were expanded in the presence or absence of a feeder [bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs or osteoblasts], with or without cytokines and their differentiation into NK cells was determined by flow cytometry. NK cell function was quantified by LAMP-1/CD107a expression, TNF-α/IFN-γ release, and LDH release/PI staining in targets. Higher expansion of NK cells was observed after two weeks in the presence of BMSCs and cytokines (104 ± 15 compared to osteoblasts and cytokines (84 ± 29, p < 0.05. On day 14, CD3depleted UCB-MNCs in the presence of BMSCs and cytokines showed lower expression of CD3, CD19, CD14, CD15 and CD69 as well as higher expression of CD2 and CD7, which were suggestive of cell differentiation into mature NK cell lineage. Strong cytotoxicity of expanded cells was also identified with higher LDH release and PI% in targets. Significant upregulation of LAMP-1 with decreased release of IFN-γ and TNF-α from effectors were observed. We demonstrate an effective expansion of UCB-NK cells that maintained their functional capabilities applicable for cellular therapies.

  5. Evaluative Measurement Properties of the Patient-Specific Functional Scale for Primary Shoulder Complaints in Physical Therapy Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehorst, Marije L. S.; van Trijffel, Emiel; Lindeboom, Robert

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Clinical measurement, longitudinal. OBJECTIVES: To assess the test-retest reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness of the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) in patients with a primary shoulder complaint. BACKGROUND: Health measurement outcomes have become increasingly

  6. New technologies for large-scale micropatterning of functional nanocomposite polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, A.; Gray, B. L.

    2012-04-01

    We present a review of different micropatterning technologies for flexible elastomeric functional nanocomposites with a particular emphasis on mold material and processes for production of large size substrates. The functional polymers include electrically conducting and magnetic materials developed at the Micro-instrumentation Laboratory at Simon Fraser University, Canada. We present a chart that compares many of these different conductive and magnetic functional nanocomposites and their measured characteristics. Furthermore, we have previously reported hybrid processes for nanocomposite polymers micromolded against SU-8 photoepoxy masters. However, SU-8 is typically limited to substrate sizes that are compatible with microelectronics processing as a microelectronics uv-patterning step is typically involved, and de-molding problems are observed. Recently, we have developed new processes that address the problems faced with SU-8 molds. These new technologies for micropatterning nanocomposites involve new substrate materials. A low cost Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfabrication technology has been developed, which involves fabrication of micromold via either CO2 laser ablation or deep UV. We have previously reported this large-scale patterning technique using laser ablation. Finally, we compare the two processes for PMMA producing micromolds for nanocomposites.

  7. Large-scale Granger causality analysis on resting-state functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Zainul; Leistritz, Lutz; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate an approach to measure the information flow between each pair of time series in resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data of the human brain and subsequently recover its underlying network structure. By integrating dimensionality reduction into predictive time series modeling, large-scale Granger Causality (lsGC) analysis method can reveal directed information flow suggestive of causal influence at an individual voxel level, unlike other multivariate approaches. This method quantifies the influence each voxel time series has on every other voxel time series in a multivariate sense and hence contains information about the underlying dynamics of the whole system, which can be used to reveal functionally connected networks within the brain. To identify such networks, we perform non-metric network clustering, such as accomplished by the Louvain method. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach to recover the motor and visual cortex from resting state human brain fMRI data and compare it with the network recovered from a visuomotor stimulation experiment, where the similarity is measured by the Dice Coefficient (DC). The best DC obtained was 0.59 implying a strong agreement between the two networks. In addition, we thoroughly study the effect of dimensionality reduction in lsGC analysis on network recovery. We conclude that our approach is capable of detecting causal influence between time series in a multivariate sense, which can be used to segment functionally connected networks in the resting-state fMRI.

  8. The behaviour of 39 pesticides in surface waters as a function of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, P.D.; Larson, S.J.; Winterstein, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    A portion of applied pesticides runs off agricultural fields and is transported through surface waters. In this study, the behaviour of 39 pesticides is examined as a function of scale across 14 orders of magnitude from the field to the ocean. Data on pesticide loads in streams from two US Geological Survey programs were combined with literature data from field and watershed studies. The annual load as percent of use (LAPU) was quantified for each of the fields and watersheds and was used as the normalization factor across watersheds and compounds. The in-stream losses of each pesticide were estimated for a model stream with a 15 day travel time (similar in characteristics to the upper Mississippi River). These estimated in-stream losses agreed well with the observed changes in apparent LAPU values as a function of watershed area. In general, herbicides applied to the soil surface had the greatest LAPU values and minimal in-stream losses. Soil-incorporated herbicides had smaller LAPU values and substantial in-stream losses. Insecticides generally had LAPU values similar to the incorporated herbicides, but had more variation in their in-stream losses. On the basis of the LAPU values of the 39 pesticides as a function of watershed area, a generalized conceptual model of the movement of pesticides from the field to the ocean is suggested. The importance of considering both field runoff and in-stream losses is discussed in relation to interpreting monitoring data and making regulatory decisions.

  9. High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Promotes Expansion of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue and Impairs Skeletal Stem Cell Functions in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tencerova, Michaela; Figeac, Florence; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    that link obesity, BM adiposity, and bone fragility. Thus, in an obesity intervention study in C57BL/6J mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks, we investigated the molecular and cellular phenotype of bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT), BM progenitor cells, and BM microenvironment in comparison...... to peripheral adipose tissue (AT). HFD decreased trabecular bone mass by 29%, cortical thickness by 5%, and increased BM adiposity by 184%. In contrast to peripheral AT, BMAT did not exhibit pro-inflammatory phenotype. BM progenitor cells isolated from HFD mice exhibited decreased mRNA levels of inflammatory...... demonstrate that BMAT expansion in response to HFD exerts a deleterious effect on the skeleton. Continuous recruitment of progenitor cells to adipogenesis leads to progenitor cell exhaustion, decreased recruitment to osteoblastic cells, and decreased bone formation. In addition, the absence of insulin...

  10. Functionality enhancement of industrialized optical fiber sensors and system developed for full-scale pavement monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaping; Liu, Wanqiu; He, Jianping; Xing, Xiaoying; Cao, Dandan; Gao, Xipeng; Hao, Xiaowei; Cheng, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhi

    2014-05-19

    Pavements always play a predominant role in transportation. Health monitoring of pavements is becoming more and more significant, as frequently suffering from cracks, rutting, and slippage renders them prematurely out of service. Effective and reliable sensing elements are thus in high demand to make prognosis on the mechanical properties and occurrence of damage to pavements. Therefore, in this paper, various types of functionality enhancement of industrialized optical fiber sensors for pavement monitoring are developed, with the corresponding operational principles clarified in theory and the performance double checked by basic experiments. Furthermore, a self-healing optical fiber sensing network system is adopted to accomplish full-scale monitoring of pavements. The application of optical fiber sensors assembly and self-healing network system in pavement has been carried out to validate the feasibility. It has been proved that the research in this article provides a valuable method and meaningful guidance for the integrity monitoring of civil structures, especially pavements.

  11. Simulations of nanocrystals under pressure: Combining electronic enthalpy and linear-scaling density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corsini, Niccolò R. C., E-mail: niccolo.corsini@imperial.ac.uk; Greco, Andrea; Haynes, Peter D. [Department of Physics and Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hine, Nicholas D. M. [Department of Physics and Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thompson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Molteni, Carla [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-28

    We present an implementation in a linear-scaling density-functional theory code of an electronic enthalpy method, which has been found to be natural and efficient for the ab initio calculation of finite systems under hydrostatic pressure. Based on a definition of the system volume as that enclosed within an electronic density isosurface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett.94, 145501 (2005)], it supports both geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce an approach for calibrating the parameters defining the volume in the context of geometry optimizations and discuss their significance. Results in good agreement with simulations using explicit solvents are obtained, validating our approach. Size-dependent pressure-induced structural transformations and variations in the energy gap of hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals are investigated, including one comparable in size to recent experiments. A detailed analysis of the polyamorphic transformations reveals three types of amorphous structures and their persistence on depressurization is assessed.

  12. Functionally graded hardmetals and cermets: preparation, performance and production scale up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, K.; Kassel, D.; Daub, H.-W.; Berg, H. van den; Lengauer, W.; Garcia, J.; Ucakar, V.

    2001-01-01

    Sintering experiments were carried out to establish graded microstructures in hardmetals and cermets. The formation of these microstructural features was investigated as a function of nitrogen pressure, sintering temperature, sintering period and sintering profile. The nitrogen pressure influences the formation of carbonitride layers at the surface. Decreasing sintering temperature yields similar results as increasing nitrogen pressure. Upon prolonged sintering time a small growth of the outer carbonitride layer can only be obtained if a substantial WC grain growth is accepted. Variation of the sintering profile after dense sintering does not principally change the type of the graded microstructure. The laboratory experiments were scaled up in an industrial sinter/HIP furnace and showing good correspondence with each other. First turning cutting tests with different alloys show excellent performance in comparison to ungraded materials. (author)

  13. Functionality Enhancement of Industrialized Optical Fiber Sensors and System Developed for Full-Scale Pavement Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pavements always play a predominant role in transportation. Health monitoring of pavements is becoming more and more significant, as frequently suffering from cracks, rutting, and slippage renders them prematurely out of service. Effective and reliable sensing elements are thus in high demand to make prognosis on the mechanical properties and occurrence of damage to pavements. Therefore, in this paper, various types of functionality enhancement of industrialized optical fiber sensors for pavement monitoring are developed, with the corresponding operational principles clarified in theory and the performance double checked by basic experiments. Furthermore, a self-healing optical fiber sensing network system is adopted to accomplish full-scale monitoring of pavements. The application of optical fiber sensors assembly and self-healing network system in pavement has been carried out to validate the feasibility. It has been proved that the research in this article provides a valuable method and meaningful guidance for the integrity monitoring of civil structures, especially pavements.

  14. Control of modular multilevel converters based on time-scale analysis and orthogonal functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarri, L.; Tani, A.; Mengoni, M.

    2014-01-01

    current is still a complex task and cannot be fully tackled with traditional linear control techniques. In this paper a multiple time-scale analysis is proposed to determine an approximated model of the MMC that can be used to solve the control problem of the capacitor voltages. In addition, it is shown...... that the reference signal of the circulating current can be built by combining orthogonal functions of the measured voltages and currents. Numerical simulations are used to test the feasibility of the developed approach.......Modular multilevel converter (MMC) is a promising multilevel topology for high-voltage applications that has been developed in recent years. The control of MMCs has been analyzed in detail in many papers, showing that the converter capacitors can be kept charged and balanced by controlling...

  15. Exponential Expansion in Evolutionary Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Peter; Jagtfelt, Tue

    2013-01-01

    This article attempts to solve current problems of conceptual fragmentation within the field of evolutionary economics. One of the problems, as noted by a number of observers, is that the field suffers from an assemblage of fragmented and scattered concepts (Boschma and Martin 2010). A solution...... to this problem is proposed in the form of a model of exponential expansion. The model outlines the overall structure and function of the economy as exponential expansion. The pictographic model describes four axiomatic concepts and their exponential nature. The interactive, directional, emerging and expanding...... concepts are described in detail. Taken together it provides the rudimentary aspects of an economic system within an analytical perspective. It is argued that the main dynamic processes of the evolutionary perspective can be reduced to these four concepts. The model and concepts are evaluated in the light...

  16. Controlled Thermal Expansion Alloys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There has always been a need for controlled thermal expansion alloys suitable for mounting optics and detectors in spacecraft applications.  These alloys help...

  17. Primary functions of the first Japanese large-scale facility for exposing small animals to radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Yuu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Takahiro; Sakoda, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Okayama University have carried out the experimental animal study and its related studies since 2007 in order to examine the physiological effects of radon in detail. Thus, a radon test facility for small animals was developed in order to increase the statistical certainty of our animal tests. This paper illustrates the performances of that facility, the first large-scale facility of its types in Japan. The facility has a potential of approximately 150 mouse-scale tests at the same time. The apparatus for exposing small animals to radon has six animal chamber groups each of which consists of five independent cages. Different radon concentrations in each animal chamber group are available. The major functions of the facility controlling radon and avoiding thoron were shown theoretically and experimentally. The relative standard deviation of radon concentration at the highest concentration group was about 5%, although the lower concentration groups seemed to be affected by variations in background radon. (author)

  18. Ecosystem-scale fluxes in seminatural Pyrenean grasslands: role of annual dynamics of plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altimir, Nuria; Ibañez, Mercedes; Elbers, Jan; Rota, Cristina; Arias, Claudia; Carrara, Arnaud; Nogues, Salvador; Sebastia, Maria-Teresa

    2013-04-01

    The net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and the annual C balance of a site are in general modulated by light, temperature and availability of water and other resources to the plants. In grasslands, NEE is expected to depend strongly on the vegetation with a relationship that can be summarized by the above-ground biomass, its amount and dynamics. Any factor controlling the amount of green biomass is expected to have a strong impact on the short-term NEE, such as amount of solar radiation, water availability and grazing pressure. These controls are modulated differently depending on the plant functional type enduring them. Furthermore, as different guilds follow different functional strategies for optimization of the resources, they also present different patterns of change in their capacities such as photosynthetic fixation, belowground C allocation, and C loss via respiration. We examined these relationships at several semi-natural pastures to determine how the seasonal distribution of plant functional types is detected in the short-term ecosystem exchange and what role it plays. We have looked into these patterns to determine the general variation of key processes and whether different temporal patterns arise between different guilds. The study sites are in the Pyrenees, on the mountain pastures of La Bertolina, Alinyà, and Castellar at 1300, 1700, 1900 m a.s.l. respectively. We performed ecosystem-scale flux measurements by means of micrometeorologial stations combined with a thorough description of the vegetation including below- and above-ground biomass and leaf area as well as monitoring of natural abundance of C isotopes, discriminated by plant functional types. We present here the results of the study.

  19. Assessing depression related severity and functional impairment: the Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Ito

    Full Text Available The Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS is a brief, five-item measure for assessing the frequency and intensity of depressive symptoms, as well as functional impairments in pleasurable activities, work or school, and interpersonal relationships due to depression. Although this scale is expected to be useful in various psychiatric and mental health settings, the reliability, validity, and interpretability have not yet been fully examined. This study was designed to examine the reliability, factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of a Japanese version of the ODSIS, as well as its ability to distinguish between individuals with and without a major depressive disorder diagnosis.From a pool of registrants at an internet survey company, 2830 non-clinical and clinical participants were selected randomly (619 with major depressive disorder, 619 with panic disorder, 576 with social anxiety disorder, 645 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 371 non-clinical panelists. Participants were asked to respond to the ODSIS and conventional measures of depression, functional impairment, anxiety, neuroticism, satisfaction with life, and emotion regulation.Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of three split subsamples indicated the unidimensional factor structure of ODSIS. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed invariance of factor loadings between non-clinical and clinical subsamples. The ODSIS also showed excellent internal consistency and test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients. Convergence and discriminance of the ODSIS with various measures were in line with our expectations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the ODSIS was able to detect a major depressive syndrome accurately.This study supports the reliability and validity of ODSIS in a non-western population, which can be interpreted as demonstrating cross-cultural validity.

  20. Strategic Expansion Models in Academic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Rajni; Yang, Wei T; Tannir, Habib; Parikh, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In response to economic pressures, academic institutions in the United States and their radiology practices, are expanding into the community to build a larger network, thereby driving growth and achieving economies of scale. These economies of scale are being achieved variously via brick-and-mortar construction, community practice acquisition, and partnership-based network expansion. We describe and compare these three expansion models within a 4-part framework of: (1) upfront investment; (2) profitability impact; (3) brand impact; and (4) risk of execution. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Semiclassical expansions on and near caustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meetz, K.

    1984-09-01

    We show that the standard WKB expansion can be generalized so that it reproduces the behavior of the wave function on and near a caustic in two-dimensional space time. The expansion is related to the unfolding polynomials of the elementary catastrophes occurring in two dimensions: the fold and the cusp catastrophe. The method determines control parameters and transport coefficients in a self-consistent way from differential equations and does not refer to the asymptotic expansion of Feynman path integrals. The lowest order equations are solved explicitly in terms of the multivalued classical action. The result is a generalized semiclassical approximation on and beyond a caustic. (orig.)

  2. Efficient Computation of Sparse Matrix Functions for Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations: The CheSS Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Stephan; Dawson, William; Wagner, Michael; Caliste, Damien; Nakajima, Takahito; Genovese, Luigi

    2017-10-10

    We present CheSS, the "Chebyshev Sparse Solvers" library, which has been designed to solve typical problems arising in large-scale electronic structure calculations using localized basis sets. The library is based on a flexible and efficient expansion in terms of Chebyshev polynomials and presently features the calculation of the density matrix, the calculation of matrix powers for arbitrary powers, and the extraction of eigenvalues in a selected interval. CheSS is able to exploit the sparsity of the matrices and scales linearly with respect to the number of nonzero entries, making it well-suited for large-scale calculations. The approach is particularly adapted for setups leading to small spectral widths of the involved matrices and outperforms alternative methods in this regime. By coupling CheSS to the DFT code BigDFT, we show that such a favorable setup is indeed possible in practice. In addition, the approach based on Chebyshev polynomials can be massively parallelized, and CheSS exhibits excellent scaling up to thousands of cores even for relatively small matrix sizes.

  3. Self-consistent spectral function for non-degenerate Coulomb systems and analytic scaling behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortmann, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Novel results for the self-consistent single-particle spectral function and self-energy are presented for non-degenerate one-component Coulomb systems at various densities and temperatures. The GW (0) -method for the dynamical self-energy is used to include many-particle correlations beyond the quasi-particle approximation. The self-energy is analysed over a broad range of densities and temperatures (n = 10 17 cm -3 -10 27 cm -3 , T = 10 2 eV/k B -10 4 eV/k B ). The spectral function shows a systematic behaviour, which is determined by collective plasma modes at small wavenumbers and converges towards a quasi-particle resonance at higher wavenumbers. In the low density limit, the numerical results comply with an analytic scaling law that is presented for the first time. It predicts a power-law behaviour of the imaginary part of the self-energy, ImΣ ∼ -n 1/4 . This resolves a long time problem of the quasi-particle approximation which yields a finite self-energy at vanishing density

  4. Ultrathin Ceramic Membranes as Scaffolds for Functional Cell Coculture Models on a Biomimetic Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Corinne; Ahmed, Sher; Müller, Loretta; Kinnear, Calum; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Umehara, Yuki; Frey, Sabine; Liley, Martha; Angeloni, Silvia; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epithelial tissue serves as an interface between biological compartments. Many in vitro epithelial cell models have been developed as an alternative to animal experiments to answer a range of research questions. These in vitro models are grown on permeable two-chamber systems; however, commercially available, polymer-based cell culture inserts are around 10 μm thick. Since the basement membrane found in biological systems is usually less than 1 μm thick, the 10-fold thickness of cell culture inserts is a major limitation in the establishment of realistic models. In this work, an alternative insert, accommodating an ultrathin ceramic membrane with a thickness of only 500 nm (i.e., the Silicon nitride Microporous Permeable Insert [SIMPLI]-well), was produced and used to refine an established human alveolar barrier coculture model by both replacing the conventional inserts with the SIMPLI-well and completing it with endothelial cells. The structural–functional relationship of the model was evaluated, including the translocation of gold nanoparticles across the barrier, revealing a higher translocation if compared to corresponding polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes. This study demonstrates the power of the SIMPLI-well system as a scaffold for epithelial tissue cell models on a truly biomimetic scale, allowing construction of more functionally accurate models of human biological barriers. PMID:26713225

  5. Substantial improvements in large-scale redocking and screening using the novel HYDE scoring function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nadine; Hindle, Sally; Lange, Gudrun; Klein, Robert; Albrecht, Jürgen; Briem, Hans; Beyer, Kristin; Claußen, Holger; Gastreich, Marcus; Lemmen, Christian; Rarey, Matthias

    2012-06-01

    The HYDE scoring function consistently describes hydrogen bonding, the hydrophobic effect and desolvation. It relies on HYdration and DEsolvation terms which are calibrated using octanol/water partition coefficients of small molecules. We do not use affinity data for calibration, therefore HYDE is generally applicable to all protein targets. HYDE reflects the Gibbs free energy of binding while only considering the essential interactions of protein-ligand complexes. The greatest benefit of HYDE is that it yields a very intuitive atom-based score, which can be mapped onto the ligand and protein atoms. This allows the direct visualization of the score and consequently facilitates analysis of protein-ligand complexes during the lead optimization process. In this study, we validated our new scoring function by applying it in large-scale docking experiments. We could successfully predict the correct binding mode in 93% of complexes in redocking calculations on the Astex diverse set, while our performance in virtual screening experiments using the DUD dataset showed significant enrichment values with a mean AUC of 0.77 across all protein targets with little or no structural defects. As part of these studies, we also carried out a very detailed analysis of the data that revealed interesting pitfalls, which we highlight here and which should be addressed in future benchmark datasets.

  6. Usefulness of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale short form for assessing functional outcomes in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Chika; Fujino, Haruo; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Yasuda, Yuka; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Ohi, Kazutaka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Takeda, Masatoshi; Hashimoto, Ryota

    2016-11-30

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) has been widely used to assess intellectual functioning not only in healthy adults but also people with psychiatric disorders. The purpose of the study was to develop an optimal WAIS-3 short form (SF) to evaluate intellectual status in patients with schizophrenia. One hundred and fifty patients with schizophrenia and 221 healthy controls entered the study. To select subtests for SFs, following criteria were considered: 1) predictability for the full IQ (FIQ), 2) representativeness for the IQ structure, 3) consistency of subtests across versions, 4) sensitivity to functional outcome measures, 5) conciseness in administration time. First, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and multiple regression analysis were conducted to select subtests satisfying the first and the second criteria. Then, candidate SFs were nominated based on the third criterion and the coverage of verbal IQ and performance IQ. Finally, the optimality of candidate SFs was evaluated in terms of the fourth and fifth criteria. The results suggest that the dyad of Similarities and Symbol Search was the most optimal satisfying the above criteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multivariate Pattern Classification of Facial Expressions Based on Large-Scale Functional Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yin; Liu, Baolin; Li, Xianglin; Wang, Peiyuan

    2018-01-01

    It is an important question how human beings achieve efficient recognition of others' facial expressions in cognitive neuroscience, and it has been identified that specific cortical regions show preferential activation to facial expressions in previous studies. However, the potential contributions of the connectivity patterns in the processing of facial expressions remained unclear. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study explored whether facial expressions could be decoded from the functional connectivity (FC) patterns using multivariate pattern analysis combined with machine learning algorithms (fcMVPA). We employed a block design experiment and collected neural activities while participants viewed facial expressions of six basic emotions (anger, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, and surprise). Both static and dynamic expression stimuli were included in our study. A behavioral experiment after scanning confirmed the validity of the facial stimuli presented during the fMRI experiment with classification accuracies and emotional intensities. We obtained whole-brain FC patterns for each facial expression and found that both static and dynamic facial expressions could be successfully decoded from the FC patterns. Moreover, we identified the expression-discriminative networks for the static and dynamic facial expressions, which span beyond the conventional face-selective areas. Overall, these results reveal that large-scale FC patterns may also contain rich expression information to accurately decode facial expressions, suggesting a novel mechanism, which includes general interactions between distributed brain regions, and that contributes to the human facial expression recognition.

  8. Some elements of a theory of multidimensional complex variables. I - General theory. II - Expansions of analytic functions and application to fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1989-01-01

    The paper introduces a new theory of N-dimensional complex variables and analytic functions which, for N greater than 2, is both a direct generalization and a close analog of the theory of ordinary complex variables. The algebra in the present theory is a commutative ring, not a field. Functions of a three-dimensional variable were defined and the definition of the derivative then led to analytic functions.

  9. Cluster expansion for vacuum confining fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonov, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Colored particle Green functions in vacuum background random fields are written as path integrals. Averaging over random fields is done using the cluster (cumulant) expansion. The existence of a finite correlation length for vacuum background fields is shown to produce the linear confinement, in agreement with the results, obtained with the help of averaged Hamiltonians. A modified form of cluster expansion for nonabelian fields is introduced using the path-ordered cumulants

  10. Stochastic quantization and 1/N expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelli, J.C.; Mendes, R.S.

    1992-10-01

    We study the 1/N expansion of field theories in the stochastic quantization method of Parisi and Wu using the supersymmetric functional approach. This formulation provides a systematic procedure to implement the 1/N expansion which resembles the ones used in the equilibrium. The 1/N perturbation theory for the non linear sigma model in two dimensions is worked out as an example. (author). 19 refs., 5 figs

  11. The PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scales: preliminary reliability and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varni James W

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scales (PedsQL™ VAS were designed as an ecological momentary assessment (EMA instrument to rapidly measure present or at-the-moment functioning in children and adolescents. The PedsQL™ VAS assess child self-report and parent-proxy report of anxiety, sadness, anger, worry, fatigue, and pain utilizing six developmentally appropriate visual analogue scales based on the well-established Varni/Thompson Pediatric Pain Questionnaire (PPQ Pain Intensity VAS format. Methods The six-item PedsQL™ VAS was administered to 70 pediatric patients ages 5–17 and their parents upon admittance to the hospital environment (Time 1: T1 and again two hours later (Time 2: T2. It was hypothesized that the PedsQL™ VAS Emotional Distress Summary Score (anxiety, sadness, anger, worry and the fatigue VAS would demonstrate moderate to large effect size correlations with the PPQ Pain Intensity VAS, and that patient" parent concordance would increase over time. Results Test-retest reliability was demonstrated from T1 to T2 in the large effect size range. Internal consistency reliability was demonstrated for the PedsQL™ VAS Total Symptom Score (patient self-report: T1 alpha = .72, T2 alpha = .80; parent proxy-report: T1 alpha = .80, T2 alpha = .84 and Emotional Distress Summary Score (patient self-report: T1 alpha = .74, T2 alpha = .73; parent proxy-report: T1 alpha = .76, T2 alpha = .81. As hypothesized, the Emotional Distress Summary Score and Fatigue VAS were significantly correlated with the PPQ Pain VAS in the medium to large effect size range, and patient and parent concordance increased from T1 to T2. Conclusion The results demonstrate preliminary test-retest and internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the PedsQL™ Present Functioning VAS instrument for both pediatric patient self-report and parent proxy-report. Further field testing is required to extend these initial

  12. Large-scale cortico-subcortical functional networks in focal epilepsies: The role of the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Výtvarová

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Focal epilepsies affect large-scale brain networks beyond the epileptogenic zones. Cortico-subcortical functional connectivity disturbance was displayed in LTLE, FLE, and POLE. Significant changes in the resting-state functional connectivity between cortical and subcortical structures suggest an important role of the BG and thalamus in focal epilepsies.

  13. IL-15 augments TCR-induced CD4+ T cell expansion in vitro by inhibiting the suppressive function of CD25 High CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom L Van Belle

    Full Text Available Due to its critical role in NK cell differentiation and CD8(+ T cell homeostasis, the importance of IL-15 is more firmly established for cytolytic effectors of the immune system than for CD4(+ T cells. The increased levels of IL-15 found in several CD4(+ T cell-driven (auto- immune diseases prompted us to examine how IL-15 influences murine CD4(+ T cell responses to low dose TCR-stimulation in vitro. We show that IL-15 exerts growth factor activity on both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells in a TCR-dependent and Cyclosporin A-sensitive manner. In CD4(+ T cells, IL-15 augmented initial IL-2-dependent expansion and once IL-15Rα was upregulated, IL-15 sustained the TCR-induced expression of IL-2/15Rβ, supporting proliferation independently of secreted IL-2. Moreover, IL-15 counteracts CD4(+ T cell suppression by a gradually expanding CD25(HighCD4(+ T cell subset that expresses Foxp3 and originates from CD4(+CD25(+ Tregs. These in vitro data suggest that IL-15 may dramatically strengthen the T cell response to suboptimal TCR-triggering by overcoming an activation threshold set by Treg that might create a risk for autoimmune pathology.

  14. Exploring connectivity with large-scale Granger causality on resting-state functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DSouza, Adora M; Abidin, Anas Z; Leistritz, Lutz; Wismüller, Axel

    2017-08-01

    Large-scale Granger causality (lsGC) is a recently developed, resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity analysis approach that estimates multivariate voxel-resolution connectivity. Unlike most commonly used multivariate approaches, which establish coarse-resolution connectivity by aggregating voxel time-series avoiding an underdetermined problem, lsGC estimates voxel-resolution, fine-grained connectivity by incorporating an embedded dimension reduction. We investigate application of lsGC on realistic fMRI simulations, modeling smoothing of neuronal activity by the hemodynamic response function and repetition time (TR), and empirical resting-state fMRI data. Subsequently, functional subnetworks are extracted from lsGC connectivity measures for both datasets and validated quantitatively. We also provide guidelines to select lsGC free parameters. Results indicate that lsGC reliably recovers underlying network structure with area under receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.93 at TR=1.5s for a 10-min session of fMRI simulations. Furthermore, subnetworks of closely interacting modules are recovered from the aforementioned lsGC networks. Results on empirical resting-state fMRI data demonstrate recovery of visual and motor cortex in close agreement with spatial maps obtained from (i) visuo-motor fMRI stimulation task-sequence (Accuracy=0.76) and (ii) independent component analysis (ICA) of resting-state fMRI (Accuracy=0.86). Compared with conventional Granger causality approach (AUC=0.75), lsGC produces better network recovery on fMRI simulations. Furthermore, it cannot recover functional subnetworks from empirical fMRI data, since quantifying voxel-resolution connectivity is not possible as consequence of encountering an underdetermined problem. Functional network recovery from fMRI data suggests that lsGC gives useful insight into connectivity patterns from resting-state fMRI at a multivariate voxel-resolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  15. Calibration sets and the accuracy of vibrational scaling factors: A case study with the X3LYP hybrid functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Filipe; Melo, André; Cordeiro, M. Natália D. S.

    2010-09-01

    A linear least-squares methodology was used to determine the vibrational scaling factors for the X3LYP density functional. Uncertainties for these scaling factors were calculated according to the method devised by Irikura et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 109, 8430 (2005)]. The calibration set was systematically partitioned according to several of its descriptors and the scaling factors for X3LYP were recalculated for each subset. The results show that the scaling factors are only significant up to the second digit, irrespective of the calibration set used. Furthermore, multivariate statistical analysis allowed us to conclude that the scaling factors and the associated uncertainties are independent of the size of the calibration set and strongly suggest the practical impossibility of obtaining vibrational scaling factors with more than two significant digits.

  16. Expansion joints for LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzenus, M.; Hundhausen, W.; Jansing, W.

    1980-01-01

    This discourse recounts efforts put into the SNR-2 project; specifically the development of compensation devices. The various prototypes of these compensation devices are described and the state of the development reviewed. Large Na (sodium)-heat transfer systems require a lot of valuable space if the component lay-out does not include compensation devices. So, in order to condense the spatial requirement as much as possible, expansion joints must be integrated into the pipe system. There are two basic types to suit the purpose: axial expansion joints and angular expansion joints. The expansion joints were developed on the basis of specific design criteria whereby differentiation is made between expansion joints of small and large nominal diameter. Expansion joints for installation in the sodium-filled primary piping are equipped with safety bellows in addition to the actual working bellows. Expansion joints must be designed and mounted in a manner to completely withstand seismic forces. The design must exclude any damage to the bellows during intermittent operations, that is, when sodium is drained the bellows' folds must be completely empty; otherwise residual solidified sodium could destroy the bellows when restarting. The expansion joints must be engineered on the basis of the following design data for the secondary system of the SNR project: working pressure: 16 bar; failure mode pressure: 5 events; failure mode: 5 sec., 28.5 bar, 520 deg. C; working temperature: 520 deg. C; temperature transients: 30 deg. C/sec.; service life: 200,000 h; number of load cycles: 10 4 ; material: 1.4948 or 1.4919; layer thickness of folds: 0.5 mm; angular deflection (DN 800): +3 deg. C or; axial expansion absorption (DN 600): ±80 mm; calculation: ASME class. The bellows' development work is not handled within this scope. The bellows are supplied by leading manufacturers, and warrant highest quality. Multiple bellows were selected on the basis of maximum elasticity - a property

  17. Fine Scale ANUClimate Data for Ecosystem Modeling and Assessment of Plant Functional Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, M. F.; Kesteven, J. L.; Xu, T.; Evans, B. J.; Togashi, H. F.; Stein, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution spatially extended values of climate variables play a central role in the assessment of climate and projected future climate in ecosystem modeling. The ground based meteorological network remains a key resource for deriving these spatially extended climate variables. We report on the production, and applications, of new anomaly based fine scale spatial interpolations of key climate variables at daily and monthly time scale, across the Australian continent. The methods incorporate several innovations that have significantly improved spatial predictive accuracy, as well as providing a platform for the incorporation of additional remotely sensed data. The interpolated climate data are supporting many continent-wide ecosystem modeling applications and are playing a key role in testing optimality hypotheses associated with plant functional types (PFTs). The accuracy, and robustness to data error, of anomaly-based interpolation has been enhanced by incorporating physical process aspects of the different climate variables and employing robust statistical methods implemented in the ANUSPLIN package. New regression procedures have also been developed to estimate "background" monthly climate normals from all stations with minimal records to substantially increase the density of supporting spatial networks. Monthly mean temperature interpolation has been enhanced by incorporating process based coastal effects that have reduced predictive error by around 10%. Overall errors in interpolated monthly temperature fields are around 25% less than errors reported by an earlier study. For monthly and daily precipitation, a new anomaly structure has been devised to take account of the skewness in precipitation data and the large proportion of zero values that present significant challenges to standard interpolation methods. The many applications include continent-wide Gross Primary Production modeling and assessing constraints on light and water use efficiency derived

  18. A Physiologically Based, Multi-Scale Model of Skeletal Muscle Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrle, O.; Davidson, J. B.; Pullan, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle’s response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modeling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle’s response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modeling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibers and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor-unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behavior of single muscle fibers within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenization. The effect of homogenization has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibers and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the tibialis anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modeling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behavior ranging from motor-unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue. PMID:22993509

  19. A physiologically based, multi-scale model of skeletal muscle structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eRöhrle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle's response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modelling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle's response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modelling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibres and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behaviour of single muscle fibres within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenisation. The effect of homogenisation has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibres and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the Tibialis Anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modelling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behaviour ranging from motor unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue.

  20. Accelerating the loop expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi 4 theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs

  1. A simple scaling law for the equation of state and the radial distribution functions calculated by density-functional theory molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danel, J.-F.; Kazandjian, L.

    2018-06-01

    It is shown that the equation of state (EOS) and the radial distribution functions obtained by density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) obey a simple scaling law. At given temperature, the thermodynamic properties and the radial distribution functions given by a DFT-MD simulation remain unchanged if the mole fractions of nuclei of given charge and the average volume per atom remain unchanged. A practical interest of this scaling law is to obtain an EOS table for a fluid from that already obtained for another fluid if it has the right characteristics. Another practical interest of this result is that an asymmetric mixture made up of light and heavy atoms requiring very different time steps can be replaced by a mixture of atoms of equal mass, which facilitates the exploration of the configuration space in a DFT-MD simulation. The scaling law is illustrated by numerical results.

  2. Thermal expansion of mullite-type Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9}: A study by X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangir Murshed, M., E-mail: murshed@uni-bremen.de [Chemische Kristallographie fester Stoffe, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Universität Bremens, Leobener Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Mendive, Cecilia B.; Curti, Mariano [Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Dean Funes 3350, B7600AYL Mar del Plata (Argentina); Šehović, Malik [Chemische Kristallographie fester Stoffe, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Universität Bremens, Leobener Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Friedrich, Alexandra [Institut für Geowissenschaften, Abteilung Kristallographie, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Altenhöferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fischer, Michael [Kristallographie, FB Geowissenschaften, Universität Bremen, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Gesing, Thorsten M. [Chemische Kristallographie fester Stoffe, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Universität Bremens, Leobener Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Polycrystalline Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9} powder samples were synthesized using the glycerine method. Single crystals were produced from the powder product in a Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt. The lattice thermal expansion of the mullite-type compound was studied using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). The metric parameters were modeled using Grüneisen approximation for the zero pressure equation of state, where the temperature-dependent vibrational internal energy was calculated from the Debye characteristic frequency. Both the first-order and second-order Grüneisen approximations were applied for modeling the volumetric expansion, and the second-order approach provided physically meaningful axial parameters. The phonon density of states as well as phonon dispersion guided to set the characteristic frequency for simulation. The experimental infrared and Raman phonon bands were compared with those calculate from the DFT calculations. Selective Raman modes were analyzed for the thermal anharmonic behaviors using simplified Klemens model. The respective mode Grüneisen parameters were calculated from the pressure-dependent Raman spectra. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of mullite-type Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9} showing the edge-sharing AlO{sub 6} octahedra running parallel to the c-axis. - Highlights: • Thermal expansion of Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9} was studied using XRD, FTIR, Raman and DFT. • Metric parameters were modeled using Grüneisen approximation. • Phonon DOS and phonon dispersion helped to set the Debye frequency. • Mode Grüneisen parameters were calculated from the pressure-dependent Raman spectra. • Anharmonicity was analyzed for some selective Raman modes.

  3. Generation of functional cardiomyocytes from rat embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells using feeder-free expansion and differentiation in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlmann, Julia; Awad, George; Dolny, Carsten; Weinert, Sönke; Richter, Karin; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Munsch, Thomas; Leßmann, Volkmar; Volleth, Marianne; Zenker, Martin; Chen, Yaoyao; Merkl, Claudia; Schnieke, Angelika; Baraki, Hassina; Kutschka, Ingo; Kensah, George

    2018-01-01

    The possibility to generate cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells in vitro has enormous significance for basic research, disease modeling, drug development and heart repair. The concept of heart muscle reconstruction has been studied and optimized in the rat model using rat primary cardiovascular cells or xenogeneic pluripotent stem cell derived-cardiomyocytes for years. However, the lack of rat pluripotent stem cells (rPSCs) and their cardiovascular derivatives prevented the establishment of an authentic clinically relevant syngeneic or allogeneic rat heart regeneration model. In this study, we comparatively explored the potential of recently available rat embryonic stem cells (rESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (riPSCs) as a source for cardiomyocytes (CMs). We developed feeder cell-free culture conditions facilitating the expansion of undifferentiated rPSCs and initiated cardiac differentiation by embryoid body (EB)-formation in agarose microwell arrays, which substituted the robust but labor-intensive hanging drop (HD) method. Ascorbic acid was identified as an efficient enhancer of cardiac differentiation in both rPSC types by significantly increasing the number of beating EBs (3.6 ± 1.6-fold for rESCs and 17.6 ± 3.2-fold for riPSCs). These optimizations resulted in a differentiation efficiency of up to 20% cTnTpos rPSC-derived CMs. CMs showed spontaneous contractions, expressed cardiac markers and had typical morphological features. Electrophysiology of riPSC-CMs revealed different cardiac subtypes and physiological responses to cardio-active drugs. In conclusion, we describe rPSCs as a robust source of CMs, which is a prerequisite for detailed preclinical studies of myocardial reconstruction in a physiologically and immunologically relevant small animal model.

  4. High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Promotes Expansion of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue and Impairs Skeletal Stem Cell Functions in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tencerova, Michaela; Figeac, Florence; Ditzel, Nicholas; Taipaleenmäki, Hanna; Nielsen, Tina Kamilla; Kassem, Moustapha

    2018-06-01

    Obesity represents a risk factor for development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition, it has been associated with increased adipocyte formation in the bone marrow (BM) along with increased risk for bone fragility fractures. However, little is known on the cellular mechanisms that link obesity, BM adiposity, and bone fragility. Thus, in an obesity intervention study in C57BL/6J mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks, we investigated the molecular and cellular phenotype of bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT), BM progenitor cells, and BM microenvironment in comparison to peripheral adipose tissue (AT). HFD decreased trabecular bone mass by 29%, cortical thickness by 5%, and increased BM adiposity by 184%. In contrast to peripheral AT, BMAT did not exhibit pro-inflammatory phenotype. BM progenitor cells isolated from HFD mice exhibited decreased mRNA levels of inflammatory genes (Tnfα, IL1β, Lcn2) and did not manifest an insulin resistant phenotype evidenced by normal levels of pAKT after insulin stimulation as well as normal levels of insulin signaling genes. In addition, BM progenitor cells manifested enhanced adipocyte differentiation in HFD condition. Thus, our data demonstrate that BMAT expansion in response to HFD exerts a deleterious effect on the skeleton. Continuous recruitment of progenitor cells to adipogenesis leads to progenitor cell exhaustion, decreased recruitment to osteoblastic cells, and decreased bone formation. In addition, the absence of insulin resistance and inflammation in the BM suggest that BMAT buffers extra energy in the form of triglycerides and thus plays a role in whole-body energy homeostasis. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Localized Symmetry Breaking for Tuning Thermal Expansion in ScF 3 Nanoscale Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lei [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Qin, Feiyu [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China; Sanson, Andrea [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Padova I-35131, Italy; Huang, Liang-Feng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Pan, Zhao [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China; Li, Qiang [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China; Sun, Qiang [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, China; Wang, Lu [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China; Guo, Fangmin [X-Ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Aydemir, Umut [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Department of Chemistry, Koc University, Sariyer, Istanbul 34450, Turkey; Ren, Yang [X-Ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Sun, Chengjun [X-Ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Deng, Jinxia [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China; Aquilanti, Giuliana [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza, Trieste I-34149, Italy; Rondinelli, James M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Chen, Jun [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China; Xing, Xianran [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China

    2018-03-15

    The local symmetry, beyond the averaged crystallographic structure, tends to bring unu-sual performances. Negative thermal expansion is a peculiar physical property of solids. Here, we report the delicate design of the localized symmetry breaking to achieve the controllable thermal expansion in ScF3 nano-scale frameworks. Intriguingly, an isotropic zero thermal expansion is concurrently engi-neered by localized symmetry breaking, with a remarkably low coefficient of thermal expansion of about +4.0×10-8/K up to 675K. This mechanism is investigated by the joint analysis of atomic pair dis-tribution function of synchrotron X-ray total scattering and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra. A localized rhombohedral distortion presumably plays a critical role in stiffening ScF3 nano-scale frameworks and concomitantly suppressing transverse thermal vibrations of fluorine atoms. This physical scenario is also theoretically corroborated by the extinction of phonon modes with negative Grüneisen parameters in the rhombohedral ScF3. The present work opens an untraditional chemical modification to achieve controllable thermal expansion by breaking local symmetries of materials.

  6. Effective self-similar expansion for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modugno, Michele; Pagnini, Gianni; Valle-Basagoiti, Manuel Angel

    2018-04-01

    We consider an effective scaling approach for the free expansion of a one-dimensional quantum wave packet, consisting in a self-similar evolution to be satisfied on average, i.e., by integrating over the coordinates. A direct comparison with the solution of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation shows that the effective scaling reproduces with great accuracy the exact evolution—the actual wave function is reproduced with a fidelity close to one—for arbitrary values of the interactions. This result represents a proof of concept of the effectiveness of the scaling ansatz, which has been used in different forms in the literature but never compared against the exact evolution.

  7. Ultra-low thermal expansion realized in giant negative thermal expansion materials through self-compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fei-Ran; Kuang, Hao; Hu, Feng-Xia; Wu, Hui; Huang, Qing-Zhen; Liang, Fei-Xiang; Qiao, Kai-Ming; Li, Jia; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Lei; He, Min; Zhang, Ying; Zuo, Wen-Liang; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2017-10-01

    Materials with zero thermal expansion (ZTE) or precisely tailored thermal expansion are in urgent demand of modern industries. However, the overwhelming majority of materials show positive thermal expansion. To develop ZTE or negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials as compensators has become an important challenge. Here, we present the evidence for the realization of ultra-low thermal expansion in Mn-Co-Ge-In particles. The bulk with the Ni2In-type hexagonal structure undergoes giant NTE owing to a martensitic magnetostructural transition. The major finding is that the thermal expansion behavior can be totally controlled by modulating the crystallinity degree and phase transition from atomic scale. Self-compensation effect leads to ultra-low thermal expansion with a linear expansion coefficient as small as +0.68 × 10-6/K over a wide temperature range around room temperature. The present study opens an avenue to reach ZTE particularly from the large class of giant NTE materials based on phase transition.

  8. Ultra-low thermal expansion realized in giant negative thermal expansion materials through self-compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Ran Shen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Materials with zero thermal expansion (ZTE or precisely tailored thermal expansion are in urgent demand of modern industries. However, the overwhelming majority of materials show positive thermal expansion. To develop ZTE or negative thermal expansion (NTE materials as compensators has become an important challenge. Here, we present the evidence for the realization of ultra-low thermal expansion in Mn–Co–Ge–In particles. The bulk with the Ni2In-type hexagonal structure undergoes giant NTE owing to a martensitic magnetostructural transition. The major finding is that the thermal expansion behavior can be totally controlled by modulating the crystallinity degree and phase transition from atomic scale. Self-compensation effect leads to ultra-low thermal expansion with a linear expansion coefficient as small as +0.68 × 10−6/K over a wide temperature range around room temperature. The present study opens an avenue to reach ZTE particularly from the large class of giant NTE materials based on phase transition.

  9. Thermal expansion data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper gives regression data for a modified second order polynomial fitted to the expansion data of, and percentage expansions for dioxides with (a) the fluorite and antifluorite structure: AmO 2 , BkO 2 , CeO 2 , CmO 2 , HfO 2 , Li 2 O, NpO 2 , PrO 2 , PuO 2 , ThO 2 , UO 2 , ZrO 2 , and (b) the rutile structure: CrO 2 , GeO 2 , IrO 2 , MnO 2 , NbO 2 , PbO 2 , SiO 2 , SnO 2 , TeO 2 , TiO 2 and VO 2 . Reduced expansion curves for the dioxides showed only partial grouping into iso-electronic series for the fluorite structures and showed that the 'law of corresponding states' did not apply to the rutile structures. (author)

  10. Cross-Cultural adaptation of the General Functioning Scale of the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Thiago; Assis, Simone Gonçalves de; Avanci, Joviana Quintes; Pesce, Renata Pires

    2016-06-27

    To describe the process of cross-cultural adaptation of the General Functioning Scale of the Family, a subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device, for the Brazilian population. The General Functioning Scale of the Family was translated into Portuguese and administered to 500 guardians of children in the second grade of elementary school in public schools of Sao Gonçalo, Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil. The types of equivalences investigated were: conceptual and of items, semantic, operational, and measurement. The study involved discussions with experts, translations and back-translations of the instrument, and psychometric assessment. Reliability and validity studies were carried out by internal consistency testing (Cronbach's alpha), Guttman split-half correlation model, Pearson correlation coefficient, and confirmatory factor analysis. Associations between General Functioning of the Family and variables theoretically associated with the theme (father's or mother's drunkenness and violence between parents) were estimated by odds ratio. Semantic equivalence was between 90.0% and 100%. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.79 to 0.81, indicating good internal consistency of the instrument. Pearson correlation coefficient ranged between 0.303 and 0.549. Statistical association was found between the general functioning of the family score and the theoretically related variables, as well as good fit quality of the confirmatory analysis model. The results indicate the feasibility of administering the instrument to the Brazilian population, as it is easy to understand and a good measurement of the construct of interest. Descrever o processo de adaptação transcultural da escala de Funcionamento Geral da Família, subescala da McMaster Family Assessment Device, para a população brasileira. A escala de Funcionamento Geral da Família, original no idioma inglês, foi traduzida para o português e aplicada a 500 responsáveis de crianças do segundo ano do ensino

  11. Differential Item Functioning of the Psychological Domain of the Menopause Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela-Buelvas, Katherin; Oviedo, Heidi C.; Herazo, Edwin; Campo-Arias, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quality of life could be quantified with the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS), which evaluates the severity of somatic, psychological, and urogenital symptoms in menopause. However, differential item functioning (DIF) analysis has not been applied previously. Objective. To establish the DIF of the psychological domain of the MRS in Colombian women. Methods. 4,009 women aged between 40 and 59 years, who participated in the CAVIMEC (Calidad de Vida en la Menopausia y Etnias Colombianas) project, were included. Average age was 49.0 ± 5.9 years. Women were classified in mestizo, Afro-Colombian, and indigenous. The results were presented as averages and standard deviation (X ± SD). A p value <0.001 was considered statistically significant. Results. In mestizo women, the highest X ± SD were obtained in physical and mental exhaustion (PME) (0.86 ± 0.93) and the lowest ones in anxiety (0.44 ± 0.79). In Afro-Colombian women, an average score of 0.99 ± 1.07 for PME and 0.63 ± 0.88 for anxiety was gotten. Indigenous women obtained an increased average score for PME (1.33 ± 0.93). The lowest score was evidenced in depressive mood (0.50 ± 0.81), which is different from other Colombian women (p < 0.001). Conclusions. The psychological items of the MRS show differential functioning according to the ethnic group, which may induce systematic error in the measurement of the construct. PMID:27847825

  12. Measurement Properties of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Saurabh P; Fulton, Allison; Quach, Cedric; Thistle, Megan; Toledo, Cesar; Evans, Neil A

    2016-03-01

    Systematic review of measurement properties. Many primary studies have examined the measurement properties, such as reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change, of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) in different clinical populations. A systematic review summarizing these properties for the LEFS may provide an important resource. To locate and synthesize evidence on the measurement properties of the LEFS and to discuss the clinical implications of the evidence. A literature search was conducted in 4 databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL), using predefined search terms. Two reviewers performed a critical appraisal of the included studies using a standardized assessment form. A total of 27 studies were included in the review, of which 18 achieved a very good to excellent methodological quality level. The LEFS scores demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients ranging between 0.85 and 0.99) and demonstrated the expected relationships with measures assessing similar constructs (Pearson correlation coefficient values of greater than 0.7). The responsiveness of the LEFS scores was excellent, as suggested by consistently high effect sizes (greater than 0.8) in patients with different lower extremity conditions. Minimal detectable change at the 90% confidence level (MDC90) for the LEFS scores varied between 8.1 and 15.3 across different reassessment intervals in a wide range of patient populations. The pooled estimate of the MDC90 was 6 points and the minimal clinically important difference was 9 points in patients with lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions, which are indicative of true change and clinically meaningful change, respectively. The results of this review support the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the LEFS scores for assessing functional impairment in a wide array of patient groups with lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions.

  13. Large-scale analysis of intrinsic disorder flavors and associated functions in the protein sequence universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necci, Marco; Piovesan, Damiano; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-12-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) in proteins has been extensively described for the last decade; a large-scale classification of ID in proteins is mostly missing. Here, we provide an extensive analysis of ID in the protein universe on the UniProt database derived from sequence-based predictions in MobiDB. Almost half the sequences contain an ID region of at least five residues. About 9% of proteins have a long ID region of over 20 residues which are more abundant in Eukaryotic organisms and most frequently cover less than 20% of the sequence. A small subset of about 67,000 (out of over 80 million) proteins is fully disordered and mostly found in Viruses. Most proteins have only one ID, with short ID evenly distributed along the sequence and long ID overrepresented in the center. The charged residue composition of Das and Pappu was used to classify ID proteins by structural propensities and corresponding functional enrichment. Swollen Coils seem to be used mainly as structural components and in biosynthesis in both Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes. In Bacteria, they are confined in the nucleoid and in Viruses provide DNA binding function. Coils & Hairpins seem to be specialized in ribosome binding and methylation activities. Globules & Tadpoles bind antigens in Eukaryotes but are involved in killing other organisms and cytolysis in Bacteria. The Undefined class is used by Bacteria to bind toxic substances and mediate transport and movement between and within organisms in Viruses. Fully disordered proteins behave similarly, but are enriched for glycine residues and extracellular structures. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  14. Differential Item Functioning of the Psychological Domain of the Menopause Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa-Castro, Alvaro; Portela-Buelvas, Katherin; Oviedo, Heidi C; Herazo, Edwin; Campo-Arias, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quality of life could be quantified with the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS), which evaluates the severity of somatic, psychological, and urogenital symptoms in menopause. However, differential item functioning (DIF) analysis has not been applied previously. Objective . To establish the DIF of the psychological domain of the MRS in Colombian women. Methods . 4,009 women aged between 40 and 59 years, who participated in the CAVIMEC (Calidad de Vida en la Menopausia y Etnias Colombianas) project, were included. Average age was 49.0 ± 5.9 years. Women were classified in mestizo, Afro-Colombian, and indigenous. The results were presented as averages and standard deviation ( X ± SD). A p value <0.001 was considered statistically significant. Results . In mestizo women, the highest X ± SD were obtained in physical and mental exhaustion (PME) (0.86 ± 0.93) and the lowest ones in anxiety (0.44 ± 0.79). In Afro-Colombian women, an average score of 0.99 ± 1.07 for PME and 0.63 ± 0.88 for anxiety was gotten. Indigenous women obtained an increased average score for PME (1.33 ± 0.93). The lowest score was evidenced in depressive mood (0.50 ± 0.81), which is different from other Colombian women ( p < 0.001). Conclusions . The psychological items of the MRS show differential functioning according to the ethnic group, which may induce systematic error in the measurement of the construct.

  15. Uniform gradient expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  16. Social functioning in Chinese college students with and without schizotypal personality traits: an exploratory study of the Chinese version of the First Episode Social Functioning Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The First Episode Social Functioning Scale (FESFS was designed to measure social functioning of young individuals with schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to validate a Chinese version of the FESFS in a sample of young Chinese adults. METHOD: The FESFS was translated to Chinese prior to being administered to 1576 college students. The factor structure, reliability, and validity of the scale were examined. RESULTS: Two items were deleted after item analysis and the internal consistency of the whole scale was .89. A six-factor structure was derived by exploratory factor analysis. The factors were interpersonal, family and friends, school, living skills, intimacy, and balance. Estimates of the structural equation model supported this structure, with Goodness of Fit Chi-Square χ(2 = 1097.53 (p<0.0001, the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA = 0.058, and the comparative fit index (CFI = 0.93. Scale validity was supported by significant correlations between social functioning factors scores and schizophrenia personality questionnaire (SPQ scores. Individuals with schizotypal personality features presented poorer social functioning than those without schizotypal personality features. CONCLUSIONS: The Chinese revised version of the FESFS was found to have good psychometric properties and could be used in the future to examine social functioning in Chinese college students.

  17. Heat capacities, third-law entropies and thermodynamic functions of the negative thermal expansion materials, cubic α-ZrW2O8 and cubic ZrMo2O8, from T=(0 to 400) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Rebecca; Linford, Jessica; Woodfield, Brian F.; Boerio-Goates, Juliana.; Lind, Cora; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Kowach, Glen

    2003-01-01

    The molar heat capacities of crystalline cubic α-ZrW 2 O 8 and cubic ZrMo 2 O 8 have been measured at temperatures from (0.6 to 400) K. At T=298.15 K, the standard molar heat capacities are (207.01±0.21) J·K -1 ·mol -1 for the tungstate and (210.06±0.42) J·K -1 ·mol -1 for the molybdate. Thermodynamic functions have been generated from smoothed fits of the experimental results. The standard molar entropies for the tungstate and molybdate are (257.96±0.50) J·K -1 ·mol -1 and (254.3±1) J·K -1 ·mol -1 , respectively. The uncertainty of the entropy of the cubic ZrMo 2 O 8 is larger due to the presence of small chemical and phase impurities whose effects cannot be corrected for at this time. The heat capacities of the negative thermal expansion materials have been compared to the weighted sums of their constituent binary oxides. Both negative thermal expansion materials have heat capacities which are significantly greater than the sum of the binary oxides over the entire temperature region

  18. Functionalized Carbon Nano-scale Drug Delivery Systems From Biowaste Sago Bark For Cancer Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Manaf, Shoriya Aruni; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Mandal, Uttam Kumar; Wui, Tin Wong; Roy, Partha

    2017-01-01

    Nano-scale carbon systems are emerging alternatives in drug delivery and bioimaging applications of which they gradually replace the quantum dots characterized by toxic heavy metal content in the latter application. The work intended to use carbon nanospheres synthesized from biowaste Sago bark for cancer cell imaging applications. This study synthesised carbon nanospheres from biowaste Sago bark using a catalyst-free pyrolysis technique. The nanospheres were functionalized with fluorescent dye coumarin-6 for cell imaging. Fluorescent nanosytems were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X ray, photon correlation spectroscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The average size of carbon nanospheres ranged between 30 and 40 nm with zeta potential of -26.8 ± 1.87 mV. The percentage viability of cancer cells on exposure to nanospheres varied from 91- 89 % for N2a cells and 90-85 % for A-375 cells respectively. Speedy uptake of the fluorescent nanospheres in both N2a and A-375 cells was observed within two hours of exposure. Novel fluorescent carbon nanosystem design following waste-to-wealth approach exhibited promising potential in cancer cell imaging applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Complex-scaling of screened Coulomb potentials for resonance calculations utilizing the modified Bessel functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li-Guang; Ho, Yew Kam

    2014-05-01

    The screened Coulomb potential (SCP) has been extensively used in atomic physics, nuclear physics, quantum chemistry and plasma physics. However, an accurate calculation for atomic resonances under SCP is still a challenging task for various methods. Within the complex-scaling computational scheme, we have developed a method utilizing the modified Bessel functions to calculate doubly-excited resonances in two-electron atomic systems with configuration interaction-type basis. To test the validity of our method, we have calculated S- and P-wave resonance states of the helium atom with various screening strengths, and have found good agreement with earlier calculations using different methods. Our present method can be applied to calculate high-lying resonances associated with high excitation thresholds of the He+ ion, and with high-angular-momentum states. The derivation and calculation details of our present investigation together with new results of high-angular-momentum states will be presented at the meeting. Supported by NSC of Taiwan.

  20. Suitability of the Miller Function and Participation Scales (M-FUN) for use with Israeli Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihtman, Tanya; Parush, Shula

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Our aim was to generate a Hebrew translation of the Miller Function and Participation Scales (M-FUN) and assess the validity of U.S. norms for Israeli children. METHOD. All components of the M-FUN were translated, and a pilot study revealed a need for further investigation. The Hebrew M-FUN's fine, gross, and visual-motor (VM) components and M-FUN participation questionnaires were administered to 267 Israeli children (128 boys, 139 girls; mean age = 59.21 mo, standard deviation = 17.84). RESULTS. Significant correlations supported construct validity between age and all motor and participation scores as well as age-group differences. Significant differences between the U.S. and Israeli samples were found only for the VM score. Participation and motor scores were significantly correlated. CONCLUSION. Although VM score results should be interpreted with caution, we provide evidence for use of the fine and gross motor norms and the U.S. criterion-referenced participation scores of the M-FUN with Israeli children. Copyright © 2014 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.