WorldWideScience

Sample records for scaling function expansion

  1. Estimates of expansion time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E. M.

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expansion of a spacefaring civilization show that descendants of that civilization should be found near virtually every useful star in the Galaxy in a time much less than the current age of the Galaxy. Only extreme assumptions about local population growth rates, emigration rates, or ship ranges can slow or halt an expansion. The apparent absence of extraterrestrials from the solar system suggests that no such civilization has arisen in the Galaxy.

  2. Numerical evaluation of the coefficients of thermal expansion of fibers in composite materials using a lamina-scale cost function with quasi-analytical gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jae Hyuk [Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Charpentier, Jean Baptiste [École Nationale Supérieur des Mines de Saint-Étienne, Saint-Étienne (France); Sohn, Dong Woo [Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    In this work, the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) of fibers in composite materials that contain microstructures are numerically evaluated using a lamina-scale cost function with quasi-analytical gradients. To consider the effects of fiber arrangements and local defects, such as interface debonding and voids, a variety of representative volume elements are modeled with a number of finite element meshes. Then, the CTEs of fibers are evaluated by minimizing a lamina-scale cost function that represents the difference between the measured CTEs and the computed CTEs by means of a computational homogenization scheme for the composite lamina. The descent direction of the cost function is obtained using quasi-analytical gradients that take partial derivatives from prediction models, such as the Schapery model and Hashin model defined in an explicit manner, which accelerates the minimization procedure. To verify the performance of the proposed scheme in terms of accuracy and efficiency, the CTEs of constituents calculated using the proposed scheme in a unidirectional composite lamina are compared with experimental values reported in the literature. Furthermore, the convergence behavior of the proposed scheme with quasi-analytical gradients is also investigated and compared with other minimization methods.

  3. Dressed skeleton expansion and the coupling scale ambiguity problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hung Jung.

    1992-09-01

    Perturbative expansions in quantum field theories are usually expressed in powers of a coupling constant. In principle, the infinite sum of the expansion series is independent of the renormalization scale of the coupling constant. In practice, there is a remnant dependence of the truncated series on the renormalization scale. This scale ambiguity can severely restrict the predictive power of theoretical calculations. The dressed skeleton expansion is developed as a calculational method which avoids the coupling scale ambiguity problem. In this method, physical quantities are expressed as functional expansions in terms of a coupling vertex function. The arguments of the vertex function are given by the physical momenta of each process. These physical momenta effectively replace the unspecified renormalization scale and eliminate the ambiguity problem. This method is applied to various field theoretical models and its main features and limitations are explored. For quantum chromodynamics, an expression for the running coupling constant of the three-gluon vertex is obtained. The effective coupling scale of this vertex is shown to be essentially given by [mu][sup 2] [approximately] Q[sub min][sup 2]Q[sub med][sup 2]/Q[sub max][sup 2] where Q[sub min][sup 2]Q[sub med][sup 2]/Q[sub max][sup 2] are respectively the smallest, the next-to-smallest and the largest scale among the three gluon virtualities. This functional form suggests that the three-gluon vertex becomes non-perturbative at asymmetric momentum configurations. Implications for four-jet physics is discussed.

  4. Dressed skeleton expansion and the coupling scale ambiguity problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hung Jung

    1992-09-01

    Perturbative expansions in quantum field theories are usually expressed in powers of a coupling constant. In principle, the infinite sum of the expansion series is independent of the renormalization scale of the coupling constant. In practice, there is a remnant dependence of the truncated series on the renormalization scale. This scale ambiguity can severely restrict the predictive power of theoretical calculations. The dressed skeleton expansion is developed as a calculational method which avoids the coupling scale ambiguity problem. In this method, physical quantities are expressed as functional expansions in terms of a coupling vertex function. The arguments of the vertex function are given by the physical momenta of each process. These physical momenta effectively replace the unspecified renormalization scale and eliminate the ambiguity problem. This method is applied to various field theoretical models and its main features and limitations are explored. For quantum chromodynamics, an expression for the running coupling constant of the three-gluon vertex is obtained. The effective coupling scale of this vertex is shown to be essentially given by {mu}{sup 2} {approximately} Q{sub min}{sup 2}Q{sub med}{sup 2}/Q{sub max}{sup 2} where Q{sub min}{sup 2}Q{sub med}{sup 2}/Q{sub max}{sup 2} are respectively the smallest, the next-to-smallest and the largest scale among the three gluon virtualities. This functional form suggests that the three-gluon vertex becomes non-perturbative at asymmetric momentum configurations. Implications for four-jet physics is discussed.

  5. Volume of Plasma Expansion and Functional Outcomes in Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph B; Lewandowski, Christopher; Wira, Charles R; Taylor, Andrew; Burmeister, Charlotte; Welch, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Plasma expansion in acute ischemic stroke has potential to improve cerebral perfusion, but the long-term effects on functional outcome are mixed in prior trials. The goal of this study was to evaluate how the magnitude of plasma expansion affects neurological recovery in acute stroke. This was a secondary analysis of data from the Albumin in Acute Stroke Part 2 trial investigating the relationship between the magnitude of overall intravenous volume infusion (crystalloid and colloid) to clinical outcome. The data were inclusive of 841 patients with a mean age of 64 years and a median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) of 11. In a multivariable-adjusted logistic regression model, this analysis tested the volume of plasma expansion over the first 48 h of hospitalization as a predictor of favorable outcome, defined as either a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1 or a NIHSS score of 0 or 1 at 90 days. This model included all study patients, irrespective of albumin or isotonic saline treatment. Patients that received higher volumes of plasma expansion more frequently had large vessel ischemic stroke and higher NIHSS scores. The multivariable-adjusted model revealed that there was decreased odds of a favorable outcome for every 250 ml additional volume plasma expansion over the first 48 h (OR 0.91, 95 % CI, 0.88-0.94). The present study demonstrates an association between greater volume of plasma expansion and worse neurological recovery.

  6. Parabolic cyclinder functions : examples of error bounds for asymptotic expansions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Vidunas; N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractSeveral asymptotic expansions of parabolic cylinder functions are discussedand error bounds for remainders in the expansions are presented. Inparticular Poincaré-type expansions for large values of the argument$z$ and uniform expansions for large values of the parameter areconsidered.

  7. Generation Expansion Planning Considering Integrating Large-scale Wind Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chunyu; Ding, Yi; Østergaard, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Generation expansion planning (GEP) is the problem of finding the optimal strategy to plan the Construction of new generation while satisfying technical and economical constraints. In the deregulated and competitive environment, large-scale integration of wind generation (WG) in power system has...... necessitated the inclusion of more innovative and sophisticated approaches in power system investment planning. A bi-level generation expansion planning approach considering large-scale wind generation was proposed in this paper. The first phase is investment decision, while the second phase is production...

  8. Broad-scale lake expansion and flooding inundates essential wood bison habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosi, Jennifer B.; Thienpont, Joshua R.; Pisaric, Michael F. J.; Demontigny, Peter; Perreault, Joelle T.; McDonald, Jamylynn; Simpson, Myrna J.; Armstrong, Terry; Kokelj, Steven V.; Smol, John P.; Blais, Jules M.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the interaction between the response of a complex ecosystem to climate change and the protection of vulnerable wildlife species is essential for conservation efforts. In the Northwest Territories (Canada), the recent movement of the Mackenzie wood bison herd (Bison bison athabascae) out of their designated territory has been postulated as a response to the loss of essential habitat following regional lake expansion. We show that the proportion of this landscape occupied by water doubled since 1986 and the timing of lake expansion corresponds to bison movements out of the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary. Historical reconstructions using proxy data in dated sediment cores show that the scale of recent lake expansion is unmatched over at least the last several hundred years. We conclude that recent lake expansion represents a fundamental alteration of the structure and function of this ecosystem and its use by Mackenzie wood bison, in response to climate change.

  9. Neural substrate expansion for the restoration of brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chiao Isaac Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoring neurological and cognitive function in individuals who have suffered brain damage is one of the principal objectives of modern translational neuroscience. Electrical stimulation approaches, such as deep-brain stimulation, have achieved the most clinical success, but they ultimately may be limited by the computational capacity of the residual cerebral circuitry. An alternative strategy is brain substrate expansion, in which the computational capacity of the brain is augmented through the addition of new processing units and the reconstitution of network connectivity. This latter approach has been explored to some degree using both biological and electronic means but thus far has not demonstrated the ability to reestablish the function of large-scale neuronal networks. In this review, we contend that fulfilling the potential of brain substrate expansion will require a significant shift from current methods that emphasize direct manipulations of the brain (e.g., injections of cellular suspensions and the implantation of multi-electrode arrays to the generation of more sophisticated neural tissues and neural-electric hybrids in vitro that are subsequently transplanted into the brain. Drawing from neural tissue engineering, stem cell biology, and neural interface technologies, this strategy makes greater use of the manifold techniques available in the laboratory to create biocompatible constructs that recapitulate brain architecture and thus are more easily recognized and utilized by brain networks.

  10. Effect of Microstructure Scale on Negative Thermal Expansion of Antiperovskite Manganese Nitride

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhonghua Sun Xiaoyan Song

    The negative thermal expansion (NTE) properties of the antiperovskite manganese nitrides with micron-scale, submicron-scale and nanometer-scale microstructures, respectively, were investigated using...

  11. On g-functions for Laguerre function expansions of Hermite type

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 121; Issue 1. On -Functions for Laguerre Function Expansions of Hermite Type. Błażej Jan Wróbel. Volume 121 Issue 1 February 2011 pp 45-75 ... Keywords. Laguerre function expansions; vector-valued Calderón–Zygmund operators; -functions.

  12. Expansion with respect to resonance functions in nuclear physics problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gareev, F.A.; Bang, J.

    1980-07-01

    A study is made of the pole expansion (in accordance with Mittag-Leffler's theorem) of the wave functions, scattering amplitudes, and Green's functions at positive energies. The general form of these expansions is obtained and discussed for finite-range potentials and also for a Coulomb repulsive potential. A number of examples of the use of the method are considered in structure calculations including continuum states, and the limits of applicability of other approximate methods used in such calculations are established.

  13. The c-function expansion of a basic hypergeometric function associated to root systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, J.

    2014-01-01

    We derive an explicit c-function expansion of a basic hypergeometric function associated to root systems. The basic hypergeometric function in question was constructed as an explicit series expansion in symmetric Macdonald polynomials by Cherednik in case the associated twisted affine root system is

  14. Converting Hangar High Expansion Foam Systems to Prevent Cockpit Damage: Full-Scale Validation Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AFCEC-CO-TY-TR-2018-0001 CONVERTING HANGAR HIGH EXPANSION FOAM SYSTEMS TO PREVENT COCKPIT DAMAGE: FULL-SCALE VALIDATION TESTS Gerard G...09-2017 Final Test Report May 2017 Converting Hangar High Expansion Foam Systems to Prevent Cockpit Damage: Full-Scale Validation Tests N00173-15-D...images. The fire protection systems currently installed in U.S. Air Force (USAF) aircraft hangars consist of High Expansion (Hi-Ex) foam generators located

  15. Nucleon structure functions from lattice operator product expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, A.J.; Somfleth, K.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). CSSM, Dept. of Physics; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe (Japan); Perlt, H.; Schiller, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Div.; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Deep-inelastic scattering, in the laboratory and on the lattice, is most instructive for understanding how the nucleon is built from quarks and gluons. The long-term goal is to compute the associated structure functions from first principles. So far this has been limited to model calculations. In this Letter we propose a new method to compute the structure functions directly from the virtual, all-encompassing Compton amplitude, utilizing the operator product expansion. This overcomes issues of renormalization and operator mixing, which so far have hindered lattice calculations of power corrections and higher moments.

  16. Design of ultra-compact triplexer with function-expansion based topology optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zejun; Tsuji, Yasuhide; Yasui, Takashi; Hirayama, Koichi

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, in order to optimize wavelength selective photonic devices using the function-expansion-based topology optimization method, several expansion functions are considered and the influence on the optimized structure based on each expansion function was investigated. Although the Fourier series is conventionally used in the function-expansion-based method, the optimized structure sometimes has a complicated refractive index distribution. Therefore, we employed a sampling function and a pyramid function to obtain a simpler structure through the optimal design. A triplexer was designed by using our method, and the comparison between the optimized structures based on the three expansion functions was also discussed in detail.

  17. Hydrodynamics with strength: scaling-invariant solutions for elastic-plastic cavity expansion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Jason; Ramsey, Scott; Baty, Roy

    2017-11-01

    Spherical cavity expansion (SCE) models are used to describe idealized detonation and high-velocity impact in a variety of materials. The common theme in SCE models is the presence of a pressure-driven cavity or void within a domain comprised of plastic and elastic response sub-regions. In past work, the yield criterion characterizing material strength in the plastic sub-region is usually taken for granted and assumed to take a known functional form restrictive to certain classes of materials, e.g. ductile metals or brittle geologic materials. Our objective is to systematically determine a general functional form for the yield criterion under the additional requirement that the SCE admits a similarity solution. Solutions determined under this additional requirement have immediate implications toward development of new compressible flow algorithm verification test problems. However, more importantly, these results also provide novel insight into modeling the yield criteria from the perspective of hydrodynamic scaling.

  18. Cluster expansions for the correlated basis functions theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardiola, R. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear)

    1982-08-16

    Four kinds of cluster expansions for the calculation of non-diagonal matrix elements of the hamiltonian between correlated states have been derived. The derivation is based on a linearization mechanism for the standard cluster expansions in a configuration mixed state. Particulary simple formulae result for the multiplicative Factor-Aviles-Hartog-Tolhoek expansion and for the exponential form of the Gaudin-Gillespie-Ripka cluster expansion. The resulting expansions are directly usable in finite nuclei.

  19. A nonlinear analytic function expansion nodal method for transient calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Han Gyn; Park, Sang Yoon; Cho, Byung Oh; Zee, Sung Quun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The nonlinear analytic function expansion nodal (AFEN) method is applied to the solution of the time-dependent neutron diffusion equation. Since the AFEN method requires both the particular solution and the homogeneous solution to the transient fixed source problem, the derivation of the solution method is focused on finding the particular solution efficiently. To avoid complicated particular solutions, the source distribution is approximated by quadratic polynomials and the transient source is constructed such that the error due to the quadratic approximation is minimized, In addition, this paper presents a new two-node solution scheme that is derived by imposing the constraint of current continuity at the interface corner points. The method is verified through a series of application to the NEACRP PWR rod ejection benchmark problems. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  20. City-scale expansion of human thermoregulatory costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Richard W; Muhich, Timothy E; Humphries, Murray M

    2013-01-01

    The physiological maintenance of a stable internal temperature by mammals and birds - the phenomenon termed homeothermy - is well known to be energetically expensive. The annual energy requirements of free-living mammals and birds are estimated to be 15-30 times higher than those of similar-size ectothermic vertebrates like lizards. Contemporary humans also use energy to accomplish thermoregulation. They are unique, however, in having shifted thermoregulatory control from the body to the occupied environment, with most people living in cities in dwellings that are temperature-regulated by furnaces and air conditioners powered by exogenous energy sources. The energetic implications of this strategy remain poorly defined. Here we comparatively quantify energy costs in cities, dwellings, and individual human bodies. Thermoregulation persists as a major driver of energy expenditure across these three scales, resulting in energy-versus-ambient-temperature relationships remarkably similar in shape. Incredibly, despite the many and diversified uses of network-delivered energy in modern societies, the energy requirements of six North American cities are as temperature-dependent as the energy requirements of isolated, individual homeotherms. However, the annual per-person energy cost of exogenously powered thermoregulation in cities and dwellings is 9-28 times higher than the cost of endogenous, metabolic thermoregulation of the human body. Shifting the locus of thermoregulatory control from the body to the dwelling achieves climate-independent thermal comfort. However, in an era of amplifying climate change driven by the carbon footprint of humanity, we must acknowledge the energetic extravagance of contemporary, city-scale thermoregulation, which prioritizes heat production over heat conservation.

  1. Large-Scale Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cell Expansion: A Visualization Tool for Bioprocess Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Toon; Sonnaert, Maarten; Schrooten, Jan; Luyten, Frank P; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Papantoniou, Ioannis

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale and cost-effective cell expansion processes are a prerequisite for the clinical and commercial translation of cell-based therapies. A large variety of cell expansion processes are described in literature, utilizing different cell types, culture vessels, and medium formulations. Consequently there are no straightforward means for the comparison or benchmarking of these processes in terms of efficiency, scale, or costs. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the available mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) expansion literature and develop an interactive visualization tool for comparing the expansion processes. By using this computational tool, process data could be concentrated, standardized, and analyzed to facilitate a more general understanding of the parameters that define a cell culture process, and in the future allow rational selection or design of these bioprocesses. Additionally, a set of bioprocess metrics were defined that assured the comparability between different processes. Currently, the literature-based data repository holds 73 individual cell expansion processes on seven different types of human MSCs in five different types of culture vessels. The visualization tool allowed benchmarking of these processes against each other, serving as a reference point for cell expansion process efficiency.

  2. Growth Type and Functional Trajectories: An Empirical Study of Urban Expansion in Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Drawing upon the Landsat satellite images of Nanjing from 1985, 1995, 2001, 2007, and 2013, this paper integrates the convex hull analysis and common edge analysis at double scales, and develops a comprehensive matrix analysis to distinguish the different types of urban land expansion. The results show that Nanjing experienced rapid urban expansion, dominated by a mix of residential and manufacturing land from 1985 to 2013, which in turn has promoted Nanjing’s shift from a compact mononuclear city to a polycentric one. Spatial patterns of three specific types of growth, namely infilling, extension, and enclave were quite different in four consecutive periods. These patterns result primarily from the existing topographic constraints, as well as government-oriented urban planning and policies. By intersecting the function maps, we also reveal the functional evolution of newly-developed urban land. Moreover, both self-enhancing and mutual promotion of the newly developed functions are surveyed over the last decade. Our study confirms that the integration of a multi-scale method and multi-perspective analysis, such as the spatiotemporal patterns and functional evolution, helps us to better understand the rapid urban growth in China. PMID:26845155

  3. Remarks on Slater's asymptotic expansions of Kummer functions for large values of the $a-$parameter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn Slater's 1960 standard work on confluent hypergeometric functions, also called Kummer functions, a number of asymptotic expansions of these functions can be found. We summarize expansions derived from a differential equation for large values of the $a-$parameter. We show how similar

  4. Line Capacity Expansion and Transmission Switching in Power Systems With Large-Scale Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Jonas Christoffer; Bronmo, Geir; Philpott, Andy B.

    2013-01-01

    In 2020 electricity production from wind power should constitute nearly 50% of electricity demand in Denmark. In this paper we look at optimal expansion of the transmission network in order to integrate 50% wind power in the system, while minimizing total fixed investment cost and expected cost...... of power generation. We allow for active switching of transmission elements to reduce congestion effects caused by Kirchhoff's voltage law. Results show that actively switching transmission lines may yield a better utilization of transmission networks with large-scale wind power and increase wind power...... penetration. Furthermore, it is shown that transmission switching is likely to affect the optimal line capacity expansion plan....

  5. Some Consequences of the Expansion of the Universe on Small Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunian, H. A.

    2017-12-01

    The possibility of detecting the accelerated expansion of the universe at all its points is examined. Observational data indicative of Hubble expansion on small scales are adduced for this purpose. The validity of current opinion on the equilibrium of systems of cosmic objects is also discussed. It is noted that this opinion is a simple consequence of the unproved Kant-Laplace hypothesis on the formation of cosmic objects and systems of them. It is proposed that a system attached to the cosmological horizon be used as a reference system. It is noted that all points on this sphere are an initial point from which expansion of the observed universe of the given observer began. The numerical value of the acceleration obtained in this way is almost the same as the anomalous acceleration found by space probes.

  6. The role of break-induced replication in large-scale expansions of (CAG)n/(CTG)nrepeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane C; Harris, Samantha T; Dinter, Teresa; Shah, Kartik A; Mirkin, Sergei M

    2017-01-01

    Expansions of (CAG) n /(CTG) n trinucleotide repeats are responsible for over a dozen neuromuscular and neurodegenerative disorders. Large-scale expansions are commonly observed in human pedigrees and may be explained by iterative small-scale events such as strand slippage during replication or repair DNA synthesis. Alternatively, a distinct mechanism may lead to a large-scale repeat expansion as a single step. To distinguish between these possibilities, we developed a novel experimental system specifically tuned to analyze large-scale expansions of (CAG) n /(CTG) n repeats in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The median size of repeat expansions was ∼60 triplets, although we also observed additions of more than 150 triplets. Genetic analysis revealed that Rad51, Rad52, Mre11, Pol32, Pif1, and Mus81 and/or Yen1 proteins are required for large-scale expansions, whereas proteins previously implicated in small-scale expansions are not involved. From these results, we propose a new model for large-scale expansions, which is based on the recovery of replication forks broken at (CAG) n /(CTG) n repeats via break-induced replication.

  7. Clinical scale rapid expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell transfer therapy in the WAVE® bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background To simplify clinical scale lymphocyte expansions, we investigated the use of the WAVE®, a closed system bioreactor that utilizes active perfusion to generate high cell numbers in minimal volumes. Methods We have developed an optimized rapid expansion protocol for the WAVE bioreactor that produces clinically relevant numbers of cells for our adoptive cell transfer clinical protocols. Results TIL and genetically modified PBL were rapidly expanded to clinically relevant scales in both static bags and the WAVE bioreactor. Both bioreactors produced comparable numbers of cells; however the cultures generated in the WAVE bioreactor had a higher percentage of CD4+ cells and had a less activated phenotype. Conclusions The WAVE bioreactor simplifies the process of rapidly expanding tumor reactive lymphocytes under GMP conditions, and provides an alternate approach to cell generation for ACT protocols. PMID:22475724

  8. GMP-compliant isolation and large-scale expansion of bone marrow-derived MSC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Fekete

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC have gained importance in tissue repair, tissue engineering and in immunosupressive therapy during the last years. Due to the limited availability of MSC in the bone marrow, ex vivo amplification prior to clinical application is requisite to obtain therapeutic applicable cell doses. Translation of preclinical into clinical-grade large-scale MSC expansion necessitates precise definition and standardization of all procedural parameters including cell seeding density, culture medium and cultivation devices. While xenogeneic additives such as fetal calf serum are still widely used for cell culture, its use in the clinical context is associated with many risks, such as prion and viral transmission or adverse immunological reactions against xenogeneic components. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We established animal-free expansion protocols using platelet lysate as medium supplement and thereby could confirm its safety and feasibility for large-scale MSC isolation and expansion. Five different GMP-compliant standardized protocols designed for the safe, reliable, efficient and economical isolation and expansion of MSC was performed and MSC obtained were analyzed for differentiation capacity by qPCR and histochemistry. Expression of standard MSC markers as defined by the International Society for Cellular Therapy as well as expression of additional MSC markers and of various chemokine and cytokine receptors was analysed by flow cytometry. Changes of metabolic markers and cytokines in the medium were addressed using the LUMINEX platform. CONCLUSIONS: The five different systems for isolation and expansion of MSC described in this study are all suitable to produce at least 100 millions of MSC, which is commonly regarded as a single clinical dose. Final products are equal according to the minimal criteria for MSC defined by the ISCT. We showed that chemokine and integrin receptors analyzed had the same expression pattern

  9. GMP-compliant isolation and large-scale expansion of bone marrow-derived MSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Natalie; Rojewski, Markus T; Fürst, Daniel; Kreja, Ludwika; Ignatius, Anita; Dausend, Julia; Schrezenmeier, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have gained importance in tissue repair, tissue engineering and in immunosupressive therapy during the last years. Due to the limited availability of MSC in the bone marrow, ex vivo amplification prior to clinical application is requisite to obtain therapeutic applicable cell doses. Translation of preclinical into clinical-grade large-scale MSC expansion necessitates precise definition and standardization of all procedural parameters including cell seeding density, culture medium and cultivation devices. While xenogeneic additives such as fetal calf serum are still widely used for cell culture, its use in the clinical context is associated with many risks, such as prion and viral transmission or adverse immunological reactions against xenogeneic components. We established animal-free expansion protocols using platelet lysate as medium supplement and thereby could confirm its safety and feasibility for large-scale MSC isolation and expansion. Five different GMP-compliant standardized protocols designed for the safe, reliable, efficient and economical isolation and expansion of MSC was performed and MSC obtained were analyzed for differentiation capacity by qPCR and histochemistry. Expression of standard MSC markers as defined by the International Society for Cellular Therapy as well as expression of additional MSC markers and of various chemokine and cytokine receptors was analysed by flow cytometry. Changes of metabolic markers and cytokines in the medium were addressed using the LUMINEX platform. The five different systems for isolation and expansion of MSC described in this study are all suitable to produce at least 100 millions of MSC, which is commonly regarded as a single clinical dose. Final products are equal according to the minimal criteria for MSC defined by the ISCT. We showed that chemokine and integrin receptors analyzed had the same expression pattern, suggesting that MSC from either of the systems show equal

  10. Linear-scaling generation of potential energy surfaces using a double incremental expansion

    CERN Document Server

    König, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    We present a combination of the incremental expansion of potential energy surfaces (PESs), known as n-mode expansion, with the incremental evaluation of the electronic energy in a many-body approach. The application of semi-local coordinates in this context allows the generation of PESs in a very cost-efficient way. For this, we employ the recently introduced FALCON (Flexible Adaptation of Local COordinates of Nuclei) coordinates. By introducing an additional transformation step, concerning only a fraction of the vibrational degrees of freedom, we can achieve linear scaling of the accumulated cost of the single point calculations required in the PES generation. Numerical examples of these double incremental approaches for oligo-phenyl examples show fast convergence with respect to the maximum number of simultaneously treated fragments and only a modest error introduced by the additional transformation step. The approach, presented here, represents a major step towards the applicability of vibrational wave fun...

  11. Asymptotic expansion for the functional of Markovian evolution in Rd in the circuit of diffusion approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Samoilenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the asymptotic expansion for solution of singularly perturbed equation for functional of Markovian evolution in Rd. The view of regular and singular parts of solution is found.

  12. Identification and properties of the fundamental expansion functions for neutron transport in an infinite homogeneous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, Michael S. [P.O. Box 1484, Deep River, Ont., K0J 1P0 (Canada)]. E-mail: mike@geometrics-unlimited.com

    2005-07-15

    Starting from the basic expression for the neutron flux due to a point source in an infinite homogeneous scattering and absorbing medium, the first few fundamental expansion functions corresponding to successive collisions are identified, and their analytic properties are presented, in spherical and plane geometry. Various representations of the functions are obtained in the form of power series, an expansion in a series of exponential integrals, and other integrals. The adequacy of traditional asymptotic forms is considered.

  13. Expansion of a chromosomal repeat in Escherichia coli: roles of replication, repair, and recombination functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poteete Anthony R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of gene amplification in Escherichia coli have suggested that it occurs in two steps: duplication and expansion. Expansion is thought to result from homologous recombination between the repeated segments created by duplication. To explore the mechanism of expansion, a 7 kbp duplication in the chromosome containing a leaky mutant version of the lac operon was constructed, and its expansion into an amplified array was studied. Results Under selection for lac function, colonies bearing multiple copies of the mutant lac operon appeared at a constant rate of approximately 4 to 5 per million cells plated per day, on days two through seven after plating. Expansion was not seen in a recA strain; null mutations in recBCD and ruvC reduced the rate 100- and 10-fold, respectively; a ruvC recG double mutant reduced the rate 1000-fold. Expansion occurred at an increased rate in cells lacking dam, polA, rnhA, or uvrD functions. Null mutations of various other cellular recombination, repair, and stress response genes had little effect upon expansion. The red recombination genes of phage lambda could substitute for recBCD in mediating expansion. In the red-substituted cells, expansion was only partially dependent upon recA function. Conclusion These observations are consistent with the idea that the expansion step of gene amplification is closely related, mechanistically, to interchromosomal homologous recombination events. They additionally provide support for recently described models of RecA-independent Red-mediated recombination at replication forks.

  14. Large-scale progenitor cell expansion for multiple donors in a monitored hollow fibre bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Toon; Papantoniou, Ioannis; Rice, Brent; Schrooten, Jan; Luyten, Frank P; Aerts, Jean-Marie

    2016-09-01

    With the increasing scale in stem cell production, a robust and controlled cell expansion process becomes essential for the clinical application of cell-based therapies. The objective of this work was the assessment of a hollow fiber bioreactor (Quantum Cell Expansion System from Terumo BCT) as a cell production unit for the clinical-scale production of human periosteum derived stem cells (hPDCs). We aimed to demonstrate comparability of bioreactor production to standard culture flask production based on a product characterization in line with the International Society of Cell Therapy in vitro benchmarks and supplemented with a compelling quantitative in vivo bone-forming potency assay. Multiple process read-outs were implemented to track process performance and deal with donor-to-donor-related variation in nutrient needs and harvest timing. The data show that the hollow fiber bioreactor is capable of robustly expanding autologous hPDCs on a clinical scale (yield between 316 million and 444 million cells starting from 20 million after ± 8 days of culture) while maintaining their in vitro quality attributes compared with the standard flask-based culture. The in vivo bone-forming assay on average resulted in 10.3 ± 3.7% and 11.0 ± 3.8% newly formed bone for the bioreactor and standard culture flask respectively. The analysis showed that the Quantum system provides a reproducible cell expansion process in terms of yields and culture conditions for multiple donors. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic variation reveals large-scale population expansion and migration during the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Schlebusch, Carina; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2014-10-22

    The majority of sub-Saharan Africans today speak a number of closely related languages collectively referred to as 'Bantu' languages. The current distribution of Bantu-speaking populations has been found to largely be a consequence of the movement of people rather than a diffusion of language alone. Linguistic and single marker genetic studies have generated various hypotheses regarding the timing and the routes of the Bantu expansion, but these hypotheses have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we re-analysed microsatellite markers typed for large number of African populations that-owing to their fast mutation rates-capture signatures of recent population history. We confirm the spread of west African people across most of sub-Saharan Africa and estimated the expansion of Bantu-speaking groups, using a Bayesian approach, to around 5600 years ago. We tested four different divergence models for Bantu-speaking populations with a distribution comprising three geographical regions in Africa. We found that the most likely model for the movement of the eastern branch of Bantu-speakers involves migration of Bantu-speaking groups to the east followed by migration to the south. This model, however, is only marginally more likely than other models, which might indicate direct movement from the west and/or significant gene flow with the western Branch of Bantu-speakers. Our study use multi-loci genetic data to explicitly investigate the timing and mode of the Bantu expansion and it demonstrates that west African groups rapidly expanded both in numbers and over a large geographical area, affirming the fact that the Bantu expansion was one of the most dramatic demographic events in human history.

  16. Asymptotic expansions of integral means and applications to the ratio of gamma functions

    OpenAIRE

    Elezović, Neven; Vukšić, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    Integral means are important class of bivariate means. In this paper we prove the very general algorithm for calculation of coefficients in asymptotic expansion of integral mean. It is based on explicit solving the equation of the form $B(A(x))=C(x)$, where $B$ and $C$ have known asymptotic expansions. The results are illustrated by calculation of some important integral means connected with gamma and digamma functions.

  17. Fuzzy local linearization and local basis function expansion in nonlinear system modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Q; Harris, C J

    1999-01-01

    Fuzzy local linearization is compared with local basis function expansion for modeling unknown nonlinear processes. First-order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model and the analysis of variance (ANOVA) decomposition are combined for the fuzzy local linearization of nonlinear systems, in which B-splines are used as membership functions of the fuzzy sets for input space partition. A modified algorithm for adaptive spline modeling of observation data (MASMOD) is developed for determining the number of necessary B-splines and their knot positions to achieve parsimonious models. This paper illustrates that fuzzy local linearization models have several advantages over local basis function expansion based models in nonlinear system modeling.

  18. Large-scale in vitro expansion of polyclonal human switched-memory B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Néron

    Full Text Available Polyclonal preparations of therapeutic immunoglobulins, namely intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg, are essential in the treatment of immunodeficiency and are increasingly used for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Currently, patients' accessibility to IVIg depends exclusively upon volunteer blood donations followed by the fractionation of pooled human plasma obtained from thousands of individuals. Presently, there are no in vitro cell culture procedures allowing the preparation of polyclonal human antibodies. All in vitro human therapeutic antibodies that are currently generated are based on monoclonal antibodies, which are mostly issued from genetic engineering or single cell antibody technologies. Here, we describe an in vitro cell culture system, using CD40-CD154 interactions, that leads to a 1×10(6-fold expansion of switched memory B lymphocytes in approximately 50 days. These expanded cells secrete polyclonal IgG, which distribution into IgG(1, IgG(2, IgG(3 and IgG(4 is similar to that of normal human serum. Such in vitro generated IgG showed relatively low self-reactivity since they interacted moderately with only 24 human antigens among a total of 9484 targets. Furthermore, up to one liter of IgG secreting cells can be produced in about 40 days. This experimental model, providing large-scale expansion of human B lymphocytes, represents a critical step toward the in vitro production of polyclonal human IgG and a new method for the ex vivo expansion of B cells for therapeutic purposes.

  19. Asymptotic expansions for Riesz fractional derivatives of Airy functions and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. Temme (Nico); V. Varlamov

    2009-01-01

    textabstractRiesz fractional derivatives of a function, $D_{x}^{\\alpha}f(x)$ (also called Riesz potentials), are defined as fractional powers of the Laplacian. Asymptotic expansions for large $x$ are computed for the Riesz fractional derivatives of the Airy function of the first kind, $Ai(x)$, and

  20. Optical Control of DNA Helicase Function through Genetic Code Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ji; Kong, Muwen; Liu, Lili; Samanta, Subhas; Van Houten, Bennett; Deiters, Alexander

    2017-03-02

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a general DNA repair mechanism that is capable of removing a wide variety of DNA lesions induced by physical or chemical insults. UvrD, a member of the helicase SF1 superfamily, plays an essential role in bacterial NER by unwinding the duplex DNA in the 3' to 5' direction to displace the lesion-containing strand. In order to achieve conditional control over NER, we generated a light-activated DNA helicase. This was achieved through a site-specific incorporation of a genetically encoded hydroxycoumarin lysine at a crucial position in the ATP-binding pocket of UvrD. The resulting caged enzyme was completely inactive in several functional assays. Moreover, enzymatic activity of the optically triggered UvrD was comparable to that of the wild-type protein, thus demonstrating excellent OFF to ON switching of the helicase. The developed approach provides optical control of NER, thereby laying a foundation for the regulation of ATP-dependent helicase functions in higher organisms. In addition, this methodology is applicable to the light-activation of a wide range of ATPases. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Functional Scaling of Musculoskeletal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark

    specific to the patient. This is accomplished using optimisation methods to determine patient-specific joint positions and orientations, which minimise the least-squares error between model markers and the recorded markers from a motion capture experiment. Functional joint positions and joint axis...

  2. Closures of the functional expansion hierarchy in the non-Markovian quantum state diffusion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Gerhard; Strunz, Walter T; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2017-08-14

    To find a practical scheme to numerically solve the non-Markovian Quantum State Diffusion equation (NMQSD), one often uses a functional expansion of the functional derivative that appears in the general NMQSD equation. This expansion leads to a hierarchy of coupled operators. It turned out that if one takes only the zeroth order term into account, one has a very efficient method that agrees remarkably well with the exact results for many cases of interest. We denote this approach as zeroth order functional expansion (ZOFE). In the present work, we investigate two extensions of ZOFE. Firstly, we investigate how the hierarchy converges when taking higher orders into account (which, however, leads to a fast increase in numerical size). Secondly, we demonstrate that by using a terminator that approximates the higher order contributions, one can obtain significant improvement, at hardly any additional computational cost. We carry out our investigations for the case of absorption spectra of molecular aggregates.

  3. Expanded functional diversity of shaker K(+ channels in cnidarians is driven by gene expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Jegla

    Full Text Available The genome of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis (starlet sea anemone provides a molecular genetic view into the first nervous systems, which appeared in a late common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Nematostella has a surprisingly large and diverse set of neuronal signaling genes including paralogs of most neuronal signaling molecules found in higher metazoans. Several ion channel gene families are highly expanded in the sea anemone, including three subfamilies of the Shaker K(+ channel gene family: Shaker (Kv1, Shaw (Kv3 and Shal (Kv4. In order to better understand the physiological significance of these voltage-gated K(+ channel expansions, we analyzed the function of 18 members of the 20 gene Shaker subfamily in Nematostella. Six of the Nematostella Shaker genes express functional homotetrameric K(+ channels in vitro. These include functional orthologs of bilaterian Shakers and channels with an unusually high threshold for voltage activation. We identified 11 Nematostella Shaker genes with a distinct "silent" or "regulatory" phenotype; these encode subunits that function only in heteromeric channels and serve to further diversify Nematostella Shaker channel gating properties. Subunits with the regulatory phenotype have not previously been found in the Shaker subfamily, but have evolved independently in the Shab (Kv2 family in vertebrates and the Shal family in a cnidarian. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that regulatory subunits were present in ancestral cnidarians, but have continued to diversity at a high rate after the split between anthozoans and hydrozoans. Comparison of Shaker family gene complements from diverse metazoan species reveals frequent, large scale duplication has produced highly unique sets of Shaker channels in the major metazoan lineages.

  4. Expanded functional diversity of shaker K(+) channels in cnidarians is driven by gene expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegla, Timothy; Marlow, Heather Q; Chen, Bihan; Simmons, David K; Jacobo, Sarah M; Martindale, Mark Q

    2012-01-01

    The genome of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis (starlet sea anemone) provides a molecular genetic view into the first nervous systems, which appeared in a late common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Nematostella has a surprisingly large and diverse set of neuronal signaling genes including paralogs of most neuronal signaling molecules found in higher metazoans. Several ion channel gene families are highly expanded in the sea anemone, including three subfamilies of the Shaker K(+) channel gene family: Shaker (Kv1), Shaw (Kv3) and Shal (Kv4). In order to better understand the physiological significance of these voltage-gated K(+) channel expansions, we analyzed the function of 18 members of the 20 gene Shaker subfamily in Nematostella. Six of the Nematostella Shaker genes express functional homotetrameric K(+) channels in vitro. These include functional orthologs of bilaterian Shakers and channels with an unusually high threshold for voltage activation. We identified 11 Nematostella Shaker genes with a distinct "silent" or "regulatory" phenotype; these encode subunits that function only in heteromeric channels and serve to further diversify Nematostella Shaker channel gating properties. Subunits with the regulatory phenotype have not previously been found in the Shaker subfamily, but have evolved independently in the Shab (Kv2) family in vertebrates and the Shal family in a cnidarian. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that regulatory subunits were present in ancestral cnidarians, but have continued to diversity at a high rate after the split between anthozoans and hydrozoans. Comparison of Shaker family gene complements from diverse metazoan species reveals frequent, large scale duplication has produced highly unique sets of Shaker channels in the major metazoan lineages.

  5. Linked-cluster expansion for the Green's function of the infinite-U Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Perepelitsky, Edward; Rigol, Marcos; Shastry, B Sriram

    2014-06-01

    We implement a highly efficient strong-coupling expansion for the Green's function of the Hubbard model. In the limit of extreme correlations, where the onsite interaction is infinite, the evaluation of diagrams simplifies dramatically enabling us to carry out the expansion to the eighth order in powers of the hopping amplitude. We compute the finite-temperature Green's function analytically in the momentum and Matsubara frequency space as a function of the electron density. Employing Padé approximations, we study the equation of state, Kelvin thermopower, momentum distribution function, quasiparticle fraction, and quasiparticle lifetime of the system at temperatures lower than, or of the order of, the hopping amplitude. We also discuss several different approaches for obtaining the spectral functions through analytic continuation of the imaginary frequency Green's function, and show results for the system near half filling. We benchmark our results for the equation of state against those obtained from a numerical linked-cluster expansion carried out to the eleventh order.

  6. Linked-cluster expansion for the Green's function of the infinite-U Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Perepelitsky, Edward; Rigol, Marcos; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2014-06-01

    We implement a highly efficient strong-coupling expansion for the Green's function of the Hubbard model. In the limit of extreme correlations, where the onsite interaction is infinite, the evaluation of diagrams simplifies dramatically enabling us to carry out the expansion to the eighth order in powers of the hopping amplitude. We compute the finite-temperature Green's function analytically in the momentum and Matsubara frequency space as a function of the electron density. Employing Padé approximations, we study the equation of state, Kelvin thermopower, momentum distribution function, quasiparticle fraction, and quasiparticle lifetime of the system at temperatures lower than, or of the order of, the hopping amplitude. We also discuss several different approaches for obtaining the spectral functions through analytic continuation of the imaginary frequency Green's function, and show results for the system near half filling. We benchmark our results for the equation of state against those obtained from a numerical linked-cluster expansion carried out to the eleventh order.

  7. Covariant spectator theory of $np$ scattering:\\\\ Effective range expansions and relativistic deuteron wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz Gross, Alfred Stadler

    2010-09-01

    We present the effective range expansions for the 1S0 and 3S1 scattering phase shifts, and the relativistic deuteron wave functions that accompany our recent high precision fits (with \\chi^2/N{data} \\simeq 1) to the 2007 world np data below 350 MeV. The wave functions are expanded in a series of analytical functions (with the correct asymptotic behavior at both large and small arguments) that can be Fourier-transformed from momentum to coordinate space and are convenient to use in any application. A fortran subroutine to compute these wave functions can be obtained from the authors.

  8. Polynomial expansion of the precoder for power minimization in large-scale MIMO systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sifaou, Houssem

    2016-07-26

    This work focuses on the downlink of a single-cell large-scale MIMO system in which the base station equipped with M antennas serves K single-antenna users. In particular, we are interested in reducing the implementation complexity of the optimal linear precoder (OLP) that minimizes the total power consumption while ensuring target user rates. As most precoding schemes, a major difficulty towards the implementation of OLP is that it requires fast inversions of large matrices at every new channel realizations. To overcome this issue, we aim at designing a linear precoding scheme providing the same performance of OLP but with lower complexity. This is achieved by applying the truncated polynomial expansion (TPE) concept on a per-user basis. To get a further leap in complexity reduction and allow for closed-form expressions of the per-user weighting coefficients, we resort to the asymptotic regime in which M and K grow large with a bounded ratio. Numerical results are used to show that the proposed TPE precoding scheme achieves the same performance of OLP with a significantly lower implementation complexity. © 2016 IEEE.

  9. Restraining infarct expansion preserves left ventricular geometry and function after acute anteroapical infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, S T; Malekan, R; Gorman, J H; Jackson, B M; Gorman, R C; Suzuki, Y; Plappert, T; Bogen, D K; Sutton, M G; Edmunds, L H

    Expansion of an acute myocardial infarction predicts progressive left ventricular (LV) dilatation, functional deterioration, and early death. This study tests the hypothesis that restraining expansion of an acute infarction preserves LV geometry and resting function. In 23 sheep, snares were placed around the distal left anterior descending and second diagonal coronary arteries. In 12 sheep, infarct deformation was prevented by Marlex mesh placed over the anticipated myocardial infarct. Snared arteries were occluded 10 to 14 days later. Serial hemodynamic measurements and transdiaphragmatic quantitative echocardiograms were obtained up to 8 weeks after anteroapical infarction of 0.23 of LV mass. In sheep with mesh, circulatory hemodynamics, stroke work, and end-systolic elastance return to preinfarction values 1 week after infarction and do not change subsequently. Ventricular volumes and ejection fraction do not change after the first week postinfarction. Control animals develop large anteroapical ventricular aneurysms, increasing LV dilatation, and progressive deterioration in circulatory hemodynamics and ventricular function. At week 8, differences in LV end-diastolic pressure, cardiac output, end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, ejection fraction, stroke work, and end-systolic elastance are significant (P<0.01) between groups. Preventing expansion of acute myocardial infarctions preserves LV geometry and function.

  10. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-21

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions.

  11. An extension of the compression-expansion fixed point theorem of functional type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard I. Avery

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we use an interval of functional type as the underlying set in our compression-expansion fixed point theorem argument which can be used to exploit properties of the operator to improve conditions that will guarantee the existence of a fixed point in applications. An example is provided to demonstrate how intervals of functional type can improve conditions in applications to boundary value problems. We also show how one can use suitable $k$-contractive conditions to prove that a fixed point in a functional-type interval is unique.

  12. Aft-body loading function for penetrators based on the spherical cavity-expansion approximation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longcope, Donald B., Jr.; Warren, Thomas Lynn; Duong, Henry

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we develop an aft-body loading function for penetration simulations that is based on the spherical cavity-expansion approximation. This loading function assumes that there is a preexisting cavity of radius a{sub o} before the expansion occurs. This causes the radial stress on the cavity surface to be less than what is obtained if the cavity is opened from a zero initial radius. This in turn causes less resistance on the aft body as it penetrates the target which allows for greater rotation of the penetrator. Results from simulations are compared with experimental results for oblique penetration into a concrete target with an unconfined compressive strength of 23 MPa.

  13. Application of a new functional expansion to the cubic anharmonic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliess, Michel; Lamnabhi-Lagarrigue, Françoise

    1982-04-01

    A new representation of causal functionals is introduced which makes use of noncommutative generating power series and iterated integrals. This technique allows the solutions of nonlinear differential equations with forcing terms to be obtained in a simple and natural way. It generalizes some properties of Fourier and Laplace transforms to nonlinear systems and leads to effective computations of various perturbative expansions. Illustrations by means of the cubic anharmonic oscillator are given in both the deterministic and the stochastic cases.

  14. Overcoming the bottleneck of platelet lysate supply in large-scale clinical expansion of adipose-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glovinski, Peter Viktor; Herly, Mikkel; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Platelet lysates (PL) represent a promising replacement for xenogenic growth supplement for adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) expansions. However, fresh platelets from human blood donors are not clinically feasible for large-scale cell expansion based on their limited supply. Therefore......, we tested PLs prepared via three methods from outdated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates (PCs) to establish an efficient and feasible expansion of ASCs for clinical use. METHODS: PLs were prepared by the freeze-thaw method from freshly drawn platelets or from outdated buffy coat-derived PCs...... stored in the platelet additive solution, InterSol. Three types of PLs were prepared from outdated PCs with platelets suspended in either (1) InterSol (not manipulated), (2) InterSol + supplemented with plasma or (3) plasma alone (InterSol removed). Using these PLs, we compared ASC population doubling...

  15. Functional Materials Produced On An Industrial Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barska Justyna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a wide range of applications of functional materials and a scale of their current industrial production. These are the materials which have specific characteristics, thanks to which they became virtually indispensable in certain constructional solutions. Their basic characteristics, properties, methods of production and use as smart materials were described.

  16. Preserving neural function under extreme scaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Cuntz

    Full Text Available Important brain functions need to be conserved throughout organisms of extremely varying sizes. Here we study the scaling properties of an essential component of computation in the brain: the single neuron. We compare morphology and signal propagation of a uniquely identifiable interneuron, the HS cell, in the blowfly (Calliphora with its exact counterpart in the fruit fly (Drosophila which is about four times smaller in each dimension. Anatomical features of the HS cell scale isometrically and minimise wiring costs but, by themselves, do not scale to preserve the electrotonic behaviour. However, the membrane properties are set to conserve dendritic as well as axonal delays and attenuation as well as dendritic integration of visual information. In conclusion, the electrotonic structure of a neuron, the HS cell in this case, is surprisingly stable over a wide range of morphological scales.

  17. Series Expansion for the Green's Function of the Infinite-U Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Perepelitsky, Edward; Shastry, B. Sriram; Rigol, Marcos

    2013-03-01

    We implement computationally a strong-coupling expansion for the dynamical single-particle Green's function of the infinite-U Hubbard model up to the eighth order in the hopping, within the formalism introduced by Metzner. We obtain analytical expressions for the finite Matsubara frequency Green's functions and the Dyson self energy in the momentum space at all densities in the thermodynamic limit. The results match those obtained up to the fourth order by means of another method devised by us. Furthermore, we employ Pade approximations and various numerical re-summation techniques to extend the region of convergence to lower temperatures.

  18. Semi-quartic force fields retrieved from multi-mode expansions: Accuracy, scaling behavior, and approximations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Rauhut, Guntram, E-mail: rauhut@theochem.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-04-21

    Semi-quartic force fields (QFF) rely on a Taylor-expansion of the multi-dimensional Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface (PES) and are frequently used within the calculation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies based on 2nd order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2). As such they are usually determined by differentiation of the electronic energy with respect to the nuclear coordinates. Alternatively, potential energy surfaces can be expanded in terms of multi-mode expansions, which typically do not require any derivative techniques. The computational effort to retrieve QFF from size-reduced multi-mode expansions has been studied and has been compared with standard Taylor-expansions. As multi-mode expansions allow for the convenient introduction of subtle approximations, these will be discussed in some detail. In addition, a preliminary study about the applicability of a generalized Duschinsky transformation to QFFs is provided. This transformation allows for the efficient evaluation of VPT2 frequencies of isotopologues from the PES of the parent compound and thus avoids the recalculation of PESs in different axes systems.

  19. Large-Scale Selective Functionalization of Alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Karen I; Goldman, Alan S

    2017-03-21

    Great progress has been made in the past several decades concerning C-H bond functionalization. But despite many significant advances, a commercially viable large-scale process for selective alkane functionalization remains an unreached goal. Such conversions will require highly active, selective, and long-lived catalysts. In addition, essentially complete atom-economy will be required. Thus, any reagents used in transforming the alkanes must be almost free (e.g., O2, H2O, N2), or they should be incorporated into the desired large-scale product. Any side-products should be completely benign or have value as fuels (e.g., H2 or other alkanes). Progress and promising leads toward the development of such systems involving primarily molecular transition metal catalysts are described.

  20. Protein SUMOylation Is Required for Regulatory T Cell Expansion and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Ding

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (Treg cells are essential for immune tolerance; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Treg cell expansion and function are still not well understood. SUMOylation is a protein post-translational modification characterized by covalent attachment of SUMO moieties to lysines. UBC9 is the only E2 conjugating enzyme involved in this process, and loss of UBC9 completely abolishes the SUMOylation pathway. Here, we report that selective deletion of Ubc9 within the Treg lineage results in fatal early-onset autoimmunity similar to Foxp3 mutant mice. Ubc9-deficient Treg cells exhibit severe defects in TCR-driven homeostatic proliferation, accompanied by impaired activation and compromised suppressor function. Importantly, TCR ligation enhanced SUMOylation of IRF4, a critical regulator of Treg cell function downstream of TCR signals, which regulates its stability in Treg cells. Our data thus have demonstrated an essential role of SUMOylation in the expansion and function of Treg cells.

  1. Functional dissection of a neuronal network required for cuticle tanning and wing expansion in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Haojiang; Lemon, William C; Peabody, Nathan C; Pohl, Jascha B; Zelensky, Paul K; Wang, Ding; Nitabach, Michael N; Holmes, Todd C; White, Benjamin H

    2006-01-11

    A subset of Drosophila neurons that expresses crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) has been shown previously to make the hormone bursicon, which is required for cuticle tanning and wing expansion after eclosion. Here we present evidence that CCAP-expressing neurons (NCCAP) consist of two functionally distinct groups, one of which releases bursicon into the hemolymph and the other of which regulates its release. The first group, which we call NCCAP-c929, includes 14 bursicon-expressing neurons of the abdominal ganglion that lie within the expression pattern of the enhancer-trap line c929-Gal4. We show that suppression of activity within this group blocks bursicon release into the hemolymph together with tanning and wing expansion. The second group, which we call NCCAP-R, consists of NCCAP neurons outside the c929-Gal4 pattern. Because suppression of synaptic transmission and protein kinase A (PKA) activity throughout NCCAP, but not in NCCAP-c929, also blocks tanning and wing expansion, we conclude that neurotransmission and PKA are required in NCCAP-R to regulate bursicon secretion from NCCAP-c929. Enhancement of electrical activity in NCCAP-R by expression of the bacterial sodium channel NaChBac also blocks tanning and wing expansion and leads to depletion of bursicon from central processes. NaChBac expression in NCCAP-c929 is without effect, suggesting that the abdominal bursicon-secreting neurons are likely to be silent until stimulated to release the hormone. Our results suggest that NCCAP form an interacting neuronal network responsible for the regulation and release of bursicon and suggest a model in which PKA-mediated stimulation of inputs to normally quiescent bursicon-expressing neurons activates release of the hormone.

  2. Scale Expansion of Community Investigations and Integration of the Effects of Abiotic and Biotic Processes on Maintenance of Species Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on the maintenance of diversity patterns from regional to local scales is dispersed among academic fields due to the local focus of community ecology. To better understand these patterns, the study of ecological communities needs to be expanded to larger scales and the various processes affecting them need to be integrated using a suitable quantitative method. We determined a range of communities on a flora-subregional scale in Yunnan province, China (383210.02 km2. A series of species pools were delimited from the regional to plot scales. Plant diversity was evaluated and abiotic and biotic processes identified at each pool level. The species pool effect was calculated using an innovative model, and the contribution of these processes to the maintenance of plant species diversity was determined and integrated: climate had the greatest effect at the flora-subregional scale, with historical and evolutionary processes contributing ∼11%; climate and human disturbance had the greatest effect at the local site pool scale; competition exclusion and stress limitation explained strong filtering at the successional stage pool scale; biotic processes contributed more on the local community scale than on the regional scale. Scale expansion combined with the filtering model approach solves the local problem in community ecology.

  3. Spatial and topgraphic trends in forest expansion and biomass change, from regional to local scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Buma; Tara M. Barrett

    2015-01-01

    Natural forest growth and expansion are important carbon sequestration processes globally. Climate change is likely to increase forest growth in some regions via CO2 fertilization, increased temperatures, and altered precipitation; however, altered disturbance regimes and climate stress (e.g. drought) will act to reduce carbon stocks in forests...

  4. Expansion and functions of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Peng; Wang, Li-Zhen; Lin, P Charles

    2016-09-28

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a group of immature myeloid cells accumulated in most cancer patients and mouse tumor models. MDSCs suppress host immune response and concurrently promote tumor angiogenesis, thereby promote tumor growth and progression. In this review, we discuss recent progresses in expansion and activity of tumor MDSCs, and describe new findings about immunosuppressive function of different subtypes of MDSCs in cancer. We also discussed tumor angiogenic activities and pro-tumor invasion/metastatic roles of MDSCs in tumor progression. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. On the first two coefficients of the Bergman function expansion for radial metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhiming

    2017-09-01

    Let gF be Kähler metrics on rotation invariant domains Ω =Bd, Cd ,Bd∗ ,Cd∗ associated with the Kähler potentials ΦF(z , z bar) = F(ln(‖ z‖2)) . The purpose of this paper is twofold. Firstly, we obtain explicit formulas of the coefficients aj(j = 1 , 2) of the Bergman function expansion for the domains (Ω ,gF) . Secondly, we obtain explicit expressions of F when both a1 and a2 are constants on Ω.

  6. Asymptotic expansion of a partition function related to the sinh-model

    CERN Document Server

    Borot, Gaëtan; Kozlowski, Karol K

    2016-01-01

    This book elaborates on the asymptotic behaviour, when N is large, of certain N-dimensional integrals which typically occur in random matrices, or in 1+1 dimensional quantum integrable models solvable by the quantum separation of variables. The introduction presents the underpinning motivations for this problem, a historical overview, and a summary of the strategy, which is applicable in greater generality. The core aims at proving an expansion up to o(1) for the logarithm of the partition function of the sinh-model. This is achieved by a combination of potential theory and large deviation theory so as to grasp the leading asymptotics described by an equilibrium measure, the Riemann-Hilbert approach to truncated Wiener-Hopf in order to analyse the equilibrium measure, the Schwinger-Dyson equations and the boostrap method to finally obtain an expansion of correlation functions and the one of the partition function. This book is addressed to researchers working in random matrices, statistical physics or integra...

  7. Eukaryote-specific rRNA expansion segments function in ribosome biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Madhumitha; Woolford, John L

    2016-08-01

    The secondary structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is largely conserved across all kingdoms of life. However, eukaryotes have evolved extra blocks of rRNA sequences, relative to those of prokaryotes, called expansion segments (ES). A thorough characterization of the potential roles of ES remains to be done, possibly because of limitations in the availability of robust systems to study rRNA mutants. We sought to systematically investigate the potential functions, if any, of the ES in 25S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by deletion mutagenesis. We deleted 14 of the 16 different eukaryote-specific ES in yeast 25S rRNA individually and assayed their phenotypes. Our results show that all but two of the ES tested are necessary for optimal growth and are required for production of 25S rRNA, suggesting that ES play roles in ribosome biogenesis. Further, we classified expansion segments into groups that participate in early nucleolar, middle, and late nucleoplasmic steps of ribosome biogenesis, by assaying their pre-rRNA processing phenotypes. This study is the first of its kind to systematically identify the functions of eukaryote-specific expansion segments by showing that they play roles in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. The catalog of phenotypes we identified, combined with previous investigations of the roles ribosomal proteins in large subunit biogenesis, leads us to infer that assembling ribosomes are composed of distinct RNA and protein structural neighborhood clusters that participate in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. © 2016 Ramesh and Woolford; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. Assessing hydroclimate impacts of a large-scale perennial biofuel crop expansion over the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Wagner, M.; Miguez-Macho, G.; Mahalov, A.; Georgescu, M.

    2013-12-01

    Perennial bioenergy crops are a potential alternative energy source to fossil fuels that could increase U.S. energy independence and mitigate anthropogenic climate change. Large-scale conversion of existing lands to perennial bioenergy crops has shown the potential to decrease near-surface temperatures but could cause unintended consequences on water resources via changes in soil moisture/groundwater depletion. Spatiotemporal analysis of long-term and extreme hydrological impacts remains limited but is necessary for examination of large-scale sustainable deployment of this alternative energy pathway. Here, we quantify hydroclimatic impacts associated with perennial bioenergy crop expansion (e.g., miscanthus or switchgrass) and examine simulated effects on magnitude and frequency of extreme events (i.e. heat waves and anomalous precipitation events). We conduct 10-year (2001-2010) U.S. continental scale simulations of baseline and perennial bioenergy crop expansion (based on recent assessments of abandoned and degraded cropland over the conterminous U.S.) using WRF coupled to a land surface model (LEAF-Hydro) at 20 km resolution. Time series analysis and spatial statistical methods are applied to quantify extreme hydroclimate frequency owing to biofuels expansion, investigated through groundwater table depth, soil moisture and energy partitioning change and variability, and consequential impacts on ET, temperature, and precipitation. A further quantification of intensity, duration and persistence of extreme hydroclimate events is made based on extreme value theory. This study demonstrates a framework of feedback assessment between land use/land cover change and water resources, as well as evaluating feasibility and long-term sustainability of large-scale deployment of perennial bioenergy crops across the continental U.S.

  9. Moment expansion to the memory function for generalized Drude scattering rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Pankaj; Das, Nabyendu; Singh, Navinder

    2016-05-01

    The memory function formalism is an important tool to evaluate the frequency dependent electronic conductivity. It is previously used within some approximations in the case of electrons interacting with various other degrees of freedom in metals with great success. However, one needs to go beyond those approximations as the interaction strengths become stronger. In this work, we propose a systematic expansion of the memory function involving its various moments. We calculate the higher order contribution to the generalized Drude scattering rate in case of electron-impurity interactions. Further we compare our results with the results from previously studied lowest order calculations. We find larger contributions from the higher moments in the low frequency regime and also in the case of larger interaction strength.

  10. Moment expansion to the memory function for generalized Drude scattering rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhalla, Pankaj, E-mail: pankajbhalla66@gmail.com [Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, 382355 (India); Das, Nabyendu; Singh, Navinder [Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380009 (India)

    2016-05-20

    The memory function formalism is an important tool to evaluate the frequency dependent electronic conductivity. It is previously used within some approximations in the case of electrons interacting with various other degrees of freedom in metals with great success. However, one needs to go beyond those approximations as the interaction strengths become stronger. In this work, we propose a systematic expansion of the memory function involving its various moments. We calculate the higher order contribution to the generalized Drude scattering rate in case of electron–impurity interactions. Further we compare our results with the results from previously studied lowest order calculations. We find larger contributions from the higher moments in the low frequency regime and also in the case of larger interaction strength.

  11. Accelerating large scale Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations with semi-local functionals and hybrid functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin

    The computational cost of standard Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT) calculations scale cubically with respect to the system size, which limits its use in large scale applications. In recent years, we have developed an alternative procedure called the pole expansion and selected inversion (PEXSI) method. The PEXSI method solves KSDFT without solving any eigenvalue and eigenvector, and directly evaluates physical quantities including electron density, energy, atomic force, density of states, and local density of states. The overall algorithm scales as at most quadratically for all materials including insulators, semiconductors and the difficult metallic systems. The PEXSI method can be efficiently parallelized over 10,000 - 100,000 processors on high performance machines. The PEXSI method has been integrated into a number of community electronic structure software packages such as ATK, BigDFT, CP2K, DGDFT, FHI-aims and SIESTA, and has been used in a number of applications with 2D materials beyond 10,000 atoms. The PEXSI method works for LDA, GGA and meta-GGA functionals. The mathematical structure for hybrid functional KSDFT calculations is significantly different. I will also discuss recent progress on using adaptive compressed exchange method for accelerating hybrid functional calculations. DOE SciDAC Program, DOE CAMERA Program, LBNL LDRD, Sloan Fellowship.

  12. Purification and Ex Vivo Expansion of Fully Functional Salivary Gland Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalitha S.Y. Nanduri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyposalivation often leads to irreversible and untreatable xerostomia. Salivary gland (SG stem cell therapy is an attractive putative option to salvage these patients but is impeded by the limited availability of adult human tissue. Here, using murine SG cells, we demonstrate single-cell self-renewal, differentiation, enrichment of SG stem cells, and robust in vitro expansion. Dependent on stem cell marker expression, SG sphere-derived single cells could be differentiated in vitro into distinct lobular or ductal/lobular organoids, suggestive of progenitor or stem cell potency. Expanded cells were able to form miniglands/organoids containing multiple SG cell lineages. Expansion of these multipotent cells through serial passaging resulted in selection of a cell population, homogenous for stem cell marker expression (CD24hi/CD29hi. Cells highly expressing CD24 and CD29 could be prospectively isolated and were able to efficiently restore radiation-damaged SG function. Our approach will facilitate the use of adult SG stem cells for a variety of scientific and therapeutic purposes.

  13. Differences of the Truncal Expansion and Respiratory Function between Children with Spastic Diplegic and Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Lee, Hye Young

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] We attempted to determine whether differences of respiratory function could be found in terms of truncal expansion, respiratory muscle strength, and pulmonary function test (PFT) between children with spastic diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] We recruited 19 children with spastic diplegic CP (diplegic-CP group) and 10 children with spastic hemiplegic CP (hemiplegic-CP group). For all the children, clinical factors associated with respiratory functions were assessed in terms of truncal expansion (chest and waist expansion), respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiration and expiration pressures: MIP and MEP), and pulmonary function test (FVC, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC). [Results] Overall, the diplegic-CP group showed lower truncal circumference, respiratory muscle strength, and pulmonary function values than the hemiplegic-CP group. However, in the comparison of the two groups significant differences were only found in waist expansion, MIP, MEP, FVC, and FEV1. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that children with diplegic CP have much poorer waist expansion, weaker respiratory muscle, and lower pulmonary function values. These findings will provide valuable information for use in the clinical assessment and treatment of children with spastic CP.

  14. The Personal Selling Ethics Scale: Revisions and Expansions for Teaching Sales Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoho, Casey; Heinze, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    The field of sales draws a large number of marketing graduates. Sales curricula used within today's marketing programs should include rigorous discussions of sales ethics. The Personal Selling Ethics Scale (PSE) provides an analytical tool for assessing and discussing students' ethical sales sensitivities. However, since the scale fails to address…

  15. Effects of smoking on chest expansion, lung function, and respiratory muscle strength of youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantisuwat, Anong; Thaveeratitham, Premtip

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] Smoking has a direct effect on the respiratory system. The rate of cigarette smoking among young people has continued to increase steadily. The present study quantified and compared the respiratory function of smoking and non-smoking youths. [Subjects] Smoking and non-smoking male participants aged between 15 to 18 years were recruited (n=34 per group). [Methods] Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire relating to smoking habits and the Fagerström test for nicotine dependence questionnaire, and their respiratory function was tested (measurement of chest expansion, lung function test with a spirometer, and assessment of respiratory muscle strength). [Results] All respiratory function tests demonstrated significant differences between the smoking and non-smoking groups. Smokers initiated cigarette smoking between the ages of 15 to 18 years. The most common duration of cigarette smoking was 1-3 years and the degree of nicotine dependence among the youths was at a low level. [Conclusion] This study's findings show that the early effects of cigarette smoking found in youths can lead to problems with the respiratory system. Such information can be used to illustrate the harm of smoking and should be used to encourage young people to quit or avoid cigarette smoking.

  16. The evolutionary strata of DARPP-32 tail implicates hierarchical functional expansion in higher vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Choong Yong; Teoh, Teow Chong

    2014-06-01

    DARPP-32 (dopamine and adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa), which belongs to PPP1R1 gene family, is known to act as an important integrator in dopamine-mediated neurotransmission via the inhibition of protein phosphatase-1 (PP1). Besides its neuronal roles, this protein also behaves as a key player in pathological and pharmacological aspects. Use of bioinformatics and phylogenetics approaches to further characterize the molecular features of DARPP-32 can guide future works. Predicted phosphorylation sites on DARPP-32 show conservation across vertebrates. Phylogenetics analysis indicates evolutionary strata of phosphorylation site acquisition at the C-terminus, suggesting functional expansion of DARPP-32, where more diverse signalling cues may involve in regulating DARPP-32 in inhibiting PP1 activity. Moreover, both phylogenetics and synteny analyses suggest de novo origination of PPP1R1 gene family via chromosomal rearrangement and exonization.

  17. Shell energy in the heaviest nuclei using the Green's function oscillator expansion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cwiok, S.; Dudek, W.; Kaszynski, P. [Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Nazarewicz, W. [University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Physics Division, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warsaw University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Warsaw (Poland)

    2005-03-01

    The Green's function oscillator expansion method and the generalized Strutinsky smoothing procedure are applied to shell corrections in the heaviest elements. A macroscopic-microscopic method with a finite deformed Woods-Saxon potential is used. The stability condition for the shell correction is discussed in detail and the parameters defining the smoothing procedure are carefully determined. It is demonstrated that the spurious contribution to the total binding energy due to the unphysical particle gas that appears in the standard method can be as large as 1.5 MeV for weakly bound neutron-rich superheavy nuclei, but the effect on energy differences (e.g., alpha-decay values) is fairly small. (orig.)

  18. Generalized Switch Functions in the Multilevel Many-Body Expansion Method and Its Application to Water Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo Dong; Weng, Jingwei; Song, Guoliang; Li, Zhen Hua

    2017-05-09

    The many-body expansion (MBE) method is the basis of many fragment-based methods and is widely applied to the computation of large molecular systems. To reach linear-scaling computation, a cutoff must be used to discard those subsystems with long interfragment distances. However, this leads to a discontinuous potential energy surface (PES) that would cause various problems in geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simulations. To solve this problem, we present a generalized-switch-function (GSF) approach to smooth the PES computed by the MBE method with the use of a cutoff distance. The GSFs are naturally normalized and are permutation invariant. This approach can be applied to adaptively computing any order of many-body correction energies with multilevel computational methods and is a dynamic subsystem approach. We have applied the two versions of our method, GSF-MBE(m)/L1 and GSF-MBE(m)/(L1:L2:L3), to water clusters. Thorough tests show that our method can indeed give smooth potential-energy surface and is linear scaling but without losing much accuracy for very large water clusters with appropriately chosen cutoff distances.

  19. Are serum-free and xeno-free culture conditions ideal for large scale clinical grade expansion of Wharton's jelly derived mesenchymal stem cells? A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamynathan, Priyanka; Venugopal, Parvathy; Kannan, Suresh; Thej, Charan; Kolkundar, Udaykumar; Bhagwat, Swaroop; Ta, Malancha; Majumdar, Anish Sen; Balasubramanian, Sudha

    2014-07-28

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) for clinical use have largely been isolated from the bone marrow, although isolation of these cells from many different adult and fetal tissues has been reported as well. One such source of MSCs is the Whartons Jelly (WJ) of the umbilical cord, as it provides an inexhaustible source of stem cells for potential therapeutic use. Isolation of MSCs from the umbilical cord also presents little, if any, ethical concerns, and the process of obtaining the cord tissue is relatively simple with appropriate consent from the donor. However, a great majority of studies rely on the use of bovine serum containing medium for isolation and expansion of these cells, and porcine derived trypsin for dissociating the cells during passages, which may pose potential risks for using these cells in clinical applications. It is therefore of high priority to develop a robust production process by optimizing culture variables to efficiently and consistently generate MSCs that retain desired regenerative and differentiation properties while minimizing risk of disease transmission. We have established a complete xeno-free, serum-free culture condition for isolation, expansion and characterization of WJ-MSCs, to eliminate the use of animal components right from initiation of explant culture to clinical scale expansion and cryopreservation. Growth kinetics, in vitro differentiation capacities, immunosuppressive potential and immunophenotypic characterization of the cells expanded in serum-free media have been compared against those cultured under standard fetal bovine serum (FBS) containing medium. We have also compared the colony-forming frequency and genomic stability of the large scale expanded cells. Secretome analysis was performed to compare the angiogenic cytokines and functional angiogenic potency was proved by Matrigel assays. Results presented in this report identify one such serum-free, xeno-free medium for WJ expansion. Cells cultured in serum

  20. An extinction scale-expansion unit for the Beckman DK2 spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, M.

    1967-01-01

    The paper describes a simple but accurate unit for the Beckman DK2 recording spectrophotometer, whereby any 0·1 section of the extinction (`absorbance') scale may be expanded tenfold, while preserving complete linearity in extinction. PMID:6048800

  1. Expansion of the wilderness values scale with three sub-scales: Personal maintenance, expression and learning, and societal maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy M. Schuster; Ken Cordell; Gary T. Green

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to expand the wilderness value scale administered in the 1994 and 2000 versions of the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment using questions included in the 2003 NSRE. A data set of 1,900 cases was randomly split in half. Validity of the additional questions was tested using principal component analysis, a confirmatory...

  2. Phonon contribution to RIXS spectra calculated with a cumulant expansion for the quasiparticle Green's function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Keith; Geondzhian, Andrey; Kas, Josh

    Much of the effort in many-body techniques for going beyond standard density functional theory seeks to improve the accuracy of quasiparticle energies, particularly for large or complex systems. A quantity that is sometimes overlooked is the quasiparticle spectral function. Accurately calculating satellite features due to boson excitations is essential for providing a meaningful interpretation of many experimental results, particularly for X-ray spectroscopies. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a relatively new experimental probe of the coupling of electronic states to various excitations in a material such as plasmons, magnons and phonons. The localized nature of the core hole in X-ray spectroscopies allows one to use linked-cluster formulations, as in the seminal work of Nozieres, that express the electron Green's function as a cumulant expansion rather than via a Dyson equation. Kas et al. have recently used this approach for electron-plasmon coupling in X-ray photoemission and X-ray absorption. We perform analogous work for the case of coupling to phonons, with a particular focus on RIXS. RIXS is increasingly used to study electron-phonon coupling in unconventional superconductors and it is essential to improve our interpretation of these spectra. TiO2, for which high energy resolution RIXS data was recently reported, serves as our test case.

  3. A tractable prescription for large-scale free flight expansion of wavefunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuar, P.

    2016-11-01

    A numerical recipe is given for obtaining the density image of an initially compact quantum mechanical wavefunction that has expanded by a large but finite factor under free flight. The recipe given avoids the memory storage problems that plague this type of calculation by reducing the problem to the sum of a number of fast Fourier transforms carried out on the relatively small initial lattice. The final expanded state is given exactly on a coarser magnified grid with the same number of points as the initial state. An important application of this technique is the simulation of measured time-of-flight images in ultracold atom experiments, especially when the initial clouds contain superfluid defects. It is shown that such a finite-time expansion, rather than a far-field approximation is essential to correctly predict images of defect-laden clouds, even for long flight times. Examples shown are: an expanding quasicondensate with soliton defects and a matter-wave interferometer in 3D.

  4. Uniform Asymptotic Expansion for the Helmholtz Green's Function-- Application to Inversion Preprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedlin, M. J.; Virieux, J.; van Vorst, D. G.

    2010-12-01

    In acoustic, electromagnetic, and elastic wave propagation problems, of the Helmholtz type, in inhomogeneous media, a reasonable approximation, in the JWKB limit, is given by asymptotic ray theory with appropriate phase corrections in the presence of smooth caustics. Herein, we present a modification of ray theory to account for source singularities, which correspond to line and point caustics respectively in two and three dimensions. The classical ray theory ansatz breaks down in the neighborhood of a source singularity, a manifestation of the vanishing of the cross-sectional area of the ray tube near the source. Conventional methods of fixing this problem involve surrounding the source by a homogeneous medium and computing the initial ray data on a sphere of fixed radius. Such a method is dependent on the foregoing conditions and is considered non-uniform. The new uniform asymptotic expansion ansatz for the Green’s function is based on Zauderer [1] and Yedlin [2] with the replacement of the phase term by the actual Green’s function that contains the travel-time function. An analysis will be presented in both two and three dimensions, in the frequency domain, illustrating the fundamental construction and differences in wave propagation effects. While applications of this new representation of the Green’s function include the calculation of sensitivity kernels [3], [4] a new application has presented itself in waveform inversion, especially in crosshole radar [5]. In crosshole radar waveform inversion, the received data is a three-dimensional wave, while the inversion is initially performed in two-dimensions, usually with a starting model obtained via travel-time tomography. To invert the data correctly, it must be transformed from a three-dimensional data field into a two-dimensional data field. To do so, a transfer function must be defined for the inhomogeneous media between the transmitter and receiver. Such a frequency domain transfer function can be

  5. Nucleotide excision repair and the 26S proteasome function together to promote trinucleotide repeat expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, Claire; Lahue, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underpins a number of inheritable neurological human disorders. Multiple mechanisms are thought to contribute to the expansion process. The incorrect processing of the repeat tract by DNA repair proteins can drive this mutation process forward, as expansions are suppressed following ablation of certain repair factors in mouse models and cell models of disease. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one repair pathway implicated in TNR instability, although most previous work focussed on TNR contractions, not expansions. Here we investigated the role of NER in modulating expansions of threshold-length (CTG·CAG) repeats in yeast. We show that both the global genome and transcription-coupled repair subpathways promote expansions of threshold-length TNRs. Furthermore, NER works with the 26S proteasome to drive expansions, based on analysis of double mutants defective in both pathways, and of Rad23, a protein involved in both NER and the shuttling of ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome. This work provides the first evidence that both subpathways of NER can promote threshold-length TNR expansions and that NER interacts with the proteasome to drive expansions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Towards all-order Laurent expansion of generalized hypergeometric functions around rational values of parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalmykov, M.Yu.; Kniehl, B.A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-07-15

    We prove the following theorems: 1) The Laurent expansions in {epsilon} of the Gauss hypergeometric functions {sub 2}F{sub 1}(I{sub 1}+a{epsilon},I{sub 2}+b{epsilon};I{sub 3}+(p)/(q)+c{epsilon};z), {sub 2}F{sub 1}(I{sub 1}+(p)/(q)+a{epsilon},I{sub 2}+(p/q)+b{epsilon};I{sub 3}+(p)/(q)+c{epsilon};z) and {sub 2}F{sub 1}(I{sub 1}+(p)/(q)+ a{epsilon},I{sub 2}+b{epsilon};I{sub 3}+(p)/(q)+c{epsilon};z), where I{sub 1},I{sub 2},I{sub 3},p,q are arbitrary integers, a,b,c are arbitrary numbers and {epsilon} is an infinitesimal parameter, are expressible in terms of multiple polylogarithms of q-roots of unity with coefficients that are ratios of polynomials; 2) The Laurent expansion of the Gauss hypergeometric function {sub 2}F{sub 1}(I{sub 1}+(p)/(q)+a{epsilon},I{sub 2}+b{epsilon};I{sub 3}+c{epsilon};z) is expressible in terms of multiple polylogarithms of q-roots of unity times powers of logarithm with coefficients that are ratios of polynomials; 3) The multiple inverse rational sums {sigma}{sup {infinity}}{sub j=1}({gamma}(j))/({gamma}(1+j-(p)/(q))) (z{sup j})/(j{sup c}) S{sub a{sub 1}}(j-1).. S{sub a{sub p}}(j-1) and the multiple rational sums {sigma}{sup {infinity}}{sub j=1} ({gamma}(j+(p)/(q)))/({gamma}(1+j)) (z{sup j})/(j{sup c}) S{sub a{sub 1}}(j-1).. S{sub a{sub p}}(j-1), where S{sub a}(j)={sigma}{sup j}{sub k=1}(1)/(k{sup a}) is a harmonic series and c is an arbitrary integer, are expressible in terms of multiple polylogarithms; 4) The generalized hypergeometric functions {sub p}F{sub p.1}((vector)A+(vector)a{epsilon};(vector)B+(vector)b{epsilon},(p)/(q)+B{sub p-1};z) and {sub p}F{sub p-1}((vector)A+(vector)a{epsilon},(p)/(q)+A{sub p};(vector)B+(vector)b{epsilon};z) are expressible in terms of multiple polylogarithms with coefficients that are ratios of polynomials. (orig.)

  7. Solving the functional Schroedinger equation: Yang-Mills string tension and surface critical scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, Paul E-mail: p.r.w.mansfield@durham.ac.uk

    2004-04-01

    Motivated by a heuristic model of the Yang-Mills vacuum that accurately describes the string-tension in three dimensions we develop a systematic method for solving the functional equation in a derivative expansion. This is applied to the Landau-Ginzburg theory that describes surface critical scaling in the Ising model. A Renormalisation Group analysis of the solution yields the value {eta} = 1.003 for the anomalous dimension of the correlation function of surface spins which compares well with the exact result of unity implied by Onsager's solution. We give the expansion of the corresponding {beta}-function to 17th order (which receives contributions from up to 17-loops in conventional perturbation theory). (author)

  8. Family expansion and gene rearrangements contributed to the functional specialization of PRDM genes in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcalay Myriam

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive diversification of paralogs after gene expansion is essential to increase their functional specialization. However, mode and tempo of this divergence remain mostly unclear. Here we report the comparative analysis of PRDM genes, a family of putative transcriptional regulators involved in human tumorigenesis. Results Our analysis assessed that the PRDM genes originated in metazoans, expanded in vertebrates and further duplicated in primates. We experimentally showed that fast-evolving paralogs are poorly expressed, and that the most recent duplicates, such as primate-specific PRDM7, acquire tissue-specificity. PRDM7 underwent major structural rearrangements that decreased the number of encoded Zn-Fingers and modified gene splicing. Through internal duplication and activation of a non-canonical splice site (GC-AG, PRDM7 can acquire a novel intron. We also detected an alternative isoform that can retain the intron in the mature transcript and that is predominantly expressed in human melanocytes. Conclusion Our findings show that (a molecular evolution of paralogs correlates with their expression pattern; (b gene diversification is obtained through massive genomic rearrangements; and (c splicing modification contributes to the functional specialization of novel genes.

  9. Effects of Lung Expansion Therapy on Lung Function in Patients with Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Huey Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Common complications in PMV include changes in the airway clearance mechanism, pulmonary function, and respiratory muscle strength, as well as chest radiological changes such as atelectasis. Lung expansion therapy which includes IPPB and PEEP prevents and treats pulmonary atelectasis and improves lung compliance. Our study presented that patients with PMV have improvements in lung volume and oxygenation after receiving IPPB therapy. The combination of IPPB and PEEP therapy also results in increase in respiratory muscle strength. The application of IPPB facilitates the homogeneous gas distribution in the lung and results in recruitment of collapsed alveoli. PEEP therapy may reduce risk of respiratory muscle fatigue by preventing premature airway collapse during expiration. The physiologic effects of IPPB and PEEP may result in enhancement of pulmonary function and thus increase the possibility of successful weaning from mechanical ventilator during weaning process. For patients with PMV who were under the risk of atelectasis, the application of IPPB may be considered as a supplement therapy for the enhancement of weaning outcome during their stay in the hospital.

  10. Implementation of functional assessment scales in geriatric practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Ingrid; Hesselbo, Bjørn; Pietersen, Inge

    2005-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of functional assessment scales regarding completion rate and ability to document functional changes in geriatric rehabilitation patients.......A study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of functional assessment scales regarding completion rate and ability to document functional changes in geriatric rehabilitation patients....

  11. The Expansion of Self-similar Functions in the Faber–Schauder System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy A. Timofeev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Let \\(\\Omega = A^{N}\\ be a space of right-sided innite sequences drawn from a nite alphabet \\(A = \\{0,1\\}\\, \\(N = \\{1,2,\\dots\\}\\. Let $$\\label{rho} \\rho(\\boldsymbol{x},\\boldsymbol{y} =\\sum_{k=1}^{\\infty}|x_{k} - y_{k}|2^{-k}$$- be a metric on \\(\\Omega = A^{N}\\, and \\(\\mu\\ - the Bernoulli measure on \\(\\Omega\\ with probabilities \\(p_0,p_1>0\\, \\(p_0+p_1=1\\. Denote by \\(B(\\boldsymbol{x},\\omega\\ an open ball of radius \\(r\\ centered at \\(\\boldsymbol{\\omega}\\. The main result of this paper is$$\\mu\\left(B(\\boldsymbol{\\omega},r\\right =r+\\sum_{n=0}^{\\infty}\\sum_{j=0}^{2^n-1}\\mu_{n,j}(\\boldsymbol{\\omega}\\tau(2^nr-j,$$where \\(tau(x =2\\min\\{x,1-x\\}\\, \\(0\\leq x \\leq 1\\, \\(tau(x = 0, if x<0 or x>1\\,$$mu_{n,j}(\\boldsymbol{\\omega} = \\left(1-p_{\\omega_{n+1}}\\right\\prod_{k=1}^n p_{\\omega_k\\oplus j_k},\\ \\ j = j_12^{n-1}+j_22^{n-2}+\\dots+j_n$$.The family of functions \\(1,x,\\tau(2^nx-j\\, \\(j =0,1,\\dots,2^n-1\\, \\(n=0,1,\\dots\\ is the Faber{Schauder system for the space \\(C([0, 1]\\ of continuous functions on \\([0, 1]\\.We also obtain the Faber{Schauder expansion for the Lebesgue's singular function, Cezaro curves, and Koch{Peano curves.

  12. Functional expansion of sensorimotor representation and structural reorganization of callosal connections in lower limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Elington L; Bramati, Ivanei; Rodrigues, Erika; Franzoi, Ana; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda

    2012-02-29

    Previous studies have indicated that amputation or deafferentation of a limb induces functional changes in sensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices, related to phantom limb pain. However, the extent of cortical reorganization after lower limb amputation in patients with nonpainful phantom phenomena remains uncertain. In this study, we combined functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the existence and extent of cortical and callosal plasticity in these subjects. Nine "painless" patients with lower limb amputation and nine control subjects (sex- and age-matched) underwent a 3-T MRI protocol, including fMRI with somatosensory stimulation. In amputees, we observed an expansion of activation maps of the stump in S1 and M1 of the deafferented hemisphere, spreading to neighboring regions that represent the trunk and upper limbs. We also observed that tactile stimulation of the intact foot in amputees induced a greater activation of ipsilateral S1, when compared with controls. These results demonstrate a functional remapping of S1 in lower limb amputees. However, in contrast to previous studies, these neuroplastic changes do not appear to be dependent on phantom pain but do also occur in those who reported only the presence of phantom sensation without pain. In addition, our findings indicate that amputation of a limb also induces changes in the cortical representation of the intact limb. Finally, DTI analysis showed structural changes in the corpus callosum of amputees, compatible with the hypothesis that phantom sensations may depend on inhibitory release in the sensorimotor cortex.

  13. A xenogeneic-free bioreactor system for the clinical-scale expansion of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Francisco; Campbell, Andrew; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Andrade, Pedro Z; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Wen, Yuan; Boucher, Shayne; Vemuri, Mohan C; da Silva, Cláudia L; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2014-06-01

    The large cell doses (>1 × 10(6)  cells/kg) used in clinical trials with mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) will require an efficient production process. Moreover, monitoring and control of MSC ex-vivo expansion is critical to provide a safe and reliable cell product. Bioprocess engineering approaches, such as bioreactor technology, offer the adequate tools to develop and optimize a cost-effective culture system for the rapid expansion of human MSC for cellular therapy. Herein, a xenogeneic (xeno)-free microcarrier-based culture system was successfully established for bone marrow (BM) MSC and adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cell (ASC) cultivation using a 1L-scale controlled stirred-tank bioreactor, allowing the production of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(8) and (4.5 ± 0.2) × 10(7) cells for BM MSC and ASC, respectively, after 7 days. Additionally, the effect of different percent air saturation values (%Airsat ) and feeding regime on the proliferation and metabolism of BM MSC was evaluated. No significant differences in cell growth and metabolic patterns were observed under 20% and 9%Airsat . Also, the three different feeding regimes studied-(i) 25% daily medium renewal, (ii) 25% medium renewal every 2 days, and (iii) fed-batch addition of concentrated nutrients and growth factors every 2 days-yielded similar cell numbers, and only slight metabolic differences were observed. Moreover, the immunophenotype (positive for CD73, CD90 and CD105 and negative for CD31, CD80 and HLA-DR) and multilineage differentiative potential of expanded cells were not affected upon bioreactor culture. These results demonstrated the feasibility of expanding human MSC from different sources in a clinically relevant expansion configuration in a controlled microcarrier-based stirred culture system under xeno-free conditions. The further optimization of this bioreactor culture system will represent a crucial step towards an efficient GMP-compliant clinical-scale MSC

  14. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-12-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10-5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g-1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g-1) had a negative rise potential (-31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to -6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. These results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  15. Communication: Density functional theory embedding with the orthogonality constrained basis set expansion procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpitt, Tanner; Brorsen, Kurt R.

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) embedding approaches have generated considerable interest in the field of computational chemistry because they enable calculations on larger systems by treating subsystems at different levels of theory. To circumvent the calculation of the non-additive kinetic potential, various projector methods have been developed to ensure the orthogonality of molecular orbitals between subsystems. Herein the orthogonality constrained basis set expansion (OCBSE) procedure is implemented to enforce this subsystem orbital orthogonality without requiring a level shifting parameter. This scheme is a simple alternative to existing parameter-free projector-based schemes, such as the Huzinaga equation. The main advantage of the OCBSE procedure is that excellent convergence behavior is attained for DFT-in-DFT embedding without freezing any of the subsystem densities. For the three chemical systems studied, the level of accuracy is comparable to or higher than that obtained with the Huzinaga scheme with frozen subsystem densities. Allowing both the high-level and low-level DFT densities to respond to each other during DFT-in-DFT embedding calculations provides more flexibility and renders this approach more generally applicable to chemical systems. It could also be useful for future extensions to embedding approaches combining wavefunction theories and DFT. PMID:28576084

  16. Output Tracking Control of Switched Hybrid Systems: A Fliess Functional Expansion Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghua He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The output tracking problem is investigated for a nonlinear affine system with multiple modes of continuous control inputs. We convert the family of nonlinear affine systems under consideration into a switched hybrid system by introducing a multiple-valued logic variable. The Fliess functional expansion is adopted to express the input and output relationship of the switched hybrid system. The optimal switching control is determined for a multiple-step output tracking performance index. The proposed approach is applied to a multitarget tracking problem for a flight vehicle aiming for one real target with several decoys flying around it in the terminal guidance course. These decoys appear as apparent targets and have to be distinguished with the approaching of the flight vehicle. The guidance problem of one flight vehicle versus multiple apparent targets should be considered if no large miss distance might be caused due to the limitation of the flight vehicle maneuverability. The target orientation at each time interval is determined. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Remote haptic perception of slanted surfaces shows the same scale expansion as visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Dennis M; McManama, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Previous work has shown that overestimates of geographic slant depend on the modality used (verbal or haptic). Recently, that line of reasoning has come into question for many reasons, not the least of which is that the typical method used for measuring "action" has been the use of a palm board, which is not well calibrated to any type of action toward slanted surfaces. In the present work, we investigated how a remote haptic task that has been well calibrated to action in previous work is related to verbal overestimates of slanted surfaces that are out of reach. The results show that haptic estimates are perceptually equivalent to the verbal overestimates that have been found in numerous previous studies. This work shows that the haptic perceptual system is scaled in the same way as the visual perceptual system for estimating the orientation of slanted surfaces that are out of reach.

  18. Scheme-Independent Series Expansions at an Infrared Zero of the Beta Function in Asymptotically Free Gauge Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, T. A.; Shrock, R.

    2016-01-01

    We consider an asymptotically free vectorial gauge theory, with gauge group $G$ and $N_f$ fermions in a representation $R$ of $G$, having an infrared (IR) zero in the beta function at $\\alpha_{IR}$. We present general formulas for scheme-independent series expansions of quantities, evaluated...... at $\\alpha_{IR}$, as powers of an $N_f$-dependent expansion parameter, $\\Delta_f$. First, we apply these to calculate the derivative $d\\beta/d\\alpha$ evaluated at $\\alpha_{IR}$, denoted $\\beta'_{IR}$, which is equal to the anomalous dimension of the ${\\rm Tr}(F_{\\mu\

  19. Recovering functions from the spherical mean transform with data on an ellipse using eigenfunction expansion in elliptical coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Yehonatan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a new inversion procedure for recovering functions, defined on R2 , from the spherical mean transform, which integrates functions on a prescribed family Λ of circles, where Λ consists of circles whose centers belong to a given ellipse E on the plane. The method presented here follows the same procedure which was used by Norton (J Acoust Soc Am 67:1266-1273, 1980) for recovering functions in case where Λ consists of circles with centers on a circle. However, at some point we will have to modify the method in [24] by using expansion in elliptical coordinates, rather than spherical coordinates, in order to solve the more generalized elliptical case. We will rely on a recent result obtained by Cohl and Volkmer (J Phys A Math Theor 45:355204, 2012) for the eigenfunction expansion of the Bessel function in elliptical coordinates.

  20. Phase diagram of electronic systems with quadratic Fermi nodes in 2 expansion, 4 -ɛ expansion, and functional renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Lukas; Herbut, Igor F.

    2017-02-01

    Several materials in the regime of strong spin-orbit interaction such as HgTe, the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7 , and the half-Heusler compound LaPtBi, as well as various systems related to these three prototype materials, are believed to host a quadratic band touching point at the Fermi level. Recently, it has been proposed that such a three-dimensional gapless state is unstable to a Mott-insulating ground state at low temperatures when the number of band touching points N at the Fermi level is smaller than a certain critical number Nc. We further substantiate and quantify this scenario by various approaches. Using ɛ expansion near two spatial dimensions, we show that Nc=64 /(25 ɛ2) +O (1 /ɛ ) and demonstrate that the instability for N functional renormalization group equations in the dynamical bosonization scheme which we show to agree to one-loop order with the results from ɛ expansion both near two as well as near four dimensions, and which smoothly interpolates between these two perturbatively accessible limits for general 2

  1. Isoreticular Expansion of Metal-Organic Frameworks with Multiple Functionalities and Controlled Pore Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hexiang

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are made by linking organic and inorganic molecular building blocks into extended structures through strong bonds. With a judicious choice of inorganic joints and various functional groups available in organic links, a large number of MOFs have been synthesized in the past decade. Along with the fast expansion of the family of MOFs, important applications emerge including hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture, both of which address the most pressing societal demand for clean and sustainable energy resources. Although numerous MOFs are now known and they have found widespread applications, the introduction of more than one kind of building block into their crystal structures remains challenging. One of the main objectives of this study is to demonstrate the successful incorporating of multiple functional groups into MOFs. Here, a new strategy has been developed to achieve the synthesis of a series of eighteen multivariate MOFs (MTV-MOFs) containing up to eight distinct functional groups, while their parent topologies were fully preserved. The backbone of these MTV-MOFs was found to be ordered, while the orientation, number, relative position and ratio of the functionalities along the backbone could be controlled by virtue of the unchanged length of the link and its unaltered connectivity. This strategy allows us to endow the pores of these MOFs with a new level of complexity which far exceeds any held by that of the original mono-functional MOFs---an aspect that makes it possible to fine-tune the pore environment of a porous crystal with favorable implications. Indeed, one member of these MTV-MOFs has already shown an 87% improvement of the hydrogen uptake while another member demonstrated a 400% increase in CO2 selectivity comparing to their mono-functional counterparts. Another goal of this study has been to maximize MOF porosity and pore size. There were three major obstacles against expanding the pore size of porous crystals

  2. Multiscale functions, scale dynamics, and applications to partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresson, Jacky; Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Modeling phenomena from experimental data always begins with a choice of hypothesis on the observed dynamics such as determinism, randomness, and differentiability. Depending on these choices, different behaviors can be observed. The natural question associated to the modeling problem is the following: "With a finite set of data concerning a phenomenon, can we recover its underlying nature? From this problem, we introduce in this paper the definition of multi-scale functions, scale calculus, and scale dynamics based on the time scale calculus [see Bohner, M. and Peterson, A., Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications (Springer Science & Business Media, 2001)] which is used to introduce the notion of scale equations. These definitions will be illustrated on the multi-scale Okamoto's functions. Scale equations are analysed using scale regimes and the notion of asymptotic model for a scale equation under a particular scale regime. The introduced formalism explains why a single scale equation can produce distinct continuous models even if the equation is scale invariant. Typical examples of such equations are given by the scale Euler-Lagrange equation. We illustrate our results using the scale Newton's equation which gives rise to a non-linear diffusion equation or a non-linear Schrödinger equation as asymptotic continuous models depending on the particular fractional scale regime which is considered.

  3. Developing knowledge level scale of functional foods: Validity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to develop a scale to determine the knowledge levels of University students on functional foods and to investigate the validity and reliability of the scale. The research was conducted on 417 (209 girls and 208 boys) undergraduate students in Selcuk University regarding functional foods.

  4. Scramjet test flow reconstruction for a large-scale expansion tube, Part 1: quasi-one-dimensional modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildfind, D. E.; Jacobs, P. A.; Morgan, R. G.; Chan, W. Y. K.; Gollan, R. J.

    2017-11-01

    Large-scale free-piston driven expansion tubes have uniquely high total pressure capabilities which make them an important resource for development of access-to-space scramjet engine technology. However, many aspects of their operation are complex, and their test flows are fundamentally unsteady and difficult to measure. While computational fluid dynamics methods provide an important tool for quantifying these flows, these calculations become very expensive with increasing facility size and therefore have to be carefully constructed to ensure sufficient accuracy is achieved within feasible computational times. This study examines modelling strategies for a Mach 10 scramjet test condition developed for The University of Queensland's X3 facility. The present paper outlines the challenges associated with test flow reconstruction, describes the experimental set-up for the X3 experiments, and then details the development of an experimentally tuned quasi-one-dimensional CFD model of the full facility. The 1-D model, which accurately captures longitudinal wave processes, is used to calculate the transient flow history in the shock tube. This becomes the inflow to a higher-fidelity 2-D axisymmetric simulation of the downstream facility, detailed in the Part 2 companion paper, leading to a validated, fully defined nozzle exit test flow.

  5. Maxillary Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Anirudh; Mathur, Rinku

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Maxillary transverse discrepancy usually requires expansion of the palate by a combination of orthopedic and orthodontic tooth movements. Three expansion treatment modalities are used today: rapid maxillary expansion, slow maxillary expansion and surgically assisted maxillary expansion.This article aims to review the maxillary expansion by all the three modalities and a brief on commonly used appliances.

  6. Comparative and functional triatomine genomics reveals reductions and expansions in insecticide resistance-related gene families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucila Traverso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Triatomine insects are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that is the causative agent of Chagas' disease. This is a neglected disease affecting approximately 8 million people in Latin America. The existence of diverse pyrethroid resistant populations of at least two species demonstrates the potential of triatomines to develop high levels of insecticide resistance. Therefore, the incorporation of strategies for resistance management is a main concern for vector control programs. Three enzymatic superfamilies are thought to mediate xenobiotic detoxification and resistance: Glutathione Transferases (GSTs, Cytochromes P450 (CYPs and Carboxyl/Cholinesterases (CCEs. Improving our knowledge of key triatomine detoxification enzymes will strengthen our understanding of insecticide resistance processes in vectors of Chagas' disease.The discovery and description of detoxification gene superfamilies in normalized transcriptomes of three triatomine species: Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma infestans and Triatoma pallidipennis is presented. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of these superfamilies among the triatomine transcriptomes and the genome of Rhodnius prolixus, also a triatomine vector of Chagas' disease, and other well-studied insect genomes was performed. The expression pattern of detoxification genes in R. prolixus transcriptomes from key organs was analyzed. The comparisons reveal gene expansions in Sigma class GSTs, CYP3 in CYP superfamily and clade E in CCE superfamily. Moreover, several CYP families identified in these triatomines have not yet been described in other insects. Conversely, several groups of insecticide resistance related enzymes within each enzyme superfamily are reduced or lacking in triatomines. Furthermore, our qRT-PCR results showed an increase in the expression of a CYP4 gene in a T. infestans population resistant to pyrethroids. These results could point to an involvement of metabolic detoxification mechanisms

  7. Expansion of amphibian intronless interferons revises the paradigm for interferon evolution and functional diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferons (IFNs) are key cytokines identified in vertebrates, and evolutionary dominance of intronless IFN genes in amniotes is a signature event in IFN evolution. For the first time, we show that the emergence and expansion of intronless IFN genes is evident in amphibians, shown by 24-37 intronle...

  8. COMBINED EFFECT OF PNF STRETCHING WITH CHEST MOBILITY EXERCISES ON CHEST EXPANSION AND PULMONARY FUNCTIONS FOR ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Babu .K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: PNF stretching and chest mobility exercises found to be effective in elder patients, however the combined effectiveness of these techniques were unknown. The purpose of this study is to find the effect of Hold-relax PNF stretching technique for pectoralis muscle combined with chest mobility exercises on improvement of chest expansion and pulmonary function for elderly subjects. Method: An Experimental study design, 30 subjects with age group above 60 years were randomized 15 subjects each into Study and Control group. Control group received Supervised Active Assisted Exercise Program while Study group received Hold-relax PNF Stretching for pectoralis muscle, Chest Mobility Exercises Program and supervised Active Assisted Exercise Program for a period of one week. Outcome measures such as chest expansion at axilla and xiphisternum and pulmonary function test such as FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC were measured before and after one week of treatment. Results: Analysis using paired ‘t’ test within the group found that there is no statistically significant difference within control group where as there is a statistical significant difference within study group. Comparative analysis of pre-intervention means shown that there is no statistically significant difference between the groups. Comparative analysis of post-intervention means shown that there is a statistically significant difference in means of Chest expansion, FEV1/FVC and there is no statistical significant difference in FEV1 and FVC between study and control groups. Conclusion: It is concluded that one week of combined Hold-relax PNF stretching for pectoralis muscle with chest mobility exercises shown significant improvement in chest expansion and pulmonary function test such as forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity than only active assisted exercise program for elderly subjects.

  9. Perspective: Methods for large-scale density functional calculations on metallic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Jolyon; Sarwar, Misbah; Thompsett, David; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2016-12-14

    Current research challenges in areas such as energy and bioscience have created a strong need for Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on metallic nanostructures of hundreds to thousands of atoms to provide understanding at the atomic level in technologically important processes such as catalysis and magnetic materials. Linear-scaling DFT methods for calculations with thousands of atoms on insulators are now reaching a level of maturity. However such methods are not applicable to metals, where the continuum of states through the chemical potential and their partial occupancies provide significant hurdles which have yet to be fully overcome. Within this perspective we outline the theory of DFT calculations on metallic systems with a focus on methods for large-scale calculations, as required for the study of metallic nanoparticles. We present early approaches for electronic energy minimization in metallic systems as well as approaches which can impose partial state occupancies from a thermal distribution without access to the electronic Hamiltonian eigenvalues, such as the classes of Fermi operator expansions and integral expansions. We then focus on the significant progress which has been made in the last decade with developments which promise to better tackle the length-scale problem in metals. We discuss the challenges presented by each method, the likely future directions that could be followed and whether an accurate linear-scaling DFT method for metals is in sight.

  10. Expansion and functional diversification of a leucyl aminopeptidase family that encodes the major protein constituents of Drosophila sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karr Timothy L

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary diversification of gene families through gene creation (and loss is a dynamic process believed to be critical to the evolution of functional novelty. Previous identification of a closely related family of eight annotated metalloprotease genes of the M17 Merops family in the Drosophila sperm proteome (termed, Sperm-LeucylAminoPeptidases, S-LAPs 1-8 led us to hypothesize that this gene family may have experienced such a diversification during insect evolution. Results To assess putative functional activities of S-LAPs, we (i demonstrated that all S-LAPs are specifically expressed in the testis, (ii confirmed their presence in sperm by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, (iii determined that they represent a major portion of the total protein in sperm and (iv identified aminopeptidase enzymatic activity in sperm extracts using LAP-specific substrates. Functionally significant divergence at the canonical M17 active site indicates that the largest phylogenetic group of S-LAPs lost catalytic activity and likely acquired novel, as yet undetermined, functions in sperm prior to the expansion of the gene family. Conclusions Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed the dramatic expansion of the S-LAP gene family during Drosophila evolution and copy number heterogeneity in the genomes of related insects. This finding, in conjunction with the loss of catalytic activity and potential neofunctionalization amongst some family members, extends empirical support for pervasive "revolving door" turnover in the evolution of reproductive gene family composition and function.

  11. Landscape scale assessment of ecosystem goods and services and the extent, location, and magnitude of urban-suburban expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human development adjoining coastal cities is the prevalent force changing the Anthropocene landscape. The extent, location, and magnitude of urban-suburban expansion can drastically modify how important features of ecosystems are effected. These effects are best summarized usin...

  12. Empirical modeling of single-wake advection and expansion using full-scale pulsed lidar-based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machefaux, Ewan; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Troldborg, Niels

    2015-01-01

    and to obtain an estimate of the wake expansion in a fixed frame of reference. A comparison shows good agreement between the measured average expansion and the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) large eddy simulation–actuator line computations. Frandsen’s expansion model seems to predict the wake expansion......In the present paper, single-wake dynamics have been studied both experimentally and numerically. The use of pulsed lidar measurements allows for validation of basic dynamic wake meandering modeling assumptions. Wake center tracking is used to estimate the wake advection velocity experimentally...... fairly well in the far wake but lacks accuracy in the outer region of the near wake. An empirical relationship, relating maximum wake induction and wake advection velocity, is derived and linked to the characteristics of a spherical vortex structure. Furthermore, a new empirical model for single...

  13. The Cost Function and Scale Economies in Academic Research Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lewis Guodo

    2002-01-01

    This empirical research examined scale economies of academic research libraries that belong to the Association of Research Libraries and developed a total cost function for estimating economies of scale. Argues that libraries are information provision organizations that provide multiproducts and multiservices and compares this study with previous…

  14. The Cost Function and Scale Economies in Academic Research Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lewis G.

    2003-01-01

    This empirical research examined scale economies of academic research libraries and developed a total cost function for estimating economies of scale. Suggests that libraries in general, and academic research libraries in particular, are information provision organizations that provide multiproducts and multiservices. Findings indicate that slight…

  15. Bessel function expansion to reduce the calculation time and memory usage for cylindrical computer-generated holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Yusuke; Barada, Daisuke; Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2017-07-10

    This study proposes a method to reduce the calculation time and memory usage required for calculating cylindrical computer-generated holograms. The wavefront on the cylindrical observation surface is represented as a convolution integral in the 3D Fourier domain. The Fourier transformation of the kernel function involving this convolution integral is analytically performed using a Bessel function expansion. The analytical solution can drastically reduce the calculation time and the memory usage without any cost, compared with the numerical method using fast Fourier transform to Fourier transform the kernel function. In this study, we present the analytical derivation, the efficient calculation of Bessel function series, and a numerical simulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the analytical solution through comparisons of calculation time and memory usage.

  16. Functional and Structural Characterization of a Receptor-Like Kinase Involved in Germination and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs are widespread in different plant species and play important roles in growth and development. Germination inhibition is vital for the completion of seed maturation and cell expansion is a fundamental cellular process driving plant growth. Here, we report genetic and structural characterizations of a functionally uncharacterized LRR-RLK, named GRACE (Germination Repression and Cell Expansion receptor-like kinase. Overexpression of GRACE in Arabidopsis exhibited delayed germination, enlarged cotyledons, rosette leaves and stubbier petioles. Conversely, these phenotypes were reversed in the T-DNA insertion knock-down mutant grace-1 plants. A crystal structure of the extracellular domain of GRACE (GRACE-LRR determined at the resolution of 3.0 Å revealed that GRACE-LRR assumed a right-handed super-helical structure with an island domain (ID. Structural comparison showed that structure of the ID in GRACE-LRR is strikingly different from those observed in other LRR-RLKs. This structural observation implies that GRACE might perceive a new ligand for signaling. Collectively, our data support roles of GRACE in repressing seed germination and promoting cell expansion of Arabidopsis, presumably by perception of unknown ligand(s.

  17. Expansion and Functional Divergence of AP2 Group Genes in Spermatophytes Determined by Molecular Evolution and Arabidopsis Mutant Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengkai; Cheng, Tielong; Lu, Mengzhu; Liu, Guangxin; Li, Meiping; Shi, Jisen; Lu, Ye; Laux, Thomas; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The APETALA2 (AP2) genes represent the AP2 group within a large group of DNA-binding proteins called AP2/EREBP. The AP2 gene is functional and necessary for flower development, stem cell maintenance, and seed development, whereas the other members of AP2 group redundantly affect flowering time. Here we study the phylogeny of AP2 group genes in spermatophytes. Spermatophyte AP2 group genes can be classified into AP2 and TOE types, six clades, and we found that the AP2 group homologs in gymnosperms belong to the AP2 type, whereas TOE types are absent, which indicates the AP2 type gene are more ancient and TOE type was split out of AP2 type and losing the major function. In Brassicaceae, the expansion of AP2 and TOE type lead to the gene number of AP2 group were up to six. Purifying selection appears to have been the primary driving force of spermatophyte AP2 group evolution, although positive selection occurred in the AP2 clade. The transition from exon to intron of AtAP2 in Arabidopsis mutant leads to the loss of gene function and the same situation was found in AtTOE2. Combining this evolutionary analysis and published research, the results suggest that typical AP2 group genes may first appear in gymnosperms and diverged in angiosperms, following expansion of group members and functional differentiation. In angiosperms, AP2 genes (AP2 clade) inherited key functions from ancestors and other genes of AP2 group lost most function but just remained flowering time controlling in gene formation. In this study, the phylogenies of AP2 group genes in spermatophytes was analyzed, which supported the evidence for the research of gene functional evolution of AP2 group.

  18. Test Review: Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allee-Smith, Paula J.; Winters, Rebecca R.; Drake, Amanda; Joslin, Amanda K.

    2013-01-01

    The Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS), authored by Russell A. Barkley and published by Guilford in 2011, is an individually administered assessment tool that may be used to evaluate adults ages 18 to 81. The purpose of this measure is to screen those who may be experiencing executive functioning (EF) deficits in…

  19. Nonperturbative Series Expansion of Green's Functions: The Anatomy of Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering in the Doped Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2017-12-01

    We present a nonperturbative, divergence-free series expansion of Green's functions using effective operators. The method is especially suited for computing correlators of complex operators as a series of correlation functions of simpler forms. We apply the method to study low-energy excitations in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) in doped one- and two-dimensional single-band Hubbard models. The RIXS operator is expanded into polynomials of spin, density, and current operators weighted by fundamental x-ray spectral functions. These operators couple to different polarization channels resulting in simple selection rules. The incident photon energy dependent coefficients help to pinpoint main RIXS contributions from different degrees of freedom. We show in particular that, with parameters pertaining to cuprate superconductors, local spin excitation dominates the RIXS spectral weight over a wide doping range in the cross-polarization channel.

  20. Acute plasma volume expansion alters cardiovascular but not thermal function during moderate intensity prolonged exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, B D; Green, H J; Grant, S M; Tarnopolsky, M A

    2000-03-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that the increase in plasma volume (PV) that typically occurs with training results in improved cardiovascular and thermal regulation during prolonged exercise, eight untrained males (V(O2)peak = 3.52 +/- 0.12 L x min(-1)) performed 90 min of cycle ergometry at 62% V(O2)peak before and after acute PV expansion. Subjects were infused with a PV-expanding solution (dextran (6%) or Pentaspan (10%)) equivalent to 6.7 mL x kg(-1) body mass (PVX) or acted as their own control (CON) in a randomized order. PVX resulted in a calculated 15.8% increase in resting PV, which relative to CON, was maintained throughout the exercise (P performance without affecting the thermoregulatory response to prolonged cycle exercise.

  1. Comparison of Conjugate Gradient Density Matrix Search and Chebyshev Expansion Methods for Avoiding Diagonalization in Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Kevin R.; Daniels, Andrew D.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-01-01

    We report a comparison of two linear-scaling methods which avoid the diagonalization bottleneck of traditional electronic structure algorithms. The Chebyshev expansion method (CEM) is implemented for carbon tight-binding calculations of large systems and its memory and timing requirements compared to those of our previously implemented conjugate gradient density matrix search (CG-DMS). Benchmark calculations are carried out on icosahedral fullerenes from C60 to C8640 and the linear scaling memory and CPU requirements of the CEM demonstrated. We show that the CPU requisites of the CEM and CG-DMS are similar for calculations with comparable accuracy.

  2. Chaotic expansion and smoothness of some functionals of the fractional Brownian motion

    OpenAIRE

    Eddahbi, M’hamed; Vives, Josep

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with some additive functionals of the fractional Brownian motion that arise as limits in law of some occupation times of this process. In concrete, this functionals are obtained via the Cauchy principal value and the Hadamard finite part. We derive some regularity properties of theses functionals in Sobolev-Watanabe sense.

  3. Large-scale expansion of human skin-derived precursor cells (hSKPs) in stirred suspension bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrao, Denver C; Boon, Kathryn; Borys, Breanna; Sinha, Sarthak; Kumar, Ranjan; Biernaskie, Jeff; Kallos, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Human skin-derived precursor cells (hSKPs) are multipotent adult stem cells found in the dermis of human skin. Incorporation of hSKPs into split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs), the current gold standard to treat severe burns or tissue resections, has been proposed as a treatment option to enhance skin wound healing and tissue function. For this approach to be clinically viable substantial quantities of hSKPs are required, which is the rate-limiting step, as only a few thousand hSKPs can be isolated from an autologous skin biopsy without causing donor site morbidity. In order to produce sufficient quantities of clinically viable cells, we have developed a bioprocess capable of expanding hSKPs as aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors (SSBs). In this study, we found hSKPs from adult donors to expand significantly more (P < 0.05) at 60 rpm in SSBs than in static cultures. Furthermore, the utility of the SSBs, at 60 rpm is demonstrated by serial passaging of hSKPs from a small starting population, which can be isolated from an autologous skin biopsy without causing donor site morbidity. At 60 rpm, aggregates were markedly smaller and did not experience oxygen diffusional limitations, as seen in hSKPs cultured at 40 rpm. While hSKPs also grew at 80 rpm (0.74 Pa) and 100 rpm (1 Pa), they produced smaller aggregates due to high shear stress. The pH of the media in all the SSBs was closer to biological conditions and significantly different (P < 0.05) from static cultures, which recorded acidic pH conditions. The nutrient concentrations of the media in all the SSBs and static cultures did not drop below acceptable limits. Furthermore, there was no significant build-up of waste products to limit hSKP expansion in the SSBs. In addition, hSKP markers were maintained in the 60 rpm SSB as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. This method of growing hSKPs in a batch culture at 60 rpm in a SSB represents an important first step in developing an

  4. Sub-50 nm Scale to Micrometer Scale Soft Lithographic Patterning of Functional Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, A.

    2011-01-01

    This PhD thesis addresses two major issues: 1) Fabricating nanometer-scale patterns of functional materials, 2) Extending the applicability of soft lithographic processes to a wide range of functional materials on conventional silicon substrates and flexible plastic substrates. This thesis describes

  5. Solving the functional Schrödinger equation: Yang-Mills string tension and surface critical scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Paul

    2004-04-01

    Motivated by a heuristic model of the Yang-Mills vacuum that accurately describes the string-tension in three dimensions we develop a systematic method for solving the functional Schrödinger equation in a derivative expansion. This is applied to the Landau-Ginzburg theory that describes surface critical scaling in the Ising model. A Renormalisation Group analysis of the solution yields the value eta = 1.003 for the anomalous dimension of the correlation function of surface spins which compares well with the exact result of unity implied by Onsager's solution. We give the expansion of the corresponding beta-function to 17-th order (which receives contributions from up to 17-loops in conventional perturbation theory).

  6. Functional Independent Scaling Relation for ORR/OER Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rune; Hansen, Heine Anton; Dickens, Colin F.

    2016-01-01

    A widely used adsorption energy scaling relation between OH* and OOH* intermediates in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), has previously been determined using density functional theory and shown to dictate a minimum thermodynamic overpotential for both...... reactions. Here, we show that the oxygen-oxygen bond in the OOH* intermediate is, however, not well described with the previously used class of exchange-correlation functionals. By quantifying and correcting the systematic error, an improved description of gaseous peroxide species versus experimental data...... and a reduction in calculational uncertainty is obtained. For adsorbates, we find that the systematic error largely cancels the vdW interaction missing in the original determination of the scaling relation. An improved scaling relation, which is fully independent of the applied exchange-correlation functional...

  7. Intensive Working Memory Training Produces Functional Changes in Large-scale Frontoparietal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Todd W; Waskom, Michael L; Gabrieli, John D E

    2016-04-01

    Working memory is central to human cognition, and intensive cognitive training has been shown to expand working memory capacity in a given domain. It remains unknown, however, how the neural systems that support working memory are altered through intensive training to enable the expansion of working memory capacity. We used fMRI to measure plasticity in activations associated with complex working memory before and after 20 days of training. Healthy young adults were randomly assigned to train on either a dual n-back working memory task or a demanding visuospatial attention task. Training resulted in substantial and task-specific expansion of dual n-back abilities accompanied by changes in the relationship between working memory load and activation. Training differentially affected activations in two large-scale frontoparietal networks thought to underlie working memory: the executive control network and the dorsal attention network. Activations in both networks linearly scaled with working memory load before training, but training dissociated the role of the two networks and eliminated this relationship in the executive control network. Load-dependent functional connectivity both within and between these two networks increased following training, and the magnitudes of increased connectivity were positively correlated with improvements in task performance. These results provide insight into the adaptive neural systems that underlie large gains in working memory capacity through training.

  8. Expansion of 3D human induced pluripotent stem cell aggregates in bioreactors: Bioprocess intensification and scaling-up approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecasis, Bernardo; Aguiar, Tiago; Arnault, Émilie; Costa, Rita; Gomes-Alves, Patricia; Aspegren, Anders; Serra, Margarida; Alves, Paula M

    2017-03-20

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) are attractive tools for drug screening and disease modeling and promising candidates for cell therapy applications. However, to achieve the high numbers of cells required for these purposes, scalable and clinical-grade technologies must be established. In this study, we use environmentally controlled stirred-tank bioreactors operating in perfusion as a powerful tool for bioprocess intensification of hiPSC production. We demonstrate the importance of controlling the dissolved oxygen concentration at low levels (4%) and perfusion at 1.3day-1 dilution rate to improve hiPSC growth as aggregates in a xeno-free medium. This strategy allowed for increased cell specific growth rate, maximum volumetric concentrations (4.7×106cell/mL) and expansion factors (approximately 19 in total cells), resulting in a 2.6-fold overall improvement in cell yields. Extensive cell characterization, including whole proteomic analysis, was performed to confirm that cells' pluripotent phenotype was maintained during culture. A scalable protocol for continuous expansion of hiPSC aggregates in bioreactors was implemented using mechanical dissociation for aggregate disruption and cell passaging. A total expansion factor of 1100 in viable cells was obtained in 11days of culture, while cells maintained their proliferation capacity, pluripotent phenotype and potential as well as genomic stability after 3 sequential passages in bioreactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. General post-Minkowskian expansion and application of the phase function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Cheng-Gang; Shao, Cheng-Gang

    2017-07-01

    The phase function is a useful tool to study all observations of space missions, since it can give all the information about light propagation in a gravitational field. For the extreme accuracy of the modern space missions, a precise relativistic modeling of observations is required. So, we develop a recursive procedure enabling us to expand the phase function into a perturbative series of ascending powers of the Newtonian gravitational constant. Any n th-order perturbation of the phase function can be determined by the integral along the straight line connecting two point events. To illustrate the result, we carry out the calculation of the phase function outside a static, spherically symmetric body up to the order of G2. Then, we develop a precise relativistic model that is able to calculate the phase function and the derivatives of the phase function in the gravitational field of rotating and uniformly moving bodies. This model allows the computing of the Doppler, radio science, and astrometric observables of the space missions in the Solar System. With the development of space technology, the relativistic corrections due to the motion of a planet's spin must be considered in the high-precision space missions in the near future. As an example, we give the estimates of the relativistic corrections on the observables about the space missions TianQin and BEACON.

  10. Robust determination of the chemical potential in the pole expansion and selected inversion method for solving Kohn-Sham density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Weile; Lin, Lin

    2017-10-01

    Fermi operator expansion (FOE) methods are powerful alternatives to diagonalization type methods for solving Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT). One example is the pole expansion and selected inversion (PEXSI) method, which approximates the Fermi operator by rational matrix functions and reduces the computational complexity to at most quadratic scaling for solving KSDFT. Unlike diagonalization type methods, the chemical potential often cannot be directly read off from the result of a single step of evaluation of the Fermi operator. Hence multiple evaluations are needed to be sequentially performed to compute the chemical potential to ensure the correct number of electrons within a given tolerance. This hinders the performance of FOE methods in practice. In this paper, we develop an efficient and robust strategy to determine the chemical potential in the context of the PEXSI method. The main idea of the new method is not to find the exact chemical potential at each self-consistent-field (SCF) iteration but to dynamically and rigorously update the upper and lower bounds for the true chemical potential, so that the chemical potential reaches its convergence along the SCF iteration. Instead of evaluating the Fermi operator for multiple times sequentially, our method uses a two-level strategy that evaluates the Fermi operators in parallel. In the regime of full parallelization, the wall clock time of each SCF iteration is always close to the time for one single evaluation of the Fermi operator, even when the initial guess is far away from the converged solution. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method using examples with metallic and insulating characters, as well as results from ab initio molecular dynamics.

  11. Thoracic malformation with early-onset scoliosis: effect of serial VEPTR expansion thoracoplasty on lung growth and function in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Etsuro K; Yang, Charles I; Deeney, Vincent F

    2009-03-01

    The effect on pulmonary function of serial VEPTR expansion thoracoplasty was studied longitudinally in anesthetized children with spondylothoracic dysplasia using a special mobile unit. The median age of 24 children at the start of surgery was 4.6 years (1.8-10.8) and most exhibited a moderate-to-severe restrictive lung defect. After a median of 3.2 years (1.0-6.5), their forced vital capacity (FVC) was found to have increased by an average of 11.1%/year. The rate of increase was greater in children who were younger than 6 years at the start of the study than in older children (14.5% versus 6.5%, p<0.01). The average specific respiratory system compliance (C(rs)) was mildly-to-moderately decreased at the start, and over the study it decreased on average to 56% of the initial value in spite of clinically successful expansion thoracoplasty and lung growth, indicating increasing stiffness of the thorax with growth.

  12. Development of a scale of executive functioning for the RBANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert J; Kitchen Andren, Katherine A; Tolle, Kathryn A

    2017-02-22

    The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) is a cognitive battery that contains scales of several cognitive abilities, but no scale in the instrument is exclusively dedicated to executive functioning. Although the subtests allow for observation of executive-type errors, each error is of fairly low base rate, and healthy and clinical normative data are lacking on the frequency of these types of errors, making their significance difficult to interpret in isolation. The aim of this project was to create an RBANS executive errors scale (RBANS EE) with items comprised of qualitatively dysexecutive errors committed throughout the test. Participants included Veterans referred for outpatient neuropsychological testing. Items were initially selected based on theoretical literature and were retained based on item-total correlations. The RBANS EE (a percentage calculated by dividing the number of dysexecutive errors by the total number of responses) was moderately related to each of seven established measures of executive functioning and was strongly predictive of dichotomous classification of executive impairment. Thus, the scale had solid concurrent validity, justifying its use as a supplementary scale. The RBANS EE requires no additional administration time and can provide a quantified measure of otherwise unmeasured aspects of executive functioning.

  13. Off The ScaleExpansion or Development? A Small Town within a Metropolitan Zone as an Alternative Place of Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz-Wróbel, Agnieszka

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this paper is to point out the types of spatial changes that the small towns located in Krakow’s range of influence are currently undergoing, as well as what are the consequences of the various types of changes in these towns. The author asks the question whether the current changes seen in small towns that are under the influence of Krakow can be described as sustainable development – at the basis of which is the increasing of the quality of the functional and spatial structure of a town while preserving its qualities and character – or, on the contrary, that it is more appropriate to describe the changes in the spatial structure of towns as an expansion, which is related only to an increase in their surface area or an increase in the density of their built environment? An attempt has also been made to determine the cause of these changes. An analysis of a set of towns in terms of their accessibility in relation to Krakow, as well as the demographic changes in towns in recent years, has been carried out. This research was useful in determining the dynamic of urban changes or their stagnation. Afterwards, groups of towns with varying degrees of transformation (towns that have been intensively transformed, towns with a balanced degree of spatial changes and towns which remain on the side-lines) were established. In addition, various forms of changes were defined – ranging from cities which register an increase in attractiveness and the changes that it brings while preserving their qualities in accordance with the principles of sustainable development, to settlements which are losing their small-town character as a result of intensive change, at the same time undergoing unification both in terms of space and form of use. From among the groups of towns, example which most fully illustrate the varying degrees and character of the changes of small towns in the area of Krakow has been selected. Based on the research that has been conducted, we can

  14. Information filtering via a scaling-based function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Chen, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Finding a universal description of the algorithm optimization is one of the key challenges in personalized recommendation. In this article, for the first time, we introduce a scaling-based algorithm (SCL) independent of recommendation list length based on a hybrid algorithm of heat conduction and mass diffusion, by finding out the scaling function for the tunable parameter and object average degree. The optimal value of the tunable parameter can be abstracted from the scaling function, which is heterogeneous for the individual object. Experimental results obtained from three real datasets, Netflix, MovieLens and RYM, show that the SCL is highly accurate in recommendation. More importantly, compared with a number of excellent algorithms, including the mass diffusion method, the original hybrid method, and even an improved version of the hybrid method, the SCL algorithm remarkably promotes the personalized recommendation in three other aspects: solving the accuracy-diversity dilemma, presenting a high novelty, and solving the key challenge of cold start problem.

  15. Conditional scale function estimate in the presence of unknown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper considers the problem of nonparametric estimation of conditional scale function of time series, based on quantile regression methodology of Koenker and Bassett (1978). We use a flexible model introduced in Mwita (2003), that makes no moment assumptions, and discuss an estimate which we get by inverting a ...

  16. Response function of the large-scale structure of the universe to the small scale inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimichi, Takahiro, E-mail: takahiro.nishimichi@ipmu.jp [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 6 et CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); CREST, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Bernardeau, Francis, E-mail: francis.bernardeau@iap.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 6 et CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France); CEA, CNRS, UMR 3681, Institut de Physique Théorique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Taruya, Atsushi, E-mail: ataruya@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-11-10

    In order to infer the impact of the small-scale physics to the large-scale properties of the universe, we use a series of cosmological N-body simulations of self-gravitating matter inhomogeneities to measure, for the first time, the response function of such a system defined as a functional derivative of the nonlinear power spectrum with respect to its linear counterpart. Its measured shape and amplitude are found to be in good agreement with perturbation theory predictions except for the coupling from small to large-scale perturbations. The latter is found to be significantly damped, following a Lorentzian form. These results shed light on validity regime of perturbation theory calculations giving a useful guideline for regularization of small scale effects in analytical modeling. Most importantly our result indicates that the statistical properties of the large-scale structure of the universe are remarkably insensitive to the details of the small-scale physics, astrophysical or gravitational, paving the way for the derivation of robust estimates of theoretical uncertainties on the determination of cosmological parameters from large-scale survey observations.

  17. Capacity Expansion and Reliability Evaluation on the Networks Flows with Continuous Stochastic Functional Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hamzezadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In many systems such as computer network, fuel distribution, and transportation system, it is necessary to change the capacity of some arcs in order to increase maximum flow value from source s to sink t, while the capacity change incurs minimum cost. In real-time networks, some factors cause loss of arc’s flow. For example, in some flow distribution systems, evaporation, erosion or sediment in pipes waste the flow. Here we define a real capacity, or the so-called functional capacity, which is the operational capacity of an arc. In other words, the functional capacity of an arc equals the possible maximum flow that may pass through the arc. Increasing the functional arcs capacities incurs some cost. There is a certain resource available to cover the costs. First, we construct a mathematical model to minimize the total cost of expanding the functional capacities to the required levels. Then, we consider the loss of flow on each arc as a stochastic variable and compute the system reliability.

  18. Coiled-Coil Proteins Facilitated the Functional Expansion of the Centrosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Michael; Hyman, Anthony A.; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing existing proteins for new cellular functions is recognized as a main mechanism of evolutionary innovation, but its role in organelle evolution is unclear. Here, we explore the mechanisms that led to the evolution of the centrosome, an ancestral eukaryotic organelle that expanded its functional repertoire through the course of evolution. We developed a refined sequence alignment technique that is more sensitive to coiled coil proteins, which are abundant in the centrosome. For proteins with high coiled-coil content, our algorithm identified 17% more reciprocal best hits than BLAST. Analyzing 108 eukaryotic genomes, we traced the evolutionary history of centrosome proteins. In order to assess how these proteins formed the centrosome and adopted new functions, we computationally emulated evolution by iteratively removing the most recently evolved proteins from the centrosomal protein interaction network. Coiled-coil proteins that first appeared in the animal–fungi ancestor act as scaffolds and recruit ancestral eukaryotic proteins such as kinases and phosphatases to the centrosome. This process created a signaling hub that is crucial for multicellular development. Our results demonstrate how ancient proteins can be co-opted to different cellular localizations, thereby becoming involved in novel functions. PMID:24901223

  19. Transposon-Derived and Satellite-Derived Repetitive Sequences Play Distinct Functional Roles in Mammalian Intron Size Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng; Su, Yao; Wang, Xumin; Lei, Hongxing; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Repetitive sequences (RSs) are redundant, complex at times, and often lineage-specific, representing significant “building” materials for genes and genomes. According to their origins, sequence characteristics, and ways of propagation, repetitive sequences are divided into transposable elements (TEs) and satellite sequences (SSs) as well as related subfamilies and subgroups hierarchically. The combined changes attributable to the repetitive sequences alter gene and genome architectures, such as the expansion of exonic, intronic, and intergenic sequences, and most of them propagate in a seemingly random fashion and contribute very significantly to the entire mutation spectrum of mammalian genomes. Principal findings Our analysis is focused on evolutional features of TEs and SSs in the intronic sequence of twelve selected mammalian genomes. We divided them into four groups—primates, large mammals, rodents, and primary mammals—and used four non-mammalian vertebrate species as the out-group. After classifying intron size variation in an intron-centric way based on RS-dominance (TE-dominant or SS-dominant intron expansions), we observed several distinct profiles in intron length and positioning in different vertebrate lineages, such as retrotransposon-dominance in mammals and DNA transposon-dominance in the lower vertebrates, amphibians and fishes. The RS patterns of mouse and rat genes are most striking, which are not only distinct from those of other mammals but also different from that of the third rodent species analyzed in this study—guinea pig. Looking into the biological functions of relevant genes, we observed a two-dimensional divergence; in particular, genes that possess SS-dominant and/or RS-free introns are enriched in tissue-specific development and transcription regulation in all mammalian lineages. In addition, we found that the tendency of transposons in increasing intron size is much stronger than that of satellites, and the

  20. Effects of Smoking on Chest Expansion, Lung Function, and Respiratory Muscle Strength of Youths

    OpenAIRE

    Tantisuwat, Anong; Thaveeratitham, Premtip

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Smoking has a direct effect on the respiratory system. The rate of cigarette smoking among young people has continued to increase steadily. The present study quantified and compared the respiratory function of smoking and non-smoking youths. [Subjects] Smoking and non-smoking male participants aged between 15 to 18 years were recruited (n=34 per group). [Methods] Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire relating to smoking habits and the Fagerström test for nicotine depen...

  1. Functional diversity of human protein kinase splice variants marks significant expansion of human kinome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Krishanpal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases are involved in diverse spectrum of cellular processes. Availability of draft version of the human genomic data in the year 2001 enabled recognition of repertoire of protein kinases. However, over the years the human genomic data is being refined and the current release of human genomic data has helped us to recognize a larger repertoire of over 900 human protein kinases represented mainly by splice variants. Results Many of these identified protein kinases are alternatively spliced products. Interestingly, some of the human kinase splice variants appear to be significantly diverged in terms of their functional properties as represented by incorporation or absence of one or more domains. Many sets of protein kinase splice variants have substantially different domain organization and in a few sets of splice variants kinase domains belong to different subfamilies of kinases suggesting potential participation in different signal transduction pathways. Conclusions Addition or deletion of a domain between splice variants of multi-domain kinases appears to be a means of generating differences in the functional features of otherwise similar kinases. It is intriguing that marked sequence diversity within the catalytic regions of some of the splice variant kinases result in kinases belonging to different subfamilies. These human kinase splice variants with different functions might contribute to diversity of eukaryotic cellular signaling.

  2. Genetic alphabet expansion transcription generating functional RNA molecules containing a five-letter alphabet including modified unnatural and natural base nucleotides by thermostable T7 RNA polymerase variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Michiko; Meyer, Adam J; Hirao, Ichiro; Ellington, Andrew D

    2017-11-14

    Thermostable T7 RNA polymerase variants were explored for genetic alphabet expansion transcription involving the unnatural Ds-Pa pair. One variant exhibited high incorporation efficiencies of functionally modified Pa substrates and enabled the simultaneous incorporation of 2'-fluoro-nucleoside triphosphates of pyrimidines into transcripts, allowing the generation of novel, highly functional RNA molecules.

  3. Development of large-scale functional brain networks in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh Supekar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of large-scale functional organization of the human brain is not well understood. Here we use network analysis of intrinsic functional connectivity to characterize the organization of brain networks in 23 children (ages 7-9 y and 22 young-adults (ages 19-22 y. Comparison of network properties, including path-length, clustering-coefficient, hierarchy, and regional connectivity, revealed that although children and young-adults' brains have similar "small-world" organization at the global level, they differ significantly in hierarchical organization and interregional connectivity. We found that subcortical areas were more strongly connected with primary sensory, association, and paralimbic areas in children, whereas young-adults showed stronger cortico-cortical connectivity between paralimbic, limbic, and association areas. Further, combined analysis of functional connectivity with wiring distance measures derived from white-matter fiber tracking revealed that the development of large-scale brain networks is characterized by weakening of short-range functional connectivity and strengthening of long-range functional connectivity. Importantly, our findings show that the dynamic process of over-connectivity followed by pruning, which rewires connectivity at the neuronal level, also operates at the systems level, helping to reconfigure and rebalance subcortical and paralimbic connectivity in the developing brain. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of network analysis of brain connectivity to elucidate key principles underlying functional brain maturation, paving the way for novel studies of disrupted brain connectivity in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism.

  4. Research on AutoCAD secondary development and function expansion based on VBA technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runmei; Gu, Yehuan

    2017-06-01

    AutoCAD is the most widely used drawing tool among the similar design drawing products. In the process of drawing different types of design drawings of the same product, there are a lot of repetitive and single work contents. The traditional manual method uses a drawing software AutoCAD drawing graphics with low efficiency, high error rate and high input cost shortcomings and many more. In order to solve these problems, the design of the parametric drawing system of the hot-rolled I-beam (steel beam) cross-section is completed by using the VBA secondary development tool and the Access database software with large-capacity storage data, and the analysis of the functional extension of the plane drawing and the parametric drawing design in this paper. For the secondary development of AutoCAD functions, the system drawing work will be simplified and work efficiency also has been greatly improved. This introduction of parametric design of AutoCAD drawing system to promote the industrial mass production and related industries economic growth rate similar to the standard I-beam hot-rolled products.

  5. Expansion of the Kano model to identify relevant customer segments and functional requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlason, Reynir Smari; Stefansson, Arnaldur Smari; Wietz, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The Kano model of customer satisfaction has been widely used to analyse perceived needs of customers. The model provides product developers valuable information about if, and then how much a given functional requirement (FR) will impact customer satisfaction if implemented within a product, syste...... more than one combined customer segment. It further shows which segments provide the highest possibility for high satisfaction of combined sets of FRs. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach in a case study involving customers’ preference for outdoor sports equipment.......The Kano model of customer satisfaction has been widely used to analyse perceived needs of customers. The model provides product developers valuable information about if, and then how much a given functional requirement (FR) will impact customer satisfaction if implemented within a product, system...... or a service. A current limitation of the Kano model is that it does not allow developers to visualise which combined sets of FRs would provide the highest satisfaction between different customer segments. In this paper, a stepwise method to address this particular shortcoming is presented. First...

  6. Natural glucocorticoids induce expansion of all developmental stages of murine bone marrow granulocytes without inhibiting function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottier, Mark D.; Newsted, Matthew M.; King, Louis E.; Fraker, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    Natural glucocorticoids (Gc) produced during stress have profound effects on the immune system. It is well known that Gc induce apoptosis in precursor T and B cells, markedly altering lymphopoiesis. However, it has been noted that marrow myeloid cells expanded both in proportion and absolute numbers in the mouse after Gc exposure. Mice were implanted with a corticosterone (CS) tablet that increased serum Gc and caused atrophied thymuses, both classic signs of activation of the stress axis. Blood neutrophil counts were elevated (4.8×), whereas lymphocyte counts declined. Flow cytometric analysis of the marrow revealed that the phenotypic distribution of the various major classes of cells was shifted by Gc exposure. As expected, marrow lymphocyte numbers declined >40% after 3 days of exposure to Gc. Conversely, in the myeloid compartment, both monocytes and granulocytes increased in number by >40%. Further, all granulocyte developmental stages showed large increases in both total number and percentage of cells. To investigate the functional capacity of mature granulocytes from Gc-treated mice, an improved granulocyte isolation method was developed. Gc exposure had little effect on the ability of granulocytes to produce superoxide or undergo chemotaxis or phagocytose bacteria. These results indicate that Gc treatment shifts bone marrow composition and provides evidence that granulocytes and their progenitors are selectively preserved under stressful conditions without losing function. PMID:18250324

  7. The Extended Symmetry Lie Algebra and the Asymptotic Expansion of the Transversal Correlation Function for the Isotropic Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grebenev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The extended symmetry of the functional of length determined in an affine space K3 of the correlation vectors for homogeneous isotropic turbulence is studied. The two-point velocity-correlation tensor field (parametrized by the time variable t of the velocity fluctuations is used to equip this space by a family of the pseudo-Riemannian metrics dl2(t (Grebenev and Oberlack (2011. First, we observe the results obtained by Grebenev and Oberlack (2011 and Grebenev et al. (2012 about a geometry of the correlation space K3 and expose the Lie algebra associated with the equivalence transformation of the above-mentioned functional for the quadratic form dlD22(t generated by dl2(t which is similar to the Lie algebra constructed by Grebenev et al. (2012. Then, using the properties of this Lie algebra, we show that there exists a nontrivial central extension wherein the central charge is defined by the same bilinear skew-symmetric form c as for the Witt algebra which measures the number of internal degrees of freedom of the system. For the applications in turbulence, as the main result, we establish the asymptotic expansion of the transversal correlation function for large correlation distances in the frame of dlD22(t.

  8. Explanatory Factors of the Expansion of Recreation Function on the Bank of Danube River in Budapest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pál Szabó

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In a city's development a river and riverbank played important role, however in recent decades the functions of them have changed, transformed, especially in major cities in the more developed countries, so the city administration was faced with a new phenomenon and geographical space: the changing riverbanks, and the utilization, development, revitalization of them has become a key issue. The various real processes showed the direction that these areas should be provided to the people, and the recreation service will be important for the local residents and tourists. Overall, the urban waterfront development is an increasingly important researched topic and policy. The question is: can we realize it in Budapest also nowadays? In recent years, those processes took place in Budapest, which resulted in an increasing utilization of the Danube and its banks for recreational functions. On the one hand, local social and economic processes have led to the waterfront sites released, on the other hand the needs of the residential population and tourists using the river and the riverside for recreational purposes have increased, and thirdly, the new city administration decided to renew the banks of the Danube, mainly to create new recreational areas. In this paper, we analyze these three factors, focusing on a past short period, because there is an exceptional cohesion between the processes, the needs and the new development goals. Two case studies are in the paper also: the Margaret Island as the oldest traditional recreational area in Budapest, and the Kopaszi-dam, as the newest and successful recreational area of Budapest. The analysis of the processes is based on data and literature, the analysis of the needs is based on a survey, and the analysis of the goals is based on the different development documents.

  9. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radivojac, Predrag; Clark, Wyatt T; Oron, Tal Ronnen; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Wittkop, Tobias; Sokolov, Artem; Graim, Kiley; Funk, Christopher; Verspoor, Karin; Ben-Hur, Asa; Pandey, Gaurav; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Talwalkar, Ameet S; Repo, Susanna; Souza, Michael L; Piovesan, Damiano; Casadio, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Jianlin; Fang, Hai; Gough, Julian; Koskinen, Patrik; Törönen, Petri; Nokso-Koivisto, Jussi; Holm, Liisa; Cozzetto, Domenico; Buchan, Daniel W A; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T; Limaye, Bhakti; Inamdar, Harshal; Datta, Avik; Manjari, Sunitha K; Joshi, Rajendra; Chitale, Meghana; Kihara, Daisuke; Lisewski, Andreas M; Erdin, Serkan; Venner, Eric; Lichtarge, Olivier; Rentzsch, Robert; Yang, Haixuan; Romero, Alfonso E; Bhat, Prajwal; Paccanaro, Alberto; Hamp, Tobias; Kaßner, Rebecca; Seemayer, Stefan; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schaefer, Christian; Achten, Dominik; Auer, Florian; Boehm, Ariane; Braun, Tatjana; Hecht, Maximilian; Heron, Mark; Hönigschmid, Peter; Hopf, Thomas A; Kaufmann, Stefanie; Kiening, Michael; Krompass, Denis; Landerer, Cedric; Mahlich, Yannick; Roos, Manfred; Björne, Jari; Salakoski, Tapio; Wong, Andrew; Shatkay, Hagit; Gatzmann, Fanny; Sommer, Ingolf; Wass, Mark N; Sternberg, Michael J E; Škunca, Nives; Supek, Fran; Bošnjak, Matko; Panov, Panče; Džeroski, Sašo; Šmuc, Tomislav; Kourmpetis, Yiannis A I; van Dijk, Aalt D J; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Gong, Qingtian; Dong, Xinran; Tian, Weidong; Falda, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Lavezzo, Enrico; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toppo, Stefano; Lan, Liang; Djuric, Nemanja; Guo, Yuhong; Vucetic, Slobodan; Bairoch, Amos; Linial, Michal; Babbitt, Patricia C; Brenner, Steven E; Orengo, Christine; Rost, Burkhard; Mooney, Sean D; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-03-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be high. Here we report the results from the first large-scale community-based critical assessment of protein function annotation (CAFA) experiment. Fifty-four methods representing the state of the art for protein function prediction were evaluated on a target set of 866 proteins from 11 organisms. Two findings stand out: (i) today's best protein function prediction algorithms substantially outperform widely used first-generation methods, with large gains on all types of targets; and (ii) although the top methods perform well enough to guide experiments, there is considerable need for improvement of currently available tools.

  10. Density Functional Theory and Materials Modeling at Atomistic Length Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapan K. Ghosh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We discuss the basic concepts of density functional theory (DFT as applied to materials modeling in the microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic length scales. The picture that emerges is that of a single unified framework for the study of both quantum and classical systems. While for quantum DFT, the central equation is a one-particle Schrodinger-like Kohn-Sham equation, the classical DFT consists of Boltzmann type distributions, both corresponding to a system of noninteracting particles in the field of a density-dependent effective potential, the exact functional form of which is unknown. One therefore approximates the exchange-correlation potential for quantum systems and the excess free energy density functional or the direct correlation functions for classical systems. Illustrative applications of quantum DFT to microscopic modeling of molecular interaction and that of classical DFT to a mesoscopic modeling of soft condensed matter systems are highlighted.

  11. Expansion of arbitrary electromagnetic fields in terms of vector spherical wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Wendel Lopes; Neves, Antonio Alvaro Ranha; Garbos, Martin K; Euser, Tijmen G; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2016-02-08

    Since 1908, when Mie reported analytical expressions for the fields scattered by a spherical particle upon incidence of plane-waves, generalizing his analysis for the case of an arbitrary incident wave has been an open question because of the cancellation of the prefactor radial spherical Bessel function. This cancellation was obtained before by our own group for a highly focused beam centered in the objective. In this work, however, we show for the first time how these terms can be canceled out for any arbitrary incident field that satisfies Maxwells equations, and obtain analytical expressions for the beam shape coefficients. We show several examples on how to use our method to obtain analytical beam shape coefficients for: Bessel beams, general hollow waveguide modes and specific geometries such as cylindrical and rectangular. Our method uses the vector potential, which shows the interesting characteristic of being gauge invariant. These results are highly relevant for speeding up numerical calculation of light scattering applications such as the radiation forces acting on spherical particles placed in an arbitrary electromagnetic field, as in an optical tweezers system.

  12. Coordination Covalent Frameworks: A New Route for Synthesis and Expansion of Functional Porous Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaidi, Sameh K.; Mohamed, Mona H.; Loring, John S.; McGrail, Bernard. Pete; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2016-10-26

    The synthetic approaches for fine-tuning the structural properties of coordination polymers or metal organic frameworks have exponentially grown during the last decade. This is due to the control over the properties of the resulting structures such as stability, pore size, pore chemis-try and surface area for myriad possible applications. Herein, we present a new class of porous materials called Covalent Coordination Frameworks (CCFs) that were designed and effectively synthesized using a two-step reticular chemistry approach. During the first step, trigonal prismatic molecular building block was isolated using 4-aminobenazoic acid and Cr (III) salt, subsequently in the second step the polymerization of the isolated molecular building blocks (MBBs) takes place by the formation of strong covalent bonds where small organic molecules can connect the MBBs forming extended porous CCF materials. All the isolated CCFs were found to be permanently porous while the discrete MBB were non-porous. This approach would inevitably open a feasible path for the applications of reticular chemistry and the synthesis of novel porous materials with various topologies under ambient conditions using simple organic molecules and versatile MBBs with different functionalities which would not be possible using the traditional one step approach

  13. Scaling and functional morphology in strigiform hind limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Meena A.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Bright, Jen A.

    2017-01-01

    Strigiformes are an order of raptorial birds consisting exclusively of owls: the Tytonidae (barn owls) and the Strigidae (true owls), united by a suite of adaptations aiding a keen predatory lifestyle, including robust hind limb elements modified for grip strength. To assess variation in hind limb morphology, we analysed how the dimensions of the major hind limb elements in subfossil and modern species scaled with body mass. Comparing hind limb element length, midshaft width, and robusticity index (RI: ratio of midshaft width to maximum length) to body mass revealed that femoral and tibiotarsal width scale with isometry, whilst length scales with negative allometry, and close to elastic similarity in the tibiotarsus. In contrast, tarsometatarsus width shows strong positive allometry with body mass, whilst length shows strong negative allometry. Furthermore, the tarsometatarsi RI scales allometrically to mass0.028, whilst a weak relationship exists in femora (mass0.004) and tibiotarsi (mass0.004). Our results suggest that tarsometatarsi play a more substantial functional role than tibiotarsi and femora. Given the scaling relationship between tarsometatarsal width and robusticity to body mass, it may be possible to infer the body mass of prehistoric owls by analysing tarsometatarsi, an element that is frequently preserved in the fossil record of owls. PMID:28327549

  14. Character expansion of matrix integrals

    OpenAIRE

    van de Leur, J. W.; Orlov, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    We consider character expansion of tau functions and multiple integrals in characters of orhtogonal and symplectic groups. In particular we consider character expansions of integrals over orthogonal and over symplectic matrices.

  15. LUTE (Local Unpruned Tuple Expansion): Accurate Continuously Flexible Protein Design with General Energy Functions and Rigid Rotamer-Like Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen, Mark A; Jou, Jonathan D; Donald, Bruce R

    2017-06-01

    Most protein design algorithms search over discrete conformations and an energy function that is residue-pairwise, that is, a sum of terms that depend on the sequence and conformation of at most two residues. Although modeling of continuous flexibility and of non-residue-pairwise energies significantly increases the accuracy of protein design, previous methods to model these phenomena add a significant asymptotic cost to design calculations. We now remove this cost by modeling continuous flexibility and non-residue-pairwise energies in a form suitable for direct input to highly efficient, discrete combinatorial optimization algorithms such as DEE/A* or branch-width minimization. Our novel algorithm performs a local unpruned tuple expansion (LUTE), which can efficiently represent both continuous flexibility and general, possibly nonpairwise energy functions to an arbitrary level of accuracy using a discrete energy matrix. We show using 47 design calculation test cases that LUTE provides a dramatic speedup in both single-state and multistate continuously flexible designs.

  16. Spanish juniper gain expansion opportunities by counting on a functionally diverse dispersal assemblage community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano-Ávila, Gema; Pías, Beatriz; Sanz-Pérez, Virginia; Virgós, Emilio; Escudero, Adrián; Valladares, Fernando

    2013-10-01

    Seed dispersal is typically performed by a diverse array of species assemblages with different behavioral and morphological traits which determine dispersal quality (DQ, defined as the probability of recruitment of a dispersed seed). Fate of ecosystems to ongoing environmental changes is critically dependent on dispersal and mainly on DQ in novel scenarios. We assess here the DQ, thus the multiplicative effect of germination and survival probability to the first 3 years of life, for seeds dispersed by several bird species (Turdus spp.) and carnivores (Vulpes vulpes, Martes foina) in mature woodland remnants of Spanish juniper (Juniperus thurifera) and old fields which are being colonized by this species. Results showed that DQ was similar in mature woodlands and old fields. Germination rate for seeds dispersed by carnivores (11.5%) and thrushes (9.12%) was similar, however, interacted with microhabitat suitability. Seeds dispersed by carnivores reach the maximum germination rate on shrubs (16%), whereas seeds dispersed by thrushes did on female juniper canopies (15.5) indicating that each group of dispersers performed a directed dispersal. This directional effect was diluted when survival probability was considered: thrushes selected smaller seeds which had higher mortality in the seedling stage (70%) in relation to seedlings dispersed by carnivores (40%). Overall, thrushes resulted low-quality dispersers which provided a probability or recruitment of 2.5%, while a seed dispersed by carnivores had a probability of recruitment of 6.5%. Our findings show that generalist dispersers (i.e., carnivores) can provide a higher probability of recruitment than specialized dispersers (i.e., Turdus spp.). However, generalist species are usually opportunistic dispersers as their role as seed dispersers is dependent on the availability of trophic resources and species feeding preferences. As a result, J. thurifera dispersal community is composed by two functional groups of

  17. Validation of a functional remission threshold for the Functional Remission of General Schizophrenia (FROGS) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Laurent; Richieri, Raphaëlle; Guedj, Eric; Faget-Agius, Catherine; Loundou, Anderson; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Auquier, Pascal; Lançon, Christophe

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a functional remission threshold for the Functional Remission Of General Schizophrenia (FROGS) scale, and test its validity regarding clinical and quality of life outcomes. Cross-sectional study. Schizophrenia according to DSM-IV-TR criteria. Functioning was assessed using the FROGS and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scales; psychotic symptoms using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale; memory, attention, and executive functions were assessed using the California Verbal Learning Test, the D2 attention task, the Stroop color-word test, the verbal fluency test, the Trail Making Test A and B and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale; and quality of life using the schizophrenia quality of life (S-QoL 18) scale. A logistic regression analysis including the different dimensions of the FROGS was used to create a composite score to classify patients into remitted and non-remitted according a gold standard (cut-off: GAF>= 61). Receiver operating characteristics analyses were then performed to determine the area under the curve (AUC). Of 137 patients enrolled, 26 were functionally remitted and 111 were not remitted according to GAF score. The AUC for the combination of the FROGS's dimensions to detect functional remission was 0.903 (p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity for the combination of the FROGS dimensions using the Youden index were 88.5 [69.8; 97.6] and 81.1 [72.5; 87.9], respectively. Validity of this combination was satisfactory. Patients in functional remission had a lower severity of the disease, especially for PANSS negative (p<0.001) and general psychopathology (p<0.001) symptoms. Only two cognitive functions (i.e. fluency and episodic memory) were improved in remitted patients. Higher quality of life levels were globally associated with better functioning. These findings provide for first accurate FROGS thresholds to detect functional remission in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  18. Functional assessment of a series of paediatric patients receiving neurointensive treatment: New Functional status scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madurga-Revilla, P; López-Pisón, J; Samper-Villagrasa, P; Garcés-Gómez, R; García-Íñiguez, J P; Domínguez-Cajal, M; Gil-Hernández, I; Viscor-Zárate, S

    2017-11-01

    Functional health, a reliable parameter of the impact of disease, should be used systematically to assess prognosis in paediatric intensive care units (PICU). Developing scales for the assessment of functional health is therefore essential. The Paediatric Overall and Cerebral Performance Category (POPC, PCPC) scales have traditionally been used in paediatric studies. The new Functional Status Scale (FSS) was designed to provide more objective results. This study aims to confirm the validity of the FSS compared to the classic POPC and PCPC scales, and to evaluate whether it may also be superior to the latter in assessing of neurological function. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of 266 children with neurological diseases admitted to intensive care between 2012 and 2014. Functional health at discharge and at one year after discharge was evaluated using the PCPC and POPC scales and the new FSS. Global FSS scores were found to be well correlated with all POPC scores (P<.001), except in category 5 (coma/vegetative state). Global FSS score dispersion increases with POPC category. The neurological versions of both scales show a similar correlation. Comparison with classic POPC and PCPC categories suggests that the new FSS scale is a useful method for evaluating functional health in our setting. The dispersion of FSS values underlines the poor accuracy of POPC-PCPC compared to the new FSS scale, which is more disaggregated and objective. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Regional-scale drivers of forest structure and function in northwestern Amazonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Higgins

    Full Text Available Field studies in Amazonia have found a relationship at continental scales between soil fertility and broad trends in forest structure and function. Little is known at regional scales, however, about how discrete patterns in forest structure or functional attributes map onto underlying edaphic or geological patterns. We collected airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging data and VSWIR (Visible to Shortwave Infrared imaging spectroscopy measurements over 600 km2 of northwestern Amazonian lowland forests. We also established 83 inventories of plant species composition and soil properties, distributed between two widespread geological formations. Using these data, we mapped forest structure and canopy reflectance, and compared them to patterns in plant species composition, soils, and underlying geology. We found that variations in soils and species composition explained up to 70% of variation in canopy height, and corresponded to profound changes in forest vertical profiles. We further found that soils and plant species composition explained more than 90% of the variation in canopy reflectance as measured by imaging spectroscopy, indicating edaphic and compositional control of canopy chemical properties. We last found that soils explained between 30% and 70% of the variation in gap frequency in these forests, depending on the height threshold used to define gaps. Our findings indicate that a relatively small number of edaphic and compositional variables, corresponding to underlying geology, may be responsible for variations in canopy structure and chemistry over large expanses of Amazonian forest.

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis, Lineage-Specific Expansion and Functional Divergence of seed dormancy 4-Like Genes in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subburaj, Saminathan; Cao, Shuanghe; Xia, Xianchun; He, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    The rice gene seed dormancy 4 (OsSdr4) functions in seed dormancy and is a major factor associated with pre-harvest sprouting (PHS). Although previous studies of this protein family were reported for rice and other species, knowledge of the evolution of genes homologous to OsSdr4 in plants remains inadequate. Fifty four Sdr4-like (hereafter designated Sdr4L) genes were identified in nine plant lineages including 36 species. Phylogenetic analysis placed these genes in eight subfamilies (I-VIII). Genes from the same lineage clustered together, supported by analysis of conserved motifs and exon-intron patterns. Segmental duplications were present in both dicot and monocot clusters, while tandemly duplicated genes occurred only in monocot clusters indicating that both tandem and segmental duplications contributed to expansion of the grass I and II subfamilies. Estimation of the approximate ages of the duplication events indicated that ancestral Sdr4 genes evolved from a common angiosperm ancestor, about 160 million years ago (MYA). Moreover, diversification of Sdr4L genes in mono and dicot plants was mainly associated with genome-wide duplication and speciation events. Functional divergence was observed in all subfamily pairs, except IV/VIIIa. Further analysis indicated that functional constraints between subfamily pairs I/II, I/VIIIb, II/VI, II/VIIIb, II/IV, and VI/VIIIb were statistically significant. Site and branch-site model analyses of positive selection suggested that these genes were under strong adaptive selection pressure. Critical amino acids detected for both functional divergence and positive selection were mostly located in the loops, pointing to functional importance of these regions in this protein family. In addition, differential expression studies by transcriptome atlas of 11 Sdr4L genes showed that the duplicated genes may have undergone divergence in expression between plant species. Our findings showed that Sdr4L genes are functionally divergent

  1. Information filtering via a scaling-based function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Qiu

    Full Text Available Finding a universal description of the algorithm optimization is one of the key challenges in personalized recommendation. In this article, for the first time, we introduce a scaling-based algorithm (SCL independent of recommendation list length based on a hybrid algorithm of heat conduction and mass diffusion, by finding out the scaling function for the tunable parameter and object average degree. The optimal value of the tunable parameter can be abstracted from the scaling function, which is heterogeneous for the individual object. Experimental results obtained from three real datasets, Netflix, MovieLens and RYM, show that the SCL is highly accurate in recommendation. More importantly, compared with a number of excellent algorithms, including the mass diffusion method, the original hybrid method, and even an improved version of the hybrid method, the SCL algorithm remarkably promotes the personalized recommendation in three other aspects: solving the accuracy-diversity dilemma, presenting a high novelty, and solving the key challenge of cold start problem.

  2. Information Filtering via a Scaling-Based Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Chen, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Finding a universal description of the algorithm optimization is one of the key challenges in personalized recommendation. In this article, for the first time, we introduce a scaling-based algorithm (SCL) independent of recommendation list length based on a hybrid algorithm of heat conduction and mass diffusion, by finding out the scaling function for the tunable parameter and object average degree. The optimal value of the tunable parameter can be abstracted from the scaling function, which is heterogeneous for the individual object. Experimental results obtained from three real datasets, Netflix, MovieLens and RYM, show that the SCL is highly accurate in recommendation. More importantly, compared with a number of excellent algorithms, including the mass diffusion method, the original hybrid method, and even an improved version of the hybrid method, the SCL algorithm remarkably promotes the personalized recommendation in three other aspects: solving the accuracy-diversity dilemma, presenting a high novelty, and solving the key challenge of cold start problem. PMID:23696829

  3. Enhanced Expansion and Sustained Inductive Function of Skin‐Derived Precursor Cells in Computer‐Controlled Stirred Suspension Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agabalyan, Natacha A.; Borys, Breanna S.; Sparks, Holly D.; Boon, Kathryn; Raharjo, Eko W.; Abbasi, Sepideh; Kallos, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endogenous dermal stem cells (DSCs) reside in the adult hair follicle mesenchyme and can be isolated and grown in vitro as self‐renewing colonies called skin‐derived precursors (SKPs). Following transplantation into skin, SKPs can generate new dermis and reconstitute the dermal papilla and connective tissue sheath, suggesting they could have important therapeutic value for the treatment of skin disease (alopecia) or injury. Controlled cell culture processes must be developed to efficiently and safely generate sufficient stem cell numbers for clinical use. Compared with static culture, stirred‐suspension bioreactors generated fivefold greater expansion of viable SKPs. SKPs from each condition were able to repopulate the dermal stem cell niche within established hair follicles. Both conditions were also capable of inducing de novo hair follicle formation and exhibited bipotency, reconstituting the dermal papilla and connective tissue sheath, although the efficiency was significantly reduced in bioreactor‐expanded SKPs compared with static conditions. We conclude that automated bioreactor processing could be used to efficiently generate large numbers of autologous DSCs while maintaining their inherent regenerative function. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:434–443 PMID:28191777

  4. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) function is important to the development and expansion of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyach, Jennifer A; Bojnik, Engin; Ruppert, Amy S; Stefanovski, Matthew R; Goettl, Virginia M; Smucker, Kelly A; Smith, Lisa L; Dubovsky, Jason A; Towns, William H; MacMurray, Jessica; Harrington, Bonnie K; Davis, Melanie E; Gobessi, Stefania; Laurenti, Luca; Chang, Betty Y; Buggy, Joseph J; Efremov, Dimitar G; Byrd, John C; Johnson, Amy J

    2014-02-20

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by constitutive activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway, but variable responsiveness of the BCR to antigen ligation. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) shows constitutive activity in CLL and is the target of irreversible inhibition by ibrutinib, an orally bioavailable kinase inhibitor that has shown outstanding activity in CLL. Early clinical results in CLL with other reversible and irreversible BTK inhibitors have been less promising, however, raising the question of whether BTK kinase activity is an important target of ibrutinib and also in CLL. To determine the role of BTK in CLL, we used patient samples and the Eμ-TCL1 (TCL1) transgenic mouse model of CLL, which results in spontaneous leukemia development. Inhibition of BTK in primary human CLL cells by small interfering RNA promotes apoptosis. Inhibition of BTK kinase activity through either targeted genetic inactivation or ibrutinib in the TCL1 mouse significantly delays the development of CLL, demonstrating that BTK is a critical kinase for CLL development and expansion and thus an important target of ibrutinib. Collectively, our data confirm the importance of kinase-functional BTK in CLL.

  5. Nitrogen-Related Constraints of Carbon Uptake by Large-Scale Forest Expansion: Simulation Study for Climate Change and Management Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracher, Daniela

    2017-11-01

    Increase of forest areas has the potential to increase the terrestrial carbon (C) sink. However, the efficiency for C sequestration depends on the availability of nutrients such as nitrogen (N), which is affected by climatic conditions and management practices. In this study, I analyze how N limitation affects C sequestration of afforestation and how it is influenced by individual climate variables, increased harvest, and fertilizer application. To this end, JSBACH, the land component of the Earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology is applied in idealized simulation experiments. In those simulations, large-scale afforestation increases the terrestrial C sink in the 21st century by around 100 Pg C compared to a business as usual land-use scenario. N limitation reduces C sequestration roughly by the same amount. The relevance of compensating effects of uptake and release of carbon dioxide by plant productivity and soil decomposition, respectively, gets obvious from the simulations. N limitation of both fluxes compensates particularly in the tropics. Increased mineralization under global warming triggers forest expansion, which otherwise is restricted by N availability. Due to compensating higher plant productivity and soil respiration, the global net effect of warming for C sequestration is however rather small. Fertilizer application and increased harvest enhance C sequestration as well as boreal expansion. The additional C sequestration achieved by fertilizer application is offset to a large part by additional emissions of nitrous oxide.

  6. Use of RGD-Functionalized Sandwich Cultures to Promote Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Beta Cells After In Vitro Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloy-Reverté, Caterina; Moreno-Amador, José L; Nacher, Montserrat; Montanya, Eduard; Semino, Carlos E

    2018-03-01

    Islet transplantation has provided proof of concept that cell therapy can restore normoglycemia in patients with diabetes. However, limited availability of islet tissue severely restricts the clinical use of the treatment. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new strategies to generate an abundant source of insulin-producing cells that could be used to treat diabetes. A potential approach is the in vitro expansion of pancreatic beta cells obtained from cadaveric organ donors. However, when human beta cells are expanded in vitro, they dedifferentiate and lose the expression of insulin, probably as a consequence of pancreatic islet dissociation into single cells. We have studied whether reestablishment of cell-cell and cell-matrix relationships with a biomimetic synthetic scaffold could induce redifferentiation of expanded dedifferentiated beta cells. Cells isolated from human islet preparations were expanded in monolayer cultures and allowed to reaggregate into islet-like cell clusters (ICCs). Afterward, ICCs were embedded between two thin layers of the noninstructive self-assembling peptide (SAP), RAD16-I or RAD16-I functionalized with the integrin-binding motif RGD (RAD16-I/RGD) (R: arginine, G: glycine, D: aspartic acid), which was expected to promote cell-extracellular matrix interactions. ICCs cultured with RAD16-I were viable, maintained their cluster conformation, and increased in size by aggregation of ICCs, suggesting a self-organizing process. ICCs cultured in RAD16-I/RGD showed enhanced cell adhesion to RAD16-I matrix and reexpression of the beta cell-specific genes, Ins, Pdx1, Nkx6.1, and MafA. Redifferentiation was caused solely by bioactive cues introduced to the RAD16-I peptide since no differentiation factors were added to the culture medium. The results indicate that RGD-functionalized SAP in sandwich conformation is a promising three-dimensional platform to induce redifferentiation toward a beta cell phenotype and to generate insulin

  7. Ground Validation of IMERG as a Function of Spatiotemporal Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J.; Petersen, W. A.; Tian, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG), a global high-resolution gridded precipitation data set, will have widespread uses, ranging from studies on precipitation characteristics to applications in hydrology to evaluation of weather and climate models. These applications typically re-grid the precipitation rates to lower resolutions or average them over specific domains. Such a modification of scale will impact the reliability of IMERG. In this study, the performance of IMERG is evaluated against ground-based measurements as a function of increasing spatial resolution and accumulation periods. The focus of this study is the Final run of IMERG, which is derived from a constellation of satellites with monthly gauge adjustment. For ground truth, the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS) Stage III product, a radar- and gauge-based operational precipitation product over the US, is used. The analysis is restricted to a region in which MRMS is highly reliable due to good radar coverage, wherein IMERG is compared to MRMS averaged over boxes of increasing size and accumulation, starting from 0.1° at 1 h. TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) is also included as a benchmark. In general, IMERG expectedly performs better with increasing spatial and temporal scale, with higher correlations, lower error values and better identification of rain events. IMERG also outperforms TMPA most of the time. These results will serve as a reference for users of IMERG on its reliability over the scales relevant to their studies.

  8. Comparison of the effects of core stabilization and chest mobilization exercises on lung function and chest wall expansion in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Jun; Lee, Ju-Hwan; Min, Kyung-Ok

    2017-07-01

    [Purpose] The main purpose of this study was to compare the effects of core stabilization and chest mobilization exercises on pulmonary function and chest expansion in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were randomly divided into two groups: a core stabilization exercise group (n=15) and a chest mobilization exercise group (n=15). Each exercise was performed 3 times per week for 30 minutes for 4 weeks, and pulmonary function and chest expansion when breathing were measured for both groups. [Results] There were significant increases in both forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second before and after intervention. Core stabilization exercise resulted in a significant increase in peak expiratory flow, and significant increases in upper and lower chest expansion were detected with chest mobilization exercise. However, no significant difference was revealed between the two groups. [Conclusion] This study suggested that both exercises were effective in some aspects of pulmonary function while core stabilization can help increase peak expiratory flow and chest mobilization can assist with chest expansion.

  9. New solutions for conformable fractional Boussinesq and combined KdV-mKdV equations using Jacobi elliptic function expansion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasbozan, Orkun; Çenesiz, Yücel; Kurt, Ali

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the Jacobi elliptic function expansion method is proposed for the first time to construct the exact solutions of the time conformable fractional two-dimensional Boussinesq equation and the combined KdV-mKdV equation. New exact solutions are found. This method is based on Jacobi elliptic functions. The results obtained confirm that the proposed method is an efficient technique for analytic treatment of a wide variety of nonlinear conformable time-fractional partial differential equations.

  10. Conformal expansions and renormalons

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, S J; Grunberg, G; Rathsman, J; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Gardi, Einan; Grunberg, Georges; Rathsman, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The coefficients in perturbative expansions in gauge theories are factoriallyincreasing, predominantly due to renormalons. This type of factorial increaseis not expected in conformal theories. In QCD conformal relations betweenobservables can be defined in the presence of a perturbative infraredfixed-point. Using the Banks-Zaks expansion we study the effect of thelarge-order behavior of the perturbative series on the conformal coefficients.We find that in general these coefficients become factorially increasing.However, when the factorial behavior genuinely originates in a renormalonintegral, as implied by a postulated skeleton expansion, it does not affect theconformal coefficients. As a consequence, the conformal coefficients willindeed be free of renormalon divergence, in accordance with previousobservations concerning the smallness of these coefficients for specificobservables. We further show that the correspondence of the BLM method with theskeleton expansion implies a unique scale-setting procedure. Th...

  11. An efficient multi-scale Green's function reaction dynamics scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbailò, Luigi; Noé, Frank

    2017-11-14

    Molecular Dynamics-Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) is a multiscale simulation method for particle dynamics or particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics that is suited for systems involving low particle densities. Particles in a low-density region are just diffusing and not interacting. In this case, one can avoid the costly integration of microscopic equations of motion, such as molecular dynamics (MD), and instead turn to an event-based scheme in which the times to the next particle interaction and the new particle positions at that time can be sampled. At high (local) concentrations, however, e.g., when particles are interacting in a nontrivial way, particle positions must still be updated with small time steps of the microscopic dynamical equations. The efficiency of a multi-scale simulation that uses these two schemes largely depends on the coupling between them and the decisions when to switch between the two scales. Here we present an efficient scheme for multi-scale MD-GFRD simulations. It has been shown that MD-GFRD schemes are more efficient than brute-force molecular dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 102 μM. In this paper, we show that the choice of the propagation domains has a relevant impact on the computational performance. Domains are constructed using a local optimization of their sizes and a minimal domain size is proposed. The algorithm is shown to be more efficient than brute-force Brownian dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 103 μM and is up to an order of magnitude more efficient compared with previous MD-GFRD schemes.

  12. An efficient multi-scale Green's function reaction dynamics scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbailò, Luigi; Noé, Frank

    2017-11-01

    Molecular Dynamics-Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) is a multiscale simulation method for particle dynamics or particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics that is suited for systems involving low particle densities. Particles in a low-density region are just diffusing and not interacting. In this case, one can avoid the costly integration of microscopic equations of motion, such as molecular dynamics (MD), and instead turn to an event-based scheme in which the times to the next particle interaction and the new particle positions at that time can be sampled. At high (local) concentrations, however, e.g., when particles are interacting in a nontrivial way, particle positions must still be updated with small time steps of the microscopic dynamical equations. The efficiency of a multi-scale simulation that uses these two schemes largely depends on the coupling between them and the decisions when to switch between the two scales. Here we present an efficient scheme for multi-scale MD-GFRD simulations. It has been shown that MD-GFRD schemes are more efficient than brute-force molecular dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 102 μM. In this paper, we show that the choice of the propagation domains has a relevant impact on the computational performance. Domains are constructed using a local optimization of their sizes and a minimal domain size is proposed. The algorithm is shown to be more efficient than brute-force Brownian dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 103 μM and is up to an order of magnitude more efficient compared with previous MD-GFRD schemes.

  13. Regional-scale identification of forest stands with protective functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Andreas; Kofler, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In avalanche practice physical-based dynamical models are commonly utilized to estimate expected avalanche characteristics, such as runout lengths, velocities or impact pressures. These are of major interest for hazard zoning or planning and construction of mitigation measures and infrastructure in avalanche prone terrain. Physical-based models are commonly applied on a local scale for single avalanche tracks, where required model inputs are estimated based on local expertise and calculation times are not a limiting criterion. For regional scale studies on geophysical mass flows the area-wide availability of input parameters and required computational times present constraints on model applicability. Consequently, for studies encompassing larger areas, spatially distributed models with limited input parameter requirements have been developed and successfully applied in recent years. Published approaches often apply a combination of a one-dimensional physical or empirical runout model with different algorithms for flow propagation and spreading. Here, we describe a model for snow avalanche runout estimation based on an empirical runout criterion coupled with a simple propagation model. Avalanche runout lengths are obtained by a travel-angle and flow propagation is calculated based on hydrological flow directions derived from a raster digital elevation model. We compare model results to observed avalanche events and subsequently employ the model for a regional-scale identification of forest stands, which potentially provide direct protection for infrastructure objects. This comprises forested areas which are located in potential avalanche release areas and/or modeled avalanche tracks upslope of infrastructure objects. These are identified by back-tracing modeled flow paths from affected infrastructure objects to the respective release areas, which are delineated based on a combined thresholds for slope-angle and a proxy for seasonal snow cover. Results indicate that

  14. Assessment of family functioning: evaluation of the General Functioning Scale in a Swedish Bariatric Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Ami; Årestedt, Kristofer; Benzein, Eva; Thorell, Anders; Persson, Carina

    2016-09-01

    The General Functioning Scale (GFS) was developed to assess self-perceived overall family functioning. The scale has satisfactory psychometric properties, is internationally recognised and has been used in different contexts. However, no validated Swedish version is available. Healthy family functioning can support patients and help them adhere to treatment regimens. Moreover, it maintains the physical and emotional health and that of the family as a unit. Yet, there is limited information regarding family functioning postgastric bypass surgery. Thus, it is important to use validated instruments to understand family functioning in bariatric contexts. To evaluate aspects of reliability and validity in GFS in a Swedish bariatric sample, focusing on factor structure. The Swedish version of the GFS (S-GFS) was administered on two occasions to 163 participants who had undergone gastric bypass surgery 6-8 weeks prior to testing. Internal consistency, temporal stability and construct validity were assessed. Data were positively skewed. The S-GFS showed good internal consistency (ordinal α = 0.92) with a sufficient overall mean interitem correlation (0.500) and adequate temporal stability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.833). After modifying response alternatives, confirmatory factor analysis indicated acceptable fit for a one-factor model. The scale is a promising tool for assessing family functioning in bariatric settings. The S-GFS showed satisfactory reliability - consistent with prior research - and acceptable validity in the study sample. This study contributes to the limited research on the scale's validity. However, the S-GFS needs to be evaluated in different cultural and clinical contexts, focusing on various aspects of validity and responsiveness (sensitivity to detect significant change over time) in different samples. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Scaling root processes based on plant functional traits (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissenstat, D. M.; McCormack, M. L.; Gaines, K.; Adams, T.

    2013-12-01

    There are great challenges to scaling root processes as variation across species and variation of a particular species over different spatial and temporal scales is poorly understood. We have examined tree species variation using multispecies plantings, often referred to by ecologists as 'common gardens'. Choosing species with wide variation in growth rate, root morphology (diameter, branching intensity) and root chemistry (root N and Ca concentration), we found that variation in root lifespan was well correlated with plant functional traits across 12 species. There was also evidence that localized liquid N addition could increase root lifespan and localized water addition diminished root lifespan over untreated controls, with effects strongest in the species of finest root diameter. In an adjacent forest, we have also seen tree species variation in apparent depth of rooting using water isotopes. In particular species of wood anatomy that was ring porous (e.g. oaks) typically had the deepest rooting depth, whereas those that had either diffuse-porous sapwood (maples) or tracheid sapwood (pines) were shallower rooted. These differences in rooting depth were related to sap flux of trees during and immediately after periods of drought. The extent that the patterns observed in central Pennsylvania are modulated by environment or indicative of other plant species will be discussed.

  16. On the equisummability of Hermite and Fourier expansions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove an equisummability result for the Fourier expansions and Hermite expansions as well as special Hermite expansions. We also prove the uniform boundedness of the Bochner-Riesz means associated to the Hermite expansions for polyradial functions.

  17. Smoluchowski Equations for Agglomeration in Conditions of Variable Temperature and Pressure and a New Scaling of Rate Constants: Application to Nozzle-Beam Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiken, J; Goodisman, J; Kornilov, O

    2015-07-09

    The Smoluchowski equations provide a rigorous and efficient means for including multiple kinetic pathways when modeling coalescence growth systems. Originally written for a constant temperature and volume system, the equations must be modified if temperature and pressure vary during the coalescence time. In this paper, the equations are generalized, and adaptations appropriate to the situation presented by supersonic nozzle beam expansions are described. Given rate constants for all the cluster-cluster reactions, solution of the Smoluchowski equations would yield the abundances of clusters of all sizes at all times. This is unlikely, but we show that if these rate constants scale with the sizes of the reacting partners, the asymptotic (large size and large time) form of the cluster size distribution can be predicted. Experimentally determined distributions for He fit the predicted asymptotic distribution very well. Deviations between predicted and observed distributions allow identification of special cluster sizes that is, magic numbers. Furthermore, fitting an observed distribution to the theoretical form yields the base agglomeration cross section, from which all cluster-cluster rate constants may be obtained by scaling. Comparing the base cross section to measures of size and reactivity gives information about the coalescence process.

  18. About Ganoderma boninense in oil palm plantations of Sumatra and peninsular Malaysia: Ancient population expansion, extensive gene flow and large scale dispersion ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercière, Maxime; Boulord, Romain; Carasco-Lacombe, Catherine; Klopp, Christophe; Lee, Yang-Ping; Tan, Joon-Sheong; Syed Alwee, Sharifah S R; Zaremski, Alba; De Franqueville, Hubert; Breton, Frédéric; Camus-Kulandaivelu, Létizia

    Wood rot fungi form one of the main classes of phytopathogenic fungus. The group includes many species, but has remained poorly studied. Many species belonging to the Ganoderma genus are well known for causing decay in a wide range of tree species around the world. Ganoderma boninense, causal agent of oil palm basal stem rot, is responsible for considerable yield losses in Southeast Asian oil palm plantations. In a large-scale sampling operation, 357 sporophores were collected from oil palm plantations spread over peninsular Malaysia and Sumatra and genotyped using 11 SSR markers. The genotyping of these samples made it possible to investigate the population structure and demographic history of G. boninense across the oldest known area of interaction between oil palm and G. boninense. Results show that G. boninense possesses a high degree of genetic diversity and no detectable genetic structure at the scale of Sumatra and peninsular Malaysia. The fact that few duplicate genotypes were found in several studies including this one supports the hypothesis of spore dispersal in the spread of G. boninense. Meanwhile, spatial autocorrelation analysis shows that G. boninense is able to disperse across both short and long distances. These results bring new insight into mechanisms by which G. boninense spreads in oil palm plantations. Finally, the use of approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) modelling indicates that G. boninense has undergone a demographic expansion in the past, probably before the oil palm was introduced into Southeast Asia. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-Term Reserve Expansion of Power Systems With High Wind Power Penetration Using Universal Generating Function Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DING, YI; Wang, Peng; Goel, Lalit

    2010-01-01

    reliabilities. The effect of transmission network on customer reliabilities is also considered in the system UGF. The power output models of wind turbine generators in a wind farm considering wind speed correlation and un-correlation are developed, respectively. A reliability-based reserve expansion method......In a power system with high wind power penetration, reliability based reserve expansion is a major problem of system planning and operation due to the uncertainty and fast fluctuation of wind speeds. This paper studied the impact of high wind power penetration on the system reserve and reliability...

  20. Large-scale functional purification of recombinant HIV-1 capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdeleine Hung

    Full Text Available During human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 virion maturation, capsid proteins undergo a major rearrangement to form a conical core that protects the viral nucleoprotein complexes. Mutations in the capsid sequence that alter the stability of the capsid core are deleterious to viral infectivity and replication. Recently, capsid assembly has become an attractive target for the development of a new generation of anti-retroviral agents. Drug screening efforts and subsequent structural and mechanistic studies require gram quantities of active, homogeneous and pure protein. Conventional means of laboratory purification of Escherichia coli expressed recombinant capsid protein rely on column chromatography steps that are not amenable to large-scale production. Here we present a function-based purification of wild-type and quadruple mutant capsid proteins, which relies on the inherent propensity of capsid protein to polymerize and depolymerize. This method does not require the packing of sizable chromatography columns and can generate double-digit gram quantities of functionally and biochemically well-behaved proteins with greater than 98% purity. We have used the purified capsid protein to characterize two known assembly inhibitors in our in-house developed polymerization assay and to measure their binding affinities. Our capsid purification procedure provides a robust method for purifying large quantities of a key protein in the HIV-1 life cycle, facilitating identification of the next generation anti-HIV agents.

  1. Urban scaling and the production function for cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, José; Bettencourt, Luís M A; Strumsky, Deborah; West, Geoffrey B

    2013-01-01

    The factors that account for the differences in the economic productivity of urban areas have remained difficult to measure and identify unambiguously. Here we show that a microscopic derivation of urban scaling relations for economic quantities vs. population, obtained from the consideration of social and infrastructural properties common to all cities, implies an effective model of economic output in the form of a Cobb-Douglas type production function. As a result we derive a new expression for the Total Factor Productivity (TFP) of urban areas, which is the standard measure of economic productivity per unit of aggregate production factors (labor and capital). Using these results we empirically demonstrate that there is a systematic dependence of urban productivity on city population size, resulting from the mismatch between the size dependence of wages and labor, so that in contemporary US cities productivity increases by about 11% with each doubling of their population. Moreover, deviations from the average scale dependence of economic output, capturing the effect of local factors, including history and other local contingencies, also manifest surprising regularities. Although, productivity is maximized by the combination of high wages and low labor input, high productivity cities show invariably high wages and high levels of employment relative to their size expectation. Conversely, low productivity cities show both low wages and employment. These results shed new light on the microscopic processes that underlie urban economic productivity, explain the emergence of effective aggregate urban economic output models in terms of labor and capital inputs and may inform the development of economic theory related to growth.

  2. expansion method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we shall apply the (G /G)-expansion method to obtain the exact travelling wave solution of the two-dimensional ... In §3, we apply our method to the mentioned equations. In §4, some conclusions are ..... The exact solution obtained by this method can be used to check computer codes or as initial condition for ...

  3. Functional biogeography of oceanic islands and the scaling of functional diversity in the Azores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Robert J; Rigal, François; Borges, Paulo A V; Cardoso, Pedro; Terzopoulou, Sofia; Casanoves, Fernando; Pla, Laura; Guilhaumon, François; Ladle, Richard J; Triantis, Kostas A

    2014-09-23

    Analyses of species-diversity patterns of remote islands have been crucial to the development of biogeographic theory, yet little is known about corresponding patterns in functional traits on islands and how, for example, they may be affected by the introduction of exotic species. We collated trait data for spiders and beetles and used a functional diversity index (FRic) to test for nonrandomness in the contribution of endemic, other native (also combined as indigenous), and exotic species to functional-trait space across the nine islands of the Azores. In general, for both taxa and for each distributional category, functional diversity increases with species richness, which, in turn scales with island area. Null simulations support the hypothesis that each distributional group contributes to functional diversity in proportion to their species richness. Exotic spiders have added novel trait space to a greater degree than have exotic beetles, likely indicating greater impact of the reduction of immigration filters and/or differential historical losses of indigenous species. Analyses of species occurring in native-forest remnants provide limited indications of the operation of habitat filtering of exotics for three islands, but only for beetles. Although the general linear (not saturating) pattern of trait-space increase with richness of exotics suggests an ongoing process of functional enrichment and accommodation, further work is urgently needed to determine how estimates of extinction debt of indigenous species should be adjusted in the light of these findings.

  4. Antigen-specific in vitro expansion of functional redirected NY-ESO-1-specific human CD8+ T-cells in a cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakka, Gopinadh; Schuberth, Petra C; Thiel, Markus; Held, Gerhard; Stenner, Frank; Van Den Broek, Maries; Renner, Christoph; Mischo, Axel; Petrausch, Ulf

    2013-10-01

    Tumors can be targeted by the adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) redirected T-cells. Antigen-specific expansion protocols are needed to generate large quantities of redirected T-cells. We aimed to establish a protocol to expand functional active NY-ESO-1-specific redirected human CD8(+) T-cells. The anti-idiotypic Fab antibody A4 with specificity for HLA-A 0201/NY-ESO-1157-165 was tested by competition assays using a HLA-A 0201/NY-ESO-1157-165 tetramer. HLA-A 0201/NY-ESO-1157-165 redirected T-cells were generated, expanded and tested for CAR expression, cytokine release, in vitro cytolysis and protection against xenografted HLA-A 0201/NY-ESO-1157-165-positive multiple myeloma cells. A4 demonstrated antigen-specific binding to HLA-A 0201/NY-ESO-1157-165 redirected T-cells. Expansion with A4 resulted in 98% of HLA-A 0201/NY-ESO-1157-165 redirected T-cells. A4 induced strong proliferation, resulting in a 300-fold increase of redirected T-cells. After expansion protocols, redirected T-cells secreted Interleukin-2, (IL-2), interferon gamma (IFNγ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and lysed target cells in vitro and were protective in vivo. A4 expanded HLA-A 0201/NY-ESO-1157-165 redirected T-cells with preservation of antigen-specific function.

  5. High Fidelity, Efficiency and Functionalization of Ds-Px Unnatural Base Pairs in PCR Amplification for a Genetic Alphabet Expansion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Itaru; Miyatake, Yuya; Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2016-11-18

    Genetic alphabet expansion of DNA using an artificial extra base pair (unnatural base pair) could augment nucleic acid and protein functionalities by increasing their components. We previously developed an unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienyl)-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds) and 2-nitro-4-propynylpyrrole (Px), which exhibits high fidelity as a third base pair in PCR amplification. Here, the fidelity and efficiency of Ds-Px pairing using modified Px bases with functional groups, such as diol, azide, ethynyl and biotin, were evaluated by an improved method with optimized PCR conditions. The results revealed that all of the base pairs between Ds and either one of the modified Px bases functioned with high amplification efficiency (0.76-0.81), high selectivity (≥99.96% per doubling), and less sequence dependency, in PCR using 3'-exonuclease-proficient Deep Vent DNA polymerase. We also demonstrated that the azide-Px in PCR-amplified DNA was efficiently modified with any functional groups by copper-free click reaction. This genetic alphabet expansion system could endow nucleic acids with a wide variety of increased functionalities by the site-specific incorporation of modified Px bases at desired positions in DNA.

  6. Resonant state expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P.

    1993-02-01

    The completeness properties of the discrete set of bound state, virtual states and resonances characterizing the system of a single nonrelativistic particle moving in a central cutoff potential is investigated. From a completeness relation in terms of these discrete states and complex scattering states one can derive several Resonant State Expansions (RSE). It is interesting to obtain purely discrete expansion which, if valid, would significantly simplify the treatment of the continuum. Such expansions can be derived using Mittag-Leffler (ML) theory for a cutoff potential and it would be nice to see if one can obtain the same expansions starting from an eigenfunction theory that is not restricted to a finite sphere. The RSE of Greens functions is especially important, e.g. in the continuum RPA (CRPA) method of treating giant resonances in nuclear physics. The convergence of RSE is studied in simple cases using square well wavefunctions in order to achieve high numerical accuracy. Several expansions can be derived from each other by using the theory of analytic functions and one can the see how to obtain a natural discretization of the continuum. Since the resonance wavefunctions are oscillating with an exponentially increasing amplitude, and therefore have to be interpreted through some regularization procedure, every statement made about quantities involving such states is checked by numerical calculations.Realistic nuclear wavefunctions, generated by a Wood-Saxon potential, are used to test also the usefulness of RSE in a realistic nuclear calculation. There are some fundamental differences between different symmetries of the integral contour that defines the continuum in RSE. One kind of symmetry is necessary to have an expansion of the unity operator that is idempotent. Another symmetry must be used if we want purely discrete expansions. These are found to be of the same form as given by ML. (29 refs.).

  7. Worldsheet operator product expansions and p-point functions in AdS{sub 3}/CFT{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsch, Ingo [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Wirtz, Tim [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik

    2011-06-15

    We construct the operator product expansions (OPE) of the chiral primary operators in the worldsheet theory for strings on AdS{sub 3} x S{sup 3} x T{sup 4}. As an interesting application, we will use the worldsheet OPEs to derive a recursion relation for a particular class of extremal p-point correlators on the sphere. We compare our result with the corresponding recursion relation previously found in the symmetric orbifold theory on the boundary of AdS{sub 3}. (orig.)

  8. Direct observation of a transverse vibrational mechanism for negative thermal expansion in Zn(CN)2: an atomic pair distribution function analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Karena W; Chupas, Peter J; Kepert, Cameron J

    2005-11-09

    The instantaneous structure of the cyanide-bridged negative thermal expansion (NTE) material Zn(CN)(2) has been probed using atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of high energy X-ray scattering data (100-400 K). The temperature dependence of the atomic separations extracted from the PDFs indicates an increase of the average transverse displacement of the cyanide bridge from the line connecting the Zn(II) centers with increasing temperature. This allows the contraction of non-nearest-neighbor Zn...Zn' and Zn...C/N distances despite the observed expansion of the individual direct Zn-C/N and C-N bonds. Thus, this analysis provides definitive structural confirmation that an increase in the average displacement of bridging atoms is the origin of the NTE behavior. The lattice parameters reveal a slight reduction in the NTE behavior at high temperature from a minimum coefficient of thermal expansion (alpha = dl/ldT) of -19.8 x 10(-6) K(-1) below 180 K, which is attributed to interaction between the doubly interpenetrated frameworks that comprise the structure.

  9. An Item Response Analysis of the Motor and Behavioral Subscales of the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale in Huntington Disease Gene Expansion Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarino, Anthony L.; Anderson, Karen; Borowsky, Beth; Duff, Kevin; Giuliano, Joseph; Guttman, Mark; Ho, Aileen K.; Orth, Michael; Paulsen, Jane S.; Sills, Terrence; van Kammen, Daniel P.; Evans, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Although the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) is widely used in the assessment of Huntington disease (HD), the ability of individual items to discriminate individual differences in motor or behavioral manifestations has not been extensively studied in HD gene expansion carriers without a motor-defined clinical diagnosis (i.e., prodromal-HD or prHD). To elucidate the relationship between scores on individual motor and behavioral UHDRS items and total score for each subscale, a non-parametric item response analysis was performed on retrospective data from two multicentre, longitudinal studies. Motor and Behavioral assessments were supplied for 737 prHD individuals with data from 2114 visits (PREDICT-HD) and 686 HD individuals with data from 1482 visits (REGISTRY). Option characteristic curves were generated for UHDRS subscale items in relation to their subscale score. In prHD, overall severity of motor signs was low and participants had scores of 2 or above on very few items. In HD, motor items that assessed ocular pursuit, saccade initiation, finger tapping, tandem walking, and to a lesser extent saccade velocity, dysarthia, tongue protrusion, pronation/supination, Luria, bradykinesia, choreas, gait and balance on the retropulsion test were found to discriminate individual differences across a broad range of motor severity. In prHD, depressed mood, anxiety, and irritable behavior demonstrated good discriminative properties. In HD, depressed mood demonstrated a good relationship with the overall behavioral score. These data suggest that at least some UHDRS items appear to have utility across a broad range of severity, although many items demonstrate problematic features. PMID:21370269

  10. Application of a Multi-Scale form of Terzaghi’s Effective Stress Principle for Unsaturated Expansive Clays to Simulate Hydro-Mechanical Behavior During Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainka Julia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed multi-scale form of Terzaghi’s effective stress principle for unsaturated swelling clays that was rigorously derived by periodic homogenization starting from micro- and nano-mechanical analyses is applied to numerically simulate one-dimensional swelling pressure tests of compacted bentonites during hydration. The total macroscopic stress captures the coupling between disjoining forces at the nanoscopic scale of clay platelets and capillary effects at the microscopic scale of clay aggregates over the entire water content range. The numerical results allow to draw conclusions on the water transfer mechanism between inter- and intra-aggregate pores during hydration and consequently on the evolution of the external swelling pressure resulting from the competition between capillary and disjoining forces. In addition, such application highlights the abilities and the limits of the electrical double-layer theory to compute the disjoining pressure in the nano-pores. For large platelet distances, in the range of osmotic swelling, the nature of the disjoining pressure is electro-chemical and can be computed from Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Conversely, at small distances, in the crystalline swelling, a solvation component has to be added to account for the molecular nature of the solvent. As a first improvement of the nano-scale description the solvent is treated as a hard sphere fluid using Density Functional Theory.

  11. Functional assessment of mother-child relationships: The EEI Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Panduro Paredes, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    An infant stimulation in mother-child relationship assessment scale (ISA Scale) was developed, based on a classification of probable effects on child's behavior, such as behavioral promotion stimulation (BPS) and behavioral control stimulation (BCS), refering to mother action level to promote desirable behaviors and to control socially non desirable behaviors in child's behavior repertory. 540 mother-child dyads were evaluated. The construct validity tests showed significant correlations in i...

  12. On the equisummability of Hermite and Fourier expansions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove an equisummability result for the Fourier expansions and. Hermite expansions as well as special Hermite expansions. We also prove the uniform boundedness of the Bochner-Riesz means associated to the Hermite expansions for polyradial functions. Keywords. Hermite functions; special Hermite expansions; ...

  13. Multidisciplinary Delphi Development of a Scale to Evaluate Team Function in Obstetric Emergencies: The PETRA Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Mrinalini; Hoppe, David; Monks, David; Cooke, Mary Ellen; Sharples, Lynn; Windrim, Rory

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new interdisciplinary teamwork scale, the Perinatal Emergency: Team Response Assessment (PETRA), for the management of obstetric crises, through consensus agreement of obstetric caregivers. This prospective study was performed using expert consensus, based on a Delphi method. The study investigators developed a new PETRA tool, specifically related to obstetric crisis management, based on the existing literature and discussions among themselves. The scale was distributed to a selected panel of experts in the field for the Delphi process. After each round of Delphi, every component of the scale was analyzed quantitatively by the percentage of agreement ratings and each comment reviewed by the blinded investigators. The assessment scale was then modified, with components of less than 80% agreement removed from the scale. The process was repeated on three occasions to reach a consensus and final PETRA scale. Fourteen of 24 invited experts participated in the Delphi process. The original PETRA scale included six categories and 48 items, one global scale item, and a 3-point rubric for rating. The overall percentage agreement by experts in the first, second, and third rounds was 95.0%, 93.2%, and 98.5%, respectively. The final scale after the third round of Delphi consisted of the following seven categories: shared mental model, communication, situational awareness, leadership, followership, workload management, and positive/effective behaviours and attitudes. There were 34 individual items within these categories, each with a 5-point rating rubric (1 = unacceptable to 5 = perfect). Using a structured Delphi method, we established the face and content validity of this assessment scale that focuses on important aspects of interdisciplinary teamwork in the management of obstetric crises. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada

  14. Low-energy. beta. -function in a finite super-Yang-Mills model with multiple mass scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.; Helayel-Neto, J.A. (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy))

    1985-02-14

    We compute the one-loop contribution to the low-energy light-fermion gauge coupling in a finite supersymmetric gauge theory with two mass scales: a heavy mass that breaks an initial N=4 supersymmetry down to N=2, but respects the finiteness, and a light mass that, for simplicity, is set to zero. We find that coupling grows with the mass of the heavy intermediate states. Hence the latter do not decouple at low energies, leading to large logarithms that invalidate low-energy perturbation theory. Consequently, further manipulations are required to obtain a meaningful perturbative expansion. Enforcing decoupling through finite renormalizations, that absorb the heavy mass effects into a redefinition of the parameters of the lagrangian, introduces an arbitrary subtraction mass ..mu... The requirement that the S-matrix elements be independent of ..mu.. leads to a non-trivial renormalization-group equation for the low-energy theory, with a non-vanishing ..beta..-function.

  15. Virial Expansion Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  16. orthogonal and scaling transformations of quadratic functions with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. E-mail: bguta@math.aau.edu.et. ABSTRACT: In this paper ... construct a non-singular transformation that can reduce a quadratic function whose level surfaces are ellipsoids to another quadratic function whose level surfaces are spherical while preserving the convexity/concavity property of the given ...

  17. Quality of Life Scale: A Measure of Function for People with Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality Of Life Scale A Measure Of Function For People With Pain 0 Non-functioning 1 2 3 4 ... the week Active on weekends 9 10 Normal Quality of Life Work/volunteer/be active eight hours daily Take ...

  18. Method of generating q-expansion coefficients for conformal block and N=2 Nekrasov function by {beta}-deformed matrix model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoyama, H., E-mail: itoyama@sci.osaka-cu.ac.j [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138, Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Osaka City University Advanced Mathematical Institute (OCAMI), 3-3-138, Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Oota, T., E-mail: toota@sci.osaka-cu.ac.j [Osaka City University Advanced Mathematical Institute (OCAMI), 3-3-138, Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2010-10-21

    We observe that, at {beta}-deformed matrix models for the four-point conformal block, the point q=0 is the point where the three-Penner type model becomes a pair of decoupled two-Penner type models and where, in the planar limit, (an array of), two-cut eigenvalue distribution(s) coalesce into (that of) one-cut one(s). We treat the Dotsenko-Fateev multiple integral, with their paths under the recent discussion, as perturbed double-Selberg matrix model (at q=0, it becomes a pair of Selberg integrals) to construct two kinds of generating functions for the q-expansion coefficients and compute some. A formula associated with the Jack polynomial is noted. The second Nekrasov coefficient for SU(2) with N{sub f}=4 is derived. A pair of Young diagrams appears naturally. The finite N loop equation at q=0 as well as its planar limit is solved exactly, providing a useful tool to evaluate the coefficients as those of the resolvents. The planar free energy in the q-expansion is computed to the lowest non-trivial order. A free field representation of the Nekrasov function is given.

  19. Reduced renal function in patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 and the association to CTG expansion and other potential risk factors for chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldenbratt, Annika; Lindberg, Christopher; Svensson, Maria K

    2017-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) affects several organs. Disease severity and age at onset are correlated to the CTG repeat expansion. The aim of this study was to assess renal function and the association to numbers of CTG repeat expansion in patients with DM1. Ninety-eight patients with DM1 were included. Glomerular filtration rate (measured GFR) was measured using iohexol clearance. Data on CTG repeats were available in 83/98 (85%) patients. The overall mGFR was 74 (16) ml/min/1.73 m 2 (range 38-134). Sixty-four patients (69%) had a mild and sixteen patients (17%) a moderate decrease in renal function (mGFR 60-89 and 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively). No correlations were found between CTG repeats and mGFR (r = 0.10, p = 0.4) or between CTG repeats and serum cystatin C (r = 0.12, p = 0.29). CTG repeats was positively correlated to creatinine-based estimates of GFR (eGFR) (modified diet in renal disease r = 0.49, p CTG repeats, a marker of disease severity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling Asymmetric Flow of Viscoelastic Fluid in Symmetric Planar Sudden Expansion Geometry Based on User-Defined Function in FLUENT CFD Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ying Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Through embedding an in-house subroutine into FLUENT code by utilizing the functionalization of user-defined function provided by the software, a new numerical simulation methodology on viscoelastic fluid flows has been established. In order to benchmark this methodology, numerical simulations under different viscoelastic fluid solution concentrations (with solvent viscosity ratio varied from 0.2 to 0.9, extensibility parameters (100≤L2≤500, Reynolds numbers (0.1 ≤ Re ≤ 100, and Weissenberg numbers (0 ≤ Wi ≤ 20 are conducted on unsteady laminar flows through a symmetric planar sudden expansion with expansion ratio of 1: 3 for viscoelastic fluid flows. The constitutive model used to describe the viscoelastic effect of viscoelastic fluid flow is FENE-P (finitely extensive nonlinear elastic-Peterlin model. The numerical simulation results show that the influences of elasticity, inertia, and concentration on the flow bifurcation characteristics are more significant than those of extensibility. The present simulation results including the critical Reynolds number for which the flow becomes asymmetric, vortex size, bifurcation diagram, velocity distribution, streamline, and pressure loss show good agreements with some published results. That means the newly established method based on FLUENT software platform for simulating peculiar flow behaviors of viscoelastic fluid is credible and suitable for the study of viscoelastic fluid flows.

  1. Mathematical Structure Common to Animal Growth Analysis and Space Expansion Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shimojo, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate mathematical structures common to animal growth analysis and space expansion analysis. Six particular functions for the growth analysis of the individual animal had a common mathematical structure composed of the respective function and its first and second derivatives. The standard model of the space expansion had a deceleration parameter composed of the scale factor and its first and second derivatives. The results obtained from this study suggested h...

  2. Regions of the Production Function, Returns, and Economies of Scale: Further Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truett, Lila J.; Truett, Dale B.

    1990-01-01

    Argues that the return-to-scale concept is important in explaining to more advanced students how production structures underlie costs. Reviews Christopher Ross Bell's graphical analysis, contending that its argument suggests a variable-returns-to-scale function rather than one exhibiting decreasing returns to scale. Explores classic views and the…

  3. Characteristic functions of scale mixtures of multivariate skew-normal distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyoung-Moon

    2011-08-01

    We obtain the characteristic function of scale mixtures of skew-normal distributions both in the univariate and multivariate cases. The derivation uses the simple stochastic relationship between skew-normal distributions and scale mixtures of skew-normal distributions. In particular, we describe the characteristic function of skew-normal, skew-t, and other related distributions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Image segmentation based on scaled fuzzy membership functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan; Ring,, P.; Christiansen, Pernille

    1993-01-01

    As a basis for an automated interpretation of magnetic resonance images, the authors propose a fuzzy segmentation method. The method uses five standard fuzzy membership functions: small, small medium, medium, large medium, and large. The method fits these membership functions to the modes...... of interest in the image histogram by means of a piecewise-linear transformation. A test example is given concerning a human head image, including a sensitivity analysis based on the fuzzy area measure. The method provides a rule-based interface to the physician...

  5. A novel method of constructing compactly supported orthogonal scaling functions from splines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouzhi Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A novel construction of compactly supported orthogonal scaling functions and wavelets with spline functions is presented in this paper. Let M n $M_{n}$ be the center B-spline of order n, except for the case of order one, we know M n $M_{n}$ is not orthogonal. But by the formula of orthonormalization procedure, we can construct an orthogonal scaling function corresponding to M n $M_{n}$ . However, unlike M n $M_{n}$ itself, this scaling function no longer has compact support. To induce the orthogonality while keeping the compact support of M n $M_{n}$ , we put forward a simple, yet efficient construction method that uses the formula of orthonormalization procedure and the weighted average method to construct the two-scale symbol of some compactly supported orthogonal scaling functions.

  6. Large-scale expansion of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells with engineered K562 feeder cells in G-Rex vessels and their use as chimeric antigen receptor-modified effector cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Chen, Can; Li, Zhendong; Zhu, Sumin; Tay, Johan Ck; Zhang, Xi; Zha, Shijun; Zeng, Jieming; Tan, Wee Kiat; Liu, Xin; Chng, Wee Joo; Wang, Shu

    2018-02-02

    Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are a minor subset of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood that has been extensively investigated for their tolerability, safety and anticancer efficacy. A hindrance to the broad application of these cells for adoptive cellular immunotherapy has been attaining clinically appropriate numbers of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Furthermore, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells exist at low frequencies among cancer patients. We, therefore, sought to conceive an economical method that allows for a quick and robust large-scale expansion of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. A two-step protocol was developed, in which peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors or cancer patients were activated with Zometa and interleukin (IL)-2, followed by co-culturing with gamma-irradiated, CD64-, CD86- and CD137L-expressing K562 artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) in the presence of the anti-CD3 antibody OKT3. We optimized the co-culture ratio of K562 aAPCs to immune cells, and migrated this method to a G-Rex cell growth platform to derive clinically relevant cell numbers in a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant manner. We further include a depletion step to selectively remove αβ T lymphocytes. The method exhibited high expansion folds and a specific enrichment of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells displayed an effector memory phenotype with a concomitant down-regulated expression of inhibitory immune checkpoint receptors. Finally, we ascertained the cytotoxic activity of these expanded cells by using nonmodified and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engrafted Vγ9Vδ2 T cells against a panel of solid tumor cells. Overall, we report an efficient approach to generate highly functional Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in massive numbers suitable for clinical application in an allogeneic setting. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radivojac, P.; Clark, W.T.; Oron, T.R.; Schnoes, A.M.; Wittkop, T.; Kourmpetis, Y.A.I.; Dijk, van A.D.J.; Friedberg, I.

    2013-01-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be

  8. Large-scale functional MRI study on a production grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glatard, Tristan; Soleman, Remi S.; Veltman, Dick J.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Olabarriaga, Silvia D.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis is usually carried out with standard software packages (e.g., FSL and SPM) implementing the General Linear Model (GLM) computation. Yet, the validity of an analysis may still largely depend on the parameterization of those tools, which has,

  9. A scale purification procedure for evaluation of differential item functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalid, Muhammad Naveed; Glas, Cornelis A.W.

    2014-01-01

    Item bias or differential item functioning (DIF) has an important impact on the fairness of psychological and educational testing. In this paper, DIF is seen as a lack of fit to an item response (IRT) model. Inferences about the presence and importance of DIF require a process of so-called test

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Negative thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, G. D.; Bruno, J. A. O.; Barron, T. H. K.; Allan, N. L.

    2005-02-01

    There has been substantial renewed interest in negative thermal expansion following the discovery that cubic ZrW2O8 contracts over a temperature range in excess of 1000 K. Substances of many different kinds show negative thermal expansion, especially at low temperatures. In this article we review the underlying thermodynamics, emphasizing the roles of thermal stress and elasticity. We also discuss vibrational and non-vibrational mechanisms operating on the atomic scale that are responsible for negative expansion, both isotropic and anisotropic, in a wide range of materials.

  11. The effect of artificial antigen-presenting cells with preclustered anti-CD28/-CD3/-LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies on the induction of ex vivo expansion of functional human antitumor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappasodi, Roberta; Di Nicola, Massimo; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Mortarini, Roberta; Molla, Alessandra; Vegetti, Claudia; Albani, Salvatore; Anichini, Andrea; Gianni, Alessandro M

    2008-10-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with ex vivo expanded autologous antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes represents an important therapeutic option as an anticancer strategy. In order to identify a reliable method for producing adequate amounts of functional antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes with a potentially long in vivo lifespan, we tested the T-cell expansion efficiency of a new artificial antigen-presenting cell-based system. Our artificial antigen-presenting cells were generated with activating (anti-CD3), co-stimulating (anti-CD28) and adhesion (anti-LFA-1) biotinylated monoclonal antibodies preclustered in microdomains held on a liposome scaffold by neutravidin rafts. The co-localization of T-cell ligands in microdomains and the targeting of an adhesion protein, increasing the efficiency of immunological synapse formation, represent the novelties of our system. The activity of our artificial antigen-presenting cells was compared with that of anti-CD3/-CD28 coated immunomagnetic microbeads and immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (OKT3 clone), the only two commercially available artificial systems. Our artificial antigen-presenting cells expanded both polyclonal T cells and MART-1-specific CD8(+) T cells in a more efficient manner than the other systems. Stimulation with artificial antigen-presenting cells allows for the generation of viable T cells displaying an immunophenotype consistent with in vivo potential for persistence, without increasing the frequency of regulatory T cells. The starting specificity of anti MART-1 CD8(+) T cells was preserved after stimulation with artificial antigen-presenting cells and it was statistically greater when compared to the activity of the same cells expanded with the other systems. Finally, our artificial antigen-presenting cells proved to be suitable for large-scale application, minimizing the volume and the costs of T-cell expansion. Our artificial antigen-presenting cells might represent an efficient tool to rapidly obtain a

  12. Equifinality and the Scaling Exponent of the Structure Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitton, G. F.; Mezematy, Y.; Schertzer, D. J. M.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2014-12-01

    In turbulence the structure function is by far the most widely used tool for the empirical analysis of the velocity field. This is due mainly to the work of Kolmogorov (1941) who hypothesised a homogeneous flux of energy and derived the famous 2/3 power law for the second-order structure function; — which corresponds to a 5/3 law for the energy spectrum (Obukhov, 1942). In 1962 Kolmogorov refined his hypothesis to take into account the intermittency of the flux, with the consequence that the exponent ξ(q) of the structure function is not longer proportional to its statistical order q. In this communication, we first show that the refined hypothesis can lead to different models that can have opposite intermittency corrections. Secondly, we demonstrate that the inverse problem, i.e., starting from a given expression of ξ(q) to recover the involved flux leads to an interesting problem of equifinality for the definition of this flux. This is done in particular in the framework of the Fractionally Integrated Flux model that gives a precise meaning to the refined hypothesis. The theoretical and practical consequences are illustrated with the help data analysis and simulations of turbulence in wind farms and urban lakes.

  13. A Short Note on the Scaling Function Constant Problem in the Two-Dimensional Ising Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothner, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    We provide a simple derivation of the constant factor in the short-distance asymptotics of the tau-function associated with the 2-point function of the two-dimensional Ising model. This factor was first computed by Tracy (Commun Math Phys 142:297-311, 1991) via an exponential series expansion of the correlation function. Further simplifications in the analysis are due to Tracy and Widom (Commun Math Phys 190:697-721, 1998) using Fredholm determinant representations of the correlation function and Wiener-Hopf approximation results for the underlying resolvent operator. Our method relies on an action integral representation of the tau-function and asymptotic results for the underlying Painlevé-III transcendent from McCoy et al. (J Math Phys 18:1058-1092, 1977).

  14. Functional evaluation of pediatric patients after discharge from the intensive care unit using the Functional Status Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gabriela Alves; Schaan, Camila Wohlgemuth; Ferrari, Renata Salatti

    2017-12-07

    To evaluate the functional status of pediatric patients after discharge from the pediatric intensive care unit using the Functional Status Scale and to compare the time of invasive mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit, and Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 results among individuals with different degrees of functional impairment. A cross-sectional study was conducted on patients who were discharged from a pediatric intensive care unit. The functional evaluation by the Functional Status Scale was performed on the first day after discharge from the unit, and the Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 was used to predict the mortality rate at the time of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit. The sample consisted of 50 individuals, 60% of which were male, with a median age of 19 [6 - 61] months. The overall score of the Functional Status Scale was 11.5 [7 - 15], and the highest scores were observed in the "motor function" 3 [1 - 4] and "feeding" 4 [1 - 4] domains. Compared to patients who were not readmitted to the pediatric intensive care unit, patients who were readmitted presented a worse overall score (p = 0.01), worse scores in the "motor function" (p = 0.01), "feeding" (p = 0.02), and "respiratory" (p = 0.036) domains, and a higher mortality rate according to the Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 (p = 0.025). Evaluation of the functional status using the Functional Status Scale indicated moderate impairment in patients after discharge from the pediatric intensive care unit, mainly in the "motor function" and "feeding" domains; patients who were readmitted to the pediatric intensive care unit demonstrated worse overall functional, motor function, feeding and respiratory scores. Individuals with greater functional impairment had longer times of invasive mechanical ventilation and hospitalization in the pediatric intensive care unit.

  15. Large-Scale Functional Brain Network Reorganization During Taoist Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Tun; Li, Chia-Wei; Vértes, Petra E; Wu, Changwei Wesley; Achard, Sophie; Hsieh, Chao-Hsien; Liou, Chien-Hui; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Bullmore, Edward T

    2016-02-01

    Meditation induces a distinct and reversible mental state that provides insights into brain correlates of consciousness. We explored brain network changes related to meditation by graph theoretical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Eighteen Taoist meditators with varying levels of expertise were scanned using a within-subjects counterbalanced design during resting and meditation states. State-related differences in network topology were measured globally and at the level of individual nodes and edges. Although measures of global network topology, such as small-worldness, were unchanged, meditation was characterized by an extensive and expertise-dependent reorganization of the hubs (highly connected nodes) and edges (functional connections). Areas of sensory cortex, especially the bilateral primary visual and auditory cortices, and the bilateral temporopolar areas, which had the highest degree (or connectivity) during the resting state, showed the biggest decrease during meditation. Conversely, bilateral thalamus and components of the default mode network, mainly the bilateral precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex, had low degree in the resting state but increased degree during meditation. Additionally, these changes in nodal degree were accompanied by reorganization of anatomical orientation of the edges. During meditation, long-distance longitudinal (antero-posterior) edges increased proportionally, whereas orthogonal long-distance transverse (right-left) edges connecting bilaterally homologous cortices decreased. Our findings suggest that transient changes in consciousness associated with meditation introduce convergent changes in the topological and spatial properties of brain functional networks, and the anatomical pattern of integration might be as important as the global level of integration when considering the network basis for human consciousness.

  16. Three-body expansion of the fragment molecular orbital method combined with density-functional tight-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio; Fedorov, Dmitri G

    2017-03-15

    The three-body fragment molecular orbital (FMO3) method is formulated for density-functional tight-binding (DFTB). The energy, analytic gradient, and Hessian are derived in the gas phase, and the energy and analytic gradient are also derived for polarizable continuum model. The accuracy of FMO3-DFTB is evaluated for five proteins, sodium cation in explicit solvent, and three isomers of polyalanine. It is shown that FMO3-DFTB is considerably more accurate than FMO2-DFTB. Molecular dynamics simulations for sodium cation in water are performed for 100 ps, yielding radial distribution functions and coordination numbers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Assessing Impairment of Executive Function and Psychomotor Speed in Premanifest and Manifest Huntington's Disease Gene-expansion Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unmack Larsen, Ida; Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Gade, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) and psychomotor speed (PMS) has been widely studied in Huntington's disease (HD). Most studies have focused on finding markers of disease progression by comparing group means at different disease stages. Our aim was to investigate performances on nine measures of EF and PMS...

  18. Exact low-temperature series expansion for the partition function of the zero-field Ising model on the infinite square lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudem, Grzegorz; Fronczak, Agata; Fronczak, Piotr

    2016-10-10

    In this paper, we provide the exact expression for the coefficients in the low-temperature series expansion of the partition function of the two-dimensional Ising model on the infinite square lattice. This is equivalent to exact determination of the number of spin configurations at a given energy. With these coefficients, we show that the ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic phase transition in the square lattice Ising model can be explained through equivalence between the model and the perfect gas of energy clusters model, in which the passage through the critical point is related to the complete change in the thermodynamic preferences on the size of clusters. The combinatorial approach reported in this article is very general and can be easily applied to other lattice models.

  19. Envelope periodic solutions for a discrete network with the Jacobi elliptic functions and the alternative (G'/G)-expansion method including the generalized Riccati equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tala-Tebue, E.; Tsobgni-Fozap, D. C.; Kenfack-Jiotsa, A.; Kofane, T. C.

    2014-06-01

    Using the Jacobi elliptic functions and the alternative ( G'/ G-expansion method including the generalized Riccati equation, we derive exact soliton solutions for a discrete nonlinear electrical transmission line in (2+1) dimension. More precisely, these methods are general as they lead us to diverse solutions that have not been previously obtained for the nonlinear electrical transmission lines. This study seeks to show that it is not often necessary to transform the equation of the network into a well-known differential equation before finding its solutions. The solutions obtained by the current methods are generalized periodic solutions of nonlinear equations. The shape of solutions can be well controlled by adjusting the parameters of the network. These exact solutions may have significant applications in telecommunication systems where solitons are used to codify or for the transmission of data.

  20. Double Scaling Limits, Airy Functions and Multicritical Behaviour in O(N) Vektor Sigma Models

    OpenAIRE

    Maeder, Joachim; Rühl, Werner

    1995-01-01

    O(N) vector sigma models possessing catastrophes in their action are studied. Coupling the limit N - > infinity with an appropriate scaling behaviour of the coupling constants, the partition function develops a singular factor. This is a generalized Airy function in the case of spacetime dimension zero and the partition function of a scalar field theory for positive spacetime dimension.

  1. A Genome-Scale Resource for the Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Pruneda-Paz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extensive transcriptional networks play major roles in cellular and organismal functions. Transcript levels are in part determined by the combinatorial and overlapping functions of multiple transcription factors (TFs bound to gene promoters. Thus, TF-promoter interactions provide the basic molecular wiring of transcriptional regulatory networks. In plants, discovery of the functional roles of TFs is limited by an increased complexity of network circuitry due to a significant expansion of TF families. Here, we present the construction of a comprehensive collection of Arabidopsis TFs clones created to provide a versatile resource for uncovering TF biological functions. We leveraged this collection by implementing a high-throughput DNA binding assay and identified direct regulators of a key clock gene (CCA1 that provide molecular links between different signaling modules and the circadian clock. The resources introduced in this work will significantly contribute to a better understanding of the transcriptional regulatory landscape of plant genomes.

  2. Overcoming the bottleneck of platelet lysate supply in large-scale clinical expansion of adipose-derived stem cells: A comparison of fresh versus three types of platelet lysates from outdated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovinski, Peter V; Herly, Mikkel; Mathiasen, Anders B; Svalgaard, Jesper D; Borup, Rehannah; Talman, Maj-Lis M; Elberg, Jens J; Kølle, Stig-Frederik T; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Platelet lysates (PL) represent a promising replacement for xenogenic growth supplement for adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) expansions. However, fresh platelets from human blood donors are not clinically feasible for large-scale cell expansion based on their limited supply. Therefore, we tested PLs prepared via three methods from outdated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates (PCs) to establish an efficient and feasible expansion of ASCs for clinical use. PLs were prepared by the freeze-thaw method from freshly drawn platelets or from outdated buffy coat-derived PCs stored in the platelet additive solution, InterSol. Three types of PLs were prepared from outdated PCs with platelets suspended in either (1) InterSol (not manipulated), (2) InterSol + supplemented with plasma or (3) plasma alone (InterSol removed). Using these PLs, we compared ASC population doubling time, cell yield, differentiation potential and cell surface markers. Gene expression profiles were analyzed using microarray assays, and growth factor concentrations in the cell culture medium were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Of the three PL compositions produced from outdated PCs, removal of Intersol and resuspension in plasma prior to the first freezing process was overall the best. This specific outdated PL induced ASC growth kinetics, surface markers, plastic adherence and differentiation potentials comparable with PL from fresh platelets. ASCs expanded in PL from fresh versus outdated PCs exhibited different expressions of 17 overlapping genes, of which 10 were involved in cellular proliferation, although not significantly reflected by cell growth. Only minor differences in growth factor turnover were observed. PLs from outdated platelets may be an efficient and reliable source of human growth supplement allowing for large-scale ASC expansion for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Expansion and Functional Divergence of AP2 Group Genes in Spermatophytes Determined by Molecular Evolution and Arabidopsis Mutant Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pengkai; Cheng, Tielong; Lu, Mengzhu; Liu, Guangxin; Li, Meiping; Shi, Jisen; Lu, Ye; Laux, Thomas; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The APETALA2 (AP2) genes represent the AP2 group within a large group of DNA-binding proteins called AP2/EREBP. The AP2 gene is functional and necessary for flower development, stem cell maintenance, and seed development, whereas the other members of AP2 group redundantly affect flowering time. Here we study the phylogeny of AP2 group genes in spermatophytes. Spermatophyte AP2 group genes can be classified into AP2 and TOE types, six clades, and we found that the AP2 group homologs in gymnosp...

  4. Expansion of genetic testing in the division of functional genomics, research center for bioscience and technology, tottori university from 2000 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kaori

    2014-03-01

    At the Division of Functional Genomics, Research Center for Bioscience and Technology, Tottori University, we have been making an effort to establish a genetic testing facility that can provide the same screening procedures conducted worldwide. Direct Sequencing of PCR products is the main method to detect point mutations, small deletions and insertions. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) was used to detect large deletions or insertions. Expansion of the repeat was analyzed for triplet repeat diseases. Original primers were constructed for 41 diseases when the reported primers failed to amplify the gene. Prediction of functional effects of human nsSNPs (PolyPhen) was used for evaluation of novel mutations. From January 2000 to September 2013, a total of 1,006 DNA samples were subjected to genetic testing in the Division of Functional Genomics, Research Center for Bioscience and Technology, Tottori University. The hospitals that requested genetic testing were located in 43 prefectures in Japan and in 11 foreign countries. The genetic testing covered 62 diseases, and mutations were detected in 287 out of 1,006 with an average mutation detection rate of 24.7%. There were 77 samples for prenatal diagnosis. The number of samples has rapidly increased since 2010. In 2013, the next-generation sequencers were introduced in our facility and are expected to provide more comprehensive genetic testing in the near future. Nowadays, genetic testing is a popular and powerful tool for diagnosis of many genetic diseases. Our genetic testing should be further expanded in the future.

  5. Translation, cultural adaptation and reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire for Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Chiari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To translate, to perform a cultural adaptation of and to test the reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire for Brazil. METHODS: First, the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire was translated into Portuguese and was then back-translated into French. These translations were reviewed by a committee to establish a Brazilian version of the questionnaire to be tested. The validity and reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire was evaluated. Patients of both sexes, who were aged 18 to 60 years and presented with rheumatoid arthritis affecting their hands, were interviewed. The patients were initially interviewed by two observers and were later interviewed by a single rater. First, the Visual Analogue Scale for hand pain, the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Disability questionnaire and the Health Assessment Questionnaire were administered. The third administration of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale was performed fifteen days after the first administration. Ninety patients were assessed in the present study. RESULTS: Two questions were modified as a result of the assessment of cultural equivalence. The Cronbach's alpha value for this assessment was 0.93. The intraclass intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients were 0.76 and 0.96, respectively. The Spearman's coefficient indicated that there was a low level of correlation between the Cochin Hand Functional Scale and the Visual Analogue Scale for pain (0.46 and that there was a moderate level of correlation of the Cochin Scale with the Health Assessment Questionnaire (0.66 and with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (0.63. The average administration time for the Cochin Scale was three minutes. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale was successfully translated and adapted, and this version exhibited good internal consistency, reliability and construct validity.

  6. A scaled boundary finite element formulation with bubble functions for elasto-static analyses of functionally graded materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, E. T.; Song, C.; Natarajan, S.

    2017-07-01

    This manuscript presents an extension of the recently-developed high order complete scaled boundary shape functions to model elasto-static problems in functionally graded materials. Both isotropic and orthotropic functionally graded materials are modelled. The high order complete properties of the shape functions are realized through the introduction of bubble-like functions derived from the equilibrium condition of a polygon subjected to body loads. The bubble functions preserve the displacement compatibility between the elements in the mesh. The heterogeneity resulting from the material gradient introduces additional terms in the polygon stiffness matrix that are integrated analytically. Few numerical benchmarks were used to validate the developed formulation. The high order completeness property of the bubble functions result in superior accuracy and convergence rates for generic elasto-static and fracture problems involving functionally graded materials.

  7. Strain, nano-phase separation, multi-scale structures and function of advanced materials

    OpenAIRE

    Billinge, S. J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Recent atomic pair distribution function results from our group from manganites and cuprate systems are reviewed in light of the presence of multi-scale structures. These structures have a profound effect on the material properties

  8. Clustering and Visualizing Functionally Similar Regions in Large-Scale Spatial Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fushimi, Takayasu; Saito, Kazumi; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Kazama, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    .... For this purpose, based on our previous algorithm called the FCE method that extracted functional clusters for each network, we propose a new method that efficiently deals with several large-scale...

  9. Stress-induced alterations in large-scale functional networks of the rodent brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, Marloes J A G; van der Marel, Kajo; van der Toorn, A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/138484821; Pillai, Anup G.; Fernández, Guillén; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/174680058; Joëls, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Stress-related psychopathology is associated with altered functioning of large-scale brain networks. Animal research into chronic stress, one of the most prominent environmental risk factors for development of psychopathology, has revealed molecular and cellular mechanisms potentially contributing

  10. Evolution of the K-band Galaxy Cluster Luminosity Function and Scaling Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yen-Ting; Mohr, Joseph J.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Stanford, S Adam

    2006-01-01

    We study the evolution of two fundamental properties of galaxy clusters: the luminosity function (LF) and the scaling relations between the total galaxy number N (or luminosity) and cluster mass M. Using a sample of 27 clusters (0

  11. Periodic solutions for a food chain system with Monod-Haldane functional response on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejun Zhuang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study a three species food chain model on time scales, with Monod-Haldane functional response and time delay. With the help of coincidence degree theory, we establish the existence of periodic solutions.

  12. Perception of Family Functioning: Psychometric Analysis of Family APGAR Scale in Adolescents in Lima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, Humberto; Caycho, Tomas; Shimabukuro, Midori; Valdivia, Amalia

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the psychometric analysis of the APGAR Scale developed by Smilkstein (1978), consisting of five Likert items with five alternatives, which evaluates the perception of family functioning (Gómez & Ponce, 2010). The scale was administered to 256 male students aged from 11 to 18 attending state school in Lima. Item-test…

  13. Reliability of the EK scale, a functional test for non-ambulatory persons with Duchenne dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Birgit F.; Hyde, Sylvia A.; Attermann, Jørn

    2002-01-01

    The EK {Egen Klassifikation} scale was developed to assess overall functional ability in the non-ambulatory stage of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of the EK scale. Six subjects with DMD, selected as representative of the entire range...

  14. Expansion of Kolarik model for tensile strength of polymer particulate nanocomposites as a function of matrix, nanoparticles and interphase properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Yasser; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2017-11-15

    Kolarik proposed a model for tensile strength of polymer particulate composites based on the cubic orthogonal skeleton or three perpendicular plates (3PP) system. In this paper, Kolarik model is expanded for tensile strength of polymer nanocomposites containing spherical nanoparticles assuming the interphase properties. This model expresses the strength as a function of interphase properties. This development is performed using some models such as Pukanszky and Nicolais-Narkis. The expanded model is applied to calculate the thickness and strength of interphase by the experimental results. Furthermore, the strength of polymer nanocomposites is evaluated at different levels of material and interphase properties. The experimental data show good agreement with the predictions of the developed model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Monkeypox virus infection of rhesus macaques induces massive expansion of natural killer cells but suppresses natural killer cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Song

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play critical roles in innate immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infection. However, the response of NK cells to monkeypox virus (MPXV infection is not well characterized. In this intravenous challenge study of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, we analyzed blood and lymph node NK cell changes in absolute cell numbers, cell proliferation, chemokine receptor expression, and cellular functions. Our results showed that the absolute number of total NK cells in the blood increased in response to MPXV infection at a magnitude of 23-fold, manifested by increases in CD56+, CD16+, CD16-CD56- double negative, and CD16+CD56+ double positive NK cell subsets. Similarly, the frequency and NK cell numbers in the lymph nodes also largely increased with the total NK cell number increasing 46.1-fold. NK cells both in the blood and lymph nodes massively proliferated in response to MPXV infection as measured by Ki67 expression. Chemokine receptor analysis revealed reduced expression of CXCR3, CCR7, and CCR6 on NK cells at early time points (days 2 and 4 after virus inoculation, followed by an increased expression of CXCR3 and CCR5 at later time points (days 7-8 of infection. In addition, MPXV infection impaired NK cell degranulation and ablated secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Our data suggest a dynamic model by which NK cells respond to MPXV infection of rhesus macaques. Upon virus infection, NK cells proliferated robustly, resulting in massive increases in NK cell numbers. However, the migrating capacity of NK cells to tissues at early time points might be reduced, and the functions of cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion were largely compromised. Collectively, the data may explain, at least partially, the pathogenesis of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques.

  16. Extra-cellular expansion in the normal, non-infarcted myocardium is associated with worsening of regional myocardial function after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj; Broadbent, David A; Swoboda, Peter P; Foley, James R J; Fent, Graham J; Musa, Tarique A; Ripley, David P; Erhayiem, Bara; Dobson, Laura E; McDiarmid, Adam K; Haaf, Philip; Kidambi, Ananth; Crandon, Saul; Chew, Pei G; van der Geest, R J; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2017-09-25

    Expansion of the myocardial extracellular volume (ECV) is a surrogate measure of focal/diffuse fibrosis and is an independent marker of prognosis in chronic heart disease. Changes in ECV may also occur after myocardial infarction, acutely because of oedema and in convalescence as part of ventricular remodelling. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in the pattern of distribution of regional (normal, infarcted and oedematous segments) and global left ventricular (LV) ECV using semi-automated methods early and late after reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Fifty patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging acutely (24 h-72 h) and at convalescence (3 months). The CMR protocol included: cines, T2-weighted (T2 W) imaging, pre-/post-contrast T1-maps and LGE-imaging. Using T2 W and LGE imaging on acute scans, 16-segments of the LV were categorised as normal, oedema and infarct. 800 segments (16 per-patient) were analysed for changes in ECV and wall thickening (WT). From the acute studies, 325 (40.6%) segments were classified as normal, 246 (30.8%) segments as oedema and 229 (28.6%) segments as infarct. Segmental change in ECV between acute and follow-up studies (Δ ECV) was significantly different for normal, oedema and infarct segments (0.8 ± 6.5%, -1.78 ± 9%, -2.9 ± 10.9%, respectively; P < 0.001). Normal segments which demonstrated deterioration in wall thickening at follow-up showed significantly increased Δ ECV compared with normal segments with preserved wall thickening at follow up (1.82 ± 6.05% versus -0.10 ± 6.88%, P < 0.05). Following reperfused STEMI, normal myocardium demonstrates subtle expansion of the extracellular volume at 3-month follow up. Segmental ECV expansion of normal myocardium is associated with worsening of contractile function.

  17. Encoding the Scaling of the Cosmological Variables with the Euler Beta Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Per, M. A.; Seguí, A. J.

    We study the scaling exponents for the expanding isotropic flat cosmological models. The dimension of space, the equation of state of the cosmic fluid and the scaling exponent for a physical variable are related by the Euler Beta function that controls the singular behavior of the global integrals. We encounter dual cosmological scenarios using the properties of the Beta function. When we study the integral of the density of entropy we reproduce the Fischler-Susskind holographic bound.

  18. The PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scales: preliminary reliability and validity

    OpenAIRE

    Varni James W; Burwinkle Tasha M; Eisen Sarajane; Sherman Sandra A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scales (PedsQL™ VAS) were designed as an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) instrument to rapidly measure present or at-the-moment functioning in children and adolescents. The PedsQL™ VAS assess child self-report and parent-proxy report of anxiety, sadness, anger, worry, fatigue, and pain utilizing six developmentally appropriate visual analogue scales based on the well-established Varni/Thompson Pediatric Pain Questionnai...

  19. On the scaling of functional spaces, from smart cities to cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The study of spacetime, and its role in understanding functional systems has received little attention in information science. Recent work, on the origin of universal scaling in cities and biological systems, provides an intriguing insight into the functional use of space, and its measurable effects. Cities are large information systems, with many similarities to other technological infrastructures, so the results shed new light indirectly on the scaling the expected behaviour of smart pervas...

  20. Development and Psychometric Properties of the OCD Family Functioning (OFF) Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S. Evelyn; Hu, Yu-Pei; Hezel, Dianne M.; Proujansky, Rachel; Lamstein, Abby; Walsh, Casey; Ben-Joseph, Elana Pearl; Gironda, Christina; Jenike, Michael; Geller, Daniel A.; Pauls, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) influences not only patients but also family members. Although the construct of family accommodation has received attention in OCD literature, no measures of overall family functioning are currently available. The OCD Family Functioning (OFF) Scale was developed to explore the context, extent, and perspectives of functional impairment in families affected by OCD. It is a three-part, self-report measure capturing independent perspectives of patients and relatives. A total of 400 subjects were enrolled between 2008 and 2010 from specialized OCD clinics and OCD research studies. Psychometric properties of this scale were examined including internal consistency, test–retest reliability, convergent and divergent validity, and exploratory factor analyses. Both patient and relative versions of the OFF Scale demonstrated excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient = 0.96). The test–retest reliability was also adequate (ICC = 0.80). Factor analyses determined that the OFF Scale comprises a family functioning impairment factor and four OCD symptom factors that were consistent with previously reported OCD symptom dimension studies. The OFF Scale demonstrated excellent convergent validity with the Family Accommodation Scale and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Information gathered regarding emotional impact and family role-specific impairment was novel and not captured by other examined scales. The OFF Scale is a reliable and valid instrument for the clinical and research assessment of family functioning in pediatric and adult OCD. This will facilitate the exploration of family functioning impairment as a potential risk factor, as a moderator and as a treatment outcome measure in OCD. PMID:21553962

  1. Functional ability among elderly people in three service settings: the discriminatory power of a new functional ability scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, K; Holstein, B E

    1998-01-01

    The purpose is to assess the discriminatory power of the Avlund scales: (1) by assessing the ability of the scales to discriminate between three different populations of elderly people, and (2) by studying groups with a poor fit between use of formal home care and functional ability. The study...... and memory abilities; they gave more help to others, had higher social participation, and lived alone (only the women). A somewhat lager group of poor functioning non-users of home care (n = 266) had the opposite characteristics. In addition, they were older, had a poor social network and poor social support....

  2. Interpretability of the PedsQL gastrointestinal symptoms scales and gastrointestinal worry scales in pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigates the clinical interpretability of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventor (PedsQL) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales and Worry Scales in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic gastrointestinal diseases in comparison with healthy controls....

  3. The function of communities in protein interaction networks at multiple scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Nick S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If biology is modular then clusters, or communities, of proteins derived using only protein interaction network structure should define protein modules with similar biological roles. We investigate the link between biological modules and network communities in yeast and its relationship to the scale at which we probe the network. Results Our results demonstrate that the functional homogeneity of communities depends on the scale selected, and that almost all proteins lie in a functionally homogeneous community at some scale. We judge functional homogeneity using a novel test and three independent characterizations of protein function, and find a high degree of overlap between these measures. We show that a high mean clustering coefficient of a community can be used to identify those that are functionally homogeneous. By tracing the community membership of a protein through multiple scales we demonstrate how our approach could be useful to biologists focusing on a particular protein. Conclusions We show that there is no one scale of interest in the community structure of the yeast protein interaction network, but we can identify the range of resolution parameters that yield the most functionally coherent communities, and predict which communities are most likely to be functionally homogeneous.

  4. Making the most of our land: managing soil functions from local to continental scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier Patrick Olaf Schulte

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The challenges of achieving both food security and environmental sustainability have resulted in a confluence of demands on land within the European Union (EU: we expect our land to provide food, fibre and fuel, to purify water, to sequester carbon, and provide a home to biodiversity as well as external nutrients in the form of waste from humans and intensive livestock enterprises. All soils can perform all of these five functions, but some soils are better at supplying selective functions. Functional Land Management is a framework for policy-making aimed at meeting these demands by incentivising land use and soil management practices that selectively augment specific soil functions, where required. Here, we explore how the demands for contrasting soil functions, as framed by EU policies, may apply to very different spatial scales, from local to continental scales. At the same time, using Ireland as a national case study, we show that the supply of each soil function is largely determined by local soil and land use conditions, with large variations at both local and regional scales. These discrepancies between the scales at which the demands and supply of soil functions are manifested, have implications for soil and land management: while some soil functions must be managed at local (e.g. farm or field scale, others may be offset between regions with a view to solely meeting national or continental demands. In order to facilitate the optimisation of the delivery of soil functions at national level, to meet the demands that are framed at continental scale, we identify and categorise 14 policy and market instruments that are available in the EU. The results from this inventory imply that there may be no need for the introduction of new specific instruments to aid the governance of Functional Land Management. We conclude that there may be more merit in adapting existing governance instruments by facilitating differentiation between soils and

  5. Hartle-Hawking wave function and large-scale power suppression of CMB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Dong-han

    2018-01-01

    In this presentation, we first describe the Hartle-Hawking wave function in the Euclidean path integral approach. After we introduce perturbations to the background instanton solution, following the formalism developed by Halliwell-Hawking and Laflamme, one can obtain the scale-invariant power spectrum for small-scales. We further emphasize that the Hartle-Hawking wave function can explain the large-scale power suppression by choosing suitable potential parameters, where this will be a possible window to confirm or falsify models of quantum cosmology. Finally, we further comment on possible future applications, e.g., Euclidean wormholes, which can result in distinct signatures to the power spectrum.

  6. Identification of Interleukin-1 by Functional Screening as a Key Mediator of Cellular Expansion and Disease Progression in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Carey

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Secreted proteins in the bone marrow microenvironment play critical roles in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Through an ex vivo functional screen of 94 cytokines, we identified that the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1 elicited profound expansion of myeloid progenitors in ∼67% of AML patients while suppressing the growth of normal progenitors. Levels of IL-1β and IL-1 receptors were increased in AML patients, and silencing of the IL-1 receptor led to significant suppression of clonogenicity and in vivo disease progression. IL-1 promoted AML cell growth by enhancing p38MAPK phosphorylation and promoting secretion of various other growth factors and inflammatory cytokines. Treatment with p38MAPK inhibitors reversed these effects and recovered normal CD34+ cells from IL-1-mediated growth suppression. These results highlight the importance of ex vivo functional screening to identify common and actionable extrinsic pathways in genetically heterogeneous malignancies and provide impetus for clinical development of IL-1/IL1R1/p38MAPK pathway-targeted therapies in AML.

  7. Advanced methodology for generation expansion planning including interconnected systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, M.; Yokoyama, R.; Yasuda, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Sasaki, H. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Ogimoto, K. [Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews advanced methodology for generation expansion planning including interconnected systems developed in Japan, putting focus on flexibility and efficiency in a practical application. First, criteria for evaluating flexibility of generation planning considering uncertainties are introduced. Secondly, the flexible generation mix problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization with more than two objective functions. The multi-objective optimization problem is then transformed into a single objective problem by using the weighting method, to obtain the Pareto optimal solution, and solved by a dynamics programming technique. Thirdly, a new approach for electric generation expansion planning of interconnected systems is presented, based on the Benders Decomposition technique. That is, large scale generation problem constituted by the general economic load dispatch problem, and several sub problems which are composed of smaller scale isolated system generation expansion plans. Finally, the generation expansion plan solved by an artificial neural network is presented. In conclusion, the advantages and disadvantages of this method from the viewpoint of flexibility and applicability to practical generation expansion planning are presented. (author) 29 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Psychometric Comparison of the Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS) and the Questions about Behavioral Function (QABF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koritsas, S.; Iacono, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS) and the Questions About Behavioral Function (QABF) are frequently used to assess the learned function of challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability (ID). The aim was to explore and compare the psychometric properties of the MAS and the QABF. Method: Seventy adults with ID and…

  9. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2011-12-22

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor\\'s frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  10. Renormalized Wick expansion for a modified PQCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, Alejandro [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica, Group of Theoretical Physics, Vedado, La Habana (Cuba); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    The renormalization scheme for the Wick expansion of a modified version of the perturbative QCD introduced in previous works is discussed. Massless QCD is considered by implementing the usual multiplicative scaling of the gluon and quark wave functions and vertices. However, also massive quark and gluon counterterms are allowed in this massless theory since the condensates are expected to generate masses. A natural set of expansion parameters of the physical quantities is introduced: the coupling itself and the two masses m{sub q} and m{sub g} associated to quarks and gluons, respectively. This procedure allows one to implement a dimensional transmutation effect through these new mass scales. A general expression for the new generating functional in terms of the mass parameters m{sub q} and m{sub g} is obtained in terms of integrals over arbitrary but constant gluon or quark fields in each case. Further, the one loop potential is evaluated in more detail in the case when only the quark condensate is retained. This lowest order result again indicates the dynamical generation of quark condensates in the vacuum. (orig.)

  11. Origin of the colossal positive and negative thermal expansion in Ag{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]: an ab initio density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, Mark [Cambridge eScience Centre, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Goodwin, Andrew L; Dove, Martin T [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mtd10@cam.ac.uk

    2008-06-25

    DFT calculations have been used to provide insights into the origin of the colossal positive and negative thermal expansion in Ag{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]. The results confirm that the positive expansion within the trigonal basal plane and the negative expansion in the orthogonal direction are coupled due to the existence of a network defined by nearly rigid bonds within the chains of Co-C-N-Ag-N-C-Co linkages. The origin of the colossal values of the coefficients of thermal expansion arise from an extremely shallow energy surface that allows a flexing of the structure with small energy cost. The thermal expansion can be achieved with a modest value of the overall Grueneisen parameter. The energy surface is so shallow that we need to incorporate a small empirical dispersive interaction to give ground-state lattice parameters that match experimental values at low temperature. We compare the results with DFT calculations on two isostructural systems: H{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}], which is known to have much smaller values of the coefficients of thermal expansion, and Au{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}], which has not yet been synthesized but which is predicted by our calculations to be another candidate material for showing colossal positive and negative thermal expansion.

  12. The brief family relationship scale: a brief measure of the relationship dimension in family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Carlotta Ching Ting; Allen, James; Henry, David

    2014-02-01

    The Relationship dimension of the Family Environment Scale, which consists of the Cohesion, Expressiveness, and Conflict subscales, measures a person's perception of the quality of his or her family relationship functioning. This study investigates an adaptation of the Relationship dimension of the Family Environment Scale for Alaska Native youth. The authors tested the adapted measure, the Brief Family Relationship Scale, for psychometric properties and internal structure with 284 12- to 18-year-old predominately Yup'ik Eskimo Alaska Native adolescents from rural, remote communities. This non-Western cultural group is hypothesized to display higher levels of collectivism traditionally organized around an extended kinship family structure. Results demonstrate a subset of the adapted items function satisfactorily, a three-response alternative format provided meaningful information, and the subscale's underlying structure is best described through three distinct first-order factors, organized under one higher order factor. Convergent and discriminant validity of the Brief Family Relationship Scale was assessed through correlational analysis.

  13. Convergent validity of the Defense Mechanisms Manual and the Defensive Functioning Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Cogan, Rosemary; Kamoo, Ray; Miller, Kristen

    2010-09-01

    We examined the convergent validity of Cramer's Defense Mechanisms Manual (DMM; Cramer, 1991b) by comparing it to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) Defensive Functioning Scale (DFS). A total of 60 low income urban women from a primary care medical facility responded to four Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943) cards and an interview of early memories and descriptions of significant others. We scored the TAT narratives with the DMM, and we coded the interview narratives with the DFS. DMM Denial and Projection scales were negatively correlated with the DFS Overall Defensive Functioning scale (r = -.28, p< .01 and r = -.22, p< .10, respectively) and were positively correlated with a DFS pathological composite score (r = .36, p< .01 and r = .32, p< .05, respectively). These findings support the convergent validity of the DMM Denial and Projection scales.

  14. Scaling collapse and structure functions: identifying self-affinity in finite length time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Chapman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical determination of the scaling properties and exponents of time series presents a formidable challenge in testing, and developing, a theoretical understanding of turbulence and other out-of-equilibrium phenomena. We discuss the special case of self affine time series in the context of a stochastic process. We highlight two complementary approaches to the differenced variable of the data: i attempting a scaling collapse of the Probability Density Functions which should then be well described by the solution of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation and ii using structure functions to determine the scaling properties of the higher order moments. We consider a method of conditioning that recovers the underlying self affine scaling in a finite length time series, and illustrate it using a Lévy flight.

  15. Thermal Expansion of Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    expansion tests and the response of the microstructure. A novel optical method is described which is appropriate for measuring thermal expansion at high temperatures without influencing the thermal expansion measurement. Detailed microstructural investigations will also be described which show cell expansion as a function of temperature. Finally, a phenomenological model on thermal expansion will be described.

  16. Large-scale identification of human protein function using topological features of interaction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanchao; Liu, Zhiqing; Zhong, Wenqian; Huang, Menghua; Wu, Na; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiaoyong

    2016-11-01

    The annotation of protein function is a vital step to elucidate the essence of life at a molecular level, and it is also meritorious in biomedical and pharmaceutical industry. Developments of sequencing technology result in constant expansion of the gap between the number of the known sequences and their functions. Therefore, it is indispensable to develop a computational method for the annotation of protein function. Herein, a novel method is proposed to identify protein function based on the weighted human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. The network topology features with local and global information are presented to characterise proteins. The minimum redundancy maximum relevance algorithm is used to select 227 optimized feature subsets and support vector machine technique is utilized to build the prediction models. The performance of current method is assessed through 10-fold cross-validation test, and the range of accuracies is from 67.63% to 100%. Comparing with other annotation methods, the proposed way possesses a 50% improvement in the predictive accuracy. Generally, such network topology features provide insights into the relationship between protein functions and network architectures. The source code of Matlab is freely available on request from the authors.

  17. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale as a predictor of peak aerobic capacity and ambulatory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Frederick M; Katzel, Leslie I; Sorkin, John D; Macko, Richard F; Shulman, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is a widely applied index of disease severity. Our objective was to assess the utility of UPDRS for predicting peak aerobic capacity (VO2 peak) and ambulatory function. Participants (n = 70) underwent evaluation for UPDRS (Total and Motor ratings), VO2 peak, 6-minute walk distance (6MW), and 30-foot self-selected walking speed (SSWS). Using regression, we determined the extent to which the Total and Motor UPDRS scores predicted each functional capacity measure after adjusting for age and sex. We also tested whether adding the Hoehn and Yahr scale (H-Y) to the model changed predictive power of the UPDRS. Adjusted for age and sex, both the Total UPDRS and Motor UPDRS subscale failed to predict VO2 peak. The Total UPDRS did weakly predict 6MW and SSWS (both p scales do not predict VO2 peak, but that a weak relationship exists between Total UPDRS and measures of ambulatory function.

  18. Asymptotic stability and instability of large-scale systems. [using vector Liapunov functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujic, L. T.; Siljak, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop new methods for constructing vector Lyapunov functions and broaden the application of Lyapunov's theory to stability analysis of large-scale dynamic systems. The application, so far limited by the assumption that the large-scale systems are composed of exponentially stable subsystems, is extended via the general concept of comparison functions to systems which can be decomposed into asymptotically stable subsystems. Asymptotic stability of the composite system is tested by a simple algebraic criterion. By redefining interconnection functions among the subsystems according to interconnection matrices, the same mathematical machinery can be used to determine connective asymptotic stability of large-scale systems under arbitrary structural perturbations.

  19. Large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations using an enriched finite element basis

    CERN Document Server

    Kanungo, Bikash

    2016-01-01

    We present a computationally efficient approach to perform large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations by enriching the classical finite element basis with compactly supported atom-centered numerical basis functions that are constructed from the solution of the Kohn-Sham (KS) problem for single atoms. We term these numerical basis functions as enrichment functions, and the resultant basis as the enriched finite element basis. The enrichment functions are compactly supported through the use of smooth cutoff functions, which enhances the conditioning and maintains the locality of the basis. The integrals involved in the evaluation of the discrete KS Hamiltonian and overlap matrix in the enriched finite element basis are computed using an adaptive quadrature grid based on the characteristics of enrichment functions. Further, we propose an efficient scheme to invert the overlap matrix by using a block-wise matrix inversion in conjunction with special reduced-order quadrature rules to transform...

  20. [Upper limb functional assessment scale for children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Spinal muscular atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Raúl G; Lucero, Nayadet; Solares, Carmen; Espinoza, Victoria; Moscoso, Odalie; Olguín, Polín; Muñoz, Karin T; Rosas, Ricardo

    2016-08-16

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes significant disability and progressive functional impairment. Readily available instruments that assess functionality, especially in advanced stages of the disease, are required to monitor the progress of the disease and the impact of therapeutic interventions. To describe the development of a scale to evaluate upper limb function (UL) in patients with DMD and SMA, and describe its validation process, which includes self-training for evaluators. The development of the scale included a review of published scales, an exploratory application of a pilot scale in healthy children and those with DMD, self-training of evaluators in applying the scale using a handbook and video tutorial, and assessment of a group of children with DMD and SMA using the final scale. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach and Kendall concordance and with intra and inter-rater test-retest, and validity with concordance and factorial analysis. A high level of reliability was observed, with high internal consistency (Cronbach α=0.97), and inter-rater (Kendall W=0.96) and intra-rater concordance (r=0.97 to 0.99). The validity was demonstrated by the absence of significant differences between results by different evaluators with an expert evaluator (F=0.023, P>.5), and by the factor analysis that showed that four factors account for 85.44% of total variance. This scale is a reliable and valid tool for assessing UL functionality in children with DMD and SMA. It is also easily implementable due to the possibility of self-training and the use of simple and inexpensive materials. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Contradictions of TNCs’ Foreign Economic Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnikov Aleksandr Borisovich

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Some directions of the external economic expansion of multinational corporations in modern conditions of globalization, the contradictions generated by these conditions and the conflicts in the system of world economy are presented in the article. The global strategy of functioning of multinational corporation professes the principle of “double standards”. Multinational corporations, on the one hand, support liberalization and internationalization in scales of world reproduction, on the other hand – further redistribution of spheres of influence, and imposing the new world economic order. The functional role of modern multinational corporations is inconsistent. Though they stimulate the tendency of increasing the competitiveness, concentration of the capital and production, at the same time, the monopolization and institutional barriers created by multinational corporation and its structural divisions. Multinational corporations determine the competitive struggle, implement the sanitation mechanism and optimization of world economy. The diversification of multinational corporations’ activity promotes the generation of new requirements and the markets (information, innovations, technologies, services, etc. where individual subjects and competitive forces are formed. It is caused by a progressive functional role of modern multinational corporations in the global economy. Massive penetration into the international business, external expansion of transnational monopolies stimulates economic growth in host countries, promotes specialization, division of labor, cooperation. At the same time, the monopolist form of these processes inevitably leads to numerous negative phenomena, a slow down and inconsistent development of production in the countries-recipients.

  2. Predicting protein functions from redundancies in large-scale protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Liang, Shoudan

    2003-01-01

    Interpreting data from large-scale protein interaction experiments has been a challenging task because of the widespread presence of random false positives. Here, we present a network-based statistical algorithm that overcomes this difficulty and allows us to derive functions of unannotated proteins from large-scale interaction data. Our algorithm uses the insight that if two proteins share significantly larger number of common interaction partners than random, they have close functional associations. Analysis of publicly available data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals >2,800 reliable functional associations, 29% of which involve at least one unannotated protein. By further analyzing these associations, we derive tentative functions for 81 unannotated proteins with high certainty. Our method is not overly sensitive to the false positives present in the data. Even after adding 50% randomly generated interactions to the measured data set, we are able to recover almost all (approximately 89%) of the original associations.

  3. Subspace accelerated inexact Newton method for large scale wave functions calculations in Density Functional Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattebert, J

    2008-07-29

    We describe an iterative algorithm to solve electronic structure problems in Density Functional Theory. The approach is presented as a Subspace Accelerated Inexact Newton (SAIN) solver for the non-linear Kohn-Sham equations. It is related to a class of iterative algorithms known as RMM-DIIS in the electronic structure community. The method is illustrated with examples of real applications using a finite difference discretization and multigrid preconditioning.

  4. Rasch validation of the Arabic version of the lower extremity functional scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnahdi, Ali H

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the internal construct validity of the Arabic version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (20-item Arabic LEFS) using Rasch analysis. Patients (n = 170) with lower extremity musculoskeletal dysfunction were recruited. Rasch analysis of 20-item Arabic LEFS was performed. Once the initial Rasch analysis indicated that the 20-item Arabic LEFS did not fit the Rasch model, follow-up analyses were conducted to improve the fit of the scale to the Rasch measurement model. These modifications included removing misfitting individuals, changing item scoring structure, removing misfitting items, addressing bias caused by response dependency between items and differential item functioning (DIF). Initial analysis indicated deviation of the 20-item Arabic LEFS from the Rasch model. Disordered thresholds in eight items and response dependency between six items were detected with the scale as a whole did not meet the requirement of unidimensionality. Refinements led to a 15-item Arabic LEFS that demonstrated excellent internal consistency (person separation index [PSI] = 0.92) and satisfied all the requirement of the Rasch model. Rasch analysis did not support the 20-item Arabic LEFS as a unidimensional measure of lower extremity function. The refined 15-item Arabic LEFS met all the requirement of the Rasch model and hence is a valid objective measure of lower extremity function. The Rasch-validated 15-item Arabic LEFS needs to be further tested in an independent sample to confirm its fit to the Rasch measurement model. Implications for Rehabilitation The validity of the 20-item Arabic Lower Extremity Functional Scale to measure lower extremity function is not supported. The 15-item Arabic version of the LEFS is a valid measure of lower extremity function and can be used to quantify lower extremity function in patients with lower extremity musculoskeletal disorders.

  5. Scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities using functional diversity and community deconstruction approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pedro Giovâni da; Hernández, Malva Isabel Medina

    2015-01-01

    Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass) for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae) community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in the distribution

  6. Scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities using functional diversity and community deconstruction approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Giovâni da Silva

    Full Text Available Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in

  7. Developing and Psychometrically Testing the Functions of Diabetes Peer Support Group Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chii-Jun; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Lin, Ying-Chun; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2016-12-01

    Peer support groups for people with diabetes are increasingly considered a part of the healthcare system. Understanding the functions of peer support groups assist healthcare professionals to provide critical assistance. The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the psychometric properties of the Functions of Diabetes Peer Support Group (F-DPSG) scale. This study used a cross-sectional design. A 16-item F-DPSG scale was developed and administered to 589 patients with Type 2 diabetes who were selected from 34 diabetes peer support groups in Taiwan. Construct validity was evaluated using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and by examining the correlation with the score of the Chinese Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale. Reliability was tested using internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The 16-item F-DPSG scale, including four subscales, was supported by a second-order confirmatory factor analysis, with the following fit indices: χ/df ratio = 2.60, comparative fit index = .94, normed fit index = .91, and root mean square error of approximation = .07. The four subscales were "enhancing self-care practice," "obtaining knowledge and skills," "psychological support," and "collective identification." The score of the F-DPSG scale correlated significantly with the score of the Chinese Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale (r = .45, p peer support groups for people with diabetes and to provide necessary assistance.

  8. PRODUCTION ELASTICITIES, RETURN TO SCALE AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thinkexploitsint'l

    function indicating that there is room for expansion in output and productivity of yam farmers in. Edo State. This can be ... Keywords: Allocative Efficiency, Elasticity of Production, Return to Scale, Yam. INTRODUCTION .... 1, 2 or 3) where the respondent is operating (Olukosi and Ogungbile1989). • Likert scale was used to ...

  9. High-resolution respirometry of fine-needle muscle biopsies in pre-manifest Huntington's disease expansion mutation carriers shows normal mitochondrial respiratory function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Buck

    Full Text Available Alterations in mitochondrial respiration are an important hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD, one of the most common monogenetic causes of neurodegeneration. The ubiquitous expression of the disease causing mutant huntingtin gene raises the prospect that mitochondrial respiratory deficits can be detected in skeletal muscle. While this tissue is readily accessible in humans, transgenic animal models offer the opportunity to cross-validate findings and allow for comparisons across organs, including the brain. The integrated respiratory chain function of the human vastus lateralis muscle was measured by high-resolution respirometry (HRR in freshly taken fine-needle biopsies from seven pre-manifest HD expansion mutation carriers and nine controls. The respiratory parameters were unaffected. For comparison skeletal muscle isolated from HD knock-in mice (HdhQ111 as well as a broader spectrum of tissues including cortex, liver and heart muscle were examined by HRR. Significant changes of mitochondrial respiration in the HdhQ knock-in mouse model were restricted to the liver and the cortex. Mitochondrial mass as quantified by mitochondrial DNA copy number and citrate synthase activity was stable in murine HD-model tissue compared to control. mRNA levels of key enzymes were determined to characterize mitochondrial metabolic pathways in HdhQ mice. We demonstrated the feasibility to perform high-resolution respirometry measurements from small human HD muscle biopsies. Furthermore, we conclude that alterations in respiratory parameters of pre-manifest human muscle biopsies are rather limited and mirrored by a similar absence of marked alterations in HdhQ skeletal muscle. In contrast, the HdhQ111 murine cortex and liver did show respiratory alterations highlighting the tissue specific nature of mutant huntingtin effects on respiration.

  10. Use of Gilliam Asperger's disorder scale in differentiating high and low functioning autism and ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L; Murray, Michael J; Morrow, Jill D; Yurich, Kirsten K L; Cothren, Shiyoko; Purichia, Heather; Bouder, James N

    2011-02-01

    Little is known about the validity of Gilliam Asperger's Disorder Scale (GADS), although it is widely used. This study of 199 children with high functioning autism or Asperger's disorder, 195 with low functioning autism, and 83 with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) showed high classification accuracy (autism vs. ADHD) for clinicians' GADS Quotients (92%), and somewhat lower accuracy (77%) for parents' Quotients. Both children with high and low functioning autism had clinicians' Quotients (M=99 and 101, respectively) similar to the Asperger's Disorder mean of 100 for the GADS normative sample. Children with high functioning autism scored significantly higher on the cognitive patterns subscale than children with low functioning autism, and the latter had higher scores on the remaining subscales: social interaction, restricted patterns of behavior, and pragmatic skills. Using the clinicians' Quotient and Cognitive Patterns score, 70% of children were correctly identified as having high or low functioning autism or ADHD.

  11. Validation of the Dutch functional, communicative and critical health literacy scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Hilderink-Koertshuis, Rianne T.E.; Klaase, Joost M.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2012-01-01

    Objective: While most existing health literacy (HL) measures focus primarily on reading comprehension, the functional, communicative and critical HL scales from Ishikawa et al. [19] aim to measure a broader HL spectrum. The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Dutch

  12. Effects on Scale Linking of Different Definitions of Criterion Functions for the IRT Characteristic Curve Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonghoon; Kolen, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Under item response theory, the characteristic curve methods (Haebara and Stocking-Lord methods) are used to link two ability scales from separate calibrations. The linking methods use their respective criterion functions that can be defined differently according to the symmetry- and distribution-related schemes. The symmetry-related scheme…

  13. Risks of large-scale use of systemic insecticides to ecosystem functioning and services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chagnon, M.; Kreutzweiser, D.; Mitchell, E.A.D.; Morrissey, C.A.; Noome, D.A.; van der Sluijs, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073427489

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale use of the persistent and potent neonicotinoid and fipronil insecticides has raised concerns about risks to ecosystem functions provided by a wide range of species and environments affected by these insecticides. The concept of ecosystem services is widely used in decision making in the

  14. A simulation study provided sample size guidance for differential item functioning (DIF) studies using short scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Neil W; Fayers, Peter M; Aaronson, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analyses are increasingly used to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments, which often include relatively short subscales. Computer simulations were used to explore how various factors including scale length affect analysis of DIF by ordinal...

  15. A simulation study provided sample size guidance for differential item functioning (DIF) studies using short scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, Neil W.; Fayers, Peter M.; Aaronson, Neil K.; Bottomley, Andrew; de Graeff, Alexander; Groenvold, Mogens; Gundy, Chad; Koller, Michael; Petersen, Morten A.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.

    Objective: Differential item functioning (DIF) analyses are increasingly used to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments, which often include relatively short subscales. Computer simulations were used to explore how various factors including scale length affect analysis of DIF by

  16. Functional diversity response to hardwood forest management varies across taxa and spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bryan D; Holland, Jeffrey D; Summerville, Keith S; Dunning, John B; Saunders, Michael R; Jenkins, Michael A

    2017-06-01

    Contemporary forest management offers a trade-off between the potential positive effects of habitat heterogeneity on biodiversity, and the potential harm to mature forest communities caused by habitat loss and perforation of the forest canopy. While the response of taxonomic diversity to forest management has received a great deal of scrutiny, the response of functional diversity is largely unexplored. However, functional diversity may represent a more direct link between biodiversity and ecosystem function. To examine how forest management affects diversity at multiple spatial scales, we analyzed a long-term data set that captured changes in taxonomic and functional diversity of moths (Lepidoptera), longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and breeding birds in response to contemporary silvicultural systems in oak-hickory hardwood forests. We used these data sets to address the following questions: how do even- and uneven-aged silvicultural systems affect taxonomic and functional diversity at the scale of managed landscapes compared to the individual harvested and unharvested forest patches that comprise the landscapes, and how do these silvicultural systems affect the functional similarity of assemblages at the scale of managed landscapes and patches? Due to increased heterogeneity within landscapes, we expected even-aged silviculture to increase and uneven-aged silviculture to decrease functional diversity at the landscape level regardless of impacts at the patch level. Functional diversity responses were taxon-specific with respect to the direction of change and time since harvest. Responses were also consistent across patch and landscape levels within each taxon. Moth assemblage species richness, functional richness, and functional divergence were negatively affected by harvesting, with stronger effects resulting from uneven-aged than even-aged management. Longhorned beetle assemblages exhibited a peak in species richness two years after harvesting

  17. Functional cognitive assessment scale (FUCAS): a new scale to assess executive cognitive function in daily life activities in patients with dementia and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounti, Fotini; Tsolaki, Magda; Kiosseoglou, Grigoris

    2006-07-01

    Several tests have been developed to examine performance of demented patients in daily life activities. However, most of them are based either on the subjective evaluation of performance by the patient him/herself, or on the reports of relatives. Functional Cognitive Assessment Scale (FUCAS) is a new reliable (alpha > 0.89 - 0.92) cognitive-behavioral scale that assesses executive function in daily life activities directly in patients with dementia. This study aimed at testing FUCAS' internal consistency of items, criterion-related validity, interrater reliability, discriminative ability, and effect of age, sex, and education on FUCAS scores. Criterion-related validity was supported by significant correlations between FUCAS, CAMCOG, MMSE, and FRSSD. The interrater reliability of FUCAS' total score for two raters was r 0.997 and we found no significant effect of age, sex, or education on FUCAS' total performance. Discriminant analysis has identified that FUCAS was able to sufficiently discriminate the patients with MCI from those with moderate-severe dementia. FUCAS is a useful and reliable diagnostic tool for MCI. Cognitive-behavioral assessment such as that provided by FUCAS can provide objective information that can serve to enhance the quality of clinical decision-making.

  18. Modelling the large-scale redshift-space 3-point correlation function of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2017-08-01

    We present a configuration-space model of the large-scale galaxy 3-point correlation function (3PCF) based on leading-order perturbation theory and including redshift-space distortions (RSD). This model should be useful in extracting distance-scale information from the 3PCF via the baryon acoustic oscillation method. We include the first redshift-space treatment of biasing by the baryon-dark matter relative velocity. Overall, on large scales the effect of RSD is primarily a renormalization of the 3PCF that is roughly independent of both physical scale and triangle opening angle; for our adopted Ωm and bias values, the rescaling is a factor of ∼1.8. We also present an efficient scheme for computing 3PCF predictions from our model, important for allowing fast exploration of the space of cosmological parameters in future analyses.

  19. Assessment of executive function in ADHD adolescents: contribution of performance tests and rating scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Virginia; Amador-Campos, Juan Antonio

    2017-10-18

    This study aimed to analyze performance on measures of neuropsychological and behavioral executive functions (EF) in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and to evaluate the utility of performance-based tests for predicting scores on behavioral EF ratings. One hundred eighteen adolescents (75 ADHD and 43 controls) aged 12-16 years performed neuropsychological tests and completed a behavior rating scale of EF. The ADHD group presented significantly lower scores than controls on Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) and all indexes of the WISC-IV, except the verbal comprehension index (VCI). The ADHD group had significantly lower scores on performance-based tests of working memory, planning and inhibition, and on EF rating scales. Scores on the cognitive EF working memory, planning and flexibility modestly predicted performance on behavioral EF. The results suggest that the combined use of performance-based tests and rating scales provides valuable complementary information that can improve the assessment of executive domains in ADHD.

  20. Validation of the fatigue scale for motor and cognitive functions in a danish multiple sclerosis cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oervik, M. S.; Sejbaek, T.; Penner, I. K.

    2017-01-01

    . The area under the curve (AUC) for the ROC curves represented excellent accuracy (Danish MS cohort, AUC = 0.9190; German MS cohort, AUC = 0.9034). Conclusion The Danish translation of the FSMC has a high convergent validity with another measure of fatigue as well as excellent internal consistency......Background Our objective was to validate the Danish translation of the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions (FSMC) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Materials and methods A Danish MS cohort (n = 84) was matched and compared to the original German validation cohort (n = 309......) and a healthy control cohort (n = 147). The Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) was used as reference scale and Becks Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS) and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) for confounding factors. We assessed internal consistencies; convergent, divergent, and predictive validity...

  1. Outcome measurement in functional somatic syndromes: SF-36 summary scores and some scales were not valid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Andreas; Oernboel, Eva; Licht, Rasmus W; Sharpe, Michael; Fink, Per

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to test the validity of the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scales and summaries in patients with severe functional somatic syndromes (FSS), such as fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome. One hundred twenty patients with severe FSS enrolled in a randomized controlled trial filled in the SF-36 questionnaire. We tested for data quality, central scaling assumptions, and agreement with the conceptual model. Most SF-36 scales were found to be valid; however, three scales (role physical, role emotional, and general health) did not satisfy predefined criteria for construct validity, internal consistency, or targeting to the sample. The correlations between SF-36 scales differed considerably from those reported in the general population. As a consequence, the SF-36 summaries, physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS), did not accurately reflect their underlying scales and were negatively correlated (r=-0.46, 95% CI [-0.60 to -0.31]). Although the SF-36 is a valuable instrument to assess perceived health in patients with severe FSS, there are problems with some of the scales and with the scoring procedure of the summaries. The SF-36 PCS may, therefore, not accurately measure the physical health status of these patients. Alternative summary measures are needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A simulation study provided sample size guidance for differential item functioning (DIF) studies using short scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Neil W; Fayers, Peter M; Aaronson, Neil K; Bottomley, Andrew; de Graeff, Alexander; Groenvold, Mogens; Gundy, Chad; Koller, Michael; Petersen, Morten A; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2009-03-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analyses are increasingly used to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments, which often include relatively short subscales. Computer simulations were used to explore how various factors including scale length affect analysis of DIF by ordinal logistic regression. Simulated data, representative of HRQoL scales with four-category items, were generated. The power and type I error rates of the DIF method were then investigated when, respectively, DIF was deliberately introduced and when no DIF was added. The sample size, scale length, floor effects (FEs) and significance level were varied. When there was no DIF, type I error rates were close to 5%. Detecting moderate uniform DIF in a two-item scale required a sample size of 300 per group for adequate (>80%) power. For longer scales, a sample size of 200 was adequate. Considerably larger sample sizes were required to detect nonuniform DIF, when there were extreme FEs or when a reduced type I error rate was required. The impact of the number of items in the scale was relatively small. Ordinal logistic regression successfully detects DIF for HRQoL instruments with short scales. Sample size guidelines are provided.

  3. Probability density and scaling exponents of longitudinal structure functions in strong turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yakhot, V

    1997-01-01

    The advective terms in the Navier-Stokes and Burgers equations are similar. It is proposed that the longitudinal structure functions $S_{n}(r)$ in homogeneous and isotropic three- dimensional turbulence are goverened by a one-dimensional equation of motion, resembling the 1D-Burgers equation, with the strongly non-local pressure contributions accounted for by galilean-invariance-breaking terms. The resulting equations give both scaling exponents and amplitudes of the structure functions in an excellent agreement with experimental data. The derived probability density function $P(\\Delta u,r)\

  4. Bridges Expansion Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-01-01

    The survey is concerned with the expansion joints, used in bridge constructions to compensate medium and significant operational linear and spatial displacements between adjacent spans or between bridge span and pier. The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting the modern demands imposed to expansion joints.

  5. Radial distribution function for hard spheres from scaled particle theory, and an improved equation of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiss, H.; Casberg, R.V.

    1974-08-01

    Previous applications of scaled particle theory have been limited to the calculation of thermodynamic properties of fluids rather than structure. In the present paper, the theory is expanded so that it is capable of yielding the radial distribution function. The method is first illustrated by applying it to one-dimensional fluids of hard rods where, as in other theories, the radial distribution function is obtained exactly. It is then applied to a fluid of hard spheres where a closure condition is necessary. This condition is supported by recent work in scaled particle theory dealing with the thermodynamics of boundary layers. It is used to calculate the radial distribution function around a lambda-cule of varying size, including one of the size of a typical hard sphere solvent molecule. (40 refs.)

  6. Human platelet lysate is an alternative to fetal bovine serum for large-scale expansion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottipamula, Sanjay; Sharma, Archana; Krishnamurthy, Sagar; Majumdar, Anish Sen; Seetharam, Raviraja N

    2012-07-01

    Human platelet lysate (HPL) was evaluated as an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in large-scale culturing of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) for therapeutic applications. Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM)of low glucose (LG) and Knock Out (KO) were used with human platelet lysate (HPL) as LG-HPL and KO-HPL, and with FBS as LG-FBS and KO-FBS to culture the BM-MSCs. HPL at 10 % (v/v) supported BM-MSCs growth and subsequent isolation efficiency generated >90 × 10(6) MSCs in LG-HPL. Population doublings (PDs) and population doubling times of LG-HPL and KO-HPL (PDT) were not significantly different but LG-HPL showed a significant clonogenic potential and HPL cultures had an average PDT of 36.5 ± 6.5 h and an average PDs of 5 ± 0.7/passage. BM-MSCs cultured with LG-HPL had significantly higher immunosuppression compared to LG-FBS, but KO-HPL and KO-FBS-grown cultures were not significantly different. HPL is therefore alternative to FBS for large-scale production of BM-MSCs for therapeutic applications.

  7. A novel antagonist of p75NTR reduces peripheral expansion and CNS trafficking of pro-inflammatory monocytes and spares function after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmi; Mattingly, Aaron; Lin, Amity; Sacramento, Jeffrey; Mannent, Leda; Castel, Marie-Noelle; Canolle, Benoit; Delbary-Gossart, Sandrine; Ferzaz, Badia; Morganti, Josh M; Rosi, Susanna; Ferguson, Adam R; Manley, Geoffrey T; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Beattie, Michael S

    2016-04-22

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in long-term neurological deficits, which may be mediated in part by pro-inflammatory responses in both the injured brain and the circulation. Inflammation may be involved in the subsequent development of neurodegenerative diseases and post-injury seizures. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) has multiple biological functions, affecting cell survival, apoptotic cell death, axonal growth, and degeneration in pathological conditions. We recently found that EVT901, a novel piperazine derivative that inhibits p75NTR oligomerization, is neuroprotective, reduces microglial activation, and improves outcomes in two models of TBI in rats. Since TBI elicits both CNS and peripheral inflammation, we used a mouse model of TBI to examine whether EVT901 would affect peripheral immune responses and trafficking to the injured brain. Cortical contusion injury (CCI)-TBI of the sensory/motor cortex was induced in C57Bl/6 wild-type mice and CCR2(+/RFP) heterozygote transgenic mice, followed by treatment with EVT901, a selective antagonist of p75NTR, or vehicle by i.p. injection at 4 h after injury and then daily for 7 days. Brain and blood were collected at 1 and 6 weeks after injury. Flow cytometry and histological analysis were used to determine peripheral immune responses and trafficking of peripheral immune cells into the lesion site at 1 and 6 weeks after TBI. A battery of behavioral tests administered over 6 weeks was used to evaluate neurological outcome, and stereological estimation of brain tissue volume at 6 weeks was used to assess tissue damage. Finally, multivariate principal components analysis (PCA) was used to evaluate the relationships between inflammatory events, EVT901 treatment, and neurological outcomes. EVT901 is neuroprotective in mouse CCI-TBI and dramatically reduced the early trafficking of CCR2+ and pro-inflammatory monocytes into the lesion site. EVT901 reduced the number of CD45(high)CD11b+ and CD45(high)F4/80+ cells

  8. Skin and scales of teleost fish: Simple structure but high performance and multiple functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernerey, Franck J.; Barthelat, Francois

    2014-08-01

    Natural and man-made structural materials perform similar functions such as structural support or protection. Therefore they rely on the same types of properties: strength, robustness, lightweight. Nature can therefore provide a significant source of inspiration for new and alternative engineering designs. We report here some results regarding a very common, yet largely unknown, type of biological material: fish skin. Within a thin, flexible and lightweight layer, fish skins display a variety of strain stiffening and stabilizing mechanisms which promote multiple functions such as protection, robustness and swimming efficiency. We particularly discuss four important features pertaining to scaled skins: (a) a strongly elastic tensile behavior that is independent from the presence of rigid scales, (b) a compressive response that prevents buckling and wrinkling instabilities, which are usually predominant for thin membranes, (c) a bending response that displays nonlinear stiffening mechanisms arising from geometric constraints between neighboring scales and (d) a robust structure that preserves the above characteristics upon the loss or damage of structural elements. These important properties make fish skin an attractive model for the development of very thin and flexible armors and protective layers, especially when combined with the high penetration resistance of individual scales. Scaled structures inspired by fish skin could find applications in ultra-light and flexible armor systems, flexible electronics or the design of smart and adaptive morphing structures for aerospace vehicles.

  9. x- and xi-scaling of the Nuclear Structure Function at Large x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Arrington; C. S. Armstrong; T. Averett; O. K. Baker; L. de Bever; C. W. Bochna; W. Boeglin; B. Bray; R. D. Carlini; G. Collins; C. Cothran; D. Crabb; D. Day; J. A. Dunne; D. Dutta; R. Ent; B. W. Filippone; A. Honegger; E. W. Hughes; J. Jensen; J. Jourdan; C. E. Keppel; D. M. Koltenuk; R. Lindgren; A. Lung; D. J Mack; J. McCarthy; R. D. McKeown; D. Meekins; J. H. Mitchell; H. G. Mkrtchyan; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; T. Petitjean; O. Rondon; I. Sick; C. Smith; B. Terburg; W. F. Vulcan; S. A. Wood; C. Yan; J. Zhao; B. Zihlmann

    2001-07-01

    Inclusive electron scattering data are presented for {sup 2}H and Fe targets at an incident electron energy of 4.045 GeV for a range of momentum transfers from Q{sup 2} = 1 to 7 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Data were taken at Jefferson Laboratory for low values of energy loss, corresponding to values of Bjorken x greater than or near 1. The structure functions do not show scaling in x in this range, where inelastic scattering is not expected to dominate the cross section. The data do show scaling, however, in the Nachtmann variable {xi}. This scaling may be the result of Bloom Gilman duality in the nucleon structure function combined with the Fermi motion of the nucleons in the nucleus. The resulting extension of scaling to larger values of {xi} opens up the possibility of accessing nuclear structure functions in the high-x region at lower values of Q{sup 2} than previously believed.

  10. Brazilian Portuguese transcultural adaptation of Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Polignano Godoy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the importance of Executive Functions to clinical and nonclinical situations, Barkley proposed a new theory of executive functioning based on an evolutionary neuropsychological perspective and clinical research using large samples of clinical and community identified adults and children as well as children with ADHD followed to adulthood. Objective The present study aims to adapt the Barkley Deficits in Executive Functions Scales (BDEFS to Brazilian Portuguese and also assess its construct validity in a sample of normal Brazilian adults. Methods The original version of scale was adapted to Brazilian Portuguese according to the guideline from the ISPOR Task Force. To assess the semantic equivalence between the original and adapted version, both of them were applied into a sample of 25 Brazilian bilingual adults. Finally, 60 Brazilian adults completed the BDEFS and the Brazilian versions of Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11 and Adult Self-Report Scale (ASRS-18 to assess convergent validity. Results The BDEFS Brazilian Portuguese version has semantic correspondence with the original version indicating that the adaptation procedure was successful. The BDEFS correlated significantly with the impulsivity and attention scores from the BIS-11 and ASRS-18 supporting its construct validity. Cronbach’s alpha (α = 0.961 indicated that the BDEFS translated version has satisfactory internal consistency. Discussion Together, these findings indicate the successful adaptation of the BDEFS to Brazilian Portuguese and support its utility in that population.

  11. Scaling exponents of the velocity structure functions in the interplanetary medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Carbone

    Full Text Available We analyze the scaling exponents of the velocity structure functions, obtained from the velocity fluctuations measured in the interplanetary space plasma. Using the expression for the energy transfer rate which seems the most relevant in describing the evolution of the pseudo-energy densities in the interplanetary medium, we introduce an energy cascade model derived from a simple fragmentation process, which takes into account the intermittency effect. In the absence and in the presence of the large-scale magnetic field decorrelation effect the model reduces to the fluid and the hydromagnetic p-model, respectively. We show that the scaling exponents of the q-th power of the velocity structure functions, as obtained by the model in the absence of the decorrelation effect, furnishes the best-fit to the data analyzed from the Voyager 2 velocity field measurements at 8.5 AU. Our results allow us to hypothesize a new kind of scale-similarity for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence when the decorrelation effect is at work, related to the fourth-order velocity structure function.

  12. On skin expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Djenane C; Velloso, Raquel Q; Radwanski, Henrique N

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses skin expansion without considering cellular growth of the skin. An in vivo analysis was carried out that involved expansion at three different sites on one patient, allowing for the observation of the relaxation process. Those measurements were used to characterize the human skin of the thorax during the surgical process of skin expansion. A comparison between the in vivo results and the numerical finite elements model of the expansion was used to identify the material elastic parameters of the skin of the thorax of that patient. Delfino's constitutive equation was chosen to model the in vivo results. The skin is considered to be an isotropic, homogeneous, hyperelastic, and incompressible membrane. When the skin is extended, such as with expanders, the collagen fibers are also extended and cause stiffening in the skin, which results in increasing resistance to expansion or further stretching. We observed this phenomenon as an increase in the parameters as subsequent expansions continued. The number and shape of the skin expanders used in expansions were also studied, both mathematically and experimentally. The choice of the site where the expansion should be performed is discussed to enlighten problems that can lead to frustrated skin expansions. These results are very encouraging and provide insight into our understanding of the behavior of stretched skin by expansion. To our knowledge, this study has provided results that considerably improve our understanding of the behavior of human skin under expansion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The temporal structures and functional significance of scale-free brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Biyu J; Zempel, John M; Snyder, Abraham Z; Raichle, Marcus E

    2010-05-13

    Scale-free dynamics, with a power spectrum following P proportional to f(-beta), are an intrinsic feature of many complex processes in nature. In neural systems, scale-free activity is often neglected in electrophysiological research. Here, we investigate scale-free dynamics in human brain and show that it contains extensive nested frequencies, with the phase of lower frequencies modulating the amplitude of higher frequencies in an upward progression across the frequency spectrum. The functional significance of scale-free brain activity is indicated by task performance modulation and regional variation, with beta being larger in default network and visual cortex and smaller in hippocampus and cerebellum. The precise patterns of nested frequencies in the brain differ from other scale-free dynamics in nature, such as earth seismic waves and stock market fluctuations, suggesting system-specific generative mechanisms. Our findings reveal robust temporal structures and behavioral significance of scale-free brain activity and should motivate future study on its physiological mechanisms and cognitive implications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Validation of the Dutch functional, communicative and critical health literacy scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; ten Klooster, Peter M; Hilderink-Koertshuis, Rianne T E; Klaase, Joost M; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2012-10-01

    While most existing health literacy (HL) measures focus primarily on reading comprehension, the functional, communicative and critical HL scales from Ishikawa et al. [19] aim to measure a broader HL spectrum. The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Dutch translation of this instrument. Two survey studies (n = 79 and n = 209) and one cognitive interview study (n = 18) were performed among samples of breast cancer patients and patients with rheumatic diseases. Analyses showed the scales measured three distinct factors and convergent validity was satisfactory for communicative and critical HL. Nevertheless, the comprehension of the items and the suitability of the response options raised some problems. The HL scales seem promising to measure a broad definition of HL. By revising some of the items and response options as proposed in this article, the scale will become more understandable for people with low HL skills, which might increase the content validity and the distributional properties of the scale. The scale should be revised and revalidated. An improved version should be used in practice to gain insight into HL levels of patients. This will help to develop suitable education programs for people with low HL skills. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of the fatigue scale for motor and cognitive functions in a danish multiple sclerosis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oervik, M S; Sejbaek, T; Penner, I K; Roar, M; Blaabjerg, M

    2017-10-01

    Our objective was to validate the Danish translation of the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions (FSMC) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. A Danish MS cohort (n = 84) was matched and compared to the original German validation cohort (n = 309) and a healthy control cohort (n = 147). The Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) was used as reference scale and Becks Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS) and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) for confounding factors. We assessed internal consistencies; convergent, divergent, and predictive validity; partial correlations correcting for depression; significant differences between the mean scores of the cohorts; and sensitivity and specificity with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Excellent internal consistencies for the total scale and subscales were found (α = 0.91-0.95). Strong positive correlations between the two fatigue scales implied high convergent validity (total scores: r = 0.851, p Danish MS cohort, AUC = 0.9190; German MS cohort, AUC = 0.9034). The Danish translation of the FSMC has a high convergent validity with another measure of fatigue as well as excellent internal consistency and accuracy. It is found to be an applicable and recommendable measure of fatigue in Danish MS patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Theoretical model for mesoscopic-level scale-free self-organization of functional brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersa, Jaroslaw; Piekniewski, Filip; Schreiber, Tomasz

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we provide theoretical and numerical analysis of a geometric activity flow network model which is aimed at explaining mathematically the scale-free functional graph self-organization phenomena emerging in complex nervous systems at a mesoscale level. In our model, each unit corresponds to a large number of neurons and may be roughly seen as abstracting the functional behavior exhibited by a single voxel under functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In the course of the dynamics, the units exchange portions of formal charge, which correspond to waves of activity in the underlying microscale neuronal circuit. The geometric model abstracts away the neuronal complexity and is mathematically tractable, which allows us to establish explicit results on its ground states and the resulting charge transfer graph modeling functional graph of the network. We show that, for a wide choice of parameters and geometrical setups, our model yields a scale-free functional connectivity with the exponent approaching 2, which is in agreement with previous empirical studies based on fMRI. The level of universality of the presented theory allows us to claim that the model does shed light on mesoscale functional self-organization phenomena of the nervous system, even without resorting to closer details of brain connectivity geometry which often remain unknown. The material presented here significantly extends our previous work where a simplified mean-field model in a similar spirit was constructed, ignoring the underlying network geometry.

  17. Scaling of topologically similar functional modules defines mouse primary auditory and somatosensory microcircuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovsky, Alexander J; MacLean, Jason N

    2013-08-28

    Mapping the flow of activity through neocortical microcircuits provides key insights into the underlying circuit architecture. Using a comparative analysis we determined the extent to which the dynamics of microcircuits in mouse primary somatosensory barrel field (S1BF) and auditory (A1) neocortex generalize. We imaged the simultaneous dynamics of up to 1126 neurons spanning multiple columns and layers using high-speed multiphoton imaging. The temporal progression and reliability of reactivation of circuit events in both regions suggested common underlying cortical design features. We used circuit activity flow to generate functional connectivity maps, or graphs, to test the microcircuit hypothesis within a functional framework. S1BF and A1 present a useful test of the postulate as both regions map sensory input anatomically, but each area appears organized according to different design principles. We projected the functional topologies into anatomical space and found benchmarks of organization that had been previously described using physiology and anatomical methods, consistent with a close mapping between anatomy and functional dynamics. By comparing graphs representing activity flow we found that each region is similarly organized as highlighted by hallmarks of small world, scale free, and hierarchical modular topologies. Models of prototypical functional circuits from each area of cortex were sufficient to recapitulate experimentally observed circuit activity. Convergence to common behavior by these models was accomplished using preferential attachment to scale from an auditory up to a somatosensory circuit. These functional data imply that the microcircuit hypothesis be framed as scalable principles of neocortical circuit design.

  18. Thermal expansion of L-ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaï, B.; Barrio, M.; Tamarit, J.-Ll.; Céolin, R.; Rietveld, I. B.

    2017-04-01

    The specific volume of vitamin C has been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction as a function of temperature from 110 K up to complete degradation around 440 K. Its thermal expansion is relatively small in comparison with other organic compounds with an expansivity α v of 1.2(3) × 10-4 K-1. The structure consists of strongly bound molecules in the ac plane through a dense network of hydrogen bonds. The thermal expansion is anisotropic. Along the b axis, the expansion has most leeway and is about 10 times larger than in the other directions.

  19. Expansion of cord blood CD34 cells in presence of zVADfmk and zLLYfmk improved their in vitro functionality and in vivo engraftment in NOD/SCID mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha V M

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cord blood (CB is a promising source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. The limitation of cell dose associated with this source has prompted the ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs. However, the expansion procedure is known to exhaust the stem cell pool causing cellular defects that promote apoptosis and disrupt homing to the bone marrow. The role of apoptotic machinery in the regulation of stem cell compartment has been speculated in mouse hematopoietic and embryonic systems. We have consistently observed an increase in apoptosis in the cord blood derived CD34(+ cells cultured with cytokines compared to their freshly isolated counterpart. The present study was undertaken to assess whether pharmacological inhibition of apoptosis could improve the outcome of expansion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CB CD34(+ cells were expanded with cytokines in the presence or absence of cell permeable inhibitors of caspases and calpains; zVADfmk and zLLYfmk respectively. A novel role of apoptotic protease inhibitors was observed in increasing the CD34(+ cell content of the graft during ex vivo expansion. This was further reflected in improved in vitro functional aspects of the HSPCs; a higher clonogenicity and long term culture initiating potential. These cells sustained superior long term engraftment and an efficient regeneration of major lympho-myeloid lineages in the bone marrow of NOD/SCID mouse compared to the cells expanded with growth factors alone. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that, use of either zVADfmk or zLLYfmk in the culture medium improves expansion of CD34(+ cells. The strategy protects stem cell pool and committed progenitors, and improves their in vitro functionality and in vivo engraftment. This observation may complement the existing protocols used in the manipulation of hematopoietic cells for therapeutic purposes. These findings may have an impact in the CB transplant

  20. Virial expansion coefficients in the harmonic approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Armstrong, J.; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; V. Fedorov, D.

    2012-01-01

    The virial expansion method is applied within a harmonic approximation to an interacting N-body system of identical fermions. We compute the canonical partition functions for two and three particles to get the two lowest orders in the expansion. The energy spectrum is carefully interpolated...

  1. Validating the Functions of Identity Scale: addressing methodological and conceptual matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Toni E; Maitland, Scott B

    2013-02-01

    Various studies have examined the validity of the Functions of Identity Scale; the current study addressed gaps in previous works. Its three main goals were to revise the Control subscale and establish its construct validity, to assess the structural validity of a five-factor model, and to establish the external validity of the subscales. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was employed with a sample of 422 female and 107 male undergraduate students from two universities in Ontario, Canada. The analysis supported the construct validity of the revised five-factor measurement model and the new Personal Control factor. The external validity of each of the subscales was tested, and scale items were revised to increase clarity and readability (to a Grade 5.5 reading level). Rigorous validity testing, strong psychometric properties, low reading level, and a novel focus on the outer workings of identity formation make this scale an attractive addition to current identity measures.

  2. Toward a quantitative description of large-scale neocortical dynamic function and EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, P L

    2000-06-01

    A general conceptual framework for large-scale neocortical dynamics based on data from many laboratories is applied to a variety of experimental designs, spatial scales, and brain states. Partly distinct, but interacting local processes (e.g., neural networks) arise from functional segregation. Global processes arise from functional integration and can facilitate (top down) synchronous activity in remote cell groups that function simultaneously at several different spatial scales. Simultaneous local processes may help drive (bottom up) macroscopic global dynamics observed with electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG). A local/global dynamic theory that is consistent with EEG data and the proposed conceptual framework is outlined. This theory is neutral about properties of neural networks embedded in macroscopic fields, but its global component makes several qualitative and semiquantitative predictions about EEG measures of traveling and standing wave phenomena. A more general "metatheory" suggests what large-scale quantitative theories of neocortical dynamics may be like when more accurate treatment of local and nonlinear effects is achieved. The theory describes the dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic action fields. EEG and MEG provide large-scale estimates of modulation of these synaptic fields around background levels. Brain states are determined by neuromodulatory control parameters. Purely local states are dominated by local feedback gains and rise and decay times of postsynaptic potentials. Dominant local frequencies vary with brain region. Other states are purely global, with moderate to high coherence over large distances. Multiple global mode frequencies arise from a combination of delays in corticocortical axons and neocortical boundary conditions. Global frequencies are identical in all cortical regions, but most states involve dynamic interactions between local networks and the global system. EEG frequencies may involve a

  3. Multi-scale clustering of functional data with application to hydraulic gradients in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Mark C.; Sojda, Richard S.; Sharp, Julia L.; Peck, Rory G.; Rosenberry, Donald O.

    2011-01-01

    A new set of methods are developed to perform cluster analysis of functions, motivated by a data set consisting of hydraulic gradients at several locations distributed across a wetland complex. The methods build on previous work on clustering of functions, such as Tarpey and Kinateder (2003) and Hitchcock et al. (2007), but explore functions generated from an additive model decomposition (Wood, 2006) of the original time se- ries. Our decomposition targets two aspects of the series, using an adaptive smoother for the trend and circular spline for the diurnal variation in the series. Different measures for comparing locations are discussed, including a method for efficiently clustering time series that are of different lengths using a functional data approach. The complicated nature of these wetlands are highlighted by the shifting group memberships depending on which scale of variation and year of the study are considered.

  4. Multi-scale coding of genomic information: From DNA sequence to genome structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneodo, Alain, E-mail: alain.arneodo@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Vaillant, Cedric, E-mail: cedric.vaillant@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Audit, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.audit@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Argoul, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.argoul@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); D' Aubenton-Carafa, Yves, E-mail: daubenton@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thermes, Claude, E-mail: claude.thermes@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-02-15

    Understanding how chromatin is spatially and dynamically organized in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and how this affects genome functions is one of the main challenges of cell biology. Since the different orders of packaging in the hierarchical organization of DNA condition the accessibility of DNA sequence elements to trans-acting factors that control the transcription and replication processes, there is actually a wealth of structural and dynamical information to learn in the primary DNA sequence. In this review, we show that when using concepts, methodologies, numerical and experimental techniques coming from statistical mechanics and nonlinear physics combined with wavelet-based multi-scale signal processing, we are able to decipher the multi-scale sequence encoding of chromatin condensation-decondensation mechanisms that play a fundamental role in regulating many molecular processes involved in nuclear functions.

  5. Reliability and validity testing of the Self-Efficacy for Functional Activities Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, B

    1999-01-01

    Self-efficacy expectations for functional activities were defined operationally by having individuals rate their perceived judgment or confidence in their ability to perform each specific activity of daily living (ADL) (bathing, dressing, transferring, ambulating, and stair climbing) at a given point in time. The Self-Efficacy for Functional Activities (SEFA) scale initially included 27 items focusing on efficacy expectations related to performance of each ADL independently, with adaptive equipment, and with the help of another person. After initial pilaf testing the scale was revised to include 9 items which focused on efficacy expectations related to performance of each ADL independently, or with the help of another person. Two additional studies were done and provided some evidence for the reliability and validity of the SEFA when used with older adults.

  6. Validity of the German Version of the Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance 10 Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Härdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance 10 Test (CS-PFP 10 quantitatively assesses physical functional performance in older adults who have a broad range of physical functional ability. This study assessed the validity and reliability of the CS-PFP 10 German version. Methods. Forward-translations and backtranslations as well as cultural adaptions of the test were conducted. Participants were German-speaking Swiss community-dwelling adults aged 64 and older. Concurrent validity was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients between CS-PFP 10 and gait velocity, Timed Up and Go Test, hand grip strength, SF-36 physical function domain, and Freiburger Physical Activity Questionnaire. Internal consistency was calculated by Cronbach’s alpha. Results. Backtranslation and cultural adaptions were accepted by the CS-PFP 10 developer. CS-PFP 10 total score and subscores (upper body strength, upper body flexibility, lower body strength, balance and coordination, and endurance correlated significantly with all measures of physical function tested. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach’s alpha 0.95–0.98. Conclusion. The CS-PFP 10 German version is valid and reliable for measuring physical functional performance in German-speaking Swiss community-dwelling older adults. Quantifying physical function is essential for clinical practice and research and provides meaningful insight into physical functional performance of older adults. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01539200.

  7. A full scale approximation of covariance functions for large spatial data sets

    KAUST Repository

    Sang, Huiyan

    2011-10-10

    Gaussian process models have been widely used in spatial statistics but face tremendous computational challenges for very large data sets. The model fitting and spatial prediction of such models typically require O(n 3) operations for a data set of size n. Various approximations of the covariance functions have been introduced to reduce the computational cost. However, most existing approximations cannot simultaneously capture both the large- and the small-scale spatial dependence. A new approximation scheme is developed to provide a high quality approximation to the covariance function at both the large and the small spatial scales. The new approximation is the summation of two parts: a reduced rank covariance and a compactly supported covariance obtained by tapering the covariance of the residual of the reduced rank approximation. Whereas the former part mainly captures the large-scale spatial variation, the latter part captures the small-scale, local variation that is unexplained by the former part. By combining the reduced rank representation and sparse matrix techniques, our approach allows for efficient computation for maximum likelihood estimation, spatial prediction and Bayesian inference. We illustrate the new approach with simulated and real data sets. © 2011 Royal Statistical Society.

  8. Susceptibility of functional impairment scales to noncredible responses in the clinical evaluation of adult ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuermaier, Anselm B M; Tucha, Oliver; Koerts, Janneke; Butzbach, Marah; Weisbrod, Matthias; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Tucha, Lara

    2017-11-23

    A growing body of research questions the reliance of symptom self-reports in the clinical evaluation of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adulthood. A recent study suggested that also impairment reports are vulnerable to noncredible responses, as derived from a simulation design using a global functional impairment scale. The present study aims to add evidence to this issue, by using an ADHD specific impairment scale in a simulation design on large samples. Impairment ratings on the Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale (WFIRS) of 62 patients with ADHD were compared to 142 healthy individuals who were instructed to show normal behavior. Furthermore, impairment ratings of patients with ADHD were compared to ratings of 330 healthy individuals who were randomly assigned to one of four simulation conditions that were instructed to complete the scale as if they had ADHD. Patients with ADHD reported higher levels of impairment than the healthy control group in all domains of life. Furthermore, individuals instructed to feign ADHD indicated higher levels of impairments in most domains of life compared to control participants and genuine patients with ADHD. The group differences between individuals feigning ADHD and individuals with genuine ADHD, however, were only small to moderate. Further analyses revealed that the WFRIS was not useful to successfully differentiate genuine from feigned ADHD. The present study confirms the conclusion that self-reported impairments are susceptible to noncredible responses and should be used with caution in the clinical evaluation of adult ADHD.

  9. Linking plat traits at ecosystem scale to ecosystem functions as observed by eddy covariance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat Musavi, Talie; Kattge, Jens; Mahecha, Miguel; Reichstein, Markus; Van de Weg, Marjan; Van Bodegom, Peter; Bahn, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this study we analyze the correlation structure among plant traits, ecosystem functional properties, characteristics of climate, soil and vegetation at 253 FLUXNET sites. This correlation structure may provide a basis for assessing vegetation functioning and its vulnerability under climate change. Until now, analyses of the FLUXNET dataset have shown that much of the observed spatial and temporal variation of ecosystem fluxes can be explained and scaled by information on soil, climate and vegetation structure, without considering the variation in the functional characteristics of the vegetation occurring at the FLUXNET sites. Instead, these studies have used plant functional types (PFT) as a parameter representing the vegetation influence on fluxes. However, provided the variability in traits that exists within an individual PFT at different sites, we analyze in this study how traits additionally influence ecosystem functional properties. We use community mean trait values to understand how vegetation characteristics relate to ecosystem functional properties, like maximum GPP at light saturation, or photosynthetic water use efficiency. These functional properties are derived from the combination of ecosystem level flux observation and information of spatial meteorology and vegetation remote sensing covariates. In addition, we investigate whether vegetation characteristics have an influence on ecosystem fluxes when combined with climate and soil information. So far analyses of this kind were impossible due to a lack of plant trait information. But the plant trait dataset TRY has been growing for years and in combination with novel methods in machine learning. We now have the opportunity to predict plant trait values for individual sites. We will present first results focusing on the relationship of ecosystem functional properties to leaf traits like specific leaf area and leaf carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentration scaled to canopy level.

  10. Further developments and field deployment of phosphorus functionalized polymeric scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, Malcolm J.; Thornton, Alex R.; Wylde, Jonathan J.; Strachan, Catherine J.; Moir, Gordon [Clariant Oil Services, Muttenz (Switzerland); Goulding, John [John Goulding Consultancy, York (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    As the oil and gas industry strives to replace ageing, environmentally undesirable scale inhibitors there is an ever increasing use of polymeric inhibitors. The incorporation of phosphorous functionality into a polymer backbone has been shown to improve inhibition efficiency, enhance adsorption characteristics and allow the polymer concentration to be analyzed by elemental phosphorus. It is known that some phosphorus tagged polymers can be problematic to analyze in oil field brines as they typically have a low phosphorus content which is difficult to determine from the background. The development of novel phosphorus functionalized polymeric scale inhibitors was previously described (IBP3530-10). This paper follows the development of the inhibitor class. Utilizing extensive laboratory testing the interactive nature of the scale inhibitors and reservoir lithology was studied. These novel phosphorus functionalized inhibitors were compared to a number of other available scale inhibitors. The incorporation of phosphorus functionality into polymeric inhibitors can be expensive utilizing traditional methods as the phosphorus containing monomers are the financially limiting factor. These are typically vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA), or vinyl diphosphonic acid (VDPA). The novel phosphorus functionalized monomers utilized herein are simpler to manufacture allowing higher phosphorus content within the polymer backbone. The addition of phosphorus into a polymer backbone has previously been known to exacerbate analysis issues in some commercially available scale inhibitors. This is due to incomplete polymerization reactions leaving free and/or inorganic phosphorus containing moieties which can interfere with the analysis, or low levels of phosphorus within end-capped polymers can make it difficult to determine the active concentration accurately within field brines which contain many impuritie. Polymeric inhibitors are known to contain a range of molecular weights with varying

  11. Interval Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Forced Functional Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with oscillation of second-order forced functional dynamic equations of the form (r(t(xΔ(tγΔ+∑i=0n‍qi(t|x(δi(t|αisgn  x(δi(t=e(t on time scales. By using a generalized Riccati technique and integral averaging techniques, we establish new oscillation criteria which handle some cases not covered by known criteria.

  12. Simulations of Nanocrystals Under Pressure: Combining Electronic Enthalpy and Linear-Scaling Density-Functional Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Corsini, NR; Greco, A.; Hine, ND; Molteni, C.; Haynes, PD

    2013-01-01

    We present an implementation in a linear-scaling density-functional theory code of an electronic enthalpy method, which has been found to be natural and efficient for the ab initio calculation of finite systems under hydrostatic pressure. Based on a definition of the system volume as that enclosed within an electronic density isosurface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 145501 (2005)], it supports both geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simula...

  13. Scale-up of nature's tissue weaving algorithms to engineer advanced functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Joanna L; Knothe, Lillian E; Whan, Renee M; Knothe, Ulf; Tate, Melissa L Knothe

    2017-01-11

    We are literally the stuff from which our tissue fabrics and their fibers are woven and spun. The arrangement of collagen, elastin and other structural proteins in space and time embodies our tissues and organs with amazing resilience and multifunctional smart properties. For example, the periosteum, a soft tissue sleeve that envelops all nonarticular bony surfaces of the body, comprises an inherently "smart" material that gives hard bones added strength under high impact loads. Yet a paucity of scalable bottom-up approaches stymies the harnessing of smart tissues' biological, mechanical and organizational detail to create advanced functional materials. Here, a novel approach is established to scale up the multidimensional fiber patterns of natural soft tissue weaves for rapid prototyping of advanced functional materials. First second harmonic generation and two-photon excitation microscopy is used to map the microscopic three-dimensional (3D) alignment, composition and distribution of the collagen and elastin fibers of periosteum, the soft tissue sheath bounding all nonarticular bone surfaces in our bodies. Then, using engineering rendering software to scale up this natural tissue fabric, as well as multidimensional weaving algorithms, macroscopic tissue prototypes are created using a computer-controlled jacquard loom. The capacity to prototype scaled up architectures of natural fabrics provides a new avenue to create advanced functional materials.

  14. Scale-up of nature’s tissue weaving algorithms to engineer advanced functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Joanna L.; Knothe, Lillian E.; Whan, Renee M.; Knothe, Ulf; Tate, Melissa L. Knothe

    2017-01-01

    We are literally the stuff from which our tissue fabrics and their fibers are woven and spun. The arrangement of collagen, elastin and other structural proteins in space and time embodies our tissues and organs with amazing resilience and multifunctional smart properties. For example, the periosteum, a soft tissue sleeve that envelops all nonarticular bony surfaces of the body, comprises an inherently “smart” material that gives hard bones added strength under high impact loads. Yet a paucity of scalable bottom-up approaches stymies the harnessing of smart tissues’ biological, mechanical and organizational detail to create advanced functional materials. Here, a novel approach is established to scale up the multidimensional fiber patterns of natural soft tissue weaves for rapid prototyping of advanced functional materials. First second harmonic generation and two-photon excitation microscopy is used to map the microscopic three-dimensional (3D) alignment, composition and distribution of the collagen and elastin fibers of periosteum, the soft tissue sheath bounding all nonarticular bone surfaces in our bodies. Then, using engineering rendering software to scale up this natural tissue fabric, as well as multidimensional weaving algorithms, macroscopic tissue prototypes are created using a computer-controlled jacquard loom. The capacity to prototype scaled up architectures of natural fabrics provides a new avenue to create advanced functional materials.

  15. Building a minimum frustration framework for brain functions over long time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Arturo; Flå, Tor; Peters, James F

    2016-08-01

    The minimum frustration principle (MFP) is a computational approach stating that, over the long time scales of evolution, proteins' free energy decreases more than expected by thermodynamical constraints as their amino acids assume conformations progressively closer to the lowest energetic state. This Review shows that this general principle, borrowed from protein folding dynamics, can also be fruitfully applied to nervous function. Highlighting the foremost role of energetic requirements, macromolecular dynamics, and above all intertwined time scales in brain activity, the MFP elucidates a wide range of mental processes from sensations to memory retrieval. Brain functions are compared with trajectories that, over long nervous time scales, are attracted toward the low-energy bottom of funnel-like structures characterized by both robustness and plasticity. We discuss how the principle, derived explicitly from evolution and selection of a funneling structure from microdynamics of contacts, is unlike other brain models equipped with energy landscapes, such as the Bayesian and free energy principles and the Hopfield networks. In summary, we make available a novel approach to brain function cast in a biologically informed fashion, with the potential to be operationalized and assessed empirically. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Scaling of velocity and scalar structure functions in ac electrokinetic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Guiren

    2017-02-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) turbulence or electrohydrodynamic (EHD) turbulence has been recently achieved in different fluids under both ac [G. Wang et al., Lab Chip 14, 1452 (2014), 10.1039/C3LC51403J; Phys. Rev. E 93, 013106 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.013106] and dc electric fields [A. Varshney et al., Soft Matter 12, 1759 (2016), 10.1039/C5SM02316E]. Here, through dimensional analysis, scaling laws of both velocity and electric conductivity structure functions in the forced cascade region of ac EK turbulence can be predicated (similar to Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling law in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection), in either macroscale or microscale flows. In the forced cascade region, EK force, which relies on the direct cascade of conductivity structures, injects energy directly into a wide spectral region to sustain the flow disturbance. The scaling exponents of the second-order velocity and conductivity structures are 2/5 and 4/5, respectively. In addition to the scaling regions, two characteristic small length scales are derived for both weak and strong electric body forces, respectively. This theoretical investigation can significantly enhance our understanding of EK or EHD turbulence while forced by an ac electric field. It can further broaden our understanding of the forced cascade region of forced turbulence and make the manipulation of the turbulent cascade process more flexible and controllable.

  17. Cosmological simulations in MOND: the cluster scale halo mass function with light sterile neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, G. W.; Diaferio, A.; Famaey, B.; van der Heyden, K. J.

    2013-11-01

    We use our Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) cosmological particle-mesh N-body code to investigate the feasibility of structure formation in a framework involving MOND and light sterile neutrinos in the mass range 11-300 eV: always assuming that Ω _{ν _s}=0.225 for H0 = 72 km s-1 Mpc-1. We run a suite of simulations with variants on the expansion history, cosmological variation of the MOND acceleration constant, different normalizations of the power spectrum of the initial perturbations and interpolating functions. Using various box sizes, but typically with ones of length 256 Mpc h-1, we compare our simulated halo mass functions with observed cluster mass functions and show that (i) the sterile neutrino mass must be larger than 30 eV to account for the low-mass (M200 sterile neutrino mass or any of the variations we mentioned above, it is not possible to form the correct number of high-mass (M200 > 1015.1 M⊙) clusters of galaxies: there is always a considerable over production. This means that the ansatz of considering the weak-field limit of MOND together with a component of light sterile neutrinos to form structure from z ˜ 200 fails. If MOND is the correct description of weak-field gravitational dynamics, it could mean that subtle effects of the additional fields in covariant theories of MOND render the ansatz inaccurate, or that the gravity generated by light sterile neutrinos (or by similar hot dark matter particles) is different from that generated by the baryons.

  18. Scale dependency of forest functional diversity assessed using imaging spectroscopy and airborne laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. D.; Morsdorf, F.; Schmid, B.; Petchey, O. L.; Hueni, A.; Schimel, D.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Forest functional traits offer a mechanistic link between ecological processes and community structure and assembly rules. However, measuring functional traits of forests in a continuous and consistent way is particularly difficult due to the complexity of in-situ measurements and geo-referencing. New imaging spectroscopy measurements overcome these limitations allowing to map physiological traits on broad spatial scales. We mapped leaf chlorophyll, carotenoids and leaf water content over 900 ha of temperate mixed forest (Fig. 1a). The selected traits are functionally important because they are indicating the photosynthetic potential of trees, leaf longevity and protection, as well as tree water and drought stress. Spatially continuous measurements on the scale of individual tree crowns allowed to assess functional diversity patterns on a range of ecological extents. We used indexes of functional richness, divergence and evenness to map different aspects of diversity. Fig. 1b shows an example of physiological richness at an extent of 240 m radius. We compared physiological to morphological diversity patterns, derived based on plant area index, canopy height and foliage height diversity. Our results show that patterns of physiological and morphological diversity generally agree, independently measured by airborne imaging spectroscopy and airborne laser scanning, respectively. The occurrence of disturbance areas and mixtures of broadleaf and needle trees were the main drivers of the observed diversity patterns. Spatial patterns at varying extents and richness-area relationships indicated that environmental filtering is the predominant community assembly process. Our results demonstrate the potential for mapping physiological and morphological diversity in a temperate mixed forest between and within species on scales relevant to study community assembly and structure from space and test the corresponding measurement schemes.

  19. Large-spin expansions of GKP strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floratos, Emmanuel; Georgiou, George; Linardopoulos, Georgios

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate that the large-spin expansion of the energy of Gubser-Klebanov-Polyakov (GKP) strings that rotate in ℝ × S2 and AdS3 can be expressed in terms of Lambert's W-function. We compute the leading, subleading and next-to-subleading series of exponential corrections to the infinite-volume dispersion relation of GKP strings that rotate in ℝ × S2. These strings are dual to the long = 4 SYM operators +… and provide their scaling dimensions at strong coupling. We also show that the strings obey a short-long (strings) duality. For the folded GKP strings that spin inside AdS3 and are dual to twist-2 operators, we confirm the known formulas for the leading and next-to-leading coefficients of their anomalous dimensions and derive the corresponding expressions for the next-to-next-to-leading coefficients.

  20. Bridges Expansion Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The survey is concerned with the expansion joints, used in bridge constructions to compensate medium and significant operational linear and spatial displacements between adjacent spans or between bridge span and pier. The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting the modern demands imposed to expansion joints.

  1. Bridges Expansion Joints

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-01-01

    .... The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting...

  2. Human umbilical cord blood plasma can replace fetal bovine serum for in vitro expansion of functional human endothelial colony-forming cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lan; Critser, Paul J; Grimes, Brenda R; Yoder, Mervin C

    2011-07-01

    A hierarchy of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) with different levels of proliferative potential has been identified in human circulating blood and blood vessels. ECFC has recently become an attractive target for new vascular regenerative therapies; however, in vitro expansion of ECFC typically depends on the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) or fetal calf serum (FCS) in the culture medium, which is not appropriate for its therapeutic application. To identify optimal conditions for in vitro expansion of ECFC, the effects of human endothelial serum-free medium (SFM) supplemented with six pro-angiogenic cytokines and human umbilical cord blood plasma (HCP) were investigated. The in vitro morphology, proliferation, surface antigen expression and in vivo vessel-forming ability were utilized for examining the effects of medium on ECFC. This novel formulation of endothelial cell culture medium allows us, for the first time, to isolate and expand human ECFC efficiently in vitro with a low concentration of HCP (1.5%) and without bovine serum additives. In this serum-reduced medium (SRM), human ECFC colony yields remained quantitatively similar to those cultured in a high concentration (10%) of bovine serum-supplemented medium. SRM-cultured ECFC displayed a robust clonal proliferative ability in vitro and human vessel-forming capacity in vivo. The present study provides a novel method for the expansion of human ECFC in vitro and will help to advance approaches for using the cells in human therapeutic trials.

  3. Evidence of a Large-Scale Functional Organization of Mammalian Chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from inbred strains of mice indicates that a quarter or more of the mammalian genome consists of chromosome regions containing clusters of functionally related genes. The intense selection pressures during inbreeding favor the coinheritance of optimal sets of alleles among these genetically linked, functionally related genes, resulting in extensive domains of linkage disequilibrium (LD among a set of 60 genetically diverse inbred strains. Recombination that disrupts the preferred combinations of alleles reduces the ability of offspring to survive further inbreeding. LD is also seen between markers on separate chromosomes, forming networks with scale-free architecture. Combining LD data with pathway and genome annotation databases, we have been able to identify the biological functions underlying several domains and networks. Given the strong conservation of gene order among mammals, the domains and networks we find in mice probably characterize all mammals, including humans.

  4. Functional Test Scales for Evaluating Cell-Based Therapies in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woon Ryoung Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, spinal cord researchers have focused on multifaceted approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI. However, as there is no cure for the deficits produced by SCI, various therapeutic strategies have been examined using animal models. Due to the lack of standardized functional assessment tools for use in such models, it is important to choose a suitable animal model and precise behavioral test when evaluating the efficacy of potential SCI treatments. In the present review, we discuss recent evidence regarding functional recovery in various animal models of SCI, summarize the representative models currently used, evaluate recent cell-based therapeutic approaches, and aim to identify the most precise and appropriate scales for functional assessment in such research.

  5. Large-scale functional models of visual cortex for remote sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumby, Steven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kenyon, Garrett [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rasmussen, Craig E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swaminarayan, Sriram [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bettencourt, Luis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Landecker, Will [PORTLAND STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroscience has revealed many properties of neurons and of the functional organization of visual cortex that are believed to be essential to human vision, but are missing in standard artificial neural networks. Equally important may be the sheer scale of visual cortex requiring {approx}1 petaflop of computation. In a year, the retina delivers {approx}1 petapixel to the brain, leading to massively large opportunities for learning at many levels of the cortical system. We describe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop large-scale functional models of visual cortex on LANL's Roadrunner petaflop supercomputer. An initial run of a simple region VI code achieved 1.144 petaflops during trials at the IBM facility in Poughkeepsie, NY (June 2008). Here, we present criteria for assessing when a set of learned local representations is 'complete' along with general criteria for assessing computer vision models based on their projected scaling behavior. Finally, we extend one class of biologically-inspired learning models to problems of remote sensing imagery.

  6. Expansion and rupture of charged microcapsules

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Sujit S.; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David A

    2014-01-01

    We study the deformations of pH-responsive spherical microcapsules -- micrometer-scale liquid drops surrounded by thin, solid shells -- under the influence of electrostatic forces. When exposed to a large concentration of NaOH, the microcapsules become highly charged, and expand isotropically. We find that the extent of this expansion can be understood by coupling electrostatics with shell theory; moreover, the expansion dynamics is well described by Darcy's law for fluid flow through the mic...

  7. Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

    2002-08-01

    Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

  8. Linear-scaling density functional theory using the projector augmented wave method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Nicholas D. M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum mechanical simulation of realistic models of nanostructured systems, such as nanocrystals and crystalline interfaces, demands computational methods combining high-accuracy with low-order scaling with system size. Blöchl’s projector augmented wave (PAW) approach enables all-electron (AE) calculations with the efficiency and systematic accuracy of plane-wave pseudopotential calculations. Meanwhile, linear-scaling (LS) approaches to density functional theory (DFT) allow for simulation of thousands of atoms in feasible computational effort. This article describes an adaptation of PAW for use in the LS-DFT framework provided by the ONETEP LS-DFT package. ONETEP uses optimisation of the density matrix through in situ-optimised local orbitals rather than the direct calculation of eigenstates as in traditional PAW approaches. The method is shown to be comparably accurate to both PAW and AE approaches and to exhibit improved convergence properties compared to norm-conserving pseudopotential methods.

  9. Development and preliminary validation of the First Episode Social Functioning Scale for early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Tania; Corbière, Marc; Ehmann, Tom; Addington, Jean; Abdel-Baki, Amal; Macewan, Bill

    2014-05-30

    The current study aimed at developing and conducting a preliminary validation a novel social functioning measure for people with early psychosis. The First Episode Social Functioning Scale (FESFS) was developed to cover many domains specific to this population in their contemporary reality. The self-report version of the FESFS was administered to 203 individuals receiving services in first episode clinics. Scores of the GAF, SOFAS, Social Functioning Scale and BPRS were also obtained for parts of the sample to calculate convergent and discriminant validity. A subgroup also answered the FESFS at several time points during treatment in order to determine sensibility to change. Principal component factor analyses and internal consistency analyses revealed the following nine factors with alphas ranging from 0.63 to 0.80: Friendships and social activities, Independent living skills, Interacting with people, Family, Intimacy, Relationships and social activities at work, Work abilities, Relationships and social activities at school, Educational abilities. Convergent and discriminant validity were demonstrated, as well as sensitivity to change. Clinical and research utility of the FESFS are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Spatial scaling patterns and functional redundancies in a changing boreal lake landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Uden, Daniel R.; Johnson, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    Global transformations extend beyond local habitats; therefore, larger-scale approaches are needed to assess community-level responses and resilience to unfolding environmental changes. Using longterm data (1996–2011), we evaluated spatial patterns and functional redundancies in the littoral invertebrate communities of 85 Swedish lakes, with the objective of assessing their potential resilience to environmental change at regional scales (that is, spatial resilience). Multivariate spatial modeling was used to differentiate groups of invertebrate species exhibiting spatial patterns in composition and abundance (that is, deterministic species) from those lacking spatial patterns (that is, stochastic species). We then determined the functional feeding attributes of the deterministic and stochastic invertebrate species, to infer resilience. Between one and three distinct spatial patterns in invertebrate composition and abundance were identified in approximately one-third of the species; the remainder were stochastic. We observed substantial differences in metrics between deterministic and stochastic species. Functional richness and diversity decreased over time in the deterministic group, suggesting a loss of resilience in regional invertebrate communities. However, taxon richness and redundancy increased monotonically in the stochastic group, indicating the capacity of regional invertebrate communities to adapt to change. Our results suggest that a refined picture of spatial resilience emerges if patterns of both the deterministic and stochastic species are accounted for. Spatially extensive monitoring may help increase our mechanistic understanding of community-level responses and resilience to regional environmental change, insights that are critical for developing management and conservation agendas in this current period of rapid environmental transformation.

  11. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-09-05

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury.

  12. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  13. Functional models for large-scale gene regulation networks: realism and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino; Bassetti, Bruno; Castellani, Gastone; Remondini, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    High-throughput experiments are shedding light on the topology of large regulatory networks and at the same time their functional states, namely the states of activation of the nodes (for example transcript or protein levels) in different conditions, times, environments. We now possess a certain amount of information about these two levels of description, stored in libraries, databases and ontologies. A current challenge is to bridge the gap between topology and function, i.e. developing quantitative models aimed at characterizing the expression patterns of large sets of genes. However, approaches that work well for small networks become impossible to master at large scales, mainly because parameters proliferate. In this review we discuss the state of the art of large-scale functional network models, addressing the issue of what can be considered as "realistic" and what the main limitations may be. We also show some directions for future work, trying to set the goals that future models should try to achieve. Finally, we will emphasize the possible benefits in the understanding of biological mechanisms underlying complex multifactorial diseases, and in the development of novel strategies for the description and the treatment of such pathologies.

  14. FuncTree: Functional Analysis and Visualization for Large-Scale Omics Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeru Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Exponential growth of high-throughput data and the increasing complexity of omics information have been making processing and interpreting biological data an extremely difficult and daunting task. Here we developed FuncTree (http://bioviz.tokyo/functree, a web-based application for analyzing and visualizing large-scale omics data, including but not limited to genomic, metagenomic, and transcriptomic data. FuncTree allows user to map their omics data onto the "Functional Tree map", a predefined circular dendrogram, which represents the hierarchical relationship of all known biological functions defined in the KEGG database. This novel visualization method allows user to overview the broad functionality of their data, thus allowing a more accurate and comprehensive understanding of the omics information. FuncTree provides extensive customization and calculation methods to not only allow user to directly map their omics data to identify the functionality of their data, but also to compute statistically enriched functions by comparing it to other predefined omics data. We have validated FuncTree's analysis and visualization capability by mapping pan-genomic data of three different types of bacterial genera, metagenomic data of the human gut, and transcriptomic data of two different types of human cell expression. All three mapping strongly confirms FuncTree's capability to analyze and visually represent key functional feature of the omics data. We believe that FuncTree's capability to conduct various functional calculations and visualizing the result into a holistic overview of biological function, would make it an integral analysis/visualization tool for extensive omics base research.

  15. Functional traits reveal processes driving natural afforestation at large spatial scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman W H Mason

    Full Text Available An understanding of the processes governing natural afforestation over large spatial scales is vital for enhancing forest carbon sequestration. Models of tree species occurrence probability in non-forest vegetation could potentially identify the primary variables determining natural afforestation. However, inferring processes governing afforestation using tree species occurrence is potentially problematic, since it is impossible to know whether observed occurrences are due to recruitment or persistence of existing trees following disturbance. Plant functional traits have the potential to reveal the processes by which key environmental and land cover variables influence afforestation. We used 10,061 survey plots to identify the primary environmental and land cover variables influencing tree occurrence probability in non-forest vegetation in New Zealand. We also examined how these variables influenced diversity of functional traits linked to plant ecological strategy and dispersal ability. Mean annual temperature was the most important environmental predictor of tree occurrence. Local woody cover and distance to forest were the most important land cover variables. Relationships between these variables and ecological strategy traits revealed a trade-off between ability to compete for light and colonize sites that were marginal for tree occurrence. Biotically dispersed species occurred less frequently with declining temperature and local woody cover, suggesting that abiotic stress limited their establishment and that biotic dispersal did not increase ability to colonize non-woody vegetation. Functional diversity for ecological strategy traits declined with declining temperature and woody cover and increasing distance to forest. Functional diversity for dispersal traits showed the opposite trend. This suggests that low temperatures and woody cover and high distance to forest may limit tree species establishment through filtering on ecological

  16. Functional Traits Reveal Processes Driving Natural Afforestation at Large Spatial Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Norman W. H.; Wiser, Susan K.; Richardson, Sarah J.; Thorsen, Michael J.; Holdaway, Robert J.; Dray, Stéphane; Thomson, Fiona J.; Carswell, Fiona E.

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the processes governing natural afforestation over large spatial scales is vital for enhancing forest carbon sequestration. Models of tree species occurrence probability in non-forest vegetation could potentially identify the primary variables determining natural afforestation. However, inferring processes governing afforestation using tree species occurrence is potentially problematic, since it is impossible to know whether observed occurrences are due to recruitment or persistence of existing trees following disturbance. Plant functional traits have the potential to reveal the processes by which key environmental and land cover variables influence afforestation. We used 10,061 survey plots to identify the primary environmental and land cover variables influencing tree occurrence probability in non-forest vegetation in New Zealand. We also examined how these variables influenced diversity of functional traits linked to plant ecological strategy and dispersal ability. Mean annual temperature was the most important environmental predictor of tree occurrence. Local woody cover and distance to forest were the most important land cover variables. Relationships between these variables and ecological strategy traits revealed a trade-off between ability to compete for light and colonize sites that were marginal for tree occurrence. Biotically dispersed species occurred less frequently with declining temperature and local woody cover, suggesting that abiotic stress limited their establishment and that biotic dispersal did not increase ability to colonize non-woody vegetation. Functional diversity for ecological strategy traits declined with declining temperature and woody cover and increasing distance to forest. Functional diversity for dispersal traits showed the opposite trend. This suggests that low temperatures and woody cover and high distance to forest may limit tree species establishment through filtering on ecological strategy traits, but not on

  17. Multi-scale finite element modeling of Eustachian tube function: influence of mucosal adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, J E; Swarts, J D; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-12-01

    The inability to open the collapsible Eustachian tube (ET) leads to the development of chronic Otitis Media (OM). Although mucosal inflammation during OM leads to increased mucin gene expression and elevated adhesion forces within the ET lumen, it is not known how changes in mucosal adhesion alter the biomechanical mechanisms of ET function. In this study, we developed a novel multi-scale finite element model of ET function in adults that utilizes adhesion spring elements to simulate changes in mucosal adhesion. Models were created for six adult subjects, and dynamic patterns in muscle contraction were used to simulate the wave-like opening of the ET that occurs during swallowing. Results indicate that ET opening is highly sensitive to the level of mucosal adhesion and that exceeding a critical value of adhesion leads to rapid ET dysfunction. Parameter variation studies and sensitivity analysis indicate that increased mucosal adhesion alters the relative importance of several tissue biomechanical properties. For example, increases in mucosal adhesion reduced the sensitivity of ET function to tensor veli palatini muscle forces but did not alter the insensitivity of ET function to levator veli palatini muscle forces. Interestingly, although changes in cartilage stiffness did not significantly influence ET opening under low adhesion conditions, ET opening was highly sensitive to changes in cartilage stiffness under high adhesion conditions. Therefore, our multi-scale computational models indicate that changes in mucosal adhesion as would occur during inflammatory OM alter the biomechanical mechanisms of ET function. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Development and Initial Validation of the Beliefs About Sexual Functioning Scale: A Gender Invariant Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal, Patrícia M; Alvarez, Maria-João; Pereira, Cicero Roberto; Nobre, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    Past research on cognitive models of sexual functioning has focused on sexual beliefs as an important vulnerability factor for sexual dysfunction. However, the existing measurements of sexual beliefs are lengthy and entangle beliefs about sexual functioning with moral beliefs and ideas about sexuality. Furthermore, they have female and male versions, which does not allow for sex comparisons or dyadic research with heterosexual couples. To describe the development and validation of the Beliefs About Sexual Functioning Scale (BASEF), which assesses beliefs about sexual functioning in men and women. This study included two cross-sectional online studies with adults in heterosexual dyadic committed and exclusive relationships. In study 1 (sample A, n = 274, mean age = 32.27 years; sample B, n = 114, mean age = 30.6 years), the factorial validity of the BASEF was analyzed through an exploratory factor analysis with an initial poll of 51 items, followed by a test of its structure in a confirmatory factor analysis. In study 2 (n = 426, mean age = 31.5 years), the factorial equivalence of the BASEF was tested across sexes and its association with total scores of sexual functioning was analyzed. The main outcome was a new instrument for measurement of beliefs about sexual functioning. In study 1, 15 items indicating 5 factors were retained. The structure was confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis, establishing its factorial validity with the five factors aggregated in a second-order latent variable. In study 2, the equivalence of the BASEF was demonstrated across sexes and its association with theoretically related measurements, the International Index of Erectile Function and the Female Sexual Function Index, was supported. This new measurement could be useful to evaluate clients and design interventions that take into account similarity and discrepancy in sexual beliefs in couples, such as those interventions framed in cognitive and systemic clinical models. This

  19. Coupling transfer function and GIS for assessing non-point-source groundwater vulnerability at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, A.; Comegna, V.; de Simone, L.

    2009-04-01

    Non-point source (NPS) pollution in the vadose zone is a global environmental problem. The knowledge and information required to address the problem of NPS pollutants in the vadose zone cross several technological and sub disciplinary lines: spatial statistics, geographic information systems (GIS), hydrology, soil science, and remote sensing. The main issues encountered by NPS groundwater vulnerability assessment, as discussed by Stewart [2001], are the large spatial scales, the complex processes that govern fluid flow and solute transport in the unsaturated zone, the absence of unsaturated zone measurements of diffuse pesticide concentrations in 3-D regional-scale space as these are difficult, time consuming, and prohibitively costly, and the computational effort required for solving the nonlinear equations for physically-based modeling of regional scale, heterogeneous applications. As an alternative solution, here is presented an approach that is based on coupling of transfer function and GIS modeling that: a) is capable of solute concentration estimation at a depth of interest within a known error confidence class; b) uses available soil survey, climatic, and irrigation information, and requires minimal computational cost for application; c) can dynamically support decision making through thematic mapping and 3D scenarios This result was pursued through 1) the design and building of a spatial database containing environmental and physical information regarding the study area, 2) the development of the transfer function procedure for layered soils, 3) the final representation of results through digital mapping and 3D visualization. One side GIS modeled environmental data in order to characterize, at regional scale, soil profile texture and depth, land use, climatic data, water table depth, potential evapotranspiration; on the other side such information was implemented in the up-scaling procedure of the Jury's TFM resulting in a set of texture based travel time

  20. Function Self-Efficacy Scale-FSES: Development, Evaluation, and Contribution to Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovel, Hava; Carmel, Sara

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Function Self-Efficacy Scale (FSES) for assessing the degree of confidence in self-functioning while facing decline in health and function (DHF). The FSES was evaluated in two studies of older Israelis, aged 75+ years. Data were collected by structured home interviews. Exploratory factor analyses conducted in both studies clearly revealed two underlying factors: emotion self-efficacy and action self-efficacy. Confirmatory factor analyses resulted in acceptable model fit criteria. The shortened final 13-item FSES had good internal consistency and satisfactory criterion and convergent validity. Multiple regression analyses, conducted to predict subjective well-being in each of the studies, showed that function self-efficacy had a positive and significant contribution to the explanation of well-being, while controlling for general self-efficacy, self-rated health, and sociodemographic variables. We propose that appropriate interventions can strengthen function self-efficacy, thus improving the well-being of elderly persons and their ability to cope with DHF. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Does Cosmological Scale Expansion Explain the Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masreliez, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The idea of the creation of the world has been central in Western civilization since the earliest recorded history some 6000 years ago and it still prevails, supported by religious dogma. If the creation idea is wrong and the universe is eternal we might wonder why science has not yet revealed this fundamental truth. To understand why, we have to review how the Big Bang theory came to be the dominant cosmological paradigm in spite of many clear indications that the theory might be fundamentally flawed.

  2. Minimization of Linear Functionals Defined on| Solutions of Large-Scale Discrete Ill-Posed Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elden, Lars; Hansen, Per Christian; Rojas, Marielba

    2003-01-01

    The minimization of linear functionals de ned on the solutions of discrete ill-posed problems arises, e.g., in the computation of con dence intervals for these solutions. In 1990, Elden proposed an algorithm for this minimization problem based on a parametric-programming reformulation involving...... the solution of a sequence of trust-region problems, and using matrix factorizations. In this paper, we describe MLFIP, a large-scale version of this algorithm where a limited-memory trust-region solver is used on the subproblems. We illustrate the use of our algorithm in connection with an inverse heat...

  3. GENASIS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-11-01

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual 'unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. These classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GENASIS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes them useful for physics simulations in many fields.

  4. Cross-Cultural adaptation of the General Functioning Scale of the Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Pires

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the process of cross-cultural adaptation of the General Functioning Scale of the Family, a subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device, for the Brazilian population. METHODS The General Functioning Scale of the Family was translated into Portuguese and administered to 500 guardians of children in the second grade of elementary school in public schools of Sao Gonçalo, Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil. The types of equivalences investigated were: conceptual and of items, semantic, operational, and measurement. The study involved discussions with experts, translations and back-translations of the instrument, and psychometric assessment. Reliability and validity studies were carried out by internal consistency testing (Cronbach’s alpha, Guttman split-half correlation model, Pearson correlation coefficient, and confirmatory factor analysis. Associations between General Functioning of the Family and variables theoretically associated with the theme (father’s or mother’s drunkenness and violence between parents were estimated by odds ratio. RESULTS Semantic equivalence was between 90.0% and 100%. Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.79 to 0.81, indicating good internal consistency of the instrument. Pearson correlation coefficient ranged between 0.303 and 0.549. Statistical association was found between the general functioning of the family score and the theoretically related variables, as well as good fit quality of the confirmatory analysis model. CONCLUSIONS The results indicate the feasibility of administering the instrument to the Brazilian population, as it is easy to understand and a good measurement of the construct of interest.

  5. Motor function measure scale, steroid therapy and patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C. da Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the evolution of motor function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD treated with steroids (prednisolone or deflazacort through the Motor Function Measure (MFM, which evaluates three dimensions of motor performance (D1, D2, D3. METHODS: Thirty-three patients with DMD (22 ambulant, 6 non-ambulant and 5 who lost the capacity to walk during the period of the study were assessed using the MFM scale six times over a period of 18 months. RESULTS: All the motor functions remained stable for 14 months in all patients, except D1 for those who lost their walking ability. In ambulant patients, D2 (axial and proximal motor capacities motor functions improved during six months; an improvement in D3 (distal motor capacity was noted during the total follow-up. D1 (standing posture and transfers and total score were useful to predict the loss of the ability to walk. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the MFM in DMD patients confirms the benefits of the steroid treatment for slowing the progression of the disease.

  6. Strategies for directing the structure and function of three-dimensional collagen biomaterials across length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, B D; Stegemann, J P

    2014-04-01

    Collagen type I is a widely used natural biomaterial that has found utility in a variety of biological and medical applications. Its well-characterized structure and role as an extracellular matrix protein make it a highly relevant material for controlling cell function and mimicking tissue properties. Collagen type I is abundant in a number of tissues, and can be isolated as a purified protein. This review focuses on hydrogel biomaterials made by reconstituting collagen type I from a solubilized form, with an emphasis on in vitro studies in which collagen structure can be controlled. The hierarchical structure of collagen from the nanoscale to the macroscale is described, with an emphasis on how structure is related to function across scales. Methods of reconstituting collagen into hydrogel materials are presented, including molding of macroscopic constructs, creation of microscale modules and electrospinning of nanoscale fibers. The modification of collagen biomaterials to achieve the desired structures and functions is also addressed, with particular emphasis on mechanical control of collagen structure, creation of collagen composite materials and crosslinking of collagenous matrices. Biomaterials scientists have made remarkable progress in rationally designing collagen-based biomaterials and in applying them both to the study of biology and for therapeutic benefit. This broad review illustrates recent examples of techniques used to control collagen structure and thereby to direct its biological and mechanical functions. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Strategies for Directing the Structure and Function of 3D Collagen Biomaterials across Length Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Brandan D.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen type I is a widely used natural biomaterial that has found utility in a variety of biological and medical applications. Its well characterized structure and role as an extracellular matrix protein make it a highly relevant material for controlling cell function and mimicking tissue properties. Collagen type I is abundant in a number of tissues, and can be isolated as a purified protein. This review focuses on hydrogel biomaterials made by reconstituting collagen type I from a solubilized form, with an emphasis on in vitro studies in which collagen structure can be controlled. The hierarchical structure of collagen from the nanoscale to the macroscale is described, with an emphasis on how structure is related to function across scales. Methods of reconstituting collagen into hydrogel materials are presented, including molding of macroscopic constructs, creation of microscale modules, and electrospinning of nanoscale fibers. The modification of collagen biomaterials to achieve desired structures and functions is also addressed, with particular emphasis on mechanical control of collagen structure, creation of collagen composite materials, and crosslinking of collagenous matrices. Biomaterials scientists have made remarkable progress in rationally designing collagen-based biomaterials and in applying them to both the study of biology and for therapeutic benefit. This broad review illustrates recent examples of techniques used to control collagen structure, and to thereby direct its biological and mechanical functions. PMID:24012608

  8. [BREV: a rapid clinical scale for cognitive function evaluation in preschool and school-age children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, C; Vol, S; Livet, M O; Motte, J; Vallée, L; Gillet, P; Marquet, T

    2002-02-01

    BREV, standing for the French "Batterie Rapide d'Evaluation des Fonctions Cognitive", is a rapid test to screen children with disorders of higher functions and to define the patterns of these disorders. We describe here two phases of the validation procedure. The first phase consisted in measuring the internal validity of the scale by testing 500 normal school children free of disability. The validation process provided appropriate values for each of the 18 subtests assessing cognitive functions (oral language, non-verbal abilities, attention and memory, education and memory, educational achievment) in ten age groups from 4 to 8 years. All subtests with the same content for any revealed values which increased significantly with age. Inter-reliability was tested by retesting 70 children. The second phase of validation, comparing BREV results and those from a large classical neuropsychological battery, tested specificity and sensitivity. Each of the BREV subtests were correlated with the similar subtest of the classical battery. Correlations between verbal and non-verbal scores and verbal and performance intellectual quotient (Weschler scale) were very significant. Sensitivity and specificity of BREV were above 75p.100;. This confirms the reliability of this battery for children, with good sensitivity and specificity. BREV is a reliable test, with carefully established norms, appropriate for preschool and school-age children.

  9. Introducing ONETEP: linear-scaling density functional simulations on parallel computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Haynes, Peter D; Mostofi, Arash A; Payne, Mike C

    2005-02-22

    We present ONETEP (order-N electronic total energy package), a density functional program for parallel computers whose computational cost scales linearly with the number of atoms and the number of processors. ONETEP is based on our reformulation of the plane wave pseudopotential method which exploits the electronic localization that is inherent in systems with a nonvanishing band gap. We summarize the theoretical developments that enable the direct optimization of strictly localized quantities expressed in terms of a delocalized plane wave basis. These same localized quantities lead us to a physical way of dividing the computational effort among many processors to allow calculations to be performed efficiently on parallel supercomputers. We show with examples that ONETEP achieves excellent speedups with increasing numbers of processors and confirm that the time taken by ONETEP as a function of increasing number of atoms for a given number of processors is indeed linear. What distinguishes our approach is that the localization is achieved in a controlled and mathematically consistent manner so that ONETEP obtains the same accuracy as conventional cubic-scaling plane wave approaches and offers fast and stable convergence. We expect that calculations with ONETEP have the potential to provide quantitative theoretical predictions for problems involving thousands of atoms such as those often encountered in nanoscience and biophysics. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Effect of Exercise Counseling on Functional Scales Quality of Life in Women with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shobeyri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer and the most lethal malignancy among women in the world. Diagnosis, treatment, and treatment complications incur physical, mental and social complications, and consequently reduce the quality of life in these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise counseling on functional scales in women with breast cancer. Materials & Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 60 women with breast cancer selected in cancer treatment centers in Hamadan city. Participants were randomly allocated to exercise counseling group (n=30 and control group (n=30. The intervention included two weeks of exercise counseling in the gym and eight weeks of training at home. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, QLQ-C30 and QLQ BR-23. Data were analyzed in SPSS.20, using &chi2 Fisher’s exact test, t-test, ANCOVA at a confidence level of p0.05. Conclusion: The functional scales of exercise counseling had a positive effect on the quality of life of women with breast cancer, and led to a significant improvement in patients. This method can be used as a part of the routine therapeutic measures for these patients.

  11. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiron, Yohai [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Baile; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Spurzem, Rainer, E-mail: ymeiron@pku.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    We present graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations of two fast force calculation methods based on series expansions of the Poisson equation. One method is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other method is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a 'pure' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms. We show that despite the expansion bias, these methods are more accurate than direct techniques for the same number of particles. The performance of our GPU code, which we call ETICS, is profiled and compared to a CPU implementation. On the tested GPU hardware, a full force calculation for one million particles took ∼0.1 s (depending on expansion cutoff), making simulations with as many as 10{sup 8} particles fast for a comparatively small number of nodes.

  12. Musculoskeletal determinants of pelvic sucker function in Hawaiian stream gobiid fishes: interspecific comparisons and allometric scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maie, Takashi; Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Blob, Richard W

    2013-07-01

    Gobiid fishes possess a distinctive ventral sucker, formed from fusion of the pelvic fins. This sucker is used to adhere to a wide range of substrates including, in some species, the vertical cliffs of waterfalls that are climbed during upstream migrations. Previous studies of waterfall-climbing goby species have found that pressure differentials and adhesive forces generated by the sucker increase with positive allometry as fish grow in size, despite isometry or negative allometry of sucker area. To produce such scaling patterns for pressure differential and adhesive force, waterfall-climbing gobies might exhibit allometry for other muscular or skeletal components of the pelvic sucker that contribute to its adhesive function. In this study, we used anatomical dissections and modeling to evaluate the potential for allometric growth in the cross-sectional area, effective mechanical advantage (EMA), and force generating capacity of major protractor and retractor muscles of the pelvic sucker (m. protractor ischii and m. retractor ischii) that help to expand the sealed volume of the sucker to produce pressure differentials and adhesive force. We compared patterns for three Hawaiian gobiid species: a nonclimber (Stenogobius hawaiiensis), an ontogenetically limited climber (Awaous guamensis), and a proficient climber (Sicyopterus stimpsoni). Scaling patterns were relatively similar for all three species, typically exhibiting isometric or negatively allometric scaling for the muscles and lever systems examined. Although these scaling patterns do not help to explain the positive allometry of pressure differentials and adhesive force as climbing gobies grow, the best climber among the species we compared, S. stimpsoni, does exhibit the highest calculated estimates of EMA, muscular input force, and output force for pelvic sucker retraction at any body size, potentially facilitating its adhesive ability. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Establishing score equivalence of the Functional Independence Measure motor scale and the Barthel Index, utilising the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and Rasch measurement theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodinger, Birgit; O'Connor, Rory J; Stucki, Gerold; Tennant, Alan

    2017-05-16

    Two widely used outcome measures to assess functioning in neurological rehabilitation are the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) and the Barthel Index. The current study aims to establish the equivalence of the total score of the FIM™ motor scale and the Barthel Index through the application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and Rasch measurement theory. Secondary analysis of a large sample of patients with stroke, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis, undergoing rehabilitation was conducted. All patients were assessed at the same time on both the FIM™ and the Barthel Index. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Linking Rules were used to establish conceptual coherency between the 2 scales, and the Rasch measurement model to establish an exchange of the total scores. Using the FIM™ motor scale, items from both scales linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health d4 Mobility or d5 Self-care chapters. Their co-calibration satisfied the assumptions of the Rasch model for each of 3 diagnostic groups. A ceiling effect was observed for the Barthel Index when contrasted against the FIM™ motor scale. Having a Rasch interval metric to transform scores between the FIM™ motor scale and Barthel Index is valuable for monitoring functioning, meta-analysis, quality audits and hospital benchmarking.

  14. Validación de la Escala de Independencia Funcional Validation of the Functional Independence Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Martínez-Martín

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar la calidad psicométrica de un instrumento diseñado para medir la independencia funcional (Escala de Independencia Funcional, EIF en varios dominios de actividades de la vida diaria y ser aplicado por entrevistadores entrenados no expertos en el ámbito sanitario. El estudio se realizó en población mayor no institucionalizada residente en la Comunidad de Madrid. Métodos: Estudio transversal de validación. Se aplicaron la EIF, el test de Pfeiffer, la subescala de depresión de la Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, un indicador de comorbilidad, el Índice de Barthel y el EQ-5D, a población residente en medio comunitario (n=500 y a pacientes ambulatorios en medio hospitalario (n=100 de edad ≥65 años. Se analizaron los siguientes atributos psicométricos de la EIF: aceptabilidad, asunciones escalares, consistencia interna, validez de constructo y precisión. Resultados: La escala resultó totalmente computable en el 94,3% de los sujetos, con efecto techo (60,65% y sin efecto suelo (0,22% en el medio comunitario. En el medio hospitalario no se evidenció efecto suelo ni techo. La escala mostró asunciones escalares satisfactorias y elevada consistencia interna (correlaciones ítem-total: 0,57-0,91; alfa de Cronbach: 0,94, así como una estructura multidimensional (tres factores; 74,3% de la varianza. Los índices de validez convergente, interna y para grupos conocidos, al igual que la precisión (error estándar de la medida: 2,49; intervalo de confianza del 95%: 4,88 resultaron satisfactorios. Conclusiones: En suma, la EIF es una escala de uso sencillo con atributos métricos apropiados, y su aplicación por parte de personal no sanitario resulta útil para muestras amplias de individuos mayores no institucionalizados.Objective: To assess the psychometric quality of an instrument designed to measure functional independence (Functional Independence Scale [FIS] in several activities of daily living domains and to be

  15. Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, M.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Luo, J.; Carley, J.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Gentry, T.J.; Gu, B.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Criddle, C.S.; Zhou, J.

    2010-02-15

    A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 {micro}gl{sup -1}) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions.

  16. Large-scale Granger causality analysis on resting-state functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Zainul; Leistritz, Lutz; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate an approach to measure the information flow between each pair of time series in resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data of the human brain and subsequently recover its underlying network structure. By integrating dimensionality reduction into predictive time series modeling, large-scale Granger Causality (lsGC) analysis method can reveal directed information flow suggestive of causal influence at an individual voxel level, unlike other multivariate approaches. This method quantifies the influence each voxel time series has on every other voxel time series in a multivariate sense and hence contains information about the underlying dynamics of the whole system, which can be used to reveal functionally connected networks within the brain. To identify such networks, we perform non-metric network clustering, such as accomplished by the Louvain method. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach to recover the motor and visual cortex from resting state human brain fMRI data and compare it with the network recovered from a visuomotor stimulation experiment, where the similarity is measured by the Dice Coefficient (DC). The best DC obtained was 0.59 implying a strong agreement between the two networks. In addition, we thoroughly study the effect of dimensionality reduction in lsGC analysis on network recovery. We conclude that our approach is capable of detecting causal influence between time series in a multivariate sense, which can be used to segment functionally connected networks in the resting-state fMRI.

  17. The behaviour of 39 pesticides in surface waters as a function of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, P.D.; Larson, S.J.; Winterstein, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    A portion of applied pesticides runs off agricultural fields and is transported through surface waters. In this study, the behaviour of 39 pesticides is examined as a function of scale across 14 orders of magnitude from the field to the ocean. Data on pesticide loads in streams from two US Geological Survey programs were combined with literature data from field and watershed studies. The annual load as percent of use (LAPU) was quantified for each of the fields and watersheds and was used as the normalization factor across watersheds and compounds. The in-stream losses of each pesticide were estimated for a model stream with a 15 day travel time (similar in characteristics to the upper Mississippi River). These estimated in-stream losses agreed well with the observed changes in apparent LAPU values as a function of watershed area. In general, herbicides applied to the soil surface had the greatest LAPU values and minimal in-stream losses. Soil-incorporated herbicides had smaller LAPU values and substantial in-stream losses. Insecticides generally had LAPU values similar to the incorporated herbicides, but had more variation in their in-stream losses. On the basis of the LAPU values of the 39 pesticides as a function of watershed area, a generalized conceptual model of the movement of pesticides from the field to the ocean is suggested. The importance of considering both field runoff and in-stream losses is discussed in relation to interpreting monitoring data and making regulatory decisions.

  18. PedsQL gastrointestinal symptoms scales and gastrointestinal worry scales in pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases in comparison to healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary objective was to compare the gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and worry of pediatric patients with functional GI disorders (FGIDs) and organic GI diseases to healthy controls utilizing the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Worry Scales for patient s...

  19. Stochastic quantization and 1/N expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunelli, J.C. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mendes, R.S. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1992-10-01

    We study the 1/N expansion of field theories in the stochastic quantization method of Parisi and Wu using the supersymmetric functional approach. This formulation provides a systematic procedure to implement the 1/N expansion which resembles the ones used in the equilibrium. The 1/N perturbation theory for the non linear sigma model in two dimensions is worked out as an example. (author). 19 refs., 5 figs.

  20. The HI Content of Galaxies as a Function of Local Density and Large-Scale Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoreen, Henry; Cantwell, Kelly; Maloney, Erin; Cane, Thomas; Brough Morris, Theodore; Flory, Oscar; Raskin, Mark; Crone-Odekon, Mary; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    We examine the HI content of galaxies as a function of environment, based on a catalogue of 41527 galaxies that are part of the 70% complete Arecibo Legacy Fast-ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We use nearest-neighbor methods to characterize local environment, and a modified version of the algorithm developed for the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to classify large-scale environment as group, filament, tendril, or void. We compare the HI content in these environments using statistics that include both HI detections and the upper limits on detections from ALFALFA. The large size of the sample allows to statistically compare the HI content in different environments for early-type galaxies as well as late-type galaxies. This work is supported by NSF grants AST-1211005 and AST-1637339, the Skidmore Faculty-Student Summer Research program, and the Schupf Scholars program.

  1. Functionality enhancement of industrialized optical fiber sensors and system developed for full-scale pavement monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaping; Liu, Wanqiu; He, Jianping; Xing, Xiaoying; Cao, Dandan; Gao, Xipeng; Hao, Xiaowei; Cheng, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhi

    2014-05-19

    Pavements always play a predominant role in transportation. Health monitoring of pavements is becoming more and more significant, as frequently suffering from cracks, rutting, and slippage renders them prematurely out of service. Effective and reliable sensing elements are thus in high demand to make prognosis on the mechanical properties and occurrence of damage to pavements. Therefore, in this paper, various types of functionality enhancement of industrialized optical fiber sensors for pavement monitoring are developed, with the corresponding operational principles clarified in theory and the performance double checked by basic experiments. Furthermore, a self-healing optical fiber sensing network system is adopted to accomplish full-scale monitoring of pavements. The application of optical fiber sensors assembly and self-healing network system in pavement has been carried out to validate the feasibility. It has been proved that the research in this article provides a valuable method and meaningful guidance for the integrity monitoring of civil structures, especially pavements.

  2. Functionality Enhancement of Industrialized Optical Fiber Sensors and System Developed for Full-Scale Pavement Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pavements always play a predominant role in transportation. Health monitoring of pavements is becoming more and more significant, as frequently suffering from cracks, rutting, and slippage renders them prematurely out of service. Effective and reliable sensing elements are thus in high demand to make prognosis on the mechanical properties and occurrence of damage to pavements. Therefore, in this paper, various types of functionality enhancement of industrialized optical fiber sensors for pavement monitoring are developed, with the corresponding operational principles clarified in theory and the performance double checked by basic experiments. Furthermore, a self-healing optical fiber sensing network system is adopted to accomplish full-scale monitoring of pavements. The application of optical fiber sensors assembly and self-healing network system in pavement has been carried out to validate the feasibility. It has been proved that the research in this article provides a valuable method and meaningful guidance for the integrity monitoring of civil structures, especially pavements.

  3. The importance of different spatial scales in determining structural and functional characteristics of deep-sea infauna communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ingels

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The urge to understand spatial distributions of species and communities and their causative processes has continuously instigated the development and testing of conceptual models in spatial ecology. For the deep sea, there is evidence that structural and functional characteristics of benthic communities are regulated by a multitude of biotic and environmental processes that act in concert on different spatial scales, but the spatial patterns are poorly understood compared to those for terrestrial ecosystems. Deep-sea studies generally focus on very limited scale ranges, thereby impairing our understanding of which spatial scales and associated processes are most important in driving structural and functional diversity of communities. Here, we used an extensive integrated dataset of free-living nematodes from deep-sea sediments to unravel the importance of different spatial scales in determining benthic infauna communities. Multiple-factor multivariate permutational analyses were performed on different sets of community descriptors (structure, structural and functional diversity, standing stock. The different spatial scales investigated cover two margins in the northeast Atlantic, several submarine canyons/channel/slope areas, a bathymetrical range of 700–4300 m, different sampling locations at each station, and vertical sediment profiles. The results indicated that the most important spatial scale for structural and functional diversity and standing stock variability is the smallest one; infauna communities changed substantially more with differences between sediment depth layers than with differences associated to larger geographical or bathymetrical scales. Community structure differences were greatest between stations at both margins. Important regulating ecosystem processes and the scale on which they occur are discussed. The results imply that, if we are to improve our understanding of ecosystem patterns of deep-sea infauna and the

  4. Large-scale reorganization of corticofugal fibers after neonatal hemidecortication for functional restoration of forelimb movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahito; Vattanajun, Anusara; Umeda, Tatsuya; Isa, Kaoru; Isa, Tadashi

    2009-11-01

    As an experimental model to study the mechanism of large-scale network plasticity of the juvenile brain, functional compensation after neonatal brain damage was studied in rats that received unilateral decortication at postnatal day 5. These animals exhibited a marked ability in reaching and grasping movements in the contralesional side of the forelimb when tested at 10-14 weeks of age. Additional lesion of the sensorimotor cortex in the remaining contralesional hemisphere at this stage resulted in severe impairment of both forelimbs. It was suggested that the sensorimotor cortex on the contralesional side was controlling the movements of both forelimbs. Following the injection of an anterograde tracer into the remaining sensorimotor cortex, the corticofugal axons from the remaining sensorimotor cortex were found to issue aberrant projections to the contralateral red nucleus, contralateral superior colliculus, contralateral pontine nuclei, ipsilateral dorsal column nucleus and ipsilateral gray matter of the cervical spinal cord, all of which appeared to be necessary for the control of contralesional forelimb movements. These results suggest that the forelimb movements on the contralesional side were compensated by large-scale reorganization of the corticofugal axons from the remaining sensorimotor cortex.

  5. Ecosystem-scale fluxes in seminatural Pyrenean grasslands: role of annual dynamics of plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altimir, Nuria; Ibañez, Mercedes; Elbers, Jan; Rota, Cristina; Arias, Claudia; Carrara, Arnaud; Nogues, Salvador; Sebastia, Maria-Teresa

    2013-04-01

    The net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and the annual C balance of a site are in general modulated by light, temperature and availability of water and other resources to the plants. In grasslands, NEE is expected to depend strongly on the vegetation with a relationship that can be summarized by the above-ground biomass, its amount and dynamics. Any factor controlling the amount of green biomass is expected to have a strong impact on the short-term NEE, such as amount of solar radiation, water availability and grazing pressure. These controls are modulated differently depending on the plant functional type enduring them. Furthermore, as different guilds follow different functional strategies for optimization of the resources, they also present different patterns of change in their capacities such as photosynthetic fixation, belowground C allocation, and C loss via respiration. We examined these relationships at several semi-natural pastures to determine how the seasonal distribution of plant functional types is detected in the short-term ecosystem exchange and what role it plays. We have looked into these patterns to determine the general variation of key processes and whether different temporal patterns arise between different guilds. The study sites are in the Pyrenees, on the mountain pastures of La Bertolina, Alinyà, and Castellar at 1300, 1700, 1900 m a.s.l. respectively. We performed ecosystem-scale flux measurements by means of micrometeorologial stations combined with a thorough description of the vegetation including below- and above-ground biomass and leaf area as well as monitoring of natural abundance of C isotopes, discriminated by plant functional types. We present here the results of the study.

  6. Assessing depression related severity and functional impairment: the Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Ito

    Full Text Available The Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS is a brief, five-item measure for assessing the frequency and intensity of depressive symptoms, as well as functional impairments in pleasurable activities, work or school, and interpersonal relationships due to depression. Although this scale is expected to be useful in various psychiatric and mental health settings, the reliability, validity, and interpretability have not yet been fully examined. This study was designed to examine the reliability, factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of a Japanese version of the ODSIS, as well as its ability to distinguish between individuals with and without a major depressive disorder diagnosis.From a pool of registrants at an internet survey company, 2830 non-clinical and clinical participants were selected randomly (619 with major depressive disorder, 619 with panic disorder, 576 with social anxiety disorder, 645 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 371 non-clinical panelists. Participants were asked to respond to the ODSIS and conventional measures of depression, functional impairment, anxiety, neuroticism, satisfaction with life, and emotion regulation.Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of three split subsamples indicated the unidimensional factor structure of ODSIS. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed invariance of factor loadings between non-clinical and clinical subsamples. The ODSIS also showed excellent internal consistency and test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients. Convergence and discriminance of the ODSIS with various measures were in line with our expectations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the ODSIS was able to detect a major depressive syndrome accurately.This study supports the reliability and validity of ODSIS in a non-western population, which can be interpreted as demonstrating cross-cultural validity.

  7. Large-Scale Hypoconnectivity Between Resting-State Functional Networks in Unmedicated Adolescent Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchet, Matthew D; Ho, Tiffany C; Connolly, Colm G; Tymofiyeva, Olga; Lewinn, Kaja Z; Han, Laura Km; Blom, Eva H; Tapert, Susan F; Max, Jeffrey E; Frank, Guido Kw; Paulus, Martin P; Simmons, Alan N; Gotlib, Ian H; Yang, Tony T

    2016-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) often emerges during adolescence, a critical period of brain development. Recent resting-state fMRI studies of adults suggest that MDD is associated with abnormalities within and between resting-state networks (RSNs). Here we tested whether adolescent MDD is characterized by abnormalities in interactions among RSNs. Participants were 55 unmedicated adolescents diagnosed with MDD and 56 matched healthy controls. Functional connectivity was mapped using resting-state fMRI. We used the network-based statistic (NBS) to compare large-scale connectivity between groups and also compared the groups on graph metrics. We further assessed whether group differences identified using nodes defined from functionally defined RSNs were also evident when using anatomically defined nodes. In addition, we examined relations between network abnormalities and depression severity and duration. Finally, we compared intranetwork connectivity between groups and assessed the replication of previously reported MDD-related abnormalities in connectivity. The NBS indicated that, compared with controls, depressed adolescents exhibited reduced connectivity (pdepression was significantly correlated with reduced connectivity in this set of network interactions (p=0.020, corrected), specifically with reduced connectivity between components of the dorsal attention network. The dorsal attention network was also characterized by reduced intranetwork connectivity in the MDD group. Finally, we replicated previously reported abnormal connectivity in individuals with MDD. In summary, adolescents with MDD show hypoconnectivity between large-scale brain networks compared with healthy controls. Given that connectivity among these networks typically increases during adolescent neurodevelopment, these results suggest that adolescent depression is associated with abnormalities in neural systems that are still developing during this critical period.

  8. Simulating recurrent event data with hazard functions defined on a total time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn-Eimermacher, Antje; Ingel, Katharina; Ozga, Ann-Kathrin; Preussler, Stella; Binder, Harald

    2015-03-08

    In medical studies with recurrent event data a total time scale perspective is often needed to adequately reflect disease mechanisms. This means that the hazard process is defined on the time since some starting point, e.g. the beginning of some disease, in contrast to a gap time scale where the hazard process restarts after each event. While techniques such as the Andersen-Gill model have been developed for analyzing data from a total time perspective, techniques for the simulation of such data, e.g. for sample size planning, have not been investigated so far. We have derived a simulation algorithm covering the Andersen-Gill model that can be used for sample size planning in clinical trials as well as the investigation of modeling techniques. Specifically, we allow for fixed and/or random covariates and an arbitrary hazard function defined on a total time scale. Furthermore we take into account that individuals may be temporarily insusceptible to a recurrent incidence of the event. The methods are based on conditional distributions of the inter-event times conditional on the total time of the preceeding event or study start. Closed form solutions are provided for common distributions. The derived methods have been implemented in a readily accessible R script. The proposed techniques are illustrated by planning the sample size for a clinical trial with complex recurrent event data. The required sample size is shown to be affected not only by censoring and intra-patient correlation, but also by the presence of risk-free intervals. This demonstrates the need for a simulation algorithm that particularly allows for complex study designs where no analytical sample size formulas might exist. The derived simulation algorithm is seen to be useful for the simulation of recurrent event data that follow an Andersen-Gill model. Next to the use of a total time scale, it allows for intra-patient correlation and risk-free intervals as are often observed in clinical trial data

  9. Ultra-low thermal expansion realized in giant negative thermal expansion materials through self-compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fei-Ran; Kuang, Hao; Hu, Feng-Xia; Wu, Hui; Huang, Qing-Zhen; Liang, Fei-Xiang; Qiao, Kai-Ming; Li, Jia; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Lei; He, Min; Zhang, Ying; Zuo, Wen-Liang; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2017-10-01

    Materials with zero thermal expansion (ZTE) or precisely tailored thermal expansion are in urgent demand of modern industries. However, the overwhelming majority of materials show positive thermal expansion. To develop ZTE or negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials as compensators has become an important challenge. Here, we present the evidence for the realization of ultra-low thermal expansion in Mn-Co-Ge-In particles. The bulk with the Ni2In-type hexagonal structure undergoes giant NTE owing to a martensitic magnetostructural transition. The major finding is that the thermal expansion behavior can be totally controlled by modulating the crystallinity degree and phase transition from atomic scale. Self-compensation effect leads to ultra-low thermal expansion with a linear expansion coefficient as small as +0.68 × 10-6/K over a wide temperature range around room temperature. The present study opens an avenue to reach ZTE particularly from the large class of giant NTE materials based on phase transition.

  10. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Arabic version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnahdi, Ali H

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the factorial structure of the Arabic version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS-Ar) using a confirmatory factor analysis. The study was designed as a cross-sectional study in which individuals with lower extremity musculoskeletal disorders were recruited. During the testing session, participants completed the LEFS-Ar in addition to general information form and anthropometric measurements. A hypothesized one-factor structure underlying the 20 items of the LEFS-Ar was examined using a confirmatory factor analysis. The fit of the observed data to the hypothesized factorial structure was examined using multiple fit statistics including χ2, Tucker-Lewis index (TLI), comparative-fit index (CFI), and the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA). A total of 160 patients with lower extremity dysfunctions participated in this study. The fit statistics showed the following: χ2 goodness fit statistic=654.390 (d.f.=170, Pfactor structure proposed in this study. Examination of standardized residuals and modification indices pointed to areas of misfit within the model. The findings of the current study do not support the hypothesized one-factor structure of the LEFS-Ar and suggest that modifications are needed to the LEFS-Ar to yield a unidimensional measure of lower extremity function (i.e. activity limitation due to lower extremity dysfunction).

  11. Differential Item Functioning for Lesbians, Bisexual, and Heterosexual Women in the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnholz, Justin L.; Young, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed whether the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) functions equivalently in assessing depressive symptom severity in lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual women. Using differential item functioning methods, the authors examined (a) whether there is a bias in CES-D total scores and in individual item scores…

  12. Large-scale cortico-subcortical functional networks in focal epilepsies: The role of the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Výtvarová

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Focal epilepsies affect large-scale brain networks beyond the epileptogenic zones. Cortico-subcortical functional connectivity disturbance was displayed in LTLE, FLE, and POLE. Significant changes in the resting-state functional connectivity between cortical and subcortical structures suggest an important role of the BG and thalamus in focal epilepsies.

  13. The PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scales: preliminary reliability and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varni James W

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scales (PedsQL™ VAS were designed as an ecological momentary assessment (EMA instrument to rapidly measure present or at-the-moment functioning in children and adolescents. The PedsQL™ VAS assess child self-report and parent-proxy report of anxiety, sadness, anger, worry, fatigue, and pain utilizing six developmentally appropriate visual analogue scales based on the well-established Varni/Thompson Pediatric Pain Questionnaire (PPQ Pain Intensity VAS format. Methods The six-item PedsQL™ VAS was administered to 70 pediatric patients ages 5–17 and their parents upon admittance to the hospital environment (Time 1: T1 and again two hours later (Time 2: T2. It was hypothesized that the PedsQL™ VAS Emotional Distress Summary Score (anxiety, sadness, anger, worry and the fatigue VAS would demonstrate moderate to large effect size correlations with the PPQ Pain Intensity VAS, and that patient" parent concordance would increase over time. Results Test-retest reliability was demonstrated from T1 to T2 in the large effect size range. Internal consistency reliability was demonstrated for the PedsQL™ VAS Total Symptom Score (patient self-report: T1 alpha = .72, T2 alpha = .80; parent proxy-report: T1 alpha = .80, T2 alpha = .84 and Emotional Distress Summary Score (patient self-report: T1 alpha = .74, T2 alpha = .73; parent proxy-report: T1 alpha = .76, T2 alpha = .81. As hypothesized, the Emotional Distress Summary Score and Fatigue VAS were significantly correlated with the PPQ Pain VAS in the medium to large effect size range, and patient and parent concordance increased from T1 to T2. Conclusion The results demonstrate preliminary test-retest and internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the PedsQL™ Present Functioning VAS instrument for both pediatric patient self-report and parent proxy-report. Further field testing is required to extend these initial

  14. The PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scales: preliminary reliability and validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Sandra A; Eisen, Sarajane; Burwinkle, Tasha M; Varni, James W

    2006-01-01

    Background The PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scales (PedsQL™ VAS) were designed as an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) instrument to rapidly measure present or at-the-moment functioning in children and adolescents. The PedsQL™ VAS assess child self-report and parent-proxy report of anxiety, sadness, anger, worry, fatigue, and pain utilizing six developmentally appropriate visual analogue scales based on the well-established Varni/Thompson Pediatric Pain Questionnaire (PPQ) Pain Intensity VAS format. Methods The six-item PedsQL™ VAS was administered to 70 pediatric patients ages 5–17 and their parents upon admittance to the hospital environment (Time 1: T1) and again two hours later (Time 2: T2). It was hypothesized that the PedsQL™ VAS Emotional Distress Summary Score (anxiety, sadness, anger, worry) and the fatigue VAS would demonstrate moderate to large effect size correlations with the PPQ Pain Intensity VAS, and that patient" parent concordance would increase over time. Results Test-retest reliability was demonstrated from T1 to T2 in the large effect size range. Internal consistency reliability was demonstrated for the PedsQL™ VAS Total Symptom Score (patient self-report: T1 alpha = .72, T2 alpha = .80; parent proxy-report: T1 alpha = .80, T2 alpha = .84) and Emotional Distress Summary Score (patient self-report: T1 alpha = .74, T2 alpha = .73; parent proxy-report: T1 alpha = .76, T2 alpha = .81). As hypothesized, the Emotional Distress Summary Score and Fatigue VAS were significantly correlated with the PPQ Pain VAS in the medium to large effect size range, and patient and parent concordance increased from T1 to T2. Conclusion The results demonstrate preliminary test-retest and internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the PedsQL™ Present Functioning VAS instrument for both pediatric patient self-report and parent proxy-report. Further field testing is required to extend these initial findings to other

  15. Functional profiling of mercuric reductase (mer A genes in biofilm communities of a technical scale biocatalyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Canstein Harald

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial mercury resistance is based on enzymatic reduction of ionic mercury to elemental mercury and has recently been demonstrated to be applicable for industrial wastewater clean-up. The long-term monitoring of such biocatalyser systems requires a cultivation independent functional community profiling method targeting the key enzyme of the process, the merA gene coding for the mercuric reductase. We report on the development of a profiling method for merA and its application to monitor changes in the functional diversity of the biofilm community of a technical scale biocatalyzer over 8 months of on-site operation. Results Based on an alignment of 30 merA sequences from Gram negative bacteria, conserved primers were designed for amplification of merA fragments with an optimized PCR protocol. The resulting amplicons of approximately 280 bp were separated by thermogradient gelelectrophoresis (TGGE, resulting in strain specific fingerprints for mercury resistant Gram negative isolates with different merA sequences. The merA profiling of the biofilm community from a technical biocatalyzer showed persistence of some and loss of other inoculum strains as well as the appearance of new bands, resulting in an overall increase of the functional diversity of the biofilm community. One predominant new band of the merA community profile was also detected in a biocatalyzer effluent isolate, which was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolated strain showed lower mercury reduction rates in liquid culture than the inoculum strains but was apparently highly competitive in the biofilm environment of the biocatalyzer where moderate mercury levels were prevailing. Conclusions The merA profiling technique allowed to monitor the ongoing selection for better adapted strains during the operation of a biocatalyzer and to direct their subsequent isolation. In such a way, a predominant mercury reducing Ps. aeruginosa strain was identified by

  16. Wake Expansion Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Different models of wake expansion are presented in this chapter: the 1D momentum theory model, the cylinder analog model and Theodorsen’s model. Far wake models such as the ones from Frandsen or Rathmann or only briefly mentioned. The different models are compared to each other. Results from thi...... this chapter are used in Chap. 16 to link near-wake and far-wake parameters and in Chap. 20 to study the influence of expansion on tip-losses....

  17. Nuclear expansion with excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, J.N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Samaddar, S.K. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Vinas, X. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centelles, M. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: mario@ecm.ub.es

    2006-07-06

    The expansion of an isolated hot spherical nucleus with excitation energy and its caloric curve are studied in a thermodynamic model with the SkM{sup *} force as the nuclear effective two-body interaction. The calted results are shown to compare well with the recent experimental data from energetic nuclear collisions. The fluctuations in temperature and density are also studied. They are seen to build up very rapidly beyond an excitation energy of {approx}9 MeV/u. Volume-conserving quadrupole deformation in addition to expansion indicates, however, nuclear disassembly above an excitation energy of {approx}4 MeV/u.

  18. Uniform gradient expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giovannini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  19. Low-rank spectral expansions of two electron excitations for the acceleration of quantum chemistry calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Mazziotti, David A

    2012-12-28

    Treatment of two-electron excitations is a fundamental but computationally expensive part of ab initio calculations of many-electron correlation. In this paper we develop a low-rank spectral expansion of two-electron excitations for accelerated electronic-structure calculations. The spectral expansion differs from previous approaches by relying upon both (i) a sum of three expansions to increase the rank reduction of the tensor and (ii) a factorization of the tensor into geminal (rank-two) tensors rather than orbital (rank-one) tensors. We combine three spectral expansions from the three distinct forms of the two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM), (i) the two-particle (2)D, (ii) the two-hole (2)Q, and the (iii) particle-hole (2)G matrices, to produce a single spectral expansion with significantly accelerated convergence. While the resulting expansion is applicable to any quantum-chemistry calculation with two-particle excitation amplitudes, it is employed here in the parametric 2-RDM method [D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 253002 (2008)]. The low-rank parametric 2-RDM method scales quartically with the basis-set size, but like its full-rank version it can capture multi-reference correlation effects that are difficult to treat efficiently by traditional single-reference wavefunction methods. Applications are made to computing potential energy curves of HF and triplet OH(+), equilibrium bond distances and frequencies, the HCN-HNC isomerization, and the energies of hydrocarbon chains. Computed 2-RDMs nearly satisfy necessary N-representability conditions. The low-rank spectral expansion has the potential to expand the applicability of the parametric 2-RDM method as well as other ab initio methods to large-scale molecular systems that are often only treatable by mean-field or density functional theories.

  20. Measuring the relative resilience of subarctic lakes to global change: redundancies of functions within and across temporal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Johnson, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    1. Ecosystems at high altitudes and latitudes are expected to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of global change. We assessed the responses of littoral invertebrate communities to changing abiotic conditions in subarctic Swedish lakes with long-term data (1988–2010) and compared the responses of subarctic lakes with those of more southern, hemiboreal lakes. 2. We used a complex systems approach, based on multivariate time-series modelling, and identified dominant and distinct temporal frequencies in the data; that is, we tracked community change at distinct temporal scales. We determined the distribution of functional feeding groups of invertebrates within and across temporal scales. Within and cross-scale distributions of functions have been considered to confer resilience to ecosystems, despite changing environmental conditions. 3. Two patterns of temporal change within the invertebrate communities were identified that were consistent across the lakes. The first pattern was one of monotonic change associated with changing abiotic lake conditions. The second was one of showing fluctuation patterns largely unrelated to gradual environmental change. Thus, two dominant and distinct temporal frequencies (temporal scales) were present in all lakes analysed. 4. Although the contribution of individual feeding groups varied between subarctic and hemiboreal lakes, they shared overall similar functional attributes (richness, evenness, diversity) and redundancies of functions within and between the observed temporal scales. This highlights similar resilience characteristics in subarctic and hemiboreal lakes. 5. Synthesis and applications. The effects of global change can be particularly strong at a single scale in ecosystems. Over time, this can cause monotonic change in communities and eventually lead to a loss of important ecosystem services upon reaching a critical threshold. Dynamics at other spatial or temporal scales can be unrelated to environmental change

  1. Large-scale parallel surface functionalization of goblet-type whispering gallery mode microcavity arrays for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bog, Uwe; Brinkmann, Falko; Kalt, Heinz; Koos, Christian; Mappes, Timo; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Köber, Sebastian

    2014-10-15

    A novel surface functionalization technique is presented for large-scale selective molecule deposition onto whispering gallery mode microgoblet cavities. The parallel technique allows damage-free individual functionalization of the cavities, arranged on-chip in densely packaged arrays. As the stamp pad a glass slide is utilized, bearing phospholipids with different functional head groups. Coated microcavities are characterized and demonstrated as biosensors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A physiologically based, multi-scale model of skeletal muscle structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrle, O; Davidson, J B; Pullan, A J

    2012-01-01

    Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle's response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modeling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle's response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modeling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibers and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor-unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behavior of single muscle fibers within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenization. The effect of homogenization has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibers and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the tibialis anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modeling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behavior ranging from motor-unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue.

  3. Landscape Connectivity as a Function of Scale and Organism Vagility in a Real Forested Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. D'Eon

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Landscape connectivity is considered a vital element of landscape structure because of its importance to population survival. The difficulty surrounding the notion of landscape connectivity is that it must be assessed at the scale of the interaction between an organism and the landscape. We present a unique method for measuring connectivity between patches as a function of organism vagility. We used this approach to assess connectivity between harvest, old-growth, and recent wildfire patches in a real forested landscape in southeast British Columbia. By varying a distance criterion, habitat patches were considered connected and formed habitat clusters if they fell within this critical distance. The amount of area and distance to edge within clusters at each critical distance formed the basis of connectivity between patches. We then assessed landscape connectivity relative to old-growth associates within our study area based on species' dispersal abilities. Connectivity was greatest between harvest patches, followed by old-growth, and then wildfire patches. In old-growth patches, we found significant trends between increased connectivity and increased total habitat amount, and between decreased connectivity and increased old-growth harvesting. Highly vagile old-growth associates, such as carnivorous birds, perceive this landscape as connected and are able to access all patches. Smaller, less vagile species, such as woodpeckers, chickadees, and nuthatches, may be affected by a lack of landscape connectivity at the scale of their interaction with old-growth patches. Of particular concern is the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus, which we predict is limited in this landscape due to relatively weak dispersal abilities.

  4. A physiologically based, multi-scale model of skeletal muscle structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eRöhrle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle's response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modelling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle's response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modelling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibres and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behaviour of single muscle fibres within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenisation. The effect of homogenisation has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibres and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the Tibialis Anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modelling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behaviour ranging from motor unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue.

  5. Palmitoylation of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is critical for its functional cooperation with SP-B to sustain compression/expansion dynamics in cholesterol-containing surfactant films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Florian; Ospina, Olga L; Mingarro, Ismael; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2010-11-17

    Recent data suggest that a functional cooperation between surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C may be required to sustain a proper compression-expansion dynamics in the presence of physiological proportions of cholesterol. SP-C is a dually palmitoylated polypeptide of 4.2 kDa, but the role of acylation in SP-C activity is not completely understood. In this work we have compared the behavior of native palmitoylated SP-C and recombinant nonpalmitoylated versions of SP-C produced in bacteria to get a detailed insight into the importance of the palmitic chains to optimize interfacial performance of cholesterol-containing surfactant films. We found that palmitoylation of SP-C is not essential for the protein to promote rapid interfacial adsorption of phospholipids to equilibrium surface tensions (∼22 mN/m), in the presence or absence of cholesterol. However, palmitoylation of SP-C is critical for cholesterol-containing films to reach surface tensions ≤1 mN/m at the highest compression rates assessed in a captive bubble surfactometer, in the presence of SP-B. Interestingly, the ability of SP-C to facilitate reinsertion of phospholipids during expansion was not impaired to the same extent in the absence of palmitoylation, suggesting the existence of palmitoylation-dependent and -independent functions of the protein. We conclude that palmitoylation is key for the functional cooperation of SP-C with SP-B that enables cholesterol-containing surfactant films to reach very low tensions under compression, which could be particularly important in the design of clinical surfactants destined to replacement therapies in pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Copyright © 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. AUTO-EXPANSIVE FLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physics suggests that the interplay of momentum, continuity, and geometry in outward radial flow must produce density and concomitant pressure reductions. In other words, this flow is intrinsically auto-expansive. It has been proposed that this process is the key to understanding...

  7. Rethinking expansive learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Lundh Snis, Ulrika

    discussion forum on Google groups, they created new ways of reflecting and learning. We used netnography to select qualitative postings from the online community and expansive learning concepts for data analysis. The findings show how students changed practices of organisational learning...

  8. Cross-Cultural adaptation of the General Functioning Scale of the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Thiago; Assis, Simone Gonçalves de; Avanci, Joviana Quintes; Pesce, Renata Pires

    2016-06-27

    To describe the process of cross-cultural adaptation of the General Functioning Scale of the Family, a subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device, for the Brazilian population. The General Functioning Scale of the Family was translated into Portuguese and administered to 500 guardians of children in the second grade of elementary school in public schools of Sao Gonçalo, Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil. The types of equivalences investigated were: conceptual and of items, semantic, operational, and measurement. The study involved discussions with experts, translations and back-translations of the instrument, and psychometric assessment. Reliability and validity studies were carried out by internal consistency testing (Cronbach's alpha), Guttman split-half correlation model, Pearson correlation coefficient, and confirmatory factor analysis. Associations between General Functioning of the Family and variables theoretically associated with the theme (father's or mother's drunkenness and violence between parents) were estimated by odds ratio. Semantic equivalence was between 90.0% and 100%. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.79 to 0.81, indicating good internal consistency of the instrument. Pearson correlation coefficient ranged between 0.303 and 0.549. Statistical association was found between the general functioning of the family score and the theoretically related variables, as well as good fit quality of the confirmatory analysis model. The results indicate the feasibility of administering the instrument to the Brazilian population, as it is easy to understand and a good measurement of the construct of interest. Descrever o processo de adaptação transcultural da escala de Funcionamento Geral da Família, subescala da McMaster Family Assessment Device, para a população brasileira. A escala de Funcionamento Geral da Família, original no idioma inglês, foi traduzida para o português e aplicada a 500 responsáveis de crianças do segundo ano do ensino

  9. Differential Item Functioning of the Psychological Domain of the Menopause Rating Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Monterrosa-Castro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Quality of life could be quantified with the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS, which evaluates the severity of somatic, psychological, and urogenital symptoms in menopause. However, differential item functioning (DIF analysis has not been applied previously. Objective. To establish the DIF of the psychological domain of the MRS in Colombian women. Methods. 4,009 women aged between 40 and 59 years, who participated in the CAVIMEC (Calidad de Vida en la Menopausia y Etnias Colombianas project, were included. Average age was 49.0±5.9 years. Women were classified in mestizo, Afro-Colombian, and indigenous. The results were presented as averages and standard deviation (X±SD. A p value <0.001 was considered statistically significant. Results. In mestizo women, the highest X±SD were obtained in physical and mental exhaustion (PME (0.86±0.93 and the lowest ones in anxiety (0.44±0.79. In Afro-Colombian women, an average score of 0.99±1.07 for PME and 0.63±0.88 for anxiety was gotten. Indigenous women obtained an increased average score for PME (1.33±0.93. The lowest score was evidenced in depressive mood (0.50±0.81, which is different from other Colombian women (p<0.001. Conclusions. The psychological items of the MRS show differential functioning according to the ethnic group, which may induce systematic error in the measurement of the construct.

  10. Psychometric properties of the Female Sexual Function Index in the visual analogue scale format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpe, Raquel E; Queiroz, Ana P A; Zomkowski, Kamilla; Sperandio, Fabiana F

    2017-04-07

    The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) is the gold standard for evaluating female sexual function, yet it has not been validated in a visual analogue scale (VAS) format. The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of the FSFI applied to the VAS. Methods: The study was conducted in three phases. In Phase 1, the instrument was adapted by two independent researchers, generating two versions, which were evaluated by a committee of six experts. The FSFI-VAS, resulting from this first phase, was used in a pilot study with 45 women. In Phase 2, the FSFI-Likert (original format) and FSFI-VAS questionnaires were administered to 246 women recruited to the study. Tests of reproducibility (test-retest/phase 3), internal consistency, discriminant validity and construct validity were applied. Results: In Phase 1, the pilot study showed that there were no doubts and difficulties completing the FSFI-VAS. In Phase 2, the Spearman rank (validity) test showed high correlation between the total scores on the FSFI-Likert and FSFI-VAS (0.87). The results of the internal consistency test were between 0.66 and 0.88, and the results of the construct validity test indicated a good value (0.73). The discriminant validity test was also appropriate. In Phase 3, the lowest intraclass correlation coefficient value was 0.81. Conclusion: The FSFI-VAS has internal consistency, construct validity, discriminant validity and reproducibility adequate to assess female sexual dysfunction in young women.

  11. Differential Item Functioning of the Psychological Domain of the Menopause Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela-Buelvas, Katherin; Oviedo, Heidi C.; Herazo, Edwin; Campo-Arias, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quality of life could be quantified with the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS), which evaluates the severity of somatic, psychological, and urogenital symptoms in menopause. However, differential item functioning (DIF) analysis has not been applied previously. Objective. To establish the DIF of the psychological domain of the MRS in Colombian women. Methods. 4,009 women aged between 40 and 59 years, who participated in the CAVIMEC (Calidad de Vida en la Menopausia y Etnias Colombianas) project, were included. Average age was 49.0 ± 5.9 years. Women were classified in mestizo, Afro-Colombian, and indigenous. The results were presented as averages and standard deviation (X ± SD). A p value <0.001 was considered statistically significant. Results. In mestizo women, the highest X ± SD were obtained in physical and mental exhaustion (PME) (0.86 ± 0.93) and the lowest ones in anxiety (0.44 ± 0.79). In Afro-Colombian women, an average score of 0.99 ± 1.07 for PME and 0.63 ± 0.88 for anxiety was gotten. Indigenous women obtained an increased average score for PME (1.33 ± 0.93). The lowest score was evidenced in depressive mood (0.50 ± 0.81), which is different from other Colombian women (p < 0.001). Conclusions. The psychological items of the MRS show differential functioning according to the ethnic group, which may induce systematic error in the measurement of the construct. PMID:27847825

  12. Differential Item Functioning of the Psychological Domain of the Menopause Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa-Castro, Alvaro; Portela-Buelvas, Katherin; Oviedo, Heidi C; Herazo, Edwin; Campo-Arias, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quality of life could be quantified with the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS), which evaluates the severity of somatic, psychological, and urogenital symptoms in menopause. However, differential item functioning (DIF) analysis has not been applied previously. Objective . To establish the DIF of the psychological domain of the MRS in Colombian women. Methods . 4,009 women aged between 40 and 59 years, who participated in the CAVIMEC (Calidad de Vida en la Menopausia y Etnias Colombianas) project, were included. Average age was 49.0 ± 5.9 years. Women were classified in mestizo, Afro-Colombian, and indigenous. The results were presented as averages and standard deviation ( X ± SD). A p value <0.001 was considered statistically significant. Results . In mestizo women, the highest X ± SD were obtained in physical and mental exhaustion (PME) (0.86 ± 0.93) and the lowest ones in anxiety (0.44 ± 0.79). In Afro-Colombian women, an average score of 0.99 ± 1.07 for PME and 0.63 ± 0.88 for anxiety was gotten. Indigenous women obtained an increased average score for PME (1.33 ± 0.93). The lowest score was evidenced in depressive mood (0.50 ± 0.81), which is different from other Colombian women ( p < 0.001). Conclusions . The psychological items of the MRS show differential functioning according to the ethnic group, which may induce systematic error in the measurement of the construct.

  13. Large-scale analysis of intrinsic disorder flavors and associated functions in the protein sequence universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necci, Marco; Piovesan, Damiano; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-12-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) in proteins has been extensively described for the last decade; a large-scale classification of ID in proteins is mostly missing. Here, we provide an extensive analysis of ID in the protein universe on the UniProt database derived from sequence-based predictions in MobiDB. Almost half the sequences contain an ID region of at least five residues. About 9% of proteins have a long ID region of over 20 residues which are more abundant in Eukaryotic organisms and most frequently cover less than 20% of the sequence. A small subset of about 67,000 (out of over 80 million) proteins is fully disordered and mostly found in Viruses. Most proteins have only one ID, with short ID evenly distributed along the sequence and long ID overrepresented in the center. The charged residue composition of Das and Pappu was used to classify ID proteins by structural propensities and corresponding functional enrichment. Swollen Coils seem to be used mainly as structural components and in biosynthesis in both Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes. In Bacteria, they are confined in the nucleoid and in Viruses provide DNA binding function. Coils & Hairpins seem to be specialized in ribosome binding and methylation activities. Globules & Tadpoles bind antigens in Eukaryotes but are involved in killing other organisms and cytolysis in Bacteria. The Undefined class is used by Bacteria to bind toxic substances and mediate transport and movement between and within organisms in Viruses. Fully disordered proteins behave similarly, but are enriched for glycine residues and extracellular structures. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  14. Social functioning in Chinese college students with and without schizotypal personality traits: an exploratory study of the Chinese version of the First Episode Social Functioning Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The First Episode Social Functioning Scale (FESFS was designed to measure social functioning of young individuals with schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to validate a Chinese version of the FESFS in a sample of young Chinese adults. METHOD: The FESFS was translated to Chinese prior to being administered to 1576 college students. The factor structure, reliability, and validity of the scale were examined. RESULTS: Two items were deleted after item analysis and the internal consistency of the whole scale was .89. A six-factor structure was derived by exploratory factor analysis. The factors were interpersonal, family and friends, school, living skills, intimacy, and balance. Estimates of the structural equation model supported this structure, with Goodness of Fit Chi-Square χ(2 = 1097.53 (p<0.0001, the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA = 0.058, and the comparative fit index (CFI = 0.93. Scale validity was supported by significant correlations between social functioning factors scores and schizophrenia personality questionnaire (SPQ scores. Individuals with schizotypal personality features presented poorer social functioning than those without schizotypal personality features. CONCLUSIONS: The Chinese revised version of the FESFS was found to have good psychometric properties and could be used in the future to examine social functioning in Chinese college students.

  15. Functionalized Carbon Nano-scale Drug Delivery Systems From Biowaste Sago Bark For Cancer Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Manaf, Shoriya Aruni; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Mandal, Uttam Kumar; Wui, Tin Wong; Roy, Partha

    2017-01-01

    Nano-scale carbon systems are emerging alternatives in drug delivery and bioimaging applications of which they gradually replace the quantum dots characterized by toxic heavy metal content in the latter application. The work intended to use carbon nanospheres synthesized from biowaste Sago bark for cancer cell imaging applications. This study synthesised carbon nanospheres from biowaste Sago bark using a catalyst-free pyrolysis technique. The nanospheres were functionalized with fluorescent dye coumarin-6 for cell imaging. Fluorescent nanosytems were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X ray, photon correlation spectroscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The average size of carbon nanospheres ranged between 30 and 40 nm with zeta potential of -26.8 ± 1.87 mV. The percentage viability of cancer cells on exposure to nanospheres varied from 91- 89 % for N2a cells and 90-85 % for A-375 cells respectively. Speedy uptake of the fluorescent nanospheres in both N2a and A-375 cells was observed within two hours of exposure. Novel fluorescent carbon nanosystem design following waste-to-wealth approach exhibited promising potential in cancer cell imaging applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Reliability of the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale in young children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krosschell, Kristin J; Scott, Charles B; Maczulski, Jo Anne; Lewelt, Aga J; Reyna, Sandra P; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2011-08-01

    The test-retest reliability of the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (MHFMS) in children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) ≤30 months of age was assessed. The age at which typically developing children (TD) achieve maximum MHFMS scores was also studied. Twenty-two children with SMA type II [mean age (SD) = 20 (5) months, range 9-30 months) were tested twice using the MHFMS. Twenty-five TD children [mean age (SD) = 18 (7) months, range 9-30 months) were tested once. The average difference between MHFMS scores for SMA children was 0.18 [first assessment: mean (SD) = 12.8 (9.8); second assessment: mean (SD) = 13.0 (8.8)]. Reliability was excellent (ICC(1,3) = 0.96, SEM 1.86). TD participants had MHFMS scores ranging from 36 to 40 [mean (SD) = 39.2 (1.2)] and achieved maximum test scores at 12 months of age. MHFMS scores in young children with SMA type II showed excellent test-retest stability. This suggests that the MHFMS can be used reliably in this younger population for clinical trials and follow-up. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Functional Dysphagia Scale Is a Useful Tool for Predicting Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Sook Joung; Chun, Sang Myung; Jung, Sung Moon

    2016-06-01

    To describe the correlation between the functional dysphagia scale and aspiration pneumonia and which characteristics influence the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. Fifty-three patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease were prospectively evaluated in this study. Disease severity and functional status were measured by modified Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) staging, Schwab and England activities of daily living (S-E ADL) scale and Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE). Swallowing function was evaluated by the functional dysphagia scale (FDS) and the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) based on a videofluoroscopic swallowing study. The patients were followed up for 3 months and divided into two groups according to the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia. The correlation between the variables and aspiration pneumonia was analyzed. Eight patients of the 53 patients were allocated to the aspiration pneumonia group and 45 patients to the non-aspiration pneumonia group. The patients in the aspiration pneumonia group had significantly higher H&Y staging, and scored lower on S-E ADL scale and K-MMSE. The patients in the aspiration pneumonia group had significantly higher scores on FDS and PAS. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the S-E ADL scale and the FDS were associated with the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia in the patients with Parkinson disease. Given that the FDS can quantitatively assess the functional problems associated with dysphagia, it can be clinically effective in predicting the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia, and the FDS and the S-E ADL scale could be predictive variables for aspiration pneumonia in patients with Parkinson disease.

  18. On orthogonal expansions of the space of vector functions which are square-summable over a given domain and the vector analysis operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykhovskiy, E. B.; Smirnov, N. V.

    1983-01-01

    The Hilbert space L2(omega) of vector functions is studied. A breakdown of L2(omega) into orthogonal subspaces is discussed and the properties of the operators for projection onto these subspaces are investigated from the standpoint of preserving the differential properties of the vectors being projected. Finally, the properties of the operators are examined.

  19. Locally-smeared operator product expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostantinos

    2014-12-01

    We propose a "locally-smeared Operator Product Expansion" (sOPE) to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of locally-smeared operators. The sOPE formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements of smeared degrees of freedom, determined numerically using the gradient flow, to non-local operators in the continuum. The nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale prevents a simple connection to the standard operator product expansion and therefore requires the construction of a two-scale formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach using the example of real scalar field theory.

  20. Co-stimulation through 4-1BB/CD137 improves the expansion and function of CD8(+ melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ann Chacon

    Full Text Available Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL can induce tumor regression in up to 50% or more of patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma. However, current methods to expand melanoma TIL, especially the "rapid expansion protocol" (REP were not designed to enhance the generation of optimal effector-memory CD8(+ T cells for infusion. One approach to this problem is to manipulate specific co-stimulatory signaling pathways to enhance CD8(+ effector-memory T-cell expansion. In this study, we determined the effects of activating the TNF-R family member 4-1BB/CD137, specifically induced in activated CD8(+ T cells, on the yield, phenotype, and functional activity of expanded CD8(+ T cells during the REP. We found that CD8(+ TIL up-regulate 4-1BB expression early during the REP after initial TCR stimulation, but neither the PBMC feeder cells in the REP or the activated TIL expressed 4-1BB ligand. However, addition of an exogenous agonistic anti-4-1BB IgG4 (BMS 663513 to the REP significantly enhanced the frequency and total yield of CD8(+ T cells as well as their maintenance of CD28 and increased their anti-tumor CTL activity. Gene expression analysis found an increase in bcl-2 and survivin expression induced by 4-1BB that was associated with an enhanced survival capability of CD8(+ post-REP TIL when re-cultured in the absence or presence of cytokines. Our findings suggest that adding an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody during the time of TIL REP initiation produces a CD8(+ T cell population capable of improved effector function and survival. This may greatly improve TIL persistence and anti-tumor activity in vivo after adoptive transfer into patients.

  1. Co-Stimulation through 4-1BB/CD137 Improves the Expansion and Function of CD8+ Melanoma Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes for Adoptive T-Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Jessica Ann; Wu, Richard C.; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Sarnaik, Amod; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Weber, Jeffrey; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) can induce tumor regression in up to 50% or more of patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma. However, current methods to expand melanoma TIL, especially the “rapid expansion protocol” (REP) were not designed to enhance the generation of optimal effector-memory CD8+ T cells for infusion. One approach to this problem is to manipulate specific co-stimulatory signaling pathways to enhance CD8+ effector-memory T-cell expansion. In this study, we determined the effects of activating the TNF-R family member 4-1BB/CD137, specifically induced in activated CD8+ T cells, on the yield, phenotype, and functional activity of expanded CD8+ T cells during the REP. We found that CD8+ TIL up-regulate 4-1BB expression early during the REP after initial TCR stimulation, but neither the PBMC feeder cells in the REP or the activated TIL expressed 4-1BB ligand. However, addition of an exogenous agonistic anti-4-1BB IgG4 (BMS 663513) to the REP significantly enhanced the frequency and total yield of CD8+ T cells as well as their maintenance of CD28 and increased their anti-tumor CTL activity. Gene expression analysis found an increase in bcl-2 and survivin expression induced by 4-1BB that was associated with an enhanced survival capability of CD8+ post-REP TIL when re-cultured in the absence or presence of cytokines. Our findings suggest that adding an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody during the time of TIL REP initiation produces a CD8+ T cell population capable of improved effector function and survival. This may greatly improve TIL persistence and anti-tumor activity in vivo after adoptive transfer into patients. PMID:23560068

  2. Co-stimulation through 4-1BB/CD137 improves the expansion and function of CD8(+) melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Jessica Ann; Wu, Richard C; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Sarnaik, Amod; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Weber, Jeffrey; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) can induce tumor regression in up to 50% or more of patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma. However, current methods to expand melanoma TIL, especially the "rapid expansion protocol" (REP) were not designed to enhance the generation of optimal effector-memory CD8(+) T cells for infusion. One approach to this problem is to manipulate specific co-stimulatory signaling pathways to enhance CD8(+) effector-memory T-cell expansion. In this study, we determined the effects of activating the TNF-R family member 4-1BB/CD137, specifically induced in activated CD8(+) T cells, on the yield, phenotype, and functional activity of expanded CD8(+) T cells during the REP. We found that CD8(+) TIL up-regulate 4-1BB expression early during the REP after initial TCR stimulation, but neither the PBMC feeder cells in the REP or the activated TIL expressed 4-1BB ligand. However, addition of an exogenous agonistic anti-4-1BB IgG4 (BMS 663513) to the REP significantly enhanced the frequency and total yield of CD8(+) T cells as well as their maintenance of CD28 and increased their anti-tumor CTL activity. Gene expression analysis found an increase in bcl-2 and survivin expression induced by 4-1BB that was associated with an enhanced survival capability of CD8(+) post-REP TIL when re-cultured in the absence or presence of cytokines. Our findings suggest that adding an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody during the time of TIL REP initiation produces a CD8(+) T cell population capable of improved effector function and survival. This may greatly improve TIL persistence and anti-tumor activity in vivo after adoptive transfer into patients.

  3. Using the Zeldovich dynamics to test expansion schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valageas, P.

    2007-12-01

    Aims:We apply various expansion schemes that may be used to study gravitational clustering to the simple case of the Zeldovich dynamics. Methods: Using the well-known exact solution of the Zeldovich dynamics we can compare the predictions of these various perturbative methods with the exact nonlinear result. We can also study their convergence properties and their behavior at high orders. Results: We find that most systematic expansions fail to recover the decay of the response function in the highly nonlinear regime. “Linear methods” lead to increasingly fast growth in the nonlinear regime for higher orders, except for Padé approximants that give a bounded response at any order. “Nonlinear methods” manage to obtain some damping at one-loop order but they fail at higher orders. Although it recovers the exact Gaussian damping, a resummation in the high-k limit is not justified very well as the generation of nonlinear power does not originate from a finite range of wavenumbers (hence there is no simple separation of scales). No method is able to recover the relaxation of the matter power spectrum on highly nonlinear scales. It is possible to impose a Gaussian cutoff in a somewhat ad-hoc fashion to reproduce the behavior of the exact two-point functions for two different times. However, this cutoff is not directly related to the clustering of matter and disappears in exact equal-time statistics such as the matter power spectrum. On a quantitative level, on weakly nonlinear scales, the usual perturbation theory, and the nonlinear scheme to which one adds an ansatz for the response function with such a Gaussian cutoff, are the two most efficient methods. We can expect these results to hold for the gravitational dynamics as well (this has been explicitly checked at one-loop order), since the structure of the equations of motion is identical for both dynamics.

  4. Self-Reported Graphic Personal and Social Performance Scale (SRG-PSP) for measuring functionality in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei Bai, Ya; Li, Cheng-Ta; Chen, Mu-Hong; Kuang Yang, Yen

    2017-06-01

    The self-reported graphic version of the Personal and Social Performance Scale (SRG-PSP) is the first graphic, self-reported rating scale that assesses functioning, and its reliability and validity have been documented in patients with schizophrenia. This study investigated the validity of SRG-PSP in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Patients with BD were recruited from psychiatric outpatient clinics, and assessed with the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI)-Bipolar and CGI-Depression, the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), the Global assessment of function (GAF), and the PSP. All participants completed the self-rating questionnaires: the SRG-PSP, the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Sheehan disability Scale (SDS). In total, 114 patients with BD were enrolled. The criterion-related validities between the SRG-PSP and the PSP were all significantly correlated with their counterparts. The global score of the SRG-PSP was significantly correlated with the scores of the YMRS, MADRS, PANSS, CGI-Depression, GAF, SF-36, and SDS. Three SRG-PSP domains (socially useful activities, personal and social relationships, and self-care) were negatively correlated with the scores of the MADRS, PANSS, CGI-depression, and SDS; and were positively correlated with the GAF, SF-36 scores. The disturbing and aggressive behavior domain was positively correlated with the scores of the YMRS, MADRS, PANSS, CGI-Bipolar, CGI-Depression, and SDS; and was negatively correlated with the GAF, SF-36 scores (all p<0.01). The SRG-PSP is a validated self-reported scale for assessing functionality in patients with BD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A Conditional Fourier-Feynman Transform and Conditional Convolution Product with Change of Scales on a Function Space II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hyun Cho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a simple formula for conditional expectations over continuous paths, we will evaluate conditional expectations which are types of analytic conditional Fourier-Feynman transforms and conditional convolution products of generalized cylinder functions and the functions in a Banach algebra which is the space of generalized Fourier transforms of the measures on the Borel class of L2[0,T]. We will then investigate their relationships. Particularly, we prove that the conditional transform of the conditional convolution product can be expressed by the product of the conditional transforms of each function. Finally we will establish change of scale formulas for the conditional transforms and the conditional convolution products. In these evaluation formulas and change of scale formulas, we use multivariate normal distributions so that the conditioning function does not contain present positions of the paths.

  6. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  7. IKEA's International Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Harapiak, Clayton

    2013-01-01

    This case concerns a global retailing firm that is dealing with strategic management and marketing issues. Applying a scenario of international expansion, this case provides a thorough analysis of the current business environment for IKEA. Utilizing a variety of methods (e.g. SWOT, PESTLE, McKinsey Matrix) the overall objective is to provide students with the opportunity to apply their research skills and knowledge regarding a highly competitive industry to develop strategic marketing strateg...

  8. Development and preliminary validation of a new scale to assess functional ability of older population in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Aarti; Gadhave, Swapnil; Kulkarni, Shruti

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the decline in functional ability and preventing disability is the critical element of the quality of life of an old age. However, the lack of contextual scale to assess the decline in functional capacity is a major issue. Objective of this study is to design the functional ability assessment scale for elderly people in India and test its psychometric properties. Random sample of 659 individuals above 60 years of age from western part of India was recruited. This paper outlines the construction, reliability and validity of a newly developed 14 item scale named as Pune-Functional Ability Assessment Tool (Pune-FAAT). The factors were extracted using the principal component analysis. Two-factor-structure of scale was accepted after applying the K1 rule, scree plot and parallel analysis method. The two factor structure yielded variance of 64.4%. The psychometric properties of the scale were examined using confirmatory factor analysis. The scale has an excellent reliability (Cronbach's α 0.928) and very good test-retest reliability (r=0.884). Each subscale demonstrated good internal consistency (Subscale I - Cronbach's α 0.938 and Subscale II - Cronbach's α 0.762). Excellent convergent validity with Standford's health assessment questionnaire (r=0.959). Discriminant validity was very good as FAAT index showed significant difference in young adults (mean±SD 1.11±0.24) and older adults (mean±SD 1.69±0.70). This new measure is a potentially valuable research tool for investigating older adult's functional ability to perform basic and complex daily activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure-mechanical function relations at nano-scale in heat-affected human dental tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A; Le Bourhis, Eric; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2014-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanical properties of dental materials related to their hierarchical structure is essential for understanding and predicting the effect of microstructural alterations on the performance of dental tissues in the context of forensic and archaeological investigation as well as laser irradiation treatment of caries. So far, few studies have focused on the nano-scale structure-mechanical function relations of human teeth altered by chemical or thermal treatment. The response of dental tissues to thermal treatment is thought to be strongly affected by the mineral crystallite size, their spatial arrangement and preferred orientation. In this study, synchrotron-based small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques were used to investigate the micro-structural alterations (mean crystalline thickness, crystal perfection and degree of alignment) of heat-affected dentine and enamel in human dental teeth. Additionally, nanoindentation mapping was applied to detect the spatial and temperature-dependent nano-mechanical properties variation. The SAXS/WAXS results revealed that the mean crystalline thickness distribution in dentine was more uniform compared with that in enamel. Although in general the mean crystalline thickness increased both in dentine and enamel as the temperature increased, the local structural variations gradually reduced. Meanwhile, the hardness and reduced modulus in enamel decreased as the temperature increased, while for dentine, the tendency reversed at high temperature. The analysis of the correlation between the ultrastructure and mechanical properties coupled with the effect of temperature demonstrates the effect of mean thickness and orientation on the local variation of mechanical property. This structural-mechanical property alteration is likely to be due to changes of HAp crystallites, thus dentine and enamel exhibit different responses at different temperatures. Our results enable an improved understanding of

  10. Explaining forest productivity using tree functional traits and phylogenetic information: two sides of the same coin over evolutionary scale?

    OpenAIRE

    Paquette, Alain; Joly, Simon; Messier, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Given evidences that diverse ecosystems provide more services than depauperate ones, much attention has now turned toward finding meaningful and operational diversity indices. We ask two questions: (1) Does phylogenetic diversity contain additional information not explained by functional traits? And (2) What are the strength and nature of the correlation between phylogeny and functional traits according to the evolutionary scale considered? We used data from permanent forest plots of northeas...

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of SET domain family reveals the origin, expansion, and putative function of the arthropod-specific SmydA genes as histone modifiers in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Qing; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Huimin; Song, Tianqi; Yang, Meiling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The SET domain is an evolutionarily conserved motif present in histone lysine methyltransferases, which are important in the regulation of chromatin and gene expression in animals. In this study, we searched for SET domain–containing genes (SET genes) in all of the 147 arthropod genomes sequenced at the time of carrying out this experiment to understand the evolutionary history by which SET domains have evolved in insects. Phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis revealed an arthropod-specific SET gene family, named SmydA, that is ancestral to arthropod animals and specifically diversified during insect evolution. Considering that pseudogenization is the most probable fate of the new emerging gene copies, we provided experimental and evolutionary evidence to demonstrate their essential functions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and in vitro methyltransferase activity assays showed that the SmydA-2 gene was transcriptionally active and retained the original histone methylation activity. Expression knockdown by RNA interference significantly increased mortality, implying that the SmydA genes may be essential for insect survival. We further showed predominantly strong purifying selection on the SmydA gene family and a potential association between the regulation of gene expression and insect phenotypic plasticity by transcriptome analysis. Overall, these data suggest that the SmydA gene family retains essential functions that may possibly define novel regulatory pathways in insects. This work provides insights into the roles of lineage-specific domain duplication in insect evolution. PMID:28444351

  12. The quest for modular nanocages: Tbo -MOF as an archetype for mutual substitution, functionalization, and expansion of quadrangular pillar building blocks

    KAUST Repository

    Eubank, Jarrod F.

    2011-09-14

    A new blueprint network for the design and synthesis of porous, functional 3D metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been identified, namely, the tbo net. Accordingly, tbo-MOFs based on this unique (3,4)-connected net can be exclusively constructed utilizing a combination of well-known and readily targeted [M(R-BDC)]n MOF layers [i.e., supermolecular building layers (SBLs)] based on the edge-transitive 4,4 square lattice (sql) (i.e., 2D four-building units) and a novel pillaring strategy based on four proximal isophthalate ligands from neighboring SBL membered rings (i.e., two pairs from each layer) covalently cross-linked through an organic quadrangular core (e.g., tetrasubstituted benzene). Our strategy permits the rational design and synthesis of isoreticular structures, functionalized and/or expanded, that possess extra-large nanocapsule-like cages, high porosity, and potential for gas separation and storage, among others. Thus, tbo-MOF serves as an archetypal tunable, isoreticular MOF platform for targeting desired applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. Mapping Brazilian Cropland Expansion, 2000-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalles, V.; Hansen, M.; Potapov, P.

    2016-12-01

    Brazil is one of the world's leading producers and exporters of agricultural goods. Despite undergoing significant increases in its cropland area in the last decades, it remains one of the countries with the most potential for further agricultural expansion. Most notably, the expansion in production areas of commodity crops such as soybean, corn, and sugarcane has become the leading cause of land cover conversion in Brazil. Natural land covers, such as the Amazon and Cerrado forests, have been negatively affected by this agricultural expansion, causing carbon emissions, biodiversity loss, altered water cycles, and many other disturbances to ecosystem services. Monitoring of change in cropland area extent can provide relevant information to decision makers seeking to understand and manage land cover change drivers and their impacts. In this study, the freely-available Landsat archive was leveraged to produce a large-scale, methodologically consistent map of cropland cover at 30 m. resolution for the entire Brazilian territory in the year 2000. Additionally, we mapped cropland expansion from 2000 to 2013, and used statistical sampling techniques to accurately estimate cropland area per Brazilian state. Using the Global Forest Change product produced by Hansen et al. (2013), we can disaggregate forest cover loss due to cropland expansion by year, revealing spatiotemporal trends that could advance our understanding of the drivers of forest loss.

  14. Upregulation of Intestinal Barrier Function in Mice with DSS-Induced Colitis by a Defined Bacterial Consortium Is Associated with Expansion of IL-17A Producing Gamma Delta T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial consortium transplantation (BCT is a promising alternative to fecal microbiota transplantation in treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Here, we showed that a defined bacterial consortium derived from healthy mice was able to enhance the intestinal barrier function of mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis. Interestingly, we found that the bacterial consortium significantly promoted the expansion of IL-17A-producing γδT (γδT17 cells in colonic lamina propria, which was closely associated with changing of intestinal microbial composition. The increased IL-17A secretion upon treatment with microbial products derived from the bacterial consortium was accompanied with upregulation of TLR2 expression by γδT cells, and it might be responsible for the upregulation of mucosal barrier function through IL-17R-ACT1-mediated recovery of the disrupted occludin subcellular location. Changing of some specific microbial groups such as Bifidobacterium and Bacillus spp. was closely correlated with the promotion of TLR2+ γδT cells. Our results support that BCT can restore the alliance between commensal microbiota and intestinal γδT cells, which contributes to the improvement of intestinal barrier function. This study provides new insight into the development of bacteria transplantation therapy for the treatment of IBD.

  15. A novel scale for describing visual outcomes in patients following resection of lesions affecting the optic apparatus: the Unified Visual Function Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Serge; Ye, Vincent; Gooderham, Peter A; Akagami, Ryojo

    2018-01-12

    OBJECTIVE Historically, descriptions of visual acuity and visual field change following intracranial procedures have been very rudimentary. Clinicians and researchers have often used basic descriptions, such as "improved," "worsened," and "unchanged," to describe outcomes following resections of tumors affecting the optic apparatus. These descriptors are vague, difficult to quantify, and challenging to apply in a clinical perspective. Several groups have attempted to combine visual acuity and visual fields into a single assessment score, but these are not user-friendly. The authors present a novel way to describe a patient's visual function as a combination of visual acuity and visual field assessment that is simple to use and can be used by surgeons and researchers to gauge visual outcomes following tumor resection. METHODS Visual acuity and visual fields were combined into 3 categories designed around the definitions of legal blindness and fitness to drive in Canada. The authors then applied the scale (the Unified Visual Function Scale, or UVFS) to their previously published case series of perisellar meningiomas to document and test overall visual outcomes for patients undergoing tumor resection. The results were compared with previously documented visual loss scales in the literature. RESULTS Using the UVFS the authors were able to capture the overall visual change; the scale was sensitive enough to define the overall visual improvement or worsening quantitatively, using categories that are clinically relevant and understandable. CONCLUSIONS The UVFS is a robust way to assess a patient's vision, combining visual fields and acuity. The implementation of pre- and postoperative assessment is sensitive enough to assess overall change while also providing clinically relevant information for surgeons, and allows for comparisons between treatment groups.

  16. Psychometric properties of PedsQL Generic Core Scales for children with Functional constipation in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, E.E.; Pawaskar, M.; Williams, V.; McLeod, L.; Dubois, D.; Benninga, M.A.; Joseph, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Dutch translation of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory version 4.0 Generic Core Scales (PedsQL) in children with functional constipation (FC). Methods: The PedsQL was completed by children with FC ages 5 to 18

  17. Psychometric Evaluation of the Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS) Short Forms with Out-of-Home Care Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Thomas J.; Duppong Hurley, Kristin; Lambert, Matthew C.; Epstein, Michael H.; Stevens, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a need for brief progress monitoring measures of behavioral and emotional symptoms for youth in out-of-home care. The Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS; Bickman et al. in Manual of the peabody treatment progress battery. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, 2010) is one measure that has clinician and youth short forms…

  18. Assessment of English-French differential item functioning of the Satisfaction with Appearance Scale (SWAP) in systemic sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jewett, L.R.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Hudson, M.; Baron, M.; Thombs, B.D.

    2017-01-01

    The Satisfaction with Appearance Scale (SWAP) has been used to assess body image distress among people with the rare and disfiguring disease systemic sclerosis (SSc); however, it has not been validated across different languages groups. The objective was to examine differential item functioning of

  19. Analysis of the Gender Variable in the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire--Revised Scales Using Differential Item Functioning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorial, Sergio; Navas, Maria J.

    2007-01-01

    Studies in the field of personality have systematically found gender differences in two of the three dimensions of the Eysenck model: neuroticism and psychoticism. This study aims to analyze these differences in the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire--Revised (EPQ-R) scales using differential item functioning (DIF) techniques to determine whether…

  20. Clinical studies on the ex-vivo expansion of autologous adipose derived stem cells for the functional reconstruction of mucous membrane in empty nose syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze and evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of using autologous adipose derived stem cells (ASCs for rebuilding the function of nasal mucosa in patients with empty nose syndrome (ENS. Methods Autologous adipose tissue 15-20ml were obtained from each of 5 ENS patients admitted from Aug. 2013 to Feb. 2014, and from which stem cells were isolated, cultured and expanded in vitro. The phenotype, differentiation, and genetic stability of the third generation of amplified stem cells were identified. For the patients with rudimental turbinate (n=3, ASCs were injected into the damaged nasal mucosa for 4 times (once every 10 days. For the patients with no rudimental turbinate (n=2, autologous pure fat granules 1-5ml were extracted after 3 times of ASCs injection into the damaged nasal mucosa, and mixed with the 3rd-6th generation of ASCs for inferior or middle nasal turbinate angioplasty. Nasal endoscopic examination was performed before treatment and 3, 6 and 9 months after treatment for comparison, and the data of SNOT-20 questionnaire, nasality resistance and nasal mucociliary clearance action were statistically analyzed. Results With injection transplantation of the 3rd-6th generation of ASCs in 2 patients with no rudimental turbinate, and 3, 6 and 9 months after the combined ASCs and fat granules transplantation in 3 patients with rudimental turbinate, nasal endoscopy showed that no obvious absorption in conchoplasty, nasal mucosa was improved significantly, and same as SNOT-20 scores, with statistically significant difference (P0.05. Conclusions The reconstruction of mucosa function by nasal turbinate angioplasty combined with adipose derived stem cells and autologous adipose transplantation may significantly improve the symptoms in patients with ENS with lasting effects. It is a new procedure which is helpful for the mucosal repair in patients with ENS. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.10.11

  1. Functional evaluation of human donation after cardiac death donor hearts using a continuous isolated myocardial perfusion technique: Potential for expansion of the cardiac donor population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Satoru; Locher, Matthew R; Lushaj, Entela B; Akhter, Shahab A; Kohmoto, Takushi

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the resuscitation potential and contractile function in adult human donation after cardiac death (DCD) hearts by ex vivo perfusion. With institutional review board approval and under the DCD protocol at the University of Wisconsin (UW) Organ Procurement Organization, 5 brain dead (BD) and 5 DCD donor hearts were evaluated. All BD hearts were declined for clinical transplantation because of coronary artery disease, advanced age, or social history. All hearts were preserved by flushing and cold storage with UW solution. By using our ex vivo perfusion system, the left ventricular end systolic pressure-volume relationship (LV-ESPVR) was assessed for 2 hours of oxygenated blood reperfusion. All BD (n = 5) and 4 DCD hearts were successfully resuscitated. One DCD heart was unable to be resuscitated due to prolonged warm ischemic time (WIT; 174 minutes). Mean WIT for resuscitated DCD hearts (from extubation to flushing with cold UW solution) was 34 ± 3 minutes (range, 26 to 40 minutes); mean cold ischemic time for BD donors was 211 ± 31 minutes compared with 177 ± 64 minutes for DCD donors. The calculated LV-ESPVRs for BD hearts after 1 and 2 hours of reperfusion were 6.9 ± 0.7 and 5.7 ± 1.0 mm Hg/mL, respectively; LV-ESPVRs for DCD hearts after 1 and 2 hours of reperfusion were 5.6 ± 1.5 (P = .45) and 3.0 ± 0.7 mm Hg/mL (P = .07), respectively. We successfully resuscitated and measured ex vivo cardiac function in human DCD and BD donor hearts. Resuscitation potential in DCD hearts was achieved when the WIT was less than 40 minutes. Contractile performance in DCD hearts tended to be lower compared with BD hearts. Further investigation with longer reperfusion periods seems warranted. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Negative thermal expansion in framework compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron microscopy, EXAFS and differential scanning calorimetry have been used to study structural properties as a function of temperature for these compounds. In this paper we report the results obtained from our study [14–20] of negative thermal expansion (NTE) compounds with chemical compositions of NX2O8 and.

  3. Expansion and contraction of finite states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Allard

    2004-01-01

    We present a theory that copes with the dynamics of inconsistent information. A method is set forth to represent possibly inconsistent information by a *finite state*. Next, finite operations for expansion and contraction of finite states are given. No extra-logical element -- a choice function or

  4. Revisting expansive learning for knowledge production and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Revisting expansive learning for knowledge production and capability development at postgraduate level in Higher Education Studies. R Niemann. Abstract. Higher education in South Africa is challenged by academic and social demands. Universities, therefore, have to produce graduates who will be able to function ...

  5. A functional morphological approach to the scaling of the feeding system in the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrel, Anthony; Van Wassenbergh, Sam; Wouters, Sarah; Adriaens, Dominique; Aerts, Peter

    2005-06-01

    Effects of size are pervasive and affect nearly all aspects of the biology of animals and plants. Theoretical scaling models have been developed to predict the effects of size on the functioning of musculo-skeletal systems. Although numerous experimental studies have investigated the effects of size on the movements of skeletal elements during locomotion and feeding in vertebrates, relatively little is known about the scaling of the muscles and bones responsible for the actual movements. Here, we examine the scaling of external morphology, skeletal elements of the feeding system, and a number of cranial muscles to understand how this may affect the movements observed during suction feeding in the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus. The results show that neither the head nor the cranial elements themselves scale according to geometric similarity models. Relative to head size, distinct changes in the mass and configuration of the feeding structures takes place. Unexpectedly, different cranial muscles show different scaling patterns that ultimately all lead to a positive allometry of muscle cross-sectional area relative to fish head size. This suggests that (1) the scaling of the cranial elements cannot be predicted a priori based on the scaling of external head dimensions and (2) the scaling of the feeding system is optimised towards high force output in the larger animals. An analysis of the consequences of the observed changes in morphology with size on performance traits, including bite force and jaw closing velocity, suggests a tight link between the scaling of the feeding system and the natural diet of these fish. Whereas for smaller size classes the system is tuned towards high bite forces, for animals with cranial lengths greater than 65 mm the scaling of the feeding system appears to be dictated by the hydrodynamic constraints on suction feeding.

  6. Rasch Analysis of a New Hierarchical Scoring System for Evaluating Hand Function on the Motor Assessment Scale for Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce S. Sabari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. (1 To develop two independent measurement scales for use as items assessing hand movements and hand activities within the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS, an existing instrument used for clinical assessment of motor performance in stroke survivors; (2 To examine the psychometric properties of these new measurement scales. Design. Scale development, followed by a multicenter observational study. Setting. Inpatient and outpatient occupational therapy programs in eight hospital and rehabilitation facilities in the United States and Canada. Participants. Patients (N=332 receiving stroke rehabilitation following left (52% or right (48% cerebrovascular accident; mean age 64.2 years (sd 15; median 1 month since stroke onset. Intervention. Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures. Data were tested for unidimensionality and reliability, and behavioral criteria were ordered according to difficulty level with Rasch analysis. Results. The new scales assessing hand movements and hand activities met Rasch expectations of unidimensionality and reliability. Conclusion. Following a multistep process of test development, analysis, and refinement, we have redesigned the two scales that comprise the hand function items on the MAS. The hand movement scale contains an empirically validated 10-behavior hierarchy and the hand activities item contains an empirically validated 8-behavior hierarchy.

  7. Mixed-Metal Strategy on Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) for Functionalities Expansion: Co Substitution Induces Aerobic Oxidation of Cyclohexene over Inactive Ni-MOF-74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dengrong; Sun, Fangxiang; Deng, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhaohui

    2015-09-08

    Different amounts of Co-substituted Ni-MOF-74 have been prepared via a post-synthetic metal exchange. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses indicated the successful metathesis between Co and Ni in Ni-MOF-74 to form the solid-solution-like mixed-metal Co/Ni-MOF-74. It was found that introduction of active Co into the Ni-MOF-74 framework enabled the inert Ni-MOF-74 to show activity for cyclohexene oxidation. Since Co was favorably substituted at positions more accessible to the substrate, the mixed-metal Co/Ni-MOF-74 showed superior catalytic performance, compared with pure Co-MOF-74 containing a similar amount of Co. This study provides a facile method to develop solid-solution-like MOFs for heterogeneous catalysis and highlights the great potential of this mixed-metal strategy in the development of MOFs with specific endowed functionalities.

  8. Voxel Scale Complex Networks of Functional Connectivity in the Rat Brain: Neurochemical State Dependence of Global and Local Topological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Schwarz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Network analysis of functional imaging data reveals emergent features of the brain as a function of its topological properties. However, the brain is not a homogeneous network, and the dependence of functional connectivity parameters on neuroanatomical substrate and parcellation scale is a key issue. Moreover, the extent to which these topological properties depend on underlying neurochemical changes remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated both global statistical properties and the local, voxel-scale distribution of connectivity parameters of the rat brain. Different neurotransmitter systems were stimulated by pharmacological challenge (d-amphetamine, fluoxetine, and nicotine to discriminate between stimulus-specific functional connectivity and more general features of the rat brain architecture. Although global connectivity parameters were similar, mapping of local connectivity parameters at high spatial resolution revealed strong neuroanatomical dependence of functional connectivity in the rat brain, with clear differentiation between the neocortex and older brain regions. Localized foci of high functional connectivity independent of drug challenge were found in the sensorimotor cortices, consistent with the high neuronal connectivity in these regions. Conversely, the topological properties and node roles in subcortical regions varied with neurochemical state and were dependent on the specific dynamics of the different functional processes elicited.

  9. In vivo expansion, persistence, and function of peptide vaccine-induced CD8 T cells occur independently of CD4 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assudani, Deepak; Cho, Hyun-Il; DeVito, Nicholas; Bradley, Norma; Celis, Esteban

    2008-12-01

    Significant efforts are being devoted toward the development of effective therapeutic vaccines against cancer. Specifically, well-characterized subunit vaccines, which are designed to generate antitumor cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses. Because CD4 T cells participate at various stages of CD8 T-cell responses, it is important to study the role of CD4 T cells in the induction and persistence of antitumor CD8 T-cell responses by these vaccines. Recent evidence points to the requirement of CD4 T cells for the long-term persistence of memory CD8 T cells, which in the case of cancer immunotherapy would be critical for the prevention of tumor recurrences. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether CD4 T cells are necessary for the generation and maintenance of antigen-specific CD8 T cells induced by subunit (peptide or DNA) vaccines. We have used a vaccination strategy that combines synthetic peptides representing CD8 T-cell epitopes, a costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody and a Toll-like receptor agonist (TriVax) to generate large numbers of antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses. Our results show that the rate of decline (clonal contraction) of the antigen-specific CD8 T cells and their functional state is not affected by the presence or absence of CD4 T cells throughout the immune response generated by TriVax. We believe that these results bear importance for the design of effective vaccination strategies against cancer.

  10. In Vivo Expansion, Persistence and Function of Peptide Vaccine-Induced CD8 T Cells Occurs Independently of CD4 T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assudani, Deepak; Cho, Hyun-Il; DeVito, Nicholas; Bradley, Norma; Celis, Esteban

    2008-01-01

    Significant efforts are being devoted towards the development of effective therapeutic vaccines against cancer. Specifically, well-characterized subunit vaccines, which are designed to generate anti-tumor cytotoxic CD8 T cell responses. Since CD4 T cells participate at various stages of CD8 T cell responses, it is important to study the role of CD4 T cells in the induction and persistence of anti-tumor CD8 T cell responses by these vaccines. Recent evidence points to the requirement of CD4 T cells for the long-term persistence of memory CD8 T cells, which in the case of cancer immunotherapy would be critical for the prevention of tumor recurrences. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether CD4 T cells are necessary for the generation and maintenance of antigen-specific CD8 T cells induced by subunit (peptide or DNA) vaccines. We have utilized a vaccination strategy that combines synthetic peptides representing CD8 T cell epitopes, a costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody and a Toll-like receptor agonist (TriVax) to generate large numbers of antigen-specific CD8 T cell responses. Our results show that the rate of decline (clonal contraction) of the antigen-specific CD8 T cells and their functional state is not affected by the presence or absence of CD4 T cells throughout the immune response generated by TriVax. We believe that these results bear importance for the design of effective vaccination strategies against cancer. PMID:19047170

  11. Large-scale genome-wide analysis identifies genetic variants associated with cardiac structure and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, Philipp S.; Felix, Janine F.; Schillert, Arne; Teumer, Alexander; Chen, Ming-Huei; Leening, Maarten J. G.; Voelker, Uwe; Grossmann, Vera; Brody, Jennifer A.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Pramana, Setia; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Reinhold; Stanton, Alice V.; Malzahn, Doerthe; Smith, Albert Vernon; Sundstrom, Johan; Minelli, Cosetta; Ruggiero, Daniela; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Tiller, Daniel; Smith, J. Gustav; Monnereau, Claire; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Musani, Solomon K.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Pers, Tune H.; Morley, Michael; Kleber, Marcus E.; Aragam, Jayashri; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bis, Joshua C.; Bisping, Egbert; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cheng, Susan; Deckers, Jaap W.; Del Greco, Fabiola; Edelmann, Frank; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Lude; Friedrich, Nele; Harris, Tamara B.; Hofer, Edith; Hofman, Albert; Huang, Jie; Hughes, Alun D.; Kahonen, Mika; Kruppa, Jochen; Lackner, Karl J.; Lannfelt, Lars; Laskowski, Rafael; Launer, Lenore J.; Leosdottir, Margret; Lin, Honghuang; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Loley, Christina; MacRae, Calum A.; Mascalzoni, Deborah; Mayet, Jamil; Medenwald, Daniel; Morris, Andrew P.; Mueller, Christian; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nappo, Stefania; Nilsson, Peter M.; Nuding, Sebastian; Nutile, Teresa; Peters, Annette; Pfeufer, Arne; Pietzner, Diana; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ruohonen, Saku T.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Samdarshi, Tandaw E.; Schmidt, Helena; Sharp, Andrew S. P.; Shields, Denis C.; Sorice, Rossella; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Stricker, Bruno H.; Surendran, Praveen; Thom, Simon; Toeglhofer, Anna M.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wachter, Rolf; Voelzke, Henry; Ziegler, Andreas; Muenzel, Thomas; Maerz, Winfried; Cappola, Thomas P.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Fox, Ervin R.; Dueker, Nicole D.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Melander, Olle; Russ, Martin; Lehtimaki, Terho; Ciullo, Marina; Hicks, Andrew A.; Lind, Lars; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Pieske, Burkert; Barron, Anthony J.; Zweiker, Robert; Schunkert, Heribert; Ingelsson, Erik; Liu, Kiang; Arnett, Donna K.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Larson, Martin G.; Felix, Stephan B.; Franco, Oscar H.; Zeller, Tanja; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Doerr, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Understanding the genetic architecture of cardiac structure and function may help to prevent and treat heart disease. This investigation sought to identify common genetic variations associated with inter-individual variability in cardiac structure and function. METHODS. A GWAS

  12. Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Nonlinear Functional Dynamic Equations with Damping on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Tuğla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study oscillatory behavior of second-order dynamic equations with damping under some assumptions on time scales. New theorems extend and improve the results in the literature. Illustrative examples are given.

  13. "Diminishing Returns" in the Scaling of Functional Leaf Traits across and within Species Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karl J. Niklas; Edward D. Cobb; Ülo Niinemets; Peter B. Reich; Arne Sellin; Bill Shipley; Ian J. Wright

    2007-01-01

    More than 5,000 measurements from 1,943 plant species were used to explore the scaling relationships among the foliar surface area and the dry, water, and nitrogen/phosphorus mass of mature individual leaves...

  14. Evaluation of Neuropsychiatric Function in Phenylketonuria: Psychometric Properties of the ADHD Rating Scale-IV and Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale Inattention Subscale in Phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwich, Kathleen W; Auguste, Priscilla; Yu, Ren; Zhang, Charlie; Dewees, Benjamin; Winslow, Barbara; Yu, Shui; Merilainen, Markus; Prasad, Suyash

    2015-06-01

    Previous qualitative research among adults and parents of children with phenylketonuria (PKU) has identified inattention as an important psychiatric aspect of this condition. The parent-reported ADHD Rating Scale-IV (ADHD RS-IV) and the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) have been validated for measuring inattention symptoms in persons with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); however, their psychometric attributes for measuring PKU-related inattention have not been established. The primary objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the ADHD RS-IV and ASRS inattention symptoms subscales in a randomized controlled trial of patients with PKU aged 8 years or older. A post hoc analysis investigated the psychometric properties (Rasch model fit, reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness) of the ADHD RS-IV and ASRS inattention subscales using data from a phase 3b, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in those with PKU aged 8 years or older. The Rasch results revealed good model fit, and reliability analyses revealed strong internal consistency reliability (α ≥ 0.87) and reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.87) for both measures. Both inattention measures demonstrated the ability to discriminate between known groups (P < 0.001) created by the Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale. Correlations between the ADHD RS-IV and the ASRS with the Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale and the age-appropriate Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function Working Memory subscale were consistently moderate to strong (r ≥ 0.56). Similarly, results of the change score correlations were of moderate magnitude (r ≥ 0.43) for both measures when compared with changes over time in Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function Working Memory subscales. These findings of reliability, validity, and responsiveness of both the ADHD RS-IV and the ASRS inattention scales

  15. Verification of a Dynamic Scaling for the Pair Correlation Function during the Slow Drainage of a Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Marcel; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik Grude; Toussaint, Renaud

    2017-10-01

    In this Letter we give experimental grounding for the remarkable observation made by Furuberg et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 2117 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.61.2117] of an unusual dynamic scaling for the pair correlation function N (r ,t ) during the slow drainage of a porous medium. Those authors use an invasion percolation algorithm to show numerically that the probability of invasion of a pore at a distance r away and after a time t from the invasion of another pore scales as N (r ,t )∝r-1f (rD/t ) , where D is the fractal dimension of the invading cluster and the function f (u )∝u1.4, for u ≪1 and f (u )∝u-0.6, for u ≫1 . Our experimental setup allows us to have full access to the spatiotemporal evolution of the invasion, which is used to directly verify this scaling. Additionally, we connect two important theoretical contributions from the literature to explain the functional dependency of N (r ,t ) and the scaling exponent for the short-time regime (t ≪rD). A new theoretical argument is developed to explain the long-time regime exponent (t ≫rD).

  16. Anisotropic thermal expansion in flexible materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romao, Carl P.

    2017-10-01

    A definition of the Grüneisen parameters for anisotropic materials is derived based on the response of phonon frequencies to uniaxial stress perturbations. This Grüneisen model relates the thermal expansion in a given direction (αi i) to one element of the elastic compliance tensor, which corresponds to the Young's modulus in that direction (Yi i). The model is tested through ab initio prediction of thermal expansion in zinc, graphite, and calcite using density functional perturbation theory, indicating that it could lead to increased accuracy for structurally complex systems. The direct dependence of αi i on Yi i suggests that materials which are flexible along their principal axes but rigid in other directions will generally display both positive and negative thermal expansion.

  17. Integrating depth functions and hyper-scale terrain analysis for 3D soil organic carbon modeling in agricultural fields at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Lopez, L.; van Wesemael, B.; Stevens, A.; Doetterl, S.; Van Oost, K.; Behrens, T.; Schmidt, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) represents a key component in the global C cycle and has an important influence on the global CO2 fluxes between terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere. In the context of agricultural landscapes, SOC inventories are important since soil management practices have a strong influence on CO2 fluxes and SOC stocks. However, there is lack of accurate and cost-effective methods for producing high spatial resolution of SOC information. In this respect, our work is focused on the development of a three dimensional modeling approach for SOC monitoring in agricultural fields. The study area comprises ~420 km2 and includes 4 of the 5 agro-geological regions of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. The soil dataset consist of 172 profiles (1033 samples) which were not sampled specifically for this study. This dataset is a combination of profile samples collected in previous soil surveys and soil profiles sampled for other research purposes. The proposed strategy comprises two main steps. In the first step the SOC distribution within each profile (vertical distribution) is modeled. Depth functions for are fitted in order to summarize the information content in the profile. By using these functions the SOC can be interpolated at any depth within the profiles. The second step involves the use of contextual terrain (ConMap) features (Behrens et al., 2010). These features are based on the differences in elevation between a given point location in the landscape and its circular neighbourhoods at a given set of different radius. One of the main advantages of this approach is that it allows the integration of several spatial scales (eg. local and regional) for soil spatial analysis. In this work the ConMap features are derived from a digital elevation model of the area and are used as predictors for spatial modeling of the parameters of the depth functions fitted in the previous step. In this poster we present some preliminary results in which we analyze: i. The use of

  18. Admissible and Minimax Estimators of a Lower Bounded Scale Parameter of a Gamma Distribution under the Entropy Loss Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nasr Esfahani

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with admissible and minimax estimation of scale parameter θ of a gamma distribution under the entropy loss function, when it is known that θ > a for some known a > 0. An admissible minimax estimator of θ, which is the pointwise limit of a sequence of Bayes estimators, is derived. Also, the admissible estimators and the only minimax estimator of θ in the class of truncated linear estimators are obtained. Finally, the results are extended to a subclass of scale parameter exponential family and the family of transformed chi-square distributions

  19. Differential Item Functioning in the SF-36 Physical Functioning and Mental Health Sub-Scales: A Population-Based Investigation in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lix, Lisa M; Wu, Xiuyun; Hopman, Wilma; Mayo, Nancy; Sajobi, Tolulope T; Liu, Juxin; Prior, Jerilynn C; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Josse, Robert G; Towheed, Tanveer E; Davison, K Shawn; Sawatzky, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Self-reported health status measures, like the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), can provide rich information about the overall health of a population and its components, such as physical, mental, and social health. However, differential item functioning (DIF), which arises when population sub-groups with the same underlying (i.e., latent) level of health have different measured item response probabilities, may compromise the comparability of these measures. The purpose of this study was to test for DIF on the SF-36 physical functioning (PF) and mental health (MH) sub-scale items in a Canadian population-based sample. Study data were from the prospective Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos), which collected baseline data in 1996-1997. DIF was tested using a multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) method. Confirmatory factor analysis defined the latent variable measurement model for the item responses and latent variable regression with demographic and health status covariates (i.e., sex, age group, body weight, self-perceived general health) produced estimates of the magnitude of DIF effects. The CaMos cohort consisted of 9423 respondents; 69.4% were female and 51.7% were less than 65 years. Eight of 10 items on the PF sub-scale and four of five items on the MH sub-scale exhibited DIF. Large DIF effects were observed on PF sub-scale items about vigorous and moderate activities, lifting and carrying groceries, walking one block, and bathing or dressing. On the MH sub-scale items, all DIF effects were small or moderate in size. SF-36 PF and MH sub-scale scores were not comparable across population sub-groups defined by demographic and health status variables due to the effects of DIF, although the magnitude of this bias was not large for most items. We recommend testing and adjusting for DIF to ensure comparability of the SF-36 in population-based investigations.

  20. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on 'sequence capture' reveals functional diversity in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-12-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agricultural soil communities through captured metagenomics. Captured metagenomics uses custom-designed, hybridization-based oligonucleotide probes that enrich functional genes of interest in metagenomic libraries where only probe-bound DNA fragments are sequenced. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with targeted genes while maintaining their target diversity and their taxonomic distribution correlated well with the traditional ribosomal sequencing. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with genes related to organic matter degradation; at least five times more than similar, publicly available soil WMG projects. This target enrichment technique also preserves the functional representation of the soils, thereby facilitating comparative metagenomics projects. Here, we present the first study that applies the captured metagenomics approach in large scale, and this novel method allows deep investigations of central ecosystem processes by studying functional gene abundances. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  1. The Louisville Swim Scale: A Novel Assessment of Hindlimb Function following Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Burke, Darlene A.; Baldini, Angela D.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Baltzley, Ryan; Bunger, Michelle; Magnuson, David S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of animal studies examining the recovery of function following spinal cord injury use the BBB Open-Field Locomotor Scale as a primary outcome measure. However, it is now well known that rehabilitation strategies can bring about significant improvements in hindlimb function in some animal models. Thus, improvements in walking following spinal cord injury in rats may be influenced by differences in activity levels and housing conditions during the first few weeks post-injury. Swimming is a natural form of locomotion that animals are not normally exposed to in the laboratory setting. We hypothesized that deficits in, and functional recovery of, swimming would accurately represent the locomotor capability of the nervous system in the absence of any retraining effects. To test this hypothesis, we have compared the recovery of walking and swimming in rats following a range of standardized spinal cord injuries and two different retraining strategies. In order to assess swimming, we developed a rating system we call the Louisville Swimming Scale (LSS) that evaluates three characteristics of swimming that are highly altered by spinal cord injury— namely, hindlimb movement, forelimb dependency, and body position. The data indicate that the LSS is a sensitive and reliable method of determining swimming ability and the improvement in hindlimb function after standardized contusion injury of the thoracic spinal cord. Furthermore, the data suggests that when used in conjunction with the BBB Open-field Locomotor Scale, the LSS assesses locomotor capabilities that are not influenced by a retraining effect. PMID:17115911

  2. A Genome-Scale Analysis of the PIN Gene Family Reveals Its Functions in Cotton Fiber Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhou; He, Peng; Yang, Zuoren; Huang, Gai; Wang, Limin; Pang, Chaoyou; Xiao, Hui; Zhao, Peng; Yu, Jianing; Xiao, Guanghui

    2017-01-01

    The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein, the most important polar auxin transporter, plays a critical role in the distribution of auxin and controls multiple biological processes. However, characterizations and functions of this gene family have not been identified in cotton. Here, we identified the PIN family in Gossypium hirsutum, Gossypium arboreum, and Gossypium raimondii. This gene family was divided into seven subgroups. A chromosomal distribution analysis showed that GhPIN genes were evenly distributed in eight chromosomes and that the whole genome and dispersed duplications were the main duplication events for GhPIN expansion. qRT-PCR analysis showed a tissue-specific expression pattern for GhPIN. Likely due to the cis-element variations in their promoters, transcripts of PIN6 and PIN8 genes from the At (tetraploid genome orginated from G. arboreum) subgenome and PIN1a from the Dt (tetraploid genome orginated from G. raimondii) subgenome in G. hirsutum was significantly increased compared to the transcripts in the diploids. The differential regulation of these PIN genes after the polyploidization may be conducive to fiber initiation and elongation. Exogenously applied auxin polar transport inhibitor significantly suppressed fiber growth, which is consistent with the essential function of these PIN genes for regulating cotton fiber development. Furthermore, the overexpression of GhPIN1a_Dt, GhPIN6_At, and GhPIN8_At in Arabidopsis promoted the density and length of trichomes in leaves.

  3. Landscape object-based analysis of wetland plant functional types: the effects of spatial scale, vegetation classes and classifier methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronova, I.; Gong, P.; Wang, L.; Clinton, N.; Fu, W.; Qi, S.

    2011-12-01

    Remote sensing-based vegetation classifications representing plant function such as photosynthesis and productivity are challenging in wetlands with complex cover and difficult field access. Recent advances in object-based image analysis (OBIA) and machine-learning algorithms offer new classification tools; however, few comparisons of different algorithms and spatial scales have been discussed to date. We applied OBIA to delineate wetland plant functional types (PFTs) for Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China and Ramsar wetland conservation site, from 30-m Landsat TM scene at the peak of spring growing season. We targeted major PFTs (C3 grasses, C3 forbs and different types of C4 grasses and aquatic vegetation) that are both key players in system's biogeochemical cycles and critical providers of waterbird habitat. Classification results were compared among: a) several object segmentation scales (with average object sizes 900-9000 m2); b) several families of statistical classifiers (including Bayesian, Logistic, Neural Network, Decision Trees and Support Vector Machines) and c) two hierarchical levels of vegetation classification, a generalized 3-class set and more detailed 6-class set. We found that classification benefited from object-based approach which allowed including object shape, texture and context descriptors in classification. While a number of classifiers achieved high accuracy at the finest pixel-equivalent segmentation scale, the highest accuracies and best agreement among algorithms occurred at coarser object scales. No single classifier was consistently superior across all scales, although selected algorithms of Neural Network, Logistic and K-Nearest Neighbors families frequently provided the best discrimination of classes at different scales. The choice of vegetation categories also affected classification accuracy. The 6-class set allowed for higher individual class accuracies but lower overall accuracies than the 3-class set because

  4. Multiple pathways of commodity crop expansion in tropical forest landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyfroidt, Patrick; Carlson, Kimberly M.; Fagan, Matthew E.; Gutiérrez-Vélez, Victor H.; Macedo, Marcia N.; Curran, Lisa M.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Dyer, George A.; Gibbs, Holly K.; Lambin, Eric F.; Morton, Douglas C.; Robiglio, Valentina

    2014-07-01

    Commodity crop expansion, for both global and domestic urban markets, follows multiple land change pathways entailing direct and indirect deforestation, and results in various social and environmental impacts. Here we compare six published case studies of rapid commodity crop expansion within forested tropical regions. Across cases, between 1.7% and 89.5% of new commodity cropland was sourced from forestlands. Four main factors controlled pathways of commodity crop expansion: (i) the availability of suitable forestland, which is determined by forest area, agroecological or accessibility constraints, and land use policies, (ii) economic and technical characteristics of agricultural systems, (iii) differences in constraints and strategies between small-scale and large-scale actors, and (iv) variable costs and benefits of forest clearing. When remaining forests were unsuitable for agriculture and/or policies restricted forest encroachment, a larger share of commodity crop expansion occurred by conversion of existing agricultural lands, and land use displacement was smaller. Expansion strategies of large-scale actors emerge from context-specific balances between the search for suitable lands; transaction costs or conflicts associated with expanding into forests or other state-owned lands versus smallholder lands; net benefits of forest clearing; and greater access to infrastructure in already-cleared lands. We propose five hypotheses to be tested in further studies: (i) land availability mediates expansion pathways and the likelihood that land use is displaced to distant, rather than to local places; (ii) use of already-cleared lands is favored when commodity crops require access to infrastructure; (iii) in proportion to total agricultural expansion, large-scale actors generate more clearing of mature forests than smallholders; (iv) property rights and land tenure security influence the actors participating in commodity crop expansion, the form of land use displacement

  5. Large-scale atomistic simulations of nanostructured materials based on divide-and-conquer density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vashishta P.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A linear-scaling algorithm based on a divide-and-conquer (DC scheme is designed to perform large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations, in which interatomic forces are computed quantum mechanically in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT. This scheme is applied to the thermite reaction at an Al/Fe2O3 interface. It is found that mass diffusion and reaction rate at the interface are enhanced by a concerted metal-oxygen flip mechanism. Preliminary simulations are carried out for an aluminum particle in water based on the conventional DFT, as a target system for large-scale DC-DFT simulations. A pair of Lewis acid and base sites on the aluminum surface preferentially catalyzes hydrogen production in a low activation-barrier mechanism found in the simulations

  6. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) and Subsequent Bias in Group Comparisons using a Composite Measurement Scale: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouquette, Alexandra; Hardouin, Jean-Benoit; Coste, Joel

    To determine the conditions in which the estimation of a difference between groups for a construct evaluated using a composite measurement scale is biased if the presence of Differential Item Functioning (DIF) is not taken into account. Datasets were generated using the Partial Credit Model to simulate 642 realistic scenarios. The effect of seven factors on the bias on the estimated difference between groups was evaluated using ANOVA: sample size, true difference between groups, number of items in the scale, proportion of items showing DIF, DIF-size for these items, position of these items location parameters along the latent trait, and uniform/non-uniform DIF. For uniform DIF, only the DIF-size and the proportion of items showing DIF (and their interaction term) had meaningful effects. The effect of non-uniform DIF was negligible. The measurement bias resulting from DIF was quantified in various realistic conditions of composite measurement scale use.

  7. Primary Visual Cortex Scales Individual's Perceived Brightness with Power Function: Inner Psychophysics with fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubomi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Takashi; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Perceived brightness is well described by Stevens' power function (S. S. Stevens, 1957, On the psychophysical law, "Psychological Review", Vol. 64, pp. 153-181), with a power exponent of 0.33 (the cubic-root function of luminance). The power exponent actually varies across individuals, yet little is known about neural substrates underlying this…

  8. Managing landscapes at multiple scales for sustainability of ecosystem functions (Preface)

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Birdsey; R. Lucas; Y. Pan; G. Sun; E.J. Gustafson; A.H.  Perera

    2010-01-01

    The science of landscape ecology is a rapidly evolving academic field with an emphasis on studying large-scale spatial heterogeneity created by natural influences and human activities. These advances have important implications for managing and conserving natural resources. At a September 2008 IUFRO conference in Chengdu, Sichuan, P.R. China, we highlighted both the...

  9. Do Personality Scale Items Function Differently in People with High and Low IQ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiyavutti, Chakadee; Johnson, Wendy; Deary, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    Intelligence differences might contribute to true differences in personality traits. It is also possible that intelligence might contribute to differences in understanding and interpreting personality items. Previous studies have not distinguished clearly between these possibilities. Before it can be accepted that scale score differences actually…

  10. Assessing Psychosocial Impairment in Children and Adolescents: A Review of the Barkley Functional Impairment Scale (BFIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Appraising psychosocial impairment is an essential enterprise of diagnostic decision-making in the field of school psychology. Despite its importance, few practitioners utilize systematic procedures when engaging in this process, despite the fact that a number of impairment measures and scales have been developed specifically for this purpose. The…

  11. Scaling tests of a new algorithm for DFT hybrid-functional calculations on Trinity Haswell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Alan F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    We show scaling results for materials of interest in Sandia Radiation-Effects and High-Energy-Density-Physics Mission Areas. Each timing is from a self-consistent calculation for bulk material. Two timings are given: (1) walltime for the construction of the CR exchange operator (Exchange-Operator) and (2) walltime for everything else (non-Exchange-Operator).

  12. Coexistence of sympatric carnivores in relatively homogeneous Mediterranean landscapes: functional importance of habitat segregation at the fine-scale level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Carolina; Palomares, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    One of the main objectives of community ecology is to understand the conditions allowing species to coexist. However, few studies have investigated the role of fine-scale habitat use segregation in the functioning of guild communities in relatively homogeneous landscapes where opportunities for coexistence are likely to be the most restrictive. We investigate how the process of habitat use differentiation at the home range level according to the degree of specialism/generalism of species can lead to coexistence between guild species. We examine differences in fine-scale habitat use and niche separation as potential mechanisms explaining the coexistence of five sympatric carnivore species that differ in life history traits (Iberian lynx, Eurasian badger, Egyptian mongoose, common genet and red fox) by collecting data from systematic track censuses in a relatively homogeneous Mediterranean landscape. We found that a higher degree of specialism determines the segregation of species among the fine-scale ecological niche dimensions defined using quantitative elements associated with vegetation, landscape, prey availability and human disturbance. The species with the lowest total performance over the set of variables did not exhibit segregation in the use of habitat at this level. Our study indicates that in relatively homogeneous landscapes, there exist subtle patterns of habitat partitioning over small-scale gradients of habitat determinants as a function of the degree of specialism of carnivore species within a guild. Our results also suggest that coexistence between generalist species may be permitted by fine-scale spatial-temporal segregation of activity patterns or trophic resource consumption, but not fine-scale habitat use differentiation.

  13. Space and time analysis of the nanosecond scale discharges in atmospheric pressure air: I. Gas temperature and vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, A.; Cessou, A.; Boubert, P.; Vervisch, P.

    2014-03-01

    Reliable experimental data on nanosecond discharge plasmas in air become more and more crucial considering their interest in a wide field of applications. However, the investigations on such nonequilibrium plasmas are made difficult by the spatial non-homogeneities, in particular under atmospheric pressure, the wide range of time scales, and the complexity of multi-physics processes involved therein. In this study, we report spatiotemporal experimental analysis on the gas temperature and the vibrational excitation of N2 and O2 in their ground electronic state during the post-discharge of an overvoltage nanosecond-pulsed discharge generated in a pin-to-plane gap of air at atmospheric pressure. The gas temperature during the pulsed discharge is measured by optical emission spectroscopy related to the rotational bands of the 0-0 vibrational transition N2(C 3 Πu, v = 0) → N2(B3 Πg, v = 0) of nitrogen. The results show a rapid gas heating up to 700 K in tens of nanoseconds after the current rise. This fast gas heating leads to a high gas temperature up to 1000 K measured at 150 ns in the first stages of the post-discharge using spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS). The spatiotemporal measurements of the gas temperature and the vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2, also obtained by SRS, over the post-discharge show the spatial expansion of the high vibrational excitation of N2, and the gas heating during the post-discharge. The present measurements, focused on thermal and energetic aspect of the discharge, provide a base for spatiotemporal analysis of gas number densities of N2, O2 and O atoms and hydrodynamic effects achieved during the post-discharge in part II of this investigation. All these results provide space and time database for the validation of plasma chemical models for nanosecond-pulsed discharges at atmospheric pressure air.

  14. The roles of whole-genome and small-scale duplications in the functional specialization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A Fares

    Full Text Available Researchers have long been enthralled with the idea that gene duplication can generate novel functions, crediting this process with great evolutionary importance. Empirical data shows that whole-genome duplications (WGDs are more likely to be retained than small-scale duplications (SSDs, though their relative contribution to the functional fate of duplicates remains unexplored. Using the map of genetic interactions and the re-sequencing of 27 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes evolving for 2,200 generations we show that SSD-duplicates lead to neo-functionalization while WGD-duplicates partition ancestral functions. This conclusion is supported by: (a SSD-duplicates establish more genetic interactions than singletons and WGD-duplicates; (b SSD-duplicates copies share more interaction-partners than WGD-duplicates copies; (c WGD-duplicates interaction partners are more functionally related than SSD-duplicates partners; (d SSD-duplicates gene copies are more functionally divergent from one another, while keeping more overlapping functions, and diverge in their sub-cellular locations more than WGD-duplicates copies; and (e SSD-duplicates complement their functions to a greater extent than WGD-duplicates. We propose a novel model that uncovers the complexity of evolution after gene duplication.

  15. Conformal expansions and renormalons

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, E; Gardi, Einan; Grunberg, Georges

    2001-01-01

    The large-order behaviour of QCD is dominated by renormalons. On the other hand renormalons do not occur in conformal theories, such as the one describing the infrared fixed-point of QCD at small beta_0 (the Banks--Zaks limit). Since the fixed-point has a perturbative realization, all-order perturbative relations exist between the conformal coefficients, which are renormalon-free, and the standard perturbative coefficients, which contain renormalons. Therefore, an explicit cancellation of renormalons should occur in these relations. The absence of renormalons in the conformal limit can thus be seen as a constraint on the structure of the QCD perturbative expansion. We show that the conformal constraint is non-trivial: a generic model for the large-order behaviour violates it. We also analyse a specific example, based on a renormalon-type integral over the two-loop running-coupling, where the required cancellation does occur.

  16. Assessing upper limb function: transcultural adaptation and validation of the Portuguese version of the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, João Paulo; Oliveira, Sandra; Páscoa Pinheiro, João; L Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Brachial hemiparesis is one of the most frequent sequelae of stroke, leading to important functional disability given the role of the upper limb in executing activities of daily living (ADL). The Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale (SULCS) is a stroke-specific assessment instrument that evaluates functional capacity of the upper limb based on the execution of 10 tasks. The objective of this study is the transcultural adaptation and psychometric validation of the Portuguese version of the SULCS. A Portuguese version of the SULCS was developed, using the process of forward-backward translation, after authorisation from the author of the original scale. Then, a multicentre study was conducted in Portuguese stroke patients (n = 122) to validate the psychometric properties of the instrument. The relationship between sociodemographic and clinical characteristics was used to test construct validity. The relationship between SULCS scores and other instruments was used to test criterion validity. Semantic and linguistic adaptation of the SULCS was executed without substantial issues and allowed the development of a Portuguese version. The application of this instrument suggested the existence of celling effect (19.7% of participants with maximum score). Reliability was demonstrated through the intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.98. As for construct validity, SULCS was sensible to muscle tonus and aphasia. SULCS classification impacted the scores of the Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke (MESUPES) and the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). The present version of SULCS shows valid and reliable cultural adaptation, with good reliability and stability.

  17. [Detecting and measuring functional and organic disease in general population: Development and validation of TOPYPS clinical scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailhez, Guillem; Castaño, Juan; Rosado, Silvia; Ballester, M Del Mar; Vendrell, Cristina; Canale, Francisco; Bulbena, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    To develop and validate the TOPYPS scale, an instrument designed to: (i)detect with a high degree of suspicion the most frequent functional pathologies according to standard diagnostic criteria, and (ii)to assess the physical health in the general population quickly, comprehensive and reliable. Validation of a scale. Primary Care Centre, Barcelona. The scale was administered to 67 randomly selected adults. TOPYPS scale was administered to 67 adults randomly selected from a primary care setting in Barcelona, Spain. TOPYPS has six sections based on body systems, each one scored according to the degree of interference in daily activity, type of treatment received, and prognostic of the reported illnesses in each section. Test-retest reliability completions were on two separate occasions one week apart. Validity was then tested by comparing the results with the clinical examination conducted by two different specialists in general practice (gold standard). Repeatability (test-retest) and inter-rater agreement for each of the six sections and for the total score were satisfactory. Validity was acceptable both for content and construct, according to their correlation with the gold standard. TOPYPS displayed good psychometrical properties. It is a suitable tool to detect and measure functional and organic diseases in general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Extensions of Island Biogeography Theory predict the scaling of functional trait composition with habitat area and isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Claire; Mouillot, David; Kulbicki, Michel; Gravel, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    The Theory of Island Biogeography (TIB) predicts how area and isolation influence species richness equilibrium on insular habitats. However, the TIB remains silent about functional trait composition and provides no information on the scaling of functional diversity with area, an observation that is now documented in many systems. To fill this gap, we develop a probabilistic approach to predict the distribution of a trait as a function of habitat area and isolation, extending the TIB beyond the traditional species-area relationship. We compare model predictions to the body-size distribution of piscivorous and herbivorous fishes found on tropical reefs worldwide. We find that small and isolated reefs have a higher proportion of large-sized species than large and connected reefs. We also find that knowledge of species body-size and trophic position improves the predictions of fish occupancy on tropical reefs, supporting both the allometric and trophic theory of island biogeography. The integration of functional ecology to island biogeography is broadly applicable to any functional traits and provides a general probabilistic approach to study the scaling of trait distribution with habitat area and isolation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  19. Ontogenetic scaling patterns and functional anatomy of the pelvic limb musculature in emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Lamas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae are exclusively terrestrial, bipedal and cursorial ratites with some similar biomechanical characteristics to humans. Their growth rates are impressive, as their body mass increases eighty-fold from hatching to adulthood whilst maintaining the same mode of locomotion throughout life. These ontogenetic characteristics stimulate biomechanical questions about the strategies that allow emus to cope with their rapid growth and locomotion, which can be partly addressed via scaling (allometric analysis of morphology. In this study we have collected pelvic limb anatomical data (muscle architecture, tendon length, tendon mass and bone lengths and calculated muscle physiological cross sectional area (PCSA and average tendon cross sectional area from emus across three ontogenetic stages (n = 17, body masses from 3.6 to 42 kg. The data were analysed by reduced major axis regression to determine how these biomechanically relevant aspects of morphology scaled with body mass. Muscle mass and PCSA showed a marked trend towards positive allometry (26 and 27 out of 34 muscles respectively and fascicle length showed a more mixed scaling pattern. The long tendons of the main digital flexors scaled with positive allometry for all characteristics whilst other tendons demonstrated a less clear scaling pattern. Finally, the two longer bones of the limb (tibiotarsus and tarsometatarsus also exhibited positive allometry for length, and two others (femur and first phalanx of digit III had trends towards isometry. These results indicate that emus experience a relative increase in their muscle force-generating capacities, as well as potentially increasing the force-sustaining capacities of their tendons, as they grow. Furthermore, we have clarified anatomical descriptions and provided illustrations of the pelvic limb muscle–tendon units in emus.

  20. Evaluation of complete functional status of patients with stroke by Functional Independence Measure scale on admission, discharge, and six months poststroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Alikhani, Ebrahim; Bayat, Masume; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the patients with stroke by Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale, at the times of admission to hospital, discharge, and six-month poststroke, and to determine the level of improvement in patients after rehabilitative procedures. Methods: A total number of 108 patients with stroke entered the study who were admitted to neurology ward. They all received rehabilitation consultation, and occupational and physical therapies were prescribed for them. Finally, their functional status was evaluated by FIM scale. Results: The median (and range) of FIM scores were 86 (15-119), 102 (16-123) and 119 (17-126) at admission, discharge, and after six-month follow-up, respectively. Our observations showed a significant improvement in FIM scores (P < 0.001). About 13, 30, and 76 percent of the patients in individual functional tasks of motor domain and 61, 75, and 86 percent in cognitive domain got the score of 6 or 7 (complete or partial independence) on admission, discharge, and after six months, respectively. There was a reverse correlation between age and FIM improvement and also duration of hospitalization (P = 0.002). Conclusion: The study showed that the FIM is a valid tool for evaluation of patients with stroke, their follow-up and tracking the disease course. Moreover, we concluded that patients with stroke make a significant improvement in their functional status overtime. The exact effect of rehabilitative procedures and comparison with no treatment, must be assessed in separate studies. PMID:28435628

  1. Adaptation, acclimation, and assembly: How optimality principles govern the scaling of form, function, and diversity of ecosystem function in the light of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enquist, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    The link between variation in species-specific traits - due to acclimation, adaptation, and how ecological communities assemble in time and space - and larger scale ecosystem processes is an important focus for global change research. Understanding such linkages requires synthesis of evolutionary, biogeograpahic, and biogeochemical approaches. Recent observations reveal several paradoxical patterns across ecosystems. Optimality principles provide a novel framework for generating numerous predictions for how ecosystems have and will reorganize and respond to climate change. Tropical elevation gradients are natural laboratories to assess how changing climate can ramify to influence tropical forest diversity and ecosystem functioning. We tested several new predictions from trait- and metabolic scaling theories by assessing the covariation between climate, traits, biomass and gross and net primary productivity (GPP and NPP) across tropical forest plots spanning elevation gradients. We measured multiple leaf physiological, morphological, and stoichiometric traits linked to variation in tree growth. Consistent with theory, observed decreases in NPP and GPP with temperature were best predicted by forest biomass, and scaled allometrically as predicted by theory but the effect of temperature was much less, characterized by a kinetic response much lower ( 0.1eV) than predicted ( 0.65eV). This is likely due to an observed exponential increase in the mean community leaf P:N ratio and photosynthetic nutrient use efficiency with decreases in temperature. Our results are consistent with predictions from Trait Driver Theory, where adaptive/acclamatory shifts in plant traits compensate for the kinetic effects of temperature on tree growth. Further, most of the traits measured showed significantly skewed trait distributions consistent with recent observations that observed shifts in species composition. The development of trait-based scaling theory provides a robust basis to predict

  2. Resonant state expansion of the resolvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren, T.; Lind, P. (Department of Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden))

    1993-02-01

    An analytic method of generating resonant state expansions from the standard completeness relation of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is described and shown to reproduce the generalized completeness relations, earlier derived, involving resonant states. The method is then applied to the expansion of the resolvent (the complete Green's function), the symmetry properties of which [ital seem] to be destroyed if a conventional application of the completeness relations is made. These forms of expansions have a continuum term which contains symmetry-restoring contributions and can therefore never vanish identically, nor can it be neglected. The symmetry-conserving form of the expansion has a set of discrete terms which are identical in form to those of the Mittag-Leffler series for the resolvent. In addition, it contains a continuum contribution which in some cases vanishes identically, but in general does not. We illustrate these findings with numerical applictions in which the potential (a square well) is chosen so as to permit analytic evaluation of practically all functions and quantities involved.

  3. The Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale as a predictor of peak aerobic capacity and ambulatory function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Frederick M.; Katzel, Leslie I.; Sorkin, John D.; Macko, Richard F.; Shulman, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    The Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is a widely applied index of disease severity. Our objective was to assess the utility of UPDRS for predicting peak aerobic capacity (VO2 peak) and ambulatory function. Participants (n = 70) underwent evaluation for UPDRS (Total and Motor ratings), VO2 peak, 6-minute walk distance (6MW), and 30-foot self-selected walking speed (SSWS). Using regression, we determined the extent to which the Total and Motor UPDRS scores predicted each functional capacity measure after adjusting for age and sex. We also tested whether adding the Hoehn and Yahr scale (H-Y) to the model changed predictive power of the UPDRS. Adjusted for age and sex, both the Total UPDRS and Motor UPDRS subscale failed to predict VO2 peak. The Total UPDRS did weakly predict 6MW and SSWS (both p scales do not predict VO2 peak, but that a weak relationship exists between Total UPDRS and measures of ambulatory function. PMID:23341319

  4. Genome-wide identification and comparative expression analysis reveal a rapid expansion and functional divergence of duplicated genes in the WRKY gene family of cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiu-Yang; Xia, En-Hua; Liu, Fei-Hu; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2015-02-15

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs), one of the ten largest TF families in higher plants, play important roles in regulating plant development and resistance. To date, little is known about the WRKY TF family in Brassica oleracea. Recently, the completed genome sequence of cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata) allows us to systematically analyze WRKY genes in this species. A total of 148 WRKY genes were characterized and classified into seven subgroups that belong to three major groups. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses revealed that the repertoire of cabbage WRKY genes was derived from a common ancestor shared with Arabidopsis thaliana. The B. oleracea WRKY genes were found to be preferentially retained after the whole-genome triplication (WGT) event in its recent ancestor, suggesting that the WGT event had largely contributed to a rapid expansion of the WRKY gene family in B. oleracea. The analysis of RNA-Seq data from various tissues (i.e., roots, stems, leaves, buds, flowers and siliques) revealed that most of the identified WRKY genes were positively expressed in cabbage, and a large portion of them exhibited patterns of differential and tissue-specific expression, demonstrating that these gene members might play essential roles in plant developmental processes. Comparative analysis of the expression level among duplicated genes showed that gene expression divergence was evidently presented among cabbage WRKY paralogs, indicating functional divergence of these duplicated WRKY genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Micro-architected Composite Lattices with Tunable Negative Thermal Expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiming

    Solid materials with minimum or negative thermal expansion (NTE) have broad applications, from dental fillings to thermal-sensitive precision instruments. Previous studies on NTE structures were mostly focused on theoretically design and 2D experimental demonstrations. Here, aided with multimaterial projection micro-stereolithography, we experimentally fabricate multi-material composite lattices that exhibit significant negative thermal expansion in three directions and over a large range of temperature variations. The negative thermal expansion is induced by the structural interaction of material components with distinct thermal expansion coefficients. The NTE performance can be tuned over a large range by varying the thermal expansion coefficient difference between constituent beams and geometrical arrangement. Our experimental results match qualitatively with a simple scaling law and quantitatively consistently with computational models.

  6. Permissible limit for mandibular expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shirai, Sawa; Yano, Shinya; Nakanishi, Kotoe; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2005-04-01

    In recent years, mandibular expansion has been increasingly performed in conjunction with orthodontic treatment. Lateral tipping of the molars associated with mandibular expansion should, however, be considered, because excessive expansion may result in excessive buccal tooth inclination, which may disturb the occlusal relationship. This study was conducted to quantitatively clarify molar movement during mandibular expansion using the Schwarz appliance to determine the permissible limit of mandibular expansion as a clinical index for inclination movement. Inclinations in the masticatory surface of the first molar and intermolar width were measured before expansion (T1), after expansion (T2), and before edgewise treatment (T3). Lower plaster models from 29 subjects treated with expansion plates were used and compared with models from 11 control subjects with normal occlusion. The average treatment change (T1-T2) in intermolar width was 5.42 mm (standard deviation 1.98), and the average angle of buccal tooth inclination was 10.16 degrees (standard deviation 3.83). No significant correlation was found between age prior to treatment and the treatment period when they were compared with the intermolar width increments and inclination angles. There was a significant positive correlation between retention duration and the amount of expansion. The regression coefficient of the angle of buccal tooth inclination during expansion to the increment of the intermolar width was approximately 0.2. This means that 1 mm of expansion is accompanied by 5 degrees of molar lateral tipping. This coefficient is clinically useful for estimating the permissible limit for mandibular expansion.

  7. The Spanish lower extremity functional scale: a reliable, valid and responsive questionnaire to assess musculoskeletal disorders in the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Díaz, David; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Osuna-Pérez, María Catalina; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Fernández, Ángeles Díaz; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) is a widely used questionnaire to evaluate the functional impairment of a patient with a disorder of one or both lower extremities. It also can be used to monitor the patient over time and to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention. Nevertheless there is no Spanish version of the LEFS, so the aim of this study was the translation and cross-cultural adaption of the Spanish version of the LEFS and to evaluate its psychometrics properties. The questionnaire was cross cultural adapted into Spanish. The psychometric properties tested in the Spanish version of the LEFS were: internal consistency, test-retest reliability, constructs validity, discriminative validity, responsiveness, concurrent validity and floor and ceiling effects in 132 participants seeking for treatment due to lower extremity dysfunction. The Spanish version of the LEFS had high internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.989), test-retest reliability (ICC=0.998, 95% CI: 0.996-0.999) and presented a high correlation with the SF-36 (36-Item Short-Form Health Survey) especially with the physical function and pain subscales. The construct validity showed a single factor that account for 84.95% of the variance. The standard error of measurement of the Spanish version of the LEFS was 0.88 scale points (95% CI) and the minimal detectable change was 2.18 scale points (95% CI). The sample, collected from five Spanish physical therapy centers, was divided in groups (acute, sub-acute and chronic subjects). Within group changes showed a significant improvement on the LEFS score (pspeaker population. Implications for Rehabilitation Cross-cultural adaptation of a self-reported questionnaire to evaluate musculoskeletal lower extremity disorders in the Spanish population. To provide Spanish clinicians and physiotherapists a useful tool to assess the lower extremity function. To provide Spanish researchers a valid tool for research on lower extremity function: patient

  8. Simulation of Left Atrial Function Using a Multi-Scale Model of the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironet, Antoine; Dauby, Pierre C.; Paeme, Sabine; Kosta, Sarah; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    During a full cardiac cycle, the left atrium successively behaves as a reservoir, a conduit and a pump. This complex behavior makes it unrealistic to apply the time-varying elastance theory to characterize the left atrium, first, because this theory has known limitations, and second, because it is still uncertain whether the load independence hypothesis holds. In this study, we aim to bypass this uncertainty by relying on another kind of mathematical model of the cardiac chambers. In the present work, we describe both the left atrium and the left ventricle with a multi-scale model. The multi-scale property of this model comes from the fact that pressure inside a cardiac chamber is derived from a model of the sarcomere behavior. Macroscopic model parameters are identified from reference dog hemodynamic data. The multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including the left atrium is then simulated to show that the physiological roles of the left atrium are correctly reproduced. This include a biphasic pressure wave and an eight-shaped pressure-volume loop. We also test the validity of our model in non basal conditions by reproducing a preload reduction experiment by inferior vena cava occlusion with the model. We compute the variation of eight indices before and after this experiment and obtain the same variation as experimentally observed for seven out of the eight indices. In summary, the multi-scale mathematical model presented in this work is able to correctly account for the three roles of the left atrium and also exhibits a realistic left atrial pressure-volume loop. Furthermore, the model has been previously presented and validated for the left ventricle. This makes it a proper alternative to the time-varying elastance theory if the focus is set on precisely representing the left atrial and left ventricular behaviors. PMID:23755183

  9. Simulation of left atrial function using a multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Pironet

    Full Text Available During a full cardiac cycle, the left atrium successively behaves as a reservoir, a conduit and a pump. This complex behavior makes it unrealistic to apply the time-varying elastance theory to characterize the left atrium, first, because this theory has known limitations, and second, because it is still uncertain whether the load independence hypothesis holds. In this study, we aim to bypass this uncertainty by relying on another kind of mathematical model of the cardiac chambers. In the present work, we describe both the left atrium and the left ventricle with a multi-scale model. The multi-scale property of this model comes from the fact that pressure inside a cardiac chamber is derived from a model of the sarcomere behavior. Macroscopic model parameters are identified from reference dog hemodynamic data. The multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including the left atrium is then simulated to show that the physiological roles of the left atrium are correctly reproduced. This include a biphasic pressure wave and an eight-shaped pressure-volume loop. We also test the validity of our model in non basal conditions by reproducing a preload reduction experiment by inferior vena cava occlusion with the model. We compute the variation of eight indices before and after this experiment and obtain the same variation as experimentally observed for seven out of the eight indices. In summary, the multi-scale mathematical model presented in this work is able to correctly account for the three roles of the left atrium and also exhibits a realistic left atrial pressure-volume loop. Furthermore, the model has been previously presented and validated for the left ventricle. This makes it a proper alternative to the time-varying elastance theory if the focus is set on precisely representing the left atrial and left ventricular behaviors.

  10. Simulation of left atrial function using a multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironet, Antoine; Dauby, Pierre C; Paeme, Sabine; Kosta, Sarah; Chase, J Geoffrey; Desaive, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    During a full cardiac cycle, the left atrium successively behaves as a reservoir, a conduit and a pump. This complex behavior makes it unrealistic to apply the time-varying elastance theory to characterize the left atrium, first, because this theory has known limitations, and second, because it is still uncertain whether the load independence hypothesis holds. In this study, we aim to bypass this uncertainty by relying on another kind of mathematical model of the cardiac chambers. In the present work, we describe both the left atrium and the left ventricle with a multi-scale model. The multi-scale property of this model comes from the fact that pressure inside a cardiac chamber is derived from a model of the sarcomere behavior. Macroscopic model parameters are identified from reference dog hemodynamic data. The multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including the left atrium is then simulated to show that the physiological roles of the left atrium are correctly reproduced. This include a biphasic pressure wave and an eight-shaped pressure-volume loop. We also test the validity of our model in non basal conditions by reproducing a preload reduction experiment by inferior vena cava occlusion with the model. We compute the variation of eight indices before and after this experiment and obtain the same variation as experimentally observed for seven out of the eight indices. In summary, the multi-scale mathematical model presented in this work is able to correctly account for the three roles of the left atrium and also exhibits a realistic left atrial pressure-volume loop. Furthermore, the model has been previously presented and validated for the left ventricle. This makes it a proper alternative to the time-varying elastance theory if the focus is set on precisely representing the left atrial and left ventricular behaviors.

  11. From Points to Patterns - Functional Relations between Groundwater Connectivity and Catchment-scale Streamflow Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderer, M.; McGlynn, B. L.; van Meerveld, I. H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater measurements can help us to improve our understanding of runoff generation at the catchment-scale but typically only provide point-scale data. These measurements, therefore, need to be interpolated or upscaled in order to obtain information about catchment scale groundwater dynamics. Our approach used data from 51 spatially distributed groundwater monitoring sites in a Swiss pre-alpine catchment and time series clustering to define six groundwater response clusters. Each of the clusters was characterized by distinctly different site characteristics (i.e., Topographic Wetness Index and curvature), which allowed us to assign all unmonitored locations to one of these clusters. Time series modeling and the definition of response thresholds (i.e., the depth of more transmissive soil layers) allowed us to derive maps of the spatial distribution of active (i.e., responding) locations across the catchment at 15 min time intervals. Connectivity between all active locations and the stream network was determined using a graph theory approach. The extent of the active and connected areas differed during events and suggests that not all active locations directly contributed to streamflow. Gate keeper sites prevented connectivity of upslope locations to the channel network. Streamflow dynamics at the catchment outlet were correlated to catchment average connectivity dynamics. In a sensitivity analysis we tested six different groundwater levels for a site to be considered "active", which showed that the definition of the threshold did not significantly influence the conclusions drawn from our analysis. This study is the first one to derive patterns of groundwater dynamics based on empirical data (rather than interpolation) and provides insight into the spatio-temporal evolution of the active and connected runoff source areas at the catchment-scale that is critical to understanding the dynamics of water quantity and quality in streams.

  12. Scalar-QED {beta}-functions near Planck`s scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Gentil O. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Campos e Particulas

    1997-12-31

    The Renormalization Group Flow Equations of the Scalar-QED model near Planck`s scale are computed within the framework of the average effective action. Exact Flow Equations, corrected by Einstein Gravity, for the running self-interacting scalar coupling parameter and for the running v.e.v. of {phi} {sup *} {phi}, are computed taking into account threshold effects. Analytic solutions are given in the infrared and ultraviolet limits. (author) 17 refs.

  13. Modeling clinically relevant blast parameters based on scaling principles produces functional & histological deficits in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ryan C; Naser, Zachary J; Logsdon, Aric F; DiPasquale, Kenneth H; Jackson, Garrett J; Robson, Matthew J; Gettens, Robert T T; Matsumoto, Rae R; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2013-10-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury represents a leading cause of injury in modern warfare with injury pathogenesis poorly understood. Preclinical models of blast injury remain poorly standardized across laboratories and the clinical relevance unclear based upon pulmonary injury scaling laws. Models capable of high peak overpressures and of short duration may better replicate clinical exposure when scaling principles are considered. In this work we demonstrate a tabletop shock tube model capable of high peak overpressures and of short duration. By varying the thickness of the polyester membrane, peak overpressure can be controlled. We used membranes with a thickness of 0.003, 0.005, 0.007, and 0.010 in to generate peak reflected overpressures of 31.47, 50.72, 72.05, and 90.10 PSI, respectively. Blast exposure was shown to decrease total activity and produce neural degeneration as indicated by fluoro-jade B staining. Similarly, blast exposure resulted in increased glial activation as indicated by an increase in the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein expressing astrocytes compared to control within the corpus callosum, the region of greatest apparent injury following blast exposure. Similar findings were observed with regard to activated microglia, some of which displayed phagocytic-like morphology within the corpus callosum following blast exposure, particularly with higher peak overpressures. Furthermore, hematoxylin and eosin staining showed the presence of red blood cells within the parenchyma and red, swollen neurons following blast injury. Exposure to blast with 90.10 PSI peak reflected overpressure resulted in immediate mortality associated with extensive intracranial bleeding. This work demonstrates one of the first examples of blast-induced brain injury in the rodent when exposed to a blast wave scaled from human exposure based on scaling principles derived from pulmonary injury lethality curves. © 2013.

  14. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  15. Angular spectral plane-wave expansion of nonstationary random fields in stochastic mode-stirred reverberation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaut, Luk R

    2010-04-01

    We derive an integral expression for the plane-wave expansion of the time-varying (nonstationary) random field inside a mode-stirred reverberation chamber. It is shown that this expansion is a so-called oscillatory process, whose kernel can be expressed explicitly in closed form. The effect of nonstationarity is a modulation of the spectral density of the field on a time scale that is a function of the cavity relaxation time. It is also shown how the contribution by a nonzero initial value of the field can be incorporated into the expansion. The results are extended to a special class of second-order processes, relevant to the reception of a mode-stirred reverberation field by a device under test with a first-order (relaxation-type) frequency response.

  16. Different scaling of white matter volume, cortical connectivity, and gyrification across rodent and primate brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Antunes, Lissa; Mota, Bruno; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of the cortical gray matter in evolution has been accompanied by an even faster expansion of the subcortical white matter volume and by folding of the gray matter surface, events traditionally considered to occur homogeneously across mammalian species. Here we investigate how white matter expansion and cortical folding scale across species of rodents and primates as the gray matter gains neurons. We find very different scaling rules of white matter expansion across the two orders, favoring volume conservation and smaller propagation times in primates. For a similar number of cortical neurons, primates have a smaller connectivity fraction and less white matter volume than rodents; moreover, as the cortex gains neurons, there is a much faster increase in white matter volume and in its ratio to gray matter volume in rodents than in primates. Order-specific scaling of the white matter can be attributed to different scaling of average fiber caliber and neuronal connectivity in rodents and primates. Finally, cortical folding increases as different functions of the number of cortical neurons in rodents and primates, scaling faster in the latter than in the former. While the neuronal rules that govern gray and white matter scaling are different across rodents and primates, we find that they can be explained by the same unifying model, with order-specific exponents. The different scaling of the white matter has implications for the scaling of propagation time and computational capacity in evolution, and calls for a reappraisal of developmental models of cortical expansion in evolution. PMID:23576961

  17. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Turkish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale on patients with knee injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citaker, Seyit; Kafa, Nihan; Hazar Kanik, Zeynep; Ugurlu, Mustafa; Kafa, Baris; Tuna, Zeynep

    2016-03-01

    The Lower Extremity Functional Scale is a widely used questionnaire to evaluate the functional impairment in lower extremities. To date, the Lower Extremity Functional Scale has not been translated into Turkish. The aim of this study is to translate and culturally adapt the Lower Extremity Functional Scale into a Turkish version, and evaluate the psychometric properties of this version in patients with knee injuries. The translation of the English version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale into a Turkish version was performed using standard guidelines. Validity and reliability of Turkish version were tested in 134 patients with knee injuries. Association level between other outcomes measures (Kujala Patellofemoral Score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and a Visual Analog Scale) and Turkish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale was analyzed to assess validation. Participants completed the questionnaire at baseline and after 2 days to test reliability. The Turkish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale was showed a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.93). ICCs were 0.96 and no floor or ceiling effects. The Lower Extremity Functional Scale had a high level of association with the Kujala Patellofemoral Score (r = 0.82), Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale (r = 0.80) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores (r = 0.69) (all, p < 0.05). The Turkish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale is a valid and reliable questionnaire that can be used to evaluate functional status in Turkish speaking patients with different knee disorders. III.

  18. Large-scale genome-wide analysis identifies genetic variants associated with cardiac structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Philipp S.; Felix, Janine F.; Schillert, Arne; Chen, Ming-Huei; Leening, Maarten J.G.; Völker, Uwe; Großmann, Vera; Brody, Jennifer A.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Pramana, Setia; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Reinhold; Stanton, Alice V.; Malzahn, Dörthe; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Tiller, Daniel; Smith, J. Gustav; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Musani, Solomon K.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Pers, Tune H.; Morley, Michael; Kleber, Marcus E.; Aragam, Jayashri; Bis, Joshua C.; Bisping, Egbert; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cheng, Susan; Deckers, Jaap W.; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Edelmann, Frank; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Lude; Friedrich, Nele; Harris, Tamara B.; Hofer, Edith; Hofman, Albert; Huang, Jie; Hughes, Alun D.; Kähönen, Mika; investigators, KNHI; Kruppa, Jochen; Lackner, Karl J.; Lannfelt, Lars; Laskowski, Rafael; Launer, Lenore J.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Loley, Christina; Mayet, Jamil; Medenwald, Daniel; Morris, Andrew P.; Müller, Christian; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nappo, Stefania; Nilsson, Peter M.; Nuding, Sebastian; Nutile, Teresa; Peters, Annette; Pfeufer, Arne; Pietzner, Diana; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ruohonen, Saku T.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Samdarshi, Tandaw E.; Sharp, Andrew S.P.; Shields, Denis C.; Sorice, Rossella; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Stricker, Bruno H.; Surendran, Praveen; Töglhofer, Anna M.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Völzke, Henry; Ziegler, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; März, Winfried; Cappola, Thomas P.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Fox, Ervin R.; Dueker, Nicole D.; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Melander, Olle; Lehtimäki, Terho; Ciullo, Marina; Hicks, Andrew A.; Lind, Lars; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Pieske, Burkert; Barron, Anthony J.; Zweiker, Robert; Schunkert, Heribert; Ingelsson, Erik; Liu, Kiang; Arnett, Donna K.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Larson, Martin G.; Felix, Stephan B.; Franco, Oscar H.; Zeller, Tanja; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Dörr, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Understanding the genetic architecture of cardiac structure and function may help to prevent and treat heart disease. This investigation sought to identify common genetic variations associated with inter-individual variability in cardiac structure and function. METHODS. A GWAS meta-analysis of echocardiographic traits was performed, including 46,533 individuals from 30 studies (EchoGen consortium). The analysis included 16 traits of left ventricular (LV) structure, and systolic and diastolic function. RESULTS. The discovery analysis included 21 cohorts for structural and systolic function traits (n = 32,212) and 17 cohorts for diastolic function traits (n = 21,852). Replication was performed in 5 cohorts (n = 14,321) and 6 cohorts (n = 16,308), respectively. Besides 5 previously reported loci, the combined meta-analysis identified 10 additional genome-wide significant SNPs: rs12541595 near MTSS1 and rs10774625 in ATXN2 for LV end-diastolic internal dimension; rs806322 near KCNRG, rs4765663 in CACNA1C, rs6702619 near PALMD, rs7127129 in TMEM16A, rs11207426 near FGGY, rs17608766 in GOSR2, and rs17696696 in CFDP1 for aortic root diameter; and rs12440869 in IQCH for Doppler transmitral A-wave peak velocity. Findings were in part validated in other cohorts and in GWAS of related disease traits. The genetic loci showed associations with putative signaling pathways, and with gene expression in whole blood, monocytes, and myocardial tissue. CONCLUSION. The additional genetic loci identified in this large meta-analysis of cardiac structure and function provide insights into the underlying genetic architecture of cardiac structure and warrant follow-up in future functional studies. FUNDING. For detailed information per study, see Acknowledgments. PMID:28394258

  19. Evaluating expansion strategies for startup European Union dairy farm businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, R; Shalloo, L; Pierce, K M; Horan, B

    2013-06-01

    A stochastic whole-farm simulation model was used to examine alternative strategies for new entrant dairy farmers to grow and develop dairy farm businesses in the context of European Union (EU) milk quota abolition in 2015. Six alternative strategies were compared: remain static, natural growth expansion, waiting until after EU milk quota abolition to expand, a full-scale expansion strategy without milk quotas and not incurring super levy penalties, a full-scale expansion strategy with milk quotas and incurring super levy penalties, and once-a-day milking until EU milk quota abolition, followed by full-scale expansion. Each discrete whole farm investment strategy was evaluated over a 15-yr period (2013-2027) using multiple financial stability and risk indicators, including overall discounted farm business profitability, net worth change, return on investment, and financial risk. The results of this study indicate that, although associated with increased risk, dairy farm expansion will ensure the future profitability of the farm business. Within the context of EU milk quotas until 2015, the most attractive expansion strategy is to increase cow numbers while avoiding super levy fines using once-a-day milking techniques, increasing to the full capacity of the dairy farm once milk quotas are removed. In contrast, the results also indicate that dairy farms that remain static will experience a significant reduction in farm profitability in the coming year due to production cost inflation. Cash flow deficits were observed during the initial year of expansion and, therefore, rapidly expanding dairy farm businesses require a significant cash reserve to alleviate business risk during the initial year of expansion. The results of this analysis also indicate that dairy farm businesses that expand using lower cost capital investments and avoid milk quota super levy fines significantly reduce the financial risks associated with expansion. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science

  20. Linkages between microbial functional potential and wastewater constituents in large-scale membrane bioreactors for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanmei; Shen, Yue-xiao; Liang, Peng; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng; Huang, Xia

    2014-06-01

    Large-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) have been widely used for the municipal wastewater treatment, whose performance relies on microbial communities of activated sludge. Nevertheless, microbial functional structures in MBRs remain little understood. To gain insight into functional genes and their steering environmental factors, we adopted GeoChip, a high-throughput microarray-based tool, to examine microbial genes in four large-scale, in-operation MBRs located in Beijing, China. The results revealed substantial microbial gene heterogeneity (43.7-85.1% overlaps) among different MBRs. Mantel tests indicated that microbial nutrient cycling genes were significantly (P wastewater constituent removal. In addition, functional genes shared by all four MBRs contained a large number of genes involved in antibiotics resistance, metal resistance and organic remediation, suggesting that they were required for degradation or resistance to toxic compounds in wastewater. The linkages between microbial functional structures and environmental variables were also unveiled by the finding of hydraulic retention time, influent COD, [Formula: see text] -N, mixed liquid temperature and humic substances as major factors shaping microbial communities. Together, the results presented demonstrate the utility of GeoChip-based microarray approach in examining microbial communities of wastewater treatment plants and provide insights into the forces driving important processes of element cycling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Primordial vorticity and gradient expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The evolution equations of the vorticities of the electrons, ions and photons in a pre-decoupling plasma are derived, in a fully inhomogeneous geometry, by combining the general relativistic gradient expansion and the drift approximation within the Adler-Misner-Deser decomposition. The vorticity transfer between the different species is discussed in this novel framework and a set of general conservation laws, connecting the vorticities of the three-component plasma with the magnetic field intensity, is derived. After demonstrating that a source of large-scale vorticity resides in the spatial gradients of the geometry and of the electromagnetic sources, the total vorticity is estimated to lowest order in the spatial gradients and by enforcing the validity of the momentum constraint. By acknowledging the current bounds on the tensor to scalar ratio in the (minimal) tensor extension of the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm the maximal comoving magnetic field induced by the total vorticity turns out to be, at most, of the or...

  2. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Merabet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA, we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  3. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  4. The scaling behavior of hand motions reveals self-organization during an executive function task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastas, Jason R.; Stephen, Damian G.; Dixon, James A.

    2011-05-01

    Recent approaches to cognition explain cognitive phenomena in terms of interaction-dominant dynamics. In the current experiment, we extend this approach to executive function, a construct used to describe flexible, goal-oriented behavior. Participants were asked to perform a widely used executive function task, card sorting, under two conditions. In one condition, participants were given a rule with which to sort the cards. In the other condition, participants had to induce the rule from experimenter feedback. The motion of each participant’s hand was tracked during the sorting task. Detrended fluctuation analysis was performed on the inter-point time series using a windowing strategy to capture changes over each trial. For participants in the induction condition, the Hurst exponent sharply increased and then decreased. The Hurst exponents for the explicit condition did not show this pattern. Our results suggest that executive function may be understood in terms of changes in stability that arise from interaction-dominant dynamics.

  5. Does the Social Functioning Scale reflect real-life social functioning? An experience sampling study in patients with a non-affective psychotic disorder and healthy control individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M; Reininghaus, U; van Nierop, M; Janssens, M; Myin-Germeys, I

    2017-12-01

    The ecological validity of retrospective measures of social functioning is currently unknown in patients with schizophrenia. In the present study, patients with a diagnosis of non-affective psychosis were compared with controls on two measures of social functioning: the Social Functioning Scale (SFS) and daily-life measures collected with the Experience Sampling Methodology (ESM). The associations between both measures were examined in each group of participants to test for the ecological validity of the SFS. A total of 126 participants with a non-affective psychotic disorder and 109 controls completed the SFS and a 6-day momentary ESM protocol assessing various aspects of social functioning. Multiple linear and multilevel regression analyses were performed to test for group differences in social functioning level and examine associations between the two assessment techniques. Lower social functioning was observed in patients compared with controls on retrospective and momentary measures. The SFS interpersonal domain (social engagement/withdrawal and interpersonal behaviour dimensions) was associated with the percentage of time spent alone and negative appraisal of social interactions. The SFS activity domain (pro-social and recreational activities dimensions) was negatively associated with time spent in leisure activities. The SFS showed some degree of ecological validity at assessing broad aspects of social functioning. Low scores on the SFS social engagement/withdrawal and interpersonal behaviour dimensions captured social isolation and social avoidance in daily life, but not lack of interest in socializing. Ecological validity of the SFS activity domain was low. ESM offers a rich alternative to classical assessment techniques of social functioning.

  6. A cortical sparse distributed coding model linking mini- and macrocolumn-scale functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard J Rinkus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available No generic function for the minicolumn—i.e., one that would apply equally well to all cortical areas and species—has yet been proposed. I propose that the minicolumn does have a generic functionality, which only becomes clear when seen in the context of the function of the higher-level, subsuming unit, the macrocolumn. I propose that: a a macrocolumn’s function is to store sparse distributed representations of its inputs and to be a recognizer of those inputs; and b the generic function of the minicolumn is to enforce macrocolumnar code sparseness. The minicolumn, defined here as a physically localized pool of ~20 L2/3 pyramidals, does this by acting as a winner-take-all (WTA competitive module, implying that macrocolumnar codes consist of ~70 active L2/3 cells, assuming ~70 minicolumns per macrocolumn. I describe an algorithm for activating these codes during both learning and retrievals, which causes more similar inputs to map to more highly intersecting codes, a property which yields ultra-fast (immediate, first-shot storage and retrieval. The algorithm achieves this by adding an amount of randomness (noise into the code selection process, which is inversely proportional to an input’s familiarity. I propose a possible mapping of the algorithm onto cortical circuitry, and adduce evidence for a neuromodulatory implementation of this familiarity-contingent noise mechanism. The model is distinguished from other recent columnar cortical circuit models in proposing a generic minicolumnar function in which a group of cells within the minicolumn, the L2/3 pyramidals, compete (WTA to be part of the macrocolumnar code.

  7. Control of modular multilevel converters based on time-scale analysis and orthogonal functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarri, L.; Tani, A.; Mengoni, M.

    2014-01-01

    Modular multilevel converter (MMC) is a promising multilevel topology for high-voltage applications that has been developed in recent years. The control of MMCs has been analyzed in detail in many papers, showing that the converter capacitors can be kept charged and balanced by controlling...... current is still a complex task and cannot be fully tackled with traditional linear control techniques. In this paper a multiple time-scale analysis is proposed to determine an approximated model of the MMC that can be used to solve the control problem of the capacitor voltages. In addition, it is shown...

  8. Locomotive syndrome in the elderly: translation, cultural adaptation, and Brazilian validation of the tool 25-Question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Regina Brandão Tavares

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The term Locomotive Syndrome refers to conditions in which the elderly are at high risk of inability to ambulate due to problems in locomotor system. For Locomotive Syndrome screening, the 25-Question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale was created. The objective here was to translate, adapt culturally to Brazil, and study the psychometric properties of 25-Question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale. Method: The translation and cultural adaptation of 25-Question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale were carried out, thus resulting in GLFS 25-P, whose psychometric properties were analyzed in a sample of 100 elderly subjects. Sociodemographic data on pain, falls, self-perceived health and basic and instrumental functionalities were determined. GLFS 25-P was applied three times: in one same day by two interviewers, and after 15 days, again by the first interviewer. Result: GLFS 25-P showed a high internal consistency value according to Cronbach's alpha coefficient (0.942, and excellent reproducibility, according to intraclass correlation, with interobserver and intraobserver values of 97.6% and 98.4%, respectively (p < 0.01. Agreements for each item of the instrument were considerable (between 0.248 and 0.673, according to Kappa statistic. In its validation, according to the Pearson's coefficient, regular and good correlations were obtained for the basic (BADL and instrumental (IADL activities of daily living, respectively (p < 0.01. Statistically significant associations with chronic pain (p < 0.001, falls (p = 0.02 and self-perceived health (p < 0.001 were found. A multivariate analysis showed a significantly higher risk of Locomotive Syndrome in the presence of chronic pain (OR 15.92, 95% CI 3.08–82.27 and with a worse self-perceived health (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07–0.79. Conclusion: GLFS 25-P proved to be a reliable and valid tool in Locomotive Syndrome screening for the elderly population.

  9. Differential Item Functioning in the SF-36 Physical Functioning and Mental Health Sub-Scales: A Population-Based Investigation in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Lix

    Full Text Available Self-reported health status measures, like the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36, can provide rich information about the overall health of a population and its components, such as physical, mental, and social health. However, differential item functioning (DIF, which arises when population sub-groups with the same underlying (i.e., latent level of health have different measured item response probabilities, may compromise the comparability of these measures. The purpose of this study was to test for DIF on the SF-36 physical functioning (PF and mental health (MH sub-scale items in a Canadian population-based sample.Study data were from the prospective Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos, which collected baseline data in 1996-1997. DIF was tested using a multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC method. Confirmatory factor analysis defined the latent variable measurement model for the item responses and latent variable regression with demographic and health status covariates (i.e., sex, age group, body weight, self-perceived general health produced estimates of the magnitude of DIF effects.The CaMos cohort consisted of 9423 respondents; 69.4% were female and 51.7% were less than 65 years. Eight of 10 items on the PF sub-scale and four of five items on the MH sub-scale exhibited DIF. Large DIF effects were observed on PF sub-scale items about vigorous and moderate activities, lifting and carrying groceries, walking one block, and bathing or dressing. On the MH sub-scale items, all DIF effects were small or moderate in size.SF-36 PF and MH sub-scale scores were not comparable across population sub-groups defined by demographic and health status variables due to the effects of DIF, although the magnitude of this bias was not large for most items. We recommend testing and adjusting for DIF to ensure comparability of the SF-36 in population-based investigations.

  10. Explaining forest productivity using tree functional traits and phylogenetic information: two sides of the same coin over evolutionary scale?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Alain; Joly, Simon; Messier, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Given evidences that diverse ecosystems provide more services than depauperate ones, much attention has now turned toward finding meaningful and operational diversity indices. We ask two questions: (1) Does phylogenetic diversity contain additional information not explained by functional traits? And (2) What are the strength and nature of the correlation between phylogeny and functional traits according to the evolutionary scale considered? We used data from permanent forest plots of northeastern Canada for which these links have been demonstrated and important functional traits identified. We show that the nature of the relationship between traits and phylogeny varies dramatically among traits, but also according to the evolutionary distance considered. The demonstration that different characters show phylogenetic autocorrelation at different evolutionary depths suggests that phylogenetic content of traits may be too crude to determine whether phylogenies contain relevant information. However, our study provides support for the use of phylogenies to assess ecosystem functioning when key functional traits are unavailable. We also highlight a potentially important contribution of phylogenetics for conservation and the study of the impact of biodiversity loss on ecosystem functioning and the provision of services, given the accumulating evidence that mechanisms promoting diversity effects shift over time to involve different traits.

  11. Consequences of Uncertainty in Global-Scale Land Cover Maps for Mapping Ecosystem Functions: An Analysis of Pollination Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Alkemade

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mapping ecosystem services (ESs is an important tool for providing the quantitative information necessary for the optimal use and protection of ecosystems and biodiversity. A common mapping approach is to apply established empirical relationships to ecosystem property maps. Often, ecosystem properties that provide services to humanity are strongly related to the land use and land cover, where the spatial allocation of the land cover in the landscape is especially important. Land use and land cover maps are, therefore, essential for ES mapping. However, insight into the uncertainties in land cover maps and how these propagate into ES maps is lacking. To analyze the effects of these uncertainties, we mapped pollination efficiency as an example of an ecosystem function, using two continental-scale land cover maps and two global-scale land cover maps. We compared the outputs with maps based on a detailed national-scale map. The ecosystem properties and functions could be mapped using the GLOBCOVER map with a reasonable to good accuracy. In homogeneous landscapes, an even coarser resolution map would suffice. For mapping ESs that depend on the spatial allocation of land cover in the landscape, a classification of satellite images using fractional land cover or mosaic classes is an asset.

  12. Cardiac Light-Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy for Multi-Scale and Rapid Imaging of Architecture and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Peng; Lee, Juhyun; Packard, René R. Sevag; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Xu, Hao; Ma, Jianguo; Ding, Yichen; Kang, Hanul; Chen, Harrison; Sung, Kevin; Kulkarni, Rajan; Ardehali, Reza; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Xu, Xiaolei; Ho, Chih-Ming; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2016-03-01

    Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) enables multi-dimensional and multi-scale imaging via illuminating specimens with a separate thin sheet of laser. It allows rapid plane illumination for reduced photo-damage and superior axial resolution and contrast. We hereby demonstrate cardiac LSFM (c-LSFM) imaging to assess the functional architecture of zebrafish embryos with a retrospective cardiac synchronization algorithm for four-dimensional reconstruction (3-D space + time). By combining our approach with tissue clearing techniques, we reveal the entire cardiac structures and hypertrabeculation of adult zebrafish hearts in response to doxorubicin treatment. By integrating the resolution enhancement technique with c-LSFM to increase the resolving power under a large field-of-view, we demonstrate the use of low power objective to resolve the entire architecture of large-scale neonatal mouse hearts, revealing the helical orientation of individual myocardial fibers. Therefore, our c-LSFM imaging approach provides multi-scale visualization of architecture and function to drive cardiovascular research with translational implication in congenital heart diseases.

  13. Orbital-dependent second-order scaled-opposite-spin correlation functionals in the optimized effective potential method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabowski, Ireneusz, E-mail: ig@fizyka.umk.pl; Śmiga, Szymon; Buksztel, Adam [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Fabiano, Eduardo [National Nanotechnology Laboratory, Istituto Nanoscienze–CNR, Via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Teale, Andrew M. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Sala, Fabio Della [National Nanotechnology Laboratory, Istituto Nanoscienze–CNR, Via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies @UNILE, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Barsanti, 73010 Arnesano (LE) (Italy)

    2014-07-14

    The performance of correlated optimized effective potential (OEP) functionals based on the spin-resolved second-order correlation energy is analysed. The relative importance of singly- and doubly- excited contributions as well as the effect of