WorldWideScience

Sample records for scaled particle theory

  1. Scaled-particle theory analysis of cylindrical cavities in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2015-04-01

    The solvation of hard spherocylindrical solutes is analyzed within the context of scaled-particle theory, which takes the view that the free energy of solvating an empty cavitylike solute is equal to the pressure-volume work required to inflate a solute from nothing to the desired size and shape within the solvent. Based on our analysis, an end cap approximation is proposed to predict the solvation free energy as a function of the spherocylinder length from knowledge regarding only the solvent density in contact with a spherical solute. The framework developed is applied to extend Reiss's classic implementation of scaled-particle theory and a previously developed revised scaled-particle theory to spherocylindrical solutes. To test the theoretical descriptions developed, molecular simulations of the solvation of infinitely long cylindrical solutes are performed. In hard-sphere solvents classic scaled-particle theory is shown to provide a reasonably accurate description of the solvent contact correlation and resulting solvation free energy per unit length of cylinders, while the revised scaled-particle theory fitted to measured values of the contact correlation provides a quantitative free energy. Applied to the Lennard-Jones solvent at a state-point along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve, however, classic scaled-particle theory fails to correctly capture the dependence of the contact correlation. Revised scaled-particle theory, on the other hand, provides a quantitative description of cylinder solvation in the Lennard-Jones solvent with a fitted interfacial free energy in good agreement with that determined for purely spherical solutes. The breakdown of classical scaled-particle theory does not result from the failure of the end cap approximation, however, but is indicative of neglected higher-order curvature dependences on the solvation free energy.

  2. Radial distribution function for hard spheres from scaled particle theory, and an improved equation of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiss, H.; Casberg, R.V.

    1974-08-01

    Previous applications of scaled particle theory have been limited to the calculation of thermodynamic properties of fluids rather than structure. In the present paper, the theory is expanded so that it is capable of yielding the radial distribution function. The method is first illustrated by applying it to one-dimensional fluids of hard rods where, as in other theories, the radial distribution function is obtained exactly. It is then applied to a fluid of hard spheres where a closure condition is necessary. This condition is supported by recent work in scaled particle theory dealing with the thermodynamics of boundary layers. It is used to calculate the radial distribution function around a lambda-cule of varying size, including one of the size of a typical hard sphere solvent molecule. (40 refs.)

  3. Exotic particles below the TeV from low scale flavour theories

    CERN Document Server

    Savoy, Carlos A

    2011-01-01

    A flavour gauge theory is observable only if the symmetry is broken at relatively low energies. The intrinsic parity-violation of the fermion representations in a flavour theory describing quark, lepton and higgsino masses and mixings generically requires anomaly cancellation by new fermions. Benchmark supersymmetric flavour models are built and studied to argue that: i) the flavour symmetry breaking should be about three orders of magnitude above the higgsino mass, enough also to efficiently suppress FCNC and CP violations coming from higher-dimensional operators; ii) new fermions with exotic decays into lighter particles are typically required at scales of the order of the higgsino mass.

  4. Salting out of methane by sodium chloride: A scaled particle theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2008-08-28

    The salting out of methane by adding NaCl to water at 25 degrees C and 1 atm is investigated by calculating the work of cavity creation by means of scaled particle theory and the methane-solvent energy of attraction. The latter quantity changes to little extent on passing from pure water to an aqueous 4M NaCl solution, whereas the magnitude of the work of cavity creation increases significantly, accounting for the salting out effect. There is quantitative agreement between the experimental values of the hydration Gibbs energy and the calculated ones. The behavior of the work of cavity creation is due to the increase in the volume packing density of NaCl solutions, since the average effective molecular diameter does not change, being always 2.80 A. The same approach allows the rationalization of the difference in methane salting out along the alkali chloride series. These results indicate that, fixed the aqueous solution density, the solubility of nonpolar species is mainly determined by the effective diameter of solvent molecules and the corresponding volume packing density. There is no need to take into account the H-bond rearrangement because it is characterized by an almost complete enthalpy-entropy compensation.

  5. Henry's Constants of Persistent Organic Pollutants by a Group-Contribution Method Based on Scaled-Particle Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razdan, Neil K; Koshy, David M; Prausnitz, John M

    2017-10-09

    A group-contribution method based on scaled-particle theory was developed to predict Henry's constants for six families of persistent organic pollutants: polychlorinated benzenes, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, polychlorinated naphthalenes, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers. The group-contribution model uses limited experimental data to obtain group-interaction parameters for an easy-to-use method to predict Henry's constants for systems where reliable experimental data are scarce. By using group-interaction parameters obtained from data reduction, scaled-particle theory gives the partial molar Gibbs energy of dissolution, Δg2, allowing calculation of Henry's constant, H2, for more than 700 organic pollutants. The average deviation between predicted values of log H2 and experiment is 4%. Application of an approximate van't Hoff equation gives the temperature dependence of Henry's constants for polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated naphthalenes, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the environmentally-relevant range 0 to 40(o)C.

  6. Physics on all scales. Scalar-tensor theories of quantum gravity in particle physics and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henz, Tobias

    2016-05-10

    In this thesis, we investigate dilaton quantum gravity using a functional renormalization group approach. We derive and discuss flow equations both in the background field approximation and using a vertex expansion as well as solve the fixed point equations globally to show how realistic gravity, connecting ultraviolet and infrared physics, can be realized on a pure fixed point trajectory by virtue of spontaneous breaking of scale invariance. The emerging physical system features a dynamically generated moving Planck scale resembling the Newton coupling as well as slow roll inflation with an exponentially decreasing effective cosmological constant that vanishes completely in the infrared. The moving Planck scale might make quantum gravity experimentally accessible at a different energy scale than previously believed. We therefore not only provide further evidence for the existence of a consistent quantum theory of gravity based on general relativity, but also offer potential solutions towards the hierarchy and cosmological constant problems, thereby opening up exciting opportunities for further research.

  7. The Least Particle Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsock, Robert

    2011-10-01

    The Least Particle Theory states that the universe was cast as a great sea of energy. MaX Planck declared a quantum of energy to be the least value in the universe. We declare the quantum of energy to be the least particle in the universe. Stephen Hawking declared quantum mechanics to be of no value in todays gross mechanics. That's like saying the number 1 has no place in mathematics.

  8. Particle Theory & Cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafi, Qaisar [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Barr, Steven [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Gaisser, Thomas [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Stanev, Todor [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2015-03-31

    1. Executive Summary (April 1, 2012 - March 31, 2015) Title: Particle Theory, Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology Qaisar Shafi University of Delaware (Principal Investigator) Stephen M. Barr, University of Delaware (Co-Principal Investigator) Thomas K. Gaisser, University of Delaware (Co-Principal Investigator) Todor Stanev, University of Delaware (Co-Principal Investigator) The proposed research was carried out at the Bartol Research included Professors Qaisar Shafi Stephen Barr, Thomas K. Gaisser, and Todor Stanev, two postdoctoral fellows (Ilia Gogoladze and Liucheng Wang), and several graduate students. Five students of Qaisar Shafi completed their PhD during the period August 2011 - August 2014. Measures of the group’s high caliber performance during the 2012-2015 funding cycle included pub- lications in excellent refereed journals, contributions to working groups as well as white papers, and conference activities, which together provide an exceptional record of both individual performance as well as overall strength. Another important indicator of success is the outstanding quality of the past and current cohort of graduate students. The PhD students under our supervision regularly win the top departmental and university awards, and their publications records show excellence both in terms of quality and quantity. The topics covered under this grant cover the frontline research areas in today’s High Energy Theory & Phenomenology. For Professors Shafi and Barr they include LHC related topics including supersymmetry, collider physics, fl vor physics, dark matter physics, Higgs boson and seesaw physics, grand unifi and neutrino physics. The LHC two years ago discovered the Standard Model Higgs boson, thereby at least partially unlocking the secrets behind electroweak symmetry breaking. We remain optimistic that new and exciting physics will be found at LHC 14, which explain our focus on physics beyond the Standard Model. Professors Shafi continued his

  9. The solvation radius of silicate melts based on the solubility of noble gases and scaled particle theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottonello, Giulio; Richet, Pascal

    2014-01-28

    The existing solubility data on noble gases in high-temperature silicate melts have been analyzed in terms of Scaling Particle Theory coupled with an ab initio assessment of the electronic, dispersive, and repulsive energy terms based on the Polarized Continuum Model (PCM). After a preliminary analysis of the role of the contracted Gaussian basis sets and theory level in reproducing appropriate static dipole polarizabilities in a vacuum, we have shown that the procedure returns Henry's law constants consistent with the values experimentally observed in water and benzene at T = 25 °C and P = 1 bar for the first four elements of the series. The static dielectric constant (ɛ) of the investigated silicate melts and its optical counterpart (ɛ(∞)) were then resolved through the application of a modified form of the Clausius-Mossotti relation. Argon has been adopted as a probe to depict its high-T solubility in melts through an appropriate choice of the solvent diameter σs, along the guidelines already used in the past for simple media such as water or benzene. The σs obtained was consistent with a simple functional form based on the molecular volume of the solvent. The solubility calculations were then extended to He, Ne, and Kr, whose dispersive and repulsive coefficients are available from theory and we have shown that their ab initio Henry's constants at high T reproduce the observed increase with the static polarizability of the series element with reasonable accuracy. At room temperature (T = 25 °C) the calculated Henry's constants of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr in the various silicate media predict higher solubilities than simple extrapolations (i.e., Arrhenius plots) based on high-T experiments and give rise to smooth trends not appreciably affected by the static polarizabilities of the solutes. The present investigation opens new perspectives on a wider application of PCM theory which can be extended to materials of great industrial interest at the core of

  10. The solvation radius of silicate melts based on the solubility of noble gases and scaled particle theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottonello, Giulio; Richet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The existing solubility data on noble gases in high-temperature silicate melts have been analyzed in terms of Scaling Particle Theory coupled with an ab initio assessment of the electronic, dispersive, and repulsive energy terms based on the Polarized Continuum Model (PCM). After a preliminary analysis of the role of the contracted Gaussian basis sets and theory level in reproducing appropriate static dipole polarizabilities in a vacuum, we have shown that the procedure returns Henry's law constants consistent with the values experimentally observed in water and benzene at T = 25 °C and P = 1 bar for the first four elements of the series. The static dielectric constant (ɛ) of the investigated silicate melts and its optical counterpart (ɛ∞) were then resolved through the application of a modified form of the Clausius-Mossotti relation. Argon has been adopted as a probe to depict its high-T solubility in melts through an appropriate choice of the solvent diameter σs, along the guidelines already used in the past for simple media such as water or benzene. The σs obtained was consistent with a simple functional form based on the molecular volume of the solvent. The solubility calculations were then extended to He, Ne, and Kr, whose dispersive and repulsive coefficients are available from theory and we have shown that their ab initio Henry's constants at high T reproduce the observed increase with the static polarizability of the series element with reasonable accuracy. At room temperature (T = 25 °C) the calculated Henry's constants of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr in the various silicate media predict higher solubilities than simple extrapolations (i.e., Arrhenius plots) based on high-T experiments and give rise to smooth trends not appreciably affected by the static polarizabilities of the solutes. The present investigation opens new perspectives on a wider application of PCM theory which can be extended to materials of great industrial interest at the core of

  11. Stochastic dynamics of intermittent pore-scale particle motion in three-dimensional porous media: Experiments and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, V. L.; Dentz, M.; Willmann, M.; Holzner, M.

    2017-09-01

    We study the evolution of velocity in time, which fundamentally controls the way dissolved substances are transported and spread in porous media. Experiments are conducted that use tracer particles to track the motion of substances in water, as it flows through transparent, 3-D synthetic sandstones. Particle velocities along streamlines are found to be intermittent and strongly correlated, while their probability density functions are lognormal and nonstationary. We demonstrate that these particle velocity characteristics can be explained and modeled as a continuous time random walk that is both Markovian and mean reverting toward the stationary state. Our model accurately captures the fine-scale velocity fluctuations observed in each tested sandstone, as well as their respective dispersion regime progression from initially ballistic, to superdiffusive, and finally Fickian. Model parameterization is based on the correlation length and mean and standard deviation of the velocity distribution, thus linking pore-scale attributes with macroscale transport behavior for both short and long time scales.

  12. Vanishing cosmological constant in elementary particles theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, F. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tonasse, M.D. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-01-01

    The quest of a vanishing cosmological constant is considered in the simplest anomaly-free chiral gauge extension of the electroweak standard model where the new physics is limited to a well defined additional flavordynamics above the Fermi scale, namely up to a few TeVs by matching the gauge coupling constants at the electroweak scale, and with an extended Higgs structure. In contrast to the electroweak standard model, it is shown how the extended scalar sector of the theory allows a vanishing or a very small cosmological constant. the details of the cancellation mechanism are presented. At accessible energies the theory is indistinguishable from the standard model of elementary particles and it is in agreement with all existing data. (author). 32 refs. 32 refs.

  13. Investigations in Elementary Particle Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiler, Thomas J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Kephart, Thomas W. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Scherrer, Robert J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-07-02

    The research interests of our three Co-PI’s complement each other very well. Kephart works mainly on models of particle unification in four or higher dimensions, on aspects of gravity such as inflation, black-holes, and the very early Universe, and on applications of knot theory and topology to various physical systems (including gluon dynamics). Scherrer works mainly on aspects of the intermediate-aged Universe, including dark matter and dark energy, and particle physics in the early Universe. Weiler works mainly on neutrino physics, dark matter signatures, and extreme particle-astrophysics in the late Universe, including origins of the highest-energy cosmic-rays and gamma-rays, and the future potential of neutrino astrophysics. Kephart and Weiler have lately devoted some research attention to the LHC and its reach for probing physics beyond the Standard Model. During the 3-year funding period, our grant supported one postdoc (Chiu Man Ho) and partially supported two students, Peter Denton and Lingjun Fu. Chiu Man collaborated with all three of the Co-PI’s during the 3-year funding period and published 16 refereed papers. Chiu Man has gone on to a postdoc with Steve Hsu at Michigan State University. Denton and Fu will both receive their PhDs during the 2014-15 academic year. The total number of our papers published in refereed journals by the three co-PIs during the period of this grant (2011-present) is 54. The total number of talks given by the group members during this time period, including seminars, colloquia, and conference presentations, is 47. Some details of the accomplishments of our DOE funded researchers during the grant period include Weiler being named a Simons Fellow in 2013. He presented an invited TEDx talk in 2012. His paper on closed timelike curves (2013) garnered a great deal of national publicity. Scherrer’s paper on the “little rip” (2011) fostered a new area of cosmological research, and the name “little rip” has now entered

  14. Gauge Theories of Vector Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glashow, S. L.; Gell-Mann, M.

    1961-04-24

    The possibility of generalizing the Yang-Mills trick is examined. Thus we seek theories of vector bosons invariant under continuous groups of coordinate-dependent linear transformations. All such theories may be expressed as superpositions of certain "simple" theories; we show that each "simple theory is associated with a simple Lie algebra. We may introduce mass terms for the vector bosons at the price of destroying the gauge-invariance for coordinate-dependent gauge functions. The theories corresponding to three particular simple Lie algebras - those which admit precisely two commuting quantum numbers - are examined in some detail as examples. One of them might play a role in the physics of the strong interactions if there is an underlying super-symmetry, transcending charge independence, that is badly broken. The intermediate vector boson theory of weak interactions is discussed also. The so-called "schizon" model cannot be made to conform to the requirements of partial gauge-invariance.

  15. Reconciling theories for metabolic scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R; Nisbet, Roger M; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic theory specifies constraints on the metabolic organisation of individual organisms. These constraints have important implications for biological processes ranging from the scale of molecules all the way to the level of populations, communities and ecosystems, with their application to the latter emerging as the field of metabolic ecology. While ecologists continue to use individual metabolism to identify constraints in ecological processes, the topic of metabolic scaling remains controversial. Much of the current interest and controversy in metabolic theory relates to recent ideas about the role of supply networks in constraining energy supply to cells. We show that an alternative explanation for physicochemical constraints on individual metabolism, as formalised by dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory, can contribute to the theoretical underpinning of metabolic ecology, while increasing coherence between intra- and interspecific scaling relationships. In particular, we emphasise how the DEB theory considers constraints on the storage and use of assimilated nutrients and derive an equation for the scaling of metabolic rate for adult heterotrophs without relying on optimisation arguments or implying cellular nutrient supply limitation. Using realistic data on growth and reproduction from the literature, we parameterise the curve for respiration and compare the a priori prediction against a mammalian data set for respiration. Because the DEB theory mechanism for metabolic scaling is based on the universal process of acquiring and using pools of stored metabolites (a basal feature of life), it applies to all organisms irrespective of the nature of metabolic transport to cells. Although the DEB mechanism does not necessarily contradict insight from transport-based models, the mechanism offers an explanation for differences between the intra- and interspecific scaling of biological rates with mass, suggesting novel tests of the respective hypotheses. © 2013 The

  16. Using Wavelet Bases to Separate Scales in Quantum Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlin, Tracie L.

    This thesis investigates the use of Daubechies wavelets to separate scales in local quantum field theory. Field theories have an infinite number of degrees of freedom on all distance scales. Quantum field theories are believed to describe the physics of subatomic particles. These theories have no known mathematically convergent approximation methods. Daubechies wavelet bases can be used separate degrees of freedom on different distance scales. Volume and resolution truncations lead to mathematically well-defined truncated theories that can be treated using established methods. This work demonstrates that flow equation methods can be used to block diagonalize truncated field theoretic Hamiltonians by scale. This eliminates the fine scale degrees of freedom. This may lead to approximation methods and provide an understanding of how to formulate well-defined fine resolution limits.

  17. Scaling Theory of Polyelectrolyte Nanogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Li-Jian

    2017-08-01

    The present paper develops the scaling theory of polyelectrolyte nanogels in dilute and semidilute solutions. The dependencies of the nanogel dimension on branching topology, charge fraction, subchain length, segment number, solution concentration are obtained. For a single polyelectrolyte nanogel in salt free solution, the nanogel may be swelled by the Coulombic repulsion (the so-called polyelectrolyte regime) or the osmotic counterion pressure (the so-called osmotic regime). Characteristics and boundaries between different regimes of a single polyelectrolyte nanogel are summarized. In dilute solution, the nanogels in polyelectrolyte regime will distribute orderly with the increase of concentration. While the nanogels in osmotic regime will always distribute randomly. Different concentration dependencies of the size of a nanogel in polyelectrolyte regime and in osmotic regime are also explored. Supported by China Earthquake Administration under Grant No. 20150112 and National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 21504014

  18. Advanced concepts in particle and field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hübsch, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Uniting the usually distinct areas of particle physics and quantum field theory, gravity and general relativity, this expansive and comprehensive textbook of fundamental and theoretical physics describes the quest to consolidate the basic building blocks of nature, by journeying through contemporary discoveries in the field, and analysing elementary particles and their interactions. Designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students and abounding in worked examples and detailed derivations, as well as including historical anecdotes and philosophical and methodological perspectives, this textbook provides students with a unified understanding of all matter at the fundamental level. Topics range from gauge principles, particle decay and scattering cross-sections, the Higgs mechanism and mass generation, to spacetime geometries and supersymmetry. By combining historically separate areas of study and presenting them in a logically consistent manner, students will appreciate the underlying similarities and...

  19. Inflation, large scale structure and particle physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review experimental and theoretical developments in inflation and its application to structure formation, including the curvation idea. We then discuss a particle physics model of supersymmetric hybrid inflation at the intermediate scale in which the Higgs scalar field is responsible for large scale structure, show how such ...

  20. Continuum Theory of Phase Separation Kinetics for Active Brownian Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Tiribocchi, Adriano; Allen, Rosalind J.; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2013-10-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs), when subject to purely repulsive interactions, are known to undergo activity-induced phase separation broadly resembling an equilibrium (attraction-induced) gas-liquid coexistence. Here we present an accurate continuum theory for the dynamics of phase-separating ABPs, derived by direct coarse graining, capturing leading-order density gradient terms alongside an effective bulk free energy. Such gradient terms do not obey detailed balance; yet we find coarsening dynamics closely resembling that of equilibrium phase separation. Our continuum theory is numerically compared to large-scale direct simulations of ABPs and accurately accounts for domain growth kinetics, domain topologies, and coexistence densities.

  1. Lagrangian scale of particle dispersion in turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua; Francois, Nicolas; Punzmann, Horst; Shats, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Transport of mass, heat and momentum in turbulent flows by far exceeds that in stable laminar fluid motions. As turbulence is a state of a flow dominated by a hierarchy of scales, it is not clear which of these scales mostly affects particle dispersion. Also, it is not uncommon that turbulence coexists with coherent vortices. Here we report on Lagrangian statistics in laboratory two-dimensional turbulence. Our results provide direct experimental evidence that fluid particle dispersion is determined by a single measurable Lagrangian scale related to the forcing scale. These experiments offer a new way of predicting dispersion in turbulent flows in which one of the low energy scales possesses temporal coherency. The results are applicable to oceanographic and atmospheric data, such as those obtained from trajectories of free-drifting instruments in the ocean.

  2. The theory of n-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Furkan Semih

    2018-01-01

    We provide a theory of n-scales previously called as n dimensional time scales. In previous approaches to the theory of time scales, multi-dimensional scales were taken as product space of two time scales [1, 2]. n-scales make the mathematical structure more flexible and appropriate to real world applications in physics and related fields. Here we define an n-scale as an arbitrary closed subset of ℝn. Modified forward and backward jump operators, Δ-derivatives and Δ-integrals on n-scales are defined.

  3. A theory of scattering for quasifree particles

    CERN Document Server

    Streater, Raymond F

    2015-01-01

    In this book, the author presents the theory of quasifree quantum fields and argues that they could provide non-zero scattering for some particles. The free-field representation of the quantised transverse electromagnetic field is not closed in the weak*-topology. Its closure contains soliton-anti-soliton pairs as limits of two-photon states as time goes to infinity, and the overlap probability can be computed using Uhlmann''s prescription. There are no free parameters: the probability is determined with no requirement to specify any coupling constant. All cases of the Shale transforms of the

  4. Scale Hierarchies in Particle Physics and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoniadis I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss possible connections between several scales in particle physics andcosmology, such the the electroweak, inflation, dark energy and Planck scales. We thendescribe the phenomenology of a model of supersymmetry breaking in the presence ofa tiny (tunable positive cosmological constant. The model is coupled to the MSSM, leading to calculable soft supersymmetry breaking masses and a distinct low energy phenomenologythat allows to differentiate it from other models of supersymmetry breakingand mediation mechanisms.

  5. Suprathermal Charged Particle Acceleration by Small-scale Flux Ropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We consider different limits of our recently developed kinetic transport theory to investigate the potential of super-Alvenic solar wind regions containing several small-scale flux ropes to explain the acceleration of suprathermal ions to power-law spectra as observations show. Particle acceleration is modeled in response to flux-rope activity involving contraction, merging (reconnection), and collisions in the limit where the particle gyoradius is smaller than the characteristic flux-rope scale length. The emphasis is mainly on the statistical variance in the electric fields induced by flux-rope dynamics rather than on the mean electric field induced by multiple flux ropes whose acceleration effects are discussed elsewhere. Our steady-state analytical solutions suggest that particle drift acceleration by flux ropes, irrespective of whether displaying incompressible or compressible behavior, can yield power laws asymptotically at higher energies whereas an exponential spectral rollover results asymptotically when field-aligned guiding center motion acceleration occur by reconnection electric fields from merging flux ropes. This implies that at sufficiently high particle energies, drift acceleration might dominate. We also expect compressive flux ropes to yield harder power-law spectra than incompressible flux ropes. Preliminary results will be discussed to illustrate how particle acceleration might be affected when both diffusive shock and small-scale flux acceleration occur simultaneously at interplanetary shocks.

  6. Scale-invariant gauge theories of gravity: theoretical foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Lasenby, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    We consider the construction of gauge theories of gravity, focussing in particular on the extension of local Poincar\\'e invariance to include invariance under local changes of scale. We work exclusively in terms of finite transformations, which allow for a more transparent interpretation of such theories in terms of gauge fields in Minkowski spacetime. Our approach therefore differs from the usual geometrical description of locally scale-invariant Poincar\\'e gauge theory (PGT) and Weyl gauge theory (WGT) in terms of Riemann--Cartan and Weyl--Cartan spacetimes, respectively. In particular, we reconsider the interpretation of the Einstein gauge and also the equations of motion of matter fields and test particles in these theories. Inspired by the observation that the PGT and WGT matter actions for the Dirac field and electromagnetic field have more general invariance properties than those imposed by construction, we go on to present a novel alternative to WGT by considering an `extended' form for the transforma...

  7. Wigner particle theory and local quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassarella, Lucio; Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: fassarel@cbpf.br; schroer@cbpf.br

    2002-01-01

    Wigner's irreducible positive energy representations of the Poincare group are often used to give additional justifications for the Lagrangian quantization formalism of standard QFT. Here we study another more recent aspect. We explain in this paper modular concepts by which we are able to construct the local operator algebras for all standard positive energy representations directly without going through field coordinations. In this way the artificial emphasis on Lagrangian field coordinates is avoided from the very beginning. These new concepts allow to treat also those cases of 'exceptional' Wigner representations associated with anyons and the famous Wigner spin tower which have remained inaccessible to Lagrangian quantization. Together with the d=1+1 factorizing models (whose modular construction has been studied previously), they form an interesting family of theories with a rich vacuum-polarization structure (but no on shell real particle creation) to which the modular methods can be applied for their explicit construction. We explain and illustrate the algebraic strategy of this construction. We also comment on possibilities of formulating the Wigner theory in a setting of a noncommutativity. (author)

  8. Massive neutral particles on heterotic string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Olivares, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The motion of massive particles in the background of a charged black hole in heterotic string theory, which is characterized by a parameter $\\alpha$, is studied in detail across this paper. Since it is possible to write this space-time in the Einstein frame, we perform a quantitative analysis of the time-like geodesics by means of the standard Lagrange procedure. Thus, we obtain and solve a set of differential equations and then we describe the orbits in terms of elliptic $\\wp$-Weierstra{\\ss} function. Also, by making an elementary derivation developed by Cornbleet (Am. J. Phys. \\textbf{61} 7, (1993) 650 - 651) we obtain the correction to the angle of advance of perihelion to first order in $\\alpha$, and thus, by comparing with Mercury's data we give an estimation for the value of this parameter, which yields to an {\\it heterotic solar charge} $Q_{\\odot}\\simeq 0.728\\,[\\textrm{Km}]= 0.493\\, M_{\\odot}$. Therefore, in addition with the study on null geodesics performed by Fernando (Phys. Rev. D {\\bf 85}, (2012) ...

  9. In string theory, the fundamental string has a typical length scale.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. In string theory, the fundamental string has a typical length scale. A string vibrating in its ground state appears to a low-energy observer like a point particle. Notes:

  10. Quantum field theory and the internal states of elementary particles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greben, JM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new application of quantum field theory is developed that gives a description of the internal dynamics of dressed elementary particles and predicts their masses. The fermionic and bosonic quantum fields are treated as interdependent fields...

  11. Quantifying the Relationship Between Drainage Networks at Hillslope Scale and Particle Size Distribution at Pedon Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cámara, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Ángel; Gómez-Miguel, Vicente

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays, translating information about hydrologic and soil properties and processes across scales has emerged as a major theme in soil science and hydrology, and suitable theories for upscaling or downscaling hydrologic and soil information are being looked forward. The recognition of low-order catchments as self-organized systems suggests the existence of a great amount of links at different scales between their elements. The objective of this work was to research in areas of homogeneous bedrock material, the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the drainage networks at hillslope scale and the heterogeneity of the particle-size distribution at pedon scale. One of the most innovative elements in this work is the choice of the parameters to quantify the organization level of the studied features. The fractal dimension has been selected to measure the hierarchical structure of the drainage networks, while the Balanced Entropy Index (BEI) has been the chosen parameter to quantify the heterogeneity of the particle-size distribution from textural data. These parameters have made it possible to establish quantifiable relationships between two features attached to different steps in the scale range. Results suggest that the bedrock lithology of the landscape constrains the architecture of the drainage networks developed on it and the particle soil distribution resulting in the fragmentation processes.

  12. Particle production in higher derivative theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Lemaitre–Robertson–Walker cosmological model during the early stages of the universe is analysed in the framework of higher derivative theory. The universe has been considered as an open thermodynamic system where ...

  13. Research program in elementary-particle theory, 1983. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E C.G.; Ne& #x27; eman, Y

    1983-08-01

    Progress is reviewed on the following topics: physics of ultra high energies and cosmology; phenomenology of particle physics; quantum field theory, supersymmetry and models of particles; and geometric formulations and algebraic models. Recent DOE reports resulting from the contract are listed. (WHK)

  14. Breakdown of String Perturbation Theory for Many External Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudip; Raju, Suvrat

    2017-03-31

    We consider massless string scattering amplitudes in a limit where the number of external particles becomes very large, while the energy of each particle remains small. Using the growth of the volume of the relevant moduli space, and by means of independent numerical evidence, we argue that string perturbation theory breaks down in this limit. We discuss some remarkable implications for the information paradox.

  15. Quantum theory of many-particle systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fetter, Alexander L

    2003-01-01

    ""Singlemindedly devoted to its job of educating potential many-particle theorists…deserves to become the standard text in the field."" - Physics Today""The most comprehensive textbook yet published in its field and every postgraduate student or teacher in this field should own or have access to a copy."" - EndeavorA self-contained, unified treatment of nonrelativistic many-particle systems, this text offers a solid introduction to procedures in a manner that enables students to adopt techniques for their own use. Its discussions of formalism and applications move easily between general theo

  16. Research program in elementary particle theory, 1980. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E. C.G.; Ne' eman, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Research is reported for these subject areas: particle physics in relativistic astrophysics and cosmology; phenomenology of weak and electromagnetic interactions; strong interaction physics, QCD, and quark-parton physics; quantum field theory, quantum mechanics and fundamental problems; groups, gauges, and grand unified theories; and supergeometry, superalgebra, and unification. (GHT)

  17. Equivalent medium theory of layered sphere particle with anisotropic shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingcai; Wang, Minzhong; Zhang, Beidou

    2016-08-01

    Researches on the optical properties of small particle have been widely concerned in the atmospheric science, astronomy, astrophysics, biology and medical science. This paper provides an equivalent dielectric theory for the functional graded particle with anisotropic shells, in which inhomogeneous and anisotropic particle was equivalently transformed into a new kind of homogeneous, continuous and isotropic sphere with same size but different permittivity, and then greatly simplify the calculation process of particle's optical property. Meanwhile, the paper also discusses whether the charge on the particle can change the expression of its equivalent permittivity or not. These results proposed in this paper can be used to simulate the electrical, optical properties of layered sphere, it also meet the research requirement in the design of functional graded particles in different subjects.

  18. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongta

    This study reports a simple, roll-to-roll compatible coating technology for producing three-dimensional highly ordered colloidal crystal-polymer composites, colloidal crystals, and macroporous polymer membranes. A vertically beveled doctor blade is utilized to shear align silica microsphere-monomer suspensions to form large-area composites in a single step. The polymer matrix and the silica microspheres can be selectively removed to create colloidal crystals and self-standing macroporous polymer membranes. The thickness of the shear-aligned crystal is correlated with the viscosity of the colloidal suspension and the coating speed, and the correlations can be qualitatively explained by adapting the mechanisms developed for conventional doctor blade coating. Five important research topics related to the application of large-scale three-dimensional highly ordered macroporous films by doctor blade coating are covered in this study. The first topic describes the invention in large area and low cost color reflective displays. This invention is inspired by the heat pipe technology. The self-standing macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors which originate from the Bragg diffractive of visible light form the three-dimensional highly ordered air cavities. The colors can be easily changed by tuning the size of the air cavities to cover the whole visible spectrum. When the air cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer, the macroporous polymer films become completely transparent due to the index matching. When the solvent trapped in the cavities is evaporated by in-situ heating, the sample color changes back to brilliant color. This process is highly reversible and reproducible for thousands of cycles. The second topic reports the achievement of rapid and reversible vapor detection by using 3-D macroporous photonic crystals. Capillary condensation of a condensable vapor in the interconnected macropores leads to the

  19. Probing the frontiers of particle physics with tabletop-scale experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMille, David; Doyle, John M; Sushkov, Alexander O

    2017-09-08

    The field of particle physics is in a peculiar state. The standard model of particle theory successfully describes every fundamental particle and force observed in laboratories, yet fails to explain properties of the universe such as the existence of dark matter, the amount of dark energy, and the preponderance of matter over antimatter. Huge experiments, of increasing scale and cost, continue to search for new particles and forces that might explain these phenomena. However, these frontiers also are explored in certain smaller, laboratory-scale "tabletop" experiments. This approach uses precision measurement techniques and devices from atomic, quantum, and condensed-matter physics to detect tiny signals due to new particles or forces. Discoveries in fundamental physics may well come first from small-scale experiments of this type. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  20. Density Functional Theory and Materials Modeling at Atomistic Length Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapan K. Ghosh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We discuss the basic concepts of density functional theory (DFT as applied to materials modeling in the microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic length scales. The picture that emerges is that of a single unified framework for the study of both quantum and classical systems. While for quantum DFT, the central equation is a one-particle Schrodinger-like Kohn-Sham equation, the classical DFT consists of Boltzmann type distributions, both corresponding to a system of noninteracting particles in the field of a density-dependent effective potential, the exact functional form of which is unknown. One therefore approximates the exchange-correlation potential for quantum systems and the excess free energy density functional or the direct correlation functions for classical systems. Illustrative applications of quantum DFT to microscopic modeling of molecular interaction and that of classical DFT to a mesoscopic modeling of soft condensed matter systems are highlighted.

  1. Behaviour of fluidised particles explained by a new theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, P.N.; Furusawa, Takehiko

    1988-10-05

    The fine particles, less than 70 microns, to be used for the fluid catalytic cracker, are different from the coarse particles and expand the bed without generating bubbles at a higher fluid speed than the solid-gas fluid starting speed, because both the fluidization and bubble generating speeds are different from each other. Geldart classified, by using the particle diameter and gas density as indexes, the difference of particles in the fluid condition, which however is to be under the ordinary temperature and pressure, without the applicability to the high temperature and pressure fluid. Foscolo and Gibiraro submitted the theory to test clearly established it. Both the elastic wave and void factor propagation speeds, in the all Reynolds numbers' range where the bubble fluid appears, were conducted and derived. By that theory, the classification of high temperature and pressure particles is possible. As the fluid catalytic cracker is strongly influenced by the solid-gas catalytic condition in the bed, the movement of bubbles is important. By that theory together with formulas, the group of particles is clearly understandable in behavior, which also enables the prediction of important properties for practical use. (9 figs, 8 refs)

  2. Statistical Mechanics and Scaling Theories of Omolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    We review the statistical mechanics and scaling properties of omolecular (polymer) solutions. A pedagogic introduction to the modern theory of polymer solutions is given focusing on the link to experimental results. A short review of the analytic and numerical techniques used to study these systems is presented. Whilst the classical approach to polymer physics has been to focus on universal properties, recent work has tended to look at specific properties and how they change the relatively well understood universal properties. We describe in detail some new work on two facets of this nonuniversal behavior, namely the effect of electrostatics and rigidity on polymer conformations.

  3. Light scattering by nonspherical particles theory, measurements, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Travis, Larry D

    1999-01-01

    There is hardly a field of science or engineering that does not have some interest in light scattering by small particles. For example, this subject is important to climatology because the energy budget for the Earth's atmosphere is strongly affected by scattering of solar radiation by cloud and aerosol particles, and the whole discipline of remote sensing relies largely on analyzing the parameters of radiation scattered by aerosols, clouds, and precipitation. The scattering of light by spherical particles can be easily computed using the conventional Mie theory. However, most small solid part

  4. Second order gyrokinetic theory for particle-in-cell codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronko, Natalia; Bottino, Alberto; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The main idea of the gyrokinetic dynamical reduction consists in a systematical removal of the fast scale motion (the gyromotion) from the dynamics of the plasma, resulting in a considerable simplification and a significant gain of computational time. The gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations are nowadays implemented in for modeling (both laboratory and astrophysical) strongly magnetized plasmas. Different versions of the reduced set of equations exist, depending on the construction of the gyrokinetic reduction procedure and the approximations performed in the derivation. The purpose of this article is to explicitly show the connection between the general second order gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov system issued from the modern gyrokinetic theory and the model currently implemented in the global electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code ORB5. Necessary information about the modern gyrokinetic formalism is given together with the consistent derivation of the gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations from first principles. The variational formulation of the dynamics is used to obtain the corresponding energy conservation law, which in turn is used for the verification of energy conservation diagnostics currently implemented in ORB5. This work fits within the context of the code verification project VeriGyro currently run at IPP Max-Planck Institut in collaboration with others European institutions.

  5. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomraning, G.C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We consider the formulation of linear transport and kinetic theory describing energy and particle flow in a random mixture of two or more immiscible materials. Following an introduction, we summarize early and fundamental work in this area, and we conclude with a brief discussion of recent results.

  6. Spinning particle approach to higher spin field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Olindo, E-mail: Olindo.Corradini@bo.infn.it [Centro de Estudios en Fisica y Matematicas Basicas y Aplicadas Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2011-04-01

    We shortly review on the connection between higher-spin gauge field theories and supersymmetric spinning particle models. In such approach the higher spin equations of motion are linked to the first-class constraint algebra associated with the quantization of particle models. Here we consider a class of spinning particle models characterized by local O(N)-extended supersymmetry since these models are known to provide an alternative approach to the geometric formulation of higher spin field theory. We describe the canonical quantization of the models in curved target space and discuss the obstructions that appear in presence of an arbitrarily curved background. We then point out the special role that conformally flat spaces appear to have in such models and present a derivation of the higher-spin curvatures for maximally symmetric spaces.

  7. Test-particle motion in the nonsymmetric gravitation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, J. W.

    1987-06-01

    A derivation of the motion of test particles in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory (NGT) is given using the field equations in the presence of matter. The motion of the particle is governed by the Christoffel symbols, which are formed from the symmetric part of the fundamental tensor gμν, as well as by a tensorial piece determined by the skew part of the contracted curvature tensor Rμν. Given the energy-momentum tensor for a perfect fluid and the definition of a test particle in the NGT, the equations of motion follow from the conservation laws. The tensorial piece in the equations of motion describes a new force in nature that acts on the conserved charge in a body. Particles that carry this new charge do not follow geodesic world lines in the NGT, whereas photons do satisfy geodesic equations of motion and the equivalence principle of general relativity. Astronomical predictions, based on the exact static, spherically symmetric solution of the field equations in a vacuum and the test-particle equations of motion, are derived in detail. The maximally extended coordinates that remove the event-horizon singularities in the static, spherically symmetric solution are presented. It is shown how an inward radially falling test particle can be prevented from forming an event horizon for a value greater than a specified critical value of the source charge. If a test particle does fall through an event horizon, then it must continue to fall until it reaches the singularity at r=0.

  8. Inflationary perturbations in no-scale theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvio, Alberto [CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    We study the inflationary perturbations in general (classically) scale-invariant theories. Such scenario is motivated by the hierarchy problem and provides natural inflationary potentials and dark matter candidates. We analyse in detail all sectors (the scalar, vector and tensor perturbations) giving general formulae for the potentially observable power spectra, as well as for the curvature spectral index n{sub s} and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. We show that the conserved Hamiltonian for all perturbations does not feature negative energies even in the presence of the Weyl-squared term if the appropriate quantisation is performed and argue that this term does not lead to phenomenological problems at least in some relevant setups. The general formulae are then applied to a concrete no-scale model, which includes the Higgs and a scalar, ''the planckion'', whose vacuum expectation value generates the Planck mass. Inflation can be triggered by a combination of the planckion and the Starobinsky scalar and we show that no tension with observations is present even in the case of pure planckion inflation, if the coefficient of the Weyl-squared term is large enough. In general, even quadratic inflation is allowed in this case. Moreover, the Weyl-squared term leads to an isocurvature mode, which currently satisfies the observational bounds, but it may be detectable with future experiments. (orig.)

  9. Random matrix theory, interacting particle systems and integrable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Forrester, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Random matrix theory is at the intersection of linear algebra, probability theory and integrable systems, and has a wide range of applications in physics, engineering, multivariate statistics and beyond. This volume is based on a Fall 2010 MSRI program which generated the solution of long-standing questions on universalities of Wigner matrices and beta-ensembles and opened new research directions especially in relation to the KPZ universality class of interacting particle systems and low-rank perturbations. The book contains review articles and research contributions on all these topics, in addition to other core aspects of random matrix theory such as integrability and free probability theory. It will give both established and new researchers insights into the most recent advances in the field and the connections among many subfields.

  10. Burnout of pulverized biomass particles in large scale boiler – Single particle model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saastamoinen, Jaakko; Aho, Martti; Moilanen, Antero

    2010-01-01

    Burning of coal and biomass particles are studied and compared by measurements in an entrained flow reactor and by modelling. The results are applied to study the burning of pulverized biomass in a large scale utility boiler originally planned for coal. A simplified single particle approach, where...... the particle combustion model is coupled with one-dimensional equation of motion of the particle, is applied for the calculation of the burnout in the boiler. The particle size of biomass can be much larger than that of coal to reach complete burnout due to lower density and greater reactivity. The burner...

  11. Gauge theories in particle physics a practical introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Aitchison, Ian J R

    2013-01-01

    The fourth edition of this well-established, highly regarded two-volume set continues to provide a fundamental introduction to advanced particle physics while incorporating substantial new experimental results, especially in the areas of CP violation and neutrino oscillations. It offers an accessible and practical introduction to the three gauge theories included in the Standard Model of particle physics: quantum electrodynamics (QED), quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg (GSW) electroweak theory. In the first volume, a new chapter on Lorentz transformations and discrete symmetries presents a simple treatment of Lorentz transformations of Dirac spinors. Along with updating experimental results, this edition also introduces Majorana fermions at an early stage, making the material suitable for a first course in relativistic quantum mechanics. Covering much of the experimental progress made in the last ten years, the second volume remains focused on the two non-Abelian quantum gauge field...

  12. A gauge field theory of fermionic continuous-spin particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Bekaert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we suggest a local covariant action for a gauge field theory of fermionic Continuous-Spin Particles (CSPs. The action is invariant under gauge transformations without any constraint on both the gauge field and the gauge transformation parameter. The Fang–Fronsdal equations for a tower of massless fields with all half-integer spins arise as a particular limit of the equation of motion of fermionic CSPs.

  13. Remarks on a gauge theory for continuous spin particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivelles, Victor O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-15

    We discuss in a systematic way the gauge theory for a continuous spin particle proposed by Schuster and Toro. We show that it is naturally formulated in a cotangent bundle over Minkowski spacetime where the gauge field depends on the spacetime coordinate x{sup μ} and on a covector η{sub μ}. We discuss how fields can be expanded in η{sub μ} in different ways and how these expansions are related to each other. The field equation has a derivative of a Dirac delta function with support on the η-hyperboloid η{sup 2} + 1 = 0 and we show how it restricts the dynamics of the gauge field to the η-hyperboloid and its first neighbourhood. We then show that on-shell the field carries one single irreducible unitary representation of the Poincare group for a continuous spin particle. We also show how the field can be used to build a set of covariant equations found by Wigner describing the wave function of one-particle states for a continuous spin particle. Finally we show that it is not possible to couple minimally a continuous spin particle to a background abelian gauge field, and we make some comments about the coupling to gravity. (orig.)

  14. Combining theory and observations. A sample study of the interplay between cosmology and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Suchita C.

    2011-08-08

    We look at various methods of exploring the connection between particle physics and cosmology. We focus on various aspects of dark matter analysis. We begin with the smallest scales and look at collider phenomenology first. We discuss how the analysis of CP-properties of particles within Supersymmetry, one of the most accepted theories giving us a dark matter candidate. For this matter we take a specific case of the CP-violation in the super-partner of the tau lepton, the stau. Going slightly more towards astroparticle physics, we next study can the dark matter in the Universe be semi-relativistic. Thus, we use our prior knowledge of the cosmic scale properties of dark matter to draw implications for particle physics. In the next step, we look at large scales and examine the evolution of relationship between dark matter haloes and the background dark matter density fields. We use methods similar to field theory techniques of particle physics to understand this evolution of mapping. (orig.)

  15. Physical theory for near-bed turbulent particle suspension capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggenhuisen, Joris T.; Cartigny, Matthieu J. B.; de Leeuw, Jan

    2017-05-01

    The inability to capture the physics of solid-particle suspension in turbulent fluids in simple formulas is holding back the application of multiphase fluid dynamics techniques to many practical problems in nature and society involving particle suspension. We present a force balance approach to particle suspension in the region near no-slip frictional boundaries of turbulent flows. The force balance parameter Γ contains gravity and buoyancy acting on the sediment and vertical turbulent fluid forces; it includes universal turbulent flow scales and material properties of the fluid and particles only. Comparison to measurements shows that Γ = 1 gives the upper limit of observed suspended particle concentrations in a broad range of flume experiments and field settings. The condition of Γ > 1 coincides with the complete suppression of coherent turbulent structures near the boundary in direct numerical simulations of sediment-laden turbulent flow. Γ thus captures the maximum amount of sediment that can be contained in suspension at the base of turbulent flow, and it can be regarded as a suspension capacity parameter. It can be applied as a simple concentration boundary condition in modelling studies of the dispersion of particulates in environmental and man-made flows.

  16. Effect of Nano-Scale Roughness on Particle Wetting and on Particle-Mediated Emulsion Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel, Adriana; Behrens, Sven

    2012-02-01

    Colloidal particles can strongly adsorb to liquid interfaces and stabilize emulsions against droplet coalescence, the effectiveness of which depends crucially on the particle wettability. From the study of macroscopic solids, surface wetting is known to be influenced strongly by nano-scale roughness (as seen e.g. in the ``Lotus effect'' or in anti-fog coatings); similarly, strong effects of particle roughness on particle-stabilized emulsions should be expected. Here we report the first experimental study of particle wetting and particle-mediated emulsion stability in which particle roughness could be varied continuously without varying the surface chemistry. We demonstrate an enabling method for preparing particles and macroscopic substrates with tunable nano-roughness and correlate the extent of roughness quantitatively with surface wetting (measured via the three-phase contact angle) and with emulsion stability (quantifiable via the maximum capillary pressure). Our results confirm a dramatic influence of roughness on wetting, emulsion stability, and even the type of emulsion formed (o/w vs. w/o) upon mixing oil with an aqueous particle dispersion. Whether particle roughness benefits emulsion stability or not is seen to depend on both the size and shape of the surface features.

  17. Bare bones particle swarm optimization with scale matrix adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Mauro; Krohling, Renato A; Enriquez, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Bare bones particle swarm optimization (BBPSO) is a swarm algorithm that has shown potential for solving single-objective unconstrained optimization problems over continuous search spaces. However, it suffers of the premature convergence problem that means it may get trapped into a local optimum when solving multimodal problems. In order to address this drawback and improve the performance of the BBPSO, we propose a variant of this algorithm, named by us as BBPSO with scale matrix adaptation (SMA), SMA-BBPSO for short reference. In the SMA-BBPSO, the position of a particle is selected from a multivariate t-distribution with a rule for adaptation of its scale matrix. We use the multivariate t-distribution in its hierarchical form, as a scale mixtures of normal distributions. The t -distribution has heavier tails than those of the normal distribution, which increases the ability of the particles to escape from a local optimum. In addition, our approach includes the normal distribution as a particular case. As a consequence, the t -distribution can be applied during the optimization process by maintaining the proper balance between exploration and exploitation. We also propose a simple update rule to adapt the scale matrix associated with a particle. Our strategy consists of adapting the scale matrix of a particle such that the best position found by any particle in its neighborhood is sampled with maximum likelihood in the next iteration. A theoretical analysis was developed to explain how the SMA-BBPSO works, and an empirical study was carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm. The experimental results show the suitability of the proposed approach in terms of effectiveness to find good solutions for all benchmark problems investigated. Nonparametric statistical tests indicate that SMA-BBPSO shows a statistically significant improvement compared with other swarm algorithms.

  18. Ultra-large-scale electronic structure theory and numerical algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshi, Takeo

    2008-01-01

    This article is composed of two parts; In the first part (Sec. 1), the ultra-large-scale electronic structure theory is reviewed for (i) its fundamental numerical algorithm and (ii) its role in nano-material science. The second part (Sec. 2) is devoted to the mathematical foundation of the large-scale electronic structure theory and their numerical aspects.

  19. An effective field theory approach to two trapped particles

    OpenAIRE

    Stetcu, I.; Rotureau, J.; Barrett, B.R.; van Kolck, U.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the problem of two particles interacting via short-range interactions within a harmonic-oscillator trap. The interactions are organized according to their number of derivatives and defined in truncated model spaces made from a bound-state basis. Leading-order (LO) interactions are iterated to all orders, while corrections are treated in perturbation theory. We show explicitly that next-to-LO and next-to-next-to-LO interactions improve convergence as the model space increases. In th...

  20. Research program in elementary particle theory. Progress report, 1975--1976. [Summaries of research activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Ne' eman, Y.

    1976-01-01

    Research on particle theory is summarized including field theory models, phenomenological applications of field theory, strong interactions, the algebraic approach to weak and electromagnetic interactions, and superdense matter. A list of reports is also included. (JFP)

  1. Simulating Biomass Fast Pyrolysis at the Single Particle Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciesielski, Peter [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Jakes, Joseph E. [U.S. Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

    2017-07-01

    Simulating fast pyrolysis at the scale of single particles allows for the investigation of the impacts of feedstock-specific parameters such as particle size, shape, and species of origin. For this reason particle-scale modeling has emerged as an important tool for understanding how variations in feedstock properties affect the outcomes of pyrolysis processes. The origins of feedstock properties are largely dictated by the composition and hierarchical structure of biomass, from the microstructural porosity to the external morphology of milled particles. These properties may be accounted for in simulations of fast pyrolysis by several different computational approaches depending on the level of structural and chemical complexity included in the model. The predictive utility of particle-scale simulations of fast pyrolysis can still be enhanced substantially by advancements in several areas. Most notably, considerable progress would be facilitated by the development of pyrolysis kinetic schemes that are decoupled from transport phenomena, predict product evolution from whole-biomass with increased chemical speciation, and are still tractable with present-day computational resources.

  2. Scaling laws for implicit viscosities in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bierwisch Claas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH is a particle-based method which solves continuum equations such as the Navier-Stokes equations. A periodic fluidic system under homogeneous shear is studied using SPH in the present work. The total pressure of the system and the shear stress contributions from the SPH interaction terms for pressure and viscosity as well as the contribution caused by velocity fluctuations are analyzed. It is found that the pressure and the shear stress contributions obey certain scaling laws depending on physical properties of the system such as compressibility, viscosity and shear rate as well as the spatial resolution. Some of the identified relations resemble scaling laws for the rheology of dense granular flows. These findings render an assessment of the convergence with respect to the spatial resolution of SPH simulations possible. Furthermore, the similarities between numerical SPH particles and physical grains in dense flow provide a deeper understanding of the nature of the SPH method.

  3. Scaling laws for implicit viscosities in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierwisch, Claas; Polfer, Pit

    2017-06-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a particle-based method which solves continuum equations such as the Navier-Stokes equations. A periodic fluidic system under homogeneous shear is studied using SPH in the present work. The total pressure of the system and the shear stress contributions from the SPH interaction terms for pressure and viscosity as well as the contribution caused by velocity fluctuations are analyzed. It is found that the pressure and the shear stress contributions obey certain scaling laws depending on physical properties of the system such as compressibility, viscosity and shear rate as well as the spatial resolution. Some of the identified relations resemble scaling laws for the rheology of dense granular flows. These findings render an assessment of the convergence with respect to the spatial resolution of SPH simulations possible. Furthermore, the similarities between numerical SPH particles and physical grains in dense flow provide a deeper understanding of the nature of the SPH method.

  4. Multi scale modeling of ignition and combustion of micro and nano aluminum particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Puneesh

    With renewed interest in nano scale energetic materials like aluminum, many fundamental issues concerning the ignition and combustion characteristics at nano scales, remain to be clarified. The overall aim of the current study is the establishment of a unified theory accommodating the various processes and mechanisms involved in the combustion and ignition of aluminum particles at micro and nano scales. A comprehensive review on the ignition and combustion of aluminum particles at multi scales was first performed identifying various processes and mechanisms involved. Research focus was also placed on the establishment of a Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation tool to investigate the characteristics of nano-particulate aluminum through three major studies. The general computational framework involved parallelized preprocessing, post-processing and main code with capability to simulate different ensembles using appropriate algorithms. Size dependence of melting temperature of pure aluminum particles was investigated in the first study. Phenomena like dynamic coexistence of solid and liquid phase and effect of surface charges on melting were explored. The second study involved the study of effect of defects in the form of voids on melting of bulk and particulate phase aluminum. The third MD study was used to analyze the thermo-mechanical behavior of nano-sized aluminum particles with total diameter of 5-10 nm and oxide thickness of 1-2.5 nm. The ensuing solid-solid and solid-liquid phase changes in the core and shell, stresses developed within the shell, and the diffusion of aluminum cations in the oxide layer, were explored in depth for amorphous and crystalline oxide layers. In the limiting case, the condition for pyrophoricity/explosivity of nano-particulate aluminum was analyzed and modified. The size dependence of thermodynamic properties at nano scales were considered and incorporated into the existing theories developed for micro and larger scales. Finally, a

  5. Mokken scale analysis : Between the Guttman scale and parametric item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schuur, Wijbrandt H.

    2003-01-01

    This article introduces a model of ordinal unidimensional measurement known as Mokken scale analysis. Mokken scaling is based on principles of Item Response Theory (IRT) that originated in the Guttman scale. I compare the Mokken model with both Classical Test Theory (reliability or factor analysis)

  6. Theory and simulation of epitaxial rotation. Light particles adsorbed on graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vives, E.; Lindgård, P.-A.

    1993-01-01

    We present a theory and Monte Carlo simulations of adsorbed particles on a corrugated substrate. We have focused on the case of rare gases and light molecules, H-2 and D2, adsorbed on graphite. The competition between the particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions gives rise to frustra......We present a theory and Monte Carlo simulations of adsorbed particles on a corrugated substrate. We have focused on the case of rare gases and light molecules, H-2 and D2, adsorbed on graphite. The competition between the particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions gives rise...

  7. The physics of musical scales: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Dallin S.; Colton, John S.

    2015-10-01

    The theory of musical scales involves mathematical ratios, harmonic resonators, beats, and human perception and provides an interesting application of the physics of waves and sound. We first review the history and physics of musical scales, with an emphasis on four historically important scales: twelve-tone equal temperament, Pythagorean, quarter-comma meantone, and Ptolemaic just intonation. We then present an easy way for students and teachers to directly experience the qualities of different scales using MIDI synthesis.

  8. Scale-covariant theory of gravitation and astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V.; Adams, P. J.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Tsiang, E.

    1977-01-01

    A scale-covariant theory of gravitation is presented which is characterized by a set of equations that are complete only after a choice of the scale function is made. Special attention is given to gauge conditions and units which allow gravitational phenomena to be described in atomic units. The generalized gravitational-field equations are derived by performing a direct scale transformation, by extending Riemannian geometry to Weyl geometry through the introduction of the notion of cotensors, and from a variation principle. Modified conservation laws are provided, a set of dynamical equations is obtained, and astrophysical consequences are considered. The theory is applied to examine certain homogeneous cosmological solutions, perihelion shifts, light deflections, secular variations of planetary orbital elements, stellar structure equations for a star in quasi-static equilibrium, and the past thermal history of earth. The possible relation of the scale-covariant theory to gauge field theories and their predictions of cosmological constants is discussed.

  9. Theory and Validity of Life Satisfaction Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Ed; Inglehart, Ronald; Tay, Louis

    2013-01-01

    National accounts of subjective well-being are being considered and adopted by nations. In order to be useful for policy deliberations, the measures of life satisfaction must be psychometrically sound. The reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change of life satisfaction measures are reviewed. The scales are stable under unchanging conditions,…

  10. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Mniszewski, Susan M; Negre, Christian F A; Cawkwell, Marc J; Swart, Pieter J; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C; Wall, Michael E; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Large scale Brownian dynamics of confined suspensions of rigid particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Brennan; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Patankar, Neelesh A; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-12-28

    We introduce methods for large-scale Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulation of many rigid particles of arbitrary shape suspended in a fluctuating fluid. Our method adds Brownian motion to the rigid multiblob method [F. Balboa Usabiaga et al., Commun. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci. 11(2), 217-296 (2016)] at a cost comparable to the cost of deterministic simulations. We demonstrate that we can efficiently generate deterministic and random displacements for many particles using preconditioned Krylov iterative methods, if kernel methods to efficiently compute the action of the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa (RPY) mobility matrix and its "square" root are available for the given boundary conditions. These kernel operations can be computed with near linear scaling for periodic domains using the positively split Ewald method. Here we study particles partially confined by gravity above a no-slip bottom wall using a graphical processing unit implementation of the mobility matrix-vector product, combined with a preconditioned Lanczos iteration for generating Brownian displacements. We address a major challenge in large-scale BD simulations, capturing the stochastic drift term that arises because of the configuration-dependent mobility. Unlike the widely used Fixman midpoint scheme, our methods utilize random finite differences and do not require the solution of resistance problems or the computation of the action of the inverse square root of the RPY mobility matrix. We construct two temporal schemes which are viable for large-scale simulations, an Euler-Maruyama traction scheme and a trapezoidal slip scheme, which minimize the number of mobility problems to be solved per time step while capturing the required stochastic drift terms. We validate and compare these schemes numerically by modeling suspensions of boomerang-shaped particles sedimented near a bottom wall. Using the trapezoidal scheme, we investigate the steady-state active motion in dense suspensions of confined microrollers, whose

  12. Large scale Brownian dynamics of confined suspensions of rigid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Brennan; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Patankar, Neelesh A.; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-12-01

    We introduce methods for large-scale Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulation of many rigid particles of arbitrary shape suspended in a fluctuating fluid. Our method adds Brownian motion to the rigid multiblob method [F. Balboa Usabiaga et al., Commun. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci. 11(2), 217-296 (2016)] at a cost comparable to the cost of deterministic simulations. We demonstrate that we can efficiently generate deterministic and random displacements for many particles using preconditioned Krylov iterative methods, if kernel methods to efficiently compute the action of the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa (RPY) mobility matrix and its "square" root are available for the given boundary conditions. These kernel operations can be computed with near linear scaling for periodic domains using the positively split Ewald method. Here we study particles partially confined by gravity above a no-slip bottom wall using a graphical processing unit implementation of the mobility matrix-vector product, combined with a preconditioned Lanczos iteration for generating Brownian displacements. We address a major challenge in large-scale BD simulations, capturing the stochastic drift term that arises because of the configuration-dependent mobility. Unlike the widely used Fixman midpoint scheme, our methods utilize random finite differences and do not require the solution of resistance problems or the computation of the action of the inverse square root of the RPY mobility matrix. We construct two temporal schemes which are viable for large-scale simulations, an Euler-Maruyama traction scheme and a trapezoidal slip scheme, which minimize the number of mobility problems to be solved per time step while capturing the required stochastic drift terms. We validate and compare these schemes numerically by modeling suspensions of boomerang-shaped particles sedimented near a bottom wall. Using the trapezoidal scheme, we investigate the steady-state active motion in dense suspensions of confined microrollers, whose

  13. Scale covariant gravitation. V - Kinetic theory. VI - Stellar structure and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, S.-H.; Canuto, V. M.

    1981-01-01

    A scale covariant kinetic theory for particles and photons is developed. The mathematical framework of the theory is given by the tangent bundle of a Weyl manifold. The Liouville equation is derived, and solutions to corresponding equilibrium distributions are presented and shown to yield thermodynamic results identical to the ones obtained previously. The scale covariant theory is then used to derive results of interest to stellar structure and evolution. A radiative transfer equation is derived that can be used to study stellar evolution with a variable gravitational constant. In addition, it is shown that the sun's absolute luminosity scales as L approximately equal to GM/kappa, where kappa is the stellar opacity. Finally, a formula is derived for the age of globular clusters as a function of the gravitational constant using a previously derived expression for the absolute luminosity.

  14. Neoclassical theory of electromagnetic interactions a single theory for macroscopic and microscopic scales

    CERN Document Server

    Babin, Anatoli

    2016-01-01

    In this monograph, the authors present their recently developed theory of electromagnetic interactions. This neoclassical approach extends the classical electromagnetic theory down to atomic scales and allows the explanation of various non-classical phenomena in the same framework. While the classical Maxwell–Lorentz electromagnetism theory succeeds in describing the physical reality at macroscopic scales, it struggles at atomic scales. Here, quantum mechanics traditionally takes over to describe non-classical phenomena such as the hydrogen spectrum and de Broglie waves. By means of modifying the classical theory, the approach presented here is able to consistently explain quantum-mechanical effects, and while similar to quantum mechanics in some respects, this neoclassical theory also differs markedly from it. In particular, the newly developed framework omits probabilistic interpretations of the wave function and features a new fundamental spatial scale which, at the size of the free electron, is much lar...

  15. Recent developments in ecological theory: hierarchy and scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, R.V.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past decade, hierarchy and scale have been adopted as an ecological paradigm. Beyond this new awareness, however, a number of studies have attempted to test the underlying hierarchy theory and developed new analytical applications. The purpose of the present paper is to review these recent developments. Tests of the theory have focused on the prediction that ecological systems should not be uniformly distributed across scale, but grouped or lumped into discrete levels. The predicted breaks in spatial distribution have been found in vegetation transects. Vertebrate weight distributions are also distinctly aggregated, corresponding to the spatial scale at which each species operates. An important development of hierarchy theory has considered extrapolating information upscale. Simply stated, the dynamics of the higher level cannot be represented by the same functional form as its components. One cannot insert the mean parameter value for the components and predict higher level effects. Analytical methods, derived from hierarchy theory, have been developed deal with the problem.

  16. Resummation and renormalization in effective theories of particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jakovac, Antal

    2015-01-01

    Effective models of strong and electroweak interactions are extensively applied in particle physics phenomenology, and in many instances can compete with large-scale numerical simulations of Standard Model physics. These contexts include but are not limited to providing indications for phase transitions and the nature of elementary excitations of strong and electroweak matter. A precondition for obtaining high-precision predictions is the application of some advanced functional techniques to the effective models, where the sensitivity of the results to the accurate choice of the input parameters is under control and the insensitivity to the actual choice of ultraviolet regulators is ensured. The credibility of such attempts ultimately requires a clean renormalization procedure and an error estimation due to a necessary truncation in the resummation procedure. In this concise primer we discuss systematically and in sufficient technical depth the features of a number of approximate methods, as applied to vario...

  17. Effect of Particle Size and Impact Velocity on Collision Behaviors Between Nano-Scale TiN Particles: MD Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hai-Long; Hu, Xiao-Zhen; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2018-06-01

    Inter-particle bonding formation which determines qualities of nano-scale ceramic coatings is influenced by particle collision behaviors during high velocity collision processes. In this study, collision behaviors between nano-scale TiN particles with different diameters were illuminated by using Molecular Dynamics simulation through controlling impact velocities. Results show that nano-scale TiN particles exhibit three states depending on particle sizes and impact velocities, i.e., bonding, bonding with localized fracturing, and rebounding. These TiN particles states are summarized into a parameter selection map providing an overview of the conditions in terms of particle sizes and velocities. Microstructure results show that localized atoms displacement and partial fracture around the impact region are main reasons for bonding formation of nano-scale ceramic particles, which shows differences from conventional particles refining and amorphization. A relationship between the adhesion energy and the rebound energy is established to understand bonding formation mechanism for nano-scale TiN particle collision. Results show that the energy relationship is depended on the particle sizes and impact velocities, and nano-scale ceramic particles can be bonded together as the adhesion energy being higher than the rebound energy.

  18. Renormalization Group Theory of Bolgiano Scaling in Boussinesq Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Bolgiano scaling in Boussinesq turbulence is analyzed using the Yakhot-Orszag renormalization group. For this purpose, an isotropic model is introduced. Scaling exponents are calculated by forcing the temperature equation so that the temperature variance flux is constant in the inertial range. Universal amplitudes associated with the scaling laws are computed by expanding about a logarithmic theory. Connections between this formalism and the direct interaction approximation are discussed. It is suggested that the Yakhot-Orszag theory yields a lowest order approximate solution of a regularized direct interaction approximation which can be corrected by a simple iterative procedure.

  19. Particle-laden flow from geophysical to Kolmogorov scales

    CERN Document Server

    Clercx, Herman; Uijttewaal, Wim

    2007-01-01

    The dispersion of particles in a flow is of central importance in various geophysical and environmental problems. The spreading of aerosols and soot in the air, the growth and dispersion of plankton blooms in seas and oceans, or the transport of sediment in rivers, estuaries and coastal regions are striking examples. These problems are characterized by strong nonlinear coupling between several dynamical mechanisms. As a result, processes on widely different length and time scales are simultaneously of importance. The multiscale nature of this challenging field motivated the EUROMECH colloquium on particle-laden flow that was held at the University of Twente in 2006. This book contains a selection of the papers that were presented.

  20. Theory of electrostatics and electrokinetics of soft particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2009-12-01

    We investigate theoretically the electrostatics and electrokinetics of a soft particle, i.e. a hard particle covered with an ion-penetrable surface layer of polyelectrolytes. The electric properties of soft particles in an electrolyte solution, which differ from those of hard particles, are essentially determined by the Donnan potential in the surface layer. In particular, the Donnan potential plays an essential role in the electrostatics and electrokinetics of soft particles. Furthermore, the concept of zeta potential, which is important in the electrokinetics of hard particles, loses its physical meaning in the electrokinetics of soft particles. In this review, we discuss the potential distribution around a soft particle, the electrostatic interaction between two soft particles, and the motion of a soft particle in an electric field.

  1. Theory of electrostatics and electrokinetics of soft particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki, E-mail: ohshima@rs.noda.tus.ac.j [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Institute of Colloid and Interface Science, Center for Colloid and Interface Science, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    We investigate theoretically the electrostatics and electrokinetics of a soft particle, i.e. a hard particle covered with an ion-penetrable surface layer of polyelectrolytes. The electric properties of soft particles in an electrolyte solution, which differ from those of hard particles, are essentially determined by the Donnan potential in the surface layer. In particular, the Donnan potential plays an essential role in the electrostatics and electrokinetics of soft particles. Furthermore, the concept of zeta potential, which is important in the electrokinetics of hard particles, loses its physical meaning in the electrokinetics of soft particles. In this review, we discuss the potential distribution around a soft particle, the electrostatic interaction between two soft particles, and the motion of a soft particle in an electric field. (topical review)

  2. Theory of electrostatics and electrokinetics of soft particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Ohshima

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate theoretically the electrostatics and electrokinetics of a soft particle, i.e. a hard particle covered with an ion-penetrable surface layer of polyelectrolytes. The electric properties of soft particles in an electrolyte solution, which differ from those of hard particles, are essentially determined by the Donnan potential in the surface layer. In particular, the Donnan potential plays an essential role in the electrostatics and electrokinetics of soft particles. Furthermore, the concept of zeta potential, which is important in the electrokinetics of hard particles, loses its physical meaning in the electrokinetics of soft particles. In this review, we discuss the potential distribution around a soft particle, the electrostatic interaction between two soft particles, and the motion of a soft particle in an electric field.

  3. Theory of electrostatics and electrokinetics of soft particles

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroyuki Ohshima

    2009-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the electrostatics and electrokinetics of a soft particle, i.e. a hard particle covered with an ion-penetrable surface layer of polyelectrolytes. The electric properties of soft particles in an electrolyte solution, which differ from those of hard particles, are essentially determined by the Donnan potential in the surface layer. In particular, the Donnan potential plays an essential role in the electrostatics and electrokinetics of soft particles. Furthermore, th...

  4. Nature of Microscopic Black Holes and Gravity in Theories with Particle Species

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2010-01-01

    Relying solely on unitarity and the consistency with large-distance black hole physics, we derive model-independent properties of the microscopic black holes and of short-distance gravity in theories with N particle species. In this class of theories black holes can be as light as M_{Planck}/\\sqrt{N} and be produced in particle collisions above this energy. We show, that the micro black holes must come in the same variety as the species do, although their label is not associated with any conserved charge measurable at large distances. In contrast with big Schwarzschildian ones, the evaporation of the smallest black holes is maximally undemocratic and is biased in favor of particular species. With an increasing mass the democracy characteristic to the usual macro black holes is gradually regained. The lowest possible mass above which black holes become Einsteinian is \\sqrt{N} M_{Planck}. This fact uncovers the new fundamental scale (below the quantum gravity scale) above which gravity changes classically, and ...

  5. Non-unified sparticle and particle masses in unified theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulos, Savas K; Dimopoulos, Savas; Pomarol, Alex

    1995-01-01

    We give examples of minimal extensions of the simplest SU(5) SUSY-GUT in which all squarks and sleptons of a family have different tree level masses at the unification scale. This phenomenon is general; it occurs when the quarks and leptons are the light remnants of a theory which contains extra heavy families at the unification scale. The examples have interesting relations between Yukawa couplings: In one model the ratio of the top to bottom Yukawas is as large as \\simeq 3, partly accounting for the large m_t /m_b. Another gives m_b/m_\\tau between 2/3 and 1; this relaxes the strict bounds on the top mass and neutrino properties that come from b--\\tau unification. Still another allows m_s/m_\\mu to be between 1/6 and 1 and evades the potentially problematic GUT relation of m_s=m_\\mu. The final example has horizontal sparticle splittings in spite of the existence of horizontal symmetries.

  6. Nonequilibrium mode-coupling theory for dense active systems of self-propelled particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Saroj Kumar; Gov, Nir S

    2017-10-25

    The physics of active systems of self-propelled particles, in the regime of a dense liquid state, is an open puzzle of great current interest, both for statistical physics and because such systems appear in many biological contexts. We develop a nonequilibrium mode-coupling theory (MCT) for such systems, where activity is included as a colored noise with the particles having a self-propulsion force f0 and a persistence time τp. Using the extended MCT and a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we calculate the effective temperature Teff of the active fluid. The nonequilibrium nature of the systems is manifested through a time-dependent Teff that approaches a constant in the long-time limit, which depends on the activity parameters f0 and τp. We find, phenomenologically, that this long-time limit is captured by the potential energy of a single, trapped active particle (STAP). Through a scaling analysis close to the MCT glass transition point, we show that τα, the α-relaxation time, behaves as τα ∼ f0(-2γ), where γ = 1.74 is the MCT exponent for the passive system. τα may increase or decrease as a function of τp depending on the type of active force correlations, but the behavior is always governed by the same value of the exponent γ. Comparison with the numerical solution of the nonequilibrium MCT and simulation results give excellent agreement with scaling analysis.

  7. Linear interfacial polymerization: theory and simulations with dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezkin, Anatoly V; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2014-11-21

    Step-growth alternating interfacial polymerization between two miscible or immiscible monomer melts is investigated theoretically and by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. In both cases the kinetics for an initially bilayer system passes from the reaction to diffusion control. The polymer composed of immiscible monomers precipitates at the interface forming a film of nearly uniform density. It is demonstrated that the reaction proceeds in a narrow zone, which expands much slower than the whole film, so that newly formed polymer is extruded from the reaction zone. This concept of "reactive extrusion" is used to analytically predict the degree of polymerization and distribution of all components (monomers, polymer, and end groups) within the film in close agreement with the simulations. Increasing the comonomer incompatibility leads to thinner and more uniform films with the higher average degree of polymerization. The final product is considerably more polydisperse than expected for the homogeneous step-growth polymerization. The results extend the previous theoretical reports on interfacial polymerization and provide new insights into the internal film structure and polymer characteristics, which are important for membrane preparation, microencapsulation, and 3D printing technologies. A systematic way of mapping the simulation data onto laboratory scales is discussed.

  8. Light Scattering by Optically Soft Particles Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Subodh K

    2006-01-01

    The present monograph deals with a particular class of approximation methods in the context of light scattering by small particles. This class of approximations has been termed as eikonal or soft particle approximations. The eikonal approximation was studied extensively in the potential scattering and then adopted in optical scattering problems. In this context, the eikonal and other soft particle approximations pertain to scatterers whose relative refractive index compared to surrounding medium is close to unity. The study of these approximations is very important because soft particles occur abundantly in nature. For example, the particles that occur in ocean optics, biomedical optics, atmospheric optics and in many industrial applications can be classified as soft particles. This book was written in recognition of the long-standing and current interest in the field of scattering approximations for soft particles. It should prove to be a useful addition for researchers in the field of light scattering.

  9. The evolving Planck mass in classically scale-invariant theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannike, K.; Raidal, M.; Spethmann, C.; Veermäe, H.

    2017-04-01

    We consider classically scale-invariant theories with non-minimally coupled scalar fields, where the Planck mass and the hierarchy of physical scales are dynamically generated. The classical theories possess a fixed point, where scale invariance is spontaneously broken. In these theories, however, the Planck mass becomes unstable in the presence of explicit sources of scale invariance breaking, such as non-relativistic matter and cosmological constant terms. We quantify the constraints on such classical models from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis that lead to an upper bound on the non-minimal coupling and require trans-Planckian field values. We show that quantum corrections to the scalar potential can stabilise the fixed point close to the minimum of the Coleman-Weinberg potential. The time-averaged motion of the evolving fixed point is strongly suppressed, thus the limits on the evolving gravitational constant from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and other measurements do not presently constrain this class of theories. Field oscillations around the fixed point, if not damped, contribute to the dark matter density of the Universe.

  10. The evolving Planck mass in classically scale-invariant theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannike, K.; Raidal, M.; Spethmann, C.; Veermäe, H. [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2017-04-05

    We consider classically scale-invariant theories with non-minimally coupled scalar fields, where the Planck mass and the hierarchy of physical scales are dynamically generated. The classical theories possess a fixed point, where scale invariance is spontaneously broken. In these theories, however, the Planck mass becomes unstable in the presence of explicit sources of scale invariance breaking, such as non-relativistic matter and cosmological constant terms. We quantify the constraints on such classical models from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis that lead to an upper bound on the non-minimal coupling and require trans-Planckian field values. We show that quantum corrections to the scalar potential can stabilise the fixed point close to the minimum of the Coleman-Weinberg potential. The time-averaged motion of the evolving fixed point is strongly suppressed, thus the limits on the evolving gravitational constant from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and other measurements do not presently constrain this class of theories. Field oscillations around the fixed point, if not damped, contribute to the dark matter density of the Universe.

  11. Lienard-Wiechert potential and synchrotron radiation of a relativistic spinning particle in the pseudoclassical theory

    OpenAIRE

    Arakelyan, S. A.; Grigoryan, G. V.; Grigoryan, R. P.

    1999-01-01

    Lienard-Wiechert potentials of the relativistic spinning particle with anomalous magnetic moment in pseudoclassical theory are constructed. General expressions for the Lienard-Wiechert potentials are used for investigation of some specific cases of the motion of the spinning particle. In particular the spin dependence of the intensity of the synchrotron radiation of the transversely polarized particle performing uniform circular motion is considered. When the movement of the particle in exter...

  12. On the Theory of Fragmentation Process with Initial Particle Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, D. V.

    2017-08-01

    The problem of fragmentation (disintegration) process is theoretically studied with allowance for the initial particle volume. An exact analytical solution of integro-differential model governing the fragmentation phenomenon is obtained. The key role of a finite initial volume of particles leading to substantial changes of the particle-size distribution function is demonstrated. Supported by the Russian Science Foundation under Grant No. 16-11-10095

  13. A field theory characterization of interacting adiabatic particles in cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteaga, Daniel [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: darteaga@ub.edu

    2008-08-07

    We explore the adiabatic particle excitations of an interacting field in a cosmological background. By following the time evolution of the quantum state corresponding to the particle excitation, we show how the basic properties characterizing the particle propagation can be recovered from the two-point propagators. As an application, we study the background-induced dissipative effects on the propagation of a two-level atom in an expanding universe.

  14. Black Carbon Absorption at the Global Scale Is Affected by Particle-Scale Diversity in Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (E(sub abs)) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find E(sub abs) = 1 - 1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models.

  15. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, John Joseph M. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Hertzberg, Mark P. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  16. Towards a Scale-driven Theory for Spatial Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhilin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spatial clustering plays a key role in exploratory geographical data analysis. It is important for investigating the distribution of geographical phenomena. Spatial clustering sometimes also serves as an important pre-processing for other geographical data analysis techniques. Although lots of attentions have been paid to spatial clustering, two serious obstacles remain to be tackled:①clusters will always be discovered in any geographical dataset by spatial clustering algorithms, even if the input dataset is a random dataset; ②users feel difficult to interpret the various clustering results obtained by using different parameters. It is hypothesized that scale is not handled well in clustering process. As a result, a scale-driven theory for spatial clustering is introduced in this study, based on the human recognition theory and the natural principle of multi-scale representation. Scale is modeled as parameter of a clustering model, and the scale dependency in spatial clustering is handled by constructing a hypothesis testing, and multi-scale significant clusters can be easily discovered by controlling the scale parameters in an objective manner.

  17. Scaling Deviations for Neutrino Reactions in Aysmptotically Free Field Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, F. A.; Zee, A.; Treiman, S. B.

    1974-11-01

    Several aspects of deep inelastic neutrino scattering are discussed in the framework of asymptotically free field theories. We first consider the growth behavior of the total cross sections at large energies. Because of the deviations from strict scaling which are characteristic of such theories the growth need not be linear. However, upper and lower bounds are established which rather closely bracket a linear growth. We next consider in more detail the expected pattern of scaling deviation for the structure functions and, correspondingly, for the differential cross sections. The analysis here is based on certain speculative assumptions. The focus is on qualitative effects of scaling breakdown as they may show up in the X and y distributions. The last section of the paper deals with deviations from the Callan-Gross relation.

  18. Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

    2013-12-17

    A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

  19. Validation of Theory of Consumption Values Scales for Deal Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Deal sites became a widely used artefact. But there is still only a limited number of papers investigating their adoption and use. Most of the research published on the topic is qualitative. It is typical for an early stage of investigation of any new artefact. The Theory of Consumption Values...... explains purchase behavior. The aim of this paper is to validate scales for the Theory of Consumption Values for deal sites. This should pave a way for quantitative investigation of motives for purchasing using deal sites....

  20. Three-particle physics and dispersion relation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Anisovich, A V; Matveev, M A; Nikonov, V A; Nyiri, J; Sarantsev, A V

    2013-01-01

    The necessity of describing three-nucleon and three-quark systems have led to a constant interest in the problem of three particles. The question of including relativistic effects appeared together with the consideration of the decay amplitude in the framework of the dispersion technique. The relativistic dispersion description of amplitudes always takes into account processes connected with the investigated reaction by the unitarity condition or by virtual transitions; in the case of three-particle processes they are, as a rule, those where other many-particle states and resonances are produced. The description of these interconnected reactions and ways of handling them is the main subject of the book.

  1. A simple kinetic theory of auroral arc scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Y. T.

    1986-01-01

    A kinetic theory of the origins of the auroral arc scale spectrum is presented in this paper. The conceptual basis of the theory is current conservation in a turbulent plasma at the magnetospheric equatorial region in which a field-aligned current is generated and the local electrostatic potential structure is forced to adjust to the presence of the field-aligned current. This simple model uses an ad hoc Ohm's law relationship between the perpendicular current and the perpendicular electric field, but with a negative conductance in the generator region so that J(perpendicular) x E(perpendicular) is less than 0. An exact solution of a simple model of the concept yields a bistatic auroral generator for which multiple-arc formation is predicted if the field-aligned current exceeds a critical value. The predicted scale spectrum is inversely proportional to the square root of the field-aligned current strength spectrum.

  2. The problem of interaction in a dynamical theory of particles (general questions). 2

    CERN Document Server

    Sannikov-Proskuryakov, S S

    2002-01-01

    We continue the consideration of the interaction problem in the frame of a new field particle theory. Here a new correspondence principle and the connection between bilocal and usual local fields are discussed. The method of second quantization of bilocal fields is formulated and a scattering matrix is built. Explicit form of smearing operators and formfactors is found. Comparison of a new particle field theory with the old (local) axiomatic approach is given.

  3. Microfluidic rheology of active particle suspensions: Kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Matilla, Roberto; Ezhilan, Barath; Saintillan, David

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the effective rheology of a dilute suspension of self-propelled slender particles between two infinite parallel plates in a pressure-driven flow. We use a continuum kinetic model to study the dynamics and transport of particles, where hydrodynamic interactions induced by the swimmers are taken into account. Using finite volume simulations we study how the activity of the swimmer and the external flow modify the rheological properties of the system. Results indicate that at low flow rates, activity decreases the value of the viscosity for pushers and increases its value for pullers. Both effects become weaker with increasing the flow strength due to the alignment of the particles with the flow. In the case of puller particles, shear thinning is observed over the entire range of flow rates. Pusher particles exhibit shear thickening at intermediate flow rates, where passive stresses start dominating over active stresses, reaching a viscosity greater than that of the Newtonian fluid. Finally shear thinning is observed at high flow rates. Both pushers and pullers exhibit a Newtonian plateau at very high flow rates. We demonstrate a good agreement between numerical results and experiments.

  4. Problems in particle theory. Technical report 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, S.L.; Wilczek, F.

    1992-11-01

    Members of the Institute have worked on a number of problems including the following: acceleration algorithms for the Monte Carlo analysis of lattice field, and gauge and spin theories, based on changes of variables specific to lattices of dimension 2{sup {ell}}; construction of quaternionic generalizations of complex quantum mechanics and field theory; wave functions for paired Hall states; black hole quantum mechanics; generalized target-space duality in curved string backgrounds; gauge symnmetry algebra of the N = 2 string; two-dimensional quantum gravity and associated string theories; organizing principles from which the signal processing of neural networks in the retina and cortex can be deduced; integrable systems of KdV type; and a theory for Kondo insulators.

  5. Plato's Ideas and the Theories of Modern Particle Physics: Amazing Parallels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machleidt, Ruprecht

    2006-05-01

    It is generally known that the question, ``What are the most elementary particles that all matter is made from?'', was already posed in the antiquity. The Greek natural philosophers Leucippus and Democritus were the first to suggest that all matter was made from atoms. Therefore, most people perceive them as the ancient fathers of elementary particle physics. However, this perception is wrong. Modern particle physics is not just a simple atomism. The characteristic point of modern particle theory is that it is concerned with the symmetries underlying the particles we discover in experiment. More than 2000 years ago, a similar idea was already advanced by the Greek philosopher Plato in his dialogue Timaeus: Geometric symmetries generate the atoms from just a few even more elementary items. Plato's vision is amazingly close to the ideas of modern particle theory. This fact, which is unfortunately little known, has been pointed out repeatedly by Werner Heisenberg.

  6. A review of transport theory. [particle acceleration in astrophysical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frank C.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which energy change terms arise in the transport equation and how the various terms relate to the modes of energy exchange between the particles and plasma are shown. It is argued that the transport equation cannot be used to describe the initial acceleration of thermal particles by plasma shocks or relativistic shocks where the energetic particle speeds are never much greater than the flow speeds. In most other situations, it describes almost any acceleration process that can be caused by a moving plasma. It describes shock acceleration for both parallel shocks and oblique ones, and stochastic acceleration by the turbulent motion of the scatterers as well as by their motion across the magnetic field.

  7. Particle transport in tokamak plasmas, theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angioni, C [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP-EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fable, E; Maslov, M; Weisen, H [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Greenwald, M [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Peeters, A G [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL, Coventry (United Kingdom); Takenaga, H [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    The physical processes producing electron particle transport in the core of tokamak plasmas are described. Starting from the gyrokinetic equation, a simple analytical derivation is used as guidance to illustrate the main mechanisms driving turbulent particle convection. A review of the experimental observations on particle transport in tokamaks is presented and the consistency with the theoretical predictions is discussed. An overall qualitative agreement, and in some cases even a specific quantitative agreement, emerges between complex theoretical predictions and equally complex experimental observations, exhibiting different dependences on plasma parameters under different regimes. By these results, the direct connection between macroscopic transport properties and the character of microscopic turbulence is pointed out, and an important confirmation of the paradigm of microinstabilities and turbulence as the main cause of transport in the core of tokamaks is obtained. Finally, the impact of these results on the prediction of the peaking of the electron density profile in a fusion reactor is illustrated.

  8. Medical radiation dosimetry theory of charged particle collision energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Accurate radiation dosimetry is a requirement of radiation oncology, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. It is necessary so as to satisfy the needs of patient safety, therapeutic and diagnostic optimisation, and retrospective epidemiological studies of the biological effects resulting from low absorbed doses of ionising radiation. The radiation absorbed dose received by the patient is the ultimate consequence of the transfer of kinetic energy through collisions between energetic charged particles and atoms of the tissue being traversed. Thus, the ability of the medical physicist to both measure and calculate accurately patient dosimetry demands a deep understanding of the physics of charged particle interactions with matter. Interestingly, the physics of charged particle energy loss has an almost exclusively theoretical basis, thus necessitating an advanced theoretical understanding of the subject in order to apply it appropriately to the clinical regime. ​ Each year, about one-third of the worl...

  9. Einstein's coefficients and the wave-particle duality in the theory of thermal radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Prigara, Fedor V.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the concept of elementary resonator in the theory of thermal radiation implies the indivisible connection between particles (photons) and electromagnetic waves. This wave-particle duality covers both the Wien and Rayleigh-Jeans regions of spectrum.

  10. On the factorization of universal poles in a theory of gravitating point particles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, G. 't

    1988-01-01

    A theory is considered in which point-like particles scatter only gravitationally and electromagnetically but no other exchanges are taken into account. The two-particle amplitude at high s, low t, as computed before, has universal poles at s values whose imaginary parts are integer positive numbers

  11. Atomic-scale simulation of dust grain collisions: Surface chemistry and dissipation beyond existing theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadery, Abrar H.; Doan, Baochi D.; Tucker, William C.; Dove, Adrienne R.; Schelling, Patrick K.

    2017-10-01

    The early stages of planet formation involve steps where submicron-sized dust particles collide to form aggregates. However, the mechanism through which millimeter-sized particles aggregate to kilometer-sized planetesimals is still not understood. Dust grain collision experiments carried out in the environment of the Earth lead to the prediction of a 'bouncing barrier' at millimeter-sizes. Theoretical models, e.g., Johnson-Kendall-Roberts and Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov theories, lack two key features, namely the chemistry of dust grain surfaces, and a mechanism for atomic-scale dissipation of energy. Moreover, interaction strengths in these models are parameterized based on experiments done in the Earth's environment. To address these issues, we performed atomic-scale simulations of collisions between nonhydroxylated and hydroxylated amorphous silica nanoparticles. We used the ReaxFF approach which enables modeling chemical reactions using an empirical potential. We found that nonhydroxylated nanograins tend to adhere with much higher probability than suggested by existing theories. By contrast, hydroxylated nanograins exhibit a strong tendency to bounce. Also, the interaction between dust grains has the characteristics of a strong chemical force instead of weak van der Waals forces. This suggests that the formation of strong chemical bonds and dissipation via internal atomic vibration may result in aggregation beyond what is expected based on our current understanding. Our results also indicate that experiments should more carefully consider surface conditions to mimic the space environment. We also report results of simulations with molten silica nanoparticles. It is found that molten particles are more likely to adhere due to viscous dissipation, which supports theories that suggest aggregation to kilometer scales might require grains to be in a molten state.

  12. Quantum Optics, Diffraction Theory, and Elementary Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    Physical optics has expanded greatly in recent years. Though it remains part of the ancestry of elementary particle physics, there are once again lessons to be learned from it. I shall discuss several of these, including some that have emerged at CERN and Brookhaven.

  13. Anyons as spin particles: from classical mechanics to field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    1995-01-01

    (2+1)-dimensional relativistic fractional spin particles are considered within the framework of the group-theoretical approach to anyons starting from the level of classical mechanics and concluding by the construction of the minimal set of linear differential field equations.

  14. Unified Theory of Wave-Particle Duality and the Schr\\"odinger Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Gilson, Greyson

    2011-01-01

    Individual quantum objects display coexisting wave properties and particle properties. A wave is ordinarily associated with spatial extension while a particle is ordinarily associated with a point-like locality. Coexistence of spatial extension and a point-like locality as properties of a single entity seems paradoxical. The apparent paradox is resolved by the unified theory of wave-particle duality developed in this paper. Using this theory, a straightforward derivation of the Schr\\"odinger equations (time-independent and time-dependent) is presented where previously no such derivation was considered to be possible.

  15. Single-parameter scaling and maximum entropy inside disordered one-dimensional systems: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Ma, Xujun; Yépez, Miztli; Genack, Azriel Z.; Mello, Pier A.

    2017-11-01

    The single-parameter scaling hypothesis relating the average and variance of the logarithm of the conductance is a pillar of the theory of electronic transport. We use a maximum-entropy ansatz to explore the logarithm of the particle, or energy density lnW (x ) at a depth x into a random one-dimensional system. Single-parameter scaling would be the special case in which x =L (the system length). We find the result, confirmed in microwave measurements and computer simulations, that the average of lnW (x ) is independent of L and equal to -x /ℓ , with ℓ the mean free path. At the beginning of the sample, var [lnW (x )] rises linearly with x and is also independent of L , with a sublinear increase and then a drop near the sample output. At x =L we find a correction to the value of var [lnT ] predicted by single-parameter scaling.

  16. Scale relativity theory and integrative systems biology: 1. Founding principles and scale laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffray, Charles; Nottale, Laurent

    2008-05-01

    In these two companion papers, we provide an overview and a brief history of the multiple roots, current developments and recent advances of integrative systems biology and identify multiscale integration as its grand challenge. Then we introduce the fundamental principles and the successive steps that have been followed in the construction of the scale relativity theory, and discuss how scale laws of increasing complexity can be used to model and understand the behaviour of complex biological systems. In scale relativity theory, the geometry of space is considered to be continuous but non-differentiable, therefore fractal (i.e., explicitly scale-dependent). One writes the equations of motion in such a space as geodesics equations, under the constraint of the principle of relativity of all scales in nature. To this purpose, covariant derivatives are constructed that implement the various effects of the non-differentiable and fractal geometry. In this first review paper, the scale laws that describe the new dependence on resolutions of physical quantities are obtained as solutions of differential equations acting in the scale space. This leads to several possible levels of description for these laws, from the simplest scale invariant laws to generalized laws with variable fractal dimensions. Initial applications of these laws to the study of species evolution, embryogenesis and cell confinement are discussed.

  17. Mixing large and small particles in a pilot scale rotary kiln

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Aniol, Rasmus Wochnik; Larsen, Morten Boberg

    2011-01-01

    The mixing of solid alternative fuel particles in cement raw materials was studied experimentally by visual observation in a pilot scale rotary kiln. Fuel particles were placed on top of the raw material bed prior to the experiment. The percentage of particles visible above the bed as a function...... of time was evaluated with the bed predominantly in the rolling bed mode. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of fuel particle size and shape, fuel particle density, rotary kiln fill degree and rotational speed. Large fuel particles and low-density fuel particles appeared more on top.......Results can be up-scaled to industrial conditions in cement rotary kilns and show that even relatively large fuel particles will predominantly be covered by raw material after less than 30s in the rotary kiln. This affects the heating and combustion mechanisms for the fuel particles....

  18. Particle Production and Effective Thermalization in Inhomogeneous Mean Field Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, G.; Smit, J.

    2000-01-01

    As a toy model for dynamics in nonequilibrium quantum field theory we consider the abelian Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions with fermions. In the approximate dynamical equations, inhomogeneous classical (mean) Bose fields are coupled to quantized fermion fields, which are treated with a mode function

  19. Literature in focus: Particle beams from theory to practice

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Wednesday 1st October 16 h00 - Central Library CERN's Frank Zimmermann and DESY's Michiko G. Minty had their book 'Measurement and control of charged particle beams' published a few months ago by Springer. Frank Zimmermann, a young but already well established accelerator physicist, was awarded the European Accelerator Prize by the Interdivisional Group on Accelerators of the European Physical Society last year. Mr. Zimmermann was particularly cited for his significant contribution to the understanding of fast ion and electron cloud instabilities. The book is the first comprehensive and systematic review of all methods used for the measurement, correction, and control of the beam dynamics of modern particle accelerators and is intended for graduate students starting research or work in the field of beam physics. Specific techniques and methods for relativistic beams are illustrated by examples from operational accelerators, like CERN, DESY, SLAC, KEK, LBNL, and FNAL. Problems and solutions enhance the book...

  20. Kinetic theory for distribution functions of wave-particle interactions in plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kominis, Y; Ram, A K; Hizanidis, K

    2010-06-11

    The evolution of a charged particle distribution function under the influence of coherent electromagnetic waves in a plasma is determined from kinetic theory. For coherent waves, the dynamical phase space of particles is an inhomogeneous mix of chaotic and regular orbits. The persistence of long time correlations between the particle motion and the phase of the waves invalidates any simplifying Markovian or statistical assumptions--the basis for usual quasilinear theories. The generalized formalism in this Letter leads to a hierarchy of evolution equations for the reduced distribution function. The evolution operators, in contrast to the quasilinear theories, are time dependent and nonsingular and include the rich phase space dynamics of particles interacting with coherent waves.

  1. Charged particle behavior in localized ultralow frequency waves: Theory and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Rankin, Robert; Zou, Hong; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xing-Ran; Hao, Yi-Xin

    2017-06-01

    The formation and variability of the Van Allen radiation belts are highly influenced by charged particles accelerated via drift-resonant interactions with ultralow frequency (ULF) waves. In the prevailing theory of drift resonance, the ULF wave amplitude is assumed independent of magnetic longitude. This assumption is not generally valid in Earth's magnetosphere, as supported by numerous observations that point to the localized nature of ULF waves. Here we introduce a longitude dependence of the ULF wave amplitude, achieved via a von Mises function, into the theoretical framework of ULF wave-particle drift resonance. To validate the revised theory, the predicted particle signatures are compared with observational data through a best fit procedure. It is demonstrated that incorporation of nonlocal effects in drift-resonance theory provides an improved understanding of charged particle behavior in the inner magnetosphere through the intermediary of ULF waves.

  2. Particles and Antiparticles in the Planck Vacuum Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daywitt W. C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This short note sheds some light on the negative energy vacuum state by expanding the Planck vacuum (PV model and taking a closer look at the particle-antiparticle nature of the Dirac equation. Results of the development are briefly discussed with regard to the complexity of the PV interaction with the massless free charge, the Dirac electron, and the proton; an exercise that may lead to a better proton model.

  3. Fundamental measure theory for non-spherical hard particles: predicting liquid crystal properties from the particle shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, René; Marechal, Matthieu; Mecke, Klaus

    2016-06-22

    Density functional theory (DFT) for hard bodies provides a theoretical description of the effect of particle shape on inhomogeneous fluids. We present improvements of the DFT framework fundamental measure theory (FMT) for hard bodies and validate these improvements for hard spherocylinders. To keep the paper self-contained, we first discuss the recent advances in FMT for hard bodies that lead to the introduction of fundamental mixed measure theory (FMMT) in our previous paper (2015 Europhys. Lett. 109 26003). Subsequently, we provide an efficient semi-empirical alternative to FMMT and show that the phase diagram for spherocylinders is described with similar accuracy in both versions of the theory. Finally, we present a semi-empirical modification of FMMT whose predictions for the phase diagram for spherocylinders are in excellent quantitative agreement with computer simulation results.

  4. Calculation of positron binding energies using the generalized any particle propagator theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Jonathan; Charry, Jorge A. [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Av. Cra. 30 #45-03, Bogotá (Colombia); Flores-Moreno, Roberto [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán 1421, Guadalajara Jal., C. P. 44430 (Mexico); Varella, Márcio T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Reyes, Andrés, E-mail: areyesv@unal.edu.co [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Av. Cra. 30 #45-03, Bogotá (Colombia); Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-21

    We recently extended the electron propagator theory to any type of quantum species based in the framework of the Any-Particle Molecular Orbital (APMO) approach [J. Romero, E. Posada, R. Flores-Moreno, and A. Reyes, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 074105 (2012)]. The generalized any particle molecular orbital propagator theory (APMO/PT) was implemented in its quasiparticle second order version in the LOWDIN code and was applied to calculate nuclear quantum effects in electron binding energies and proton binding energies in molecular systems [M. Díaz-Tinoco, J. Romero, J. V. Ortiz, A. Reyes, and R. Flores-Moreno, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 194108 (2013)]. In this work, we present the derivation of third order quasiparticle APMO/PT methods and we apply them to calculate positron binding energies (PBEs) of atoms and molecules. We calculated the PBEs of anions and some diatomic molecules using the second order, third order, and renormalized third order quasiparticle APMO/PT approaches and compared our results with those previously calculated employing configuration interaction (CI), explicitly correlated and quantum Montecarlo methodologies. We found that renormalized APMO/PT methods can achieve accuracies of ∼0.35 eV for anionic systems, compared to Full-CI results, and provide a quantitative description of positron binding to anionic and highly polar species. Third order APMO/PT approaches display considerable potential to study positron binding to large molecules because of the fifth power scaling with respect to the number of basis sets. In this regard, we present additional PBE calculations of some small polar organic molecules, amino acids and DNA nucleobases. We complement our numerical assessment with formal and numerical analyses of the treatment of electron-positron correlation within the quasiparticle propagator approach.

  5. Fundamental measure theory for smectic phases: scaling behavior and higher order terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, René; Marechal, Matthieu; Mecke, Klaus

    2014-08-14

    The recent extension of Rosenfeld's fundamental measure theory to anisotropic hard particles predicts nematic order of rod-like particles. Our analytic study of different aligned shapes provides new insights into the structure of this density functional, which is basically founded on experience with hard spheres. We combine scaling arguments with dimensional crossover and motivate a modified expression, which enables an appropriate description of smectic layering. We calculate the nematic-smectic-A transition of monodisperse hard spherocylinders with and without orientational degrees of freedom and present the equation of state and phase diagram including these two liquid crystalline phases in good agreement with simulations. We also find improved results related to the isotropic-nematic interface. We discuss the quality of empirical corrections and the convergence towards an exact second virial coefficient, including higher order terms.

  6. Plant interactions alter the predictions of metabolic scaling theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yue; Berger, Uta; Grimm, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic scaling theory (MST) is an attempt to link physiological processes of individual organisms with macroecology. It predicts a power law relationship with an exponent of 24/3 between mean individual biomass and density during densitydependent mortality (self-thinning). Empirical tests have...... produced variable results, and the validity of MST is intensely debated. MST focuses on organisms’ internal physiological mechanisms but we hypothesize that ecological interactions can be more important in determining plant mass-density relationships induced by density. We employ an individual-based model...

  7. Scale dependence of multiplier distributions for particle concentration, enstrophy, and dissipation in the inertial range of homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Weston, Brian

    2017-03-01

    Turbulent flows preferentially concentrate inertial particles depending on their stopping time or Stokes number, which can lead to significant spatial variations in the particle concentration. Cascade models are one way to describe this process in statistical terms. Here, we use a direct numerical simulation (DNS) dataset of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence to determine probability distribution functions (PDFs) for cascade multipliers, which determine the ratio by which a property is partitioned into subvolumes as an eddy is envisioned to decay into smaller eddies. We present a technique for correcting effects of small particle numbers in the statistics. We determine multiplier PDFs for particle number, flow dissipation, and enstrophy, all of which are shown to be scale dependent. However, the particle multiplier PDFs collapse when scaled with an appropriately defined local Stokes number. As anticipated from earlier works, dissipation and enstrophy multiplier PDFs reach an asymptote for sufficiently small spatial scales. From the DNS measurements, we derive a cascade model that is used it to make predictions for the radial distribution function (RDF) for arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers, Re, finding good agreement with the asymptotic, infinite Re inertial range theory of Zaichik and Alipchenkov [New J. Phys. 11, 103018 (2009), 10.1088/1367-2630/11/10/103018]. We discuss implications of these results for the statistical modeling of the turbulent clustering process in the inertial range for high Reynolds numbers inaccessible to numerical simulations.

  8. Particle diagrams and embedded many-body random matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, R. A.; Müller, S.

    2014-07-01

    We present a method which uses Feynman-like diagrams to calculate the statistical quantities of embedded many-body random matrix problems. The method provides a promising alternative to existing techniques and offers many important simplifications. We use it here to find the fourth, sixth, and eighth moments of the level density of an m-body system with k fermions or bosons interacting through a random Hermitian potential (k ≤m) in the limit where the number of possible single-particle states is taken to infinity. All share the same transition, starting immediately after 2k=m, from moments arising from a semicircular level density to Gaussian moments. The results also reveal a striking feature; the domain of the 2nth moment is naturally divided into n subdomains specified by the points 2k=m,3k=m,...,nk=m.

  9. A Diffusive-Particle Theory of Free Recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumarola, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Diffusive models of free recall have been recently introduced in the memory literature, but their potential remains largely unexplored. In this paper, a diffusive model of short-term verbal memory is considered, in which the psychological state of the subject is encoded as the instantaneous position of a particle diffusing over a semantic graph. The model is particularly suitable for studying the dependence of free-recall observables on the semantic properties of the words to be recalled. Besides predicting some well-known experimental features (forward asymmetry, semantic clustering, word-length effect), a novel prediction is obtained on the relationship between the contiguity effect and the syllabic length of words; shorter words, by way of their wider semantic range, are predicted to be characterized by stronger forward contiguity. A fresh analysis of archival free-recall data allows to confirm this prediction.

  10. Particle-scale structure in frozen colloidal suspensions from small-angle x-ray scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Spannuth, Melissa

    2011-02-01

    During directional solidification of the solvent in a colloidal suspension, the colloidal particles segregate from the growing solid, forming high-particle-density regions with structure on a hierarchy of length scales ranging from that of the particle-scale packing to the large-scale spacing between these regions. Previous work has concentrated mostly on the medium- to large-length scale structure, as it is the most accessible and thought to be more technologically relevant. However, the packing of the colloids at the particle scale is an important component not only in theoretical descriptions of the segregation process, but also to the utility of freeze-cast materials for new applications. Here we present the results of experiments in which we investigated this structure across a wide range of length scales using a combination of small-angle x-ray scattering and direct optical imaging. As expected, during freezing the particles were concentrated into regions between ice dendrites forming a microscopic pattern of high- and low-particle-density regions. X-ray scattering indicates that the particles in the high-density regions were so closely packed as to be touching. However, the arrangement of the particles does not conform to that predicted by standard interparticle pair potentials, suggesting that the particle packing induced by freezing differs from that formed during equilibrium densification processes. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  11. A critical review on the scaling theory of dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Alraune; Mai, Juliane; Attinger, Sabine; Dietrich, Peter; Teutsch, Georg; Fiori, Aldo; Rubin, Yoram

    2014-05-01

    The phenomenon of dispersive mixing of solutes in aquifers is subject of research since decades. The characterization of dispersivity at a particular field site is a prerequisite to predict the movement and spreading of a contaminant plume. Experimental investigations have shown, that field-scale dispersivities vary over orders of magnitude, which apparently depends on the scale of measurement. Gelhar et al. [1992] and Schulze-Makuch [2005] have reviewed a large number of transport experiments reported in the literature. Based on that data Schulze-Makuch [2005] performed a trend analysis of longitudinal dispersivity, fostering the empirical relationship of a power law between dispersivities and the scale of measurement without an upper bound. The goal of our study is to critically revisit not only the data used for the trend analysis but the power-law scale dependence of longitudinal dispersivity (e.g. Neuman [1990], Xu and Eckstein [1995]). Our particular focus is on the reported dispersivities of large amount (larger than 100m) and large measurement scales (in the order of kilometers). We aim to evaluate current theories of transport against a critical "mass" of field experiments and to bracket the conditions of their applicability. We further aim to evaluate the adequacy of the field sampling techniques that were employed from the perspective of more than 30 years development in modeling and field characterization. Given the tremendous progress in field data acquisition techniques and new insights gained, it is reasonable to expect that interpretations of past experiments may be flawed due to the limitations or inadequacy of field sampling techniques. Gelhar, L.W., C. Welty, and K.R. Rehfeldt, 1992, A critical review of data on field-scale dispersion in aquifers, Water Resources Research 28, No. 7: 1955-1974. Schulze-Makuch, D., 2005, Longitudinal dispersivity data and implications for scaling behavior, Ground Water, Vol. 43, No. 3, 443-456. Neuman, S.P., 1990

  12. Proceedings of the Johns Hopkins workshop on current problems in particle theory 5: unified field theories and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Topics covered include: symmetric gauge theories; infinite lie algebras in physics; the mechanism for confinement in massive quark QCD; a search for possible composite models of quarks and leptons; the radiative structure of Fermion masses; fractional electric charge in QCD; heavy particle effects; Fermion mass heirarchies in theories of technicolor; statistical notions applied in the early universe; grand unification and cosmology - an environmental impact statement; first order phase transition in the early universe; the electric dipole moment of the neutron; cosmological constraints on Grand Unified Theories; and the consequences for CP invariance of instanton angles THETA in dynamically broken gauge theories. Individual items from this workshop were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  13. Linear and nonlinear theory of trapped-particle instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.M.; Adam, J.C.; Cohen, B.I.

    1976-09-01

    This paper analyzes several important features of trapped-particle instabilities. For trapped-electron modes, the complete two-dimensional (2D) spatial structure, including the effects of magnetic shear, is numerically calculated within the framework of a differential formulation for long radial wavelength modes. Growth rates obtained for representative cases correlate reasonably well with the usual one-dimensional (1D) estimates of shear stabilization. However, the spatial structure of the mode differs markedly; e.g., it typically extends over several mode-rational surfaces. At the shorter wavelengths, where the maximum growth rates of the modes typically occur, it is necessary to introduce an integral equation formulation for calculating the radial dependence. Growth rates from this 2D analysis are significantly smaller than 1D estimates, and the poloidal mode structure exhibits a pronounced localization at the magnetic field minimum. Specific collisional mechanisms affecting the linear stability of these modes are also studied. Collisional scattering of low energy electrons can reduce the nonadiabatic trapped-electron response, and collisional broadening can strongly modify the resonant response of the untrapped electrons. The saturation of the usual form of the dissipative trapped-ion instability by mode coupling is studied analytically and numerically.

  14. Microscopic theory of the one-particle excitation spectrum of normal Fermi systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodel' , V. A.; Shaginyan, V. R.

    1989-01-01

    A microscopic theory of one-particle excitations in normal Fermi systems is proposed in the framework of the density-functional method. A system of equations is obtained which makes it possible to calculate the effective mass of a quasiparticle, starting from the interaction between the particles in the vacuum. A system of equations for calculating the thermodynamic functions of heated nuclear matter is also proposed. The equations do not contain any parameters.

  15. Analytical theory of effective interactions in binary colloidal systems of soft particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majka, M; Góra, P F

    2014-09-01

    While density functional theory with integral equations techniques are very efficient tools in the numerical analysis of complex fluids, analytical insight into the phenomenon of effective interactions is still limited. In this paper, we propose a theory of binary systems that results in a relatively simple analytical expression combining arbitrary microscopic potentials into effective interaction. The derivation is based on translating a many-particle Hamiltonian including particle-depletant and depletant-depletant interactions into the occupation field language, which turns the partition function into multiple Gaussian integrals, regardless of what microscopic potentials are chosen. As a result, we calculate the effective Hamiltonian and discuss when our formula is a dominant contribution to the effective interactions. Our theory allows us to analytically reproduce several important characteristics of systems under scrutiny. In particular, we analyze the following: the effective attraction as a demixing factor in the binary systems of Gaussian particles, the screening of charged spheres by ions, which proves equivalent to Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, effective interactions in the binary mixtures of Yukawa particles, and the system of particles consisting of both a repulsive core and an attractive/repulsive Yukawa interaction tail. For this last case, we reproduce the "attraction-through-repulsion" and "repulsion-through-attraction" effects previously observed in simulations.

  16. Point-particle effective field theory II: relativistic effects and Coulomb/inverse-square competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, C. P.; Hayman, Peter; Rummel, Markus; Williams, Matt; Zalavári, László

    2017-07-01

    We apply point-particle effective field theory (PPEFT) to compute the leading shifts due to finite-sized source effects in the Coulomb bound energy levels of a relativistic spinless charged particle. This is the analogue for spinless electrons of calculating the contribution of the charge-radius of the source to these levels, and our calculation disagrees with standard calculations in several ways. Most notably we find there are two effective interactions with the same dimension that contribute to leading order in the nuclear size, one of which captures the standard charge-radius contribution. The other effective operator is a contact interaction whose leading contribution to δE arises linearly (rather than quadratically) in the small length scale, ɛ, characterizing the finite-size effects, and is suppressed by ( Zα)5. We argue that standard calculations miss the contributions of this second operator because they err in their choice of boundary conditions at the source for the wave-function of the orbiting particle. PPEFT predicts how this boundary condition depends on the source's charge radius, as well as on the orbiting particle's mass. Its contribution turns out to be crucial if the charge radius satisfies ɛ ≲ ( Zα)2 a B , where a B is the Bohr radius, because then relativistic effects become important for the boundary condition. We show how the problem is equivalent to solving the Schrödinger equation with competing Coulomb, inverse-square and delta-function potentials, which we solve explicitly. A similar enhancement is not predicted for the hyperfine structure, due to its spin-dependence. We show how the charge-radius effectively runs due to classical renormalization effects, and why the resulting RG flow is central to predicting the size of the energy shifts (and is responsible for its being linear in the source size). We discuss how this flow is relevant to systems having much larger-than-geometric cross sections, such as those with large

  17. Conflict quantum theory and gravity as a source of particle stability

    CERN Document Server

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We build a regular core of the Kerr-Newman (KN) solution and considered it as an extended soliton or bag model of spinning particle creating external gravitational and electromagnetic field of an electron. The known conflict between Quantum Theory and Gravity is solved by formation of a domain wall boundary separating zones of their influence. Gravity controls external classical (KN) spacetime, while Quantum theory is responsible for the flat zone of supersymmetric core. We show that Bogomolnyi bound determines precise boundary between these zones, controlling the shape, dynamics and stability of the particle.

  18. Large-Scale Structure Effects on Particle Motion in a Spatialy Developing Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.; Acharya, Sumanta; Ning, Hui

    1996-11-01

    We will present results from a simulation of particle motion in a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer forced by a single frequency. The simulation is based on a model which utilizes Eulerian formulation for the carrier phase flowfield and Lagrangian formulation for the dispersed particles. The carrier-phase mean flow is determined from the classical turbulent boundary layer equations and a traditional k-ɛ turbulence model modified to include interaction terms with the imposed large-scale structure. An integral energy method is used to determine the evolution of the large-scale structure which is modeled as a spatially growing wave. The effect of the carrier phase small-scale turbulent fluctuations is taken into account by using a classical stochastic model with a gaussian PDF. The effects of the particle time scale magnitude relative to the large-scale structure timescale (Stokes number) are discussed as well as the effects of the particle injection conditions. It is found that the Stokes number for which the cross-stream dispersion of the particles is maximized has a strong dependence on the particle injection conditions. The particle injection phase relative to the large-scale structure also has a profound influence on the motion of the particles and their distribution within the mixing layer.

  19. Theory of using magnetic deflections to combine charged particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckbeck, Mackenzie K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Doyle, Barney Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Several radiation effects projects in the Ion Beam Lab (IBL) have recently required two disparate charged particle beams to simultaneously strike a single sample through a single port of the target chamber. Because these beams have vastly different mass–energy products (MEP), the low-MEP beam requires a large angle of deflection toward the sample by a bending electromagnet. A second electromagnet located further upstream provides a means to compensate for the small angle deflection experienced by the high-MEP beam during its path through the bending magnet. This paper derives the equations used to select the magnetic fields required by these two magnets to achieve uniting both beams at the target sample. A simple result was obtained when the separation of the two magnets was equivalent to the distance from the bending magnet to the sample, and the equation is given by: Bs= 1/2(rc/rs) Bc, where Bs and Bc are the magnetic fields in the steering and bending magnet and rc/rs is the ratio of the radii of the bending magnet to that of the steering magnet. This result is not dependent upon the parameters of the high MEP beam, i.e. energy, mass, charge state. Therefore, once the field of the bending magnet is set for the low-MEP beam, and the field in the steering magnet is set as indicted in the equation, the trajectory path of any high-MEP beam will be directed into the sample.

  20. A theory of motion for test particles in relativistic celestial mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechin, L. M.

    Zel'manov's (1976) monad formalism is used to develop a theory of motion for test particles in the solar system as they are observed by a terrestrial observer. Relativistic additions are made to Zel'manov's calculations which are connected with transformations to planetary reference system, and to all four classical effects of Einstein's gravitational theory. It is found that a correct description of the real system of reference leads to greater conformity between theoretical conclusions and experimental results.

  1. A note on the theory of transverse diffusion in shock particle acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Treumann, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the role of the form of the spatial diffusion coefficient in shock acceleration of fast particles. Referring to non-classical diffusion and using the results of numerical (hybrid) simulations tailored for the downstream shock population in quasi-perpendicualr high-Mach number collisionless shocks to which we apply the theory, we demonstrate that the inferred diffusion coefficients are in excellent agreement with the requirements of the theory and its predictions. Diffusion in t...

  2. Random matrix theory for the analysis of the performance of an analog computer: a scaling theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Hur, Asa; Feinberg, Joshua; Fishman, Shmuel; Siegelmann, Hava T

    2004-03-22

    The phase space flow of a dynamical system, leading to the solution of linear programming (LP) problems, is explored as an example of complexity analysis in an analog computation framework. In this framework, computation by physical devices and natural systems, evolving in continuous phase space and time (in contrast to the digital computer where these are discrete), is explored. A Gaussian ensemble of LP problems is studied. The convergence time of a flow to the fixed point representing the optimal solution, is computed. The cumulative distribution function of the convergence time is calculated in the framework of random matrix theory (RMT) in the asymptotic limit of large problem size. It is found to be a scaling function, of the form obtained in the theories of critical phenomena and Anderson localization. It demonstrates a correspondence between problems of computer science and physics.

  3. Pragmatic development explains the Theory-of-Mind Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Evan; Carruthers, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Henry Wellman and colleagues have provided evidence of a robust developmental progression in theory-of-mind (or as we will say, "mindreading") abilities, using verbal tasks. Understanding diverse desires is said to be easier than understanding diverse beliefs, which is easier than understanding that lack of perceptual access issues in ignorance, which is easier than understanding false belief, which is easier than understanding that people can hide their true emotions. These findings present a challenge to nativists about mindreading, and are said to support a social-constructivist account of mindreading development instead. This article takes up the challenge on behalf of nativism. Our goal is to show that the mindreading-scale findings fail to support constructivism because well-motivated alternative hypotheses have not yet been controlled for and ruled out. These have to do with the pragmatic demands of verbal tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Stability theory for dynamic equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Martynyuk, Anatoly A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is a first in the world to present three approaches for stability analysis of solutions of dynamic equations. The first approach is based on the application of dynamic integral inequalities and the fundamental matrix of solutions of linear approximation of dynamic equations. The second is based on the generalization of the direct Lyapunovs method for equations on time scales, using scalar, vector and matrix-valued auxiliary functions. The third approach is the application of auxiliary functions (scalar, vector, or matrix-valued ones) in combination with differential dynamic inequalities. This is an alternative comparison method, developed for time continuous and time discrete systems. In recent decades, automatic control theory in the study of air- and spacecraft dynamics and in other areas of modern applied mathematics has encountered problems in the analysis of the behavior of solutions of time continuous-discrete linear and/or nonlinear equations of perturbed motion. In the book “Men of Ma...

  5. Stochastic dominance theory for location-scale family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Keung Wong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Meyer (1987 extended the theory of mean-variance criterion to include the comparison among distributions that differ only by location and scale parameters and to include general utility functions with only convexity or concavity restrictions. In this paper, we make some comments on Meyer's paper and extend the results from Tobin (1958 that the indifference curve is convex upwards for risk averters, concave downwards for risk lovers, and horizontal for risk neutral investors to include the general conditions stated by Meyer (1987. We also provide an alternative proof for the theorem. Levy (1989 extended Meyer's results by introducing some inequality relationships between the stochastic-dominance and the mean-variance efficient sets. In this paper, we comment on Levy's findings and show that these relationships do not hold in certain situations. We further develop some properties among the first- and second-degree stochastic dominance efficient sets and the mean-variance efficient set.

  6. Theory of fine-scale zonal flow generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Hahm, T. S.

    2008-11-01

    Most zonal flow generation theory has been built upon drift wave turbulence with a usual assumption of qrρiθDiamond et al., IAEA-CN-69/TH3/1 (1998), Chen et al., Phys. Plasma 7, 3129 (2000)]. However, recent nonlinear GTC simulations of trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence exhibit a relatively short radial scale of the zonal flows with qrρiθ˜1[Z. Lin et al., IAEA-CN/TH/8-4 (2004)]. This work reports an extension of zonal flow growth calculation via the wave kinetics approach to this short wavelength regime. A generalized expression for the neoclassical polarization shielding [Rosenbluth and Hinton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] comes from the modern bounce-kinetic equation [Fong and Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 6, 188 (1999)].

  7. Coarse graining and scaling in dissipative particle dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füchslin, Rudolf M; Fellermann, Harold; Eriksson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is now a well-established method for simulating soft matter systems. However, its applicability was recently questioned because some investigations showed an upper coarse-graining limit that would prevent the applicability of the method to the whole mesoscopic...

  8. Particle-Laden Flow From Geophysical to Kolmogorov Scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Uijttewaal, Wim

    2007-01-01

    This book contains a selection of the papers that were presented at the EUROMECH colloquium on particle-laden flow held at the University of Twente in 2006. The multiscale nature of this challenging field motivated the calling of the colloquium and reflects the central importance that the dispersion

  9. Atomistic theory of Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal particles under reaction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Runhai; Liu, Jin-Xun; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-02-06

    Understanding Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal particles under operating conditions has been of central importance in the study of sintering and dispersion of heterogeneous catalysts for long-term industrial implementation. To achieve a quantitative description of these complicated processes, an atomistic and generic theory taking into account the reaction environment, particle size and morphology, and metal-support interaction is developed. It includes (1) energetics of supported metal particles, (2) formation of monomers (both the metal adatoms and metal-reactant complexes) on supports, and (3) corresponding sintering rate equations and total activation energies, in the presence of reactants at arbitrary temperature and pressure. The thermodynamic criteria for the reactant assisted Ostwald ripening and induced disintegration are formulated, and the influence of reactants on sintering kinetics and redispersion are mapped out. Most energetics and kinetics barriers in the theory can be obtained conveniently by first-principles theory calculations. This allows for the rapid exploration of sintering and disintegration of supported metal particles in huge phase space of structures and compositions under various reaction environments. General strategies of suppressing the sintering of the supported metal particles and facilitating the redispersions of the low surface area catalysts are proposed. The theory is applied to TiO(2)(110) supported Rh particles in the presence of carbon monoxide, and reproduces well the broad temperature, pressure, and particle size range over which the sintering and redispersion occurred in such experiments. The result also highlights the importance of the metal-carbonyl complexes as monomers for Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal catalysts in the presence of CO.

  10. Point-particle effective field theory I: classical renormalization and the inverse-square potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, C. P.; Hayman, Peter; Williams, M.; Zalavári, László

    2017-04-01

    Singular potentials (the inverse-square potential, for example) arise in many situations and their quantum treatment leads to well-known ambiguities in choosing boundary conditions for the wave-function at the position of the potential's singularity. These ambiguities are usually resolved by developing a self-adjoint extension of the original prob-lem; a non-unique procedure that leaves undetermined which extension should apply in specific physical systems. We take the guesswork out of this picture by using techniques of effective field theory to derive the required boundary conditions at the origin in terms of the effective point-particle action describing the physics of the source. In this picture ambiguities in boundary conditions boil down to the allowed choices for the source action, but casting them in terms of an action provides a physical criterion for their determination. The resulting extension is self-adjoint if the source action is real (and involves no new degrees of freedom), and not otherwise (as can also happen for reasonable systems). We show how this effective-field picture provides a simple framework for understanding well-known renormalization effects that arise in these systems, including how renormalization-group techniques can resum non-perturbative interactions that often arise, particularly for non-relativistic applications. In particular we argue why the low-energy effective theory tends to produce a universal RG flow of this type and describe how this can lead to the phenomenon of reaction catalysis, in which physical quantities (like scattering cross sections) can sometimes be surprisingly large compared to the underlying scales of the source in question. We comment in passing on the possible relevance of these observations to the phenomenon of the catalysis of baryon-number violation by scattering from magnetic monopoles.

  11. Using satellite-based measurements to explore spatiotemporal scales and variability of drivers of new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    New particle formation (NPF) can potentially alter regional climate by increasing aerosol particle (hereafter particle) number concentrations and ultimately cloud condensation nuclei. The large scales on which NPF is manifest indicate potential to use satellite-based (inherently ...

  12. Using Atmospheric Dispersion Theory to Inform the Design of a Short-lived Radioactive Particle Release Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishel, Jeremy P; Keillor, Martin E; Arrigo, Leah M; Baciak, James E; Detwiler, Rebecca S; Kernan, Warnick J; Kirkham, Randy R; Milbrath, Brian D; Seifert, Allen; Seifert, Carolyn E; Smart, John E

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric dispersion theory can be used to predict ground deposition of particulates downwind of a radionuclide release. This paper uses standard formulations found in Gaussian plume models to inform the design of an experimental release of short-lived radioactive particles into the atmosphere. Specifically, a source depletion algorithm is used to determine the optimum particle size and release height that maximizes the near-field deposition while minimizing both the required source activity and the fraction of activity lost to long-distance transport. The purpose of the release is to provide a realistic deposition pattern that might be observed downwind of a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. The deposition field will be used, in part, to study several techniques of gamma radiation survey and spectrometry that could be used by an On-Site Inspection team investigating such an event.

  13. On the consistency of scale among experiments, theory, and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, James E.; Dye, Amanda L.; Miller, Cass T.; Gray, William G.

    2017-02-01

    As a tool for addressing problems of scale, we consider an evolving approach known as the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT), which has broad applicability to hydrology. We consider the case of modeling of two-fluid-phase flow in porous media, and we focus on issues of scale as they relate to various measures of pressure, capillary pressure, and state equations needed to produce solvable models. We apply TCAT to perform physics-based data assimilation to understand how the internal behavior influences the macroscale state of two-fluid porous medium systems. A microfluidic experimental method and a lattice Boltzmann simulation method are used to examine a key deficiency associated with standard approaches. In a hydrologic process such as evaporation, the water content will ultimately be reduced below the irreducible wetting-phase saturation determined from experiments. This is problematic since the derived closure relationships cannot predict the associated capillary pressures for these states. We demonstrate that the irreducible wetting-phase saturation is an artifact of the experimental design, caused by the fact that the boundary pressure difference does not approximate the true capillary pressure. Using averaging methods, we compute the true capillary pressure for fluid configurations at and below the irreducible wetting-phase saturation. Results of our analysis include a state function for the capillary pressure expressed as a function of fluid saturation and interfacial area.

  14. Influence of Particle Theory Conceptions on Pre-Service Science Teachers' Understanding of Osmosis and Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHarbi, Nawaf N. S.; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Won, Mihye

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the understanding of diffusion, osmosis and particle theory of matter concepts among 192 pre-service science teachers in Saudi Arabia using a 17-item two-tier multiple-choice diagnostic test. The data analysis showed that the pre-service teachers' understanding of osmosis and diffusion concepts was mildly correlated with…

  15. Solution of the Higgs scalar-tensor theory without Higgs particles for static stars

    OpenAIRE

    Rekowski, Oleg von Styp; Frommert, Hartmut

    1996-01-01

    Within the scalar-tensor theory of gravity with Higgs mechanism without Higgs particles, we prove that the excited Higgs potential (the scalar field) vanishs inside and outside of the stellar matter for static spherically symmetric configurations. The field equation for the metric (the tensorial gravitational field) turns out to be essentially the Einsteinian one.

  16. Theory of reflection reflection and transmission of electromagnetic, particle and acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lekner, John

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the reflection of electromagnetic and particle waves by interfaces. The interfaces can be sharp or diffuse. The topics of the book contain absorption, inverse problems, anisotropy, pulses and finite beams, rough surfaces, matrix methods, numerical methods,  reflection of particle waves and neutron reflection. Exact general results are presented, followed by long wave reflection, variational theory, reflection amplitude equations of the Riccati type, and reflection of short waves. The Second Edition of the Theory of Reflection is an updated and much enlarged revision of the 1987 monograph. There are new chapters on periodically stratified media, ellipsometry, chiral media, neutron reflection and reflection of acoustic waves. The chapter on anisotropy is much extended, with a complete treatment of the reflection and transmission properties of arbitrarily oriented uniaxial crystals. The book gives a systematic and unified treatment reflection and transmission of electromagnetic and particle...

  17. Theory of strong intrinsic mixing of particle suspensions in vortex magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James E

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that a type of triaxial magnetic field we call a vortex field can induce strong mixing in a magnetic particle suspension. A vortex triaxial field consists of a rotating magnetic field in a horizontal plane, with a dc field applied normal to this. The mixing torque is found to be independent of the field frequency and fluid viscosity over a broad range; scales as the square of the applied field; and is strongest for a balanced triaxial field-one in which the root-mean-square amplitudes of the three field components are equal. In this paper we show that these anomalous effects are consistent with the formation of volatile particle chains that have a precessionlike motion. Theoretical results are given for both particle chains and magnetic rods for arbitrary vortex field angles. A key conclusion is that the mixing torque is independent of particle size, making this mixing technique scale adaptive, and thus suitable for microfluidics applications.

  18. Multi-scale comparison of the fine particle removal capacity of urban forests and wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenming Zhang; Jiakai Liu; Yanan Wu; Guoxin Yan; Lijuan Zhu; Xinxiao Yu

    2017-01-01

    As fine particle (FP) pollution is harmful to humans, previous studies have focused on the mechanisms of FP removal by forests. The current study aims to compare the FP removal capacities of urban forests and wetlands on the leaf, canopy, and landscape scales. Water washing and scanning electron microscopy are used to calculate particle accumulation on leaves, and models are used to estimate vegetation collection, sedimentation, and dry deposition. Results showed that, on the leaf scale, fore...

  19. A flux-scaling scenario for high-scale moduli stabilization in string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Font, Anamaría [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, LMU, Theresienstr. 37, 80333 München (Germany); Fuchs, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Herschmann, Daniela, E-mail: herschma@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Plauschinn, Erik [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Sekiguchi, Yuta; Wolf, Florian [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, LMU, Theresienstr. 37, 80333 München (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Tree-level moduli stabilization via geometric and non-geometric fluxes in type IIB orientifolds on Calabi–Yau manifolds is investigated. The focus is on stable non-supersymmetric minima, where all moduli are fixed except for some massless axions. The scenario includes the purely axionic orientifold-odd moduli. A set of vacua allowing for parametric control over the moduli vacuum expectation values and their masses is presented, featuring a specific scaling with the fluxes. Uplift mechanisms and supersymmetry breaking soft masses on MSSM-like D7-branes are discussed as well. This scenario provides a complete effective framework for realizing the idea of F-term axion monodromy inflation in string theory. It is argued that, with all masses close to the Planck and GUT scales, one is confronted with working at the threshold of controlling all mass hierarchies.

  20. A flux-scaling scenario for high-scale moduli stabilization in string theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Blumenhagen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tree-level moduli stabilization via geometric and non-geometric fluxes in type IIB orientifolds on Calabi–Yau manifolds is investigated. The focus is on stable non-supersymmetric minima, where all moduli are fixed except for some massless axions. The scenario includes the purely axionic orientifold-odd moduli. A set of vacua allowing for parametric control over the moduli vacuum expectation values and their masses is presented, featuring a specific scaling with the fluxes. Uplift mechanisms and supersymmetry breaking soft masses on MSSM-like D7-branes are discussed as well. This scenario provides a complete effective framework for realizing the idea of F-term axion monodromy inflation in string theory. It is argued that, with all masses close to the Planck and GUT scales, one is confronted with working at the threshold of controlling all mass hierarchies.

  1. Capturing the Large Scale Behavior of Many Particle Systems Through Coarse-Graining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punshon-Smith, Samuel

    This dissertation is concerned with two areas of investigation: the first is understanding the mathematical structures behind the emergence of macroscopic laws and the effects of small scales fluctuations, the second involves the rigorous mathematical study of such laws and related questions of well-posedness. To address these areas of investigation the dissertation involves two parts: Part I concerns the theory of coarse-graining of many particle systems. We first investigate the mathematical structure behind the Mori-Zwanzig (projection operator) formalism by introducing two perturbative approaches to coarse-graining of systems that have an explicit scale separation. One concerns systems with little dissipation, while the other concerns systems with strong dissipation. In both settings we obtain an asymptotic series of `corrections' to the limiting description which are small with respect to the scaling parameter, these corrections represent the effects of small scales. We determine that only certain approximations give rise to dissipative effects in the resulting evolution. Next we apply this framework to the problem of coarse-graining the locally conserved quantities of a classical Hamiltonian system. By lumping conserved quantities into a collection of mesoscopic cells, we obtain, through a series of approximations, a stochastic particle system that resembles a discretization of the non-linear equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics. We study this system in the case that the transport coefficients are constant and prove well-posedness of the stochastic dynamics. Part II concerns the mathematical description of models where the underlying characteristics are stochastic. Such equations can model, for instance, the dynamics of a passive scalar in a random (turbulent) velocity field or the statistical behavior of a collection of particles subject to random environmental forces. First, we study general well-posedness properties of stochastic transport equation with

  2. Riverbank filtration: comparison of pilot scale transport with theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Johnson, W P; Shafieian, P; Ryu, H; Alum, A; Abbaszadegan, M; Hubbs, S A; Rauch-Williams, T

    2009-02-01

    Pilot-scale column experiments were conducted in this study using natural soil and river water from Ohio river to assess the removal of microbes of size ranging over 2 orders of magnitude, i.e., viruses (0.025-0.065 microm), bacteria (1-2 microm), and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (4-7 microm) under conditions representing normal operation and flood scour events. Among these different organisms, the bacterial indicators were transported over the longest distances and highest concentrations; whereas much greater retention was observed for smaller (i.e., viral indicators) and larger (i.e., Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts) microbes. These results are in qualitative agreement with colloid filtration theory (CFT) which predicts the least removal for micrometer size colloids, suggesting that the respective sizes of the organisms was a dominant control on their transport despite expected differences in their surface characteristics. Increased fluid velocity coupled with decreased ionic strength (representative of major flood events) decreased colloid retention, also in qualitative agreement with CFT. The retention of organisms occurred disproportionately near the source relative to the log-linear expectations of CFT, and this was true both in the presence and absence of a colmation zone, suggesting that microbial removal by the RBF system is not necessarily vulnerable to flood scour of the colmation zone.

  3. Particle Velocity Distributions and Large-Scale Electric Field in Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, J.; Vinas, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Velocity distributions of particles are key elements in the study of solar wind. The physical mechanisms that regulate their many features are a matter of debate. The present work addresses the subject with a fully analytical method in order to establish the shape of particle velocity distributions in solar wind. The method consists in solving the steady-state kinetic equation for particles and the related fluid equations, assigning spatial profiles for density and temperature matching observational data. The model is one-dimensional in configuration-space and two-dimensional in velocity-space, and accounts for large-scale processes, namely, advection, gravity, magnetic mirroring and the large-scale ambipolar electric field, without the aid of wave-particle interactions or collisions. The findings reported add to the general understanding of regulation of particle distributions in solar wind and to the predictions of their shape in regions restricted for in situ measurements.

  4. How insoluble particles affect the solutions' conductivity: a theory and the test in NaCl and chitosan solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Ziqin; Feng, Qingling

    2011-11-10

    In this study, we formalize a theory about how insoluble particles in the solution affect the solution electrical conductivity. We propose four corollaries of this theory: (1) the conductivity change is the same as long as the concentration of particles exceeds a certain value; (2) the solution conductivity is irrelevant to the particle size; (3) the increasing temperature weakens the particles' effect on solution conductivity; (4) the heavier the ions in solutions are, the larger the conductivity change caused by particles is. We then prove these four corollaries to be right by experiments in two solution systems, NaCl + CaCO(3) and chitosan + nHAC (nanohydroxyapatite/collagen composite).

  5. The standard theory of particle physics essays to celebrate CERN's 60th anniversary

    CERN Document Server

    Rolandi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The book gives a quite complete and up-to-date picture of the Standard Theory with an historical perspective, with a collection of articles written by some of the protagonists of present particle physics. The theoretical developments are described together with the most up-to-date experimental tests, including the discovery of the Higgs Boson and the measurement of its mass as well as the most precise measurements of the top mass, giving the reader a complete description of our present understanding of particle physics.

  6. The standard theory of particle physics Essays to celebrate CERN’s 60th anniversary

    CERN Document Server

    Maiani, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    The book gives a quite complete and up-to-date picture of the Standard Theory with an historical perspective, with a collection of articles written by some of the protagonists of present particle physics. The theoretical developments are described together with the most up-to-date experimental tests, including the discovery of the Higgs Boson and the measurement of its mass as well as the most precise measurements of the top mass, giving the reader a complete description of our present understanding of particle physics.

  7. Experiment and theory in particle physics: Reflections on the discovery of the tau lepton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, M.L.

    1996-08-01

    This article is thoughts from the author on particle physics work from his perspective. It is not a summary of his work on the tau lepton, but rather a look at what makes good science, experimental and theoretical, from his experiences in the field. The section titles give a good summary on the topics the author chooses to touch upon. They are: the state of elementary particle physics; getting good ideas in experimental science; a difficult field; experiments and experimenting; 10% of the money and 30% of the time; the dictatorship of theory; technological dreams; last words.

  8. Modular theory and Eyvind Wichmann's contributions to modern particle physics theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Schroer

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Some of the consequences of Eyvind Wichmann's contributions to modular theory and the QFT phase-space structure are presented. In order to show the power of those ideas in contemporary problems, I selected the issue of algebraic holography as well as a new nonperturbative constructive approach (based on the modular structure of wedge-localized algebras and modular inclusions and show that these ideas are recent consequences of the pathbreaking work which Wichmann together with his collaborator Bisognano initiated in the mid Seventies.

  9. Modular theory and Eyvind Wichmann's contributions to modern particle physics theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1999-06-01

    Some of the consequences of Eyvind Wichmann's contributions to modular theory and the QFT phase-space structure are presented. In order to show the power of those ideas in contemporary problems, I selected the issue of algebraic holography as well as a new nonperturbative constructive approach (based on the modular structure of wedge-localized algebras and modular inclusions) and show that these ideas are recent consequences of the path breaking work which Wichmann together with his collaborator Bisognano initiated in the mid 70{sup ies}. (author)

  10. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics - Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-05-10

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle's Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas.

  11. An extended coupled phase theory for the sound propagation in polydisperse concentrated suspensions of rigid particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudoin, Michael; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Coulouvrat, François; Lhuillier, Daniel

    2007-06-01

    An extension of the classical coupled phase theory is proposed to account for hydrodynamic interactions between neighboring rigid particles, which are essential to describe properly the sound propagation in concentrated suspensions. Rigorous ensemble-averaged equations are derived for each phase and simplified in the case of acoustical wave propagation. Then, closure is achieved by introducing a self-consistent scheme originally developed by Buyevich and Shchelchkova [Prog. Aerosp. Sci. 18, 121-151 (1978)] for incompressible flows, to model the transfer terms between the two phases. This provides an alternative to the effective medium self-consistent theory developed by Spelt et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 430, 51-86 (2001)] in which the suspension is considered as a whole. Here, a significantly simpler formulation is obtained in the long wavelength regime. Predictions of this self-consistent theory are compared with the classical coupled phase theory and with experimental data measuring the attenuation in concentrated suspensions of silica in water. Our calculation is shown to give a good description of the attenuation variation with volume fraction. This theory is also extended to the case of polydisperse suspensions. Finally, the link between the self-consistent theory and the different orders of the multiple scattering theory is clarified.

  12. The design and scale-up of spray dried particle delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khattawi, Ali; Bayly, Andrew; Phillips, Andrew; Wilson, David

    2018-01-01

    The rising demand for pharmaceutical particles with tailored physicochemical properties has opened new markets for spray drying especially for solubility enhancement, improving inhalation medicines and stabilization of biopharmaceuticals. Despite this, the spray drying literature is scattered and often does not address the principles underpinning robust development of pharmaceuticals. It is therefore necessary to present clearer picture of the field and highlight the factors influencing particle design and scale-up. Areas covered: The review presents a systematic analysis of the trends in development of particle delivery systems using spray drying. This is followed by exploring the mechanisms governing particle formation in the process stages. Particle design factors including those of equipment configurations and feed/process attributes were highlighted. Finally, the review summarises the current industrial approaches for upscaling pharmaceutical spray drying. Expert opinion: Spray drying provides the ability to design particles of the desired functionality. This greatly benefits the pharmaceutical sector especially as product specifications are becoming more encompassing and exacting. One of the biggest barriers to product translation remains one of scale-up/scale-down. A shift from trial and error approaches to model-based particle design helps to enhance control over product properties. To this end, process innovations and advanced manufacturing technologies are particularly welcomed.

  13. Investigation of transient flow behaviour in dual-scale porous media with micro particle image velocimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Lundström, Staffan; Nordlund, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Injection processing of composite materials most often includes infiltration of a thermoset resin into a multi-scale porous fabric. Controlling the fluid flow within the multiscale fabric is essential for the quality of the final composite material, since the transport of fluid between regions with different scales plays an important role in phenomena such as void formation and filtration of particle doped resins. In this work, the transient flow behaviour in dual scale porous media is invest...

  14. A critical look at 50 years particle theory from the perspective of the crossing property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-02-15

    The crossing property, which originated more than 5 decades ago in the aftermath of dispersion relations, was the central new concept which opened an S-matrix based line of research in particle theory. Many constructive ideas in particle theory outside perturbative QFT, among them the S-matrix bootstrap program, the dual resonance model and the various stages of string theory have their historical roots in this property. The crossing property is perhaps the most subtle aspect of the particle-field relation. Although it is not difficult to state its content in terms of certain analytic properties relating different matrix elements of the S-matrix or form factors, its relation to the localization- and positive energy spectral principles requires a level of insight into the inner workings of QFT which goes beyond anything which can be found in typical textbooks on QFT. This paper presents a recent account based on new ideas derived from 'modular localization' including a mathematic appendix on this subject. The main content is an in-depth criticism of the dual model and its string theoretic extension. The conceptual flaws of these models are closely related to misunderstandings of the true meaning of crossing. The correct interpretation of string theory is that of a dynamic infinite component wave function or pointlike field i.e. a theory which under irreducible Poincare decomposition into an infinite mass/spin tower but which also contains operators which do not commute with the generators of the Poincare group but rather intertwine between different mass/spin levels. (author)

  15. Prepare dispersed CIS nano-scale particles and spray coating CIS absorber layers using nano-scale precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jian-Chiun; Diao, Chien-Chen; Lin, Jing-Jenn; Chen, Yen-Lin; Yang, Cheng-Fu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Mo-electrode thin films were deposited by a two-stepped process, and the high-purity copper indium selenide-based powder (CuInSe2, CIS) was fabricated by hydrothermal process by Nanowin Technology Co. Ltd. From the X-ray pattern of the CIS precursor, the mainly crystalline phase was CIS, and the almost undetectable CuSe phase was observed. Because the CIS powder was aggregated into micro-scale particles and the average particle sizes were approximately 3 to 8 μm, the CIS power was ground into nano-scale particles, then the 6 wt.% CIS particles were dispersed into isopropyl alcohol to get the solution for spray coating method. Then, 0.1 ml CIS solution was sprayed on the 20 mm × 10 mm Mo/glass substrates, and the heat treatment for the nano-scale CIS solution under various parameters was carried out in a selenization furnace. The annealing temperature was set at 550°C, and the annealing time was changed from 5 to 30 min, without extra Se content was added in the furnace. The influences of annealing time on the densification, crystallization, resistivity ( ρ), hall mobility ( μ), and carrier concentration of the CIS absorber layers were well investigated in this study.

  16. In situ atomic-scale observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized gold particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junggoo; Lee, Joonho; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Mori, Hirotaro

    2009-11-01

    Phase stabilities of nanometer-sized materials are quite different from those of the corresponding bulk materials. Among the phase stabilities, melting point suppression is one of the most fundamentally important issues. In this work, real-time, atomic-scale direct observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized Au particles, along with simple size reduction, was carried out by means of in situ high resolution electron microscopy. Namely, it was confirmed in real space on an atomic scale that a solid-to-liquid transition occurred when the size of a particle, placed on a graphite substrate maintained at 1100 K, decreased to 5 nm during diminution. Furthermore, a monolayer-thick hole was formed on the substrate at the position of the liquid Au particle, probably due to carbon dissolution into the liquid Au particle.

  17. In situ atomic-scale observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized gold particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junggoo [Functional Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 66 Sangnam-dong, Changwon, Kyungsangnam-Do 641-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joonho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Tanaka, Toshihiro [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mori, Hirotaro, E-mail: jglee36@kims.re.k [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1 Mihogaoka, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2009-11-25

    Phase stabilities of nanometer-sized materials are quite different from those of the corresponding bulk materials. Among the phase stabilities, melting point suppression is one of the most fundamentally important issues. In this work, real-time, atomic-scale direct observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized Au particles, along with simple size reduction, was carried out by means of in situ high resolution electron microscopy. Namely, it was confirmed in real space on an atomic scale that a solid-to-liquid transition occurred when the size of a particle, placed on a graphite substrate maintained at 1100 K, decreased to 5 nm during diminution. Furthermore, a monolayer-thick hole was formed on the substrate at the position of the liquid Au particle, probably due to carbon dissolution into the liquid Au particle.

  18. Nanometre-scale deposition of colloidal Au particles using electrophoresis in a nanopipette probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, F.; Nagami, S.; Sumiya, Y.; Sasaki, A.

    2007-03-01

    We describe a novel technique of local electrophoretic deposition of colloidal particles using a scanning probe microscope with a nanopipette probe filled with a colloidal solution. The colloidal solution including nanometre-scale particles was put into the nanopipette probe. A thin metal wire was inserted into the nanopipette probe as an electrode for the electrophoretic deposition. With the probe edge nearly in contact with the conductive surface and with an electric potential applied between the electrode and the surface, the colloidal particles migrated toward the edge of the probe, causing them to be deposited on the surface. It was possible for nanometre-scale Au colloidal particles in an aqueous solution to be deposited on Si surfaces. The size of the Au dots could be modified by adjusting the deposition time and voltage. Dot array and line patterns were successfully plotted on the surface. This technique of local deposition should provide the possibility for fabricating nanostructures such as nanomachines and nanoelectronics.

  19. Particle-scale understanding of the bioavailability of PAHs in sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talley, J.W.; Ghosh, U.; Tucker, S.G.; Furey, J.S.; Luthy, R.G. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2002-02-01

    This study reports results of sediment bioslurry treatment and earthworm bioaccumulation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants found in sediment dredged from Milwaukee Harbor, WI, USA. A significant finding was that bioslurry treatment reduced PAHs on the sediment clay/silt fraction but not on the sediment coal-derived fraction and that PAH reduction in the clay/silt fraction correlated with substantial reduction in earthwork PAH bioaccumulation. These findings are used to infer PAH bioavailability from characterization of particle-scale PAH distribution, characterization of particle-scale PAH distribution, association, and binding among the principal particle fractions in the sediment. The results are consistent with work showing that the sediment comprised two principal particle classes for PAHs, coal-derived and clay/silt, each having much different PAH levels, release rates, and desorption action energies. PAH sorption on coal-derived particles is associated with minimal biodegradation, slow release rates, and high desorption activation energies, while PAH sorption on clay/silt particles is associated with significant potential biodegradability, relatively fast release rates, and lower desorption activation energies. These characteristics are attributed to fundamental differences in the organic matter to which the PAHs are sorbed. Although the majority of the PAHs are found preferentially on coal-derived particles, the PAHs on the clay/silt sediment fraction are more mobile and available, and thus potentially of greater concern. This study demonstrates that a suite of tests comprising both bioassays and particle-scale investigations provide a basis to assess larger scale phenomena of biotreatment of PAH-impacted sediments and bioavailability and potential toxicity of PAH contaminants in sediments. 37 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Stream discharge measurement using a large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) prototype

    OpenAIRE

    Harpold, A. A.; Mostaghimi, Saied; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Brannan, Kevin M.; Dillaha, Theo A.

    2006-01-01

    New technologies have been developed for open-channel discharge measurement due to concerns about costs, accuracy, and safety of traditional methods. One emerging technology is large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV). LSPIV is capable of measuring surface velocity by analyzing recorded images of particles added to the stream surface. LSPIV has several advantages over conventional measurement techniques: LSPIV is safer, potentially automated, and produces real-time measurements. Therefo...

  1. Effect of substrate pretreatment on particle size distribution in a full-scale research biogas plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegele, Hans-Joachim; Mönch-Tegeder, Matthias; Haag, Nicola Leonard; Oechsner, Hans

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the pretreatment effects of high-fibre substrate on particle size distribution in a full-scale agricultural biogas plant (BGP). Two digesters, one fed with pretreated material and one with untreated material, were investigated for a period of 90days. Samples from different positions and heights were taken with a special probe sampling system and put through a wet sieve. The results show that on average 58.0±8.6% of the particles in both digesters are fine fraction (particles (13.1%) with a length >4mm was measured in the untreated digester. However, the volume distribution over all positions and heights did not show a clear and uniform distribution of particles. These results reveal that substrate pretreatment has an effect on particle size in the fermenting substrate, but due to the uneven distribution mixing, is not homogeneous within the digester. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A New Likert Scale Based on Fuzzy Sets Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheryl Qing

    2010-01-01

    In social science research, the Likert method is commonly used as a psychometric scale to measure responses. This measurement scale has a procedure that facilitates survey construction and administration, and data coding and analysis. However, there are some problems with Likert scaling. This dissertation addresses the information distortion and…

  3. Conservation in two-particle self-consistent extensions of dynamical mean-field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krien, Friedrich; van Loon, Erik G. C. P.; Hafermann, Hartmut; Otsuki, Junya; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.

    2017-08-01

    Extensions of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) make use of quantum impurity models as nonperturbative and exactly solvable reference systems which are essential to treat the strong electronic correlations. Through the introduction of retarded interactions on the impurity, these approximations can be made two-particle self-consistent. This is of interest for the Hubbard model because it allows to suppress the antiferromagnetic phase transition in two dimensions in accordance with the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and to include the effects of bosonic fluctuations. For a physically sound description of the latter, the approximation should be conserving. In this paper, we show that the mutual requirements of two-particle self-consistency and conservation lead to fundamental problems. For an approximation that is two-particle self-consistent in the charge and longitudinal spin channels, the double occupancy of the lattice and the impurity is no longer consistent when computed from single-particle properties. For the case of self-consistency in the charge and longitudinal as well as transversal spin channels, these requirements are even mutually exclusive so that no conserving approximation can exist. We illustrate these findings for a two-particle self-consistent and conserving DMFT approximation.

  4. Nano iron particles transport in fractured rocks: laboratory and field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Meirav; Weisbrod, Noam

    2017-04-01

    Our study deals with the transport potential of nano iron particles (NIPs) in fractured media. Two different systemswere used to investigate transport on two scales: (1 )a laboratory flow system of a naturally discrete fractured chalk core, 0.43 and 0.18 m in length and diamater, respectively; and (2) a field system of hydraulically connected boreholes located 47 m apart which penetrate a fractured chalk aquifer. We started by testing the transport potential of various NIPs under different conditions. Particle stability experiments were conducted using various NIPs and different stabilizersat two ionic strengths. Overall, four different NIPs and three stabilizers were tested. Particles and solution properties (stability, aggregate/particle size, viscosity and density) were tested in batch experiments, and transport experiments (breakthrough curves (BTCs) and recovery) were conduted in the fractured chalk core. We have learned that the key parameters controlling particle transport are the particle/aggregate size and stability, which govern NIP settling rates and ultimately their migration distance. The governing mechanism controlling NIP transport was found to be sedimentation, and to a much lesser extent, processes such as diffusion, straining or interception. On the basis of these experiments, Carbo-Iron® particles ( 800 nm activated carbon particles doped with nano zero valent iron particles) and Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilizer were selected for the field test injection. In the field, Carbo-Iron particles were initially injected into the fractured aquifer using an excess of stabilizer in order to ensure maximum recovery. This resulted in high particle recovery and fast arrival time, similar to the ideal tracer (iodide). The high recovery of the stable particle solution emphasized the importance of particle stability for transport in fractures. To test mobility manipulation potential of the particles and simulate more realistic scenarios, a second field

  5. Experimental Exploration of Particle-Scale Bed Load Transport and Near-Bed Fluid Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathel, S. L.; Furbish, D. J.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    Bed load sediment particles move as complex motions over the surface of a stream bed, accelerating and decelerating in response to the near-bed turbulence and due to particle-bed interactions. Using high-speed imagery of coarse sand particles on a planer bed surface, we track individual particle motions from start to stop, combined with measurements of near-bed fluid velocities to better characterize the relationship between these properties. These simultaneous measurements provide an initial step towards describing the dynamic relationship between the fluid and particle entrainment on the grain-scale. We start with an Eulerian a priori method wherein we grid the analyzed area and compare the fluid velocity time series to the entrainment time series within each grid space. We progressively increase the size of the grids and monitor the correlation between the two time series. We then use an a posteriori method that focuses on the fluid velocities in the vicinity of entrained particles both at the moment of entrainment and prior to the initiation of motion. We further our analysis of the relationship between particle motions and the near-bed fluid using detailed measurements of particle motions to calibrate estimates of the sediment load using a pixel differencing method. This allows us to examine connections between the fluid and particle activity over many frames rather than over the limited, manually tracked time period. Furthermore, this allows us to empirically define a distribution of particle wait times, or the duration of time between successive entrainment events over a set area, which acts to determine the transport intensity. Preliminary results suggest that there is not a clear correlation between near-bed fluid velocities and particle entrainment. In absence of a correlation we find that (1) we must think more deeply about collective entrainment and how it 'works', and (2) we must consider how the microstructure of the particles on the bed act to set up

  6. Interfacial deflection and jetting of a paramagnetic particle-laden fluid: theory and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of experiments and mathematical analysis of the deformation of a free surface by an aggregate of magnetic particles. The system we study is differentiated from ferrofluid systems because it contains regions rich with magnetic material as well as regions of negligible magnetic content. In our experiments, the magnetic force from a spherical permanent magnet collects magnetic particles to a liquid-air interface, and deforms the free surface to form a hump. The hump is composed of magnetic and non-magnetic regions due to the particle collection. When the magnet distance falls below a threshold value, we observe the transition of the hump to a jet. The mathematical model we develop, which consists of a numerical solution and an asymptotic approximation, captures the shape of the liquid-air interface during the deformation stage and a scaling prediction for the critical magnet distance for the hump to become a jet. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Development and Characterization of Embedded Sensory Particles Using Multi-Scale 3D Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Stephen R.; Leser, William P.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Hartl, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    A method for detecting fatigue cracks has been explored at NASA Langley Research Center. Microscopic NiTi shape memory alloy (sensory) particles were embedded in a 7050 aluminum alloy matrix to detect the presence of fatigue cracks. Cracks exhibit an elevated stress field near their tip inducing a martensitic phase transformation in nearby sensory particles. Detectable levels of acoustic energy are emitted upon particle phase transformation such that the existence and location of fatigue cracks can be detected. To test this concept, a fatigue crack was grown in a mode-I single-edge notch fatigue crack growth specimen containing sensory particles. As the crack approached the sensory particles, measurements of particle strain, matrix-particle debonding, and phase transformation behavior of the sensory particles were performed. Full-field deformation measurements were performed using a novel multi-scale optical 3D digital image correlation (DIC) system. This information will be used in a finite element-based study to determine optimal sensory material behavior and density.

  8. Large-scale numerical simulations of polydisperse particle flow in a silo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Largo, S. M.; Maza, D.; Hidalgo, R. C.

    2017-10-01

    Very recently, we have examined experimentally and numerically the micro-mechanical details of monodisperse particle flows through an orifice placed at the bottom of a silo (Rubio-Largo et al. in Phys Rev Lett 114:238002, 2015). Our findings disentangled the paradoxical ideas associated to the free-fall arch concept, which has historically served to justify the dependence of the flow rate on the outlet size. In this work, we generalize those findings examining large-scale polydisperse particle flows in silos. In the range of studied apertures, both velocity and density profiles at the aperture are self-similar, and the obtained scaling functions confirm that the relevant scale of the problem is the size of the aperture. Moreover, we find that the contact stress monotonically decreases when the particles approach the exit and vanish at the outlet. The behavior of this magnitude is practically independent of the size of the orifice. However, the total and partial kinetic stress profiles suggest that the outlet size controls the propagation of the velocity fluctuations inside the silo. Examining this magnitude, we conclusively argue that indeed there is a well-defined transition region where the particle flow changes its nature. The general trend of the partial kinetic pressure profiles and the location of the transition region results the same for all particle types. We find that the partial kinetic stress is larger for bigger particles. However, the small particles carry a higher fraction of kinetic stress respect to their concentration, which suggest that the small particles have larger velocity fluctuations than the large ones and showing lower strength of correlation with the global flow. Our outcomes explain why the free-fall arch picture has served to describe the polydisperse flow rate in the discharge of silos.

  9. Analytical theory of polymer-network-mediated interaction between colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Zaccone, Alessio; Eiser, Erika

    2012-06-26

    Nanostructured materials based on colloidal particles embedded in a polymer network are used in a variety of applications ranging from nanocomposite rubbers to organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells. Further, polymer-network-mediated colloidal interactions are highly relevant to biological studies whereby polymer hydrogels are commonly employed to probe the mechanical response of living cells, which can determine their biological function in physiological environments. The performance of nanomaterials crucially relies upon the spatial organization of the colloidal particles within the polymer network that depends, in turn, on the effective interactions between the particles in the medium. Existing models based on nonlocal equilibrium thermodynamics fail to clarify the nature of these interactions, precluding the way toward the rational design of polymer-composite materials. In this article, we present a predictive analytical theory of these interactions based on a coarse-grained model for polymer networks. We apply the theory to the case of colloids partially embedded in cross-linked polymer substrates and clarify the origin of attractive interactions recently observed experimentally. Monte Carlo simulation results that quantitatively confirm the theoretical predictions are also presented.

  10. [Modeling continuous scaling of NDVI based on fractal theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hai-Jun; Tian, Qing-Jiu; Yu, Tao; Hu, Xin-Li; Huang, Yan; Du, Ling-Tong; Zhao, Li-Min; Wei, Xi; Han, Jie; Zhang, Zhou-Wei; Li, Shao-Peng

    2013-07-01

    Scale effect was one of the very important scientific problems of remote sensing. The scale effect of quantitative remote sensing can be used to study retrievals' relationship between different-resolution images, and its research became an effective way to confront the challenges, such as validation of quantitative remote sensing products et al. Traditional up-scaling methods cannot describe scale changing features of retrievals on entire series of scales; meanwhile, they are faced with serious parameters correction issues because of imaging parameters' variation of different sensors, such as geometrical correction, spectral correction, etc. Utilizing single sensor image, fractal methodology was utilized to solve these problems. Taking NDVI (computed by land surface radiance) as example and based on Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) image, a scheme was proposed to model continuous scaling of retrievals. Then the experimental results indicated that: (a) For NDVI, scale effect existed, and it could be described by fractal model of continuous scaling; (2) The fractal method was suitable for validation of NDVI. All of these proved that fractal was an effective methodology of studying scaling of quantitative remote sensing.

  11. Contribution from the interaction Hamiltonian to the expectation value of particle number with the non-equilibrium quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotta, Ryuuichi; Morozumi, Takuya; Takata, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Tomsk state Pedagogical University Tomsk 634041 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-27

    We develop the method analyzing particle number non-conserving phenomena with non-equilibrium quantum field-theory. In this study, we consider a CP violating model with interaction Hamiltonian that breaks particle number conservation. To derive the quantum Boltzmann equation for the particle number, we solve Schwinger-Dyson equation, which are obtained from two particle irreducible closed-time-path (2PI CTP) effective action. In this calculation, we show the contribution from interaction Hamiltonian to the time evolution of expectation value of particle number.

  12. Scaled momentum distributions of charged particles in dijet photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-04-15

    The scaled momentum distributions of charged particles in jets have been measured for dijet photoproduction with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 359 pb{sup -1}. The distributions are compared to predictions based on perturbative QCD carried out in the framework of the modified leading-logarithmic approximation (MLLA) and assuming local parton-hadron duality (LPHD). The universal MLLA scale, {lambda}{sub eff}, and the LPHD parameter, {kappa}{sup ch}, are extracted. (orig.)

  13. Particle acceleration by collisionless shocks containing large-scale magnetic-field variations

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, F.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration at collisionless shocks is thought to be the source of many of the energetic particles observed in space. Large-scale spatial variations of the magnetic field has been shown to be important in understanding observations. The effects are complex, so here we consider a simple, illustrative model. Here, we solve numerically the Parker transport equation for a shock in the presence of large-scale sinusoidal magnetic-field variations. We demonstrate that the familiar p...

  14. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  15. Examination of Tachyonic Particle Phenomena In Yielding A New Grand Unified Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Park, T

    2000-01-01

    The author proposes that the EPR experiment is the key to finding the non-relativistic tachyonic particle. The theory proposed here is that 1) EPR supraluminal photon-to-photon communication transfer of information, 2) ultra light speed non-paired photon particles, and 3) the varying constants of light speed at different points in space, are all due to scalar potentials. It has been theorized that in quantum physics two particles can interact nonlocally because such particles are treated as an indivisible whole. The author theorizes that simple waves can co-exist, in which such waves exhibit a property where total disturbance at any point varies from point-to-point, yet is totally independent of time. However, these simple waves can exist everywhere at everytime. Indeed, the unadulterated Maxwellian scalar potential of a system of forces can be resolved into trains of simple plane waves in any given direction whatsoever, with each simple wave propagating at a constant velocity far greater than the original ac...

  16. "Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory", 12th DESY Workshop on Elementary Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bi-annual international conference "Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory" has been held at Weimar, Germany, from April 27 to May 02, 2014. It has been the 12th conference of this series, started in 1992. The main focus of the conference are precision calculations of multi- loop and multi-leg processes in elementary particle physics for processes at present and future high-energy facilities within and beyond the Standard Model. At present many physics questions studied deal with processes at the LHC and future facilities like the ILC. A growing number of contributions deals with important developments in the field of computational technologies and algorithmic methods, including large-scale computer algebra, efficient methods to compute large numbers of Feynman diagrams, analytic summation and integration methods of various kinds, new related function spaces, precise numerical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. The present conference has been attended by more than 110 participants from all over the world, presenting more than 75 contributions, most of which have been written up for these pro- ceedings. The present volume demonstrates in an impressive way the enormous development of the field during the last few years, reaching the level of 5-loop calculations in QCD and a like- wise impressive development in massive next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order processes. Computer algebraic and numerical calculations require terabyte storage and many CPU years, even after intense parallelization, to obtain state-of-the-art theoretical predictions. The city of Weimar gave a suitable frame to the conference, with its rich history, especially in literature, music, arts, and architecture. Goethe, Schiller, Wieland, Herder, Bach and Liszt lived there and created many of their masterpieces. The many young participants signal that our field is prosperous and faces an exciting future. The conference hotel "Kaiserin Augusta" offered a warm hospitality and

  17. Mathematical gauge theory with applications to the standard model of particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Mark J D

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Model is the foundation of modern particle and high energy physics. This book explains the mathematical background behind the Standard Model, translating ideas from physics into a mathematical language and vice versa. The first part of the book covers the mathematical theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras, fibre bundles, connections, curvature and spinors. The second part then gives a detailed exposition of how these concepts are applied in physics, concerning topics such as the Lagrangians of gauge and matter fields, spontaneous symmetry breaking, the Higgs boson and mass generation of gauge bosons and fermions. The book also contains a chapter on advanced and modern topics in particle physics, such as neutrino masses, CP violation and Grand Unification. This carefully written textbook is aimed at graduate students of mathematics and physics. It contains numerous examples and more than 150 exercises, making it suitable for self-study and use alongside lecture courses. Only a basic knowledge of d...

  18. Large-scale atomistic simulations of nanostructured materials based on divide-and-conquer density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vashishta P.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A linear-scaling algorithm based on a divide-and-conquer (DC scheme is designed to perform large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations, in which interatomic forces are computed quantum mechanically in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT. This scheme is applied to the thermite reaction at an Al/Fe2O3 interface. It is found that mass diffusion and reaction rate at the interface are enhanced by a concerted metal-oxygen flip mechanism. Preliminary simulations are carried out for an aluminum particle in water based on the conventional DFT, as a target system for large-scale DC-DFT simulations. A pair of Lewis acid and base sites on the aluminum surface preferentially catalyzes hydrogen production in a low activation-barrier mechanism found in the simulations

  19. Universal Scaling Laws for Dense Particle Suspensions in Turbulent Wall-Bounded Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro; Picano, Francesco; Brandt, Luca; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2016-09-23

    The macroscopic behavior of dense suspensions of neutrally buoyant spheres in turbulent plane channel flow is examined. We show that particles larger than the smallest turbulence scales cause the suspension to deviate from the continuum limit in which its dynamics is well described by an effective suspension viscosity. This deviation is caused by the formation of a particle layer close to the wall with significant slip velocity. By assuming two distinct transport mechanisms in the near-wall layer and the turbulence in the bulk, we define an effective wall location such that the flow in the bulk can still be accurately described by an effective suspension viscosity. We thus propose scaling laws for the mean velocity profile of the suspension flow, together with a master equation able to predict the increase in drag as a function of the particle size and volume fraction.

  20. Universal scaling laws for dense particle suspensions in turbulent wall-bounded flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simões Costa, P.; Picano, Francesco; Brandt, Luca; Breugem, W.P.

    2016-01-01

    The macroscopic behavior of dense suspensions of neutrally buoyant spheres in turbulent plane channel flow is examined. We show that particles larger than the smallest turbulence scales cause the suspension to deviate from the continuum limit in which its dynamics is well described by an

  1. Scaled momentum distributions of charged particles in dijet photoproduction at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Kooijman, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068449542

    2009-01-01

    The scaled momentum distributions of charged particles in jets have been measured for dijet photoproduction with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 359 pb−1. The distributions are compared to predictions based on perturbative QCD carried out in the framework of the modified

  2. The corrections to scaling within Mazenko's theory in the limit of low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We consider corrections to scaling within an approximate theory developed by Mazenko for nonconserved order parameter in the limit of low (d → 1) and high (d →. ∞) dimensions. The corrections to scaling considered here follows from the departures of the initial condition from the scaling morphology. Including ...

  3. A Classroom Motivation Scale Illustrating the VIE Theory of Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Robert W.; Neider, Linda L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a "valence instrumentality expectancy" (VIE) questionnaire designed to measure university students' motivation to perform in an organizational psychology class. By focusing on classroom motivation, the questionnaire gives students a relevant and concrete experience with the various concepts of VIE theory. (Author/KC)

  4. Scaling of Advanced Theory-of-Mind Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhaus, Christopher; Koerber, Susanne; Sodian, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Advanced theory-of-mind (AToM) development was investigated in three separate studies involving 82, 466, and 402 elementary school children (8-, 9-, and 10-year-olds). Rasch and factor analyses assessed whether common conceptual development underlies higher-order false-belief understanding, social understanding, emotion recognition, and…

  5. Particle-scale understanding of the bioavailability of PAHs in sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Jeffrey W; Ghosh, Upal; Tucker, Samuel G; Furey, John S; Luthy, Richard G

    2002-02-01

    This study reports results of sediment bioslurry treatment and earthworm bioaccumulation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants found in sediment dredged from Milwaukee Harbor. A significant finding was that bioslurry treatment reduced PAHs on the sediment clay/silt fraction but not on the sediment coal-derived fraction and that PAH reduction in the clay/silt fraction correlated with substantial reduction in earthworm PAH bioaccumulation. These findings are used to infer PAH bioavailability from characterization of particle-scale PAH distribution, association, and binding among the principal particle fractions in the sediment. The results are consistent with work showing that the sediment comprised two principal particle classes for PAHs, coal-derived and clay/silt, each having much different PAH levels, release rates, and desorption activation energies. PAH sorption on coal-derived particles is associated with minimal biodegradation, slow release rates, and high desorption activation energies, while PAH sorption on clay/silt particles is associated with significant potential biodegradability, relatively fast release rates, and lower desorption activation energies. These characteristics are attributed to fundamental differences in the organic matter to which the PAHs are sorbed. Although the majority of the PAHs are found preferentially on coal-derived particles, the PAHs on the clay/silt sediment fraction are more mobile and available, and thus potentially of greater concern. This study demonstrates that a suite of tests comprising both bioassays and particle-scale investigations provide a basis to assess larger-scale phenomena of biotreatment of PAH-impacted sediments and bioavailability and potential toxicity of PAH contaminants in sediments. Improved understanding of contaminant bioavailability aids decision-making on the effectiveness of biotreatment of PAH-impacted sediments and the likelihood for possible reuse of dredged sediments as

  6. Nonequilibrium Gyrokinetic Fluctuation Theory and Sampling Noise in Gyrokinetic Particle-in-cell Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Krommes

    2007-10-09

    The present state of the theory of fluctuations in gyrokinetic GK plasmas and especially its application to sampling noise in GK particle-in-cell PIC simulations is reviewed. Topics addressed include the Δf method, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for both classical and GK many-body plasmas, the Klimontovich formalism, sampling noise in PIC simulations, statistical closure for partial differential equations, the theoretical foundations of spectral balance in the presence of arbitrary noise sources, and the derivation of Kadomtsev-type equations from the general formalism.

  7. Large-scale dynamo growth rates from numerical simulations and implications for mean-field theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kiwan; Blackman, Eric G; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2013-05-01

    Understanding large-scale magnetic field growth in turbulent plasmas in the magnetohydrodynamic limit is a goal of magnetic dynamo theory. In particular, assessing how well large-scale helical field growth and saturation in simulations match those predicted by existing theories is important for progress. Using numerical simulations of isotropically forced turbulence without large-scale shear with its implications, we focus on several additional aspects of this comparison: (1) Leading mean-field dynamo theories which break the field into large and small scales predict that large-scale helical field growth rates are determined by the difference between kinetic helicity and current helicity with no dependence on the nonhelical energy in small-scale magnetic fields. Our simulations show that the growth rate of the large-scale field from fully helical forcing is indeed unaffected by the presence or absence of small-scale magnetic fields amplified in a precursor nonhelical dynamo. However, because the precursor nonhelical dynamo in our simulations produced fields that were strongly subequipartition with respect to the kinetic energy, we cannot yet rule out the potential influence of stronger nonhelical small-scale fields. (2) We have identified two features in our simulations which cannot be explained by the most minimalist versions of two-scale mean-field theory: (i) fully helical small-scale forcing produces significant nonhelical large-scale magnetic energy and (ii) the saturation of the large-scale field growth is time delayed with respect to what minimalist theory predicts. We comment on desirable generalizations to the theory in this context and future desired work.

  8. Different Levels of the Meaning of Wave-Particle Duality and a Suspensive Perspective on the Interpretation of Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Yong Wook; Song, Jinwoong

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus on the genuine meaning of wave-particle duality and the interpretation of quantum theory. How can we teach duality and quantum theory despite this lack of consensus? This study attempts to answer this question. This research argues that reality issues are at the core of both the endless debates concerning the interpretation…

  9. Features of the configurations "small particle -plate" and "plate -plate" in the theory of fluctuation electromagnetic interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Dedkov, G. V.; Kyasov, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that the limiting transition from the geometrical configuration "plate -plate" to configuration "small particle -plate" being frequently used in the theory of Lifshitz -Pitaevskii, is not continually true. On the other hand, the known solution to the problem in the last configuration can be used to verify the generalizations of the theory being worked out in the former configuration.

  10. Progress report on research program in elementary particle theory, 1979-1980. [Univ. of Texas at Austin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Ne' eman, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A qualitative description is given of research in the following areas: particle physics in relativistic astrophysics and cosmology; phenomenology of weak and electromagnetic interactions; strong interaction physics and quark-parton physics; quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, and fundamental problems; and groups, gauges, and grand unified theories. Reports on this work have already been published, or will be, when it is completed. (RWR)

  11. Toward a theory of curvature-scaling gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Hoang Ky

    2013-01-01

    A salient feature of Horava gravity is the anisotropic time variable. We propose an alternative construction of the spacetime manifold which naturally enables time anisotropy. We promote the role of curvature: the Ricci scalar R at a given point sets the length scales for physical processes - including gravity - in the local inertial frames enclosing that point. The manifold is a patchwork of local regions; each region is Lorentz invariant and adopts a local scale a_R defined as a_R = 1/sqrt|R|. In each local patch, the length scales of physical processes are measured relatively to a_R, and only their dimensionless ratios partake in the dynamics of physical processes. Time anisotropy arises by requiring that the form - but not necessarily the parameters - of physical laws be unchanged under variations of the local a_R as one moves on the manifold. The time scaling is found to be dt ~ a_R^(3/2) whereas the spatial part scales as dx ~ a_R. We show how to conjoin the local patches of the manifold in a way which ...

  12. Scale-free transport in fusion plasmas: theory and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Raul [ORNL; Mier, Jose Angel [Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Newman, David E [University of Alaska; Carreras, Benjamin A [BACV Solutions, Inc., Oak Ridge; Garcia, Luis [Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel [JNL Scientific, Inc., Casa Grande, AZ; Decyk, Viktor [University of California, Los Angeles

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to detect the existence of scale-free transport in turbulent flows, based on the characterization of its Lagrangian characteristics, is presented and applied to two situations relevant for tokamak plasmas. The first one, radial transport in the presence of near-critical turbulence, has been known for quite some time to yield scale-free, superdiffusive transport. We use it to test the method and illustrate its robustness with respect to other approaches. The second situation, radial transport across radially-sheared poloidal zonal flows driven by turbulence via the Reynold stresses, is examined for the first time in this manner. The result is rather surprising and different from the traditionally assumed diffusive behavior. Instead, radial transport behaves instead in a scale-free, subdiffusive manner, which may have implications for the modeling of transport across transport barriers.

  13. Universal Scaling Laws in Quantum Theory and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.; Hurtak, James J.; Hurtak, D. E.

    2013-09-01

    We have developed a hyperdimensional geometry, Dn or Descartes space of dimensionality of n > 4, for our consideration n = 10. This model introduces a formation in terms of the conditions of constants as the space that allows us to calculate a unique set of scaling laws from the lower end scale of the quantum vacuum foam to the current universe. A group theoretical matrix formalism is made for the ten and eleven dimensional model of this space. For the eleven dimensional expressions of this geometry, a fundamental frequency is introduced and utilized as an additional condition on the topology. The constraints on the Dn space are imposed by the relationship of the universal constraints of nature expressed in terms of physical variables. The quantum foam picture can be related to the Fermi-Dirac vacuum model. Consideration is made for the lower limit of a universal size scaling from the Planck length, l = 10-33 cm, temporal component, t = 10-44 sec, density, 1093 gm/cm3 and additional Planck units of quantized variables. The upper limit of rotational frequency in the Dn space is given as 1043 Hz, as conditions or constraints that apply to the early universe which are expressed uniquely in terms of the universal constants, h, Planck's constant, the G, the gravitational constant and c, the velocity of light. We have developed a scaling law for cosmogenesis from the early universe to our present day universe. We plot the physical variables of the ten and eleven dimensional space versus a temporal evolution of these parameters. From this formalism, in order to maintain the compatibility of Einstein's General Relativity with the current model of cosmology, we replace Guth's inflationary model with a matter creation term. Also we have developed a fundamental scaling relationship between the "size scale" of organized matter with their associated fundamental frequency.

  14. An Application Of The Theory Of Scale Of Banach Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawidowski Łukasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The abstract Cauchy problem on scales of Banach space was considered by many authors. The goal of this paper is to show that the choice of the space on scale is significant. We prove a theorem that the selection of the spaces in which the Cauchy problem ut − Δu = u|u|s with initial–boundary conditions is considered has an influence on the selection of index s. For the Cauchy problem connected with the heat equation we will study how the change of the base space influents the regularity of the solutions.

  15. Particle number and probability density functional theory and A-representability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht

    2010-04-28

    In Hohenberg-Kohn density functional theory, the energy E is expressed as a unique functional of the ground state density rho(r): E = E[rho] with the internal energy component F(HK)[rho] being universal. Knowledge of the functional F(HK)[rho] by itself, however, is insufficient to obtain the energy: the particle number N is primary. By emphasizing this primacy, the energy E is written as a nonuniversal functional of N and probability density p(r): E = E[N,p]. The set of functions p(r) satisfies the constraints of normalization to unity and non-negativity, exists for each N; N = 1, ..., infinity, and defines the probability density or p-space. A particle number N and probability density p(r) functional theory is constructed. Two examples for which the exact energy functionals E[N,p] are known are provided. The concept of A-representability is introduced, by which it is meant the set of functions Psi(p) that leads to probability densities p(r) obtained as the quantum-mechanical expectation of the probability density operator, and which satisfies the above constraints. We show that the set of functions p(r) of p-space is equivalent to the A-representable probability density set. We also show via the Harriman and Gilbert constructions that the A-representable and N-representable probability density p(r) sets are equivalent.

  16. Story of the string theory. From hadrons to Planck scale; Histoire de la theorie des cordes. Des hadrons a l'echelle de Planck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petropoulos, P.M. [Centre de physique theorique, Ecole polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    2010-12-15

    Originally the string theory was devised to describe the scattering between hadron particles but was quickly put aside by the success of the quantum chromodynamics. Now string theory appears in the quantum gravity theory and has been involved in almost all attempts to define a physics beyond the standard model and to unify basic interactions. (A.C.)

  17. Atomic-Scale Modeling of Particle Size Effects for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction of Pt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We estimate the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction on platinum nanoparticles of sizes of practical importance. The proposed model explicitly accounts for surface irregularities and their effect on the activity of neighboring sites. The model reproduces the experimentally observed trends...... in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component...

  18. Particle size distributions from laboratory-scale biomass fires using fast response instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hosseini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Particle size distribution from biomass combustion is an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date, particle size distributions reported from prior studies vary not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distributions in well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern United States fuels with focus on chaparral. The combustion laboratory at the United States Department of Agriculture-Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory (USDA-FSL, Missoula, MT provided a repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for measurements. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which is attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing mass size distribution from FMPS and APS measurement 51–68% of particle mass was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most fuels produced a unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering could be better distinguished using the slopes in MCE (Modified Combustion Efficiency vs. geometric mean diameter than only using MCE values.

  19. Accurate high-harmonic spectra from time-dependent two-particle reduced density matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Fabian; Sato, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Kenichi L; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The accurate description of the non-linear response of many-electron systems to strong-laser fields remains a major challenge. Methods that bypass the unfavorable exponential scaling with particle number are required to address larger systems. In this paper we present a fully three-dimensional implementation of the time-dependent two-particle reduced density matrix (TD-2RDM) method for many-electron atoms. We benchmark this approach by a comparison with multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) results for the harmonic spectra of beryllium and neon. We show that the TD-2RDM is very well-suited to describe the non-linear atomic response and to reveal the influence of electron-correlation effects.

  20. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forward-forward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  1. Statistical mechanical theory for steady state systems. VIII. General theory for a Brownian particle driven by a time- and space-varying force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Phil; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2008-03-21

    A Brownian particle subject to a time- and space-varying force is studied with the second entropy theory for nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. A fluctuation expression is obtained for the second entropy of the path, and this is maximized to obtain the most likely path of the particle. Two approaches are used, one based on the velocity correlation function and one based on the position correlation function. The approaches are a perturbation about the free particle result and are exact for weak external forces. They provide a particularly simple way of including memory effects in time-varying driven diffusion. The theories are tested against computer simulation data for a Brownian particle trapped in an oscillating parabolic well. They accurately predict the phase lag and amplitude as a function of drive frequency, and they account quantitatively for the memory effects that are important at high frequencies and that are missing in the simplest Langevin equation.

  2. Scaling theory put into practice: First-principles modeling of transport in doped silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Rurali, R.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2007-01-01

    We combine the ideas of scaling theory and universal conductance fluctuations with density-functional theory to analyze the conductance properties of doped silicon nanowires. Specifically, we study the crossover from ballistic to diffusive transport in boron or phosphorus doped Si nanowires...

  3. Efficiently Assessing Negative Cognition in Depression: An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevers, Christopher G.; Strong, David R.; Meyer, Bjorn; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Miller, Ivan R.

    2007-01-01

    Despite a central role for dysfunctional attitudes in cognitive theories of depression and the widespread use of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, form A (DAS-A; A. Weissman, 1979), the psychometric development of the DAS-A has been relatively limited. The authors used nonparametric item response theory methods to examine the DAS-A items and…

  4. Sequential Progressions in a Theory-of-Mind Scale: Longitudinal Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Henry M.; Fang, Fuxi; Peterson, Candida C.

    2011-01-01

    Consecutive retestings of 92 U.S. preschoolers (n = 30), Chinese preschoolers (n = 31), and deaf children (n = 31) examined whether the sequences of development apparent in cross-sectional results with a theory-of-mind scale also appeared in longitudinal assessment. Longitudinal data confirmed that theory-of-mind progressions apparent in…

  5. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure at Two Loops: the apparent scale dependence of the speed of sound

    OpenAIRE

    Baldauf, Tobias; Mercolli, Lorenzo; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-01-01

    We study the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure for cosmic density and momentum fields. We show that the finite part of the two-loop calculation and its counterterms introduce an apparent scale dependence for the leading order parameter $c_\\text{s}^2$ of the EFT starting at k=0.1 h/Mpc. These terms limit the range over which one can trust the one-loop EFT calculation at the 1 % level to k

  6. A regional-scale particle-tracking method for nonstationary fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohman, Johan; Niemi, Auli; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-11-01

    A regional scale transport model is introduced that is applicable to non-stationary and statistically inhomogeneous fractured media, provided that hydraulic flow, but not necessarily solute transport, can be approximated by equivalent continuum properties at some block scale. Upscaled flow and transport block properties are transferred from multiple fracture network realizations to a regional model with grid elements of equal size to that found valid for continuum approximation of flow. In the large-scale model, flow is solved in a stochastic continuum framework, whereas the transport calculations employ a random walk procedure. Block-wise transit times are sampled from distributions linked to each block-conductivity based on its underlying fracture network. To account for channeled transport larger than the block scale, several alternatives in sampling algorithm are introduced and compared. The most reasonable alternative incorporates a spatial persistence length in sampling the particle transit times; this tracer transport persistence length is related to interblock channeling, and is quantified by the number N of blocks. The approach is demonstrated for a set of field data, and the obtained regional-scale particle breakthroughs are analyzed. These are fitted to the one-dimensional advective-dispersive equation to determine an effective macroscale dispersion coefficient. An interesting finding is that this macroscale dispersion coefficient is found to be a linear function of the transport persistence, N, with a slope equal to a representative mean block-scale dispersion coefficient and a constant that incorporates background dispersion arising from the regional heterogeneous conductivity field.

  7. Scaled unscented transform Gaussian sum filter: theory and application

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Xiaodong; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    In this work we consider the state estimation problem in nonlinear/non-Gaussian systems. We introduce a framework, called the scaled unscented transform Gaussian sum filter (SUT-GSF), which combines two ideas: the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF) based on the concept of scaled unscented transform (SUT), and the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). The SUT is used to approximate the mean and covariance of a Gaussian random variable which is transformed by a nonlinear function, while the GMM is adopted to approximate the probability density function (pdf) of a random variable through a set of Gaussian distributions. With these two tools, a framework can be set up to assimilate nonlinear systems in a recursive way. Within this framework, one can treat a nonlinear stochastic system as a mixture model of a set of sub-systems, each of which takes the form of a nonlinear system driven by a known Gaussian random process. Then, for each sub-system, one applies the SUKF to estimate the mean and covariance of the underlyi...

  8. Comparison of dust charging between Orbital-Motion-Limited theory and Particle-In-Cell simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Delzanno, Gian Luca

    2016-01-01

    The Orbital-Motion-Limited (OML) theory has been modified to predict the dust charge and the results were contrasted with the Whipple approximation [Tang and Delzanno, Phys. Plasmas 21, 123708 (2014)]. To further establish its regime of applicability, in this paper the OML predictions (for a non-electron-emitting, spherical dust grain at rest in a collisionless, unmagnetized plasma) are compared with Particle-In-Cell simulations that retain the absorption radius effect. It is found that for large dust grain radius $r_d$ relative to the plasma Debye length $\\lambda_D$, the revised OML theory remains a very good approximation as, for the parameters considered ($r_d/\\lambda_D\\le10$, equal electron and ion temperatures), it yields the dust charge to within $20\\%$ accuracy. This is a substantial improvement over the Whipple approximation. The dust collected currents and energy fluxes, which remain the same in the revised and standard OML theories, are accurate to within $15-30\\%$.

  9. On the non-linear scale of cosmological perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blas, Diego [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Garny, Mathias; Konstandin, Thomas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    We discuss the convergence of cosmological perturbation theory. We prove that the polynomial enhancement of the non-linear corrections expected from the effects of soft modes is absent in equal-time correlators like the power or bispectrum. We first show this at leading order by resumming the most important corrections of soft modes to an arbitrary skeleton of hard fluctuations. We derive the same result in the eikonal approximation, which also allows us to show the absence of enhancement at any order. We complement the proof by an explicit calculation of the power spectrum at two-loop order, and by further numerical checks at higher orders. Using these insights, we argue that the modification of the power spectrum from soft modes corresponds at most to logarithmic corrections. Finally, we discuss the asymptotic behavior in the large and small momentum regimes and identify the expansion parameter pertinent to non-linear corrections.

  10. MMS observations of wave-particle interactions in a kinetic-scale Alfvén-branch wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, D. J.; Dorelli, J.; Vinas, A. F.; Boardsen, S. A.; Avanov, L. A.; Bellan, P. M.; Schwartz, S. J.; Lavraud, B.; Coffey, V. N.; Chandler, M. O.; Saito, Y.; Paterson, W. R.; Fuselier, S. A.; Ergun, R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution particle and field measurements from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission provide an unprecedented look at fundamental plasma physics phenomena. Here we present MMS observations of a nearly monochromatic kinetic-scale Alfvén-branch wave packet observed in a reconnection exhaust near the dayside magnetopause. From multi-spacecraft spectral analysis techniques, the wave packet was found to propagate obliquely at an angle of 100o with respect to the magnetic field with parallel wavespeed VA, frequency ω/ωci 0.6, and scale k-ρi 1.3. The particle current and electric field inferred from the electron pressure tensor are found to be 90o out of phase with one another, leading to instantaneous J-·E' ≠ 0, providing the first direct observation of the energy-exchange between a kinetic Alfvén wave field and particles. The wave-averaged J-·E' and fluctuations in parallel electron temperature are equal to zero, suggesting that the measured wave was in a marginally stable state. Fluctuations in the perpendicular electron temperature, however, indicate net plasma heating and are unexpected from traditional KAW theory. Examination of the velocity distribution function of electrons in the wave packet reveals a population of suprathermal electrons with 90o magnetic pitch-angles that account for these increased perpendicular temperatures. These trapped electrons contribute 50% to the density fluctuations within the KAW and are confined within magnetic minima by a combination of the magnetic mirror force and the wave's parallel electric field.

  11. Aerosol synthesis of nano and micro-scale zero valent metal particles from oxide precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM; Lesman, Zayd [UNM; Soliman, Haytham [UNM; Zea, Hugo [UNM

    2010-01-01

    In this work a novel aerosol method, derived form the batch Reduction/Expansion Synthesis (RES) method, for production of nano / micro-scale metal particles from oxides and hydroxides is presented. In the Aerosol-RES (A-RES) method, an aerosol, consisting of a physical mixture of urea and metal oxide or hydroxides, is passed through a heated oven (1000 C) with a residence time of the order of 1 second, producing pure (zero valent) metal particles. It appears that the process is flexible regarding metal or alloy identity, allows control of particle size and can be readily scaled to very large throughput. Current work is focused on creating nanoparticles of metal and metal alloy using this method. Although this is primarily a report on observations, some key elements of the chemistry are clear. In particular, the reducing species produced by urea decomposition are the primary agents responsible for reduction of oxides and hydroxides to metal. It is also likely that the rapid expansion that takes place when solid/liquid urea decomposes to form gas species influences the final morphology of the particles.

  12. Soft particle analysis of bacterial cells and its interpretation of cell adhesion behaviors in terms of DLVO theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, H; Tsuneda, S; Hirata, A; Sasaki, H

    2001-10-01

    The electrokinetic properties of two nitrifying strains, Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi, and three heterotrophic bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were examined by electrophoretic mobility measurement and analyzed using the soft particle electrophoresis theory that is suitable for biological particles. The bacterial adhesion characteristics onto glass bead substratum were also evaluated by packed bed method. The mobility of the bacterial cells employed converged to a non-zero value as the ionic concentration increased, suggesting that the bacterial cells exhibited typical soft particle characteristics. Moreover, cell surface potentials based on the soft particle theory were lower than those estimated by the conventional Smoluchowski formula, i.e. zeta potential. Cell collision efficiencies onto glass beads (alpha(0)) were largely dependent on interfacial interaction, although almost electrically neutral P. aeruginosa did not follow that trend. From a comparison of alpha(0) with DLVO interaction energy maximum (V(max)), it was assumed that heterocoagulation between cell and substratum at primary minimum potential took place under V(max) of 24-34 kT based on soft particle analysis. On the other hand, V(max) predictions using the Smoluchowski theory gave 81-223 kT, which indicated the possibility of overestimating electrostatic repulsive forces by the conventional Smoluchowski theory. Thus, the application of this new electrophoresis theory to several kinds of bacterial cells has led to the revision of the interpretation of bacterial mobility data and provided a more detailed understanding of the bacterial adhesion phenomenon.

  13. MD Simulation on Collision Behavior Between Nano-Scale TiO₂ Particles During Vacuum Cold Spraying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hai-Long; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2018-04-01

    Particle collision behavior influences significantly inter-nano particle bonding formation during the nano-ceramic coating deposition by vacuum cold spraying (or aerosol deposition method). In order to illuminate the collision behavior between nano-scale ceramic particles, molecular dynamic simulation was applied to explore impact process between nano-scale TiO2 particles through controlling impact velocities. Results show that the recoil efficiency of the nano-scale TiO2 particle is decreased with the increase of the impact velocity. Nano-scale TiO2 particle exhibits localized plastic deformation during collision at low velocities, while it is intensively deformed by collision at high velocities. This intensive deformation promotes the nano-particle adhesion rather than rebounding off. A relationship between the adhesion energy and the rebound energy is established for the bonding formation of the nano-scale TiO2 particle. The adhesion energy required to the bonding formation between nano-scale ceramic particles can be produced by high velocity collision.

  14. Attachment of composite porous supra-particles to air-water and oil-water interfaces: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunov, Vesselin N; Al-Shehri, Hamza; Horozov, Tommy S

    2016-09-29

    We developed and tested a theoretical model for the attachment of fluid-infused porous supra-particles to a fluid-liquid interface. We considered the wetting behaviour of agglomerated clusters of particles, typical of powdered materials dispersed in a liquid, as well as of the adsorption of liquid-infused colloidosomes at the liquid-fluid interface. The free energy of attachment of a composite spherical porous supra-particle made from much smaller aggregated spherical particles to the oil-water interface was calculated. Two cases were considered: (i) a water-filled porous supra-particle adsorbed at the oil-water interface from the water phase, and, (ii) an oil-filled porous supra-particle adsorbed at the oil-water interface from the oil-phase. We derived equations relating the three-phase contact angle of the smaller "building block" particles and the contact angle of the liquid-infused porous supra-particles. The theory predicts that the porous supra-particle contact angle attached at the liquid interface strongly depends on the type of fluid infused in the particle pores and the fluid phase from which it approaches the liquid interface. We tested the theory by using millimetre-sized porous supra-particles fabricated by evaporation of droplets of polystyrene latex suspension on a pre-heated super-hydrophobic surface, followed by thermal annealing at the glass transition temperature. Such porous particles were initially infused with water or oil and approached to the oil-water interface from the infusing phase. The experiment showed that when attaching at the hexadecane-water interface, the porous supra-particles behaved as hydrophilic when they were pre-filled with water and hydrophobic when they were pre-filled with hexadecane. The results agree with the theoretically predicted contact angles for the porous composite supra-particles based on the values of the contact angles of their building block latex particles measured with the Gel Trapping Technique. The

  15. Ultrahigh energy neutrino interactions and weak-scale string theories

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, M

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested that ultrahigh energy neutrinos can acquire cross-sections approaching hadronic size if the string scale is as low as 1-10 TeV. In this case, the vertical air showers observed with energies above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff at E approximately 6x10^{19} eV could be initiated by neutrinos which are the only known primaries able to travel long distances unimpeded. We have calculated the neutrino-nucleon cross-section due to the exchange of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a field theoretical framework. We have found that the neutrino-nucleon cross section and the transferred energy per interaction are too small to explain vertical showers even in the most optimistic scenario. However, future cosmic ray experiments like AUGER or OWL which are able to observe horizontal air showers could have a potential to restrict or to discover weak-scale string physics comparable to LHC.

  16. Planet-Scale grid A particle collier leads data grid developers to unprecedented dimensions

    CERN Multimedia

    Thibodeau, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    In 2007, scientists will begin smashing protons and ions together in a massive, multinational experiment to understand what the universe looked like tiny fractions of a second after the Big Bang. The particle accelerator used in this test will release a vast flood of data on a scale unlike anything seen before, and for that scientists will need a computing grid of equally great capability

  17. A Grouping Particle Swarm Optimizer with Personal-Best-Position Guidance for Large Scale Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weian; Si, Chengyong; Xue, Yu; Mao, Yanfen; Wang, Lei; Wu, Qidi

    2017-05-04

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is a popular algorithm which is widely investigated and well implemented in many areas. However, the canonical PSO does not perform well in population diversity maintenance so that usually leads to a premature convergence or local optima. To address this issue, we propose a variant of PSO named Grouping PSO with Personal- Best-Position (Pbest) Guidance (GPSO-PG) which maintains the population diversity by preserving the diversity of exemplars. On one hand, we adopt uniform random allocation strategy to assign particles into different groups and in each group the losers will learn from the winner. On the other hand, we employ personal historical best position of each particle in social learning rather than the current global best particle. In this way, the exemplars diversity increases and the effect from the global best particle is eliminated. We test the proposed algorithm to the benchmarks in CEC 2008 and CEC 2010, which concern the large scale optimization problems (LSOPs). By comparing several current peer algorithms, GPSO-PG exhibits a competitive performance to maintain population diversity and obtains a satisfactory performance to the problems.

  18. Rebound mechanics of micrometre-scale, spherical particles in high-velocity impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Baran; Yang, Hankang; Gouldstone, Andrew; Müftü, Sinan

    2017-08-01

    The impact mechanics of micrometre-scale metal particles with flat metal surfaces is investigated for high-velocity impacts ranging from 50 m s-1 to more than 1 km s-1, where impact causes predominantly plastic deformation. A material model that includes high strain rate and temperature effects on the yield stress, heat generation due to plasticity, material damage due to excessive plastic strain and heat transfer is used in the numerical analysis. The coefficient of restitution e is predicted by the classical work using elastic-plastic deformation analysis with quasi-static impact mechanics to be proportional to Vi-1 / 4 and Vi-1 / 2 for the low and moderate impact velocities that span the ranges of 0-10 and 10-100 m s-1, respectively. In the elastic-plastic and fully plastic deformation regimes the particle rebound is attributed to the elastic spring-back that initiates at the particle-substrate interface. At higher impact velocities (0.1-1 km s-1) e is shown to be proportional to approximately Vi-1. In this deeply plastic deformation regime various deformation modes that depend on plastic flow of the material including the time lag between the rebound instances of the top and bottom points of particle and the lateral spreading of the particle are identified. In this deformation regime, the elastic spring-back initiates subsurface, in the substrate.

  19. Evidence of variant intra- and interspecific scaling of tree crown structure and relevance for allometric theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzsch, Hans; Dieler, Jochen

    2012-07-01

    General scaling rules or constants for metabolic and structural plant allometry as assumed by the theory of Euclidian geometric scaling (2/3-scaling) or metabolic scaling (3/4-scaling) may meet human's innate propensity for simplicity and generality of pattern and processes in nature. However, numerous empirical works show that variability of crown structure rather than constancy is essential for a tree's success in coping with crowding. In order to link theory and empiricism, we analyzed the intra- and inter-specific scaling of crown structure for 52 tree species. The basis is data from 84 long-term plots of temperate monospecific forests under survey since 1870 and a set of 126 yield tables of angiosperm and gymnosperm forest tree species across the world. The study draws attention to (1) the intra-specific variation and correlation of the three scaling relationships: tree height versus trunk diameter, crown cross-sectional area versus trunk diameter, and tree volume versus trunk diameter, and their dependence on competition, (2) the inter-specific variation and correlation of the same scaling exponents ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) across 52 tree species, and (3) the relevance of the revealed variable scaling of crown structure for leaf organs and metabolic scaling. Our results arrive at suggesting a more extended metabolic theory of ecology which includes variability and covariation between allometric relationships as prerequisite for the individual plant's competitiveness.

  20. Dynamical and scale invariance of charged particles slipping on a rough surface with periodic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Luo, Pengcheng; Ding, Huifang

    2017-07-01

    This letter deals with the dynamical and scaling invariance of charged particles slipping on a rough surface with periodic excitation. A variant of the Fermi-Ulam model (FUM) is proposed to describe the transport behavior of the particles when the electric field force Fe is smaller or larger than the friction force Ff, i.e., A 0. For these two cases, the stability of fixed points is analyzed with the help of the eigenvalue analysis method, and further the invariant manifolds are constructed to investigate the dynamical invariance such as energy diffusion for some initial conditions in the case A > 0 and decay process in the case A law of the statistical behavior. It follows that both the FA phenomenon for A > 0 and the velocity decay process for A < 0 satisfy scaling invariance with respect to the nondimensional acceleration A. Besides, for A < 0, the transient number nx is proposed to evaluate the speed of the velocity decay process. More importantly, nx is found to possess the attribute of scaling invariance with respect to both the initial velocity V0 and the nondimensional acceleration A. These results are very useful for the in-depth understanding of the energy transport properties of charged particle systems.

  1. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulation and laboratory-scale experiments of complex flow dynamics in unsaturated fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordilla, J.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Pan, W.; Shigorina, E.; Noffz, T.; Geyer, T.

    2015-12-01

    Unsaturated flow in fractured porous media exhibits highly complex flow dynamics and a wide range of intermittent flow processes. Especially in wide aperture fractures, flow processes may be dominated by gravitational instead of capillary forces leading to a deviation from the classical volume effective approaches (Richard's equation, Van Genuchten type relationships). The existence of various flow modes such as droplets, rivulets, turbulent and adsorbed films is well known, however, their spatial and temporal distribution within fracture networks is still an open question partially due to the lack of appropriate modeling tools. With our work we want to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying flow and transport dynamics in unsaturated fractured media in order to support the development of more refined upscaled methods, applicable on catchment scales. We present fracture-scale flow simulations obtained with a parallelized Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The model allows us to simulate free-surface flow dynamics including the effect of surface tension for a wide range of wetting conditions in smooth and rough fractures. Due to the highly efficient generation of surface tension via particle-particle interaction forces the dynamic wetting of surfaces can readily be obtained. We validated the model via empirical and semi-analytical solutions and conducted laboratory-scale percolation experiments of unsaturated flow through synthetic fracture systems. The setup allows us to obtain travel time distributions and identify characteristic flow mode distributions on wide aperture fractures intercepted by horizontal fracture elements.

  2. A new method of rapid power measurement for MW-scale high-current particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongjian; Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Zhimin; Xie, Yahong; Liu, Sheng; Liang, Lizheng; Jiang, Caichao; Sheng, Peng; Yu, Ling

    2015-09-01

    MW-scale high current particle beams are widely applied for plasma heating in the magnetic confinement fusion devices, in which beam power is an important indicator for efficient heating. Generally, power measurement of MW-scale high current particle beam adopts water flow calorimetry (WFC). Limited by the principles of WFC, the beam power given by WFC is an averaged value. In this article a new method of beam power for MW-scale high-current particle beams is introduced: (1) the temperature data of thermocouples embedded in the beam stopping elements were obtained using high data acquire system, (2) the surface heat flux of the beam stopping elements are calculated using heat transfer, (3) the relationships between positions and heat flux were acquired using numerical simulation, (4) the real-time power deposited on the beam stopping elements can be calculated using surface integral. The principle of measurement was described in detail and applied to the EAST neutral beam injector for demonstration. The result is compared with that measured by WFC. Comparison of the results shows good accuracy and applicability of this measuring method.

  3. Scaled unscented transform Gaussian sum filter: Theory and application

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xiaodong

    2010-05-01

    In this work we consider the state estimation problem in nonlinear/non-Gaussian systems. We introduce a framework, called the scaled unscented transform Gaussian sum filter (SUT-GSF), which combines two ideas: the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF) based on the concept of scaled unscented transform (SUT) (Julier and Uhlmann (2004) [16]), and the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). The SUT is used to approximate the mean and covariance of a Gaussian random variable which is transformed by a nonlinear function, while the GMM is adopted to approximate the probability density function (pdf) of a random variable through a set of Gaussian distributions. With these two tools, a framework can be set up to assimilate nonlinear systems in a recursive way. Within this framework, one can treat a nonlinear stochastic system as a mixture model of a set of sub-systems, each of which takes the form of a nonlinear system driven by a known Gaussian random process. Then, for each sub-system, one applies the SUKF to estimate the mean and covariance of the underlying Gaussian random variable transformed by the nonlinear governing equations of the sub-system. Incorporating the estimations of the sub-systems into the GMM gives an explicit (approximate) form of the pdf, which can be regarded as a "complete" solution to the state estimation problem, as all of the statistical information of interest can be obtained from the explicit form of the pdf (Arulampalam et al. (2002) [7]). In applications, a potential problem of a Gaussian sum filter is that the number of Gaussian distributions may increase very rapidly. To this end, we also propose an auxiliary algorithm to conduct pdf re-approximation so that the number of Gaussian distributions can be reduced. With the auxiliary algorithm, in principle the SUT-GSF can achieve almost the same computational speed as the SUKF if the SUT-GSF is implemented in parallel. As an example, we will use the SUT-GSF to assimilate a 40-dimensional system due to

  4. Physical adsorption: theory of van der Waals interactions between particles and clean surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianmin; Rappe, Andrew M

    2014-03-14

    van der Waals (vdW) interactions between particles and surfaces are critical for the study of physical adsorption. In this work, we develop a method to calculate the leading- and higher-order coefficients, describing the dependence of vdW interaction on height above the surface. We find that the proposed method can produce the vdW coefficients for atoms on surfaces of metals and semiconductors, with a mean absolute relative deviation of about 5%. As an important application, we study the adsorption energies for rare-gas atoms on noble-metal surfaces by combining the present method, which accounts for the long-range part, with semilocal density functional theory (DFT), which accounts for the short-range part. This combined DFT+vdW approach yields adsorption energies in excellent agreement (5%) with experiments. This suggests that the present method may serve as a useful dispersion correction to density functional approximations.

  5. Towards the spectrum of low-lying particles in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergner, G. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Montvay, I. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Muenster, G.; Oezugurel, U.D.; Sandbrink, D. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1

    2013-04-15

    We present the current results of our simulations of N=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a lattice. The masses of the gluino-glue particle, the a-{eta}', the a-f{sub 0} meson, and the scalar glueball are obtained at finer lattice spacing than before, and extrapolations towards vanishing gluino mass are made. The calculations employ different levels of stout smearing. The statistical accuracy as well as the control of finite size effects and lattice artefacts are better than in previous investigations. Taking the statistical and systematic uncertainties into account, the extrapolations towards vanishing gluino mass of the masses of the fermionic and bosonic states in our present calculations are consistent with the formation of degenerate supermultiplets.

  6. Dynamics of suspensions of hydrodynamically structured particles: analytic theory and applications to experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riest, Jonas; Eckert, Thomas; Richtering, Walter; Nägele, Gerhard

    2015-04-14

    We present an easy-to-use analytic toolbox for the calculation of short-time transport properties of concentrated suspensions of spherical colloidal particles with internal hydrodynamic structure, and direct interactions described by a hard-core or soft Hertz pair potential. The considered dynamic properties include self-diffusion and sedimentation coefficients, the wavenumber-dependent diffusion function determined in dynamic scattering experiments, and the high-frequency shear viscosity. The toolbox is based on the hydrodynamic radius model (HRM) wherein the internal particle structure is mapped on a hydrodynamic radius parameter for unchanged direct interactions, and on an existing simulation data base for solvent-permeable and spherical annulus particles. Useful scaling relations for the diffusion function and self-diffusion coefficient, known to be valid for hard-core interaction, are shown to apply also for soft pair potentials. We further discuss extensions of the toolbox to long-time transport properties including the low-shear zero-frequency viscosity and the long-time self-diffusion coefficient. The versatility of the toolbox is demonstrated by the analysis of a previous light scattering study of suspensions of non-ionic PNiPAM microgels [Eckert et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2008, 129, 124902] in which a detailed theoretical analysis of the dynamic data was left as an open task. By the comparison with Hertz potential based calculations, we show that the experimental data are consistently and accurately described using the Verlet-Weis corrected Percus-Yevick structure factor as input, and for a solvent penetration length equal to three percent of the excluded volume radius. This small amount of solvent permeability of the microgel particles has a significant dynamic effect at larger concentrations.

  7. Weak-scale string theories and ultrahigh energy neutrino interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, M

    2001-01-01

    We discuss if ultrahigh energy (UHE) neutrinos can be responsible for the observed vertical extensive air showers with energy ~10/sup 20/ e V. After briefly reviewing the proposal that the decay products from UHE neutrinos annihilations on relic neutrinos are the observed UHE primaries, we concentrate on the suggestion that UHE neutrinos can acquire cross-sections approaching hadronic size if the string scale is as low as approximately=10 TeV. In this case, the vertical air showers observed with energies above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff at E approximately=6.10/sup 19/ eV could be initiated directly by neutrinos which are the only known primaries able to travel long distances unimpeded. We review the calculation of the neutrino- nucleon cross-section sigma /sub N nu //sup KK/ due to the exchange of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a field theoretical framework and discuss the issue of unitarity. We find that sigma /sub N nu //sup KK/ and the transferred energy per interaction are too small t...

  8. A New Universal Gas Breakdown Theory for Classical Length Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Amanda Mae

    While Paschen's law is commonly used to predict breakdown voltage, it fails at microscale gaps when field emission becomes important. Accurate breakdown voltage predictions at microscale are even more important as electronic device dimensions decrease. Developing analytic models to accurately predict breakdown at microscale is vital for understanding the underlying physics occurring within the system and to either prevent or produce a discharge, depending on the application. We first take a pre-existing breakdown model coupling field emission and Townsend breakdown and perform a matched asymptotic analysis to obtain analytic equations for breakdown voltage in argon at atmospheric pressure. Next, we extend this model to generalize for gas and further explore the independent contributions of field emission and Townsend discharge. Finally, we present analytic expressions for breakdown voltage valid for any gas at any pressure, and discuss the modified Paschen minimum at microscale. The presented models agree well with numerical simulations and experimental data when using the field enhancement factor as a fitting parameter. The work presented in this thesis is a first step in unifying gas breakdown across length scales and breakdown mechanisms. Future work will aim to incorporate other breakdown mechanisms, such as quantum effects and space charge, to provide a more complete unified model for gas breakdown.

  9. Development and psychometric validation of social cognitive theory scales in an oral health context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelly; Parker, Eleanor J; Steffens, Margaret A; Logan, Richard M; Brennan, David; Jamieson, Lisa M

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate scales reflecting potentially modifiable social cognitive theory-based risk indicators associated with homeless populations' oral health. The scales are referred to as the social cognitive theory risk scales in an oral health context (SCTOH) and are referred to as SCTOH(SE), SCTOH(K) and SCTOH(F), respectively. The three SCTOH scales assess the key constructs of social cognitive theory: self-efficacy, knowledge and fatalism. The reliability and validity of the three scales were evaluated in a convenience sample of 248 homeless participants (age range 17-78 years, 79% male) located in a metropolitan setting in Australia. The scales were supported by exploratory factor analysis and established three distinct and internally consistent domains of social cognition: oral health-related self-efficacy, oral health-related knowledge and oral health-related fatalism, with Cronbach's alphas of 0.95, 0.85 and Spearman's-Brown ρ of 0.69. Concurrent ability was confirmed by each SCTOH scale's association with oral health status in the expected directions. The three SCTOH scales appear to be internally valid and reliable. If confirmed by further research, these scales could potentially be used for tailored educational and cognitive-behavioural interventions to reduce oral health inequalities among homeless and other vulnerable populations. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  10. Scaling invariance for the escape of particles from a periodically corrugated waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonel, Edson D., E-mail: edleonel@rc.unesp.br [Departamento de Estatística, Matemática Aplicada e Computação, UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Costa, Diogo R. da [Departamento de Estatística, Matemática Aplicada e Computação, UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Univ São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Cidade Universitária, CEP 05314-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dettmann, Carl P. [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TW (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-09

    The escape dynamics of a classical light ray inside a corrugated waveguide is characterised by the use of scaling arguments. The model is described via a two-dimensional nonlinear and area preserving mapping. The phase space of the mapping contains a set of periodic islands surrounded by a large chaotic sea that is confined by a set of invariant tori. When a hole is introduced in the chaotic sea, letting the ray escape, the histogram of frequency of the number of escaping particles exhibits rapid growth, reaching a maximum value at n{sub p} and later decaying asymptotically to zero. The behaviour of the histogram of escape frequency is characterised using scaling arguments. The scaling formalism is widely applicable to critical phenomena and useful in characterisation of phase transitions, including transitions from limited to unlimited energy growth in two-dimensional time varying billiard problems. -- Highlights: ► Escape of light ray inside a corrugated waveguide ► Two-dimensional nonlinear and area preserving mapping ► Scaling for escaping particles.

  11. Multi-scale comparison of the fine particle removal capacity of urban forests and wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenming; Liu, Jiakai; Wu, Yanan; Yan, Guoxin; Zhu, Lijuan; Yu, Xinxiao

    2017-04-01

    As fine particle (FP) pollution is harmful to humans, previous studies have focused on the mechanisms of FP removal by forests. The current study aims to compare the FP removal capacities of urban forests and wetlands on the leaf, canopy, and landscape scales. Water washing and scanning electron microscopy are used to calculate particle accumulation on leaves, and models are used to estimate vegetation collection, sedimentation, and dry deposition. Results showed that, on the leaf scale, forest species are able to accumulate more FP on their leaf surface than aquatic species in wetlands. On the canopy scale, horizontal vegetation collection is the major process involved in FP removal, and the contribution of vertical sedimentation/emission can be ignored. Coniferous tree species also showed stronger FP collection ability than broadleaf species. In the landscape scale, deposition on the forest occurs to a greater extent than that on wetlands, and dry deposition is the major process of FP removal on rain-free days. In conclusion, when planning an urban green system, planting an urban forest should be the first option for FP mitigation.

  12. Nano-scale interactions of particles and drops with heterogenous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui

    Recent technological developments enable one to study the behavior and interactions of particles and drops with heterogeneous surfaces at microscopic resolution, and investigate their possible applications. In this thesis, we use the microscopic calculational technique of molecular dynamics simulation, augmented by other continuum methods as appropriate, to study some prototypical examples. For applications to particle separation, we consider on the transport of particles by flow through a narrow channel of which one side has a stripe pattern of alternating wettabilities. We first consider van der Waals forces alone. The particle-wall interaction can either trap particles on the attractive stripes or deflect the trajectories of mobile particles away from the mean flow direction. Using molecular dynamics we determine how the migration angle of finite-sized rigid particles differs from the imposed fluid flow. The effects of electrostatic interactions are considered by decorating the particles and walls with opposite charges, resulting in significantly more trapping and larger deflection angles. We then use Langevin equations to simulate larger particles in the van der Waals case, and compare the results to the MD simulations. From the analysis of the associated Fokker-Planck equation we further obtain bounds on the deflection angle. The second problem involving fluid-solid interactions is that of nano-sized drop impact on a surface, which are flat, curved or pillared, with either homogeneous interactions or cross-shaped patterns of wettability. From the simulations we observe drop bouncing, sticking, spreading or disintegrating, depending on impact velocity and surface properties. In contrast to macroscopic observation, MD shows that the presence or absence of vapor has no effect on the onset of splashing. We argue that this difference is a direct consequence of drop size. For low velocity impacts, we compare MD results with continuum lattice Boltzmann methods at the

  13. Scaling up from traits to communities to ecosystems across broad climate gradients: Testing Metabolic Scaling Theories predictions for forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enquist, B. J.; Michaletz, S. T.; Buzzard, V.

    2015-12-01

    Key insights in global ecology will come from mechanistically linking pattern and process across scales. Macrosystems ecology specifically attempts to link ecological processes across spatiotemporal scales. The goal s to link the processing of energy and nutrients from cells all the way ecosystems and to understand how shifting climate influences ecosystem processes. Using new data collected from NSF funded Macrosystems project we report on new findings from forests sites across a broad temperature gradient. Our study sites span tropical, temperate, and high elevation forests we assess several key predictions and assumptions of Metabolic Scaling Theory (MST) as well as several other competing hypotheses for the role of climate, light, and plant traits on influencing forest demography and forest ecosystems. Specifically, we assess the importance of plant size, light limitation, size structure, and various climatic factors on forest growth, demography, and ecosystem functioning. We provide some of the first systematic tests of several key predictions from MST. We show that MST predictions are largely upheld and that new insights from assessing theories predictions yields new observations and findings that help modify and extend MST's predictions and applicability. We discuss how theory is critically needed to further our understanding of how to scale pattern and process in ecology - from traits to ecosystems - in order to develop a more predictive global change biology.

  14. W-pair production near threshold in unstable particle effective theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgari, Pietro

    2008-11-07

    In this thesis we present a dedicated study of the four-fermion production process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup -} anti {nu}{sub {mu}}u anti dX near the W-pair production threshold, in view of its importance for a precise determination of the W-boson mass at the ILC. The calculation is performed in the framework of unstable-particle effective theory, which allows for a gauge-invariant inclusion of instability effects, and for a systematic approximation of the full cross section with an expansion in the coupling constants, the ratio {gamma}{sub W}/M{sub W}, and the non-relativistic velocity v of the W boson. The effective-theory result, computed to next-to-leading order in the expansion parameters {gamma}{sub W}/M{sub W}{proportional_to}{alpha}{sub ew}{proportional_to}v{sup 2}, is compared to the full numerical next-to-leading order calculation of the four-fermion production cross section, and agreement to better than 0.5% is found in the region of validity of the effective theory. Furthermore, we estimate the contributions of missing higher-order corrections to the four-fermion process, and how they translate into an error on the W-boson mass determination. We find that the dominant theoretical uncertainty on MW is currently due to an incomplete treatment of initial-state radiation, while the remaining combined uncertainty of the two NLO calculations translates into {delta}M{sub W}{approx} 5 MeV. The latter error is removed by an explicit computation of the dominant missing terms, which originate from the expansion in v of next-to-next-to-leading order Standard Model diagrams. The effect of resummation of logarithmically-enhanced terms is also investigated, but found to be negligible. (orig.)

  15. DEM GPU studies of industrial scale particle simulations for granular flow civil engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizette, Patrick; Govender, Nicolin; Wilke, Daniel N.; Abriak, Nor-Edine

    2017-06-01

    The use of the Discrete Element Method (DEM) for industrial civil engineering industrial applications is currently limited due to the computational demands when large numbers of particles are considered. The graphics processing unit (GPU) with its highly parallelized hardware architecture shows potential to enable solution of civil engineering problems using discrete granular approaches. We demonstrate in this study the pratical utility of a validated GPU-enabled DEM modeling environment to simulate industrial scale granular problems. As illustration, the flow discharge of storage silos using 8 and 17 million particles is considered. DEM simulations have been performed to investigate the influence of particle size (equivalent size for the 20/40-mesh gravel) and induced shear stress for two hopper shapes. The preliminary results indicate that the shape of the hopper significantly influences the discharge rates for the same material. Specifically, this work shows that GPU-enabled DEM modeling environments can model industrial scale problems on a single portable computer within a day for 30 seconds of process time.

  16. Relativistic local quantum field theory for m=0 particles; Campos cuanticos locales relativos a particulas de masa no nula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales Villasevil, A.

    1965-07-01

    A method is introduced ta deal with relativistic quantum field theory for particles with m=0. Two mappings I and J, giving rise respectively to particle and anti particle states, are defined between a test space and the physical Hilbert space. The intrinsic field operator is then defined as the minimal causal linear combinations of operators belonging to the annihilation-creation algebra associated to the germ and antigerm parts of the element. Local elements are introduced as improper test elements and local field operators are constructed in the same way as the intrinsic ones. Commutation rules are given. (Author) 17 refs.

  17. Theory of optical second-harmonic generation from a sphere of centrosymmetric material: small-particle limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadap, Jerry I.; Shan, Jie; Heinz, Tony F.

    2004-07-01

    The electromagnetic theory of optical second-harmonic generation from small spherical particles comprised of centrosymmetric material is presented. The interfacial region where the inversion symmetry is broken provides a source of the nonlinearity. This response is described by a general surface nonlinear susceptibility tensor for an isotropic interface. In addition, the appropriate weak bulk terms for an isotropic centrosymmetric medium are introduced. The linear optical response of the sphere and the surrounding region is assumed to be isotropic, but otherwise arbitrary. The analysis is carried out to leading order in the ratio of (a/λ), the particle radius to the wavelength of the incident light, and can be considered as the Rayleigh limit for second-harmonic generation from a sphere. Emission from the sphere arises from both induced electric dipole and electric quadrupole moments at the second-harmonic frequency. The former requires a nonlocal excitation mechanism in which the phase variation of the pump beam across the sphere is considered, while the latter is present for a local-excitation mechanism. The locally excited electric dipole term, analogous to the source for linear Rayleigh scattering, is absent for the nonlinear case because of the overall inversion symmetry of the problem. The second-harmonic field is found to scale as (a/λ)3 and to be completely determined by two effective nonlinear susceptibility coefficients formed as a prescribed combination of the surface and bulk nonlinearities. Characteristic angular and polarization selection rules resulting from the mechanism of the radiation process are presented. Various experimental aspects of the problem are examined, including the expected signal strengths and methods of determining the nonlinear susceptibilities. The spectral characteristics associated with the geometry of a small sphere are also discussed, and distinctive localized plasmon resonances are identified.

  18. Time-dependent density-functional-theory investigation of the collisions of protons and α particles with uracil and adenine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Cody; Hartig, Kara; Russakoff, Arthur; Kulpins, Ryan; Varga, Kálmán

    2017-05-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory was employed to study the effects of proton and α -particle radiation on uracil and adenine. This method has the advantage of treating nuclear motion and electronic motion simultaneously, allowing for the study of electronic excitation, charge transfer, ionization, and nuclear motion. Particle energies were surveyed in the range of 15-500 keV for protons and 100-2000 keV for α particles in conjunction with impact points both on and off carbon bonds in order to investigate the electron and nuclear dynamics of irradiated molecules and the form and quantity of transferred energy. The stopping power, energy transferred, and ionization were found, and the relationship between incident particle energy and electron density of the target molecule was characterized for proton and α -particle radiation incident on adenine and uracil.

  19. Ontogenetic scaling of metabolism, growth, and assimilation: testing metabolic scaling theory with Manduca sexta larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Katie E; Kerkhoff, Andrew J; Messerman, Arianne; Itagaki, Haruhiko

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism, growth, and the assimilation of energy and materials are essential processes that are intricately related and depend heavily on animal size. However, models that relate the ontogenetic scaling of energy assimilation and metabolism to growth rely on assumptions that have yet to be rigorously tested. Based on detailed daily measurements of metabolism, growth, and assimilation in tobacco hornworms, Manduca sexta, we provide a first experimental test of the core assumptions of a metabolic scaling model of ontogenetic growth. Metabolic scaling parameters changed over development, in violation of the model assumptions. At the same time, the scaling of growth rate matches that of metabolic rate, with similar scaling exponents both across and within developmental instars. Rates of assimilation were much higher than expected during the first two instars and did not match the patterns of scaling of growth and metabolism, which suggests high costs of biosynthesis early in development. The rapid increase in size and discrete instars observed in larval insect development provide an ideal system for understanding how patterns of growth and metabolism emerge from fundamental cellular processes and the exchange of materials and energy between an organism and its environment.

  20. Basic investigation of particle swarm optimization performance in a reduced scale PWR passive safety system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Joao J. da [Eletronuclear Eletrobras Termonuclear, Gerencia de Analise de Seguranca Nuclear, Rua da Candelaria, 65, 7o andar. Centro, Rio de Janeiro 20091-906 (Brazil); Lapa, Celso Marcelo F., E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Divisao de Reatores/PPGIEN, P.O. Box 68550, Rua Helio de Almeida 75 Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (Brazil); Alvim, Antonio Carlos M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE/Nuclear, P.O. Box 68509, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao s/n, Rio de Janeiro 21945-970 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (Brazil); Lima, Carlos A. Souza [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Divisao de Reatores/PPGIEN, P.O. Box 68550, Rua Helio de Almeida 75 Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Instituto Politecnico, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional, Rua Alberto Rangel, s/n, Vila Nova, Nova Friburgo 28630-050 (Brazil); Pereira, Claudio Marcio do N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Divisao de Reatores/PPGIEN, P.O. Box 68550, Rua Helio de Almeida 75 Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    This work presents a methodology to investigate the viability of using particle swarm optimization technique to obtain the best combination of physical and operational parameters that lead to the best adjusted dimensionless groups, calculated by similarity laws, that are able to simulate the most relevant physical phenomena in single-phase flow under natural circulation and to offer an appropriate alternative reduced scale design for reactor primary loops with this flow characteristics. A PWR reactor core, under natural circulation, based on LOFT test facility, was used as the case study. The particle swarm optimization technique was applied to a problem with these thermo-hydraulics conditions and results demonstrated the viability and adequacy of the method to design similar systems with these characteristics.

  1. 12th DESY Workshop on Elementary Particle Physics: Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    LL2014

    2014-01-01

    The bi-annual international conference “Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory” has been held at Weimar, Germany, from April 27 to May 02, 2014. It has been the 12th conference of this series, started in 1992. The main focus of the conference are precision calculations of multi- loop and multi-leg processes in elementary particle physics for processes at present and future high-energy facilities within and beyond the Standard Model. At present many physics questions studied deal with processes at the LHC and future facilities like the ILC. A growing number of contributions deals with important developments in the field of computational technologies and algorithmic methods, including large-scale computer algebra, efficient methods to compute large numbers of Feynman diagrams, analytic summation and integration methods of various kinds, new related function spaces, precise numerical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. The present conference has been attended by more than 110 participants from all over the ...

  2. Large Scale Structure in Bekenstein’s Theory of Relativistic Modified Newtonian Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Skordis, C; Ferreira, P G; Böhm, C

    2006-01-01

    A relativistic theory of modified gravity has been recently proposed by Bekenstein. The tensor field in Einstein’s theory of gravity is replaced by a scalar, a vector, and a tensor field which interact in such a way to give modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) in the weak-field nonrelativistic limit. We study the evolution of the Universe in such a theory, identifying its key properties and comparing it with the standard cosmology obtained in Einstein gravity. The evolution of the scalar field is akin to that of tracker quintessence fields. We expand the theory to linear order to find the evolution of perturbations on large scales. The impact on galaxy distributions and the cosmic microwave background is calculated in detail. We show that it may be possible to reproduce observations of the cosmic microwave background and galaxy distributions with Bekenstein’s theory of MOND.

  3. Turbulent Concentration of mm-Size Particles in the Protoplanetary Nebula: Scale-Dependent Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Hartlep, T.

    2015-01-01

    The initial accretion of primitive bodies (here, asteroids in particular) from freely-floating nebula particles remains problematic. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" (or even a mm-to-cm-size barrier) in turbulent nebulae, making the preconditions for so-called "streaming instabilities" difficult to achieve even for so-called "lucky" particles. Even if growth by sticking could somehow breach the meter size barrier, turbulent nebulae present further obstacles through the 1-10km size range. On the other hand, nonturbulent nebulae form large asteroids too quickly to explain long spreads in formation times, or the dearth of melted asteroids. Theoretical understanding of nebula turbulence is itself in flux; recent models of MRI (magnetically-driven) turbulence favor low-or- no-turbulence environments, but purely hydrodynamic turbulence is making a comeback, with two recently discovered mechanisms generating robust turbulence which do not rely on magnetic fields at all. An important clue regarding planetesimal formation is an apparent 100km diameter peak in the pre-depletion, pre-erosion mass distribution of asteroids; scenarios leading directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects of this size, which avoid the problematic m-km size range, could be called "leapfrog" scenarios. The leapfrog scenario we have studied in detail involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in turbulence, which can under certain conditions shrink inexorably on 100-1000 orbit timescales and form 10-100km diameter sandpile planetesimals. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles. Thus, while they are arcane, turbulent concentration models acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. The typical sizes of planetesimals and the rate of their formation can be

  4. No-scale D=5 supergravity from Scherk-Schwarz reduction of D=6 theories

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianopoli, Laura; Lledó, M A

    2004-01-01

    We perform a generalized dimensional reduction of six dimensional supergravity theories to five dimensions. We consider the minimal $(2,0)$ and the maximal $(4,4)$ theories. In each case the reduction allows us to obtain gauged supergravities of no-scale type in dimension five with gauge groups that escape previous classifications. In the minimal case, the geometric data of the reduced theory correspond to particular cases of the D=5 real special geometry. In the maximal case we find a four parameter solution which allows partial breaking of supersymmetry.

  5. Large-Scale Linear Optimization through Machine Learning: From Theory to Practical System Design and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0073 Large-scale Linear Optimization through Machine Learning: From Theory to Practical System Design and Implementation...2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Large-scale Linear Optimization through Machine Learning: From Theory to Practical System Design and Implementation 5a...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4058 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6.  AUTHOR(S) Jinwoo Shin 5d.  PROJECT NUMBER 5e.  TASK NUMBER

  6. Watching More Closely: Shot Scale Affects Film Viewers’ Theory of Mind Tendency But Not Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Rooney

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research debates the effects of exposure to narrative fiction on recognition of mental states in others and self, referred to as Theory of Mind. The current study explores the mechanisms by which such effects could occur in fictional film. Using manipulated film scenes, we conducted a between subject experiment (N = 136 exploring how film shot-scale affects viewers’ Theory of Mind. Specifically, in our methods we distinguish between the trait Theory of Mind abilities (ToM ability, and the state-like tendency to recognize mental states in others and self (ToM tendency. Results showed that close-up shots (compared to long shots of a character was associated with higher levels of Theory of Mind tendency, when the facial expression was sad but not when it was neutral. And this effect did not transfer to other characters in the film. There was also no observable effect of character depiction on viewers’ general Theory of Mind ability. Together the findings suggest that formal and content features of shot scale can elicit Theory of Mind responses by directing attention toward character mental states rather than improving viewers’ general Theory of Mind ability.

  7. Watching More Closely: Shot Scale Affects Film Viewers’ Theory of Mind Tendency But Not Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Brendan; Bálint, Katalin E.

    2018-01-01

    Recent research debates the effects of exposure to narrative fiction on recognition of mental states in others and self, referred to as Theory of Mind. The current study explores the mechanisms by which such effects could occur in fictional film. Using manipulated film scenes, we conducted a between subject experiment (N = 136) exploring how film shot-scale affects viewers’ Theory of Mind. Specifically, in our methods we distinguish between the trait Theory of Mind abilities (ToM ability), and the state-like tendency to recognize mental states in others and self (ToM tendency). Results showed that close-up shots (compared to long shots) of a character was associated with higher levels of Theory of Mind tendency, when the facial expression was sad but not when it was neutral. And this effect did not transfer to other characters in the film. There was also no observable effect of character depiction on viewers’ general Theory of Mind ability. Together the findings suggest that formal and content features of shot scale can elicit Theory of Mind responses by directing attention toward character mental states rather than improving viewers’ general Theory of Mind ability. PMID:29387032

  8. Watching More Closely: Shot Scale Affects Film Viewers' Theory of Mind Tendency But Not Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Brendan; Bálint, Katalin E

    2017-01-01

    Recent research debates the effects of exposure to narrative fiction on recognition of mental states in others and self, referred to as Theory of Mind. The current study explores the mechanisms by which such effects could occur in fictional film. Using manipulated film scenes, we conducted a between subject experiment (N = 136) exploring how film shot-scale affects viewers' Theory of Mind. Specifically, in our methods we distinguish between the trait Theory of Mind abilities (ToM ability), and the state-like tendency to recognize mental states in others and self (ToM tendency). Results showed that close-up shots (compared to long shots) of a character was associated with higher levels of Theory of Mind tendency, when the facial expression was sad but not when it was neutral. And this effect did not transfer to other characters in the film. There was also no observable effect of character depiction on viewers' general Theory of Mind ability. Together the findings suggest that formal and content features of shot scale can elicit Theory of Mind responses by directing attention toward character mental states rather than improving viewers' general Theory of Mind ability.

  9. Quantum Phase Transitions and New Scales in QCD-Like Theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unsal, Mithat

    2008-07-03

    It is commonly believed that in confining vector-like gauge theories the center and chiral symmetry realizations are parametrically entangled, and if phase transitions occur, they must take place around the strong scale {Lambda}{sup -1} of the gauge theory. We demonstrate that (non-thermal) vector-like theories formulated on R{sup 3} x S{sup 1} where S{sup 1} is a spatial circle exhibit new dynamical scales and new phenomena. There are chiral phase transitions taking place at {Lambda}{sup -1}/N{sub c} in the absence of any change in center symmetry. {Lambda}{sup -1}/N{sub c}, invisible in (planar) perturbation theory, is also the scale where abelian versus non-abelian confinement regimes meet. Large N{sub c} volume independence (a working Eguchi-Kawai reduction) provides new insights and independently confirms the existence of these scales. We show that certain phases and scales are outside the reach of holographic (supergravity) modeling of QCD.

  10. Implementation Strategies for Large-Scale Transport Simulations Using Time Domain Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Mancillas, J.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Time domain particle tracking is an emerging alternative to the conventional random walk particle tracking algorithm. With time domain particle tracking, particles are moved from node to node on one-dimensional pathways defined by streamlines of the groundwater flow field or by discrete subsurface features. The time to complete each deterministic segment is sampled from residence time distributions that include the effects of advection, longitudinal dispersion, a variety of kinetically controlled retention (sorption) processes, linear transformation, and temporal changes in groundwater velocities and sorption parameters. The simulation results in a set of arrival times at a monitoring location that can be post-processed with a kernel method to construct mass discharge (breakthrough) versus time. Implementation strategies differ for discrete flow (fractured media) systems and continuous porous media systems. The implementation strategy also depends on the scale at which hydraulic property heterogeneity is represented in the supporting flow model. For flow models that explicitly represent discrete features (e.g., discrete fracture networks), the sampling of residence times along segments is conceptually straightforward. For continuous porous media, such sampling needs to be related to the Lagrangian velocity field. Analytical or semi-analytical methods may be used to approximate the Lagrangian segment velocity distributions in aquifers with low-to-moderate variability, thereby capturing transport effects of subgrid velocity variability. If variability in hydraulic properties is large, however, Lagrangian velocity distributions are difficult to characterize and numerical simulations are required; in particular, numerical simulations are likely to be required for estimating the velocity integral scale as a basis for advective segment distributions. Aquifers with evolving heterogeneity scales present additional challenges. Large-scale simulations of radionuclide

  11. Gravity from Poincare Gauge Theory of the Fundamental Particles. II : Equations of Motion for Test Bodies and Various Limits

    OpenAIRE

    Kenji, HAYASHI; Takeshi, SHIRAFUJI; Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo; Physics Department, Saitama University

    1980-01-01

    We study the equations of motion for test bodies and various limits in Poincare gauge theory with linear and quadratic Lagrangians. The classical equations of motion are derived both for spin-1/2 particles and for macroscopic test bodies. It is also shown that various limits can be taken, including General Relativity and New General Relativity.

  12. ETHOS—an effective theory of structure formation: From dark particle physics to the matter distribution of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Sigurdson, Kris; Zavala, Jesús; Bringmann, Torsten; Vogelsberger, Mark; Pfrommer, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    We formulate an effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS) that enables cosmological structure formation to be computed in almost any microphysical model of dark matter physics. This framework maps the detailed microphysical theories of particle dark matter interactions into the physical effective parameters that shape the linear matter power spectrum and the self-interaction transfer cross section of nonrelativistic dark matter. These are the input to structure formation simulations, which follow the evolution of the cosmological and galactic dark matter distributions. Models with similar effective parameters in ETHOS but with different dark particle physics would nevertheless result in similar dark matter distributions. We present a general method to map an ultraviolet complete or effective field theory of low-energy dark matter physics into parameters that affect the linear matter power spectrum and carry out this mapping for several representative particle models. We further propose a simple but useful choice for characterizing the dark matter self-interaction transfer cross section that parametrizes self-scattering in structure formation simulations. Taken together, these effective parameters in ETHOS allow the classification of dark matter theories according to their structure formation properties rather than their intrinsic particle properties, paving the way for future simulations to span the space of viable dark matter physics relevant for structure formation.

  13. Nonlocal strain gradient theory calibration using molecular dynamics simulation based on small scale vibration of nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehralian, Fahimeh [Mechanical Engineering Department, Shahrekord University, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tadi Beni, Yaghoub, E-mail: tadi@eng.sku.ac.ir [Faculty of Engineering, Shahrekord University, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi Zeverdejani, Mehran [Mechanical Engineering Department, Shahrekord University, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-01

    Featured by two small length scale parameters, nonlocal strain gradient theory is utilized to investigate the free vibration of nanotubes. A new size-dependent shell model formulation is developed by using the first order shear deformation theory. The governing equations and boundary conditions are obtained using Hamilton's principle and solved for simply supported boundary condition. As main purpose of this study, since the values of two small length scale parameters are still unknown, they are calibrated by the means of molecular dynamics simulations (MDs). Then, the influences of different parameters such as nonlocal parameter, scale factor, length and thickness on vibration characteristics of nanotubes are studied. It is also shown that increase in thickness and decrease in length parameters intensify the effect of nonlocal parameter and scale factor.

  14. Nonlocal strain gradient theory calibration using molecular dynamics simulation based on small scale vibration of nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehralian, Fahimeh; Tadi Beni, Yaghoub; Karimi Zeverdejani, Mehran

    2017-06-01

    Featured by two small length scale parameters, nonlocal strain gradient theory is utilized to investigate the free vibration of nanotubes. A new size-dependent shell model formulation is developed by using the first order shear deformation theory. The governing equations and boundary conditions are obtained using Hamilton's principle and solved for simply supported boundary condition. As main purpose of this study, since the values of two small length scale parameters are still unknown, they are calibrated by the means of molecular dynamics simulations (MDs). Then, the influences of different parameters such as nonlocal parameter, scale factor, length and thickness on vibration characteristics of nanotubes are studied. It is also shown that increase in thickness and decrease in length parameters intensify the effect of nonlocal parameter and scale factor.

  15. Drag force, diffusion coefficient, and electric mobility of small particles. I. Theory applicable to the free-molecule regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Wang, Hai

    2003-12-01

    The transport of small particles in the free-molecule regime is investigated on the basis of gas kinetic theory. Drag force formulations were derived in two limiting collision models-namely, specular and diffuse scattering-by considering the potential force of interactions between the particle and fluid molecules. A parametrized drag coefficient equation is proposed and accounts for the transition from specular to diffuse scattering as particle size exceeds a critical value. The resulting formulations are shown to be consistent with the Chapman-Enskog theory of molecular diffusion. In the limit of rigid-body interactions, these formulations can be simplified also to Epstein's solutions [P. S. Epstein, Phys. Rev. 23, 710 (1924)].

  16. Implications of a class of grand unified theories for large scale structure in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Q.; Stecker, F. W.

    1983-01-01

    A class of grand unified theories in which cosmologicaly significant axion and neutrino energy densities arise naturally is discussed. To obtain large scale structure three scenarios are considered: (1) an inflationary scenario; (2) inflation followed by string production; and (3) a non-inflationary scenario with density fluctuations caused solely by strings. Inflation may be compatible with the recent observational indications that mega 1 on the scale of superclusters, particularly if strings are present.

  17. Stream discharge using mobile large-scale particle image velocimetry: A proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Muste, M.; Hauet, A.; Krajewski, W. F.; Kruger, A.; Bradley, A.

    2008-09-01

    The authors describe a mobile large-scale particle image velocimetry-based system (MLSPIV) that allows real-time visualization and quantitative estimation of instantaneous and averaged flow characteristics at the river free surface with minimum preparation from the banks of the river. High spatial resolution and the remote, real-time, and fully digital nature of MLSPIV make it well suited to work as either a stand-alone instrument, as presented in the paper, or an integrated system in large-scale networks for monitoring ungauged river basins. Preliminary tests with the mobile LSPIV configuration demonstrate that the technique has the potential to efficiently support research and monitoring of riverine systems. Discharge measurements obtained with MLSPIV show good agreement with discharge measured by the U.S. Geological Survey stream gauging station and other measurement methods.

  18. Particle physics on ice: constraints on neutrino interactions far above the weak scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Feng, Jonathan L; Goldberg, Haim

    2006-01-20

    Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and neutrinos probe energies far above the weak scale. Their usefulness might appear to be limited by astrophysical uncertainties; however, by simultaneously considering up- and down-going events, one may disentangle particle physics from astrophysics. We show that present data from the AMANDA experiment in the South Pole ice already imply an upper bound on neutrino cross sections at energy scales that will likely never be probed at man-made accelerators. The existing data also place an upper limit on the neutrino flux valid for any neutrino cross section. In the future, similar analyses of IceCube data will constrain neutrino properties and fluxes at the theta(10%) level.

  19. Stereo particle image velocimetry set up for measurements in the wake of scaled wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanardi, Gabriele; Grassi, Donato; Zanotti, Alex; Nanos, Emmanouil M.; Campagnolo, Filippo; Croce, Alessandro; Bottasso, Carlo L.

    2017-08-01

    Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements were carried out in the boundary layer test section of Politecnico di Milano large wind tunnel to survey the wake of a scaled wind turbine model designed and developed by Technische Universität München. The stereo PIV instrumentation was set up to survey the three velocity components on cross-flow planes at different longitudinal locations. The area of investigation covered the entire extent of the wind turbines wake that was scanned by the use of two separate traversing systems for both the laser and the cameras. Such instrumentation set up enabled to gain rapidly high quality results suitable to characterise the behaviour of the flow field in the wake of the scaled wind turbine. This would be very useful for the evaluation of the performance of wind farm control methodologies based on wake redirection and for the validation of CFD tools.

  20. Particle formation and plasma radiative losses during laser ablation suitability of the Sedov-Taylor scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanco, Santiago; Marino, Salvatore; Gabás, Mercedes; Bijani, Shanti; Ayala, Luis; Ramos-Barrado, José R

    2014-06-30

    Deviations of the Sedov-Taylor scaling at three different laser ablation regimes (500 mJ in a 0.8 mm spot, 50 mJ in a 0.8 mm spot and 500 mJ in a 2.5 mm spot) were investigated using Schlieren photography in combination with optical scattering and optical emission spectrometry, among others. For each case, the time evolution of the shock front was related to the formation, expansion and properties of the plasma. Both, the time scale of the different radiative processes and that observed for vapor condensation into nanoparticles and sub-micron particles are compatible with the divergences found between the model and experimental data.

  1. Theory to predict particle migration and margination in the pressure-driven channel flow of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qin M.; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2017-09-01

    The inhomogeneous concentration distribution of erythrocytes and platelets in microchannel flows particularly in directions normal to the mean flow plays a significant role in hemostasis, drug delivery, and microfluidic applications. In this paper, we develop a coarse-grained theory to predict these distributions in pressure-driven channel flow at zero Reynolds number and compare them to experiments and simulations. We demonstrate that the balance between the deformability-induced lift force and the shear-induced diffusion created by hydrodynamic interactions in the suspension results in both a peak concentration of red blood cells at the channel center and a cell-free or Fahraeus-Lindqvist layer near the walls. On the other hand, the absence of a lift force and the strong red blood cell-platelet interactions result in an excess concentration of platelets in the cell-free layer. We demonstrate a strong role of hematocrit (i.e., erythrocyte volume fraction) in determining the cell-free layer thickness and the degree of platelet margination. We also demonstrate that the capillary number of the erythrocytes, based on the membrane shear modulus, plays a relatively insignificant role in the regimes that we have studied. Our theory serves as a good and simple alternative to large-scale computer simulations of the cross-stream transport processes in these mixtures.

  2. Measurement and capture of fine and ultrafine particles from a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor with an electrostatic precipitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying Li; Achariya Suriyawong; Michael Daukoru; Ye Zhuang; Pratim Biswas [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States). Aerosol and Air Quality Research Laboratory

    2009-05-15

    Experiments were carried out in a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) were used to measure the particle size distributions (PSDs) in the range of 17 nm to 10 m at the inlet and outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). At the ESP inlet, a high number concentration of ultrafine particles was found, with the peak at approximately 75 nm. A trimodal PSD for mass concentration was observed with the modes at approximately 80-100 nm, 1-2 {mu}m, and 10 {mu}m. The penetration of ultrafine particles through the ESP increased dramatically as particle size decreased below 70 nm, attributable to insufficient or partial charging of the ultrafine particles. Injection of nanostructured fine-particle sorbents for capture of toxic metals in the flue gas caused high penetration of the ultrafine particles through the ESP. The conventional ESP was modified to enhance charging using soft X-ray irradiation. A slipstream of flue gas was introduced from the pilot-scale facility and passed through this modified ESP. Enhancement of particle capture was observed with the soft X-ray irradiation when moderate voltages were used in the ESP, indicating more efficient charging of fine particles. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Is gravity less fundamental than elementary particles theory? Critical remarks on holography and E-infinity theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naschie, Mohamed Saladin [Department of Physics, University of Alexandria (Egypt); Department of Astrophysics, Cairo University (Egypt); Department of Physics, Mansura University (Egypt)

    2006-08-15

    This work is concerned with showing, using various arguments, the possibility of giving an interpretation of the fundamental interactions conveying a mental picture in which gravity and general relativity would appear to be less fundamental than high energy particle physics.

  4. In-situ sampling of a large-scale particle simulation for interactive visualization and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodring, Jonathan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heitmann, Katrin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-09

    We propose storing a random sampling of data from large scale particle simulations, such as the Roadrunner Universe MC{sup 3} cosmological simulation, to be used for interactive post-analysis and visualization. Simulation data generation rates will continue to be far greater than storage bandwidth rates and other limiting technologies by many orders of magnitude. This implies that only a very small fraction of data generated by the simulation can ever be stored and subsequently post-analyzed. The limiting technology in this situation is analogous to the problem in many population surveys: there aren't enough human resources to query a large population. To cope with the lack of resources, statistical sampling techniques are used to create a representative data set of a large population. Mirroring that situation, we propose to store a simulation-time random sampling of the particle data to cope with the bOlllenecks and support interactive, exploratory post-analysis. The particle samples are immediately stored in a level-ol-detail format for post-visualization and analysis, which amortizes the cost of post-processing for interactive visualization. Additionally, we incorporate a system for recording and visualizing sample approximation error information for confidence and importance highlighting.

  5. Turbulent Concentration of MM-Size Particles in the Protoplanetary Nebula: Scaled-Dependent Multiplier Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hartlep, Thomas; Weston, B.; Estremera, Shariff Kareem

    2014-01-01

    The initial accretion of primitive bodies (asteroids and TNOs) from freely-floating nebula particles remains problematic. Here we focus on the asteroids where constituent particle (read "chondrule") sizes are observationally known; similar arguments will hold for TNOs, but the constituent particles in those regions will be smaller, or will be fluffy aggregates, and are unobserved. Traditional growth-bysticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] (or even a mm-cm-size barrier [2]) in turbulent nebulae, while nonturbulent nebulae form large asteroids too quickly to explain long spreads in formation times, or the dearth of melted asteroids [3]. Even if growth by sticking could somehow breach the meter size barrier, other obstacles are encountered through the 1-10km size range [4]. Another clue regarding planetesimal formation is an apparent 100km diameter peak in the pre-depletion, pre-erosion mass distribution of asteroids [5]; scenarios leading directly from independent nebula particulates to this size, which avoid the problematic m-km size range, could be called "leapfrog" scenarios [6-8]. The leapfrog scenario we have studied in detail involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in turbulence, which can under certain conditions shrink inexorably on 100-1000 orbit timescales and form 10-100km diameter sandpile planetesimals. The typical sizes of planetesimals and the rate of their formation [7,8] are determined by a statistical model with properties inferred from large numerical simulations of turbulence [9]. Nebula turbulence can be described by its Reynolds number Re = L/eta sup(4/3), where L = ETA alpha sup (1/2) the largest eddy scale, H is the nebula gas vertical scale height, and a the nebula turbulent viscosity parameter, and ? is the Kolmogorov or smallest scale in turbulence (typically about 1km), with eddy turnover time t?. In the nebula, Re is far larger than any numerical simulation can

  6. Large scale water entry simulation with smoothed particle hydrodynamics on single- and multi-GPU systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhe; Xu, Fei; Takahashi, Akiyuki; Sun, Yu

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a Weakly Compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (WCSPH) framework is presented utilizing the parallel architecture of single- and multi-GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) platforms. The program is developed for water entry simulations where an efficient potential based contact force is introduced to tackle the interaction between fluid and solid particles. The single-GPU SPH scheme is implemented with a series of optimization to achieve high performance. To go beyond the memory limitation of single GPU, the scheme is further extended to multi-GPU platform basing on an improved 3D domain decomposition and inter-node data communication strategy. A typical benchmark test of wedge entry is investigated in varied dimensions and scales to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the program. The results of 2D and 3D benchmark tests manifest great consistency with the experiment and better accuracy than other numerical models. The performance of the single-GPU code is assessed by comparing with serial and parallel CPU codes. The improvement of the domain decomposition strategy is verified, and a study on the scalability and efficiency of the multi-GPU code is carried out as well by simulating tests with varied scales in different amount of GPUs. Lastly, the single- and multi-GPU codes are further compared with existing state-of-the-art SPH parallel frameworks for a comprehensive assessment.

  7. Anomalous particle pinch and scaling of vin/D based on transport analysis and multiple regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G.; Kardaun, O.

    2007-01-01

    Predictions of density profiles in current tokamaks and ITER require a validated scaling relation for vin/D where vin is the anomalous inward drift velocity and D is the anomalous diffusion coefficient. Transport analysis is necessary for determining the anomalous particle pinch from measured density profiles and for separating the impact of particle sources. A set of discharges in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET and ASDEX is analysed using a special version of the 1.5-D BALDUR transport code. Profiles of ρsvin/D with ρs the effective separatrix radius, five other dimensionless parameters and many further quantities in the confinement zone are compiled, resulting in the dataset VIND1.dat, which covers a wide parameter range. Weighted multiple regression is applied to the ASDEX Upgrade subset which leads to a two-term scaling \\rho _sv_in ({x'}) /D ({x'}) =0.0432 [ { ({L_{T_{\\rme}} ({ \\bar {x}'}) / \\rho _s}) ^{-2.58}+7.13 \\, U_L^{1.55} \

  8. Revision of the ICIDH Severity of Disabilities Scale by data linking and item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buuren, S. van; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Severity of Disabilities Scale (SDS) of the ICIDH reflects the degree to which an individual's ability to perform a certain activity is restricted. This paper describes the application of two models from item response theory (IRT), the graded response model and the partial credit model, in order

  9. A Polytomous Item Response Theory Analysis of Social Physique Anxiety Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Richard B.; Crocker, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the social physique anxiety scale's factor structure and item properties using confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory. An additional aim was to identify differences in response patterns between groups (gender). A large sample of high school students aged 11-15 years (N = 1,529) consisting of n =…

  10. A computational comparison of theory and practice of scale intonation in Byzantine chant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panteli, Maria; Purwins, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Byzantine Chant performance practice is quantitatively compared to the Chrysanthine theory. The intonation of scale degrees is quantified, based on pitch class profiles. An analysis procedure is introduced that consists of the following steps: 1) Pitch class histograms are calculated via non...

  11. Optimization of nano-scale nickel/iron particles for the reduction of high concentration chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Robert J; Riba, Olga; Gardner, Murray N; Scott, Thomas B; Jackman, Simon A; Thompson, Ian P

    2010-04-01

    The use of nano-scale particles as a means of environmental remediation still provides a comparatively novel approach for the treatment of contaminated waters. The current study compares the reactivity of micro-scale Fe, nano-scale Fe and nano-scale Ni/Fe (nickel/iron) particles specifically for dechlorination of solutions containing 350 mg L(-1) of TCE (concentration measured at a contaminated site in Derbyshire, UK). The results indicated that employing 1 g L(-1) of reactive material for dechlorination in the monometallic form (both micro- and nano-scale) exhibited very little reduction capability compared with the bimetallic Ni/Fe nano-scale particles, containing 28.9% Ni (in molar), which achieved complete dechlorination of the TCE in solution within 576 h. Experiments were also performed to determine the optimum bimetallic composition of the Ni/Fe particles for TCE reduction. This revealed that 3.2% Ni was the optimum Ni/Fe molar ratio for both maximum dehalogenation performance and minimum release of Ni into solution. Using particles of the most effective bimetallic composition, experiments were carried out to determine the concentration required for optimal TCE reduction. Over the range of nano-scale particle concentrations tested (0.1-9 g L(-1)), reduction rates of TCE increased with greater TCE:nano-scale particle ratios. However, a concentration range of 1-3 g L(-1) was selected as the most appropriate for site remediation, since more concentrated solutions demonstrated only small increases in rates of reaction. Finally, in order to test the long term performance and reactivity of the 3.2% Ni/Fe bimetallic nano-scale particles, weekly spikes of 350 mg L(-1) TCE were injected into a 3 g L(-1) nano-scale particle batch reactor. Results showed that the bimetallic nano-scale particles had the ability to reduce 1750 mg L(-1) TCE and remained active for at least 13 weeks. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The maximum sizes of large scale structures in alternative theories of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Dialektopoulos, Konstantinos F.; Enea Romano, Antonio; Skordis, Constantinos; Tomaras, Theodore N.

    2017-07-01

    The maximum size of a cosmic structure is given by the maximum turnaround radius—the scale where the attraction due to its mass is balanced by the repulsion due to dark energy. We derive generic formulae for the estimation of the maximum turnaround radius in any theory of gravity obeying the Einstein equivalence principle, in two situations: on a spherically symmetric spacetime and on a perturbed Friedman-Robertson-Walker spacetime. We show that the two formulae agree. As an application of our formula, we calculate the maximum turnaround radius in the case of the Brans-Dicke theory of gravity. We find that for this theory, such maximum sizes always lie above the ΛCDM value, by a factor 1 + 1/3ω, where ωgg 1 is the Brans-Dicke parameter, implying consistency of the theory with current data.

  13. Multi-scale connectivity and graph theory highlight critical areas for conservation under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilts, Thomas E.; Weisberg, Peter J.; Leitner, Phillip; Matocq, Marjorie D.; Inman, Richard D.; Nussear, Ken E.; Esque, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation planning and biodiversity management require information on landscape connectivity across a range of spatial scales from individual home ranges to large regions. Reduction in landscape connectivity due changes in land-use or development is expected to act synergistically with alterations to habitat mosaic configuration arising from climate change. We illustrate a multi-scale connectivity framework to aid habitat conservation prioritization in the context of changing land use and climate. Our approach, which builds upon the strengths of multiple landscape connectivity methods including graph theory, circuit theory and least-cost path analysis, is here applied to the conservation planning requirements of the Mohave ground squirrel. The distribution of this California threatened species, as for numerous other desert species, overlaps with the proposed placement of several utility-scale renewable energy developments in the American Southwest. Our approach uses information derived at three spatial scales to forecast potential changes in habitat connectivity under various scenarios of energy development and climate change. By disentangling the potential effects of habitat loss and fragmentation across multiple scales, we identify priority conservation areas for both core habitat and critical corridor or stepping stone habitats. This approach is a first step toward applying graph theory to analyze habitat connectivity for species with continuously-distributed habitat, and should be applicable across a broad range of taxa.

  14. Body shape shifting during growth permits tests that distinguish between competing geometric theories of metabolic scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirst, Andrew G.; Glazier, Douglas S.; Atkinson, David

    2014-01-01

    the size dependence of metabolism is derived from material transport across external surfaces, or through internal resource-transport networks. We show that when body shape changes during growth, these models make opposing predictions. These models are tested using pelagic invertebrates, because...... these animals exhibit highly variable intraspecific scaling relationships for metabolic rate and body shape. Metabolic scaling slopes of diverse integument-breathing species were significantly positively correlated with degree of body flattening or elongation during ontogeny, as expected from surface area...... theory, but contradicting the negative correlations predicted by resource-transport network models. This finding explains strong deviations from predictions of widely adopted theory, and underpins a new explanation for mass-invariant metabolic scaling during ontogeny in animals and plants...

  15. Computer Simulations of Nano-Scale Phenomena Based on the Dynamic Density Functional Theories: Applications of SUSHI in the OCTA System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Takashi; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro

    Multicomponent polymeric materials such as polymer blends, polymer melts, block copolymers, and polymer solutions, often show macro and micro phase separations that generate domains of the length scales of 1-100 nm. These polymeric materials with phase-separated domains are promising candidates for functional materials in nano-technologies [1-3]. The characteristic length scales of these domain structures are much larger than atomic length scales but are still smaller than hydrodynamic length scales. For phenomena on the micro and macroscopic length scales, there are well-established simulation techniques. For example, microscopic phenomena on atomic length scales can be dealt with using particle simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. On the other hand, macroscopic hydrodynamic phenomena are simulated with the finite element method (FEM). Compared to these extreme length scales, there have been very few simulation techniques for the intermediate length scales (the so-called mesoscopic scales) where the phaseseparated domains locate. To study the phase separated domains on mesoscopic scales, very useful tools are the density functional theories (DFTs) [4-7], where the phaseseparated domains are described in terms of the density distributions of monomers and solvents. One of the important features of DFT is that it can take into account the conformational entropy of polymer chains with any molecular architectures, i.e. the monomer sequence and the branching structures. Using this DFT, one can predict the equilibrium state of polymeric systems with mesoscopic structures, which is not easily accessible by the particle simulations or the fluid dynamics simulations. Therefore the DFT plays an important role in bridging between microscopic particle simulations and macroscopic fluid dynamics simulations.

  16. Facile synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical performance of multi-scale AgVO{sub 3} particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hangkong [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Li, Hailong [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); School of Energy Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Wu, Shaokang [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Liao, Changzhong; Zhou, Zhengyuan [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Liu, Xiang; Djurišić, Aleksandra B.; Xie, Maohai [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Tang, Chuyang [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Shih, Kaimin, E-mail: kshih@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2016-07-25

    Multi-scale AgVO{sub 3} particles were successfully synthesized from different organic acids using a facile sol–gel method; a series of techniques were then used to characterize the particles. The X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that a main characteristic peak of element Ag is at around 38°. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra demonstrated the binding energies of Ag{sup 0} 3d (5/2) and Ag{sup 0} 3d (3/2), which further confirmed the existence of element Ag. In addition, the composition of the samples, including the amorphous phase, was determined with a quantitative X-ray diffraction (QXRD) analysis. With a heating rate of 10 °C/min, the products synthesized with citric acid at 450 °C had a larger amorphous phase (26.4% in wt.%) than the samples synthesized with citric acid at 500 °C. To obtain lesser amorphous phase, the precursors were treated at 500 °C with a slower heating rate of 5 °C/min. The electrochemical performance of these three samples, particularly their suitability as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, were investigated. The products with minimum amorphous phase (9.4%) showed higher specific discharge capacity than other two samples at the first 40 cycles. However, with the increasing fading rate, only 27% of the initial capacity was retained after 100 cycles. Amorphous phase can stabilize the material and avoid the structural collapse during the cycles. Therefore, under the synergistic effect of amorphous content and particle size, the products obtained at 500 °C with quicker heating rate exhibited the optimal capacity and cycling stability. This electrode showed a high initial capacity of 243 mA h/g and retained 41% of the initial capacity after 100 cycles. - Highlights: • Multi-scale AgVO{sub 3} particles were synthesized successfully via a sol–gel method. • With a series of characterization techniques, the existence of Ag was confirmed. • The effects of amorphous phase on the electrochemical

  17. Pilot‐scale investigation and CFD modeling of particle deposition in low‐dust monolithic SCR DeNOx catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiredal, Michael Lykke; Jensen, Anker Degn; Thøgersen, Joakim Reimer

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of particles in selective catalytic reduction DeNOx monolithic catalysts was studied by low‐dust pilot‐scale experiments. The experiments showed a total deposition efficiency of about 30%, and the deposition pattern was similar to that observed in full‐scale low‐dust applications. On e...

  18. Small scale density variations of electrons and charged particles in the vicinity of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present small scale variations of electron number densities and particle charge number densities measured in situ in the presence of polar mesosphere summer echoes. It turns out that the small scale fluctuations of electrons and negatively charged particles show a strong anticorrelation down to the smallest scales observed. Comparing these small scale structures with the simultaneously measured radar signal to noise profile, we find that the radar profile is well described by the power spectral density of both electrons and charged particles at the radar half wavelength (=the Bragg scale. Finally, we consider the shape of the power spectra of the observed plasma fluctuations and find that both charged particles and electrons show spectra that can be explained in terms of either neutral air turbulence acting on the distribution of a low diffusivity tracer or the fossil remnants of a formerly active turbulent region. All these results are consistent with the theoretical ideas by Rapp and Lübken (2003 suggesting that PMSE can be explained by a combination of active and fossil neutral air turbulence acting on the large and heavy charged aerosol particles which are subsequently mirrored in the electron number density distribution that becomes visible to a VHF radar when small scale fluctuations are present.

  19. SU(2 Yang–Mills Theory: Waves, Particles, and Quantum Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Hofmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We elucidate how Quantum Thermodynamics at temperature T emerges from pure and classical S U ( 2 Yang–Mills theory on a four-dimensional Euclidean spacetime slice S 1 × R 3 . The concept of a (deconfining thermal ground state, composed of certain solutions to the fundamental, classical Yang–Mills equation, allows for a unified addressation of both (classical wave- and (quantum particle-like excitations thereof. More definitely, the thermal ground state represents the interplay between nonpropagating, periodic configurations which are electric-magnetically (antiselfdual in a non-trivial way and possess topological charge modulus unity. Their trivial-holonomy versions—Harrington–Shepard (HS (anticalorons—yield an accurate a priori estimate of the thermal ground state in terms of spatially coarse-grained centers, each containing one quantum of action ℏ localized at its inmost spacetime point, which induce an inert adjoint scalar field ϕ ( | ϕ | spatio-temporally constant. The field ϕ , in turn, implies an effective pure-gauge configuration, a μ gs , accurately describing HS (anticaloron overlap. Spatial homogeneity of the thermal ground-state estimate ϕ , a μ gs demands that (anticaloron centers are densely packed, thus representing a collective departure from (antiselfduality. Effectively, such a “nervous” microscopic situation gives rise to two static phenomena: finite ground-state energy density ρ gs and pressure P gs with ρ gs = − P gs as well as the (adjoint Higgs mechanism. The peripheries of HS (anticalorons are static and resemble (antiselfdual dipole fields whose apparent dipole moments are determined by | ϕ | and T, protecting them against deformation potentially caused by overlap. Such a protection extends to the spatial density of HS (anticaloron centers. Thus the vacuum electric permittivity ϵ 0 and magnetic permeability μ 0 , supporting the propagation of wave-like disturbances in the U ( 1 Cartan

  20. Optimal knockout strategies in genome-scale metabolic networks using particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Govind; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Zanghellini, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Knockout strategies, particularly the concept of constrained minimal cut sets (cMCSs), are an important part of the arsenal of tools used in manipulating metabolic networks. Given a specific design, cMCSs can be calculated even in genome-scale networks. We would however like to find not only the optimal intervention strategy for a given design but the best possible design too. Our solution (PSOMCS) is to use particle swarm optimization (PSO) along with the direct calculation of cMCSs from the stoichiometric matrix to obtain optimal designs satisfying multiple objectives. To illustrate the working of PSOMCS, we apply it to a toy network. Next we show its superiority by comparing its performance against other comparable methods on a medium sized E. coli core metabolic network. PSOMCS not only finds solutions comparable to previously published results but also it is orders of magnitude faster. Finally, we use PSOMCS to predict knockouts satisfying multiple objectives in a genome-scale metabolic model of E. coli and compare it with OptKnock and RobustKnock. PSOMCS finds competitive knockout strategies and designs compared to other current methods and is in some cases significantly faster. It can be used in identifying knockouts which will force optimal desired behaviors in large and genome scale metabolic networks. It will be even more useful as larger metabolic models of industrially relevant organisms become available.

  1. Quasi-potential and Two-Scale Large Deviation Theory for Gillespie Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Tiejun

    2016-01-07

    The construction of energy landscape for bio-dynamics is attracting more and more attention recent years. In this talk, I will introduce the strategy to construct the landscape from the connection to rare events, which relies on the large deviation theory for Gillespie-type jump dynamics. In the application to a typical genetic switching model, the two-scale large deviation theory is developed to take into account the fast switching of DNA states. The comparison with other proposals are also discussed. We demonstrate different diffusive limits arise when considering different regimes for genetic translation and switching processes.

  2. Scaling regimes of 2d turbulence with power-law stirring: theories versus numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzino, A.; Muratore-Ginanneschi, P.; Musacchio, S.

    2009-10-01

    We inquire about the statistical properties of the pair formed by the Navier-Stokes equation for an incompressible velocity field and the advection-diffusion equation for a scalar field transported in the same flow in two dimensions (2d). The system is in a regime of fully developed turbulence stirred by forcing fields with Gaussian statistics, white noise in time and self-similar in space. In this setting and if the stirring is concentrated at small spatial scales, as if due to thermal fluctuations, it is possible to carry out a first-principles ultraviolet renormalization group analysis of the scaling behavior of the model. Kraichnan's phenomenological theory of two-dimensional turbulence upholds the existence of an inertial range characterized by inverse energy transfer at scales larger than the stirring one. For our model Kraichnan's theory, however, implies scaling predictions radically discordant from the renormalization group results. We perform accurate numerical experiments to assess the actual statistical properties of 2d turbulence with power-law stirring. Our results clearly indicate that an adapted version of Kraichnan's theory is consistent with the observed phenomenology. We also provide some theoretical scenarios to account for the discrepancy between renormalization group analysis and the observed phenomenology.

  3. Scalability, Scintillation Readout and Charge Drift in a Kilogram Scale Solid Xenon Particle Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Cease, H. [Fermilab; Jaskierny, W. F. [Fermilab; Markley, D. [Fermilab; Pahlka, R. B. [Fermilab; Balakishiyeva, D. [Florida U.; Saab, T. [Florida U.; Filipenko, M. [Erlangen - Nuremberg U., ECAP

    2014-10-23

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  4. Identification of tissular origin of particles based on autofluorescence multispectral image analysis at the macroscopic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcel, Mathias; Devaux, Marie-Françoise; Guillon, Fabienne; Barron, Cécile

    2017-06-01

    Powders produced from plant materials are heterogeneous in relation to native plant heterogeneity, and during grinding, dissociation often occurred at the tissue scale. The tissue composition of powdery samples could be modified through dry fractionation diagrams and impact their end-uses properties. If tissue identification is often made on native plant structure, this characterization is not straightforward in destructured samples such powders. Taking advantage of the autofluorescence properties of cell wall components, multispectral image acquisition is envisioned to identify the tissular origin of particles. Images were acquired on maize stem sections and ground tissues isolated from the same stem by hand dissection. The variability in fluorescence intensity profiles was analysed using principal component analysis. The correspondence between fluorescence profiles and the different tissues observed in maize sections was assessed based on histology or known compositional heterogeneity. Similar variability was encountered in fluorescence profiles extracted from powder leading to the potential ability to predict tissular origin based on this autofluorescence multispectral signal.

  5. Black hole physics. Black hole lightning due to particle acceleration at subhorizon scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J; Ansoldi, S; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; Becerra González, J; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Delgado Mendez, C; Dominis Prester, D; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; García López, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido Terrats, D; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; González Muñoz, A; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Prada Moroni, P G; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rodriguez Garcia, J; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Zanin, R; Kadler, M; Schulz, R; Ros, E; Bach, U; Krauß, F; Wilms, J

    2014-11-28

    Supermassive black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses are commonly found in the centers of galaxies. Astronomers seek to image jet formation using radio interferometry but still suffer from insufficient angular resolution. An alternative method to resolve small structures is to measure the time variability of their emission. Here we report on gamma-ray observations of the radio galaxy IC 310 obtained with the MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov) telescopes, revealing variability with doubling time scales faster than 4.8 min. Causality constrains the size of the emission region to be smaller than 20% of the gravitational radius of its central black hole. We suggest that the emission is associated with pulsar-like particle acceleration by the electric field across a magnetospheric gap at the base of the radio jet. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Using Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry with Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Measure Surface Flow Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, T. Y.; Chan, H. C.; Chen, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) is a nonintrusive measurement technology. It requires fewer operators and less time than other intrusive methods. While using the LSPIV methods to measure surface flow fields, a camera is usually installed on a fixed position of river sides to record the flow conditions. However, it leads to image distortion and error of image processing. This study attempts to apply an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a camera to record the images of the water surface. It is expected to improve the orthogonality of the recording images. The tracing particles of image velocimetry used the ripples and foams on the water surface. Then, the LSPIV was used to analyze the spatially information of flow fields. The results showed the flow velocities determined by the LSPIV was close to the velocities measured by the velocimetry. It was showed that using LSPIV with UAV to measure water surface flow fields is a feasible, accurate and safe flow measuring method. It is expected to apply in future study, such as habitat survey and hydraulic characteristic.

  7. Fine and nanometer scaled particle behavior characterization and control for sustainable energy and environmental technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidehiro Kamiya; Mayumi Tsukada; Wuled Lenggoro; Wladyslaw W. Szymanski [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Characterization and control of fine and nanometer scaled particles are essential technological fundamentals for understanding and development of various approaches concerned with sustainable energy and environmental technology, for example, PM10/PM2.5 and nanoparticle emission, clean and high efficiency power generation systems from biomass and solid waste combustion. The standard measuring methods for PM10/PM2.5 and nanoparticle emission behavior from stationary sources, such as coal-fired power plants and waste incinerators, have been discussed in ISO and numerous countries. However, it is difficult to evaluate the actual emission amount and particle size distribution, such as condensable suspended particulate matter, condensable SPM, which is nucleated and grow during cooling and diluting process from flue to atmosphere. High temperature gas cleaning using rigid ceramic filters is an important technology to develop high efficiency power generation system. In this paper, based on the review of background and recent research works of each subject, mass concentration measurement method of PM10/PM2.5 and size distribution of condensable SPM from stationary sources are introduced. Subsequently, research results with focus on ash adhesion behavior characterization and control for the development of dust collection and gas cleaning technology at high temperature conditions in high efficiency power generation systems by coal, biomass and solid waste combustion are presented. 12 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Dynamical properties of a particle in a wave packet: Scaling invariance and boundary crisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Diego F.M., E-mail: diegofregolente@gmail.com [CAMTP, Center For Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Maribor, Krekova 2, SI-2000 Maribor (Slovenia); Robnik, Marko, E-mail: robnik@uni-mb.si [CAMTP, Center For Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Maribor, Krekova 2, SI-2000 Maribor (Slovenia); Leonel, Edson D., E-mail: edleonel@rc.unesp.br [Departamento de Estatistica, Matematica Aplicada e Computacao, UNESP, Univ Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515-Bela Vista, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Acceleration of particles in a wave packet. > The location of the first invariant spanning curve which borders the chaotic sea. > Scaling to characterise the transition from integrability to non-integrability. > The property of area preservation is broken and attractors emerge. > After a tiny increase of the dissipation the system experience a boundary crisis. - Abstract: Some dynamical properties present in a problem concerning the acceleration of particles in a wave packet are studied. The dynamics of the model is described in terms of a two-dimensional area preserving map. We show that the phase space is mixed in the sense that there are regular and chaotic regions coexisting. We use a connection with the standard map in order to find the position of the first invariant spanning curve which borders the chaotic sea. We find that the position of the first invariant spanning curve increases as a power of the control parameter with the exponent 2/3. The standard deviation of the kinetic energy of an ensemble of initial conditions obeys a power law as a function of time, and saturates after some crossover. Scaling formalism is used in order to characterise the chaotic region close to the transition from integrability to nonintegrability and a relationship between the power law exponents is derived. The formalism can be applied in many different systems with mixed phase space. Then, dissipation is introduced into the model and therefore the property of area preservation is broken, and consequently attractors are observed. We show that after a small change of the dissipation, the chaotic attractor as well as its basin of attraction are destroyed, thus leading the system to experience a boundary crisis. The transient after the crisis follows a power law with exponent -2.

  9. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  10. A modified Mach-Zehnder experiment to test the applicability of quantum theory to single-particle experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, K.; Lippert, Th.; Richter, M.; Barbara, B.; Miyashita, S.; De Raedt, H.

    2011-09-01

    We propose a modified single-particle Mach-Zehnder interferometer experiment in which the path length of one arm may change (randomly or systematically) according to the value of an external two-valued variable x, for each passage of a particle through the interferometer. Quantum theory predicts an interference pattern that is independent of the sequence of the values of x. On the other hand, corpuscular models that reproduce the results of quantum optics experiments carried out up to this date show a reduced visibility and a shift of the interference pattern depending on the details of the sequence of the values of x. The key question to be answered in a real laboratory experiment is: Which interference pattern is observed? Despite the general believe that quantum theory might be used to describe all single particle experiments, this is an interesting question to be answered since in the proposed experiment the experimental conditions not only continuously change but they might also have causal effects on the passage of the photons through the interferometer. The proposed experiment can be used to determine to what extent quantum theory provides a description of observed events beyond the usual statistical level.

  11. Scaling properties of SU(2) gauge theory with mixed fundamental-adjoint action

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, Enrico; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Rago, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We study the phase diagram of the SU(2) lattice gauge theory with fundamental-adjoint Wilson plaquette action. We confirm the presence of a first order bulk phase transition and we estimate the location of its end-point in the bare parameter space. If this point is second order, the theory is one of the simplest realizations of a lattice gauge theory admitting a continuum limit at finite bare couplings. All the relevant gauge observables are monitored in the vicinity of the fixed point with very good control over finite-size effects. The scaling properties of the low-lying glueball spectrum are studied while approaching the end-point in a controlled manner.

  12. Cluster solver for dynamical mean-field theory with linear scaling in inverse temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, E.; Lee, C. R.; Bai, Z. J.; Scalettar, R. T.; Jarrell, M.

    2010-05-01

    Dynamical mean-field theory and its cluster extensions provide a very useful approach for examining phase transitions in model Hamiltonians and, in combination with electronic structure theory, constitute powerful methods to treat strongly correlated materials. The key advantage to the technique is that, unlike competing real-space methods, the sign problem is well controlled in the Hirsch-Fye (HF) quantum Monte Carlo used as an exact cluster solver. However, an important computational bottleneck remains; the HF method scales as the cube of the inverse temperature, β . This often makes simulations at low temperatures extremely challenging. We present here a method based on determinant quantum Monte Carlo which scales linearly in β , with a quadratic term that comes in to play for the number of time slices larger than hundred, and demonstrate that the sign problem is identical to HF.

  13. Features and New Physical Scales in Primordial Observables: Theory and Observation

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens; Patil, Subodh P.

    2015-01-01

    All cosmological observations to date are consistent with adiabatic, Gaussian and nearly scale invariant initial conditions. These findings provide strong evidence for a particular symmetry breaking pattern in the very early universe (with a close to vanishing order parameter, $\\epsilon$), widely accepted as conforming to the predictions of the simplest realizations of the inflationary paradigm. However, given that our observations are only privy to perturbations, in inferring something about the background that gave rise to them, it should be clear that many different underlying constructions project onto the same set of cosmological observables. Features in the primordial correlation functions, if present, would offer a unique and discriminating window onto the parent theory in which the mechanism that generated the initial conditions is embedded. In certain contexts, simple linear response theory allows us to infer new characteristic scales from the presence of features that can break the aforementioned de...

  14. [Scale Relativity Theory in living beings morphogenesis: fratal, determinism and chance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaline, J

    2012-10-01

    The Scale Relativity Theory has many biological applications from linear to non-linear and, from classical mechanics to quantum mechanics. Self-similar laws have been used as model for the description of a huge number of biological systems. Theses laws may explain the origin of basal life structures. Log-periodic behaviors of acceleration or deceleration can be applied to branching macroevolution, to the time sequences of major evolutionary leaps. The existence of such a law does not mean that the role of chance in evolution is reduced, but instead that randomness and contingency may occur within a framework which may itself be structured in a partly statistical way. The scale relativity theory can open new perspectives in evolution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Incorporation of velocity-dependent restitution coefficient and particle surface friction into kinetic theory for modeling granular flow cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yifei; Feng, Zhi-Gang

    2017-12-01

    Kinetic theory (KT) has been successfully used to model rapid granular flows in which particle interactions are frictionless and near elastic. However, it fails when particle interactions become frictional and inelastic. For example, the KT is not able to accurately predict the free cooling process of a vibrated granular medium that consists of inelastic frictional particles under microgravity. The main reason that the classical KT fails to model these flows is due to its inability to account for the particle surface friction and its inelastic behavior, which are the two most important factors that need be considered in modeling collisional granular flows. In this study, we have modified the KT model that is able to incorporate these two factors. The inelasticity of a particle is considered by establishing a velocity-dependent expression for the restitution coefficient based on many experimental studies found in the literature, and the particle friction effect is included by using a tangential restitution coefficient that is related to the particle friction coefficient. Theoretical predictions of the free cooling process by the classical KT and the improved KT are compared with the experimental results from a study conducted on an airplane undergoing parabolic flights without the influence of gravity [Y. Grasselli, G. Bossis, and G. Goutallier, Europhys. Lett. 86, 60007 (2009), 10.1209/0295-5075/86/60007]. Our results show that both the velocity-dependent restitution coefficient and the particle surface friction are important in predicting the free cooling process of granular flows; the modified KT model that integrates these two factors is able to improve the simulation results and leads to better agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Self-Consistent Field Theories for the Role of Large Length-Scale Architecture in Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, David

    At large length-scales, the architecture of polymers can be described by a coarse-grained specification of the distribution of branch points and monomer types within a molecule. This includes molecular topology (e.g., cyclic or branched) as well as distances between branch points or chain ends. Design of large length-scale molecular architecture is appealing because it offers a universal strategy, independent of monomer chemistry, to tune properties. Non-linear analogs of linear chains differ in molecular-scale properties, such as mobility, entanglements, and surface segregation in blends that are well-known to impact rheological, dynamical, thermodynamic and surface properties including adhesion and wetting. We have used Self-Consistent Field (SCF) theories to describe a number of phenomena associated with large length-scale polymer architecture. We have predicted the surface composition profiles of non-linear chains in blends with linear chains. These predictions are in good agreement with experimental results, including from neutron scattering, on a range of well-controlled branched (star, pom-pom and end-branched) and cyclic polymer architectures. Moreover, the theory allows explanation of the segregation and conformations of branched polymers in terms of effective surface potentials acting on the end and branch groups. However, for cyclic chains, which have no end or junction points, a qualitatively different topological mechanism based on conformational entropy drives cyclic chains to a surface, consistent with recent neutron reflectivity experiments. We have also used SCF theory to calculate intramolecular and intermolecular correlations for polymer chains in the bulk, dilute solution, and trapped at a liquid-liquid interface. Predictions of chain swelling in dilute star polymer solutions compare favorably with existing PRISM theory and swelling at an interface helps explain recent measurements of chain mobility at an oil-water interface. In collaboration

  17. Simulations of Nanocrystals Under Pressure: Combining Electronic Enthalpy and Linear-Scaling Density-Functional Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Corsini, NR; Greco, A.; Hine, ND; Molteni, C.; Haynes, PD

    2013-01-01

    We present an implementation in a linear-scaling density-functional theory code of an electronic enthalpy method, which has been found to be natural and efficient for the ab initio calculation of finite systems under hydrostatic pressure. Based on a definition of the system volume as that enclosed within an electronic density isosurface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 145501 (2005)], it supports both geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simula...

  18. Scale relativity theory and integrative systems biology: 2. Macroscopic quantum-type mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottale, Laurent; Auffray, Charles

    2008-05-01

    In these two companion papers, we provide an overview and a brief history of the multiple roots, current developments and recent advances of integrative systems biology and identify multiscale integration as its grand challenge. Then we introduce the fundamental principles and the successive steps that have been followed in the construction of the scale relativity theory, which aims at describing the effects of a non-differentiable and fractal (i.e., explicitly scale dependent) geometry of space-time. The first paper of this series was devoted, in this new framework, to the construction from first principles of scale laws of increasing complexity, and to the discussion of some tentative applications of these laws to biological systems. In this second review and perspective paper, we describe the effects induced by the internal fractal structures of trajectories on motion in standard space. Their main consequence is the transformation of classical dynamics into a generalized, quantum-like self-organized dynamics. A Schrödinger-type equation is derived as an integral of the geodesic equation in a fractal space. We then indicate how gauge fields can be constructed from a geometric re-interpretation of gauge transformations as scale transformations in fractal space-time. Finally, we introduce a new tentative development of the theory, in which quantum laws would hold also in scale space, introducing complexergy as a measure of organizational complexity. Initial possible applications of this extended framework to the processes of morphogenesis and the emergence of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular structures are discussed. Having founded elements of the evolutionary, developmental, biochemical and cellular theories on the first principles of scale relativity theory, we introduce proposals for the construction of an integrative theory of life and for the design and implementation of novel macroscopic quantum-type experiments and devices, and discuss their potential

  19. Fast, large-scale, particle image velocimetry-based estimations of river surface velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, David W.; Todd Holland, K.; Calantoni, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    A modified high-speed implementation of cross-correlation (CC) based, large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) was used to estimate the surface velocity of a river with video collected from a gray-scale camera. To improve the quality of results in the high-noise low-signal environment, we introduce a temporal correlation averaging (TCA) scheme that merges a small number of correlation surfaces in the time domain. The TCA scheme is combined with a multi-size macroblock (MMB) sampling method that provides correlation scores from four different macroblock sizes. The TCA scheme is also used in conjunction with a signal-level indicator computed on the macroblock. The signal-level indicator is used to reject correlation scores prior to computation and helps to keep noisy results out of the TCA. These modifications were tested by comparing LSPIV calculations to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements. The percent difference of measured velocity between LSPIV with TCA and MMB and without TCA and MMB when compared to the ADCP was reduced by as much as 30%. The low processing cost of our modifications along with an efficient multithread implementation of LSPIV facilitates high speed processing of up to a few thousand vector points at rates that exceed the capture speed of common hardware.

  20. Capabilities of Large-scale Particle Image Velocimetry to characterize shallow free-surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Hauet, A.; Fujita, I.; Legout, C.; Ho, H.-C.

    2014-08-01

    Irrespective of their spatial extent, free-surface shallow flows are challenging measurement environments for most instruments due to the relatively small depths and velocities typically associated with these flows. A promising candidate for enabling measurements in such conditions is Large-scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV). This technique uses a non-intrusive approach to measure two-dimensional surface velocity fields with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Although there are many publications documenting the successful use of LSPIV in various laboratory and field open-channel flow situations, its performance has not been equally substantiated for measurement in shallow flows. This paper aims at filling in this gap by demonstrating the capabilities of LSPIV to: (a) accurately evaluate complex flow patterns in shallow channel flows; and (b) estimate depth in shallow flows using exclusively LSPIV measurements. The demonstration is provided by LSPIV measurements in three shallow flow laboratory situations with flow depths ranging from 0.05 to 0.31 m. The obtained measurements illustrate the LSPIV flexibility and reliability in measuring velocities in shallow and low-velocity (near-zero) flows. Moreover, the technique is capable to evaluate and map velocity-derived quantities that are difficult to document with alternative measurement techniques (e.g. vorticity and shear stress distributions and mapping of large-scale structure in the body of water).

  1. Measuring Student Involvement: A Comparison of Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory in the Construction of Scales from Student Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkness, Jessica; DeAngelo, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This study compares the psychometric utility of Classical Test Theory (CTT) and Item Response Theory (IRT) for scale construction with data from higher education student surveys. Using 2008 Your First College Year (YFCY) survey data from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program at the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA, two scales…

  2. The two-parametric scaling and new temporal asymptotic of survival probability of diffusing particle in the medium with traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhincheev, V E

    2017-03-01

    The new asymptotic behavior of the survival probability of particles in a medium with absorbing traps in an electric field has been established in two ways-by using the scaling approach and by the direct solution of the diffusion equation in the field. It has shown that at long times, this drift mechanism leads to a new temporal behavior of the survival probability of particles in a medium with absorbing traps.

  3. Analytical methods for describing charged particle dynamics in general focusing lattices using generalized Courant-Snyder theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of charged particles in general linear focusing lattices with quadrupole, skew-quadrupole, dipole, and solenoidal components, as well as torsion of the fiducial orbit and variation of beam energy is parametrized using a generalized Courant-Snyder (CS theory, which extends the original CS theory for one degree of freedom to higher dimensions. The envelope function is generalized into an envelope matrix, and the phase advance is generalized into a 4D symplectic rotation, or a U(2 element. The 1D envelope equation, also known as the Ermakov-Milne-Pinney equation in quantum mechanics, is generalized to an envelope matrix equation in higher dimensions. Other components of the original CS theory, such as the transfer matrix, Twiss functions, and CS invariant (also known as the Lewis invariant all have their counterparts, with remarkably similar expressions, in the generalized theory. The gauge group structure of the generalized theory is analyzed. By fixing the gauge freedom with a desired symmetry, the generalized CS parametrization assumes the form of the modified Iwasawa decomposition, whose importance in phase space optics and phase space quantum mechanics has been recently realized. This gauge fixing also symmetrizes the generalized envelope equation and expresses the theory using only the generalized Twiss function β. The generalized phase advance completely determines the spectral and structural stability properties of a general focusing lattice. For structural stability, the generalized CS theory enables application of the Krein-Moser theory to greatly simplify the stability analysis. The generalized CS theory provides an effective tool to study coupled dynamics and to discover more optimized lattice designs in the larger parameter space of general focusing lattices.

  4. Spatial and temporal scales of force and torque acting on wall-mounted spherical particles in open channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan-Braun, C.; García-Villalba, M.; Uhlmann, M.

    2013-07-01

    Data from direct numerical simulation of open channel flow over a geometrically rough wall at a bulk Reynolds number of Reb = 2900, generated by Chan-Braun et al. ["Force and torque acting on particles in a transitionally rough open-channel flow," J. Fluid Mech. 684, 441-474 (2011)], 10.1017/jfm.2011.311 are further analysed with respect to the time and length scales of force and torque acting on the wall-mounted spheres. For the two sizes of spheres in a square arrangement (11 and 49 wall units in diameter, yielding hydraulically smooth and transitionally rough flow, respectively), the spatial structure of drag, lift, and spanwise torque is investigated. The auto-correlation and spectra in time as well as the space-time correlation and convection velocities are presented and discussed. It is found that the statistics of spanwise particle torque are similar to those of shear stress at a smooth wall. Particle drag and lift are shown to differ from spanwise particle torque, exhibiting considerably smaller time and length scales; the convection velocities of drag and lift are somewhat larger than those of spanwise torque. Furthermore, correlations between the flow field and particle-related quantities are presented. The spatial structure of the correlation between streamwise velocity and drag/spanwise torque features elongated shapes reminiscent of buffer-layer streaks. The correlation between the pressure field and the particle drag exhibits two opposite-signed bulges on the upstream and downstream sides of a particle.

  5. ADE double scaled little string theories, mock modular forms and Umbral Moonshine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Murthy, Sameer; Nazaroglu, Caner

    2015-05-01

    We consider double scaled little string theory on K3. These theories are labelled by a positive integer k ≥ 2 and an ADE root lattice with Coxeter number k. We count BPS fundamental string states in the holographic dual of this theory using the super-conformal field theory . We show that the BPS fundamental string states that are counted by the second helicity supertrace of this theory give rise to weight two mixed mock modular forms. We compute the helicity supertraces using two separate techniques: a path integral analysis that leads to a modular invariant but non-holomorphic answer, and a Hamiltonian analysis of the contribution from discrete states which leads to a holomorphic but not modular invariant answer. From a mathematical point of view the Hamiltonian analysis leads to a mixed mock modular form while the path integral gives the completion of this mixed mock modular form. We also compare these weight two mixed mock modular forms to those that appear in instances of Umbral Moonshine labelled by Niemeier root lattices X that are powers of ADE root lattices and find that they are equal up to a constant factor that we determine. In the course of the analysis we encounter an interesting generalization of Appell-Lerch sums and generalizations of the Riemann relations of Jacobi theta functions that they obey.

  6. ADE double scaled little string theories, mock modular forms and Umbral Moonshine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Jeffrey A. [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Murthy, Sameer [Department of Mathematics, King’s College London, The Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Nazaroglu, Caner [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-05-25

    We consider double scaled little string theory on K3. These theories are labelled by a positive integer k≥2 and an ADE root lattice with Coxeter number k. We count BPS fundamental string states in the holographic dual of this theory using the superconformal field theory K3×(((SL(2,ℝ){sub k})/(U(1)))×((SU(2){sub k})/(U(1))))/ℤ{sub k}. We show that the BPS fundamental string states that are counted by the second helicity supertrace of this theory give rise to weight two mixed mock modular forms. We compute the helicity supertraces using two separate techniques: a path integral analysis that leads to a modular invariant but non-holomorphic answer, and a Hamiltonian analysis of the contribution from discrete states which leads to a holomorphic but not modular invariant answer. From a mathematical point of view the Hamiltonian analysis leads to a mixed mock modular form while the path integral gives the completion of this mixed mock modular form. We also compare these weight two mixed mock modular forms to those that appear in instances of Umbral Moonshine labelled by Niemeier root lattices X that are powers of ADE root lattices and find that they are equal up to a constant factor that we determine. In the course of the analysis we encounter an interesting generalization of Appell-Lerch sums and generalizations of the Riemann relations of Jacobi theta functions that they obey.

  7. The Contradiction Between the Measurement Theory of Quantum Mechanics and the Theory that the Velocity of Any Particle Can Not be Larger than the Velocity of Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Shen, Z. J.; Shen, G. T.; Yang, B. C.

    1996-01-01

    By the measurement theory of quantum mechanics and the method of Fourier transform,we proved that the wave function psi(x,y,z,t)= (8/((2(pi)(2L(exp (1/2)))(exp 3))(Phi(L,t,x)Phi(L,t,y)Phi(L,t,z)). According to the theory that the velocity of any particle can not be larger than the velocity of light and the Born interpretation, when absolute value of delta greater than (ct+ L),Phi(L,t,delta) = 0. But according to the calculation, we proved that for some delta, even if absolute value of delta is greater than (ct+L), Phi(L,t,delta) is not equal to 0.

  8. High throughput screening of particle conditioning operations: II. Evaluation of scale-up heuristics with prokaryotically expressed polysaccharide vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Aaron; Huffman, Ben; Berrill, Alex; Merchant, Nick; Godavarti, Ranga; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel; Coffman, Jonathan; Sunasara, Khurram; Mukhopadhyay, Tarit

    2015-08-01

    Multivalent polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are typically comprised of several different polysaccharides produced with distinct and complex production processes. Particle conditioning steps, such as precipitation and flocculation, may be used to aid the recovery and purification of such microbial vaccine products. An ultra scale-down approach to purify vaccine polysaccharides at the micro-scale would greatly enhance productivity, robustness, and speed the development of novel conjugate vaccines. In part one of this series, we described a modular and high throughput approach to develop particle conditioning processes (HTPC) for biologicals that combines flocculation, solids removal, and streamlined analytics. In this second part of the series, we applied HTPC to industrially relevant feedstreams comprised of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) from several bacterial species. The scalability of HTPC was evaluated between 0.8 mL and 13 L scales, with several different scaling methodologies examined. Clarification, polysaccharide yield, impurity clearance, and product quality achieved with HTPC were reproducible and comparable with larger scales. Particle sizing was the response with greatest sensitivity to differences in processing scale and enabled the identification of useful scaling rules. Scaling with constant impeller tip speed or power per volume in the impeller swept zone offered the most accurate scale up, with evidence that time integration of these values provided the optimal basis for scaling. The capability to develop a process at the micro-scale combined with evidence-based scaling metrics provide a significant advance for purification process development of vaccine processes. The USD system offers similar opportunities for HTPC of proteins and other complex biological molecules. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Scaling of Particle and Transverse Energy Production in 208Pb+208Pb collisions at 158 A GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Angelis, Aris L S; Antonenko, V G; Arefev, V; Astakhov, V A; Avdeichikov, V; Awes, T C; Baba, P V K S; Badyal, S K; Baldin, A; Barabash, L; Barlag, C; Bathe, S; Batyunya, B; Bernier, T; Bhalla, K B; Bhatia, V S; Blume, C; Bohne, E M; Böröcz, Z K; Bucher, D; Buijs, A; Büsching, H; Carlén, L; Chalyshev, V; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherbachev, R; Chujo, T; Claussen, A; Das, A C; Decowski, M P; Delagrange, H; Dzhordzhadze, V; Dönni, P; Dubovik, I; Dutt, S K; Dutta-Majumdar, M R; El-Chenawi, K F; Eliseev, S; Enosawa, K; Foka, P Y; Fokin, S L; Frolov, V; Ganti, M S; Garpman, S I A; Gavrishchuk, O P; Geurts, F J M; Ghosh, T K; Glasow, R; Sen-Gupta, S K; Guskov, B; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Gutbrod, H H; Higuchi, R; Hrivnacova, I; Ippolitov, M S; Kalechofsky, H; Kamermans, R; Kampert, K H; Karadzhev, K; Karpio, K; Kato, S; Kees, S; Kim, H; Kolb, B W; Kosarev, I G; Kucheryaev, I; Krümpel, T; Kugler, A; Kulinich, P A; Kurata, M; Kurita, K; Kuzmin, N A; Langbein, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, Y Y; Löhner, H; Luquin, Lionel; Mahapatra, D P; Man'ko, V I; Martin, M; Martínez, G; Maksimov, A; Mehdiyev, R; Mgebrishvili, G; Miake, Y; Mikhalev, D; Mir, M F; Mishra, G C; Miyamoto, Y; Mohanty, B; Mora, M J; Morrison, D; Mukhopadhyay, D S; Myalkovskii, V; Naef, H; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Neumaier, S; Nyanin, A; Nikitin, V A; Nikolaev, S; Nilsson, P O; Nishimura, S; Nomokonov, V P; Nystrand, J; Obenshain, F E; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Pachr, M; Parfenov, A; Pavlyuk, S; Peitzmann, Thomas; Petracek, V; Plasil, F; Pinganaud, W; Purschke, M L; Räven, B; Rak, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ramamurthy, V S; Rao, N K; Retière, F; Reygers, K; Roland, G; Rosselet, L; Rufanov, I A; Roy, C; Rubio, J M; Sako, H; Sambyal, S S; Santo, R; Sato, S; Schlagheck, H; Schmidt, H R; Schutz, Y; Shabratova, G; Shah, T H; Sibiryak, Yu; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Sinha, B C; Slavin, N V; Söderström, K; Solomey, Nickolas; Sørensen, S P; Stankus, P; Stefanek, G; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Stüken, D; Sumbera, M; Svensson, T; Trivedi, M D; Tsvetkov, A A; Tykarski, L; Urbahn, J; Van den Pijll, E C; van Eijndhoven, N; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Vinogradov, A; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A S; Vörös, S; Wyslouch, B; Yagi, K; Yokota, Y; Young, G R

    2001-01-01

    Transverse energy, charged particle, and photon pseudorapidity distributions have been studied as a function of the number of participants (N_{part}) and the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions (N_{coll}) in 158 A GeV Pb+Pb collisions over a wide impact parameter range. A scaling of the transverse energy and charged particle pseudorapidity density at midrapidity as N_{part}^{1.08} and N_{coll}^{0.83} is observed. This faster than linear scaling with N_{part} indicates a violation of the naive Wounded Nucleon Model.

  10. 25th Johns Hopkins Workshop on Current Problems in Particle Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dominici, Daniele; Lusanna, L

    2001-01-01

    This volume offers a comprehensive overview of our understanding of gravity at both the experimental and the theoretical level. Critical reviews by experts cover topics ranging from astrophysics (anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background, gamma ray bursts, neutron stars and astroparticles), cosmology, the status of gravitational wave sources and detectors, verification of Newton's law at short distances, the equivalence principle, gravito-magnetism, measurement theory, time machines and the foundations of Einstein's theory, to string theory and loop quantum gravity.

  11. Scaling relation and regime map of explosive gas–liquid flow of binary Lennard-Jones particle system

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime

    2012-02-01

    We study explosive gasliquid flows caused by rapid depressurization using a molecular dynamics model of Lennard-Jones particle systems. A unique feature of our model is that it consists of two types of particles: liquid particles, which tend to form liquid droplets, and gas particles, which remain supercritical gaseous states under the depressurization realized by simulations. The system has a pipe-like structure similar to the model of a shock tube. We observed physical quantities and flow regimes in systems with various combinations of initial particle number densities and initial temperatures. It is observed that a physical quantity Q, such as pressure, at position z measured along a pipe-like system at time t follows a scaling relation Q(z,t)=Q(zt) with a scaling function Q(ζ). A similar scaling relation holds for time evolution of flow regimes in a system. These scaling relations lead to a regime map of explosive flows in parameter spaces of local physical quantities. The validity of the scaling relations of physical quantities means that physics of equilibrium systems, such as an equation of state, is applicable to explosive flows in our simulations, though the explosive flows involve highly nonequilibrium processes. In other words, if the breaking of the scaling relations is observed, it means that the explosive flows cannot be fully described by physics of equilibrium systems. We show the possibility of breaking of the scaling relations and discuss its implications in the last section. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. One-particle many-body Green's function theory: Algebraic recursive definitions, linked-diagram theorem, irreducible-diagram theorem, and general-order algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, So; Doran, Alexander E.; Knowles, Peter J.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2017-07-01

    A thorough analytical and numerical characterization of the whole perturbation series of one-particle many-body Green's function (MBGF) theory is presented in a pedagogical manner. Three distinct but equivalent algebraic (first-quantized) recursive definitions of the perturbation series of the Green's function are derived, which can be combined with the well-known recursion for the self-energy. Six general-order algorithms of MBGF are developed, each implementing one of the three recursions, the Δ MPn method (where n is the perturbation order) [S. Hirata et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 1595 (2015)], the automatic generation and interpretation of diagrams, or the numerical differentiation of the exact Green's function with a perturbation-scaled Hamiltonian. They all display the identical, nondivergent perturbation series except Δ MPn, which agrees with MBGF in the diagonal and frequency-independent approximations at 1 ≤n ≤3 but converges at the full-configuration-interaction (FCI) limit at n =∞ (unless it diverges). Numerical data of the perturbation series are presented for Koopmans and non-Koopmans states to quantify the rate of convergence towards the FCI limit and the impact of the diagonal, frequency-independent, or Δ MPn approximation. The diagrammatic linkedness and thus size-consistency of the one-particle Green's function and self-energy are demonstrated at any perturbation order on the basis of the algebraic recursions in an entirely time-independent (frequency-domain) framework. The trimming of external lines in a one-particle Green's function to expose a self-energy diagram and the removal of reducible diagrams are also justified mathematically using the factorization theorem of Frantz and Mills. Equivalence of Δ MPn and MBGF in the diagonal and frequency-independent approximations at 1 ≤n ≤3 is algebraically proven, also ascribing the differences at n = 4 to the so-called semi-reducible and linked-disconnected diagrams.

  13. One-particle many-body Green's function theory: Algebraic recursive definitions, linked-diagram theorem, irreducible-diagram theorem, and general-order algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, So; Doran, Alexander E; Knowles, Peter J; Ortiz, J V

    2017-07-28

    A thorough analytical and numerical characterization of the whole perturbation series of one-particle many-body Green's function (MBGF) theory is presented in a pedagogical manner. Three distinct but equivalent algebraic (first-quantized) recursive definitions of the perturbation series of the Green's function are derived, which can be combined with the well-known recursion for the self-energy. Six general-order algorithms of MBGF are developed, each implementing one of the three recursions, the ΔMPn method (where n is the perturbation order) [S. Hirata et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 1595 (2015)], the automatic generation and interpretation of diagrams, or the numerical differentiation of the exact Green's function with a perturbation-scaled Hamiltonian. They all display the identical, nondivergent perturbation series except ΔMPn, which agrees with MBGF in the diagonal and frequency-independent approximations at 1≤n≤3 but converges at the full-configuration-interaction (FCI) limit at n=∞ (unless it diverges). Numerical data of the perturbation series are presented for Koopmans and non-Koopmans states to quantify the rate of convergence towards the FCI limit and the impact of the diagonal, frequency-independent, or ΔMPn approximation. The diagrammatic linkedness and thus size-consistency of the one-particle Green's function and self-energy are demonstrated at any perturbation order on the basis of the algebraic recursions in an entirely time-independent (frequency-domain) framework. The trimming of external lines in a one-particle Green's function to expose a self-energy diagram and the removal of reducible diagrams are also justified mathematically using the factorization theorem of Frantz and Mills. Equivalence of ΔMPn and MBGF in the diagonal and frequency-independent approximations at 1≤n≤3 is algebraically proven, also ascribing the differences at n = 4 to the so-called semi-reducible and linked-disconnected diagrams.

  14. [Research programs on elementary particle and field theories and superconductivity]. [Rockefeller Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khuri, N.N.

    1992-01-01

    Research of staff members in theoretical physics is presented in the following areas: super string theory, a new approach to path integrals, new ideas on the renormalization group, nonperturbative chiral gauge theories, the standard model, K meson decays, and the CP problem. Work on high-[Tc] superconductivity and protein folding is also related.

  15. Scattering from Model Nonspherical Particles Theory and Applications to Environmental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Borghese, Ferdinando; Saija, Rosalba

    2007-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by nonspherical particles has become an increasingly important research topic over the past 20 years. Instead of handling anisotropic particles of arbitrary shape, the authors consider the more amenable problem of aggregates of spherical particles. This is often a very satisfactory approach as the optical response of nonspherical particles depends more on their general symmetry and the quantity of refractive material than on the precise details of their shape. The book addresses a wide spectrum of applications, ranging from scattering properties of water droplets containing pollutants, atmospheric aerosols and ice crystals to the modeling of cosmic dust grains as aggregates. In this extended second edition the authors have encompassed all the new topics arising from their recent studies of cosmic dust grains. Thus many chapters were deeply revised and new chapters were added. The new material spans The description of the state of polarization of electromagnetic wave...

  16. Spectrometer for Particle Characterization With a New Multiple-Scattering Theory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There are two major commercial types of light-scattering particle size analyzers: Static Light Scattering and Dynamic Light Scattering. They are expensive, delicate,...

  17. Nanometer-scale sizing accuracy of particle suspensions on an unmodified cell phone using elastic light scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary J Smith

    Full Text Available We report on the construction of a Fourier plane imaging system attached to a cell phone. By illuminating particle suspensions with a collimated beam from an inexpensive diode laser, angularly resolved scattering patterns are imaged by the phone's camera. Analyzing these patterns with Mie theory results in predictions of size distributions of the particles in suspension. Despite using consumer grade electronics, we extracted size distributions of sphere suspensions with better than 20 nm accuracy in determining the mean size. We also show results from milk, yeast, and blood cells. Performing these measurements on a portable device presents opportunities for field-testing of food quality, process monitoring, and medical diagnosis.

  18. Nanometer-scale sizing accuracy of particle suspensions on an unmodified cell phone using elastic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary J; Chu, Kaiqin; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    We report on the construction of a Fourier plane imaging system attached to a cell phone. By illuminating particle suspensions with a collimated beam from an inexpensive diode laser, angularly resolved scattering patterns are imaged by the phone's camera. Analyzing these patterns with Mie theory results in predictions of size distributions of the particles in suspension. Despite using consumer grade electronics, we extracted size distributions of sphere suspensions with better than 20 nm accuracy in determining the mean size. We also show results from milk, yeast, and blood cells. Performing these measurements on a portable device presents opportunities for field-testing of food quality, process monitoring, and medical diagnosis.

  19. Particle size distributions from laboratory-scale biomass fires using fast response instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Hosseini; L. Qi; D. Cocker; D. Weise; A. Miller; M. Shrivastava; J.W. Miller; S. Mahalingam; M. Princevac; H. Jung

    2010-01-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion is an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date, particle size distributions reported from prior studies vary not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distributions in...

  20. Use of digital image analysis combined with fractal theory to determine particle morphology and surface texture of quartz sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia S. Araujo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The particle morphology and surface texture play a major role in influencing mechanical and hydraulic behaviors of sandy soils. This paper presents the use of digital image analysis combined with fractal theory as a tool to quantify the particle morphology and surface texture of two types of quartz sands widely used in the region of Vitória, Espírito Santo, southeast of Brazil. The two investigated sands are sampled from different locations. The purpose of this paper is to present a simple, straightforward, reliable and reproducible methodology that can identify representative sandy soil texture parameters. The test results of the soil samples of the two sands separated by sieving into six size fractions are presented and discussed. The main advantages of the adopted methodology are its simplicity, reliability of the results, and relatively low cost. The results show that sands from the coastal spit (BS have a greater degree of roundness and a smoother surface texture than river sands (RS. The values obtained in the test are statistically analyzed, and again it is confirmed that the BS sand has a slightly greater degree of sphericity than that of the RS sand. Moreover, the RS sand with rough surface texture has larger specific surface area values than the similar BS sand, which agree with the obtained roughness fractal dimensions. The consistent experimental results demonstrate that image analysis combined with fractal theory is an accurate and efficient method to quantify the differences in particle morphology and surface texture of quartz sands.

  1. Modulation of large-scale structures by neutrally buoyant and inertial finite-size particles in turbulent Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiquan; Abbas, Micheline; Climent, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Particle-resolved numerical simulations based on the Force Coupling Method are carried out to study the effect of finite-size particles on turbulent plane Couette flow. The Reynolds number is close to the laminar-turbulent transition, such that large-scale rotational structures are well developed and self-sustained. The study particularly considers the effect of concentration, particle size, and particle-to-fluid density ratio on the mixture flow features. Time-averaged profiles, in the wall-normal direction, of the mean flow and Reynolds stress components reveal that there is no significant difference between single-phase and two-phase flows at equivalent effective Reynolds number, except that the wall shear stress is higher for the two-phase flow. However, temporal and modal analysis of flow fluctuations suggest that besides injecting small-scale perturbation due to their rigidity, particles have an effect on the regeneration cycle of turbulence. Indeed, the shape of the streaks and the intermittent character of the flow (amplitude and period of oscillation of the modal fluctuation energy) are all altered by the particle presence, and especially by the inertial ones.

  2. Shape effects on time-scale divergence at athermal jamming transition of frictionless non-spherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Jin, Weiwei; Liu, Lufeng; Li, Shuixiang

    2017-10-01

    The critical behaviors of a granular system at the jamming transition have been extensively studied from both mechanical and thermodynamic perspectives. In this work, we numerically investigate the jamming behaviors of a variety of frictionless non-spherical particles, including spherocylinder, ellipsoid, spherotetrahedron and spherocube. In particular, for a given particle shape, a series of random configurations at different fixed densities are generated and relaxed to minimize interparticle overlaps using the relaxation algorithm. We find that as the jamming point (i.e., point J) is approached, the number of iteration steps (defined as the ;time-scale; for our systems) required to completely relax the interparticle overlaps exhibits a clear power-law divergence. The dependence of the detailed mathematical form of the power-law divergence on particle shapes is systematically investigated and elucidated, which suggests that the shape effects can be generally categorized as elongation and roundness. Importantly, we show the jamming transition density can be accurately determined from the analysis of time-scale divergence for different non-spherical shapes, and the obtained values agree very well with corresponding ones reported in literature. Moreover, we study the plastic behaviors of over-jammed packings of different particles under a compression-expansion procedure and find that the jamming of ellipsoid is much more robust than other non-spherical particles. This work offers an alternative approximate procedure besides conventional packing algorithms for studying athermal jamming transition in granular system of frictionless non-spherical particles.

  3. Joint global optimization of tomographic data based on particle swarm optimization and decision theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasche, H.; Tronicke, J.

    2012-04-01

    In many near surface geophysical applications multiple tomographic data sets are routinely acquired to explore subsurface structures and parameters. Linking the model generation process of multi-method geophysical data sets can significantly reduce ambiguities in geophysical data analysis and model interpretation. Most geophysical inversion approaches rely on local search optimization methods used to find an optimal model in the vicinity of a user-given starting model. The final solution may critically depend on the initial model. Alternatively, global optimization (GO) methods have been used to invert geophysical data. They explore the solution space in more detail and determine the optimal model independently from the starting model. Additionally, they can be used to find sets of optimal models allowing a further analysis of model parameter uncertainties. Here we employ particle swarm optimization (PSO) to realize the global optimization of tomographic data. PSO is an emergent methods based on swarm intelligence characterized by fast and robust convergence towards optimal solutions. The fundamental principle of PSO is inspired by nature, since the algorithm mimics the behavior of a flock of birds searching food in a search space. In PSO, a number of particles cruise a multi-dimensional solution space striving to find optimal model solutions explaining the acquired data. The particles communicate their positions and success and direct their movement according to the position of the currently most successful particle of the swarm. The success of a particle, i.e. the quality of the currently found model by a particle, must be uniquely quantifiable to identify the swarm leader. When jointly inverting disparate data sets, the optimization solution has to satisfy multiple optimization objectives, at least one for each data set. Unique determination of the most successful particle currently leading the swarm is not possible. Instead, only statements about the Pareto

  4. Effect of Porosity on Particle Erosion Wear Behavior of Lab. Scale SICF/SIC Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Min-Soo; Kohyama, Akira

    The use of silicon-based ceramics and composites as combustor liners and turbine vanes provides the potential of improving next-generation turbine engine performance, through lower emissions and higher cycle efficiency, relative to today's use of super alloy hot-section components. As a series of research for FOD resistant, a particle erosion wear test was carried out for continuous Pre-SiC fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites with a new concept of lab. scale fabrication by LPS process. The result shows that aperture (some form of porosity) between fiber and interface has a deleterious effect on erosion resistance. Aperture along the fiber interfaces consequently causes a severe wear in the form of fiber detachment. Wear rate increase proportional as contents of open porosity increases. For nearly full dense composite materials of about 0.5 % porosity, are about 200 % more wear-resistant than about 5 % porous composites. Grain growth and consolidate condition of matrix which directly affects to FOD resistant are also discussed.

  5. Large-scale particle image velocimetry for measurements in riverine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Fujita, I.; Hauet, A.

    2008-04-01

    Large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) is a nonintrusive approach to measure velocities at the free surface of a water body. The raw LSPIV results are instantaneous water surface velocity fields, spanning flow areas up to hundreds of square meters. Measurements conducted in typical conditions in conjunction with appropriate selections of parameters for image processing resulted in mean velocity errors of less than 3.5%. The current article reviews the background of LSPIV and the work of three research teams spanning over a decade. Implementation examples using various LSPIV configurations are then described to illustrate the capability of the technique to characterize spatially distributed two- and three-dimensional flow kinematic features that can be related to important morphologic and hydrodynamic aspects of natural rivers. Finally, results and a critique of research methods are discussed to encourage LSPIV use and to improve its capabilities to collect field data needed to better understand complex geomorphic, hydrologic, and ecologic river processes and interactions under normal and extreme conditions.

  6. Orienting the camera and firing lasers to enhance large scale particle image velocimetry for streamflow monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    Large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) is a nonintrusive methodology for continuous surface flow monitoring in natural environments. Recent experimental studies demonstrate that LSPIV is a promising technique to estimate flow discharge in riverine systems. Traditionally, LSPIV implementations are based on the use of angled cameras to capture extended fields of view; images are then orthorectified and calibrated through the acquisition of ground reference points. As widely documented in the literature, the identification of ground reference points and image orthorectification are major hurdles in LSPIV. Here we develop an experimental apparatus to address both of these issues. The proposed platform includes a laser system for remote frame calibration and a low-cost camera that is maintained orthogonal with respect to the water surface to minimize image distortions. We study the feasibility of the apparatus on two complex natural riverine environments where the acquisition of ground reference points is prevented and illumination and seeding density conditions are challenging. While our results confirm that velocity estimations can be severely affected by inhomogeneously seeded surface tracers and adverse illumination settings, they demonstrate that LSPIV implementations can benefit from the proposed apparatus. Specifically, the presented system opens novel avenues in the development of stand-alone platforms for remote surface flow monitoring.

  7. First order Two-Scale Particle-in-Cell numerical method for the Vlasov equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frénod Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to build an accurate numerical method for the simulation of the long time evolution of the Vlasov solution fε with an electric field Eε = E0 + εE1 for small ε. To this purpose, we use the Two-Scale Convergence to determine a first order approximation F + εF1 of fε. Then, by means of particle approximations we build an algorithm which is intended for providing a numerical approximation of F + εF1. On cherche à construire une méthode numérique pour l’évolution en temps long de la solution fε de l’équation de Vlasov avec un champ électrique Eε = E0 + εE1 pour ε petit. À cet effet, on utilise la théorie de la convergence à deux échelles pour obtenir une approximation d’ordre un F + εF1 de fε, puis une méthode particulaire pour construire l’algorithme d’approximation numérique de F + εF1.

  8. Laboratory Hydraulic Investigation of Steep Plane Bed Streams Using Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarpour, Farhad; Schneider, Josef; Fathi Moghadam, Manoochehr

    2017-04-01

    Flow hydrodynamics of steep mountain streams is not yet satisfactorily known. The presence of large isolated roughness elements with a height comparable to flow depth precludes utilization of conventional flow resistance equations normally developed for lower gradient streams. Since in steep channels a large portion of the shear stress is borne by macro roughness elements it is essential to go for approaches that take this fact into consideration. In this research we investigate hydrodynamics of flow in high gradient gravel bed streams under different channel slopes, packing densities, relative submergence of the roughness elements and ratios of macro roughness element size to bed material size. For this purpose, we use uniform size glass beads and bigger spherical obstacles to represent gravel bed and large roughness elements, respectively. Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry is utilized to obtain 2D velocity vector field in order to study the effect of experiment variables on surface flow structure. This investigation provides more insight into the nature of flow in steep plane bed channels in the presence of macro roughness elements.

  9. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures at Two Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Green, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Large scale structure surveys promise to be the next leading probe of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbation theory for the weakly non-linear regime of dark matter, where correlation functions are computed in an expansion of the wavenumber k of a mode over the wavenumber associated with the non-linear scale k_nl. Since most of the information is contained at high wavenumbers, it is necessary to compute higher order corrections to correlation functions. After the one-loop correction to the matter power spectrum, we estimate that the next leading one is the two-loop contribution, which we compute here. At this order in k/k_nl, there is only one counterterm in the EFTofLSS that must be included, though this term contributes both at tree-level and in several one-loop diagrams. We also discuss correlation functions involving the velocity and momentum fields...

  10. A highly scalable particle tracking algorithm using partitioned global address space (PGAS) programming for extreme-scale turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaria, D.; Yeung, P. K.

    2017-12-01

    A new parallel algorithm utilizing a partitioned global address space (PGAS) programming model to achieve high scalability is reported for particle tracking in direct numerical simulations of turbulent fluid flow. The work is motivated by the desire to obtain Lagrangian information necessary for the study of turbulent dispersion at the largest problem sizes feasible on current and next-generation multi-petaflop supercomputers. A large population of fluid particles is distributed among parallel processes dynamically, based on instantaneous particle positions such that all of the interpolation information needed for each particle is available either locally on its host process or neighboring processes holding adjacent sub-domains of the velocity field. With cubic splines as the preferred interpolation method, the new algorithm is designed to minimize the need for communication, by transferring between adjacent processes only those spline coefficients determined to be necessary for specific particles. This transfer is implemented very efficiently as a one-sided communication, using Co-Array Fortran (CAF) features which facilitate small data movements between different local partitions of a large global array. The cost of monitoring transfer of particle properties between adjacent processes for particles migrating across sub-domain boundaries is found to be small. Detailed benchmarks are obtained on the Cray petascale supercomputer Blue Waters at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. For operations on the particles in a 81923 simulation (0.55 trillion grid points) on 262,144 Cray XE6 cores, the new algorithm is found to be orders of magnitude faster relative to a prior algorithm in which each particle is tracked by the same parallel process at all times. This large speedup reduces the additional cost of tracking of order 300 million particles to just over 50% of the cost of computing the Eulerian velocity field at this scale. Improving support of PGAS models on

  11. Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burini, D; De Lillo, S; Gibelli, L

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a systems approach to the theory of perception and learning in populations composed of many living entities. Starting from a phenomenological description of these processes, a mathematical structure is derived which is deemed to incorporate their complexity features. The modeling is based on a generalization of kinetic theory methods where interactions are described by theoretical tools of game theory. As an application, the proposed approach is used to model the learning processes that take place in a classroom. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Time-Sliced Perturbation Theory for Large Scale Structure I: General Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Blas, Diego; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a new analytic approach to describe large scale structure formation in the mildly non-linear regime. The central object of the method is the time-dependent probability distribution function generating correlators of the cosmological observables at a given moment of time. Expanding the distribution function around the Gaussian weight we formulate a perturbative technique to calculate non-linear corrections to cosmological correlators, similar to the diagrammatic expansion in a three-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory, with time playing the role of an external parameter. For the physically relevant case of cold dark matter in an Einstein--de Sitter universe, the time evolution of the distribution function can be found exactly and is encapsulated by a time-dependent coupling constant controlling the perturbative expansion. We show that all building blocks of the expansion are free from spurious infrared enhanced contributions that plague the standard cosmological perturbation theory. This pave...

  13. Enforced Scale Selection in Field Theories of Mechanical and Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Jens Magelund

    The collective motion of driven or self-propelled interacting units is in many natural systems known to produce complex patterns. This thesis considers two continuum field theories commonly used in describing pattern formation and dynamics: The first one, the phase field crystal model, which...... dynamics of single crystals. Secondly, a continuum theory describing mesoscopic turbulence of biological active matter, which is used to study long-range ordered vorticity patterns generated by cell divisions in a endothelial cell layer....... describes the dynamical and equilibrium properties of crystalline material, is used to study the coarsening dynamics of polycrystalline materials in two and three dimensions. A generalization introducing a faster elastic relaxation time scale is then used to study the plastic deformation and dislocation...

  14. Developing Scale for Assimilate the Integration between Learning Theories and E-learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Maher Iskander

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As e-learning tend to get more and more significant for all kind of universities, researchers and consultants are becoming aware of the fact that a high technology approach and Blackboard do not guarantee successful teaching and learning. Thus, a move to pedagogy-based theories can be observed within the field of e-learning. This study describes the procedure of the development of an empirically-based psychometrically-sound instrument to measure instructional model for e-learning system at Middle East universities. In order to accelerate the acceptance of e-learning and implementation of institution-wide adoption of e-learning, it is important to understand students' perceptions with instructional model for e- learning. The 19-item scale developed shows a high probability of differentiating between positive and negative perceptions and the methods which can be used for embedding the traditional learning theories into e-learning.

  15. Birks' scaling of the particle light output functions for the EJ 299-33 plastic scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyibule, S. [University of Rochester, Department of Physics, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Tõke, J.; Henry, E. [University of Rochester, Department of Chemistry, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Schröder, W.U., E-mail: w.udo.schroeder@rochester.edu [University of Rochester, Department of Physics, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); University of Rochester, Department of Chemistry, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Acosta, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Auditore, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Department of Physics, Messina University, Messina (Italy); Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Francalanza, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Gianì, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania (Italy); Minniti, T.; Morgana, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Department of Physics, Messina University, Messina (Italy); Pagano, E.V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Pirrone, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Politi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania (Italy); Quattrocchi, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Department of Physics, Messina University, Messina (Italy); Russotto, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania (Italy); and others

    2014-12-21

    The response of the EJ 299-33 plastic scintillator to energetic charged nuclear particles ranging from isotopes of hydrogen to carbon-12 has been analyzed in terms of Birks' semi-empirical approach over the wide range of particle energies from 2 to 20 AMeV. It was found that while the original two-parameter scaling involving Birks' composite quenching parameter kB and an overall conversion efficiency parameter S may be applicable to select sets of particles, a more universal fit would still require individual scintillation efficiencies S{sub x} for individual particle species and more than just one value of the composite Birks' constant kB.

  16. Calculating the rotational friction coefficient of fractal aerosol particles in the transition regime using extended Kirkwood-Riseman theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, James; Mulholland, George W.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2017-07-01

    We apply our extended Kirkwood-Riseman theory to compute the translation, rotation, and coupling friction tensors and the scalar rotational friction coefficient for an aerosol fractal aggregate in the transition flow regime. The method can be used for particles consisting of spheres in contact. Our approach considers only the linear velocity of the primary spheres in a rotating aggregate and ignores rotational and coupling interactions between spheres. We show that this simplified approach is within approximately 40% of the true value for any particle for Knudsen numbers between 0.01 and 100. The method is especially accurate (i.e., within about 5%) near the free-molecule regime, where there is little interaction between the particle and the flow field, and for particles with low fractal dimension (≲2 ) consisting of many spheres, where the average distance between spheres is large and translational interaction effects dominate. Our results suggest that there is a universal relationship between the rotational friction coefficient and an aggregate Knudsen number, defined as the ratio of continuum to free-molecule rotational friction coefficients.

  17. Systematic Analysis of the Non-Extensive Statistical Approach in High Energy Particle Collisions—Experiment vs. Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Bíró

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of high-energy particle collisions is an excellent testbed for the non-extensive statistical approach. In these reactions we are far from the thermodynamical limit. In small colliding systems, such as electron-positron or nuclear collisions, the number of particles is several orders of magnitude smaller than the Avogadro number; therefore, finite-size and fluctuation effects strongly influence the final-state one-particle energy distributions. Due to the simple characterization, the description of the identified hadron spectra with the Boltzmann–Gibbs thermodynamical approach is insufficient. These spectra can be described very well with Tsallis–Pareto distributions instead, derived from non-extensive thermodynamics. Using the q-entropy formula, we interpret the microscopic physics in terms of the Tsallis q and T parameters. In this paper we give a view on these parameters, analyzing identified hadron spectra from recent years in a wide center-of-mass energy range. We demonstrate that the fitted Tsallis-parameters show dependency on the center-of-mass energy and particle species (mass. Our findings are described well by a QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics inspired parton evolution ansatz. Based on this comprehensive study, apart from the evolution, both mesonic and baryonic components found to be non-extensive ( q > 1 , besides the mass ordered hierarchy observed in the parameter T. We also study and compare in details the theory-obtained parameters for the case of PYTHIA8 Monte Carlo Generator, perturbative QCD and quark coalescence models.

  18. Parameter identifiability in application of soft particle electrokinetic theory to determine polymer and polyelectrolyte coating thicknesses on colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Stacey M; Phenrat, Tanapon; Small, Mitchell J; Tilton, Robert D; Lowry, Gregory V

    2012-07-17

    Soft particle electrokinetic models have been used to determine adsorbed nonionic polymer and polyelectrolyte layer properties on nanoparticles or colloids by fitting electrophoretic mobility data. Ohshima first established the formalism for these models and provided analytical approximations ( Ohshima, H. Adv. Colloid Interface Sci.1995, 62, 189 ). More recently, exact numerical solutions have been developed, which account for polarization and relaxation effects and require fewer assumptions on the particle and soft layer properties. This paper characterizes statistical uncertainty in the polyelectrolyte layer charge density, layer thickness, and permeability (Brinkman screening length) obtained from fitting data to either the analytical or numerical electrokinetic models. Various combinations of particle core and polymer layer properties are investigated to determine the range of systems for which this analysis can provide a solution with reasonably small uncertainty bounds, particularly for layer thickness. Identifiability of layer thickness in the analytical model ranges from poor confidence for cases with thick, highly charged coatings, to good confidence for cases with thin, low-charged coatings. Identifiability is similar for the numerical model, except that sensitivity is improved at very high charge and permeability, where polarization and relaxation effects are significant. For some poorly identifiable cases, parameter reduction can reduce collinearity to improve identifiability. Analysis of experimental data yielded results consistent with expectations from the simulated theoretical cases. Identifiability of layer charge density and permeability is also evaluated. Guidelines are suggested for evaluation of statistical confidence in polymer and polyelectrolyte layer parameters determined by application of the soft particle electrokinetic theory.

  19. Cloud droplet activation of mixed model HULIS and NaCl particles: Experimental results and κ-Köhler theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Thomas B.; Prisle, Nønne L.; Bilde, Merete

    2014-02-01

    Significant amounts of humic-like substances (HULIS) are present in marine submicrometer particles. The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation was investigated for marine model particles comprised of Nordic Aquatic Fulvic Acid Reference (NAFA) and sodium chloride (NaCl) in mass ratios of 100:0, 80:20, 50:50, 20:80 and 0:100 respectively. The CCN activity of NAFA was found to be represented by a κ value of 0.028. The CCN activities of the mixed particles were overestimated by volume weighted addition of the κ values of the pure compounds, which indicates that synergistic effects of the mixtures tend to lower the CCN activity. Parameterizations of water activity (aw) and surface tension (σ) versus solute concentration were obtained from measurements on aqueous solutions. The CCN activity was modeled on the basis of the parameterizations of aw and σ using Köhler theory. For the particles containing 50% or more NAFA the model overpredicted the CCN activity compared to observations. Reasonable model results were obtained by assuming a surface tension of pure water.

  20. Kinetic Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas, Charged Particle Acceleration, and Cross-Scale Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-10

    asymmetric solar wind electron distributions, Physics of Plasmas 16, 062902, doi: 10.1063/1.3085795 (2009). [4] J. Pavan , L. F. Ziebell, P. H. Yoon...New York, 2009), pp. 50—73. [9] J. Pavan , L. F. Ziebell, P. H. Yoon, and R. Gaelzer, Generation of quasi-isotropic electron population during...nonlinear beam-plasma interaction, J. Geophys. Res. 115, A01103, doi: 10.1029/2009JA014447 (2010). [10] J. Pavan , L. F. Ziebell, P. H. Yoon, and R

  1. Hamiltonian Constraints and Dirac's Observables: from Relativistic Particles towards Field Theory and General Relativity.

    OpenAIRE

    Lusanna, Luca

    1995-01-01

    A review is given of the presymplectic approach to relativistic physical systems and of the determination of their Dirac's observables. After relativistic mechanics and Nambu string, the Dirac's observables of Yang-Mills theory with fermions are given for the case of massless vector bosons (like in QED). A Dirac-Yukawa-like intrinsic ultraviolet cut-off is identified from the study of the covariantization of Hamiltonian classical field theory in the Dirac-Tomonaga-Schwinger sens. The implicat...

  2. A Non-Perturbative, Finite Particle Number Approach to Relativistic Scattering Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindesay, James V

    2001-05-11

    We present integral equations for the scattering amplitudes of three scalar particles, using the Faddeev channel decomposition, which can be readily extended to any finite number of particles of any helicity. The solution of these equations, which have been demonstrated to be calculable, provide a non-perturbative way of obtaining relativistic scattering amplitudes for any finite number of particles that are Lorentz invariant, unitary, cluster decomposable and reduce unambiguously in the non-relativistic limit to the non-relativistic Faddeev equations. The aim of this program is to develop equations which explicitly depend upon physically observable input variables, and do not require ''renormalization'' or ''dressing'' of these parameters to connect them to the boundary states.

  3. Theory of diffusion of active particles that move at constant speed in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Francisco J.; Gómez Nava, Luis A.

    2014-08-01

    Starting from a Langevin description of active particles that move with constant speed in infinite two-dimensional space and its corresponding Fokker-Planck equation, we develop a systematic method that allows us to obtain the coarse-grained probability density of finding a particle at a given location and at a given time in arbitrary short-time regimes. By going beyond the diffusive limit, we derive a generalization of the telegrapher equation. Such generalization preserves the hyperbolic structure of the equation and incorporates memory effects in the diffusive term. While no difference is observed for the mean-square displacement computed from the two-dimensional telegrapher equation and from our generalization, the kurtosis results in a sensible parameter that discriminates between both approximations. We carry out a comparative analysis in Fourier space that sheds light on why the standard telegrapher equation is not an appropriate model to describe the propagation of particles with constant speed in dispersive media.

  4. Trinity amputation and prosthesis experience scales: a psychometric assessment using classical test theory and rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Pamela; Franchignoni, F; Giordano, A; MacLachlan, M

    2010-06-01

    To perform a detailed psychometric analysis using both classical test theory and Rasch analysis of the three main scales of the Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales (TAPES) in people with a lower-limb amputation. A sample of 498 persons who were prosthesis users with a lower-limb amputation was retrospectively studied, pooled from a number of studies undertaken across the United Kingdom and Ireland in the past decade in which the TAPES had been completed as part of a postal survey. Both factor analysis techniques and Rasch analysis were performed on TAPES data. Dimensionality, item fit to the model, response category performance, and internal construct validity were assessed. Category collapsing and item removal were considered to improve the questionnaire. The analyses suggested to restructure the TAPES as follows: (a) three psychosocial adjustment subscales with a four-point rating scale (and a reworded item); (b) an activity restriction scale based on ten items with their original three-point rating scale; and (c) two satisfaction with the prosthesis subscales using a three-point rating scale. All scales and subscales showed acceptable internal consistency and ability to define a distinct hierarchy of persons along the measured construct. This study empirically identified a revised version of the TAPES (TAPES-R) with a simplified general structure and psychometrically suitable for assessing the complex experience of amputation and adjustment to a lower-limb prosthesis. Additional studies are needed to confirm and further explore its measurement properties in other samples, thereby adding clinical validity to the instrument.

  5. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsmith, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    Particle Physics is the first book to connect theory and experiment in particle physics. Duncan Carlsmith provides the first accessible exposition of the standard model with sufficient mathematical depth to demystify the language of gauge theory and Feynman diagrams used by researchers in the field. Carlsmith also connects theories to past, present, and future experiments.

  6. Application of particle swarm optimization theory in optoelectronic payload installation error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Peng, Pengfei; Luo, Bing; He, Chu

    2017-08-01

    Optoelectronic load installation error is the main factor affecting the passive positioning accuracy of photoelectric load equipped on the aerial mobile single platform. In order to solve the problem of complex modeling and low accuracy of traditional analytical methods, a particle swarm optimization (PSO) method is used to correct the installation error. The simulation results show that the particle swarm optimization method has high efficiency and good search effect, and it can be used to correct the installation error. The method proposed in the thesis provides a new simple and workable way for load installation error correction.

  7. Linear-scaling density functional theory using the projector augmented wave method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Nicholas D. M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum mechanical simulation of realistic models of nanostructured systems, such as nanocrystals and crystalline interfaces, demands computational methods combining high-accuracy with low-order scaling with system size. Blöchl’s projector augmented wave (PAW) approach enables all-electron (AE) calculations with the efficiency and systematic accuracy of plane-wave pseudopotential calculations. Meanwhile, linear-scaling (LS) approaches to density functional theory (DFT) allow for simulation of thousands of atoms in feasible computational effort. This article describes an adaptation of PAW for use in the LS-DFT framework provided by the ONETEP LS-DFT package. ONETEP uses optimisation of the density matrix through in situ-optimised local orbitals rather than the direct calculation of eigenstates as in traditional PAW approaches. The method is shown to be comparably accurate to both PAW and AE approaches and to exhibit improved convergence properties compared to norm-conserving pseudopotential methods.

  8. Item response theory analysis of the Lichtenberg Financial Decision Screening Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresi, Jeanne A; Ocepek-Welikson, Katja; Lichtenberg, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    The focus of these analyses was to examine the psychometric properties of the Lichtenberg Financial Decision Screening Scale (LFDSS). The purpose of the screen was to evaluate the decisional abilities and vulnerability to exploitation of older adults. Adults aged 60 and over were interviewed by social, legal, financial, or health services professionals who underwent in-person training on the administration and scoring of the scale. Professionals provided a rating of the decision-making abilities of the older adult. The analytic sample included 213 individuals with an average age of 76.9 (SD = 10.1). The majority (57%) were female. Data were analyzed using item response theory (IRT) methodology. The results supported the unidimensionality of the item set. Several IRT models were tested. Ten ordinal and binary items evidenced a slightly higher reliability estimate (0.85) than other versions and better coverage in terms of the range of reliable measurement across the continuum of financial incapacity.

  9. Scaling calculation of isoscalar giant resonances in relativistic Thomas-Fermi theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, S.K.; Vinas, X.; Centelles, M. E-mail: mario@ecm.ub.es; Del Estal, M

    2002-05-20

    We derive analytical expressions for the excitation energy of the isoscalar giant monopole and quadrupole resonances in finite nuclei, by using the scaling method and the extended Thomas-Fermi approach to relativistic mean-field theory. We study the ability of several nonlinear {sigma}-{omega} parameter sets of common use in reproducing the experimental data. For monopole oscillations the calculations agree better with experiment when the nuclear matter incompressibility of the relativistic interaction lies in the range 220-260 MeV. The breathing-mode energies of the scaling method compare satisfactorily with those obtained in relativistic RPA and time-dependent mean-field calculations. For quadrupole oscillations, all the analyzed nonlinear parameter sets reproduce the empirical trends reasonably well.

  10. Predicting substance abuse treatment completion using a new scale based on the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemore, Sarah E; Ajzen, Icek

    2014-02-01

    We examined whether a 9-item scale based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) predicted substance abuse treatment completion. Data were collected at a public, outpatient program among clients initiating treatment (N=200). Baseline surveys included measures of treatment-related attitudes, norms, perceived control, and intention; discharge status was collected from program records. As expected, TPB attitude and control components independently predicted intention (model R-squared=.56), and intention was positively associated with treatment completion even including clinical and demographic covariates (model R-squared=.24). TPB components were generally associated with the alternative readiness scales as expected, and the TPB remained predictive at higher levels of coercion. Meanwhile, none of the standard measures of readiness (e.g., the URICA and TREAT) or treatment coercion were positively associated with treatment participation. Results suggest promise for application of the TPB to treatment completion and support use of the intention component as a screener, though some refinements are suggested. © 2013.

  11. Front-end vision and multi-scale image analysis multi-scale computer vision theory and applications, written in Mathematica

    CERN Document Server

    Romeny, Bart M Haar

    2008-01-01

    Front-End Vision and Multi-Scale Image Analysis is a tutorial in multi-scale methods for computer vision and image processing. It builds on the cross fertilization between human visual perception and multi-scale computer vision (`scale-space') theory and applications. The multi-scale strategies recognized in the first stages of the human visual system are carefully examined, and taken as inspiration for the many geometric methods discussed. All chapters are written in Mathematica, a spectacular high-level language for symbolic and numerical manipulations. The book presents a new and effective

  12. Mitigating the Dangers of a Single Story: Creating Large-Scale Writing Assessments Aligned With Sociocultural Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behizadeh, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    The dangers of a single story in current U.S. large-scale writing assessment are that assessment practice does not align with theory and this practice has negative effects on instruction and students...

  13. Belief-based Tobacco Smoking Scale: Evaluating the PsychometricProperties of the Theory of Planned Behavior’s Constructs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Majid Barati; Hamid Allahverdipour; Alireza Hidarnia; Shamsodin Niknami; Saeed Bashirian

    2015-01-01

    ...’ beliefs regarding tobacco smoking in the Iranian society. This study aimed to evaluate the validity, reliability and feasibility of the belief-based tobacco smoking scale using the Theory of Planned Behavior’s (TPB...

  14. The Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford Phase Spaces with a Lower and Upper Length Scales and Clifford Group Geometric Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, C

    2004-01-01

    We construct the Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford-Phase spaces with an upper and lower length scales (infrared/ultraviolet cutoff). The invariance symmetry leads naturally to the real Clifford algebra Cl (2, 6, R ) and complexified Clifford Cl_C ( 4 ) algebra related to Twistors. We proceed with an extensive review of Smith's 8D model based on the Clifford algebra Cl ( 1 ,7) that reproduces at low energies the physics of the Standard Model and Gravity; including the derivation of all the coupling constants, particle masses, mixing angles, ....with high precision. Further results by Smith are discussed pertaining the interplay among Clifford, Jordan, Division and Exceptional Lie algebras within the hierarchy of dimensions D = 26, 27, 28 related to bosonic string, M, F theory. Two Geometric actions are presented like the Clifford-Space extension of Maxwell's Electrodynamics, Brandt's action related the 8D spacetime tangent-bundle involving coordinates and velocities (Finsler geometries) followed by a...

  15. Hydrodynamics of a commercial scale CFB boiler-study with radioactive tracer particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Weigang; Hansen, Peter F.B.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results with radioactive tracer particles in an 80 MWth circulating fluidized-bed boiler. Batches of gamma-ray emitting tracer particles were injected into the standpipe. The response curves of the impulse injection were measured by a set of successive scintil...... the model to the experimental data. In the same way, the average particle velocities in the furnace are estimated. The impact of loading on the particle recirculating rate and on the hydrodynamics of the boiler is discussed. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  16. Large-Scale Investigation of the Role of Trait Activation Theory for Understanding Assessment Center Convergent and Discriminant Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Filip; Chasteen, Christopher S.; Day, Eric Anthony; Christiansen, Neil D.

    2006-01-01

    This study used trait activation theory as a theoretical framework to conduct a large-scale test of the interactionist explanation of the convergent and discriminant validity findings obtained in assessment centers. Trait activation theory specifies the conditions in which cross-situationally consistent and inconsistent candidate performances are…

  17. Using Rasch measurement theory to assess three depression scales among adults with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth Reisinger; Engelhard, George; Thompson, Nancy J

    2012-07-01

    People with chronic conditions, such as epilepsy, are at a high risk for depression; however depression is often under-recognized and undertreated. Depression scales, including one specific to people with epilepsy, have been used for screening in this population, although none have been assessed with Rasch measurement theory. This study used Rasch analyses in order to evaluate and compare the psychometric properties of the modified Beck Depression Inventory, the Patient Health Questionnaire, and the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy in a sample of people with epilepsy and depression who participated in an intervention designed to reduce depressive symptoms. A secondary purpose was to assess item functioning across time. The sample includes 44 participants in the Project UPLIFT program who completed the assessments before and after taking part in the intervention. Results of the Rasch analysis indicate that the three depression scales functioned as intended. There was good overall targeting between the items and the sample, acceptable model-data fit, and good reliability of separation for persons, items, and time. The participants experienced a significant decrease in depressive symptoms from pretest to posttest. This study illustrates the value of using model-based measurement with the Rasch model to combine items across the three depression scales. It also demonstrates an approach for analyzing and evaluating the results of small scale intervention programs, such as the UPLIFT program. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An innovative experimental setup for Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry measurements in riverine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Flavia; Olivieri, Giorgio; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) is a powerful methodology to nonintrusively monitor surface flows. Its use has been beneficial to the development of rating curves in riverine environments and to map geomorphic features in natural waterways. Typical LSPIV experimental setups rely on the use of mast-mounted cameras for the acquisition of natural stream reaches. Such cameras are installed on stream banks and are angled with respect to the water surface to capture large scale fields of view. Despite its promise and the simplicity of the setup, the practical implementation of LSPIV is affected by several challenges, including the acquisition of ground reference points for image calibration and time-consuming and highly user-assisted procedures to orthorectify images. In this work, we perform LSPIV studies on stream sections in the Aniene and Tiber basins, Italy. To alleviate the limitations of traditional LSPIV implementations, we propose an improved video acquisition setup comprising a telescopic, an inexpensive GoPro Hero 3 video camera, and a system of two lasers. The setup allows for maintaining the camera axis perpendicular to the water surface, thus mitigating uncertainties related to image orthorectification. Further, the mast encases a laser system for remote image calibration, thus allowing for nonintrusively calibrating videos without acquiring ground reference points. We conduct measurements on two different water bodies to outline the performance of the methodology in case of varying flow regimes, illumination conditions, and distribution of surface tracers. Specifically, the Aniene river is characterized by high surface flow velocity, the presence of abundant, homogeneously distributed ripples and water reflections, and a meagre number of buoyant tracers. On the other hand, the Tiber river presents lower surface flows, isolated reflections, and several floating objects. Videos are processed through image-based analyses to correct for lens

  19. A preliminary and qualitative study of resource ratio theory to nitrifying lab-scale bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Micol; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Beneduce, Luciano; Graham, David W; Head, Ian M; Curtis, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of microbial diversity in design would ideally require predictive theory that would relate operational parameters to the numbers and distribution of taxa. Resource ratio-theory (RRT) might be one such theory. Based on Monod kinetics, it explains diversity in function of resource-ratio and richness. However, to be usable in biological engineered system, the growth parameters of all the bacteria under consideration and the resource supply and diffusion parameters for all the relevant nutrients should be determined. This is challenging, but plausible, at least for low diversity groups with simple resource requirements like the ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). One of the major successes of RRT was its ability to explain the ‘paradox of enrichment’ which states that diversity first increases and then decreases with resource richness. Here, we demonstrate that this pattern can be seen in lab-scale-activated sludge reactors and parallel simulations that incorporate the principles of RRT in a floc-based system. High and low ammonia and oxygen were supplied to continuous flow bioreactors with resource conditions correlating with the composition and diversity of resident AOB communities based on AOB 16S rDNA clone libraries. Neither the experimental work nor the simulations are definitive proof for the application of RRT in this context. However, it is sufficient evidence that such approach might work and justify a more rigorous investigation. PMID:25874592

  20. Large-scale transportation network congestion evolution prediction using deep learning theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Ma

    Full Text Available Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS and Internet of Things (IoT, transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation.

  1. Large-scale transportation network congestion evolution prediction using deep learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Internet of Things (IoT), transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation.

  2. Examining the validity of the Academic Motivation Scale by comparing scale construction to self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokley, K O

    2000-04-01

    This study examined the construct validity of the Academic Motivation Scale. Specifically, subscale correlations were examined to assess whether support for a continuum of self-determination would be provided. The three types of Intrinsic Motivation were significantly and positively correlated with each other .67, .62, and .58, while the three types of Extrinsic Motivation were significantly and positively intercorrelated .50, .49, and .45. The former subscales, however, correlated higher with Introjected Regulation than Identified Regulation, suggesting that Introjected Regulation may be indicative of more self-determined behavior than has previously been believed. Also, the Intrinsic Motivation To Accomplish subscale had a stronger relationship with two of the Extrinsic Motivation subscales, Identified Regulation and Introjected Regulation, than did the Extrinsic Motivation subscales with each other. This suggests that the differences between Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivation are not as obvious as has been believed. Also, contrary to self-determination theory, Amotivation had a stronger negative correlation with Identified Regulation (r = -.31) than with any of the Intrinsic Motivation subscales (rs = -.27, -.19, and -.11).

  3. Velocity moment-based quasilinear theory and particle-in-cell simulation of parallel electron firehose instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, P. H.; López, R. A.; Seough, J.; Sarfraz, M.

    2017-11-01

    The present paper investigates the physics of electron firehose instability propagating parallel to the direction of ambient magnetic field vector, by means of particle-in-cell simulation and macroscopic quasilinear kinetic theory. The electron firehose instability is excited when parallel electron temperature exceeds perpendicular temperature, T∥e>T⊥e , under high beta conditions. A recent paper [Sarfraz et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 012907 (2017)] formulated the quasilinear theory of parallel electron firehose instability by assuming that the electron and proton velocity distribution functions can be approximately described by bi-Maxwellian forms for all times but allowing for dynamical changes in perpendicular and parallel temperatures as well as the wave intensity. The present paper examines the validity of such an approach by making direct comparison against particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that the macroscopic quasilinear approach provides a qualitative description of the nonlinear phase of the instability, but some quantitative discrepancies are also found. Possible causes for the discrepancies are discussed.

  4. Large Scale FEM of the effective elastic properties of particle reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauhe, Jens Christian; Pyrz, Ryszard; Lund, Erik

    2004-01-01

    Over the years several methods have been proposed for the determination of the effective elastic properties of particle reinforced composites. The material microstructures used in the present analysis is a real microstructure and a numerically generated microstructure. X-ray microtomography is used...... three-dimensional finite element models of the microstructure. The models contain a large number of elements, up to 1 million, and are solved iteratively using an element-by-element formalism. Models containing 100 particles have been statistically generated and the material properties of each particle...... is assigned using a Gaussian distribution of the properties. Various distributions have been used to determine how the variation of particle properties influences the effective elastic properties. From this examination it was found that the larger the variation of the particle properties is the softer...

  5. Maximizing measurement efficiency of behavior rating scales using Item Response Theory: An example with the Social Skills Improvement System - Teacher Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Christopher J; DiPerna, James C; Lei, Pui-Wa

    2016-04-01

    Measurement efficiency is an important consideration when developing behavior rating scales for use in research and practice. Although most published scales have been developed within a Classical Test Theory (CTT) framework, Item Response Theory (IRT) offers several advantages for developing scales that maximize measurement efficiency. The current study provides an example of using IRT to maximize rating scale efficiency with the Social Skills Improvement System - Teacher Rating Scale (SSIS - TRS), a measure of student social skills frequently used in practice and research. Based on IRT analyses, 27 items from the Social Skills subscales and 14 items from the Problem Behavior subscales of the SSIS - TRS were identified as maximally efficient. In addition to maintaining similar content coverage to the published version, these sets of maximally efficient items demonstrated similar psychometric properties to the published SSIS - TRS. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Canonical symplectic particle-in-cell method for long-term large-scale simulations of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Jianyuan; Zhang, Ruili; He, Yang; Wang, Yulei; Sun, Yajuan; Burby, Joshua W.; Ellison, Leland; Zhou, Yao

    2015-12-14

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is the most important numerical tool in plasma physics. However, its long-term accuracy has not been established. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a canonical symplectic PIC method for the Vlasov-Maxwell system by discretising its canonical Poisson bracket. A fast local algorithm to solve the symplectic implicit time advance is discovered without root searching or global matrix inversion, enabling applications of the proposed method to very large-scale plasma simulations with many, e.g. 10(9), degrees of freedom. The long-term accuracy and fidelity of the algorithm enables us to numerically confirm Mouhot and Villani's theory and conjecture on nonlinear Landau damping over several orders of magnitude using the PIC method, and to calculate the nonlinear evolution of the reflectivity during the mode conversion process from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves.

  7. Substandard model? At last, a good reason to opt for a sexier theory of particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, A

    2001-01-01

    According to experimenters at Brookhaven, a tiny discrepancy in the magnetism of the muon may signal a crack in the Standard Model. The deviation could be the first piece of hard evidence for a more complete theory called supersymmetry (1 page).

  8. A Critical Assessment of Recent Work on the Application of Gas/Particle Partitioning Theories to Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauterbach JH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the August 1997 issue of Environmental Science&Technology (ES&T, PANKOW and co-workers at the Oregon Graduate Institute reported that the addition of ammonia-containing additives to cigarette tobacco increased the amount of unprotonated nicotine in cigarette mainstream smoke (MSS and thus increased the bioavailability of nicotine to the smoker. Articles about PANKOW's work also appeared in other publications along with allegations that ammonia-containing additives are used to manipulate nicotine deliveries. However, initial review of PANKOW's research and that reported on environmental tobacco smoke (ETS in an earlier paper showed that potentially serious issues existed with PANKOW's experimental data and conclusions. Consequently, a critical assessment of PANKOW's research and the underlying theories of gas/particle partitioning was undertaken. This assessment confirmed that PANKOW and his co-workers made a number of errors not only in their determinations of the gas/particle partitioning coefficients for nicotine in MSS and ETS but also in the interpretations of the data. During the preparation of this assessment, data from other researchers became public. These data showed that there was no correlation between tobacco ammonia (including residual ammonia from the use of ammonia-containing additives and MSS ammonia deliveries and MSS smoke pH, and that the amount of unprotonated nicotine in the undiluted MSS of a full flavor (FF American filter cigarette was less than 0.1%. These new data fully substantiated the findings of this assessment, and it can be safely concluded that the assertions made by PANKOW and his co-workers were incorrect. However, this assessment also showed that there is significant merit in the application of PANKOW's theory of absorptive partitioning for the estimation of the gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile components in MSS and ETS. Application of PANKOW's theory along with data from recent tobacco related

  9. Relativistic particle transport in extragalactic jets: I. Coupling MHD and kinetic theory

    OpenAIRE

    Casse, F.; Marcowith, A.

    2003-01-01

    Multidimensional magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) simulations coupled with stochastic differential equations (SDEs) adapted to test particle acceleration and transport in complex astrophysical flows are presented. The numerical scheme allows the investigation of shock acceleration, adiabatic and radiative losses as well as diffusive spatial transport in various diffusion regimes. The applicability of SDEs to astrophysics is first discussed in regards to the different regimes and the MHD code spat...

  10. Kinetic theory of phase space plateaux in a non-thermal energetic particle distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, F., E-mail: frida.eriksson@chalmers.se; Nyqvist, R. M. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Lilley, M. K. [Physics Department, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    The transformation of kinetically unstable plasma eigenmodes into hole-clump pairs with temporally evolving carrier frequencies was recently attributed to the emergence of an intermediate stage in the mode evolution cycle, that of an unmodulated plateau in the phase space distribution of fast particles. The role of the plateau as the hole-clump breeding ground is further substantiated in this article via consideration of its linear and nonlinear stability in the presence of fast particle collisions and sources, which are known to affect the production rates and subsequent frequency sweeping of holes and clumps. In particular, collisional relaxation, as mediated by e.g. velocity space diffusion or even simple Krook-type collisions, is found to inhibit hole-clump generation and detachment from the plateau, as it should. On the other hand, slowing down of the fast particles turns out to have an asymmetrically destabilizing/stabilizing effect, which explains the well-known result that collisional drag enhances holes and their sweeping rates but suppresses clumps. It is further demonstrated that relaxation of the plateau edge gradients has only a minor quantitative effect and does not change the plateau stability qualitatively, unless the edge region extends far into the plateau shelf and the corresponding Landau pole needs to be taken into account.

  11. Despina Hatzifotiadou: ALICE Master Class 1 - Theory: strange particles, V0 decays, invariant mass

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    This is the 1st of 4 short online videos. It contains an introduction to the first part of the exercise : what are strange particles, V0 decays, invariant mass. More details and related links on this indico event page. In more detail: What is Physics Master Classes Students after morning lectures, run programmes in the afternoon to do measurements. These tutorials are about how to use the software required to do these measurements. Background info and examples  Looking for strange particles with ALICE http://aliceinfo.cern.ch/Public/MasterCL/MasterClassWebpage.html Introduction to first part of the exercise : what are strange particles, V0 decays, invariant mass. Demonstration of the software for the 1st part of the exercise - visual identification of V0s Introduction to second part of the exercise : strangeness enhancement; centrality of lead-lead collisions; explanation of efficiency, yield, background etc Demonstration of the software for the 2nd part of the exercise - invariant mass spec...

  12. Statistical learning theory for high dimensional prediction: Application to criterion-keyed scale development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Benjamin P; Weiss, Alexander; Duberstein, Paul R

    2016-12-01

    Statistical learning theory (SLT) is the statistical formulation of machine learning theory, a body of analytic methods common in "big data" problems. Regression-based SLT algorithms seek to maximize predictive accuracy for some outcome, given a large pool of potential predictors, without overfitting the sample. Research goals in psychology may sometimes call for high dimensional regression. One example is criterion-keyed scale construction, where a scale with maximal predictive validity must be built from a large item pool. Using this as a working example, we first introduce a core principle of SLT methods: minimization of expected prediction error (EPE). Minimizing EPE is fundamentally different than maximizing the within-sample likelihood, and hinges on building a predictive model of sufficient complexity to predict the outcome well, without undue complexity leading to overfitting. We describe how such models are built and refined via cross-validation. We then illustrate how 3 common SLT algorithms-supervised principal components, regularization, and boosting-can be used to construct a criterion-keyed scale predicting all-cause mortality, using a large personality item pool within a population cohort. Each algorithm illustrates a different approach to minimizing EPE. Finally, we consider broader applications of SLT predictive algorithms, both as supportive analytic tools for conventional methods, and as primary analytic tools in discovery phase research. We conclude that despite their differences from the classic null-hypothesis testing approach-or perhaps because of them-SLT methods may hold value as a statistically rigorous approach to exploratory regression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Einstein-aether theory: dynamics of relativistic particles with spin or polarization in a Gödel-type universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakin, Alexander B.; Popov, Vladimir A.

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of the Einstein-aether theory we consider a cosmological model, which describes the evolution of the unit dynamic vector field with activated rotational degree of freedom. We discuss exact solutions of the Einstein-aether theory, for which the space-time is of the Gödel-type, the velocity four-vector of the aether motion is characterized by a non-vanishing vorticity, thus the rotational vectorial modes can be associated with the source of the universe rotation. The main goal of our paper is to study the motion of test relativistic particles with a vectorial internal degree of freedom (spin or polarization), which is coupled to the unit dynamic vector field. The particles are considered as the test ones in the given space-time background of the Gödel-type the spin (polarization) coupling to the unit dynamic vector field is modeled using exact solutions of three types. The first exact solution describes the aether with arbitrary Jacobson's coupling constants; the second one relates to the case, when the Jacobson's constant responsible for the vorticity is vanishing; the third exact solution is obtained using three constraints for the coupling constants. The analysis of the exact expressions, which are obtained for the particle momentum and for the spin (polarization) four-vector components, shows that the interaction of the spin (polarization) with the unit vector field induces a rotation, which is additional to the geodesic precession of the spin (polarization) associated with the universe rotation as a whole.

  14. Variation of particle concentrations and environmental noise on the urban neighbourhood scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stephan; Litschke, Tom

    Particulate air pollution and environmental noise received increased attention within the environmental health community during recent years due to their potential impacts on human health. In this study the spatio-temporal variation of noise and particles was estimated by a short set of mobile measurements within an urban neighbourhood in Essen, Germany. Particle concentrations (PM 1 and PM coarse = PM 10 - PM 1) were measured by an optical particle counter continuously along the measurement route while environmental noise was measured at fixed points on the same route. Additionally, wind and turbulence parameters were gathered above rooftop height and within an urban street canyon. The spatial distribution of noise was very homogeneous while the distribution of particle concentrations turned out to be rather inhomogeneous. The spatial correlation between noise and particles was found to be poor for PM coarse during all measurements. However, for PM 1 and noise a moderate positive correlation ( r ˜ 0.5) emerged under conditions of weak turbulent atmospheric mixing. The spatio-temporal covariation between particles and noise is believed to be more evident for ultrafine (<100 nm) particles.

  15. Measurement with multiple indicators and psychophysical scaling in the context of Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Putte, B.; Saris, W.E.; Hoogstraten, J.

    1995-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to test the theory of reasoned action of Fishbein and Ajzen. The measurements were done using two category scales and two psychophysical scales. No consistent difference in results was found between the four modalities. However, if the latter were used as multiple

  16. Reliability and Validity Study of the Mobile Learning Adoption Scale Developed Based on the Diffusion of Innovations Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ismail; Sahin, Ismail; Aydin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a mobile learning adoption scale (MLAS) was developed on the basis of Rogers' (2003) Diffusion of Innovations Theory. The scale that was developed consists of four sections. These sections are as follows: Stages in the innovation-decision process, Types of m-learning decision, Innovativeness level and attributes of m-learning.…

  17. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale in Portuguese adults: from classical measurement theory to Rasch model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargento, Paulo; Perea, Victoria; Ladera, Valentina; Lopes, Paulo; Oliveira, Jorge

    2015-05-01

    The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) is a largely wide used scale for sleepiness assessment. Measurement properties are studied in a sample of Portuguese adults, using different statistical procedures. The sample consisted of 222 Portuguese adults (97 men and 125 women) with a mean age of 42 years old (SD = 12.5), 46 of which had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) confirmed by polysomnography. The participants were assessed with the ESS, which was tested through a quantitative analysis based on the classical measurement theory (CMT) or the Rasch model (RM) conventions. A principal component factor analysis was performed according to the CMT, revealing a single factor explaining 39.92% of the total variance of the scale. Internal consistency measured by Cronbach's α coefficient was of .77. The mean of inter-item correlation was of .31 (.05  .47), whereas the item-total correlations were considered good (.46  .73). The ESS total score for OSA patients was significantly higher than healthy participants (p measure for assessing sleepiness in Portuguese adults.

  18. Correspondence of verbal descriptor and numeric rating scales for pain intensity: an item response theory calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelen, Maria Orlando; Saliba, Debra

    2010-07-01

    Assessing pain intensity in older adults is critical and challenging. There is debate about the most effective way to ask older adults to describe their pain severity, and clinicians vary in their preferred approaches, making comparison of pain intensity scores across settings difficult. A total of 3,676 residents from 71 community nursing homes across eight states were asked about pain presence. The 1,960 residents who reported pain within the past 5 days (53% of total, 70% female; age: M = 77.9, SD = 12.4) were included in analyses. Those who reported pain were also asked to provide a rating of pain intensity using either a verbal descriptor scale (VDS; mild, moderate, severe, and very severe and horrible), a numeric rating scale (NRS; 0 = no pain to 10 = worst pain imaginable), or both. We used item response theory (IRT) methods to identify the correspondence between the VDS and the NRS response options by estimating item parameters for these and five additional pain items. The sample reported moderate amounts of pain on average. Examination of the IRT location parameters for the pain intensity items indicated the following approximate correspondence: VDS mild approximately NRS 1-4, VDS moderate approximately NRS 5-7, VDS severe approximately NRS 8-9, and VDS very severe, horrible approximately NRS 10. This IRT calibration provides a crosswalk between the two response scales so that either can be used in practice depending on the preference of the clinician and respondent.

  19. Assessment of Social Cognition and Theory of Mind: Initial Validation of the Geneva Social Cognition Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martory, Marie-Dominique; Pegna, Alan John; Sheybani, Laurent; Métral, Mélanie; Bernasconi Pertusio, Françoise; Annoni, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Social cognition is widely studied in neurology. At present, such evaluations are designed for research or for specific diseases and simple general clinical tools are lacking. We propose a clinical evaluation tool for social cognition, the Geneva Social Cognition Scale (GeSoCS). The GeSoCS is a 100-point scale composed of 6 subtests (theory of mind stories, recognition of social emotions, false beliefs, inferences, absurdity judgement and planning abilities) chosen from different validated tests of social and cognitive evaluation. Eighty-four patients with neurological disorders and 52 controls participated in the study. Evaluation duration lasted 20-60 min. Mean scores were 92.6 ± 4.5 for controls and 76.5 ± 15.3 for patients and differentiate patients and controls in all subtests. With a cut-off score of 84, the scale had a sensitivity of 62% and a specificity of 94%. In our stroke subgroup, right CVAs failed in cartoons, inferences, 'mind in the eyes', and in the temporal rule task while left CVAs were impaired in verbal/discourse tasks (social cognition, inferences, absurd stories, and cartoons. The GeSoCS is a medium duration assessment tool that appears to detect and characterize significant social impairment in neurological patients. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Toward city-scale water quality control: building a theory for smart stormwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkez, B.; Mullapudi, A. M.; Wong, B. P.

    2016-12-01

    Urban stormwater systems are rarely designed as actual systems. Rather, it is often assumed that individual Best Management Practices (BMPs) will add up to achieve desired watershed outcomes. Given the rise of BMPs and green infrastructure, we ask: does doing "best" at the local scale guarantee the "best" at the global scale? Existing studies suggest that the system-level performance of distributed stormwater practices may actually adversely impact watersheds by increasing downstream erosion and reducing water quality. Optimizing spatial placement may not be sufficient, however, since precipitation variability and other sources of uncertainty can drive the overall system into undesirable states. To that end, it is also important to control the temporal behavior of the system, which can be achieved by equipping stormwater elements (ponds, wetlands, basins, bioswales, etc.) with "smart" sensors and valves. Rather than building new infrastructure, this permits for existing assets to be repurposed and controlled to adapt to individual storm events. While we have learned how to build and deploy the necessary sensing and control technologies, we do not have a framework or theory that combines our knowledge of hydrology, hydraulics, water quality and control. We discuss the development of such a framework and investigate how existing water domain knowledge can be transferred into a system-theoretic context to enable real-time, city-scale stormwater control. We apply this framework to water quality control in an urban watershed in southeast Michigan, which has been heavily instrumented and retrofitted for control over the past year.

  1. The Australian Racism, Acceptance, and Cultural-Ethnocentrism Scale (RACES): item response theory findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Kaine; Manderson, Lenore

    2016-03-17

    Racism and associated discrimination are pervasive and persistent challenges with multiple cumulative deleterious effects contributing to inequities in various health outcomes. Globally, research over the past decade has shown consistent associations between racism and negative health concerns. Such research confirms that race endures as one of the strongest predictors of poor health. Due to the lack of validated Australian measures of racist attitudes, RACES (Racism, Acceptance, and Cultural-Ethnocentrism Scale) was developed. Here, we examine RACES' psychometric properties, including the latent structure, utilising Item Response Theory (IRT). Unidimensional and Multidimensional Rating Scale Model (RSM) Rasch analyses were utilised with 296 Victorian primary school students and 182 adolescents and 220 adults from the Australian community. RACES was demonstrated to be a robust 24-item three-dimensional scale of Accepting Attitudes (12 items), Racist Attitudes (8 items), and Ethnocentric Attitudes (4 items). RSM Rasch analyses provide strong support for the instrument as a robust measure of racist attitudes in the Australian context, and for the overall factorial and construct validity of RACES across primary school children, adolescents, and adults. RACES provides a reliable and valid measure that can be utilised across the lifespan to evaluate attitudes towards all racial, ethnic, cultural, and religious groups. A core function of RACES is to assess the effectiveness of interventions to reduce community levels of racism and in turn inequities in health outcomes within Australia.

  2. A mesoscopic bridging scale method for fluids and coupling dissipative particle dynamics with continuum finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojic, Milos; Filipovic, Nenad; Tsuda, Akira

    2012-01-01

    A multiscale procedure to couple a mesoscale discrete particle model and a macroscale continuum model of incompressible fluid flow is proposed in this study. We call this procedure the mesoscopic bridging scale (MBS) method since it is developed on the basis of the bridging scale method for coupling molecular dynamics and finite element models [G.J. Wagner, W.K. Liu, Coupling of atomistic and continuum simulations using a bridging scale decomposition, J. Comput. Phys. 190 (2003) 249–274]. We derive the governing equations of the MBS method and show that the differential equations of motion of the mesoscale discrete particle model and finite element (FE) model are only coupled through the force terms. Based on this coupling, we express the finite element equations which rely on the Navier–Stokes and continuity equations, in a way that the internal nodal FE forces are evaluated using viscous stresses from the mesoscale model. The dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method for the discrete particle mesoscale model is employed. The entire fluid domain is divided into a local domain and a global domain. Fluid flow in the local domain is modeled with both DPD and FE method, while fluid flow in the global domain is modeled by the FE method only. The MBS method is suitable for modeling complex (colloidal) fluid flows, where continuum methods are sufficiently accurate only in the large fluid domain, while small, local regions of particular interest require detailed modeling by mesoscopic discrete particles. Solved examples – simple Poiseuille and driven cavity flows illustrate the applicability of the proposed MBS method. PMID:23814322

  3. Stream Discharge Measurement Using A Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpold, A. A.; Mostaghimi, S.

    2004-12-01

    Good water management is founded on accurate open-channel flow measurements. New technology for measuring discharge in streams and rivers has been pursued due to concerns about safety, accuracy, and costs of traditional methods. Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) is an emerging technology for measuring discharge in streams and rivers. LSPIV is a system capable of measuring velocity fields by collecting and analyzing recorded images of the flow field. The LSPIV system tracks the movement of `tracers' through successive images using statistical correspondence. Cross-correlation algorithms divide the image into small interrogation areas; each producing one displacement vector. The surface velocity field can be used to estimate discharge based on the channel bathymetry. Use of LSPIV for flow measurements in low-order streams has several advantages. LSPIV is not as labor intensive and does not present the safety concerns of the conventional methods during high flow events. Another promise for LSPIV is remote monitoring applications, which could also reduce labor and data management costs. The scheme used in this study for the development of LSPIV follows a logical progression: assimilate current knowledge, develop methods and acquire equipment, conduct laboratory and field experiments for `proof-of-concept', and refine the methods to decrease costs and increase usability. A laboratory prototype was developed and tested in a flume, with good results. The experiment evaluated the LSPIV prototype and a Marsh-McBirney flow meter against the flume manometer. Several conclusions were made from the statistical analysis. The Froude number affects the accuracy of the Marsh-McBirney flow meter and the LSPIV prototype. Therefore, future applications may wish to use an adaptive method to determine input parameters based on flow conditions. The LSPIV prototype produced poor flow measurements at camera angles above a 30 degree oblique angle. Therefore, field applications

  4. Modeling Self-Assembly Across Scales: The Unifying Perspective of Smart Minimal Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcherio Martinoli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A wealth of current research in microengineering aims at fabricating devices of increasing complexity, notably by (self-assembling elementary components into heterogeneous functional systems. At the same time, a large body of robotic research called swarm robotics is concerned with the design and the control of large ensembles of robots of decreasing size and complexity. This paper describes the asymptotic convergence of micro/nano electromechanical systems (M/NEMS on one side, and swarm robotic systems on the other, toward a unifying class of systems, which we denote Smart Minimal Particles (SMPs. We define SMPs as mobile, purely reactive and physically embodied agents that compensate for their limited on-board capabilities using specifically engineered reactivity to external physical stimuli, including local energy and information scavenging. In trading off internal resources for simplicity and robustness, SMPs are still able to collectively perform non-trivial, spatio-temporally coordinated and highly scalable operations such as aggregation and self-assembly (SA. We outline the opposite converging tendencies, namely M/NEMS smarting and robotic minimalism, by reviewing each field’s literature with specific focus on self-assembling systems. Our main claim is that the SMPs can be used to develop a unifying technological and methodological framework that bridges the gap between passive M/NEMS and active, centimeter-sized robots. By proposing this unifying perspective, we hypothesize a continuum in both complexity and length scale between these two extremes. We illustrate the benefits of possible cross-fertilizations among these originally separate domains, with specific emphasis on the modeling of collective dynamics. Particularly, we argue that while most of the theoretical studies on M/NEMS SA dynamics belong so far to one of only two main frameworks—based on analytical master equations and on numerical agent-based simulations

  5. Decadal-scale trends in regional aerosol particle properties and their linkage to emission changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Gu, Yu; Diner, David; Worden, John; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Su, Hui; Xing, Jia; Garay, Michael; Huang, Lei

    2017-05-01

    Understanding long-term trends in aerosol loading and properties is essential for evaluating the health and climatic effects of these airborne particulates as well as the effectiveness of pollution control policies. While many studies have used satellite data to examine the trends in aerosol optical depth (AOD), very few have investigated the trends in aerosol properties associated with particle size, morphology, and light absorption. In this study, we investigate decadal-scale (13-15 year) trends in aerosol loading and properties during 2001-2015 over three populous regions: the Eastern United States (EUS), Western Europe (WEU), and Eastern and Central China (ECC). We use observations from MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). Relationships between aerosol property trends and air pollutant emission changes are examined. We find that annual mean AOD shows pronounced decreasing trends over EUS and WEU regions, as a result of considerable emission reductions in all major pollutants except for mineral dust and ammonia (NH3). Over the ECC region, AOD increases before 2006 due to emission increases induced by rapid economic development, fluctuates between 2006 and 2011, and subsequently decreases after 2011 in conjunction with effective emission reduction in anthropogenic primary aerosols, sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). The fraction of small-size AOD (albedo have generally decreased, while the fractions of large-size (>1.4 μm diameter), nonspherical and absorbing AOD have generally shown increasing trends over EUS and WEU regions, indicating that fine and light-scattering aerosol constituents have been more effectively reduced than coarse and light-absorbing constituents. These trends are consistent with the larger reduction ratios in SO2 and NOx emissions than in primary aerosols, including mineral dust and black carbon (BC). Over the ECC region, no significant trends are observed with

  6. Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation hydrated Nafion EW 1200 as fuel cell membrane in nanoscopic scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hassanzadeh Afrouzi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The microphase separation of hydrated perfluorinated sulfonic acid membrane Nafion was investigated using Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD. The nafion as a polymer was modelled by connecting coarse grained beads which corresponds to the hydrophobic backbone of polytetrafluoroethylene and perfluorinated side chains terminated by hydrophilic end particles of sulfonic acid groups [1, 2]. Each four water molecule coarse grained in a bead to obtain the same bead size as built in Nafion model. The morphology of hydrated Nafion is studied for branching density of 1144, an example of Nafion EW1200, water content of 10%, 20% and 30% and polymer molecular weight of 5720, 11440 and 17160. The results show water particles and hydrophilic particles of Nafion side chains spontaneously form aggregates and are embedded in the hydrophobic phase of Nafion backbone. The averaged water pore diameter and the averaged water clusters distance were found to rises with water volume fraction.

  7. Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: Imaging at the Nanometer Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Lundt, Nils; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K.; Leone, Stephen R.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2015-04-21

    Atmospheric aerosols can undergo phase transitions including liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) while responding to changes in the ambient relative humidity (RH). Here, we report results of chemical imaging experiments using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to investigate the LLPS of micron sized particles undergoing a full hydration-dehydration cycle. Internally mixed particles composed of ammonium sulfate (AS) and either: limonene secondary organic carbon (LSOC), a, 4-dihydroxy-3-methoxybenzeneaceticacid (HMMA), or polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) were studied. Events of LLPS with apparent core-shell particle morphology were observed for all samples with both techniques. Chemical imaging with STXM showed that both LSOC/AS and HMMA/AS particles were never homogeneously mixed for all measured RH’s above the deliquescence point and that the majority of the organic component was located in the shell. The shell composition was estimated as 65:35 organic: inorganic in LSOC/AS and as 50:50 organic: inorganic for HMMA/AS. PEG-400/AS particles showed fully homogeneous mixtures at high RH and phase separated below 89-92% RH with an estimated 50:50% organic to inorganic mix in the shell. These two chemical imaging techniques are well suited for in-situ analysis of the hygroscopic behavior, phase separation, and surface composition of collected ambient aerosol particles.

  8. Selective laser processing of ink-jet printed nano-scaled tin-clad copper particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung, K.C.; Plura, T.S. [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2010-11-15

    The deposition of tin-clad nano-size copper particles was carried out by means of ink-jet printing. Curing the particles on Polyimide (PI) turned them into soldered structures using an Nd-YAG laser. Area coverage of 55% was achieved for a single-layer print. Subsequent laser sintering increased this value to 95%. A Butanol-based copper ink and an aqueous tin (Sn)-clad Copper (Cu) ink were produced and were ink-jetted in this work. These nano-metallic inks showed excellent suspension stability with particle weight concentrations as high as 5%. The ink components were examined by measuring the particle size distribution in a dispersed condition, and the melting temperature. A piezo ink-jet print head was used to deposit the inks onto a moveable substrate. The thermal effect of the laser irradiation allowed approaching and connecting adjacent particles by melting the particle's tin coating. The results were examined with regard to structure and soldering properties using EDX, SEM and optical microscopy. (orig.)

  9. Understanding Rasch and item response theory models: applications to the estimation and validation of interval latent trait measures from responses to rating scale questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massof, Robert W

    2011-02-01

    Modern psychometric theory is now routinely used in clinical vision research, as well as other areas of health research, to measure latent health states on continuous interval scales from responses to self-report rating scale questionnaires. Two competing theories are commonly employed: Rasch theory and item response theory. Because the field is currently in transition from using traditional scoring algorithms based on classical test theory to using the more modern approaches, this article offers a tutorial review of Rasch theory and item response theory and of the analytical methods employed by the two theories to estimate and validate measures.

  10. Dark Matter Halos as Particle Colliders: Unified Solution to Small-Scale Structure Puzzles from Dwarfs to Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2016-01-29

    Astrophysical observations spanning dwarf galaxies to galaxy clusters indicate that dark matter (DM) halos are less dense in their central regions compared to expectations from collisionless DM N-body simulations. Using detailed fits to DM halos of galaxies and clusters, we show that self-interacting DM (SIDM) may provide a consistent solution to the DM deficit problem across all scales, even though individual systems exhibit a wide diversity in halo properties. Since the characteristic velocity of DM particles varies across these systems, we are able to measure the self-interaction cross section as a function of kinetic energy and thereby deduce the SIDM particle physics model parameters. Our results prefer a mildly velocity-dependent cross section, from σ/m≈2  cm^{2}/g on galaxy scales to σ/m≈0.1  cm^{2}/g on cluster scales, consistent with the upper limits from merging clusters. Our results dramatically improve the constraints on SIDM models and may allow the masses of both DM and dark mediator particles to be measured even if the dark sector is completely hidden from the standard model, which we illustrate for the dark photon model.

  11. Low-energy effective field theory below the electroweak scale: anomalous dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Elizabeth E.; Manohar, Aneesh V.; Stoffer, Peter

    2018-01-01

    We compute the one-loop anomalous dimensions of the low-energy effective Lagrangian below the electroweak scale, up to terms of dimension six. The theory has 70 dimension-five and 3631 dimension-six Hermitian operators that preserve baryon and lepton number, as well as additional operators that violate baryon number and lepton number. The renormalization group equations for the quark and lepton masses and the QCD and QED gauge couplings are modified by dimension-five and dimension-six operator contributions. We compute the renormalization group equations from one insertion of dimension-five and dimension-six operators, as well as two insertions of dimension-five operators, to all terms of dimension less than or equal to six. The use of the equations of motion to eliminate operators can be ambiguous, and we show how to resolve this ambiguity by a careful use of field redefinitions.

  12. Large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations using an enriched finite element basis

    CERN Document Server

    Kanungo, Bikash

    2016-01-01

    We present a computationally efficient approach to perform large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations by enriching the classical finite element basis with compactly supported atom-centered numerical basis functions that are constructed from the solution of the Kohn-Sham (KS) problem for single atoms. We term these numerical basis functions as enrichment functions, and the resultant basis as the enriched finite element basis. The enrichment functions are compactly supported through the use of smooth cutoff functions, which enhances the conditioning and maintains the locality of the basis. The integrals involved in the evaluation of the discrete KS Hamiltonian and overlap matrix in the enriched finite element basis are computed using an adaptive quadrature grid based on the characteristics of enrichment functions. Further, we propose an efficient scheme to invert the overlap matrix by using a block-wise matrix inversion in conjunction with special reduced-order quadrature rules to transform...

  13. Formation factor in Bentheimer and Fontainebleau sandstones: Theory compared with pore-scale numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Berg, Carl F.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate quantification of formation resistivity factor F (also called formation factor) provides useful insight into connectivity and pore space topology in fully saturated porous media. In particular the formation factor has been extensively used to estimate permeability in reservoir rocks. One of the widely applied models to estimate F is Archie's law (F = ϕ- m in which ϕ is total porosity and m is cementation exponent) that is known to be valid in rocks with negligible clay content, such as clean sandstones. In this study we compare formation factors determined by percolation and effective-medium theories as well as Archie's law with numerical simulations of electrical resistivity on digital rock models. These digital models represent Bentheimer and Fontainebleau sandstones and are derived either by reconstruction or directly from micro-tomographic images. Results show that the universal quadratic power law from percolation theory accurately estimates the calculated formation factor values in network models over the entire range of porosity. However, it crosses over to the linear scaling from the effective-medium approximation at the porosity of 0.75 in grid models. We also show that the effect of critical porosity, disregarded in Archie's law, is nontrivial, and the Archie model inaccurately estimates the formation factor in low-porosity homogeneous sandstones.

  14. Patients' needs and satisfiers: applying human scale development theory on end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Margarita

    2010-09-01

    This review considers how needs-based care models have been recently discussed in the scientific literature and proposes the human scale development (HSD) theory to achieve high-quality care (HQC) at the end-of-life (EOL). Comprehensive needs-based care models have been developed among terminally ill cancer patients focusing mostly on HQC at the EOL. To achieve this goal, the implementation of several assessment tools has triggered discussions regarding alternatives for addressing the multidimensional nature of EOL care. Uncertainty has been revealed on several research limitations such as unclear definitions, lack of knowledge of healthcare professionals, psychometric problems, patient burden and reported unmet needs. However, there is general consensus about the need to uphold EOL interventions on needs-based-holistic models in order to accomplish HQC at the EOL. Patients, families and healthcare professionals become part of a process that aims to embrace a unique 'world': the patients' subjectivity, his or her own needs and resources capable of meeting those needs. During the last years, some interesting research has outlined and discussed principal broad domains that geared needs-based (patient-centered) care models; however, reported 'gaps' between desired and current practice in the provision of care reflected the complexity of human needs, specifically at the EOL. As regarding fundamental human needs, an HSD theory exists and it may contribute to improve HQC at the EOL.

  15. Group theory for the standard model of particle physics and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Ken J

    2010-01-01

    Symmetries and Conservation LawsLagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics Quantum MechanicsCoupled Oscillators: Normal Modes One-Dimensional Fields: Waves The Final Step: Lagrange-Hamilton Quantum Field TheoryQuantum Angular MomentumIndex Notation Quantum Angular Momentum Result Matrix Representations Spin 1/2Addition of Angular Momenta Clebsch-Gordan CoefficientsMatrix Representation of Direct (Outer, Kronecker) Products Change of BasisTensors and Tensor OperatorsScalars Scalar FieldsInvariant Functions Contravariant Vectors (t ?index at top) Covariant Vectors (Co = Goes Below) NotesTensorsRotatio

  16. Measurement of α-particle quenching in LAB based scintillator in independent small-scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krosigk, B. von [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Chen, M.; Liu, X.; Wright, A. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Bronx Community College, Bronx, NY (United States); Junghans, A.R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Koegler, T. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kraus, C. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON (Canada); Kuckert, L. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Nolte, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); O' Keeffe, H.M. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Lancaster University, Physics Department, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Tseung, H.W.C. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, WA (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rochester, MN (United States); Wilson, J.R. [Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Yeh, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    The α-particle light response of liquid scintillators based on linear alkylbenzene (LAB) has been measured with three different experimental approaches. In the first approach, α-particles were produced in the scintillator via {sup 12}C(n,α){sup 9}Be reactions. In the second approach, the scintillator was loaded with 2 % of {sup nat}Sm providing an α-emitter, {sup 147}Sm, as an internal source. In the third approach, a scintillator flask was deployed into the water-filled SNO+ detector and the radioactive contaminants {sup 222}Rn, {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po provided the α-particle signal. The behavior of the observed α-particle light outputs are in agreement with each case successfully described by Birks' law. The resulting Birks parameter kB ranges from (0.0066 ± 0.0016) to (0.0076 ± 0.0003) cm/MeV. In the first approach, the α-particle light response was measured simultaneously with the light response of recoil protons produced via neutron- proton elastic scattering. This enabled a first time a direct comparison of kB describing the proton and the α-particle response of LAB based scintillator. The observed kB values describing the two light response functions deviate by more than 5σ. The presented results are valuable for all current and future detectors, using LAB based scintillator as target, since they depend on an accurate knowledge of the scintillator response to different particles. (orig.)

  17. Ultrafine particle transport and deposition in a large scale 17-generation lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad S; Saha, Suvash C; Sauret, Emilie; Gemci, Tevfik; Yang, Ian A; Gu, Y T

    2017-11-07

    To understand how to assess optimally the risks of inhaled particles on respiratory health, it is necessary to comprehend the uptake of ultrafine particulate matter by inhalation during the complex transport process through a non-dichotomously bifurcating network of conduit airways. It is evident that the highly toxic ultrafine particles damage the respiratory epithelium in the terminal bronchioles. The wide range of in silico available and the limited realistic model for the extrathoracic region of the lung have improved understanding of the ultrafine particle transport and deposition (TD) in the upper airways. However, comprehensive ultrafine particle TD data for the real and entire lung model are still unavailable in the literature. Therefore, this study is aimed to provide an understanding of the ultrafine particle TD in the terminal bronchioles for the development of future therapeutics. The Euler-Lagrange (E-L) approach and ANSYS fluent (17.2) solver were used to investigate ultrafine particle TD. The physical conditions of sleeping, resting, and light activity were considered in this modelling study. A comprehensive pressure-drop along five selected path lines in different lobes was calculated. The non-linear behaviour of pressure-drops is observed, which could aid the health risk assessment system for patients with respiratory diseases. Numerical results also showed that ultrafine particle-deposition efficiency (DE) in different lobes is different for various physical activities. Moreover, the numerical results showed hot spots in various locations among the different lobes for different flow rates, which could be helpful for targeted therapeutical aerosol transport to terminal bronchioles and the alveolar region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Polygamous particles

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kun-Ta; Feng, Lang; Sha, Ruojie; Dreyfus, Rémi; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Seeman, Nadrian C.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    DNA is increasingly used as an important tool in programming the self-assembly of micrometer- and nanometer-scale particles. This is largely due to the highly specific thermoreversible interaction of cDNA strands, which, when placed on different particles, have been used to bind precise pairs in aggregates and crystals. However, DNA functionalized particles will only reach their true potential for particle assembly when each particle can address and bind to many different kinds of particles. ...

  19. Formulation of the low-energy effective theory of electroweak symmetry-breaking without a Higgs particle; Formulation de la theorie effective a basse energie du secteur electrofaible sans particule de Higgs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirn, J

    2004-07-01

    The low-energy effective theory of electroweak symmetry-breaking without a Higgs particle is constructed using the methods of Chiral Perturbation Theory. Weinberg's power-counting formula demonstrates the consistency of the loop expansion, with the corresponding renormalization. We find that the suppression of effective operators by a mass scale, which was automatic in the case of the Standard Model, no longer holds in the Higgs-less case. Moreover, the incriminated operators appear at leading order in the chiral expansion, at variance with experiments. To account for their suppression, invariance under a larger symmetry is required, corresponding to the composite sector (which produces the three Goldstone modes) being decoupled from the elementary sector (quarks, leptons and Yang-Mills fields). The couplings are introduced via spurions: this reduces the symmetry to SU(2) x U(1). In the simultaneous expansion in powers of momenta and spurions, the aforementioned operators are relegated to higher orders. In addition, the method allows for a systematic treatment of weak isospin breaking. The Weinberg power-counting formula can be recovered, and small neutrino masses accounted for. The three right-handed neutrinos (lighter than the TeV), which are introduced in connection with the custodial symmetry, are quasi-sterile and stable. A constraint on the underlying theory is obtained by studying the anomaly-matching in the composite sector and generalizing the Wess-Zumino construction. The spurion formalism is also applied to open linear moose models, for which generalized Weinberg sum rules are derived. (author)

  20. Investigating flow behaviors of colloidal materials at the single-particle scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chih

    My thesis work focuses on the nonlinear mechanical behaviors of colloidal suspensions at the particle-level. This work covers both quiescent and strongly sheared suspensions. For quiescent suspensions, we image their 3D structures with confocal microscopy, and implement Stress Assessment from Local Structural Anisotropy (SALSA) to visualize the stress fields in them. Unlike traditional numerical methods, SALSA takes a statistical approach converting the probability of hard-sphere Brownian collisions to stresses. This direct stress measurement allows us to quantify the particle-level stresses surrounding vacancies, dislocations, and grain boundaries in crystalline materials. To drive the suspensions away from equilibrium, we develop a confocal-rheoscope, which is able to shear and image colloidal materials simultaneously. Using this device, we investigate the nonlinear flow behavior governed by Brownian motion, shear induced diffusion, and advection, and more importantly, disentangle them. We also study particle assembly and its corresponding rheological properties under confinement. Finally, we study even more strongly sheared suspensions, in which particle dynamics are too fast to be imaged by a confocal microscope. Here, we use flow reversal rheometry to reveal the underlying mechanism of suspension shear thickening where the viscosity increases with shear rate. We show that the thickening behavior of a suspension arises from the particle contact forces rather than hydrodynamic interactions. Such findings then lead us to design a biaxial shear protocol that can tune the suspension viscosity on demand. This viscosity tuning capability is a foundational step toward using dense suspensions in 3D printing, energy storage, and robotics.

  1. Selective laser processing of ink-jet printed nano-scaled tin-clad copper particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, K. C.; Plura, T. S.

    2010-11-01

    The deposition of tin-clad nano-size copper particles was carried out by means of ink-jet printing. Curing the particles on Polyimide (PI) turned them into soldered structures using an Nd-YAG laser. Area coverage of 55% was achieved for a single-layer print. Subsequent laser sintering increased this value to 95%. A Butanol-based copper ink and an aqueous tin (Sn)-clad Copper (Cu) ink were produced and were ink-jetted in this work. These nano-metallic inks showed excellent suspension stability with particle weight concentrations as high as 5%. The ink components were examined by measuring the particle size distribution in a dispersed condition, and the melting temperature. A piezo ink-jet print head was used to deposit the inks onto a moveable substrate. The thermal effect of the laser irradiation allowed approaching and connecting adjacent particles by melting the particle’s tin coating. The results were examined with regard to structure and soldering properties using EDX, SEM and optical microscopy.

  2. Analytic and Computational Perspectives of Multi-Scale Theory for Homogeneous, Laminated Composite, and Sandwich Beams and Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Alexander; Gherlone, Marco; Versino, Daniele; DiSciuva, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the theoretical foundation and computational mechanics aspects of the recently developed shear-deformation theory, called the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT). The theory is based on a multi-scale formalism in which an equivalent single-layer plate theory is refined with a robust set of zigzag local layer displacements that are free of the usual deficiencies found in common plate theories with zigzag kinematics. In the RZT, first-order shear-deformation plate theory is used as the equivalent single-layer plate theory, which represents the overall response characteristics. Local piecewise-linear zigzag displacements are used to provide corrections to these overall response characteristics that are associated with the plate heterogeneity and the relative stiffnesses of the layers. The theory does not rely on shear correction factors and is equally accurate for homogeneous, laminated composite, and sandwich beams and plates. Regardless of the number of material layers, the theory maintains only seven kinematic unknowns that describe the membrane, bending, and transverse shear plate-deformation modes. Derived from the virtual work principle, RZT is well-suited for developing computationally efficient, C(sup 0)-continuous finite elements; formulations of several RZT-based elements are highlighted. The theory and its finite element approximations thus provide a unified and reliable computational platform for the analysis and design of high-performance load-bearing aerospace structures.

  3. Full-Scale Model of Subionospheric VLF Signal Propagation Based on First-Principles Charged Particle Transport Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Cully, C. M.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in D-Region ionization caused by energetic particle precipitation are monitored by the Array for Broadband Observations of VLF/ELF Emissions (ABOVE) - a network of receivers deployed across Western Canada. The observed amplitudes and phases of subionospheric-propagating VLF signals from distant artificial transmitters depend sensitively on the free electron population created by precipitation of energetic charged particles. Those include both primary (electrons, protons and heavier ions) and secondary (cascades of ionized particles and electromagnetic radiation) components. We have designed and implemented a full-scale model to predict the received VLF signals based on first-principle charged particle transport calculations coupled to the Long Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC) software. Calculations of ionization rates and free electron densities are based on MCNP-6 (a general-purpose Monte Carlo N- Particle) software taking advantage of its capability of coupled neutron/photon/electron transport and novel library of cross-sections for low-energetic electron and photon interactions with matter. Cosmic ray calculations of background ionization are based on source spectra obtained both from PAMELA direct Cosmic Rays spectra measurements and based on the recently-implemented MCNP 6 galactic cosmic-ray source, scaled using our (Calgary) neutron monitor measurement results. Conversion from calculated fluxes (MCNP F4 tallies) to ionization rates for low-energy electrons are based on the total ionization cross-sections for oxygen and nitrogen molecules from the National Institute of Standard and Technology. We use our model to explore the complexity of the physical processes affecting VLF propagation.

  4. The flow structure of pyroclastic density currents: evidence from particle models and large-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico Maria; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows. They represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Pompeii (AD 79) at Vesuvius. Much of our knowledge on the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, i.e. the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but they are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. In this paper, by means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. It allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. We show that our model results in likely values of dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration, and allows quantifying the hazard potential of pyroclastic flows.

  5. Extreme-Scale Stochastic Particle Tracing for Uncertain Unsteady Flow Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hanqi; He, Wenbin; Seo, Sangmin; Shen, Han-Wei; Peterka, Tom

    2016-11-13

    We present an efficient and scalable solution to estimate uncertain transport behaviors using stochastic flow maps (SFM,) for visualizing and analyzing uncertain unsteady flows. SFM computation is extremely expensive because it requires many Monte Carlo runs to trace densely seeded particles in the flow. We alleviate the computational cost by decoupling the time dependencies in SFMs so that we can process adjacent time steps independently and then compose them together for longer time periods. Adaptive refinement is also used to reduce the number of runs for each location. We then parallelize over tasks—packets of particles in our design—to achieve high efficiency in MPI/thread hybrid programming. Such a task model also enables CPU/GPU coprocessing. We show the scalability on two supercomputers, Mira (up to 1M Blue Gene/Q cores) and Titan (up to 128K Opteron cores and 8K GPUs), that can trace billions of particles in seconds.

  6. Snake scales, partial exposure, and the Snake Detection Theory: A human event-related potentials study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Strien, Jan W.; Isbell, Lynne A.

    2017-01-01

    Studies of event-related potentials in humans have established larger early posterior negativity (EPN) in response to pictures depicting snakes than to pictures depicting other creatures. Ethological research has recently shown that macaques and wild vervet monkeys respond strongly to partially exposed snake models and scale patterns on the snake skin. Here, we examined whether snake skin patterns and partially exposed snakes elicit a larger EPN in humans. In Task 1, we employed pictures with close-ups of snake skins, lizard skins, and bird plumage. In task 2, we employed pictures of partially exposed snakes, lizards, and birds. Participants watched a random rapid serial visual presentation of these pictures. The EPN was scored as the mean activity (225–300 ms after picture onset) at occipital and parieto-occipital electrodes. Consistent with previous studies, and with the Snake Detection Theory, the EPN was significantly larger for snake skin pictures than for lizard skin and bird plumage pictures, and for lizard skin pictures than for bird plumage pictures. Likewise, the EPN was larger for partially exposed snakes than for partially exposed lizards and birds. The results suggest that the EPN snake effect is partly driven by snake skin scale patterns which are otherwise rare in nature. PMID:28387376

  7. Sensitivity study of large-scale particle image velocimetry measurement of river discharge using numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauet, Alexandre; Creutin, Jean-Dominique; Belleudy, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    SummaryThis study deals with the uncertainty of large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) measurements in rivers. LSPIV belongs to the methods of local remote sensing of rivers, like Radar- and Lidar-based techniques. These methods have many potential advantages, in comparison with classical river gauging, but they have a fundamental drawback: they are indirect measurements. As such they need to be assessed in reference to direct measurements. A first validation method consists in the comparison of LSPIV measurements with classic gauging results, in field and laboratory experiments. Unfortunately, in both cases, it is impossible in practice to control all the parameters and to distinguish the impact of the various error sources. In the present study we propose a more theoretical assessment of LSPIV potential through numerical simulation. The idea is simply to mathematically formulate the present state of knowledge of the measurement including both the physics of the phenomenon (the illuminated river) and the physics of the sensor (the camera and the PIV tracking). The dilemma about when to start this type of simulation is the following: The simulation is satisfactory if we can validate it which means to be able to compare simulations and observations over a wide range of conditions. The simulation is useful to get preliminary insights about the most important measurement conditions to organize validation studies. Our simulator is composed of three blocks: The river block represents the unidirectional river flow by the association of the EDM model and a theoretical vertical velocity profile giving a 3D velocity distribution. This hydraulic model is complemented by features representing free surface tracers, the illumination of the free-surface (shadows and sun reflection) and the effect of the wind. The camera block transforms the river state parameters into raster images according to the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the camera. The LSPIV analysis

  8. A compact to revitalise large-scale irrigation systems: A ‘theory of change’ approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A. Lankford

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In countries with transitional economies such as those found in South Asia, large-scale irrigation systems (LSIS with a history of public ownership account for about 115 million ha (Mha or approximately 45% of their total area under irrigation. In terms of the global area of irrigation (320 Mha for all countries, LSIS are estimated at 130 Mha or 40% of irrigated land. These systems can potentially deliver significant local, regional and global benefits in terms of food, water and energy security, employment, economic growth and ecosystem services. For example, primary crop production is conservatively valued at about US$355 billion. However, efforts to enhance these benefits and reform the sector have been costly and outcomes have been underwhelming and short-lived. We propose the application of a 'theory of change' (ToC as a foundation for promoting transformational change in large-scale irrigation centred upon a 'global irrigation compact' that promotes new forms of leadership, partnership and ownership (LPO. The compact argues that LSIS can change by switching away from the current channelling of aid finances controlled by government irrigation agencies. Instead it is for irrigators, closely partnered by private, public and NGO advisory and regulatory services, to develop strong leadership models and to find new compensatory partnerships with cities and other river basin neighbours. The paper summarises key assumptions for change in the LSIS sector including the need to initially test this change via a handful of volunteer systems. Our other key purpose is to demonstrate a ToC template by which large-scale irrigation policy can be better elaborated and discussed.

  9. Item response theory analysis applied to the Spanish version of the Personal Outcomes Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guàrdia-Olmos, J; Carbó-Carreté, M; Peró-Cebollero, M; Giné, C

    2017-11-01

    The study of measurements of quality of life (QoL) is one of the great challenges of modern psychology and psychometric approaches. This issue has greater importance when examining QoL in populations that were historically treated on the basis of their deficiency, and recently, the focus has shifted to what each person values and desires in their life, as in cases of people with intellectual disability (ID). Many studies of QoL scales applied in this area have attempted to improve the validity and reliability of their components by incorporating various sources of information to achieve consistency in the data obtained. The adaptation of the Personal Outcomes Scale (POS) in Spanish has shown excellent psychometric attributes, and its administration has three sources of information: self-assessment, practitioner and family. The study of possible congruence or incongruence of observed distributions of each item between sources is therefore essential to ensure a correct interpretation of the measure. The aim of this paper was to analyse the observed distribution of items and dimensions from the three Spanish POS information sources cited earlier, using the item response theory. We studied a sample of 529 people with ID and their respective practitioners and family member, and in each case, we analysed items and factors using Samejima's model of polytomic ordinal scales. The results indicated an important number of items with differential effects regarding sources, and in some cases, they indicated significant differences in the distribution of items, factors and sources of information. As a result of this analysis, we must affirm that the administration of the POS, considering three sources of information, was adequate overall, but a correct interpretation of the results requires that it obtain much more information to consider, as well as some specific items in specific dimensions. The overall ratings, if these comments are considered, could result in bias. © 2017

  10. Gas production in the Barnett Shale obeys a simple scaling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzek, Tad W; Male, Frank; Marder, Michael

    2013-12-03

    Natural gas from tight shale formations will provide the United States with a major source of energy over the next several decades. Estimates of gas production from these formations have mainly relied on formulas designed for wells with a different geometry. We consider the simplest model of gas production consistent with the basic physics and geometry of the extraction process. In principle, solutions of the model depend upon many parameters, but in practice and within a given gas field, all but two can be fixed at typical values, leading to a nonlinear diffusion problem we solve exactly with a scaling curve. The scaling curve production rate declines as 1 over the square root of time early on, and it later declines exponentially. This simple model provides a surprisingly accurate description of gas extraction from 8,294 wells in the United States' oldest shale play, the Barnett Shale. There is good agreement with the scaling theory for 2,057 horizontal wells in which production started to decline exponentially in less than 10 y. The remaining 6,237 horizontal wells in our analysis are too young for us to predict when exponential decline will set in, but the model can nevertheless be used to establish lower and upper bounds on well lifetime. Finally, we obtain upper and lower bounds on the gas that will be produced by the wells in our sample, individually and in total. The estimated ultimate recovery from our sample of 8,294 wells is between 10 and 20 trillion standard cubic feet.

  11. Development and Evaluation of the Brief Sexual Openness Scale-A Construal Level Theory Based Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinguang Chen

    Full Text Available Obtaining reliable and valid data on sensitive questions represents a longstanding challenge for public health, particularly HIV research. To overcome the challenge, we assessed a construal level theory (CLT-based novel method. The method was previously established and pilot-tested using the Brief Sexual Openness Scale (BSOS. This scale consists of five items assessing attitudes toward premarital sex, multiple sexual partners, homosexuality, extramarital sex, and commercial sex, all rated on a standard 5-point Likert scale. In addition to self-assessment, the participants were asked to assess rural residents, urban residents, and foreigners. The self-assessment plus the assessment of the three other groups were all used as subconstructs of one latent construct: sexual openness. The method was validated with data from 1,132 rural-to-urban migrants (mean age = 32.5, SD = 7.9; 49.6% female recruited in China. Consistent with CLT, the Cronbach alpha of the BSOS as a conventional tool increased with social distance, from .81 for self-assessment to .97 for assessing foreigners. In addition to a satisfactory fit of the data to a one-factor model (CFI = .94, TLI = .93, RMSEA = .08, a common factor was separated from the four perspective factors (i.e., migrants' self-perspective and their perspectives of rural residents, urban residents and foreigners through a trifactor modeling analysis (CFI = .95, TLI = .94, RMSEA = .08. Relative to its conventional form, CTL-based BSOS was more reliable (alpha: .96 vs .81 and valid in predicting sexual desire, frequency of dating, age of first sex, multiple sexual partners and STD history. This novel technique can be used to assess sexual openness, and possibly other sensitive questions among Chinese domestic migrants.

  12. Planck scale physics of the single-particle Schrödinger equation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... nonlinear equation, the 'Newton–Schrödinger' equation, which has been found to possess stationary self-bound solutions, whose energy can be determined using an asymptotic method. We find that such a particle strongly violates the superposition principle and becomes a black hole as its mass approaches the Planck ...

  13. Magnetic topology of coronal mass ejection events out of the ecliptic: Ulysses/HI-SCALE energetic particle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Malandraki

    Full Text Available Solar energetic particle fluxes (Ee > 38 keV observed by the ULYSSES/HI-SCALE experiment are utilized as diagnostic tracers of the large-scale structure and topology of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF embedded within two well-identified Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs detected at 56° and 62° south heliolatitudes by ULYSSES during the solar maximum southern high-latitude pass. On the basis of the energetic solar particle observations it is concluded that: (A the high-latitude ICME magnetic structure observed in May 2000 causes a depression in the solar energetic electron intensities which can be accounted for by either a detached or an attached magnetic field topology for the ICME; (B during the traversal of the out-of-ecliptic ICME event observed in July 2000 energetic electrons injected at the Sun are channeled by the ICME and propagate freely along the ICME magnetic field lines to 62° S heliolatitude.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (energetic particles; interplanetary magnetic fields

  14. Magnetic topology of coronal mass ejection events out of the ecliptic: Ulysses/HI-SCALE energetic particle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Malandraki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar energetic particle fluxes (Ee > 38 keV observed by the ULYSSES/HI-SCALE experiment are utilized as diagnostic tracers of the large-scale structure and topology of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF embedded within two well-identified Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs detected at 56° and 62° south heliolatitudes by ULYSSES during the solar maximum southern high-latitude pass. On the basis of the energetic solar particle observations it is concluded that: (A the high-latitude ICME magnetic structure observed in May 2000 causes a depression in the solar energetic electron intensities which can be accounted for by either a detached or an attached magnetic field topology for the ICME; (B during the traversal of the out-of-ecliptic ICME event observed in July 2000 energetic electrons injected at the Sun are channeled by the ICME and propagate freely along the ICME magnetic field lines to 62° S heliolatitude.Key words. Interplanetary physics (energetic particles; interplanetary magnetic fields

  15. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport: Development of efficient particle-tracking methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Harihar [University of Colorado, Boulder; Brutz, Michael [University of Colorado, Boulder; Klein, Dylan R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Mallikamas, Wasin [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2014-09-18

    Matrix Diffusion and Adsorption within a rock matrix are important mechanisms for retarding transport of radionuclides in fractured rock. Due to computational limitations and difficulties in characterizing complex subsurface systems, diffusive exchange between a fracture network and surrounding rock matrix is often modeled using simplified conceptual representations. There is significant uncertainty in “effective” parameters used in these models, such as the “effective matrix diffusivity”. Often, these parameters are estimated by fitting sparse breakthrough data, and estimated values fall outside meaningful ranges, because simplified interpretive models do not consider complex three-dimensional flow. There is limited understanding of the relationship between the effective parameters and rock mass characteristics including network structure and matrix properties. There is also evidence for an apparent scale-dependence in “effective matrix diffusion” coefficients. These observations raise questions on whether fracture-matrix interaction parameters estimated from small-scale tracer tests can be used for predicting radionuclide fate and transport at the scale of DOE field sites. High-resolution three-dimensional Discrete-Fracture-Network-Matrix (DFNM) models based on well-defined local scale transport equations can help to address some of these questions. Due to tremendous advances in computational technology over the last 10 years, DFNM modeling in relatively large domains is now feasible. The overarching objective of our research is to use DFNM modeling to improve fundamental understanding of how effective parameters in conceptual models are related to fracture network structure and matrix properties. An advanced three-dimensional DFNM model is being developed, which combines upscaled particle-tracking algorithms for fracture-matrix interaction and a parallel fracture-network flow simulator. The particle-tracking algorithms allow complexity in flow fields

  16. Using G-Theory to Enhance Evidence of Reliability and Validity for Common Uses of the Paulhus Deception Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vispoel, Walter P; Morris, Carrie A; Kilinc, Murat

    2018-01-01

    We applied a new approach to Generalizability theory (G-theory) involving parallel splits and repeated measures to evaluate common uses of the Paulhus Deception Scales based on polytomous and four types of dichotomous scoring. G-theory indices of reliability and validity accounting for specific-factor, transient, and random-response measurement error supported use of polytomous over dichotomous scores as contamination checks; as control, explanatory, and outcome variables; as aspects of construct validation; and as indexes of environmental effects on socially desirable responding. Polytomous scoring also provided results for flagging faking as dependable as those when using dichotomous scoring methods. These findings argue strongly against the nearly exclusive use of dichotomous scoring for the Paulhus Deception Scales in practice and underscore the value of G-theory in demonstrating this. We provide guidelines for applying our G-theory techniques to other objectively scored clinical assessments, for using G-theory to estimate how changes to a measure might improve reliability, and for obtaining software to conduct G-theory analyses free of charge.

  17. Dispersion of overdamped diffusing particles in channel flows coupled to transverse acoustophoretic potentials: transport regimes and scaling anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Garofalo, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    We address the dispersion properties of overdamped Brownian particles migrating in a two-dimensional acoustophoretic microchannel, where a pressure-driven axial Stokes flow coexists with a transverse acoustophoretic potential. Depending on the number and symmetries of the stable nodal points of the acoustophoretic force with respect to the axial velocity profile, different convection-enhanced dispersion regimes can be observed. Among these regimes, an anomalous scaling, for which the axial dispersion increases exponentially with the particle Peclét number, is observed whenever two or more stable acoustophoretic nodes are associated with different axial velocities. A theoretical explanation of this regime is derived, based on exact moment homogenization. Attention is also focused on transient dispersion, which can exhibit superballistic behavior 〈(x-〈x〉)^{2}〉∼t^{3},x being the axial coordinate.

  18. Evaluating Trichloroethylene Degradation Using Differing Nano- and Micro-Scale Iron Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Cristina M.; Geiger, Cherie L.; Clausen, Christian A.; Billow, Alexa M.; Quinn, Jacqueline W.; Brooks, Kathleen B.

    2006-01-01

    Trichioroethylene, or TCE, is a central nervous system depressant and possible carcinogen, as well as a persistent groundwater pollutant. TCE exists in the aquifer either as free product in the form of a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) or as a dissolved-phase constituent. It is only slightly soluble in water, so dissolution of the contaminant is a long-term process and in-situ remediation is difficult. To remedy this, NASA and the University of Central Florida developed Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron, or EZVI. The emulsion droplet contains ZVI particles and water encapsulated by an oil/surfactant membrane, and effectively penetrates to degrade DNAPL-phase TCE. To maximize the efficiency of this process, several commercially available ZVIs of radically different particle sizes and morphologies both in emulsion and as neat (unemulsified) metal were evaluated for relative effectiveness at TCE degradation.

  19. A p-Adic Metric for Particle Mass Scale Organization with Genetic Divisors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAI, YANG; BORISOV, ALEXEY B.; BOYER, KEITH; RHODES, CHARLES K.

    2001-12-01

    The concept of genetic divisors can be given a quantitative measure with a non-Archimedean p-adic metric that is both computationally convenient and physically motivated. For two particles possessing distinct mass parameters x and y, the metric distance D(x, y) is expressed on the field of rational numbers Q as the inverse of the greatest common divisor [gcd (x , y)]. As a measure of genetic similarity, this metric can be applied to (1) the mass numbers of particle states and (2) the corresponding subgroup orders of these systems. The use of the Bezout identity in the form of a congruence for the expression of the gcd (x , y) corresponding to the v{sub e} and {sub {mu}} neutrinos (a) connects the genetic divisor concept to the cosmic seesaw congruence, (b) provides support for the {delta}-conjecture concerning the subgroup structure of particle states, and (c) quantitatively strengthens the interlocking relationships joining the values of the prospectively derived (i) electron neutrino (v{sub e}) mass (0.808 meV), (ii) muon neutrino (v{sub {mu}}) mass (27.68 meV), and (iii) unified strong-electroweak coupling constant ({alpha}*{sup -1} = 34.26).

  20. The Protective Behavioral Strategies for Marijuana Scale: Further examination using item response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R; Huang, Wenjing; Dvorak, Robert D; Prince, Mark A; Hummer, Justin F

    2017-08-01

    Given recent state legislation legalizing marijuana for recreational purposes and majority popular opinion favoring these laws, we developed the Protective Behavioral Strategies for Marijuana scale (PBSM) to identify strategies that may mitigate the harms related to marijuana use among those young people who choose to use the drug. In the current study, we expand on the initial exploratory study of the PBSM to further validate the measure with a large and geographically diverse sample (N = 2,117; 60% women, 30% non-White) of college students from 11 different universities across the United States. We sought to develop a psychometrically sound item bank for the PBSM and to create a short assessment form that minimizes respondent burden and time. Quantitative item analyses, including exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses with item response theory (IRT) and evaluation of differential item functioning (DIF), revealed an item bank of 36 items that was examined for unidimensionality and good content coverage, as well as a short form of 17 items that is free of bias in terms of gender (men vs. women), race (White vs. non-White), ethnicity (Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic), and recreational marijuana use legal status (state recreational marijuana was legal for 25.5% of participants). We also provide a scoring table for easy transformation from sum scores to IRT scale scores. The PBSM item bank and short form associated strongly and negatively with past month marijuana use and consequences. The measure may be useful to researchers and clinicians conducting intervention and prevention programs with young adults. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Implications of a class of grand-unified theories for large-scale structure in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Q.; Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    A class of grand-unified theories in which cosmologically significant axion and neutrino energy densities arise naturally is considered. To obtain large-scale structure, attention is given to (1) an inflationary scenario, (2) inflation followed by string production, and (3) a noninflationary scenario with density fluctuations caused solely by strings. It is shown that inflation may be compatible with the recent observational indications that Omega less than 1 on the scale of superclusters, particularly if strings are present.

  2. Fractal Scaling Models of Natural Oscillations in Chain Systems and the Mass Distribution of Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller H.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a fractal scaling model of a chain system of quantum harmonic oscillators, that reproduces some systematic features in the mass distribution of hadrons, leptons and gauge bosons.

  3. Direct Scaling Analysis of Localization in Single-Particle Quantum Systems on Graphs with Diagonal Disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chulaevsky, Victor, E-mail: victor.tchoulaevski@univ-reims.fr [Universite de Reims, Departement de Mathematiques (France)

    2012-12-15

    We propose a simplified version of the Multi-Scale Analysis of Anderson models on a lattice and, more generally, on a countable graph with polynomially bounded growth of balls, with diagonal disorder represented by an IID or strongly mixing correlated potential. We apply the new scaling procedure to discrete Schroedinger operators and obtain localization bounds on eigenfunctions and eigenfunction correlators in arbitrarily large finite subsets of the graph which imply the spectral and strong dynamical localization in the entire graph.

  4. Spatial and temporal scales of force and torque acting on wall-mounted spherical particles in open channel flow

    OpenAIRE

    Chan-Braun, Clemens; Garcia-Villalba, Manuel; Uhlmann, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Data from direct numerical simulation of open channel flow over a geometrically rough wall at a bulk Reynolds number of 2900, generated by Chan-Braun et al. ["Force and torque acting on particles in a transitionally rough open-channel flow", J. Fluid Mech. 684, 441--474 (2011), 10.1017/jfm.2011.311] are further analysed with respect to the time and length scales of force and torque acting on the wall-mounted spheres. For the two sizes of spheres in a square arrangement (11 and 49 wall units i...

  5. Psychometric properties revised reinforcement sensitivity theory (r-RST) scale in chronic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Sohrab; Behnezhad, Sepideh; Azad-Marzabadi, Esfandiar

    2017-01-01

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Questionnaire (RSQ) in patients with chronic pain. For this purpose, 312 (first study) and 70 (second study) patients with chronic pain were selected, and the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory Personality Questionnaire (RST-PQ) and Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory (PBPI) were distributed among them for their response. The reliability of the questionnaire was evaluated by Cronbach's alpha, retest, and split-half coefficient; then, the criterion validity with other questionnaires was evaluated to determine the psychometric properties of the RSQ. The factor structure was assessed via confirmatory factor analysis. The results of the factor analysis indicated that the RSQ has five factors, and checking the validity by using Cronbach's alpha, retest, and split-half coefficient reflected the stability of the scale; the criterion validity of the RSQ with other questionnaires showed desirable discriminant and convergent validity. Overall, the findings indicated that the RSQ has good psychometric properties in chronic pain samples, and the tool can be used in studies of chronic pain. It seems that the RSQ is a good predictor for pain in patients with chronic pain.

  6. An item-response theory approach to safety climate measurement: The Liberty Mutual Safety Climate Short Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Lee, Jin; Chen, Zhuo; Perry, MacKenna; Cheung, Janelle H; Wang, Mo

    2017-06-01

    Zohar and Luria's (2005) safety climate (SC) scale, measuring organization- and group- level SC each with 16 items, is widely used in research and practice. To improve the utility of the SC scale, we shortened the original full-length SC scales. Item response theory (IRT) analysis was conducted using a sample of 29,179 frontline workers from various industries. Based on graded response models, we shortened the original scales in two ways: (1) selecting items with above-average discriminating ability (i.e. offering more than 6.25% of the original total scale information), resulting in 8-item organization-level and 11-item group-level SC scales; and (2) selecting the most informative items that together retain at least 30% of original scale information, resulting in 4-item organization-level and 4-item group-level SC scales. All four shortened scales had acceptable reliability (≥0.89) and high correlations (≥0.95) with the original scale scores. The shortened scales will be valuable for academic research and practical survey implementation in improving occupational safety. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Particle cosmology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The understanding of the Universe at the largest and smallest scales traditionally has been the subject of cosmology and particle physics, respectively. Studying the evolution of the Universe connects today's large scales with the tiny scales in the very early Universe and provides the link between the physics of particles and of the cosmos. This series of five lectures aims at a modern and critical presentation of the basic ideas, methods, models and observations in today's particle cosmology.

  8. Development and Standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of Item Response Theory to the Assessment of Adaptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassé, Marc J.; Schalock, Robert L.; Thissen, David; Balboni, Giulia; Bersani, Henry, Jr.; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon A.; Spreat, Scott; Widaman, Keith F.; Zhang, Dalun; Navas, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (DABS) was developed using item response theory (IRT) methods and was constructed to provide the most precise and valid adaptive behavior information at or near the cutoff point of making a decision regarding a diagnosis of intellectual disability. The DABS initial item pool consisted of 260 items. Using IRT…

  9. Body size scaling relationships in bivalves: a comparison of field data with predictions by dynamic energy budgets (deb theory).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; van de Veer, H.W..; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory to bivalve species (1) to provide basic body-size scaling relationships that can be used to predict species characteristics when basic information is lacking, and (2) to analyse the discrepancy between DEB predictions based on energetic

  10. A Cultural Insight into the Development of Teacher Autonomy Support Scale: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang-Hashim, Rosna; Thaliah, Rajaletchumi; Kaur, Amrita

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The cross-cultural significance of autonomy within self-determination theory is divisive on universal significance. This paper aims to report a sequential exploratory mixed methods study conducted to construct and validate a scale to investigate how, in Malaysian context, the construct of autonomy is conceptualized in comparison with the…

  11. Atomistic- and Meso-Scale Computational Simulations for Developing Multi-Timescale Theory for Radiation Degradation in Electronic and Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-13

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0161 TR-2016-0161 ATOMISTIC- AND MESO-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATIONS FOR DEVELOPING MULTI-TIMESCALE THEORY FOR...From - To) 18 Aug 2015 – 7 Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atomistic- and Meso-Scale Computational Simulations for Developing Multi-Timescale Theory ...and knowledge gained from atomic- and meso-scale simulations will be input into rate-diffusion theory as initial conditions to calculate the steady

  12. Analytical theory and nonlinear δf perturbative simulations of temperature anisotropy instability in intense charged particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Startsev

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions (T_{∥b}/T_{⊥b}≪1 a Harris-like collective instability may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Such anisotropies develop naturally in accelerators and may lead to a deterioration of beam quality. This paper extends previous numerical studies [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson, and H. Qin, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002] of the stability properties of intense non-neutral charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy (T_{⊥b}≫T_{∥b} to allow for nonaxisymmetric perturbations with ∂/∂θ≠0. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure, and nonlinear dynamics are determined. The simulation results clearly show that moderately intense beams with s_{b}=ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}/2γ_{b}^{2}ω_{β⊥}^{2}≳0.5 are linearly unstable to short-wavelength perturbations with k_{z}^{2}r_{b}^{2}≳1, provided the ratio of longitudinal and transverse temperatures is smaller than some threshold value. Here, ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}=4πn[over ^]_{b}e_{b}^{2}/γ_{b}m_{b} is the relativistic plasma frequency squared, and ω_{β⊥} is the betatron frequency associated with the applied smooth-focusing field. A theoretical model is developed based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations which describes the essential features of the linear stages of instability. Both the simulations and the analytical theory predict that the dipole mode (azimuthal mode number m=1 is the most unstable mode. In the nonlinear stage, tails develop in the longitudinal momentum distribution function, and the kinetic instability saturates due to resonant wave-particle interactions.

  13. A General Systems Theory for Chaos, Quantum Mechanics and Gravity for Dynamical Systems of all Space-Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Selvam, A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Non-local connections, i. e. long-range space-time correlations intrinsic to the observed subatomic dynamics of quantum systems is also exhibited by macro-scale dynamical systems as selfsimilar fractal space-time fluctuations and is identified as self-organized criticality. The author has developed a general systems theory for the observed self-organized criticality applicable to dynamical systems of all space-time scales based on the concept that spatial integration of enclosed small-scale f...

  14. Tri-track: free software for large-scale particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallotton, Pascal; Olivier, Sandra

    2013-04-01

    The ability to correctly track objects in time-lapse sequences is important in many applications of microscopy. Individual object motions typically display a level of dynamic regularity reflecting the existence of an underlying physics or biology. Best results are obtained when this local information is exploited. Additionally, if the particle number is known to be approximately constant, a large number of tracking scenarios may be rejected on the basis that they are not compatible with a known maximum particle velocity. This represents information of a global nature, which should ideally be exploited too. Some time ago, we devised an efficient algorithm that exploited both types of information. The tracking task was reduced to a max-flow min-cost problem instance through a novel graph structure that comprised vertices representing objects from three consecutive image frames. The algorithm is explained here for the first time. A user-friendly implementation is provided, and the specific relaxation mechanism responsible for the method's effectiveness is uncovered. The software is particularly competitive for complex dynamics such as dense antiparallel flows, or in situations where object displacements are considerable. As an application, we characterize a remarkable vortex structure formed by bacteria engaged in interstitial motility.

  15. Biofunctionalization of scaffold material with nano-scaled diamond particles physisorbed with angiogenic factors enhances vessel growth after implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimke, Magdalena M; Stigler, Robert; Wu, Xujun; Waag, Thilo; Buschmann, Peter; Kern, Johann; Untergasser, Gerold; Rasse, Michael; Steinmüller-Nethl, Doris; Krueger, Anke; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Biofunctionalized scaffold facilitates complete healing of large defects. Biological constraints are induction and ingrowth of vessels. Angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor or angiopoietin-1 can be bound to nano-scaled diamond particles. Corresponding bioactivities need to be examined after biofunctionalization. We therefore determined the physisorptive capacity of distinctly manufactured, differently sized nDP and the corresponding activities of bound factors. The properties of biofunctionalized nDPs were investigated on cultivated human mesenchymal stem cells and on the developing chicken embryo chorio-allantoic membrane. Eventually porous bone substitution material was coated with nDP to generate an interface that allows biofactor physisorption. Angiopoietin-1 was applied shortly before scaffold implantation into an osseous defect in sheep calvaria. Biofunctionalized scaffolds exhibited significantly increased rates of angiogenesis already one month after implantation. Conclusively, nDP can be used to ease functionalization of synthetic biomaterials. With the advances in nanotechnology, many nano-sized materials have been used in the biomedical field. This is also true for nano-diamond particles (nDP). In this article, the authors investigated the physical properties of functionalized nano-diamond particles in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. The positive findings would help improve understanding of these nanomaterials in regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of sub-grid scale dispersion closure with regularized deconvolution method in a particle-laden turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Zhao, Xinyu; Ihme, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flows are important in numerous industrial applications, such as spray combustion engines, solar energy collectors etc. It is of interests to study this type of flows numerically, especially using large-eddy simulations (LES). However, capturing the turbulence-particle interaction in LES remains challenging due to the insufficient representation of the effect of sub-grid scale (SGS) dispersion. In the present work, a closure technique for the SGS dispersion using regularized deconvolution method (RDM) is assessed. RDM was proposed as the closure for the SGS dispersion in a counterflow spray that is studied numerically using finite difference method on a structured mesh. A presumed form of LES filter is used in the simulations. In the present study, this technique has been extended to finite volume method with an unstructured mesh, where no presumption on the filter form is required. The method is applied to a series of particle-laden turbulent jets. Parametric analyses of the model performance are conducted for flows with different Stokes numbers and Reynolds numbers. The results from LES will be compared against experiments and direct numerical simulations (DNS).

  17. Final Report for 3-year grant no. DE-FG05-85ER40226. Investigations in Elementary Particle Theory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kephart, Thomas W. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Scherrer, Robert J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Weiler, Thomas J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-11-23

    The research interests of our three Co-PI’s complement each other very well. Kephart works mainly on models of particle unification in four or higher dimensions, on aspects of gravity such as inflation, black-holes, and the very early Universe, and on applications of knot theory and topology to various physical systems (including gluon dynamics). Scherrer works mainly on aspects of the intermediate-aged Universe, including dark matter and dark energy, and particle physics in the early Universe. Weiler works mainly on neutrino physics, dark matter signatures, and extreme particle-astrophysics in the late Universe, including origins of the highest-energy cosmic-rays and gamma-rays, and the future potential of neutrino astrophysics. Kephart and Weiler have lately devoted some research attention to the LHC and its reach for probing physics beyond the Standard Model. During the 3-year funding period, our grant supported one postdoc (Chiu Man Ho) and partially supported two students, Peter Denton and Lingjun Fu. Chiu Man collaborated with all three of the Co-PI’s during the 3-year funding period and published 16 refereed papers. Chiu Man has gone on to a postdoc with Steve Hsu at Michigan State University. Denton and Fu will both receive their PhDs during the 2014-15 academic year. The total number of our papers published in refereed journals by the three co-PIs during the period of this grant (2011-present) is 54. The total number of talks given by the group members during this time period, including seminars, colloquia, and conference presentations, is 47. Some details of the accomplishments of our DOE funded researchers during the grant period include Weiler being named a Simons Fellow in 2013. He presented an invited TEDx talk in 2012. His paper on closed timelike curves (2013) garnered a great deal of national publicity. Scherrer’s paper on the “little rip” (2011) fostered a new area of cosmological research, and the name “little rip” has now entered

  18. Using satellite-based measurements to explore spatiotemporal scales and variability of drivers of new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Crippa, P.; Hallar, A. G.; Clarisse, L.; Whitburn, S.; Van Damme, M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Walker, J. T.; Khlystov, A.; Pryor, S. C.

    2016-10-01

    New particle formation (NPF) can potentially alter regional climate by increasing aerosol particle (hereafter particle) number concentrations and ultimately cloud condensation nuclei. The large scales on which NPF is manifest indicate potential to use satellite-based (inherently spatially averaged) measurements of atmospheric conditions to diagnose the occurrence of NPF and NPF characteristics. We demonstrate the potential for using satellite-based measurements of insolation (UV), trace gas concentrations (sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ammonia (NH3), formaldehyde (HCHO), and ozone (O3)), aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE)), and a proxy of biogenic volatile organic compound emissions (leaf area index (LAI) and temperature (T)) as predictors for NPF characteristics: formation rates, growth rates, survival probabilities, and ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations at five locations across North America. NPF at all sites is most frequent in spring, exhibits a one-day autocorrelation, and is associated with low condensational sink (AOD × AE) and HCHO concentrations, and high UV. However, there are important site-to-site variations in NPF frequency and characteristics, and in which of the predictor variables (particularly gas concentrations) significantly contribute to the explanatory power of regression models built to predict those characteristics. This finding may provide a partial explanation for the reported spatial variability in skill of simple generalized nucleation schemes in reproducing observed NPF. In contrast to more simple proxies developed in prior studies (e.g., based on AOD, AE, SO2, and UV), use of additional predictors (NO2, NH3, HCHO, LAI, T, and O3) increases the explained temporal variance of UFP concentrations at all sites.

  19. Particle-scale Analysis of Key Technologies on Cut-and-over Tunnel in Slope Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available When the shallow tunnel is constructed on the slope terrain in the mountains, there are the potential risks such as landslide induced by cutting the slope and the non-compacted backfill material during the construction of the cut-andcover tunnel. In order to solve these problems, based on a practical engineering, the optimized construction plans of the cut-and-cover tunnel were analyzed by particle flow code (PFC, the key parts of the open-cut construction were identified, and the anti-slide piles countermeasures were proposed. Furthermore, the grouting reinforcement process for the non-compacted backfill material around the shallow tunnel was simulated by PFC, and the variation characteristics of the porosity and grouting pressure were revealed as well. The results are of great value to the similar engineering.

  20. Fractal scaling of particle size distribution and relationships with topsoil properties affected by biological soil crusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang-Lei; Ding, Guo-Dong; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Qin, Shu-Gao; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Bao, Yan-Feng; Liu, Yun-Dong; Wan, Li; Deng, Ji-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust), as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (Pproperties (R(2) = 0.494∼0.955, Pproperties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions.

  1. Surface modification and characterization for dispersion stability of inorganic nanometer-scaled particles in liquid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Hidehiro; Iijima, Motoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are indispensable for science and technology as materials, pigments and cosmetics products. Improving the dispersion stability of nanoparticles in various liquids is essential for those applications. In this review, we discuss why it is difficult to control the stability of nanoparticles in liquids. We also overview the role of surface interaction between nanoparticles in their dispersion and characterization, e.g. by colloid probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). Two types of surface modification concepts, post-synthesis and in situ modification, were investigated in many previous studies. Here, we focus on post-synthesis modification using adsorption of various kinds of polymer dispersants and surfactants on the particle surface, as well as surface chemical reactions of silane coupling agents. We discuss CP-AFM as a technique to analyze the surface interaction between nanoparticles and the effect of surface modification on the nanoparticle dispersion in liquids. PMID:27877345

  2. Multi-Scale Bridge Wash Out Simulation During Tsunami by Using a Particle Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyagawa Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, the huge tsunami caused by the great east Japan earthquake devastated many infrastructures in pacific coast of north eastern Japan. Particularly, collapse of bridges caused a traffic disorder and these collapse behaviors led to delay of recovery after the disaster. In this study, the bridge wash away accident is selected as a target issue, and it is represented by a numerical simulation. For this purpose, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH Method, which is one of the pure mesh free methods, is utilized for the rigid body motion simulation. In this study, rigid body motion is introduced for the fluid-rigid interaction behavior during bridge wash away simulation. In the numerical analysis, the upper bridge structure is washed away by receiving an impact fluid force. The wash away simulation of two types of the bridge girder showed good agreement with the real accident on the great east Japan earthquake tsunami.

  3. Surface modification and characterization for dispersion stability of inorganic nanometer-scaled particles in liquid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiro Kamiya and Motoyuki Iijima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic nanoparticles are indispensable for science and technology as materials, pigments and cosmetics products. Improving the dispersion stability of nanoparticles in various liquids is essential for those applications. In this review, we discuss why it is difficult to control the stability of nanoparticles in liquids. We also overview the role of surface interaction between nanoparticles in their dispersion and characterization, e.g. by colloid probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM. Two types of surface modification concepts, post-synthesis and in situ modification, were investigated in many previous studies. Here, we focus on post-synthesis modification using adsorption of various kinds of polymer dispersants and surfactants on the particle surface, as well as surface chemical reactions of silane coupling agents. We discuss CP-AFM as a technique to analyze the surface interaction between nanoparticles and the effect of surface modification on the nanoparticle dispersion in liquids.

  4. Low energy expansion of the four-particle genus-one amplitude in type II superstring theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael B.; Russo, Jorge G.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2008-02-01

    A diagrammatic expansion of coefficients in the low-momentum expansion of the genus-one four-particle amplitude in type II superstring theory is developed. This is applied to determine coefficients up to order s6 R4 (where s is a Mandelstam invariant and R the linearized super-curvature), and partial results are obtained beyond that order. This involves integrating powers of the scalar propagator on a toroidal world-sheet, as well as integrating over the modulus of the torus. At any given order in s the coefficients of these terms are given by rational numbers multiplying multiple zeta values (or Euler-Zagier sums) that, up to the order studied here, reduce to products of Riemann zeta values. We are careful to disentangle the analytic pieces from logarithmic threshold terms, which involves a discussion of the conditions imposed by unitarity. We further consider the compactification of the amplitude on a circle of radius r, which results in a plethora of terms that are power-behaved in r. These coefficients provide boundary `data' that must be matched by any non-perturbative expression for the low-energy expansion of the four-graviton amplitude. The paper includes an appendix by Don Zagier.

  5. Statistical theory and transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale-lengths coexist. Nonlinear interactions in the same kind of fluctuations as well as nonlinear interplay between different classes of fluctuations are kept in the analysis. Nonlinear interactions are modelled as turbulent drag, nonlinear noise and nonlinear drive, and a set of Langevin equations is formulated. With the help of an Ansatz of a large number of degrees of freedom with positive Lyapunov number, Langevin equations are solved and the fluctuation dissipation theorem in the presence of strong plasma turbulence has been derived. A case where two driving mechanisms (one for micro mode and the other for semi-micro mode) coexist is investigated. It is found that there are several states of fluctuations: in one state, the micro mode is excited and the semi-micro mode is quenched; in the other state, the semi-micro mode is excited, and the micro mode remains at finite but suppressed level. New type of turbulence transition is obtained, and a cusp type catastrophe is revealed. A phase diagram is drawn for turbulence which is composed of multiple classes of fluctuations. Influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. Finally, the nonlocal heat transport due to the long-wave-length fluctuations, which are noise-pumped by shorter-wave-length ones, is analyzed and the impact on transient transport problems is discussed. (author)

  6. Metabolic scaling theory in plant biology and the three oxygen paradoxa of aerobic life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J

    2013-12-01

    Alfred Russell Wallace was a field naturalist with a strong interest in general physiology. In this vein, he wrote that oxygen (O2), produced by green plants, is "the food of protoplasm, without which it cannot continue to live". Here we summarize current models relating body size to respiration rates (in the context of the metabolic scaling theory) and show that oxygen-uptake activities, measured at 21 vol.% O2, correlate closely with growth patterns at the level of specific organs within the same plant. Thus, whole plant respiration can change ontogenetically, corresponding to alterations in the volume fractions of different tissues. Then, we describe the evolution of cyanobacterial photosynthesis during the Paleoarchean, which changed the world forever. By slowly converting what was once a reducing atmosphere to an oxidizing one, microbes capable of O2-producing photosynthesis modified the chemical nature and distribution of the element iron (Fe), slowly drove some of the most ancient prokaryotes to extinction, created the ozone (O3) layer that subsequently shielded the first terrestrial plants and animals from harmful UV radiation, but also made it possible for Earth's forest to burn, sometimes with catastrophic consequences. Yet another paradox is that the most abundant protein (i.e., the enzyme Rubisco, Ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) has a greater affinity for oxygen than for carbon dioxide (CO2), even though its function is to bind with the latter rather than the former. We evaluate this second "oxygen paradox" within the context of photorespiratory carbon loss and crop yield reduction in C3 vs. C4 plants (rye vs. maize). Finally, we analyze the occurrence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as destructive by-products of cellular metabolism, and discuss the three "O2-paradoxa" with reference to A. R. Wallace's speculations on "design in nature".

  7. Workshop report on large-scale matrix diagonalization methods in chemistry theory institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischof, C.H.; Shepard, R.L.; Huss-Lederman, S. [eds.

    1996-10-01

    The Large-Scale Matrix Diagonalization Methods in Chemistry theory institute brought together 41 computational chemists and numerical analysts. The goal was to understand the needs of the computational chemistry community in problems that utilize matrix diagonalization techniques. This was accomplished by reviewing the current state of the art and looking toward future directions in matrix diagonalization techniques. This institute occurred about 20 years after a related meeting of similar size. During those 20 years the Davidson method continued to dominate the problem of finding a few extremal eigenvalues for many computational chemistry problems. Work on non-diagonally dominant and non-Hermitian problems as well as parallel computing has also brought new methods to bear. The changes and similarities in problems and methods over the past two decades offered an interesting viewpoint for the success in this area. One important area covered by the talks was overviews of the source and nature of the chemistry problems. The numerical analysts were uniformly grateful for the efforts to convey a better understanding of the problems and issues faced in computational chemistry. An important outcome was an understanding of the wide range of eigenproblems encountered in computational chemistry. The workshop covered problems involving self- consistent-field (SCF), configuration interaction (CI), intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR), and scattering problems. In atomic structure calculations using the Hartree-Fock method (SCF), the symmetric matrices can range from order hundreds to thousands. These matrices often include large clusters of eigenvalues which can be as much as 25% of the spectrum. However, if Cl methods are also used, the matrix size can be between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 9} where only one or a few extremal eigenvalues and eigenvectors are needed. Working with very large matrices has lead to the development of

  8. Solid Hydrocarbon Assisted Reduction: A New Process of Generating Micron Scale Metal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    these experiments. By contrast, the pyrolysis of coal in the absence of catalysts results in a two-phase decomposition and degasification process. In... coal is heat treat has a strong impact on the nature of the decomposition [28]. The highly dynamic nature of coal pyrolysis was not accounted for...wax and low-grade coal , both with and without catalysts, in a nitrogen environment at >600 oc, located immediately below beds of micron scale

  9. A Quantitative Comparison of Chrysanthine Theory and Performance Practice of Scale Tuning, Steps, and Prominence of the Octoechos in Byzantine Chant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panteli, Maria; Purwins, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    as the frame of the first tetra- chord is more consistent with the theory than the VI. and the VII. scale degree. In practice, smaller scale degree steps (67-133 cents) appear to be increased and the highest scale step of 333 cents appears to be decreased compared to theory. In practice, the first four scale......Byzantine Chant performance practice is computationally compared to the Chrysanthine theory of the eight Byzantine Tones (octoechos). Intonation, steps, and prominence of scale degrees are quantified, based on pitch class profiles. The novel procedure introduced here comprises the following...

  10. Thresholds, switches and hysteresis in hydrology from the pedon to the catchment scale: a non-linear systems theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hysteresis is a rate-independent non-linearity that is expressed through thresholds, switches, and branches. Exceedance of a threshold, or the occurrence of a turning point in the input, switches the output onto a particular output branch. Rate-independent branching on a very large set of switches with non-local memory is the central concept in the new definition of hysteresis. Hysteretic loops are a special case. A self-consistent mathematical description of hydrological systems with hysteresis demands a new non-linear systems theory of adequate generality. The goal of this paper is to establish this and to show how this may be done. Two results are presented: a conceptual model for the hysteretic soil-moisture characteristic at the pedon scale and a hysteretic linear reservoir at the catchment scale. Both are based on the Preisach model. A result of particular significance is the demonstration that the independent domain model of the soil moisture characteristic due to Childs, Poulavassilis, Mualem and others, is equivalent to the Preisach hysteresis model of non-linear systems theory, a result reminiscent of the reduction of the theory of the unit hydrograph to linear systems theory in the 1950s. A significant reduction in the number of model parameters is also achieved. The new theory implies a change in modelling paradigm.

  11. Mass-scaling as a method to constrain outflows and particle acceleration from low-luminosity accreting black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, R. M. T.; Markoff, S.; Nowak, M. A.; Neilsen, J.; Ceccobello, C.; Crumley, P.; Froning, C. S.; Gallo, E.; Nip, J. E.

    2017-04-01

    The 'Fundamental Plane of black hole accretion' (FP), a relation between the radio luminosities (LR), X-ray luminosities (LX) and masses (MBH) of hard/quiescent state black hole binaries and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei, suggests some aspects of black hole accretion may be scale invariant. However, key questions still exist concerning the relationship between the inflow/outflow behaviour in the 'classic' hard state and quiescence, which may impact this scaling. We show that the broad-band spectra of A0620-00 and Sgr A* (the least luminous stellar mass/supermassive black holes on the FP) can be modelled simultaneously with a physically motivated outflow-dominated model where the jet power and all distances are scaled by the black hole mass. We find we can explain the data of both A0620-00 and Sgr A* (in its non-thermal flaring state) in the context of two outflow-model scenarios: (1) a synchrotron-self-Compton dominated state in which the jet plasma reaches highly sub-equipartition conditions (for the magnetic field with respect to that of the radiating particles), and (2) a synchrotron-dominated state in the fast-cooling regime in which particle acceleration occurs within the inner few gravitational radii of the black hole and plasma is close to equipartition. We show that it may be possible to further discriminate between models (1) and (2) through future monitoring of Sgr A*'s submm/infrared/X-ray emission, in particular via time lags between the variable emission in these bands.

  12. An evaluation of string theory for the prediction of dynamic tire properties using scale model aircraft tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.; Nybakken, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    The string theory was evaluated for predicting lateral tire dynamic properties as obtained from scaled model tests. The experimental data and string theory predictions are in generally good agreement using lateral stiffness and relaxation length values obtained from the static or slowly rolling tire. The results indicate that lateral forces and self-aligning torques are linearly proportional to tire lateral stiffness and to the amplitude of either steer or lateral displacement. In addition, the results show that the ratio of input excitation frequency to road speed is the proper independent variable by which frequency should be measured.

  13. A new double-scaling limit of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory and pp-wave strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, C.; Plefka, J.; Semenoff, G. W.

    2002-01-01

    The metric of a spacetime with a parallel plane (pp)-wave can be obtained in a certain limit of the space AdS5 × S5. According to the AdS/CFT correspondence, the holographic dual of superstring theory on that background should be the analogous limit of N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory...... scaling limit may be defined. We exactly compute two- and three-point functions of chiral primaries in this limit. We also carefully study certain operators conjectured to correspond to string excitations on the pp-wave background. We find non-planar linear mixing of these proposed operators, requiring...

  14. Fractal scaling of particle size distribution and relationships with topsoil properties affected by biological soil crusts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Lei Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust, as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (P<0.05; and soil organic carbon and nutrients showed an upward trend across the successional stages of biological soil crusts. Fractal dimensions ranged from 2.1477 to 2.3032, and significantly linear correlated with selected soil properties (R(2 = 0.494∼0.955, P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biological soil crusts cause an important increase in soil fertility, and are beneficial to sand fixation, although the process is rather slow. Fractal dimension proves to be a sensitive and useful index for quantifying changes in soil properties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions.

  15. An Institutional Theory Analysis of Charter Schools: Addressing Institutional Challenges to Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Luis A.; Zuckerman, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual framework derived from institutional theory in sociology that offers two competing policy contexts in which charter schools operate--a bureaucratic frame versus a decentralized frame. An analysis of evolving charter school types based on three underlying theories of action is considered. As charter school leaders…

  16. ETHOS - an effective theory of structure formation: dark matter physics as a possible explanation of the small-scale CDM problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsberger, Mark; Zavala, Jesús; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Pfrommer, Christoph; Bringmann, Torsten; Sigurdson, Kris

    2016-08-01

    We present the first simulations within an effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS), which includes the effect of interactions between dark matter and dark radiation on the linear initial power spectrum and dark matter self-interactions during non-linear structure formation. We simulate a Milky Way-like halo in four different dark matter models and the cold dark matter case. Our highest resolution simulation has a particle mass of 2.8 × 104 M⊙ and a softening length of 72.4 pc. We demonstrate that all alternative models have only a negligible impact on large-scale structure formation. On galactic scales, however, the models significantly affect the structure and abundance of subhaloes due to the combined effects of small-scale primordial damping in the power spectrum and late-time self-interactions. We derive an analytic mapping from the primordial damping scale in the power spectrum to the cutoff scale in the halo mass function and the kinetic decoupling temperature. We demonstrate that certain models within this extended effective framework that can alleviate the too-big-to-fail and missing satellite problems simultaneously, and possibly the core-cusp problem. The primordial power spectrum cutoff of our models naturally creates a diversity in the circular velocity profiles, which is larger than that found for cold dark matter simulations. We show that the parameter space of models can be constrained by contrasting model predictions to astrophysical observations. For example, some models may be challenged by the missing satellite problem if baryonic processes were to be included and even oversolve the too-big-to-fail problem; thus ruling them out.

  17. Multi-Scale Particle Size Distributions of Mars, Moon and Itokawa based on a time-maturation dependent fragmentation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present the development of a soil evolution framework and multiscale modelling of the surface of Mars, Moon and Itokawa thus providing an atlas of extra-terrestrial Particle Size Distributions (PSD). These PSDs are profoundly based on a tailoring method which interconnects several datasets from different sites captured by the various missions. The final integrated product is then fully justified through a soil evolution analysis model mathematically constructed via fundamental physical principles (Charalambous, 2013). The construction of the PSD takes into account the macroscale fresh primary impacts and their products, the mesoscale distributions obtained by the in-situ data of surface missions (Golombek et al., 1997, 2012) and finally the microscopic scale distributions provided by Curiosity and Phoenix Lander (Pike, 2011). The distribution naturally extends at the magnitudinal scales at which current data does not exist due to the lack of scientific instruments capturing the populations at these data absent scales. The extension is based on the model distribution (Charalambous, 2013) which takes as parameters known values of material specific probabilities of fragmentation and grinding limits. Additionally, the establishment of a closed-form statistical distribution provides a quantitative description of the soil's structure. Consequently, reverse engineering of the model distribution allows the synthesis of soil that faithfully represents the particle population at the studied sites (Charalambous, 2011). Such representation essentially delivers a virtual soil environment to work with for numerous applications. A specific application demonstrated here will be the information that can directly be extracted for the successful drilling probability as a function of distance in an effort to aid the HP3 instrument of the 2016 Insight Mission to Mars. Pike, W. T., et al. "Quantification of the dry history of the Martian soil inferred from in situ microscopy

  18. Aging underdamped scaled Brownian motion: Ensemble- and time-averaged particle displacements, nonergodicity, and the failure of the overdamping approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Hadiseh; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Bodrova, Anna; Metzler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    We investigate both analytically and by computer simulations the ensemble- and time-averaged, nonergodic, and aging properties of massive particles diffusing in a medium with a time dependent diffusivity. We call this stochastic diffusion process the (aging) underdamped scaled Brownian motion (UDSBM). We demonstrate how the mean squared displacement (MSD) and the time-averaged MSD of UDSBM are affected by the inertial term in the Langevin equation, both at short, intermediate, and even long diffusion times. In particular, we quantify the ballistic regime for the MSD and the time-averaged MSD as well as the spread of individual time-averaged MSD trajectories. One of the main effects we observe is that, both for the MSD and the time-averaged MSD, for superdiffusive UDSBM the ballistic regime is much shorter than for ordinary Brownian motion. In contrast, for subdiffusive UDSBM, the ballistic region extends to much longer diffusion times. Therefore, particular care needs to be taken under what conditions the overdamped limit indeed provides a correct description, even in the long time limit. We also analyze to what extent ergodicity in the Boltzmann-Khinchin sense in this nonstationary system is broken, both for subdiffusive and superdiffusive UDSBM. Finally, the limiting case of ultraslow UDSBM is considered, with a mixed logarithmic and power-law dependence of the ensemble- and time-averaged MSDs of the particles. In the limit of strong aging, remarkably, the ordinary UDSBM and the ultraslow UDSBM behave similarly in the short time ballistic limit. The approaches developed here open ways for considering other stochastic processes under physically important conditions when a finite particle mass and aging in the system cannot be neglected.

  19. Predicting Planck Scale and Newtonian Constant from a Yang-Mills Gauge Theory: 1- and 2-Loop Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo F. Sobreiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a model for an emergent gravity based on SO(5 Yang-Mills action in Euclidian 4-dimensional spacetime was proposed. In this work we provide some 1- and 2-loop computations and show that the model can accommodate suitable predicting values for the Newtonian constant. Moreover, it is shown that the typical scale of the expected transition between the quantum and the geometrodynamical theory is consistent with Planck scale. We also provide a discussion on the cosmological constant problem.

  20. Characterizing the lower log region of the atmospheric surface layer via large-scale particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Giuseppe A.; Sherry, Michael; Kinzel, Matthias; Rival, David E.

    2014-05-01

    As a first step toward characterizing coherent structures within the atmospheric surface layer (ASL), measurements obtained via a large-scale particle tracking velocimetry (LS-PTV) system were validated against wind-measurement station data as well as canonical turbulent boundary layer studies. The LS-PTV system resolves three-dimensional, Lagrangian tracks over a 16 m3 volume. Mean-velocity measurements, as well as vertical and shear Reynolds-stress measurements, generally agreed with wind-measurement station data and Reynolds-stress profiles referenced from literature. The probability distributions for streamwise, spanwise and vertical velocity-fluctuation components appear normally distributed about zero. Furthermore, the probability distributions for all three components of Lagrangian acceleration were exponential and followed the parametrization curve from LaPorta et al. (Lett Nat 409:1017-1019, 2001). Lastly, the vorticity probability distributions were exponential and symmetric about zero, which matches findings from Balint et al. (Fluid Mech 228:53-86, 1991). The vorticity intensity measured by the LS-PTV system was less than values from Priyadarshana et al. (Fluid Mech 570:307-346, 2007), which is attributed to the low spatial resolution. However, the average spacing of 0.5 m between tracer particles is deemed sufficient for the future characterization of vortical structures within the ASL.

  1. Microcontinuum field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Eringen, A Cemal

    1999-01-01

    Microcontinuum field theories constitute an extension of classical field theories -- of elastic bodies, deformations, electromagnetism, and the like -- to microscopic spaces and short time scales. Material bodies are here viewed as collections of large numbers of deformable particles, much as each volume element of a fluid in statistical mechanics is viewed as consisting of a large number of small particles for which statistical laws are valid. Classical continuum theories are valid when the characteristic length associated with external forces or stimuli is much larger than any internal scale of the body under consideration. When the characteristic lengths are comparable, however, the response of the individual constituents becomes important, for example, in considering the fluid or elastic properties of blood, porous media, polymers, liquid crystals, slurries, and composite materials. This volume is concerned with the kinematics of microcontinua. It begins with a discussion of strain, stress tensors, balanc...

  2. Biological response to nano-scale titanium dioxide (TiO2): role of particle dose, shape, and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rona M; Teesy, Christel; Franzi, Lisa; Weir, Alex; Westerhoff, Paul; Evans, James E; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2013-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely used nanomaterials, valued for its highly refractive, photocatalytic, and pigmenting properties. TiO2 is also classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible human carcinogen. The objectives of this study were to (1) establish a lowest-observed-effect level (LOEL) for nano-scale TiO2, (2) determine TiO2 uptake in the lungs, and (3) estimate toxicity based on physicochemical properties and retention in the lungs. In vivo lung toxicity of nano-scale TiO2 using varying forms of well-characterized, highly dispersed TiO2 was assessed. Anatase/rutile P25 spheres (TiO2-P25), pure anatase spheres (TiO2-A), and anatase nanobelts (TiO2-NB) were tested. To determine the effects of dose and particle characteristics, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered TiO2 (0, 20, 70, or 200 μg) via intratracheal instillation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were obtained for analysis 1 and 7 d post exposure. Despite abundant TiO2 inclusions in all exposed animals, only TiO2-NB displayed any significant degree of inflammation seen in BALF at the 1-d time point. This inflammation resolved by 7 d, although TiO2 particles had not cleared from alveolar macrophages recovered from the lung. Histological examination showed TiO2-NB produced cellular changes at d 1 that were still evident at d 7. Data indicate TiO2-NB is the most inflammatory with a LOEL of 200 μg at 1 d post instillation.

  3. Scaling Theory of a Compressibility-Driven Metal-Insulator Transition in a Two-Dimensional Electron Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belitz, D.; Kirkpatrick, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    We present a scaling description of a metal-insulator transition in two-dimensional electron systems that is driven by a vanishing compressibility rather than a vanishing diffusion coefficient. A small set of basic assumptions leads to a consistent theoretical framework that is compatible with existing transport and compressibility measurements, and allows us to make predictions for other observables. We also discuss connections between these ideas and other theories of transitions to an incompressible quantum fluid.

  4. Psychometric properties revised reinforcement sensitivity theory (r-RST) scale in chronic pain patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amiri S; Behnezhad S; Azad-Marzabadi E

    2017-01-01

    ...) in patients with chronic pain.Methods: For this purpose, 312 (first study) and 70 (second study) patients with chronic pain were selected, and the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory Personality Questionnaire...

  5. Lower limit to the scale of an effective quantum theory of gravitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, R R; Grin, Daniel

    2008-01-25

    An effective quantum theory of gravitation in which gravity weakens at energies higher than approximately 10(-3) eV is one way to accommodate the apparent smallness of the cosmological constant. Such a theory predicts departures from the Newtonian inverse-square force law on distances below approximately 0.05 mm. However, it is shown that this modification also leads to changes in the long-range behavior of gravity and is inconsistent with observed gravitational lenses.

  6. The Physics and Mathematical Theory of Nano-Scaled Ring Resonators and Loop Antennas

    OpenAIRE

    McKinley, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is based on the realisation that no analytical theory of loop antennas and rings exists that is at once applicable to the Radio Frequency (RF), Micro-wave (MW), TeraHertz (THz), Infra-red (IR), and Optical (OR) regions. Nor is there any Electrical Engineering circuit model, rigorously developed from the results of that theory, that generates results which match numerical simulations and experimental work in the literature across all of these regimes. This thesis fills that gap. Ma...

  7. Multi-particle correlations and KNO scaling in the medium-induced jet evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo, Miguel A.; Iancu, Edmond [Institut de physique théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CNRS, CEA,F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-12-20

    We study the gluon distribution produced via successive medium-induced branchings by an energetic jet propagating through a weakly-coupled quark-gluon plasma. We show that under suitable approximations the evolution of the jet can be described as a classical stochastic process, which is exactly solvable. For this process, we construct exact analytic solutions for all the n-point correlation functions (the n-body densities in the space of energy). The corresponding results for the one-point and the two-point functions were already known, but those for the higher-point functions are new. These results demonstrate strong correlations associated with the existence of common ancestors in the branching process. By integrating these n-point functions over the gluon energies, we deduce the mean gluon multiplicity 〈N〉 as well as the higher moments 〈N{sup p}〉 with p≥2. We find that the multiplicities of the soft gluons are parametrically large and show a remarkable regularity, known as Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) scaling: the reduced moments 〈N{sup p}〉/〈N〉{sup p} are pure numbers, independent of any of the physical parameters of the problem. We recognize a special negative binomial distribution which is characterized by large statistical fluctuations. These predictions can be tested in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC, via event-by-event measurements of the di-jet asymmetry.

  8. Characteristics of Atmospheric Metalliferous Particles during Large-Scale Fireworks in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zang-Ho Shon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of large-scale firework events on urban background trace metal concentrations was investigated using 24 hr data collected over 3 days at three sites in Busan Metropolitan City, Republic of Korea, during the falls (Oct. of 2011–2013. The firework events increased local background concentrations of trace metals as follows: K (1.72 times, Sr (2.64 times, As (2.86 times, Pb (2.91 times, and Al (5.44 times. The levels of some metals did not always drop to background level one day after the firework event. The contribution of fireworks to trace metal concentration levels (and emissions for 2011 event was negligible compared to 2012 and 2013 events due to different meteorological conditions (precipitation. In addition, the impact of firework events on the ambient concentration levels of trace metals was likely to be different depending on their chemical speciation. The impact of firework events in Busan on urban air quality (trace metal was less intense compared to other similar festivals worldwide. The largest emission of trace metals and elements from firework burning was represented by K (128–164 kg, followed by Pb, Cd, Cu, Mg, Ba, As, Al, Ga, Co, and Na.

  9. The electroweak theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Quigg

    2001-08-10

    After a short essay on the current state of particle physics, the author reviews the antecedents of the modern picture of the weak and electromagnetic interactions and then undertakes a brief survey of the SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} U(1){sub Y} electroweak theory. The authors reviews the features of electroweak phenomenology at tree level and beyond, presents an introduction to the Higgs boson and the 1-TeV scale, and examines arguments for enlarging the electroweak theory. The author concludes with a brief look at low-scale gravity.

  10. On the Relativistic Micro-Canonical Ensemble and Relativistic Kinetic Theory for N Relativistic Particles in Inertial and Non-Inertial Rest Frames

    OpenAIRE

    Alba, David; Crater, Horace W.; Lusanna, Luca

    2012-01-01

    A new formulation of relativistic classical mechanics allows a revisiting of old unsolved problems in relativistic kinetic theory and in relativistic statistical mechanics. In particular a definition of the relativistic micro-canonical partition function is given strictly in terms of the Poincar\\'e generators of an interacting N-particle system both in the inertial and non-inertial rest frames. The non-relativistic limit allows a definition of both the inertial and non-inertial micro-canonica...

  11. Scaling Factor Estimation Using an Optimized Mass Change Strategy, Part 1: Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aenlle, Manuel López; Fernández, Pelayo Fernández; Brincker, Rune

    2007-01-01

    . The scaling factors are determined using the natural frequencies and mode shapes of both the modified and the unmodified structure. However, the uncertainty on the scaling factor estimation depends on the modal analysis and the mass change strategy (number, magnitude and location of the masses) used to modify......In natural input modal analysis, only un-scaled mode shapes can be obtained. The mass change method is, in many cases, the simplest way to estimate the scaling factors, which involves repeated modal testing after changing the mass in different points of the structure where the mode shapes are known...

  12. Scaling Theory for Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels, Sparging, and Cyclic Feed Transport Systems for Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, William L.; Rector, David R.; Rassat, Scot D.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Minette, Michael J.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Josephson, Gary B.; Wells, Beric E.; Berglin, Eric J.

    2013-09-27

    This document is a previously unpublished work based on a draft report prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in 2012. Work on the report stopped when WTP’s approach to testing changed. PNNL is issuing a modified version of the document a year later to preserve and disseminate the valuable technical work that was completed. This document establishes technical bases for evaluating the mixing performance of Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) pretreatment process tanks based on data from less-than-full-scale testing, relative to specified mixing requirements. The technical bases include the fluid mechanics affecting mixing for specified vessel configurations, operating parameters, and simulant properties. They address scaling vessel physical performance, simulant physical performance, and “scaling down” the operating conditions at full scale to define test conditions at reduced scale and “scaling up” the test results at reduced scale to predict the performance at full scale. Essentially, this document addresses the following questions: • Why and how can the mixing behaviors in a smaller vessel represent those in a larger vessel? • What information is needed to address the first question? • How should the information be used to predict mixing performance in WTP? The design of Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being addressed in other, complementary documents.

  13. Unobservability of short-lived unstable particles and its implications for observational claims and theories in physics

    OpenAIRE

    Cabbolet, Marcoen J. T. F.

    2015-01-01

    The physics literature contains many claims that elementary particles have been observed: such observational claims are, of course, important for the development of existential knowledge. Regarding claimed observations of short-lived unstable particles in particular, the use of the word `observation' is based on the convention in physics that the observation of a short-lived unstable particle can be claimed when its predicted decay products have been observed with a significance of 5 sigma. T...

  14. Equivalence between fractional exclusion statistics and self-consistent mean-field theory in interacting-particle systems in any number of dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, D V; Nemnes, G A; Gulminelli, F

    2013-10-01

    We describe a mean field interacting particle system in any number of dimensions and in a generic external potential as an ideal gas with fractional exclusion statistics (FES). We define the FES quasiparticle energies, we calculate the FES parameters of the system and we deduce the equations for the equilibrium particle populations. The FES gas is "ideal," in the sense that the quasiparticle energies do not depend on the other quasiparticle levels' populations and the sum of the quasiparticle energies is equal to the total energy of the system. We prove that the FES formalism is equivalent to the semiclassical or Thomas Fermi limit of the self-consistent mean-field theory and the FES quasiparticle populations may be calculated from the Landau quasiparticle populations by making the correspondence between the FES and the Landau quasiparticle energies. The FES provides a natural semiclassical ideal gas description of the interacting particle gas.

  15. Burdensomeness, Belongingness, and Capability: Assessing the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide With MMPI-2-RF Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anestis, Joye C; Finn, Jacob A; Gottfried, Emily D; Hames, Jennifer L; Bodell, Lindsay P; Hagan, Christopher R; Arnau, Randolph C; Anestis, Michael D; Arbisi, Paul A; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-06-01

    Given the emerging body of literature demonstrating the validity of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS), and the importance of increasing our understanding of the development of risk factors associated with suicidal behavior, it seems worthwhile both to expand IPTS research via Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) correlates and to expand the availability of methods by which to assess the constructs of the IPTS. The present study attempted to do so in a large adult outpatient mental health sample by (a) inspecting associations between the IPTS constructs and the substantive scales of the MMPI-2-RF and (b) exploring the utility of MMPI-2-RF scale-based algorithms of the IPTS constructs. Correlates between the IPTS constructs and the MMPI-2-RF scales scores largely followed a pattern consistent with theory-based predictions, and we provide preliminary evidence that the IPTS constructs can be reasonably approximated using theoretically based MMPI-2-RF substantive scales. Implications of these findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Spatial connections in regional climate model rainfall outputs at different temporal scales: Application of network theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naufan, Ihsan; Sivakumar, Bellie; Woldemeskel, Fitsum M.; Raghavan, Srivatsan V.; Vu, Minh Tue; Liong, Shie-Yui

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall has always been a great challenge, and the impacts of climate change further complicate this issue. The present study employs the concepts of complex networks to study the spatial connections in rainfall, with emphasis on climate change and rainfall scaling. Rainfall outputs (during 1961-1990) from a regional climate model (i.e. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model that downscaled the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts, ECMWF ERA-40 reanalyses) over Southeast Asia are studied, and data corresponding to eight different temporal scales (6-hr, 12-hr, daily, 2-day, 4-day, weekly, biweekly, and monthly) are analyzed. Two network-based methods are applied to examine the connections in rainfall: clustering coefficient (a measure of the network's local density) and degree distribution (a measure of the network's spread). The influence of rainfall correlation threshold (T) on spatial connections is also investigated by considering seven different threshold levels (ranging from 0.5 to 0.8). The results indicate that: (1) rainfall networks corresponding to much coarser temporal scales exhibit properties similar to that of small-world networks, regardless of the threshold; (2) rainfall networks corresponding to much finer temporal scales may be classified as either small-world networks or scale-free networks, depending upon the threshold; and (3) rainfall spatial connections exhibit a transition phase at intermediate temporal scales, especially at high thresholds. These results suggest that the most appropriate model for studying spatial connections may often be different at different temporal scales, and that a combination of small-world and scale-free network models might be more appropriate for rainfall upscaling/downscaling across all scales, in the strict sense of scale-invariance. The results also suggest that spatial connections in the studied rainfall networks in Southeast Asia are

  17. Reliability and Structure of the TALIS Social Desirability Scale: An Assessment Based on Item Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapuza, A. V.; Tyumeneva, Yu. A.

    2017-01-01

    One of the ways of controlling for the influence of social expectations on the answers given by survey respondents is to use a social desirability scale together with the main questions. The social desirability scale, which was included in the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) international comparative study for this purpose, was…

  18. Item response theory : How Mokken scaling can be used in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watson, R.; Van der Ark, L.A.; Lin, L.C.; Fieo, R.; Deary, I.J.; Meijer, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. To demonstrate the principles and application of Mokken scaling. Background. The history and development of Mokken scaling is described, some examples of applications are given, and some recent development of the method are summarised. Design. Secondary analysis of data obtained by

  19. Non-Gaussianity as a particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hayden [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Cambridge University,Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Baumann, Daniel; Pimentel, Guilherme L. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Cambridge University,Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Institute of Physics, Universiteit van Amsterdam,Science Park, Amsterdam, 1090 GL (Netherlands)

    2016-12-13

    We study the imprints of massive particles with spin on cosmological correlators. Using the framework of the effective field theory of inflation, we classify the couplings of these particles to the Goldstone boson of broken time translations and the graviton. We show that it is possible to generate observable non-Gaussianity within the regime of validity of the effective theory, as long as the masses of the particles are close to the Hubble scale and their interactions break the approximate conformal symmetry of the inflationary background. We derive explicit shape functions for the scalar and tensor bispectra that can serve as templates for future observational searches.

  20. Quasinormal modes of scale dependent black holes in (1 +2 )-dimensional Einstein-power-Maxwell theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Ángel; Panotopoulos, Grigoris

    2018-01-01

    We study for the first time the stability against scalar perturbations, and we compute the spectrum of quasinormal modes of three-dimensional charged black holes in Einstein-power-Maxwell nonlinear electrodynamics assuming running couplings. Adopting the sixth order Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation we investigate how the running of the couplings change the spectrum of the classical theory. Our results show that all modes corresponding to nonvanishing angular momentum are unstable both in the classical theory and with the running of the couplings, while the fundamental mode can be stable or unstable depending on the running parameter and the electric charge.