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Sample records for scale temperature induction

  1. The application of two-step linear temperature program to thermal analysis for monitoring the lipid induction of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 in large scale cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bongmun; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2015-02-01

    Recently, microalgae was considered as a renewable energy for fuel production because its production is nonseasonal and may take place on nonarable land. Despite all of these advantages, microalgal oil production is significantly affected by environmental factors. Furthermore, the large variability remains an important problem in measurement of algae productivity and compositional analysis, especially, the total lipid content. Thus, there is considerable interest in accurate determination of total lipid content during the biotechnological process. For these reason, various high-throughput technologies were suggested for accurate measurement of total lipids contained in the microorganisms, especially oleaginous microalgae. In addition, more advanced technologies were employed to quantify the total lipids of the microalgae without a pretreatment. However, these methods are difficult to measure total lipid content in wet form microalgae obtained from large-scale production. In present study, the thermal analysis performed with two-step linear temeperature program was applied to measure heat evolved in temperature range from 310 to 351 °C of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 obtained from large-scale cultivation. And then, we examined the relationship between the heat evolved in 310-351 °C (HE) and total lipid content of the wet Nostoc cell cultivated in raceway. As a result, the linear relationship was determined between HE value and total lipid content of Nostoc sp. KNUA003. Particularly, there was a linear relationship of 98% between the HE value and the total lipid content of the tested microorganism. Based on this relationship, the total lipid content converted from the heat evolved of wet Nostoc sp. KNUA003 could be used for monitoring its lipid induction in large-scale cultivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An induction linac injector for scaled experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, H.L.; Faltens, A.; Pike, C.; Brodzik, D.; Johnson, R.M.; Vanecek, D.; Hewett, D.W.

    1991-04-01

    An injector is being developed at LBL that would serve as the front end of a scaled induction linac accelerator technology experiment for heavy ion fusion. The ion mass being used is in the range 10--18. It is a multi-beam device intended to accelerate up to 2 MeV with 500 mA in each beam. The first half of the accelerating column has been built and experiments with one carbon beam are underway at the 1 MeV level. 5 refs., 1 fig

  3. Reproducible and controllable induction voltage adder for scaled beam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Yasuo; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    A reproducible and controllable induction adder was developed using solid-state switching devices and Finemet cores for scaled beam compression experiments. A gate controlled MOSFET circuit was developed for the controllable voltage driver. The MOSFET circuit drove the induction adder at low magnetization levels of the cores which enabled us to form reproducible modulation voltages with jitter less than 0.3 ns. Preliminary beam compression experiments indicated that the induction adder can improve the reproducibility of modulation voltages and advance the beam physics experiments.

  4. Fuzzy Logic Temperature Control System For The Induction Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Lei Hnin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research paper describes the fuzzy logic temperature control system of the induction furnace. Temperature requirement of the heating system varies during the heating process. In the conventional control schemes the switching losses increase with the change in the load. A closed loop control is required to have a smooth control on the system. In this system pulse width modulation based power control scheme for the induction heating system is developed using the fuzzy logic controller. The induction furnace requires a good voltage regulation to have efficient response. The controller controls the temperature depending upon weight of meat water and time. This control system is implemented in hardware system using microcontroller. Here the fuzzy logic controller is designed and simulated in MATLAB to get the desire condition.

  5. High temperature sealing method : induction brazing for SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Y.H.; Lee, S.B.; Song, R.H.; Shin, D.R. [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, T.H. [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Advanced Fuel Cell Research Center

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the use of induction brazing as a high temperature sealing method for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Nickel-based brazing alloys were modified using reactive titanium-hydride (TiH2). The gas sealing properties of the induction brazing process on anode-supported tubular SOFCs and ferritic stainless steel were evaluated. Brazing alloys BNi-2 and BNi-4 were not wetted in a yttria-silica-zircon (YSZ) electrolyte. The brazing alloy with added TiH2 showed good wettability with the YSZ electrolyte as a result of the formation of a TiOX layer. Only the BNi-4 alloy joined with the YSZ electrolyte. An open circuit voltage (OCV) value was used to estimate the gas tightness of the brazed cell. It was concluded that the BNi-4 TiH2 modified alloy is a suitable sealing material for SOFCs operating in temperatures up to 750 degrees C.

  6. Temperature dependence of heat sensitization and thermotolerance induction with ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henle, K.J.; Nagle, W.A.; Moss, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Cytoxicity of 1 M ethanol was strongly temperature dependent; survival curves between 34 0 and 39 0 C were similar to heat survival curves between 40 and 45 0 without ethanol. Ethanol was non-toxic at 22 0 ; at 34.5 0 and 35.5 0 ethanol survival curves were biphasic. The major effect of 1 M ethanol was an effective temperature shift of 6.4 Celsius degrees, although temperatures between 34 0 and 36 0 caused additional sensitization reminiscent of the stepdown heating phenomenon. Induction of thermotolerance with equitoxic ethanol exposures at 35.5 0 and 37 0 or with heat alone (10 min, 45 0 ) resulted in tolerance development with similar kinetics; in contrast, ethanol exposures at 22 0 did not induce any tolerance development with similar kinetics; in contrast, ethanol exposures at 22 0 did not induce any tolerance to hyperthermia. These data provide a rationale for conflicting reports in the literature regarding thermotolerance induction by ethanol and suggest that ethanol causes ''heat'' stress at temperatures that are generally considered to be physiological. This interpretation predicts that the use of ethanol and other organic solvents in high concentrations will cause effects at 37 0 that normally occur only at hyperthermic temperatures, including membrane perturbations and HSP synthesis, and that ''physiological'' temperatures must be precisely controlled under those conditions

  7. A miniature inductive temperature sensor to monitor temperature noise in the coolant of an LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, S.A.; Sandham, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the design and performance of miniature inductive sensors developed to monitor fast temperature fluctuations in the sodium coolant above the core of a LMFBR. These instruments, designed to be installed within existing thermocouple containment thimbles, also provide a steady-state temperature indication for reactor control purposes. (author)

  8. Temperature estimation of induction machines based on wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fourth-order Kalman filter (KF algorithm is implemented in the wireless sensor node to estimate the temperatures of the stator winding, the rotor cage and the stator core in the induction machine. Three separate wireless sensor nodes are used as the data acquisition systems for different input signals. Six Hall sensors are used to acquire the three-phase stator currents and voltages of the induction machine. All of them are processed to root mean square (rms in ampere and volt. A rotary encoder is mounted for the rotor speed and Pt-1000 is used for the temperature of the coolant air. The processed signals in the physical unit are transmitted wirelessly to the host wireless sensor node, where the KF is implemented with fixed-point arithmetic in Contiki OS. Time-division multiple access (TDMA is used to make the wireless transmission more stable. Compared to the floating-point implementation, the fixed-point implementation has the same estimation accuracy at only about one-fifth of the computation time. The temperature estimation system can work under any work condition as long as there are currents through the machine. It can also be rebooted for estimation even when wireless transmission has collapsed or packages are missing.

  9. The effect of temperature on photosynthetic induction under fluctuating light in Chrysanthemum morifolium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öztürk, Isik; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Ritz, Christian

    2013-01-01

    for photosynthetic induction. Gas exchange measurements were used to investigate the rate of induction and the opening of stomata. It was determined that induction equilibrium for C. morifolium at varying temperatures under dynamic light conditions was reached within 15 to 45 minutes except at saturating light...... intensity. For the same photon irradiance, the momentary state of induction equilibrated was higher approximately at 30° C and it decreased as temperature increased. The interaction effect of irradiance and temperature on induction equilibrium was not significant. The rate of photosynthetic induction...... and the time that it reached its 90% value (t90) was influenced by irradiance significantly. The light history of a leaf had a significant effect on t90, which indicated that an equilibrium state of induction will not always be reached within the same time. The effect of temperature on photosynthetic induction...

  10. Electron temperatures of inductively coupled Cl2-Ar plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, N.C.M.; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Herman, Irving P.

    2002-01-01

    Trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy has been used to measure the electron temperature, T e , in a high-density inductively coupled Cl 2 -Ar plasma at 18 mTorr as function of the 13.56 MHz radio frequency power and Ar fraction. Only the Kr and Xe emission lines were used to determine T e , because of evidence of radiation trapping when the Ar emission lines were also used for larger Ar fractions. At 600 W (10.6 W cm-2), T e increases from ∼4.0±0.5 eV to ∼6.0±2.0 eV as the Ar fraction increases from 1% to 96%. In the H (inductive, bright) mode, T e , for a 'neat' chlorine plasma (including 1% of each He/Ne/Ar/Kr/Xe) increases only slightly from ∼3.8 to 4.0 eV as power increases from 450 to 750 W. This increase is much larger for larger Ar fractions, such as from ∼4.0 to 7.3 eV for 78% Ar. Most of these effects can be understood using the fundamental particle balance equation

  11. Temperature Scaling Law for Quantum Annealing Optimizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2017-09-15

    Physical implementations of quantum annealing unavoidably operate at finite temperatures. We point to a fundamental limitation of fixed finite temperature quantum annealers that prevents them from functioning as competitive scalable optimizers and show that to serve as optimizers annealer temperatures must be appropriately scaled down with problem size. We derive a temperature scaling law dictating that temperature must drop at the very least in a logarithmic manner but also possibly as a power law with problem size. We corroborate our results by experiment and simulations and discuss the implications of these to practical annealers.

  12. Magnetic induction of hyperthermia by a modified self-learning fuzzy temperature controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Tai, Cheng-Chi

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study involved developing a temperature controller for magnetic induction hyperthermia (MIH). A closed-loop controller was applied to track a reference model to guarantee a desired temperature response. The MIH system generated an alternating magnetic field to heat a high magnetic permeability material. This wireless induction heating had few side effects when it was extensively applied to cancer treatment. The effects of hyperthermia strongly depend on the precise control of temperature. However, during the treatment process, the control performance is degraded due to severe perturbations and parameter variations. In this study, a modified self-learning fuzzy logic controller (SLFLC) with a gain tuning mechanism was implemented to obtain high control performance in a wide range of treatment situations. This implementation was performed by appropriately altering the output scaling factor of a fuzzy inverse model to adjust the control rules. In this study, the proposed SLFLC was compared to the classical self-tuning fuzzy logic controller and fuzzy model reference learning control. Additionally, the proposed SLFLC was verified by conducting in vitro experiments with porcine liver. The experimental results indicated that the proposed controller showed greater robustness and excellent adaptability with respect to the temperature control of the MIH system.

  13. Scale hierarchy in high-temperature QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Akerlund, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Because of asymptotic freedom, QCD becomes weakly interacting at high temperature: this is the reason for the transition to a deconfined phase in Yang-Mills theory at temperature $T_c$. At high temperature $T \\gg T_c$, the smallness of the running coupling $g$ induces a hierachy betwen the "hard", "soft" and "ultrasoft" energy scales $T$, $g T$ and $g^2 T$. This hierarchy allows for a very successful effective treatment where the "hard" and the "soft" modes are successively integrated out. However, it is not clear how high a temperature is necessary to achieve such a scale hierarchy. By numerical simulations, we show that the required temperatures are extremely high. Thus, the quantitative success of the effective theory down to temperatures of a few $T_c$ appears surprising a posteriori.

  14. Temperature/electric field scaling in Ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjaji, Abdelowahed; Guyomar, Daniel; Pruvost, Sebastien; Touhtouh, Samira; Yuse, Kaori; Boughaleb, Yahia

    2010-01-01

    The effects of the field amplitude (E) and temperature on the polarization and their scaling relations were investigated on rhombohedral PMN-xPT ceramics. The scaling law was based on the physical symmetries of the problem and rendered it possible to express the temperature variation (Δθ) as an electric field equivalent ΔE eq =(α+2βxP(E,θ 0 ))xΔθ. Consequently, this was also the case for the relationship between the entropy (Γ) and polarization (P). Rhombohedral Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 ) 0.75 Ti 0.25 O 3 ceramics were used for the verification. It was found that such an approach permitted the prediction of the maximal working temperature, using only purely electrical measurements. It indicates that the working temperature should not exceed 333 K. This value corresponds to the temperature maximum before the dramatic decrease of piezoelectric properties. Reciprocally, the polarization behavior under electrical field can be predicted, using only purely thermal measurements. The scaling law enabled a prediction of the piezoelectric properties (for example, d 31 ) under an electrical field replacing the temperature variation (Δθ) by ΔE/(α+2βxp(E,θ 0 )). Inversely, predictions of the piezoelectric properties (d 31 ) as a function of temperature were permitted using purely only electrical measurements.

  15. Temperature/electric field scaling in Ferroelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajjaji, Abdelowahed, E-mail: Hajjaji12@gmail.co [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite, LGEF, INSA LYON, Bat. Gustave Ferrie, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Guyomar, Daniel; Pruvost, Sebastien [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite, LGEF, INSA LYON, Bat. Gustave Ferrie, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Touhtouh, Samira [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, LPMC, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, 24000 El-Jadida, Maroc (Morocco); Yuse, Kaori [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite, LGEF, INSA LYON, Bat. Gustave Ferrie, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Boughaleb, Yahia [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, LPMC, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, 24000 El-Jadida, Maroc (Morocco)

    2010-07-01

    The effects of the field amplitude (E) and temperature on the polarization and their scaling relations were investigated on rhombohedral PMN-xPT ceramics. The scaling law was based on the physical symmetries of the problem and rendered it possible to express the temperature variation ({Delta}{theta}) as an electric field equivalent {Delta}E{sub eq}=({alpha}+2{beta}xP(E,{theta}{sub 0}))x{Delta}{theta}. Consequently, this was also the case for the relationship between the entropy ({Gamma}) and polarization (P). Rhombohedral Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3}){sub 0.75}Ti{sub 0.25}O{sub 3} ceramics were used for the verification. It was found that such an approach permitted the prediction of the maximal working temperature, using only purely electrical measurements. It indicates that the working temperature should not exceed 333 K. This value corresponds to the temperature maximum before the dramatic decrease of piezoelectric properties. Reciprocally, the polarization behavior under electrical field can be predicted, using only purely thermal measurements. The scaling law enabled a prediction of the piezoelectric properties (for example, d{sub 31}) under an electrical field replacing the temperature variation ({Delta}{theta}) by {Delta}E/({alpha}+2{beta}xp(E,{theta}{sub 0})). Inversely, predictions of the piezoelectric properties (d{sub 31}) as a function of temperature were permitted using purely only electrical measurements.

  16. Temperature scaling method for Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Lonnie D; Windus, Theresa L

    2009-01-22

    The use of ab initio potentials in Monte Carlo simulations aimed at investigating the nucleation kinetics of water clusters is complicated by the computational expense of the potential energy determinations. Furthermore, the common desire to investigate the temperature dependence of kinetic properties leads to an urgent need to reduce the expense of performing simulations at many different temperatures. A method is detailed that allows a Markov chain (obtained via Monte Carlo) at one temperature to be scaled to other temperatures of interest without the need to perform additional large simulations. This Markov chain temperature-scaling (TeS) can be generally applied to simulations geared for numerous applications. This paper shows the quality of results which can be obtained by TeS and the possible quantities which may be extracted from scaled Markov chains. Results are obtained for a 1-D analytical potential for which the exact solutions are known. Also, this method is applied to water clusters consisting of between 2 and 5 monomers, using Dynamical Nucleation Theory to determine the evaporation rate constant for monomer loss. Although ab initio potentials are not utilized in this paper, the benefit of this method is made apparent by using the Dang-Chang polarizable classical potential for water to obtain statistical properties at various temperatures.

  17. System and method of adjusting the equilibrium temperature of an inductively-heated susceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Marc R; Negley, Mark A; Geren, William Preston

    2015-02-24

    A system for inductively heating a workpiece may include an induction coil, at least one susceptor face sheet, and a current controller coupled. The induction coil may be configured to conduct an alternating current and generate a magnetic field in response to the alternating current. The susceptor face sheet may be configured to have a workpiece positioned therewith. The susceptor face sheet may be formed of a ferromagnetic alloy having a Curie temperature and being inductively heatable to an equilibrium temperature approaching the Curie temperature in response to the magnetic field. The current controller may be coupled to the induction coil and may be configured to adjust the alternating current in a manner causing a change in at least one heating parameter of the susceptor face sheet.

  18. Development of Specialization Scales for the MSPI: A Comparison of Empirical and Inductive Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfeli, Erik J.; Richard, George V.; Savickas, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    An empirical measurement model for interest inventory construction uses internal criteria whereas an inductive measurement model uses external criteria. The empirical and inductive measurement models are compared and contrasted and then two models are assessed through tests of the effectiveness and economy of scales for the Medical Specialty…

  19. Characteristic Of Induction Magnetic Field On The Laboratory Scale Superconducting Fault Current Limiter Circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adi, Wisnu Ari; Sukirman, E.; Didin, S.W.; Yustinus, P.M.; Siregar, Riswal H.

    2004-01-01

    Model construction of the laboratory scale superconducting fault current limiter circuit (SFCL) has been performed. The SFCL is fault current limiter and used as electric network security. It mainly consists of a copper coil, a superconducting ring and an iron core that are concentrically arranged. The SFCL circuit is essentially a transformer where the secondary windings are being replaced by the ring of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x superconductor (HTS). The ring has critical transition temperature Tc = 92 K and critical current Ic = 3.61 A. Characterization of the SFCL circuit is simulated by ANSYS version 5.4 software. The SFCL circuit consists of load and transformer impedances. The results show that the inductions of magnet field flux in the iron core of primer windings and ring disappear to one other before fault state. It means that impedance of the transformer is zero. After the condition a superconductivity behavior of the ring is disappear so that the impedance of the transformer becomes very high. From this experiment, we concluded that the SFCL circuit could work normally if the resultant of induction magnetic in the iron core (transformer) is zero

  20. Global temperature stability by rule induction: An interdisciplinary bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.D.; Grzymala-Busse, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Rules incorporating influences on global temperature, an estimate of radiation balance, were induced from astronomical, geophysical, and anthropogenic variables. During periods of intermediate global temperatures (generally like the present century), the influences assume canceling roles; influences cancel the effects of extreme states potentially imposed by other influences because they are, in aggregate, most likely to be assuming opposite values. This imparts an overall stability to the global temperature. To achieve cold or hot global temperature, influences assume reinforcing roles. CO 2 is an active influence on global temperature. By virtue of its constancy in the atmosphere, it can be expected to sponsor frequent hot years in combination with the other influences as they cycle through their periods. If measures were implemented to maintain warm or cool global temperatures, it could retain the status quo of present global agricultural regions. They are probably more productive than hot world regions would be because of narrow storm tracks

  1. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and Te fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-01-01

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  2. Effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P. [Gdynia Maritime University, Department of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Str. 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)], E-mail: piotrg@am.gdynia.pl

    2009-10-15

    Marine induction machines are exposed to various power quality disturbances appearing simultaneously in ship power systems: frequency and voltage rms value deviation, voltage unbalance and voltage waveform distortions. As a result, marine induction motors can be seriously overheated due to lowered supply voltage quality. Improvement of the protection of marine induction machines requires an appropriate method of power quality assessment and modification of the power quality regulations of ship classification societies. This paper presents an analytical model of an induction cage machine supplied with voltage of lowered quality, used in part II of the work (effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part II. Results of investigations and recommendations for related regulations) for power quality assessment in ship power systems, and for justification of the new power quality regulations proposal. The presented model is suitable for implementation in an on-line measurement system.

  3. Effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part I: Machine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P. [Gdynia Maritime Univ., Dept. of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Str. 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)

    2009-10-15

    Marine induction machines are exposed to various power quality disturbances appearing simultaneously in ship power systems: frequency and voltage rms value deviation, voltage unbalance and voltage waveform distortions. As a result, marine induction motors can be seriously overheated due to lowered supply voltage quality. Improvement of the protection of marine induction machines requires an appropriate method of power quality assessment and modification of the power quality regulations of ship classification societies. This paper presents an analytical model of an induction cage machine supplied with voltage of lowered quality, used in part II of the work (effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part II. Results of investigations and recommendations for related regulations) for power quality assessment in ship power systems, and for justification of the new power quality regulations proposal. The presented model is suitable for implementation in an on-line measurement system. (author)

  4. Effect of unbalanced voltage on windings temperature, operational life and load carrying capacity of induction machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P. [Gdynia Maritime University, Department of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Street 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)

    2008-04-15

    This paper investigates the influence of the CVUF angle on the windings temperature rise and the derating factor of an induction machine supplied with unbalanced voltage. The effect of simultaneous voltage unbalance and harmonics on its operational life is analyzed as well. The results of calculations and experimental investigations are presented for two induction cage machines of rated power 3 and 5.5 kW. (author)

  5. High resolution switching mode inductance-to-frequency converter with temperature compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matko, Vojko; Milanović, Miro

    2014-10-16

    This article proposes a novel method for the temperature-compensated inductance-to-frequency converter with a single quartz crystal oscillating in the switching oscillating circuit to achieve better temperature stability of the converter. The novelty of this method lies in the switching-mode converter, the use of additionally connected impedances in parallel to the shunt capacitances of the quartz crystal, and two inductances in series to the quartz crystal. This brings a considerable reduction of the temperature influence of AT-cut crystal frequency change in the temperature range between 10 and 40 °C. The oscillator switching method and the switching impedances connected to the quartz crystal do not only compensate for the crystal's natural temperature characteristics but also any other influences on the crystal such as ageing as well as from other oscillating circuit elements. In addition, the method also improves frequency sensitivity in inductance measurements. The experimental results show that through high temperature compensation improvement of the quartz crystal characteristics, this switching method theoretically enables a 2 pH resolution. It converts inductance to frequency in the range of 85-100 µH to 2-560 kHz.

  6. High Resolution Switching Mode Inductance-to-Frequency Converter with Temperature Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Matko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a novel method for the temperature-compensated inductance-to-frequency converter with a single quartz crystal oscillating in the switching oscillating circuit to achieve better temperature stability of the converter. The novelty of this method lies in the switching-mode converter, the use of additionally connected impedances in parallel to the shunt capacitances of the quartz crystal, and two inductances in series to the quartz crystal. This brings a considerable reduction of the temperature influence of AT-cut crystal frequency change in the temperature range between 10 and 40 °C. The oscillator switching method and the switching impedances connected to the quartz crystal do not only compensate for the crystal’s natural temperature characteristics but also any other influences on the crystal such as ageing as well as from other oscillating circuit elements. In addition, the method also improves frequency sensitivity in inductance measurements. The experimental results show that through high temperature compensation improvement of the quartz crystal characteristics, this switching method theoretically enables a 2 pH resolution. It converts inductance to frequency in the range of 85–100 µH to 2–560 kHz.

  7. NdFeB magnets with zero temperature coefficient of induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, B.M.; Narasimhan, K.S.V.L.; Hurt, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature compensation for the induction of NdFeB type magnets has been investigated. A computer assisted alloy selection method was adopted to identify composition of zero temperature coefficient of induction over -50 to 200 0 C. Selected alloys were processed into magnet by the conventional powder metallurgy method. The experimental temperature coefficient on the sintered magnet correlated with the prediction satisfactory. Holmium is an essential ingredient required for temperature compensation of NdFeB magnets. A magnet, (Nd/sub 0.23/Ho/sub 0.64/Dy/sub 0.13/)/sub 15/Fe/sub 79/B/sub 6/ with B/sub r/ of 7,700 Gauss, H/sub c/ of 7,700 Oe, H/sub ci/ of 20,600 Oe, Bh/sub max/ of 14.8 MGOe and temperature coefficient of -0.029% per 0 C over -50 to +150 was obtained

  8. Methylation controls the low temperature induction of flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, E S; Bilodeau, P; Burn, J; Finnegan, E J; Genger, R; Helliwell, C; Kang, B J; Sheldon, C C; Peacock, W J

    1998-01-01

    Control of the transition to flowering is critical for reproductive success of a plant. Studies in Arabidopsis have led us to suggest how this species has harnessed the environmental cue of a period of low temperature to ensure flowering occurs at an appropriate time. We propose that Arabidopsis has both vernalization-independent and vernalization-dependent pathways for the initiation of inflorescence development in the shoot apex. The vernalization-independent pathway may be concerned with the supply of carbohydrate to the shoot apex. In late flowering ecotypes which respond to vernalization the vernalization-independent pathway is blocked by the action of two dominant repressors of flowering, FRI and FLC, which interact to produce very late flowering plants which respond strongly to vernalization. We have isolated a gene which may correspond to FLC. We suggest the vernalization-dependent pathway, which may be concerned with apical GA biosynthesis, is blocked by methylation of a gene critical for flowering. This gene may correspond to that encoding kaurenoic acid hydroxylase (KAH), an enzyme catalysing a step in the GA biosynthetic pathway. Under this scheme vernalization causes unblocking of this pathway by demethylation possibly of the KAH gene and consequent biosynthesis of active GAs in the apex.

  9. Prediction of windings temperature rise in induction motors supplied with distorted voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P. [Gdynia Maritime University, Department of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Street 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)

    2008-04-15

    One of the features of ship power systems is a different level and intensity of disturbances appearing during routine operation - the rms voltage value and frequency deviation, voltage unbalance and waveform voltage distortion. As a result, marine induction machines are exposed to overheating due to the lowered voltage quality. This paper is devoted to windings temperature rise prediction in marine induction cage machines supplied with distorted voltage, which means real voltage conditions. The proposed method of prediction does not require detailed knowledge of the thermal properties of a machine. Although the method was developed for marine induction motors, it is applicable for industry machines supplied with distorted voltage. It can also be generalized and used for estimation of the steady state windings temperature rise of any electrical machinery in various work conditions. (author)

  10. Prediction of windings temperature rise in induction motors supplied with distorted voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnacinski, P.

    2008-01-01

    One of the features of ship power systems is a different level and intensity of disturbances appearing during routine operation - the rms voltage value and frequency deviation, voltage unbalance and waveform voltage distortion. As a result, marine induction machines are exposed to overheating due to the lowered voltage quality. This paper is devoted to windings temperature rise prediction in marine induction cage machines supplied with distorted voltage, which means real voltage conditions. The proposed method of prediction does not require detailed knowledge of the thermal properties of a machine. Although the method was developed for marine induction motors, it is applicable for industry machines supplied with distorted voltage. It can also be generalized and used for estimation of the steady state windings temperature rise of any electrical machinery in various work conditions

  11. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Properties of Injection Molding Tool Materials Used in Induction Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrier, Patrick; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the heating phase of an induction heated injection molding tool precisely, the temperature-dependent magnetic properties, B–H curves, and the hysteresis loss are necessary for the molding tool materials. Hence, injection molding tool steels, core materials among other materials have...

  12. The classification of explosion-proof protected induction motor into adequate temperature and efficiency class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinovar, Iztok; Srpčič, Gregor; Seme, Sebastijan; Štumberger, Bojan; Hadžiselimović, Miralem

    2017-07-01

    This article deals with the classification of explosion-proof protected induction motors, which are used in hazardous areas, into adequate temperature and efficiency class. Hazardous areas are defined as locations with a potentially explosive atmosphere where explosion may occur due to present of flammable gasses, liquids or combustible dusts (industrial plants, mines, etc.). Electric motors and electrical equipment used in such locations must be specially designed and tested to prevent electrical initiation of explosion due to high surface temperature and arcing contacts. This article presents the basic tests of three-phase explosion-proof protected induction motor with special emphasis on the measuring system and temperature rise test. All the measurements were performed with high-accuracy instrumentation and accessory equipment and carried out at the Institute of energy technology in the Electric machines and drives laboratory and Applied electrical engineering laboratory.

  13. Scaling of induction-cell transverse impedance: effect on accelerator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekdahl, Carl August

    2016-01-01

    The strength of the dangerous beam breakup (BBU) instability in linear induction accelerators (LIAs) is characterized by the transverse coupling impedance Z ? . This note addresses the dimensional scaling of Z ? , which is important when comparing new LIA designs to existing accelerators with known i BBU growth. Moreover, it is shown that the scaling of Z ? with the accelerating gap size relates BBU growth directly to high-voltage engineering considerations. It is proposed to firmly establish this scaling though a series of AMOS calculations.

  14. DNA damage on nano- and micrometer scales impacts dicentric induction: computer modelling of ion microbeam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Schmitt, Elke

    2016-07-01

    Detailed understanding of the enhanced relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ions, in particular at high linear energy transfer (LET) values, is needed to fully explore the radiation risk of manned space missions. It is generally accepted that the enhanced RBE of high-LET particles results from the DNA lesion patterns, in particular DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), due to the spatial clustering of energy deposits around their trajectories. In conventional experiments on biological effects of radiation types of diverse quality, however, clustering of energy deposition events on nanometer scale that is relevant for the induction and local complexity of DSB is inherently interlinked with regional (sub-)micrometer-scale DSB clustering along the particle tracks. Due to this limitation, the role of both (nano- and micrometer) scales on the induction of diverse biological endpoints cannot be frankly separated. To address this issue in a unique way, experiments at the ion microbeam SNAKE [1] and corresponding track-structure based model calculations of DSB induction and subsequent repair with the biophysical code PARTRAC [2] have been performed. In the experiments, hybrid human-hamster A_{L} cells were irradiated with 20 MeV (2.6 keV/μm) protons, 45 MeV (60 keV/μm) lithium ions or 55 MeV (310 keV/μm) carbon ions. The ions were either quasi-homogeneously distributed or focused to 0.5 x 1 μm^{2} spots on regular matrix patterns of 5.4 μm, 7.6 μm and 10.6 μm grid size, with pre-defined particle numbers per spot so as to deposit a mean dose of 1.7 Gy for all irradiation patterns. As expected, the induction of dicentrics by homogeneous irradiation increased with LET: lithium and carbon ions induced about two- and four-fold higher yields of dicentrics than protons. The induction of dicentrics is, however, affected by µm-scale, too: focusing 20 lithium ions or 451 protons per spot on a 10.6 μm grid induced two or three times more dicentrics, respectively, than a

  15. Sensitive element of multifunctional sensor for measuring temperature, strain and magnetic field induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensitive element of multifunctional sensor for measuring temperature, strain and magnetic field induction has been developed based on the studies of electrical conductivity and magnetoresistance of silicon and germanium microcrystals in the temperature range 4.2—70 K, strain ±1.5*10–3 rel.un. and magnetic fields of 0—14 T. The feature of the sensitive element is the using of the p- and n-type conductivity germanium microcrystals as mechanical and magnetic field sensors, respectively, and the p-type silicon microcrystal — as temperature sensor. That allows providing the compensation of temperature influence on piezoresistance and on sensitivity to the magnetic field.

  16. Physics design and scaling of recirculating induction accelerators: from benchtop prototypes to drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D.; Callahan, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Recirculating induction accelerators (recirculators) have been investigated as possible drivers for inertial fusion energy production because of their potential cost advantage over linear induction accelerators. Point designs were obtained and many of the critical physics and technology issues that would need to be addressed were detailed. A collaboration involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers is now developing a small prototype recirculator in order to demonstrate an understanding of nearly all of the critical beam dynamics issues that have been raised. We review the design equations for recirculators and demonstrate how, by keeping crucial dimensionless quantities constant, a small prototype recirculator was designed which will simulate the essential beam physics of a driver. We further show how important physical quantities such as the sensitivity to errors of optical elements (in both field strength and placement), insertion/extraction, vacuum requirements, and emittance growth, scale from small-prototype to driver-size accelerator

  17. Local-scale and watershed-scale determinants of summertime urban stream temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derek B. Booth; Kristin A. Kraseski; C. Rhett. Jackson

    2014-01-01

    The influence of urbanization on the temperature of small streams is widely recognized, but these effects are confounded by the great natural variety of their contributing watersheds. To evaluate the relative importance of local-scale and watershed-scale factors on summer temperatures in urban streams, hundreds of near-instantaneous temperature measurements throughout...

  18. Micro-scale heterogeneity in water temperature | Dallas | Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micro-scale heterogeneity in water temperature was examined in 6 upland sites in the Western Cape, South Africa. Hourly water temperature data converted to daily data showed that greatest differences were apparent in daily maximum temperatures between shallow- and deep-water biotopes during the warmest period of ...

  19. Effect of temperature and concentration principle on gypsum scaling in desalination units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Ahmed, Samia; Tlili, Mohamed; Ben Amor, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Tunisia (North Africa) is currently confronted to the crucial problem of the public, agricultural and industrial feed water supply, in particular in the center and south areas. Production of fresh water by seawater and brackish water desalination has proved to be an alternative for these regions. However, all the desalination processes are based on the concentration principle of waters already presented higher salinity. So, scale problem can occurs by the accumulation of minerals such as CaCO 3 and CaSO 4 . These salts form hard and strongly adhering deposits on the surfaces and their formation is favoured by the decrease of their solubility with increasing temperature. The main object of this investigation is the study and the control of calcium sulphate deposition causes and conditions in the thermal desalination plant. For this purpose, the effect of different water temperatures (30-90 degree) and saturation states (3-10), on homogeneous nucleation and growth of gypsum, variety usually met, was examined. Gypsum was precipitated by mixing aqueous CaCl 2 and Na 2 SO 4 solutions. It was found that, with increasing temperature or supersaturation, the induction time decreases and the growth rate increases. At the same saturation state, the effect of temperature on reducing induction time is more significant for T<50 degree whereas the growth rate of gypsum crystals is more influenced when the temperature exceeds 50 degree. This value can be considered as a critical temperature; once reached the gypsum scaling threat becomes serious. By using classical nucleation theory, the interfacial tension and the nucleation rate values were estimated. It was shown that the interfacial tension is, as well, temperature dependent. The calculation of nucleation rate showed that: i) by increasing temperature, the number of formed nuclei does not change. The effect of this parameter is limited at the kinetic of formation and growth of these nuclei, ii) the water concentration

  20. Temperature dependence of fluctuation time scales in spin glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenning, Gregory G.; Bowen, J.; Sibani, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Using a series of fast cooling protocols we have probed aging effects in the spin glass state as a function of temperature. Analyzing the logarithmic decay found at very long time scales within a simple phenomenological barrier model, leads to the extraction of the fluctuation time scale of the s...

  1. Effects of switching frequency and leakage inductance on slow-scale stability in a voltage controlled flyback converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fa-Qiang; Ma Xi-Kui

    2013-01-01

    The effects of both the switching frequency and the leakage inductance on the slow-scale stability in a voltage controlled flyback converter are investigated in this paper. Firstly, the system description and its mathematical model are presented. Then, the improved averaged model, which covers both the switching frequency and the leakage inductance, is established, and the effects of these two parameters on the slow-scale stability in the system are analyzed. It is found that the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation in the system is the main reason for losing its slow-scale stability and both the switching frequency and the leakage inductance have an important effect on this slow-scale stability. Finally, the effectiveness of the improved averaged model and that of the corresponding theoretical analysis are confirmed by the simulation results and the experimental results. (general)

  2. [Evaluation of the scales used to measure anxiety and child behaviour during the induction of anaesthesia. Literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez, C; Lázaro, J J; Ullán, A M

    2016-02-01

    The assessment of children's anxiety during anaesthetic induction is useful to determine if pre-operative strategies have been effective in reducing anxiety. The aim of this study is to review the different tools used to evaluate child anxiety or behaviour during the induction of anaesthesia. The electronic databases with no date limits were reviewed in December 2013, with a second review repeated in September 2014. A data extraction template was applied to find the scales used in the articles. Eight observational scales were found. Six of them can only be used during induction of anaesthesia, and two of those could be applied at various perioperative times, before surgery and during induction of anaesthesia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. A High Frequency (HF) Inductive Power Transfer Circuit for High Temperature Applications Using SiC Schottky Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jennifer L.; Ponchak, George E.; Spry, David J.; Neudeck, Philip G.

    2018-01-01

    Wireless sensors placed in high temperature environments, such as aircraft engines, are desirable to reduce the mass and complexity of routing wires. While communication with the sensors is straight forward, providing power wirelessly is still a challenge. This paper introduces an inductive wireless power transfer circuit incorporating SiC Schottky diodes and its operation from room temperature (25 C) to 500 C.

  4. Deposition of silicon oxynitride at room temperature by Inductively Coupled Plasma-CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambom, Luis da Silva [MPCE-Faculdade de Tecnologia de Sao Paulo - CEETEPS, Pca Coronel Fernando Prestes, 30, Sao Paulo - CEP 01124-060 (Brazil)]. E-mail: zambom@lsi.usp.br; Verdonck, Patrick [PSI-LSI-Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: patrick@lsi.usp.br

    2006-10-25

    Oxynitride thin films are used in important optical applications and as gate dielectric for MOS devices. Their traditional deposition processes have the drawbacks that high temperatures are needed, high mechanical stresses are induced and the deposition rate is low. Plasma assisted processes may alleviate these problems. In this study, oxynitride films were deposited at room temperature through the chemical reaction of silane, nitrogen and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), in a conventional LPCVD furnace, which was modified into a high density Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) reactor. Deposition rates increased with applied coil power and were never lower than 10 nm/min, quite high for room temperature depositions. The films' refractive indexes and FTIR spectra indicate that for processes with low N{sub 2}O gas concentrations, when mixed together with N{sub 2} and SiH{sub 4}, nitrogen was incorporated in the film. This incorporation increased the resistivity, which was up to 70 G{omega} cm, increased the refractive index, from approximately 1.47 to approximately 1.50, and decreased the dielectric constant of these films, which varied in the 4-14 range. These characteristics are adequate for electric applications e.g. for TFT fabrication on glass or polymers which can not stand high temperature steps.

  5. Mass spectra and ionization temperatures in an argon-nitrogen inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houk, R.S.; Montaser, A.; Fassel, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    Positive ions were extracted from the axial channel of an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) in which the outer gas flow was Ar, N 2 , or a mixture of Ar and N 2 . Addition of N 2 to the outer gas decreases the electron number density (n/sub e/) in the axial channel. Ar +2 , O 2 + , and ArH + react with N-containing species in the plasma and/or during the ion extraction process. Ar + remains abundant even if there is no Ar in the outer gas, which indicates the probable occurrence of charge transfer reactions between N 2 + and Ar. The present work corroborates two general concepts upon which several theories of theorigin of suprathermal ionization in ICPs are based: (a) species are physically transported from the induction region to the axial channel; and (b) these species may react with a ionize neutral species in the axial channel. Ionization temperatures (T/sub ion/) measured from the ratio Cd + /I + were 5750 to 6700 K for a N 2 outer flow ICP a forward power of 1.2 kW. This T/sub ion/ range is significantly below that obtained for an Ar outer gas ICP under otherwise similar operating parameters

  6. Scaling experiments on plasma opening switches for inductive energy storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boller, J.R.; Commisso, R.J.; Cooperstein, G.

    1983-01-01

    A new type of fast opening switch for use with pulsed power accelerators is examined. This Plasma Opening Switch (POS) utilizes an injected carbon plasma to conduct large currents (circa 1 MA) for up to 100 ns while a vacuum inductor (circa 100 nH) is charged. The switch is then capable of opening on a short (circa 10 ns) timescale and depositing the stored energy into a load impedance. Output pulse widths and power levels are determined by the storage inductance and the load impedance. The switch operation is studied in detail both analytically and experimentally. Experiments are performed at the 5 kJ stored energy level on the Gamble I generator and at the 50 kJ level on the Gamble II generator. Results of both experiments are reported and the scaling of switch operation is discussed

  7. Purification and growth of LiF by induction heating furnace with electronic temperature control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria Junior, R.N. de

    1985-01-01

    An eletronic power control system for a radio frequency generator and a quartz vacuum furnace heated by induction were developed. This furnace was employed for the growth of single crystals and purification of starting materials. A lithium fluoride single crystal was grown by the Czochralski technique in order to test the temperature control and the quartz furnace. An X-ray diffraction analysis of the crystal revealed the monocrystallinity high optical quality of the crystal obtained. Lithium fluoride of 95% purity prepared by Nuclemon starting material was purified by a vertical Bridgmann method. The emission spectrographic analysis of the purified crystal demonstrated the segregation of impurities. This study showed that the purification by this method of starting materials produced by local industry resulted in a crystal 99.9% pure in the first crystallization. (Author) [pt

  8. Some Temperature Effects on AISI-304 Nitriding in an Inductively Coupled RF Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Munoz-Castro, A. E.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Rosa-Vazquez, J. de la; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.

    2006-01-01

    Some recent results obtained from nitriding AISI 304 stainless steel samples, 1.2 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm thick are reported here in the case of an 85% hydrogen and 15% nitrogen mixture work gas. The process was carried out from 300 to 400 W for (13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma within a 60 cm long pyrex glass tube 3.5 cm in diameter where the samples were biased up to -300 V with respect to earth. The resulting hardness appears to be a function of the substrate temperature which varied from 200 deg. C at a 0 V bias to 550 deg. C at -300 V. The plasma density at 400 W reached 3x1010 cm-3 with a 4 eV electron temperature. Prior to nitriding, all the samples were polished with 0.05 μm diamond paste, leading to a 30 nm average roughness (Ra). After nitriding at -300 V, the Ra rose until ∼400 nm while hardness values of 1500 HV under 300 g loads were measured. X ray diffraction indicates that the extended phase amplitude (γN), Fe and Cr nitride depends on the substrate temperature

  9. Steam Distillation with Induction Heating System: Analysis of Kaffir Lime Oil Compound and Production Yield at Various Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuraida Muhammad; Zakiah Mohd Yusoff; Mohd Noor Nasriq Nordin

    2013-01-01

    The steam temperature during the extraction process has a great influence on the essential oil quality. .This study was conducted to analyze the compound of kaffir-lime oil during extracting at different steam temperature using GC-MS analysis. The extraction was carried out by using steam distillation based on induction heating system at different extraction temperature such as 90, 95 and 100 degree Celsius, the power of the induction heating system is fixed at 1.6 kW. Increment of the steam temperature will increase the oil yield. In terms of oil composition, extraction at lower temperature resulted high concentration for four marker compounds of kaffir-lime oil which are α-pinene, sabinene, limonene, β-pinene. (author)

  10. Expression induction of P450 genes by imidacloprid in Nilaparvata lugens: A genome-scale analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yixi; Wang, Yunchao; Yang, Yuanxue; Cang, Xinzhu; Liu, Zewen

    2016-09-01

    The overexpression of P450 monooxygenase genes is a main mechanism for the resistance to imidacloprid, a representative neonicotinoid insecticide, in Nilaparvata lugens (brown planthopper, BPH). However, only two P450 genes (CYP6AY1 and CYP6ER1), among fifty-four P450 genes identified from BPH genome database, have been reported to play important roles in imidacloprid resistance until now. In this study, after the confirmation of important roles of P450s in imidacloprid resistance by the synergism analysis, the expression induction by imidacloprid was determined for all P450 genes. In the susceptible (Sus) strain, eight P450 genes in Clade4, eight in Clade3 and two in Clade2 were up-regulated by imidacloprid, among which three genes (CYP6CS1, CYP6CW1 and CYP6ER1, all in Clade3) were increased to above 4.0-fold and eight genes to above 2.0-fold. In contrast, no P450 genes were induced in Mito clade. Eight genes induced to above 2.0-fold were selected to determine their expression and induced levels in Huzhou population, in which piperonyl butoxide showed the biggest effects on imidacloprid toxicity among eight field populations. The expression levels of seven P450 genes were higher in Huzhou population than that in Sus strain, with the biggest differences for CYP6CS1 (9.8-fold), CYP6ER1 (7.7-fold) and CYP6AY1 (5.1-fold). The induction levels for all tested genes were bigger in Sus strain than that in Huzhou population except CYP425B1. Screening the induction of P450 genes by imidacloprid in the genome-scale will provide an overall view on the possible metabolic factors in the resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides. The further work, such as the functional study of recombinant proteins, will be performed to validate the roles of these P450s in imidacloprid resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Consequences of atomic layer etching on wafer scale uniformity in inductively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Chad M.; Lanham, Steven J.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2018-04-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) typically divides the etching process into two self-limited reactions. One reaction passivates a single layer of material while the second preferentially removes the passivated layer. As such, under ideal conditions the wafer scale uniformity of ALE should be independent of the uniformity of the reactant fluxes onto the wafers, provided all surface reactions are saturated. The passivation and etch steps should individually asymptotically saturate after a characteristic fluence of reactants has been delivered to each site. In this paper, results from a computational investigation are discussed regarding the uniformity of ALE of Si in Cl2 containing inductively coupled plasmas when the reactant fluxes are both non-uniform and non-ideal. In the parameter space investigated for inductively coupled plasmas, the local etch rate for continuous processing was proportional to the ion flux. When operated with saturated conditions (that is, both ALE steps are allowed to self-terminate), the ALE process is less sensitive to non-uniformities in the incoming ion flux than continuous etching. Operating ALE in a sub-saturation regime resulted in less uniform etching. It was also found that ALE processing with saturated steps requires a larger total ion fluence than continuous etching to achieve the same etch depth. This condition may result in increased resist erosion and/or damage to stopping layers using ALE. While these results demonstrate that ALE provides increased etch depth uniformity, they do not show an improved critical dimension uniformity in all cases. These possible limitations to ALE processing, as well as increased processing time, will be part of the process optimization that includes the benefits of atomic resolution and improved uniformity.

  12. An analysis of the temperature distribution in the pipe bending using high frequency induction heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukue, Hisayoshi; Mochizuki, Yoji; Nakamura, Harushige; Kobo, Hiroshi; Nitta, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    1986-01-01

    A pipe bending apparatus has recently been developed by applying high frequency induction heating. However, the smaller the radius of pipe bending, the greater becomes the reduction in wall thickness and the ovality of the pipe form. This makes it impossible to manufacture pipe bending which will meet the nuclear pipe design code. In order to solve this problem it is crucial to obtain a temperature distributions in a pipe which is moving. It is calculated by giving the following boundary conditions : distribution of the heat generation rate, and that of heat transfer of cooling water. In the process of analyzing these distributions, the following results were obtained. (1) The distribution of the heat generation rate is determined by the sink of energy flux of Poynting vectors. The coil efficiency thus calculated was sixty percent. This figure accords with the test data. (2) The distribution of heat transfer coefficient of cooling water is mainly determined by the rate of liquid film heat transfer, but departure from nucleate boiling and dryout has to be taken into consideration. (3) TRUMP CODE is modified so that the temperature distribution in moving pipes can be calculated by taking the boundary conditions into account. The calculated results were in accordance with the test data. (author)

  13. Low ambient temperature during early postnatal development fails to cause a permanent induction of brown adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabowska-Kita, Agnieszka; Trabczynska, Anna; Korytko, Agnieszka; Kaczmarek, Monika M.; Kozak, Leslie P.

    2015-01-01

    The brown adipocyte phenotype (BAP) in white adipose tissue (WAT) is transiently induced in adult mammals in response to reduced ambient temperature. Since it is unknown whether a cold challenge can permanently induce brown adipocytes (BAs), we reared C57BL/6J (B6) and AxB8/PgJ (AxB8) mice at 17 or 29°C from birth to weaning, to assess the BAP in young and adult mice. Energy balance measurements showed that 17°C reduced fat mass in the preweaning mice by increasing energy expenditure and suppressed diet-induced obesity in adults. Microarray analysis of global gene expression of inguinal fat (ING) from 10-day-old (D) mice indicates that expression at 17°C vs. 29°C was not different. Between 10 and 21 days of age, the BAP was induced coincident with morphologic remodeling of ING and marked changes in expression of neural development genes (e.g., Akap 12 and Ngfr). Analyses of Ucp1 mRNA and protein showed that 17°C transiently increased the BAP in ING from 21D mice; however, BAs were unexpectedly present in mice reared at 29°C. The involution of the BAP in WAT occurred after weaning in mice reared at 23°C. Therefore, the capacity to stimulate thermogenically competent BAs in WAT is set by a temperature-independent, genetically controlled program between birth and weaning.—Chabowska-Kita, A., Trabczynska, A., Korytko, A., Kaczmarek, M. M., Kozak, L. P. Low ambient temperature during early postnatal development fails to cause a permanent induction of brown adipocytes. PMID:25896784

  14. Room temperature inductively coupled plasma etching of InAs/InSb in BCl 3/Cl 2/Ar

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching of InAs and InSb at room temperature has been investigated using BCl 3/Cl 2/Ar plasma. Specifically, the etch rate and post-etching surface morphology were investigated as functions of the gas composition

  15. Temperature sensitivity of respiration scales with organic matter recalcitrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, J. M.; Fierer, N.; McLauchlan, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter is a key process in determining the carbon sequestration potential of ecosystems and carbon fluxes to the atmosphere. Since microbial decomposition is highly sensitive to short-term changes in temperature, predicting the temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition is critical to predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and feedbacks to anthropogenic warming. Fundamental principles of enzyme kinetics, embodied in the carbon-quality temperature hypothesis, predict that the temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition should increase with increasing biochemical recalcitrance of a substrate. To test the generality of this principle, we measured the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration of soil organic matter with serial short-term temperature manipulations over 365 days for 28 North American soils. When joined with data from similar studies that represent a wide variety of contrasts, we show that the temperature sensitivity of organic matter decomposition scales with biochemical recalcitrance. With physico-chemical protection likely an important covariate for relating plant and soil organic matter decomposition scalars, biochemically recalcitrant organic matter is highly susceptible to short-term increases in temperature, a key link in predicting the effects of warming on carbon cycling.

  16. Improved scaling of temperature-accelerated dynamics using localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    While temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) is a powerful method for carrying out non-equilibrium simulations of systems over extended time scales, the computational cost of serial TAD increases approximately as N{sup 3} where N is the number of atoms. In addition, although a parallel TAD method based on domain decomposition [Y. Shim et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 205439 (2007)] has been shown to provide significantly improved scaling, the dynamics in such an approach is only approximate while the size of activated events is limited by the spatial decomposition size. Accordingly, it is of interest to develop methods to improve the scaling of serial TAD. As a first step in understanding the factors which determine the scaling behavior, we first present results for the overall scaling of serial TAD and its components, which were obtained from simulations of Ag/Ag(100) growth and Ag/Ag(100) annealing, and compare with theoretical predictions. We then discuss two methods based on localization which may be used to address two of the primary “bottlenecks” to the scaling of serial TAD with system size. By implementing both of these methods, we find that for intermediate system-sizes, the scaling is improved by almost a factor of N{sup 1/2}. Some additional possible methods to improve the scaling of TAD are also discussed.

  17. Improved scaling of temperature-accelerated dynamics using localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques G.

    2016-01-01

    While temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) is a powerful method for carrying out non-equilibrium simulations of systems over extended time scales, the computational cost of serial TAD increases approximately as N 3 where N is the number of atoms. In addition, although a parallel TAD method based on domain decomposition [Y. Shim et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 205439 (2007)] has been shown to provide significantly improved scaling, the dynamics in such an approach is only approximate while the size of activated events is limited by the spatial decomposition size. Accordingly, it is of interest to develop methods to improve the scaling of serial TAD. As a first step in understanding the factors which determine the scaling behavior, we first present results for the overall scaling of serial TAD and its components, which were obtained from simulations of Ag/Ag(100) growth and Ag/Ag(100) annealing, and compare with theoretical predictions. We then discuss two methods based on localization which may be used to address two of the primary “bottlenecks” to the scaling of serial TAD with system size. By implementing both of these methods, we find that for intermediate system-sizes, the scaling is improved by almost a factor of N 1/2 . Some additional possible methods to improve the scaling of TAD are also discussed.

  18. Diode temperature sensor array for measuring and controlling micro scale surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Il Young; Kim, Sung Jin

    2004-01-01

    The needs of micro scale thermal detecting technique are increasing in biology and chemical industry. For example, thermal finger print, Micro PCR(Polymer Chain Reaction), TAS and so on. To satisfy these needs, we developed a DTSA(Diode Temperature Sensor Array) for detecting and controlling the temperature on small surface. The DTSA is fabricated by using VLSI technique. It consists of 32 array of diodes(1,024 diodes) for temperature detection and 8 heaters for temperature control on a 8mm surface area. The working principle of temperature detection is that the forward voltage drop across a silicon diode is approximately proportional to the inverse of the absolute temperature of diode. And eight heaters (1K) made of poly-silicon are added onto a silicon wafer and controlled individually to maintain a uniform temperature distribution across the DTSA. Flip chip packaging used for easy connection of the DTSA. The circuitry for scanning and controlling DTSA are also developed

  19. Vitrification of high level nuclear waste inside ambient temperature disposal containers using inductive heating: The SMILE system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

    1996-01-01

    A new approach, termed SMILE (Small Module Inductively Loaded Energy), for the vitrification of high level nuclear wastes (HLW) is described. Present vitrification systems liquefy the HLW solids and associated frit material in large high temperature melters. The molten mix is then poured into small (∼1 m 3 ) disposal canisters, where it solidifies and cools. SMILE eliminates the separate, large high temperature melter. Instead, the BLW solids and frit melt inside the final disposal containers, using inductive heating. The contents then solidify and cool in place. The SMILE modules and the inductive heating process are designed so that the outer stainless can of the module remains at near ambient temperature during the process cycle. Module dimensions are similar to those of present disposal containers. The can is thermally insulated from the high temperature inner container by a thin layer of refractory alumina firebricks. The inner container is a graphite crucible lined with a dense alumina refractory that holds the HLW and fiit materials. After the SMILE module is loaded with a slurry of HLW and frit solids, an external multi-turn coil is energized with 30-cycle AC current. The enclosing external coil is the primary of a power transformer, with the graphite crucible acting as a single turn ''secondary.'' The induced current in the ''secondary'' heats the graphite, which in turn heats the HLW and frit materials. The first stage of the heating process is carried out at an intermediate temperature to drive off remnant liquid water and water of hydration, which takes about 1 day. The small fill/vent tube to the module is then sealed off and the interior temperature raised to the vitrification range, i.e., ∼1200C. Liquefaction is complete after approximately 1 day. The inductive heating then ceases and the module slowly loses heat to the environment, allowing the molten material to solidify and cool down to ambient temperature

  20. Full-scale measurements of aerodynamic induction in a rotor plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2014-01-01

    in the rotor plane of an operating 2MW/80m wind turbine to perform detailed analysis the aerodynamic induction. The experimental setup, analyses of the spatial structure of the aerodynamic induction and subsequent comparisons with numerical predictions, using the HAWC2 aerolastic code, are presented....

  1. Design and Modelling of Small Scale Low Temperature Power Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wronski, Jorrit

    he work presented in this report contributes to the state of the art within design and modelling of small scale low temperature power cycles. The study is divided into three main parts: (i) fluid property evaluation, (ii) expansion device investigations and (iii) heat exchanger performance......-oriented Modelica code and was included in the thermo Cycle framework for small scale ORC systems. Special attention was paid to the valve system and a control method for variable expansion ratios was introduced based on a cogeneration scenario. Admission control based on evaporator and condenser conditions...

  2. Monitoring of full scale tensegrity skeletons under temperature change

    OpenAIRE

    KAWAGUCHI, Ken'ichi; OHYA, Shunji

    2009-01-01

    p. 224-231 Strain change in the members of full-scale tensegrity skeletons has been monitored for eight years. The one-day data of one of the tensegrity frame on the hottest and the coldest day in the record are reported and discussed. Kawaguchi, K.; Ohya, S. (2009). Monitoring of full scale tensegrity skeletons under temperature change. Symposium of the International Association for Shell and Spatial Structures. Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València. http://hdl.handle.net/10...

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of Electromagnetic Induction Technique to Determine Soil Salinity in Large –Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Hasheminejhad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Monitoring and management of saline soils depends on exact and updatable measurements of soil electrical conductivity. Large scale direct measurements are not only expensive but also time consuming. Therefore application of near ground surface sensors could be considered as acceptable time- and cost-saving methods with high accuracy in soil salinity detection. . One of these relatively innovative methods is electromagnetic induction technique. Apparent soil electrical conductivity measurement by electromagnetic induction technique is affected by several key properties of soils including soil moisture and clay content. Materials and Methods: Soil salinity and apparent soil electrical conductivity data of two years of 50000 ha area in Sabzevar- Davarzan plain were used to evaluate the sensitivity of electromagnetic induction to soil moisture and clay content. Locations of the sampling points were determined by the Latin Hypercube Sampling strategy, based on 100 sampling points were selected for the first year and 25 sampling points for the second year. Regarding to difficulties in finding and sampling the points 97 sampling points were found in the area for the first year out of which 82 points were sampled down to 90 cm depth in 30 cm intervals and all of them were measured with electromagnetic induction device at horizontal orientation. The first year data were used for training the model which included 82 points measurement of bulk conductivity and laboratory determination of electrical conductivity of saturated extract, soil texture and moisture content in soil samples. On the other hand, the second year data which were used for testing the model integrated by 25 sampling points and 9 bulk conductivity measurements around each point. Electrical conductivity of saturated extract was just measured as the only parameter in the laboratory for the second year samples. Results and Discussion: Results of the first year showed a

  4. Symmetric scaling properties in global surface air temperature anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotsos, Costas A.; Efstathiou, Maria N.

    2015-08-01

    We have recently suggested "long-term memory" or internal long-range correlation within the time-series of land-surface air temperature (LSAT) anomalies in both hemispheres. For example, an increasing trend in the LSAT anomalies is followed by another one at a different time in a power-law fashion. However, our previous research was mainly focused on the overall long-term persistence, while in the present study, the upward and downward scaling dynamics of the LSAT anomalies are analysed, separately. Our results show that no significant fluctuation differences were found between the increments and decrements in LSAT anomalies, over the whole Earth and over each hemisphere, individually. On the contrary, the combination of land-surface air and sea-surface water temperature anomalies seemed to cause a departure from symmetry and the increments in the land and sea surface temperature anomalies appear to be more persistent than the decrements.

  5. Combined scale effects for effective brazing at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartout D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In modern joining technology, the focus is on effective brazing and soldering of temperature sensitive materials. Here, as well as in diffusion welding processes the needed thermal energy is externally realized in the joint zone. This produces a heating of the whole joining parts, since in laminar joining the thermal energy is transported in interior by thermal conduction. An excess of critical temperatures or tolerable impact periods in wide parts of materials and respectively components is often not avoidable. This leads to thermal damages. In this point of view nanotechnology shows promising possibilities as scale effects and their resulting thermophysical effects such as melting temperature reduction and high diffusion rates can be used for providing a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis at room temperature. After ignition by an external energy source a self-propagating exothermic reaction is started. By producing a multilayer system with alternately arranged nanoscaled layers of e.g. Al and Ni the resulting thin foil can be used as heat source for melting the braze or solder material within the joining zone without any external preheating. Due to the high process velocities up to 30 m/s and the local heat input significant thermal influences on the joined parts are not detectable.

  6. Microcontroller based Stator Winding Resistance Determination of Induction Motor Drive on Temperature Variations

    OpenAIRE

    Siraj Ahmed T; Sukhdeo Sao; K.S.R Anjaneyulu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an experiment has been conducted to determine the online stator winding resistance of an induction motor, in industries as well as domestic purpose induction motors is largely utilized, as it has both applications of variable and constant torque operation nature. The major requirement of an electric drive system is its independent control of torque and speed; this is achieved in DC motor Drive but has more disadvantages. With the help of fast acting switching devices it is possi...

  7. Influence of inductance induced noise in an YBa2Cu3O7 dc-SQUID at high operation temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, P. Å.; Claeson, T.; Hansen, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The voltage modulation depth of a high T(c) dc-SQUID was measured at temperatures close to T(c) and compared to a model by Enpuku et al. where the flux noise from the SQUID inductance is taken into account. The device was an YBa2Cu3O7 dc-SQUID made on a bicrystal substrate of SrTiO3. The design w...

  8. Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzouki, Evanthia; Lürling, Miquel; Fastner, Jutta; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette; Wilk-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Koreivienė, Judita; Seelen, Laura; Teurlincx, Sven; Verstijnen, Yvon; Krztoń, Wojciech; Walusiak, Edward; Karosienė, Jūratė; Kasperovičienė, Jūratė; Savadova, Ksenija; Vitonytė, Irma; Cillero-Castro, Carmen; Budzyńska, Agnieszka; Goldyn, Ryszard; Kozak, Anna; Rosińska, Joanna; Szeląg-Wasielewska, Elżbieta; Domek, Piotr; Jakubowska-Krepska, Natalia; Kwasizur, Kinga; Messyasz, Beata; Pełechaty, Aleksandra; Pełechaty, Mariusz; Kokocinski, Mikolaj; García-Murcia, Ana; Real, Monserrat; Romans, Elvira; Noguero-Ribes, Jordi; Duque, David Parreño; Fernández-Morán, Elísabeth; Karakaya, Nusret; Häggqvist, Kerstin; Demir, Nilsun; Beklioğlu, Meryem; Filiz, Nur; Levi, Eti E.; Iskin, Uğur; Bezirci, Gizem; Tavşanoğlu, Ülkü Nihan; Özhan, Koray; Gkelis, Spyros; Panou, Manthos; Fakioglu, Özden; Avagianos, Christos; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; Çelik, Kemal; Yilmaz, Mete; Marcé, Rafael; Catalán, Nuria; Bravo, Andrea G.; Buck, Moritz; Colom-Montero, William; Mustonen, Kristiina; Pierson, Don; Yang, Yang; Raposeiro, Pedro M.; Gonçalves, Vítor; Antoniou, Maria G.; Tsiarta, Nikoletta; McCarthy, Valerie; Perello, Victor C.; Feldmann, Tõnu; Laas, Alo; Panksep, Kristel; Tuvikene, Lea; Gagala, Ilona; Mankiewicz-Boczek, Joana; Yağcı, Meral Apaydın; Çınar, Şakir; Çapkın, Kadir; Yağcı, Abdulkadir; Cesur, Mehmet; Bilgin, Fuat; Bulut, Cafer; Uysal, Rahmi; Obertegger, Ulrike; Boscaini, Adriano; Flaim, Giovanna; Salmaso, Nico; Cerasino, Leonardo; Richardson, Jessica; Visser, Petra M.; Verspagen, Jolanda M. H.; Karan, Tünay; Soylu, Elif Neyran; Maraşlıoğlu, Faruk; Napiórkowska-Krzebietke, Agnieszka; Ochocka, Agnieszka; Pasztaleniec, Agnieszka; Antão-Geraldes, Ana M.; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Morais, João; Vale, Micaela; Köker, Latife; Akçaalan, Reyhan; Albay, Meriç; Špoljarić Maronić, Dubravka; Stević, Filip; Žuna Pfeiffer, Tanja; Fonvielle, Jeremy; Straile, Dietmar; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo; Bláha, Luděk; Geriš, Rodan; Fránková, Markéta; Koçer, Mehmet Ali Turan; Alp, Mehmet Tahir; Remec-Rekar, Spela; Elersek, Tina; Triantis, Theodoros; Zervou, Sevasti-Kiriaki; Hiskia, Anastasia; Haande, Sigrid; Skjelbred, Birger; Madrecka, Beata; Nemova, Hana; Drastichova, Iveta; Chomova, Lucia; Edwards, Christine; Sevindik, Tuğba Ongun; Tunca, Hatice; Önem, Burçin; Aleksovski, Boris; Krstić, Svetislav; Vucelić, Itana Bokan; Nawrocka, Lidia; Salmi, Pauliina; Machado-Vieira, Danielle; de Oliveira, Alinne Gurjão; Delgado-Martín, Jordi; García, David; Cereijo, Jose Luís; Gomà, Joan; Trapote, Mari Carmen; Vegas-Vilarrúbia, Teresa; Obrador, Biel; Grabowska, Magdalena; Karpowicz, Maciej; Chmura, Damian; Úbeda, Bárbara; Gálvez, José Ángel; Özen, Arda; Christoffersen, Kirsten Seestern; Warming, Trine Perlt; Kobos, Justyna; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Pérez-Martínez, Carmen; Ramos-Rodríguez, Eloísa; Arvola, Lauri; Alcaraz-Párraga, Pablo; Toporowska, Magdalena; Pawlik-Skowronska, Barbara; Niedźwiecki, Michał; Pęczuła, Wojciech; Leira, Manel; Hernández, Armand; Moreno-Ostos, Enrique; Blanco, José María; Rodríguez, Valeriano; Montes-Pérez, Jorge Juan; Palomino, Roberto L.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Estela; Carballeira, Rafael; Camacho, Antonio; Picazo, Antonio; Rochera, Carlos; Santamans, Anna C.; Ferriol, Carmen; Romo, Susana; Soria, Juan Miguel; Dunalska, Julita; Sieńska, Justyna; Szymański, Daniel; Kruk, Marek; Kostrzewska-Szlakowska, Iwona; Jasser, Iwona; Žutinić, Petar; Gligora Udovič, Marija; Plenković-Moraj, Anđelka; Frąk, Magdalena; Bańkowska-Sobczak, Agnieszka; Wasilewicz, Michał; Özkan, Korhan; Maliaka, Valentini; Kangro, Kersti; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Paerl, Hans W.; Carey, Cayelan C.; Ibelings, Bas W.

    2018-04-13

    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light. In summer 2015, we collected samples across Europe to investigate the effect of nutrient and temperature gradients on the variability of toxin production at a continental scale. Direct and indirect effects of temperature were the main drivers of the spatial distribution in the toxins produced by the cyanobacterial community, the toxin concentrations and toxin quota. Generalized linear models showed that a Toxin Diversity Index (TDI) increased with latitude, while it decreased with water stability. Increases in TDI were explained through a significant increase in toxin variants such as MC-YR, anatoxin and cylindrospermopsin, accompanied by a decreasing presence of MC-LR. While global warming continues, the direct and indirect effects of increased lake temperatures will drive changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in Europe, potentially promoting selection of a few highly toxic species or strains.

  9. Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanthia Mantzouki

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins. Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light. In summer 2015, we collected samples across Europe to investigate the effect of nutrient and temperature gradients on the variability of toxin production at a continental scale. Direct and indirect effects of temperature were the main drivers of the spatial distribution in the toxins produced by the cyanobacterial community, the toxin concentrations and toxin quota. Generalized linear models showed that a Toxin Diversity Index (TDI increased with latitude, while it decreased with water stability. Increases in TDI were explained through a significant increase in toxin variants such as MC-YR, anatoxin and cylindrospermopsin, accompanied by a decreasing presence of MC-LR. While global warming continues, the direct and indirect effects of increased lake temperatures will drive changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in Europe, potentially promoting selection of a few highly toxic species or strains.

  10. An induction/synchronous motor with high temperature superconductor/normal conductor hybrid double-cage rotor windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, T; Nagao, K; Nishimura, T; Matsumura, K

    2009-01-01

    We propose hybrid double-cage rotor windings that consist of a high temperature superconductor (HTS) and a normal conductor, which are introduced into an HTS induction/synchronous motor (HTS-ISM). The motor rotates as a conventional induction motor when the operating temperature of the hybrid rotor is above the critical temperature of the HTS bars, i.e., in the normal conducting state. On the other hand, the HTS-ISM rotates as a synchronous motor when the temperature is below the critical temperature, i.e., in the superconducting (zero resistance) state. In other words, we do not always need to take care of the cooling conditions, if the HTS-ISM is automatically, as well as appropriately, controlled, depending upon the rotation mode. Namely, the above-mentioned hybrid double-cage HTS-ISM is possibly a breakthrough in solving the cooling problems of HTS rotating machines, especially for industrial applications. The experimental results of the aforementioned motor are reported. An example of an operation flowchart of the motor is also presented and discussed.

  11. Measurement of excitation, ionization, and electron temperatures and positive ion concentrations in a 144 MHz inductively coupled radiofrequency plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, P.E.; Chester, T.L.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Diagnostic measurements of 144 MHz radiofrequency inductively coupled plasmas at pressures between 0.5 and 14 Torr have been made. Other variables studied included the gas type (Ar or Ne) and material in plasma (Ti or Tl). Parameters measured included excitation temperatures via the atomic Boltzmann plot and the two-line method, ionization electric probes. Excitation temperatures increased as the pressure of Ar or Ne plasmas decreased and reached a maximum of approx.9000 degreeK in the latter case and approx.6700 degreeK in the former case; Tl in the Ar plasma resulted in in a smaller rate of decrease of excitation temperature with increase of pressure of Ar. The ionization temperatures were lower than the excitation temperatures and were similar for both the Ar and Ne plasmas. Electron temperatures were about 10 times higher than the excitation temperatures indicating non-LTE behavior. Again, the electron temperatures indicating in Ne were considerably higher than in Ar. With the presence of metals, the electron temperatures with a metal in the Ar plasma were higher than in the absence. Positive ion concentrations were also measured for the various plasmas and were found to be similar (approx.10 18 m -3 ) in both the Ar and Ne plasmas. The presence of metals caused significant increase in the positive ion concentrations. From the results obtained, the optimum Ar pressure for Tl electrodeless discharge lamps operated at 144 MHz would be between 2 and 4 Torr

  12. Finite Element Analysis in the Estimation of Air-Gap Torque and Surface Temperature of Induction Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mr., J. Ravi Kumar; Banakara, Basavaraja, Dr.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents electromagnetic and thermal behavior of Induction Motor (IM) through the modeling and analysis by applying multiphysics coupled Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Therefore prediction of the magnetic flux, electromagnetic torque, stator and rotor losses and temperature distribution inside an operating electric motor are the most important issues during its design. Prediction and estimation of these parameters allows design engineers to decide capability of the machine for the proposed load, temperature rating and its application for which it is being designed ensuring normal motor operation at rated conditions. In this work, multiphysics coupled electromagnetic - thermal modeling and analysis of induction motor at rated and high frequency has carried out applying Arkkio’s torque method. COMSOL Multiphysics software is used for modeling and finite element analysis of IM. Transient electromagnetic torque, magnetic field distribution, speed-torque characteristics of IM were plotted and studied at different frequencies. This proposed work helps in the design and prediction of accurate performance of induction motor specific to various industrial drive applications. Results obtained are also validated with experimental analysis. The main purpose of this model is to use it as an integral part of the design aiming to system optimization of Variable Speed Drive (VSD) and its components using coupled simulations.

  13. Influence of Sintering Temperature on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of In Situ Reinforced Titanium Composites by Inductive Hot Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Arévalo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This research is focused on the influence of processing temperature on titanium matrix composites reinforced through Ti, Al, and B4C reactions. In order to investigate the effect of Ti-Al based intermetallic compounds on the properties of the composites, aluminum powder was incorporated into the starting materials. In this way, in situ TixAly were expected to form as well as TiB and TiC. The specimens were fabricated by the powder metallurgy technique known as inductive hot pressing (iHP, using a temperature range between 900 °C and 1400 °C, at 40 MPa for 5 min. Raising the inductive hot pressing temperature may affect the microstructure and properties of the composites. Consequently, the variations of the reinforcing phases were investigated. X-ray diffraction, microstructural analysis, and mechanical properties (Young’s modulus and hardness of the specimens were carried out to evaluate and determine the significant influence of the processing temperature on the behavior of the composites.

  14. Determination of gas temperature and thermometric species in inductively coupled plasmas by emission and diode laser absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A; Cruden, Brett A; Sharma, Surendra P

    2004-01-01

    A vertical cavity surface-emitting laser diode (VCSEL) was used as a spectrally tunable emission source for measurements of the radial-integrated gas temperature inside an inductively coupled plasma reactor. The data were obtained by profiling the Doppler-broadened absorption of metastable Ar atoms at 763.51 nm in argon and argon/nitrogen plasmas (3%, 45%, and 90% N 2 in Ar) at pressures of 0.5-70 Pa and inductive powers of 100 and 300 W. The results were compared to the rotational temperature derived from the N 2 emission at the (0,0) vibrational transition of the C 3 Π u -B 3 Π g system. The differences in integrated rotational and Doppler temperatures were attributed to non-uniform spatial distributions of both temperature and thermometric species (Ar * and N 2 *) that varied depending on the conditions. A two-dimensional, three-temperature fluid plasma simulation was employed to explain these differences. This work should facilitate further development of a miniature sensor for non-intrusive acquisition of data (temperature and densities of multiple plasma species) during micro- and nano-fabrication plasma processing, thus enabling diagnostic-assisted continuous optimization and advanced control over the processes. Such sensors would also enable us to track the origins and pathways of damaging contaminants, thereby providing real-time feedback for adjustment of processes. Our work serves as an example of how two line-of-sight integrated temperatures derived from different thermometric species make it possible to characterize the radial non-uniformity of the plasma

  15. Determination of gas temperature and thermometric species in inductively coupled plasmas by emission and diode laser absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bol' shakov, Alexander A; Cruden, Brett A; Sharma, Surendra P [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2004-11-01

    A vertical cavity surface-emitting laser diode (VCSEL) was used as a spectrally tunable emission source for measurements of the radial-integrated gas temperature inside an inductively coupled plasma reactor. The data were obtained by profiling the Doppler-broadened absorption of metastable Ar atoms at 763.51 nm in argon and argon/nitrogen plasmas (3%, 45%, and 90% N{sub 2} in Ar) at pressures of 0.5-70 Pa and inductive powers of 100 and 300 W. The results were compared to the rotational temperature derived from the N{sub 2} emission at the (0,0) vibrational transition of the C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}-B {sup 3}{pi} {sub g} system. The differences in integrated rotational and Doppler temperatures were attributed to non-uniform spatial distributions of both temperature and thermometric species (Ar{sup *} and N{sub 2}*) that varied depending on the conditions. A two-dimensional, three-temperature fluid plasma simulation was employed to explain these differences. This work should facilitate further development of a miniature sensor for non-intrusive acquisition of data (temperature and densities of multiple plasma species) during micro- and nano-fabrication plasma processing, thus enabling diagnostic-assisted continuous optimization and advanced control over the processes. Such sensors would also enable us to track the origins and pathways of damaging contaminants, thereby providing real-time feedback for adjustment of processes. Our work serves as an example of how two line-of-sight integrated temperatures derived from different thermometric species make it possible to characterize the radial non-uniformity of the plasma.

  16. Surface temperature and evapotranspiration: application of local scale methods to regional scales using satellite data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguin, B.; Courault, D.; Guerif, M.

    1994-01-01

    Remotely sensed surface temperatures have proven useful for monitoring evapotranspiration (ET) rates and crop water use because of their direct relationship with sensible and latent energy exchange processes. Procedures for using the thermal infrared (IR) obtained with hand-held radiometers deployed at ground level are now well established and even routine for many agricultural research and management purposes. The availability of IR from meteorological satellites at scales from 1 km (NOAA-AVHRR) to 5 km (METEOSAT) permits extension of local, ground-based approaches to larger scale crop monitoring programs. Regional observations of surface minus air temperature (i.e., the stress degree day) and remote estimates of daily ET were derived from satellite data over sites in France, the Sahel, and North Africa and summarized here. Results confirm that similar approaches can be applied at local and regional scales despite differences in pixel size and heterogeneity. This article analyzes methods for obtaining these data and outlines the potential utility of satellite data for operational use at the regional scale. (author)

  17. Genetic variability induction in the size of the size of rice plantules by combined irradiation and temperature treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, D.; Gonzalez, L.M.; Gumberra, R.

    1993-01-01

    Induced variability in the size of rice plantules was determined using the heritability calculation in a narrow sense, by means of the progenitor-descendant regression. Progenitor stands for the original variety, whereas descendant stands for plant population from CO6 0 gamma-rays irradiated seeds (at 100-600 Gy doses), treated at different temperatures. Results obtained: show the possibility to increase efficiency in variability induction by a combined course of action of both factors. In this experience, the best combination turned out to be 300 Gy-0 celsius grated, which of all the changes that it caused, some 75 percent was of a genetic nature

  18. Determination of Ar metastable atom densities in Ar and Ar/H2 inductively coupled low-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox-Lyon, N; Knoll, A J; Oehrlein, G S; Franek, J; Demidov, V; Koepke, M; Godyak, V

    2013-01-01

    Ar metastable atoms are important energy carriers and surface interacting species in low-temperature plasmas that are difficult to quantify. Ar metastable atom densities (N Ar,m ) in inductively coupled Ar and Ar/H 2 plasmas were obtained using a model combining electrical probe measurements of electron density (N e ) and temperature (T e ), with analysis of spectrally resolved Ar plasma optical emission based on 3p → 1s optical emission ratios of the 419.8 nm line to the 420.1 nm line. We present the variation of N Ar,m as the Ar pressure and the addition of H 2 to Ar are changed comparatively to recent adsorption spectroscopy measurements. (paper)

  19. Integrated flow and temperature modeling at the catchment scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loinaz, Maria Christina; Davidsen, Hasse Kampp; Butts, Michael

    2013-01-01

    –groundwater dynamics affect stream temperature. A coupled surface water–groundwater and temperature model has therefore been developed to quantify the impacts of land management and water use on stream flow and temperatures. The model is applied to the simulation of stream temperature levels in a spring-fed stream...

  20. Improving Performance and Operational Stability of Porcine Interferon-α Production by Pichia pastoris with Combinational Induction Strategy of Low Temperature and Methanol/Sorbitol Co-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min-Jie; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Dong, Shi-Juan; Li, Zhen; Shi, Zhong-Ping; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Various induction strategies were investigated for effective porcine interferon-α (pIFN-α) production by Pichia pastoris in a 10 L fermenter. We found that pIFN-α concentration could be significantly improved with the strategies of low-temperature induction or methanol/sorbitol co-feeding. On this basis, a combinational strategy of induction at lower temperature (20 °C) with methanol/sorbitol co-feeding has been proposed for improvement of pIFN-α production. The results reveal that maximal pIFN-α concentration and antiviral activity reach the highest level of 2.7 g/L and 1.8 × 10(7) IU/mg with the proposed induction strategy, about 1.3-2.1 folds higher than those obtained with other sub-optimal induction strategies. Metabolic analysis and online multi-variable measurement results indicate that energy metabolic enrichment is responsible for the performance enhancement of pIFN-α production, as a large amount of ATP could be simultaneously produced from both formaldehyde oxidation pathway in methanol metabolism and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in sorbitol metabolism. In addition, the proposed combinational induction strategy enables P. pastoris to be resistant to high methanol concentration (42 g/L), which conceivably occur associating with the error-prone methanol over-feeding. As a result, the proposed combinational induction strategy simultaneously increased the targeted protein concentration and operational stability leading to significant improvement of pIFN-α production.

  1. The importance of ambient temperature to growth and the induction of flowering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Robertson Mcclung

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant development is exquisitely sensitive to the environment. Light quantity, quality, and duration (photoperiod have profound effects on vegetative morphology and flowering time. Recent studies have demonstrated that ambient temperature is a similarly potent stimulus influencing morphology and flowering. In Arabidopsis, ambient temperatures that are high, but not so high as to induce a heat stress response, confer morphological changes that resemble the shade avoidance syndrome. Similarly, these high but not stressful temperatures can accelerate flowering under short day conditions as effectively as exposure to long days. Photoperiodic flowering entails a series of external coincidences, in which environmental cycles of light and dark must coincide with an internal cycle in gene expression established by the endogenous circadian clock. It is evident that a similar model of external coincidence applies to the effects of elevated ambient temperature on both vegetative morphology and the vegetative to reproductive transition. Further study is imperative, because global warming is predicted to have major effects on the performance and distribution of wild species and strong adverse effects on crop yields. It is critical to understand temperature perception and response at a mechanistic level and to integrate this knowledge with our understanding of other environmental responses, including biotic and abiotic stresses, in order to improve crop production sufficiently to sustainably feed an expanding world population.

  2. A Visual Analog Scale to assess anxiety in children during anesthesia induction (VAS-I): Results supporting its validity in a sample of day care surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghmans, Johan M; Poley, Marten J; van der Ende, Jan; Weber, Frank; Van de Velde, Marc; Adriaenssens, Peter; Himpe, Dirk; Verhulst, Frank C; Utens, Elisabeth

    2017-09-01

    The modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale is widely used to assess children's anxiety during induction of anesthesia, but requires training and its administration is time-consuming. A Visual Analog Scale, in contrast, requires no training, is easy-to-use and quickly completed. The aim of this study was to evaluate a Visual Analog Scale as a tool to assess anxiety during induction of anesthesia and to determine cut-offs to distinguish between anxious and nonanxious children. Four hundred and one children (1.5-16 years) scheduled for daytime surgery were included. Children's anxiety during induction was rated by parents and anesthesiologists on a Visual Analog Scale and by a trained observer on the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale. Psychometric properties assessed were: (i) concurrent validity (correlations between parents' and anesthesiologists' Visual Analog Scale and modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale scores); (ii) construct validity (differences between subgroups according to the children's age and the parents' anxiety as assessed by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory); (iii) cross-informant agreement using Bland-Altman analysis; (iv) cut-offs to distinguish between anxious and nonanxious children (reference: modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale ≥30). Correlations between parents' and anesthesiologists' Visual Analog Scale and modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale scores were strong (0.68 and 0.73, respectively). Visual Analog Scale scores were higher for children ≤5 years compared to children aged ≥6. Visual Analog Scale scores of children of high-anxious parents were higher than those of low-anxious parents. The mean difference between parents' and anesthesiologists' Visual Analog Scale scores was 3.6, with 95% limits of agreement (-56.1 to 63.3). To classify anxious children, cut-offs for parents (≥37 mm) and anesthesiologists (≥30 mm) were established. The present data provide preliminary data for the validity of a Visual

  3. Scaling future tropical cyclone damage with global mean temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, T.; Bresch, D.; Frieler, K.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TC) are one of the most damaging natural hazards and severely affectmany countries around the globe each year. Their nominal impact is projected to increasesubstantially as the exposed coastal population grows, per capita income increases, andanthropogenic climate change manifests. The magnitude of this increase, however, variesacross regions and is obscured by the stochastic behaviour of TCs, so far impeding arigorous quantification of trends in TC damage with global mean temperature (GMT) rise. Here, we build on the large sample of spatially explicit TCs simulations generated withinISIMIP(2b) for 1) pre-industrial conditions, 2) the historical period, and 3) future projectionsunder RCP2.6 and RCP6.0 to estimate future TC damage assuming fixed present-daysocio-economic conditions or SSP-based future projections of population patterns andincome. Damage estimates will be based on region-specific empirical damage modelsderived from reported damages and accounting for regional characteristics of vulnerability.Different combinations of 1) socio-economic drivers with pre-industrial climate or 2) changingclimate with fixed socio-economic conditions will be used to derive functional relationshipsbetween regionally aggregated changes in damages on one hand and global meantemperature and socio-economic predictors on the other hand. The obtained region-specific scaling of future TC damage with GMT provides valuable inputfor IPCC's special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C by quantifying theincremental changes in impact with global warming. The approach allows for an update ofdamage functions used in integrated assessment models, and contributes to assessing theadequateness of climate mitigation and adaptation strategies.

  4. Induction of enhanced methane oxidation in compost: Temperature and moisture response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mor, Suman; Visscher, Alex de; Ravindra, Khaiwal; Dahiya, R.P.; Chandra, A.; Cleemput, Oswald van

    2006-01-01

    Landfilling is one of the most common ways of municipal solid waste disposal. Degradation of organic waste produces CH 4 and other landfill gases that significantly contribute to global warming. However, before entering the atmosphere, part of the produced CH 4 can be oxidised while passing through the landfill cover. In the present study, the oxidation rate of CH 4 was studied with various types of compost as possible landfill cover. The influence of incubation time, moisture content and temperature on the CH 4 oxidation capacity of different types of compost was examined. It was observed that the influence of moisture content and temperature on methane oxidation is time-dependent. Maximum oxidation rates were observed at moisture contents ranging from 45% to 110% (dry weight basis), while the optimum temperature ranged from 15 to 30 deg. C

  5. Assessment of Multi-frequency Electromagnetic Induction for Determining Soil Moisture Patterns at the Hillslope Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp-van Meerveld, I.; McDonnell, J.

    2009-05-01

    We present an assessment of electromagnetic induction (EM) as a potential rapid and non-invasive method to map soil moisture patterns at the Panola (GA, USA) hillslope. We address the following questions regarding the applicability of EM measurements for hillslope hydrological investigations: (1) Can EM be used for soil moisture measurements in areas with shallow soils?; (2) Can EM represent the temporal and spatial patterns of soil moisture throughout the year?; and (3) can multiple frequencies be used to extract additional information content from the EM approach and explain the depth profile of soil moisture? We found that the apparent conductivity measured with the multi-frequency GEM-300 was linearly related to soil moisture measured with an Aqua-pro capacitance sensor below a threshold conductivity and represented the temporal patterns in soil moisture well. During spring rainfall events that wetted only the surface soil layers the apparent conductivity measurements explained the soil moisture dynamics at depth better than the surface soil moisture dynamics. All four EM frequencies (7290, 9090, 11250, and 14010 Hz) were highly correlated and linearly related to each other and could be used to predict soil moisture. This limited our ability to use the four different EM frequencies to obtain a soil moisture profile with depth. The apparent conductivity patterns represented the observed spatial soil moisture patterns well when the individually fitted relationships between measured soil moisture and apparent conductivity were used for each measurement point. However, when the same (master) relationship was used for all measurement locations, the soil moisture patterns were smoothed and did not resemble the observed soil moisture patterns very well. In addition, the range in calculated soil moisture values was reduced compared to observed soil moisture. Part of the smoothing was likely due to the much larger measurement area of the GEM-300 compared to the Aqua

  6. Room temperature inductively coupled plasma etching of InAs/InSb in BCl 3/Cl 2/Ar

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2012-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching of InAs and InSb at room temperature has been investigated using BCl 3/Cl 2/Ar plasma. Specifically, the etch rate and post-etching surface morphology were investigated as functions of the gas composition, ICP power, process pressure, and RF chuck power. An optimized process has been developed, yielding anisotropic etching and very smooth surfaces with roughnesses of 0.25 nm for InAs, and 0.57 nm for InSb, which is comparable with the surface of epi-ready polished wafers. The process provides moderate etching rates of 820 /min for InAs and 2800 /min for InSb, and the micro-masking effect is largely avoided. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-contact multi-frequency magnetic induction spectroscopy system for industrial-scale bio-impedance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, M D; Marsh, L A; Davidson, J L; Tan, Y M; Armitage, D W; Peyton, A J

    2015-01-01

    Biological tissues have a complex impedance, or bio-impedance, profile which changes with respect to frequency. This is caused by dispersion mechanisms which govern how the electromagnetic field interacts with the tissue at the cellular and molecular level. Measuring the bio-impedance spectra of a biological sample can potentially provide insight into the sample’s properties and its cellular structure. This has obvious applications in the medical, pharmaceutical and food-based industrial domains. However, measuring the bio-impedance spectra non-destructively and in a way which is practical at an industrial scale presents substantial challenges. The low conductivity of the sample requires a highly sensitive instrument, while the demands of industrial-scale operation require a fast high-throughput sensor of rugged design. In this paper, we describe a multi-frequency magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) system suitable for industrial-scale, non-contact, spectroscopic bio-impedance measurement over a bandwidth of 156 kHz–2.5 MHz. The system sensitivity and performance are investigated using calibration and known reference samples. It is shown to yield rapid and consistently sensitive results with good long-term stability. The system is then used to obtain conductivity spectra of a number of biological test samples, including yeast suspensions of varying concentration and a range of agricultural produce, such as apples, pears, nectarines, kiwis, potatoes, oranges and tomatoes. (paper)

  8. Effects of photoperiod and temperature on the induction and termination of reproductive resting stage in the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca (Saussure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deMarch, B.G.E.

    1977-10-01

    Three experiments, one on the induction of reproductive resting stage and two on its termination, were performed to determine the effects of various combinations of temperature and photoperiod on the induction and termination of reproduction in Hyallella azteca. These showed that only photoperiod determined whether reproduction was continued or discontinued but that temperature influenced the rate of all changes. The 12L--12D photoperiod terminated reproduction for at least 4 months at temperatures between 12 and 25/sup 0/C in animals previously reproducing at a 16L--8D photoperiod. The 12L--12D photoperiod also induced reproduction at temperatures between 16 and 26/sup 0/C in animals previously held in a reproductive resting stage in dim light. In contrast, the 16L--8D photoperiod induced and maintained reproduction consistently, and the 8L--16D photoperiod halted reproduction and maintained a reproductive resting stage consistently. The induction of reproduction occurred faster at higher temperatures. It is believed that although photoperiod is the main cue in the induction and termination of reproduction, active reproduction takes place when environmental temperatures are 20 to 26/sup 0/C, since optimum reproduction and growth rates occur in this range. The adaptive advantage and the biogeographic variability of the photoperiodic response are discussed.

  9. Design of Annular Linear Induction Pump for High Temperature Liquid Lead Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Jae Sik; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    EM(Electro Magnetic) Pump is divided into two parts, which consisted of the primary one with electromagnetic core and exciting coils, and secondary one with liquid lead flow. The main geometrical variables of the pump included core length, inner diameter and flow gap while the electromagnetic ones covered pole pitch, turns of coil, number of pole pairs, input current and input frequency. The characteristics of design variables are analyzed by electrical equivalent circuit method taking into account hydraulic head loss in the narrow annular channel of the ALIP. The design program, which was composed by using MATLAB language, was developed to draw pump design variables according to input requirements of the flow rate, developing pressure and operation temperature from the analyses. The analysis on the design of ALIP for high temperature liquid lead transportation was carried for the produce of ALIP designing program based on MATLAB. By the using of ALIP designing program, we don't have to bother about geometrical relationship between each component during detail designing process because code calculate automatically. And prediction of outputs about designing pump can be done easily before manufacturing. By running the code, we also observe and analysis change of outputs caused by changing of pump factors. It will be helpful for the research about optimization of pump outputs.

  10. Density-temperature scaling of the fragility in a model glass-former

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    . Such a scaling, referred to as density-temperature (DT) scaling, is exact for liquids with inverse power law (IPL) interactions but has also been found to be approximately valid in many non-IPL liquids. We have analyzed the consequences of DT scaling on the density dependence of the fragility in a model glass......Dynamical quantities e.g. diffusivity and relaxation time for some glass-formers may depend on density and temperature through a specific combination, rather than independently, allowing the representation of data over ranges of density and temperature as a function of a single scaling variable......-former. We find the density dependence of kinetic fragility to be weak, and show that it can be understood in terms of DT scaling and deviations of DT scaling at low densities. We also show that the Adam-Gibbs relation exhibits DT scaling and the scaling exponent computed from the density dependence...

  11. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    temperatures. The A feature of the melting curve which suggests itself as a thermometric fixed point is found to be T//A equals 2. 75 plus or minus 0. 11 mK. The agreement between this value and independent measurements of T//A, based on nuclear or electronic paramagnetism, Johnson noise thermometry...

  12. Effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part II: Results of investigations and recommendations for related regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnacinski, P.; Mindykowski, J.; Tarasiuk, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of lowered voltage quality in ship power systems on windings temperature of low-power induction cage machines. The results of investigations carried out with experimental and analytical methods are presented. The thermal impact of power quality disturbances permitted by ship classification societies is discussed. A proposal of new power quality regulations for ship classification societies is made.

  13. Genetic variation of temperature-regulated curd induction in cauliflower: elucidation of floral transition by genome-wide association mapping and gene expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matschegewski, Claudia; Zetzsche, Holger; Hasan, Yaser; Leibeguth, Lena; Briggs, William; Ordon, Frank; Uptmoor, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) is a vernalization-responsive crop. High ambient temperatures delay harvest time. The elucidation of the genetic regulation of floral transition is highly interesting for a precise harvest scheduling and to ensure stable market supply. This study aims at genetic dissection of temperature-dependent curd induction in cauliflower by genome-wide association studies and gene expression analysis. To assess temperature-dependent curd induction, two greenhouse trials under distinct temperature regimes were conducted on a diversity panel consisting of 111 cauliflower commercial parent lines, genotyped with 14,385 SNPs. Broad phenotypic variation and high heritability (0.93) were observed for temperature-related curd induction within the cauliflower population. GWA mapping identified a total of 18 QTL localized on chromosomes O1, O2, O3, O4, O6, O8, and O9 for curding time under two distinct temperature regimes. Among those, several QTL are localized within regions of promising candidate flowering genes. Inferring population structure and genetic relatedness among the diversity set assigned three main genetic clusters. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns estimated global LD extent of r2 = 0.06 and a maximum physical distance of 400 kb for genetic linkage. Transcriptional profiling of flowering genes FLOWERING LOCUS C (BoFLC) and VERNALIZATION 2 (BoVRN2) was performed, showing increased expression levels of BoVRN2 in genotypes with faster curding. However, functional relevance of BoVRN2 and BoFLC2 could not consistently be supported, which probably suggests to act facultative and/or might evidence for BoVRN2/BoFLC-independent mechanisms in temperature-regulated floral transition in cauliflower. Genetic insights in temperature-regulated curd induction can underpin genetically informed phenology models and benefit molecular breeding strategies toward the development of thermo-tolerant cultivars. PMID:26442034

  14. The scaling of stress distribution under small scale yielding by T-scaling method and application to prediction of the temperature dependence on fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Kenichi; Hamada, Takeshi; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for scaling the crack tip stress distribution under small scale yielding condition was proposed and named as T-scaling method. This method enables to identify the different stress distributions for materials with different tensile properties but identical load in terms of K or J. Then by assuming that the temperature dependence of a material is represented as the stress-strain relationship temperature dependence, a method to predict the fracture load at an arbitrary temperature from the already known fracture load at a reference temperature was proposed. This method combined the T-scaling method and the knowledge “fracture stress for slip induced cleavage fracture is temperature independent.” Once the fracture load is predicted, fracture toughness J c at the temperature under consideration can be evaluated by running elastic-plastic finite element analysis. Finally, the above-mentioned framework to predict the J c temperature dependency of a material in the ductile-to-brittle temperature distribution was validated for 0.55% carbon steel JIS S55C. The proposed framework seems to have a possibility to solve the problem the master curve is facing in the relatively higher temperature region, by requiring only tensile tests. (author)

  15. Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Mantzouki, Evanthia; Lürling, Miquel; Fastner, Jutta; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette; Wilk-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Koreivienė, Judita; Seelen, Laura; Teurlincx, Sven; Verstijnen, Yvon; Krztoń, Wojciech; Walusiak, Edward; Karosienė, Jūratė; Kasperovičienė, Jūratė; Savadova, Ksenija; Vitonytė, Irma

    2018-01-01

    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and li...

  16. Temperature effects explain continental scale distribution of cyanobacterial toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Mantzouki, Evanthia; Lürling, Miquel; Fastner, Jutta; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette; Wilk-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Koreivienė, Judita; Seelen, Laura; Teurlincx, Sven; Verstijnen, Yvon; Krztoń, Wojciech; Walusiak, Edward; Karosienė, Jūratė; Kasperovičienė, Jūratė; Savadova, Ksenija; Vitonytė, Irma

    2018-01-01

    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and li...

  17. Understanding the Complexity of Temperature Dynamics in Xinjiang, China, from Multitemporal Scale and Spatial Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the observed data from 51 meteorological stations during the period from 1958 to 2012 in Xinjiang, China, we investigated the complexity of temperature dynamics from the temporal and spatial perspectives by using a comprehensive approach including the correlation dimension (CD, classical statistics, and geostatistics. The main conclusions are as follows (1 The integer CD values indicate that the temperature dynamics are a complex and chaotic system, which is sensitive to the initial conditions. (2 The complexity of temperature dynamics decreases along with the increase of temporal scale. To describe the temperature dynamics, at least 3 independent variables are needed at daily scale, whereas at least 2 independent variables are needed at monthly, seasonal, and annual scales. (3 The spatial patterns of CD values at different temporal scales indicate that the complex temperature dynamics are derived from the complex landform.

  18. Temperature scaling in a dense vibrofluidized granular material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunthar, P; Kumaran, V

    1999-08-01

    The leading order "temperature" of a dense two-dimensional granular material fluidized by external vibrations is determined. The grain interactions are characterized by inelastic collisions, but the coefficient of restitution is considered to be close to 1, so that the dissipation of energy during a collision is small compared to the average energy of a particle. An asymptotic solution is obtained where the particles are considered to be elastic in the leading approximation. The velocity distribution is a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the leading approximation. The density profile is determined by solving the momentum balance equation in the vertical direction, where the relation between the pressure and density is provided by the virial equation of state. The temperature is determined by relating the source of energy due to the vibrating surface and the energy dissipation due to inelastic collisions. The predictions of the present analysis show good agreement with simulation results at higher densities where theories for a dilute vibrated granular material, with the pressure-density relation provided by the ideal gas law, are in error.

  19. Temperature as a diagnostic for the drift scale test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W; Wagoner, J; Ballard, S

    2000-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for its feasibility as a potential deep geological repository of high-level nuclear waste. In a deep geological repository, the radioactive decay heat released from high-level nuclear waste will heat up the rock mass. The heat will mobilize pore water in the rock mass by evaporation, and even boiling, if the thermal load is great enough. The water vapor/steam will flow away from the heat source because of pressure and thermal gradients and the effects of buoyancy force. The vapor/steam may flow along fractures or highly permeable zones and condense into liquid water in the cooler regions. Gravity and fracture network will control the drainage of the condensed water. Some of the water may flow back toward the waste package and reevaporated. This thermal-hydrological (TH) process will affect the amount of water that may come into contact with the waste package. Water is the main concern for the integrity of the waste package and the waste form, and the potential transport of radioactive nuclides. Thermally driven chemical and mechanical processes may affect the TH process. The coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes need to be understood before the performance of a repository can be adequately predicted. DOE is conducting field thermal tests to provide data for validating the model of the coupled THMC processes. Therefore, understanding the processes revealed by a field thermal test is essential for the model validation. This paper presents examples that temperature measurement is an effective tool for understanding the TH process

  20. Leveraging a temperature-tunable, scale-like microstructure to produce multimodal, supersensitive sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong; Bera, Tushar Kanti; Yang, Zhenguo; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    The microstructure of a flexible film plays an important role in its sensing capability. Here, we fabricate a temperature-dependent wrinkled single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) film (WSPF) and a wrinkle-dependent scale

  1. Scaling of spectra in grid turbulence with a mean cross-stream temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Carla; Arwatz, Gilad; Mueller, Michael E.; George, William K.; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    Scaling of grid turbulence with a constant mean cross-stream temperature gradient is investigated using a combination of theoretical predictions, DNS, and experimental data. Conditions for self-similarity of the governing equations and the scalar spectrum are investigated, which reveals necessary conditions for self-similarity to exist. These conditions provide a theoretical framework for scaling of the temperature spectrum as well as the temperature flux spectrum. One necessary condition, predicted by the theory, is that the characteristic length scale describing the scalar spectrum must vary as √{ t} for a self-similar solution to exist. In order to investigate this, T-NSTAP sensors, specially designed for temperature measurements at high frequencies, were deployed in a heated passive grid turbulence setup together with conventional cold-wires, and complementary DNS calculations were performed to complement and complete the experimental data. These data are used to compare the behavior of different length scales and validate the theoretical predictions.

  2. The Evolution of the Celsius and Kelvin Temperature Scales and the State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, Julio; Amparo Gilabert, M.; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto

    1999-07-01

    A physical analysis is given of the evolution undergone by the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, from their definition to the present day. It is shown that in the temperature interval between the melting point of ice and the boiling point of water, the Celsius and Kelvin scales, both born centigrade by definition and actually become so afterwards by experimental determination as well, are not so any longer, either by definition or by experimental determination.

  3. Process assessment of small scale low temperature methanol synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendriyana [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Jenderal Achmad Yani Univerity (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Industrial Technology, InstitutTeknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Susanto, Herri, E-mail: herri@che.itb.ac.id; Subagjo [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Industrial Technology, InstitutTeknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource and has the potential to make a significant impact on domestic fuel supplies. Biomass can be converted to fuel like methanol via several step process. The process can be split into following main steps: biomass preparation, gasification, gas cooling and cleaning, gas shift and methanol synthesis. Untill now these configuration still has a problem like high production cost, catalyst deactivation, economy of scale and a huge energy requirements. These problems become the leading inhibition for biomass conversion to methanol, which should be resolved to move towards the economical. To address these issues, we developed various process and new configurations for methanol synthesis via methyl formate. This configuration combining two reactors: the one reactor for the carbonylation of methanol and CO to form methyl formate, and the second for the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate and H{sub 2} to form two molecule of methanol. Four plant process configurations were compared with the biomass basis is 300 ton/day. The first configuration (A) is equipped with a steam reforming process for converting methane to CO and H{sub 2} for increasing H{sub 2}/CO ratio. CO{sub 2} removal is necessary to avoid poisoning the catalyst. COSORB process used for the purpose of increasing the partial pressure of CO in the feed gas. The steam reforming process in B configuration is not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. For C configuration, the steam reforming process and COSORB are not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. D configuration is almost similar to the configuration A. This configuration difference is in the synthesis of methanol which was held in a single reactor. Carbonylation and hydrogenolysis reactions carried out in the same reactor one. These processes were analyzed in term of technical process, material and energy

  4. Process assessment of small scale low temperature methanol synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriyana; Susanto, Herri; Subagjo

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource and has the potential to make a significant impact on domestic fuel supplies. Biomass can be converted to fuel like methanol via several step process. The process can be split into following main steps: biomass preparation, gasification, gas cooling and cleaning, gas shift and methanol synthesis. Untill now these configuration still has a problem like high production cost, catalyst deactivation, economy of scale and a huge energy requirements. These problems become the leading inhibition for biomass conversion to methanol, which should be resolved to move towards the economical. To address these issues, we developed various process and new configurations for methanol synthesis via methyl formate. This configuration combining two reactors: the one reactor for the carbonylation of methanol and CO to form methyl formate, and the second for the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate and H 2 to form two molecule of methanol. Four plant process configurations were compared with the biomass basis is 300 ton/day. The first configuration (A) is equipped with a steam reforming process for converting methane to CO and H 2 for increasing H 2 /CO ratio. CO 2 removal is necessary to avoid poisoning the catalyst. COSORB process used for the purpose of increasing the partial pressure of CO in the feed gas. The steam reforming process in B configuration is not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. For C configuration, the steam reforming process and COSORB are not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. D configuration is almost similar to the configuration A. This configuration difference is in the synthesis of methanol which was held in a single reactor. Carbonylation and hydrogenolysis reactions carried out in the same reactor one. These processes were analyzed in term of technical process, material and energy balance and economic

  5. Characterizing Temperature Variability and Associated Large Scale Meteorological Patterns Across South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detzer, J.; Loikith, P. C.; Mechoso, C. R.; Barkhordarian, A.; Lee, H.

    2017-12-01

    South America's climate varies considerably owing to its large geographic range and diverse topographical features. Spanning the tropics to the mid-latitudes and from high peaks to tropical rainforest, the continent experiences an array of climate and weather patterns. Due to this considerable spatial extent, assessing temperature variability at the continent scale is particularly challenging. It is well documented in the literature that temperatures have been increasing across portions of South America in recent decades, and while there have been many studies that have focused on precipitation variability and change, temperature has received less scientific attention. Therefore, a more thorough understanding of the drivers of temperature variability is critical for interpreting future change. First, k-means cluster analysis is used to identify four primary modes of temperature variability across the continent, stratified by season. Next, composites of large scale meteorological patterns (LSMPs) are calculated for months assigned to each cluster. Initial results suggest that LSMPs, defined using meteorological variables such as sea level pressure (SLP), geopotential height, and wind, are able to identify synoptic scale mechanisms important for driving temperature variability at the monthly scale. Some LSMPs indicate a relationship with known recurrent modes of climate variability. For example, composites of geopotential height suggest that the Southern Annular Mode is an important, but not necessarily dominant, component of temperature variability over southern South America. This work will be extended to assess the drivers of temperature extremes across South America.

  6. Effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part II: Results of investigations and recommendations for related regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P.; Mindykowski, J.; Tarasiuk, T. [Gdynia Maritime Univ., Dept. of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Str. 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)

    2009-10-15

    This paper deals with the effect of lowered voltage quality in ship power systems on windings temperature of low-power induction cage machines. The results of investigations carried out with experimental and analytical methods are presented. The thermal impact of power quality disturbances permitted by ship classification societies is discussed. A proposal of new power quality regulations for ship classification societies is made. (author)

  7. Time-dependent two-temperature chemically non-equilibrium modelling of high-power Ar-N2 pulse-modulated inductively coupled plasmas at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasunori

    2006-01-01

    A time-dependent, two-dimensional, two-temperature and chemical non-equilibrium model was developed for high-power Ar-N 2 pulse-modulated inductively coupled plasmas (PMICPs) at atmospheric pressure. The high-power PMICP is a new technique for sustaining high-power induction plasmas. It can control the plasma temperature and radical densities in the time domain. The PMICP promotes non-equilibrium effects by a sudden application of electric field, even in the high-power density plasmas. The developed model accounts separately for the time-dependent energy conservation equations of electrons and heavy particles. This model also considers reaction heat effects and energy transfer between electrons and heavy particles as well as enthalpy flow resulting from diffusion caused by the particle density gradient. Chemical non-equilibrium effects are also taken into account by solving time-dependent mass conservation equations for each particle, considering diffusion, convection and net production terms resulting from 30 chemical reactions. Transport and thermodynamic properties of Ar-N 2 plasmas are calculated self-consistently using the first order approximation of the Chapman-Enskog method at each position and iteration using the local particle composition, heavy particle temperature and electron temperature. This model is useful to discuss time evolution in temperature, gas flow fields and distribution of chemical species

  8. Large-Scale Wireless Temperature Monitoring System for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwen Fan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature distribution is a critical indicator of the health condition for Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG storage tanks. In this paper, we present a large-scale wireless temperature monitoring system to evaluate the safety of LPG storage tanks. The system includes wireless sensors networks, high temperature fiber-optic sensors, and monitoring software. Finally, a case study on real-world LPG storage tanks proves the feasibility of the system. The unique features of wireless transmission, automatic data acquisition and management, local and remote access make the developed system a good alternative for temperature monitoring of LPG storage tanks in practical applications.

  9. Large-Scale Wireless Temperature Monitoring System for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage Tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guangwen; Shen, Yu; Hao, Xiaowei; Yuan, Zongming; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-09-18

    Temperature distribution is a critical indicator of the health condition for Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage tanks. In this paper, we present a large-scale wireless temperature monitoring system to evaluate the safety of LPG storage tanks. The system includes wireless sensors networks, high temperature fiber-optic sensors, and monitoring software. Finally, a case study on real-world LPG storage tanks proves the feasibility of the system. The unique features of wireless transmission, automatic data acquisition and management, local and remote access make the developed system a good alternative for temperature monitoring of LPG storage tanks in practical applications.

  10. Scaling laws and accurate small-amplitude stationary solution for the motion of a planar vortex filament in the Cartesian form of the local induction approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorder, Robert A

    2013-04-01

    We provide a formulation of the local induction approximation (LIA) for the motion of a vortex filament in the Cartesian reference frame (the extrinsic coordinate system) which allows for scaling of the reference coordinate. For general monotone scalings of the reference coordinate, we derive an equation for the planar solution to the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation governing the LIA. We proceed to solve this equation perturbatively in small amplitude through an application of multiple-scales analysis, which allows for accurate computation of the period of the planar vortex filament. The perturbation result is shown to agree strongly with numerical simulations, and we also relate this solution back to the solution obtained in the arclength reference frame (the intrinsic coordinate system). Finally, we discuss nonmonotone coordinate scalings and their application for finding self-intersections of vortex filaments. These self-intersecting vortex filaments are likely unstable and collapse into other structures or dissipate completely.

  11. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  12. Stress- and temperature-dependent scaling behavior of dynamic hysteresis in soft PZT bulk ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yimnirun, R; Wongsaenmai, S; Wongmaneerung, R; Wongdamnern, N; Ngamjarurojana, A; Ananta, S; Laosiritaworn, Y

    2007-01-01

    Effects of electric field-frequency, electric field-amplitude, mechanical stress, and temperature on the hysteresis area, especially the scaling form, were investigated in soft lead zirconate titanate (PZT) bulk ceramics. The hysteresis area was found to depend on the frequency and field-amplitude with the same set of exponents as the power-law scaling for both with and without stresses. The inclusion of stresses into the power-law was obtained in the form of σ=0 > ∝ f -0.25 E 0 σ 0.45 which indicates the difference in energy dissipation between the under-stress and stress-free conditions. The power-law temperature scaling relations were obtained for hysteresis area (A) and remanent polarization P r , while the coercivity E C was found to scale linearly with temperature T. The three temperature scaling relations were also field-dependent. At fixed field amplitude E 0 , the scaling relations take the forms of ∝ T -1.1024 , P r ∼T -1.2322 and (E C0 - E C ) ∼T

  13. Macroscopic High-Temperature Structural Analysis Model of Small-Scale PCHE Prototype (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam; Lee, Heong Yeon; Hong, Sung Deok; Park, Hong Yoon

    2011-01-01

    The IHX (intermediate heat exchanger) of a VHTR (very high-temperature reactor) is a core component that transfers the high heat generated by the VHTR at 950 .deg. C to a hydrogen production plant. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute manufactured a small-scale prototype of a PCHE (printed circuit heat exchanger) that was being considered as a candidate for the IHX. In this study, as a part of high-temperature structural integrity evaluation of the small-scale PCHE prototype, we carried out high-temperature structural analysis modeling and macroscopic thermal and elastic structural analysis for the small-scale PCHE prototype under small-scale gas-loop test conditions. The modeling and analysis were performed as a precedent study prior to the performance test in the small-scale gas loop. The results obtained in this study will be compared with the test results for the small-scale PCHE. Moreover, these results will be used in the design of a medium-scale PCHE prototype

  14. Improving Shade Modelling in a Regional River Temperature Model Using Fine-Scale LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, D. M.; Loicq, P.; Moatar, F.; Beaufort, A.; Melin, E.; Jullian, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Air temperature is often considered as a proxy of the stream temperature to model the distribution areas of aquatic species water temperature is not available at a regional scale. To simulate the water temperature at a regional scale (105 km²), a physically-based model using the equilibrium temperature concept and including upstream-downstream propagation of the thermal signal was developed and applied to the entire Loire basin (Beaufort et al., submitted). This model, called T-NET (Temperature-NETwork) is based on a hydrographical network topology. Computations are made hourly on 52,000 reaches which average 1.7 km long in the Loire drainage basin. The model gives a median Root Mean Square Error of 1.8°C at hourly time step on the basis of 128 water temperature stations (2008-2012). In that version of the model, tree shadings is modelled by a constant factor proportional to the vegetation cover on 10 meters sides the river reaches. According to sensitivity analysis, improving the shade representation would enhance T-NET accuracy, especially for the maximum daily temperatures, which are currently not very well modelized. This study evaluates the most efficient way (accuracy/computing time) to improve the shade model thanks to 1-m resolution LIDAR data available on tributary of the LoireRiver (317 km long and an area of 8280 km²). Two methods are tested and compared: the first one is a spatially explicit computation of the cast shadow for every LIDAR pixel. The second is based on averaged vegetation cover characteristics of buffers and reaches of variable size. Validation of the water temperature model is made against 4 temperature sensors well spread along the stream, as well as two airborne thermal infrared imageries acquired in summer 2014 and winter 2015 over a 80 km reach. The poster will present the optimal length- and crosswise scale to characterize the vegetation from LIDAR data.

  15. How and Why Does Stream Water Temperature Vary at Small Spatial Scales in a Headwater Stream?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. C.; Gannon, J. P.; Kelleher, C.

    2017-12-01

    The temperature of stream water is controlled by climatic variables, runoff/baseflow generation, and hyporheic exchange. Hydrologic conditions such as gaining/losing reaches and sources of inflow can vary dramatically along a stream on a small spatial scale. In this work, we attempt to discern the extent that the factors of air temperature, groundwater inflow, and precipitation influence stream temperature at small spatial scales along the length of a stream. To address this question, we measured stream temperature along the perennial stream network in a 43 ha catchment with a complex land use history in Cullowhee, NC. Two water temperature sensors were placed along the stream network on opposite sides of the stream at 100-meter intervals and at several locations of interest (i.e. stream junctions). The forty total sensors recorded the temperature every 10 minutes for one month in the spring and one month in the summer. A subset of sampling locations where stream temperature was consistent or varied from one side of the stream to the other were explored with a thermal imaging camera to obtain a more detailed representation of the spatial variation in temperature at those sites. These thermal surveys were compared with descriptions of the contributing area at the sample sites in an effort to discern specific causes of differing flow paths. Preliminary results suggest that on some branches of the stream stormflow has less influence than regular hyporheic exchange, while other tributaries can change dramatically with stormflow conditions. We anticipate this work will lead to a better understanding of temperature patterns in stream water networks. A better understanding of the importance of small-scale differences in flow paths to water temperature may be able to inform watershed management decisions in the future.

  16. Scaling of precipitation extremes with temperature in the French Mediterranean region: What explains the hook shape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobinski, P.; Alonzo, B.; Bastin, S.; Silva, N. Da; Muller, C.

    2016-04-01

    Expected changes to future extreme precipitation remain a key uncertainty associated with anthropogenic climate change. Extreme precipitation has been proposed to scale with the precipitable water content in the atmosphere. Assuming constant relative humidity, this implies an increase of precipitation extremes at a rate of about 7% °C-1 globally as indicated by the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. Increases faster and slower than Clausius-Clapeyron have also been reported. In this work, we examine the scaling between precipitation extremes and temperature in the present climate using simulations and measurements from surface weather stations collected in the frame of the HyMeX and MED-CORDEX programs in Southern France. Of particular interest are departures from the Clausius-Clapeyron thermodynamic expectation, their spatial and temporal distribution, and their origin. Looking at the scaling of precipitation extreme with temperature, two regimes emerge which form a hook shape: one at low temperatures (cooler than around 15°C) with rates of increase close to the Clausius-Clapeyron rate and one at high temperatures (warmer than about 15°C) with sub-Clausius-Clapeyron rates and most often negative rates. On average, the region of focus does not seem to exhibit super Clausius-Clapeyron behavior except at some stations, in contrast to earlier studies. Many factors can contribute to departure from Clausius-Clapeyron scaling: time and spatial averaging, choice of scaling temperature (surface versus condensation level), and precipitation efficiency and vertical velocity in updrafts that are not necessarily constant with temperature. But most importantly, the dynamical contribution of orography to precipitation in the fall over this area during the so-called "Cevenoles" events, explains the hook shape of the scaling of precipitation extremes.

  17. Global scaling analysis for the pebble bed advanced high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandford, E.D.; Peterson, P.F.

    2009-01-01

    Scaled Integral Effects Test (IET) facilities play a critical role in the design certification process of innovative reactor designs. Best-estimate system analysis codes, which minimize deliberate conservatism, require confirmatory data during the validation process to ensure an acceptable level of accuracy as defined by the regulator. The modular Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR), with a nominal power output of 900 MWth, is the most recent UC Berkeley design for a liquid fluoride salt cooled, solid fuel reactor. The PB-AHTR takes advantage of technologies developed for gas-cooled high temperature thermal and fast reactors, sodium fast reactors, and molten salt reactors. In this paper, non-dimensional scaling groups and similarity criteria are presented at the global system level for a loss of forced circulation transient, where single-phase natural circulation is the primary mechanism for decay heat removal following a primary pump trip. Due to very large margin to fuel damage temperatures, the peak metal temperature of primary-loop components was identified as the key safety parameter of interest. Fractional Scaling Analysis (FSA) methods were used to quantify the intensity of each transfer process during the transient and subsequently rank them by their relative importance while identifying key sources of distortion between the prototype and model. The results show that the development of a scaling hierarchy at the global system level informs the bottom-up scaling analysis. (author)

  18. Response of surface air temperature to small-scale land clearing across latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Mi; Wang, Wei; Lee, Xuhui; Yu, Guirui; Wang, Huimin; Han, Shijie; Yan, Junhua; Zhang, Yiping; Li, Yide; Ohta, Takeshi; Hirano, Takashi; Kim, Joon; Yoshifuji, Natsuko

    2014-01-01

    Climate models simulating continental scale deforestation suggest a warming effect of land clearing on the surface air temperature in the tropical zone and a cooling effect in the boreal zone due to different control of biogeochemical and biophysical processes. Ongoing land-use/cover changes mostly occur at local scales (hectares), and it is not clear whether the local-scale deforestation will generate temperature patterns consistent with the climate model results. Here we paired 40 and 12 flux sites with nearby weather stations in North and South America and in Eastern Asia, respectively, and quantified the temperature difference between these paired sites. Our goal was to investigate the response of the surface air temperature to local-scale (hectares) land clearing across latitudes using the surface weather stations as proxies for localized land clearing. The results show that north of 10°N, the annual mean temperature difference (open land minus forest) decreases with increasing latitude, but the temperature difference shrinks with latitude at a faster rate in the Americas [−0.079 (±0.010) °C per degree] than in Asia [−0.046 (±0.011) °C per degree]. Regression of the combined data suggests a transitional latitude of about 35.5°N that demarks deforestation warming to the south and cooling to the north. The warming in latitudes south of 35°N is associated with increase in the daily maximum temperature, with little change in the daily minimum temperature while the reverse is true in the boreal latitudes. (paper)

  19. Calculation of temperature fields formed in induction annealing of closing welded joint of jacket of steam generator for WWER 440 type nuclear power plant using ICL 2960 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajnar, P.; Fiala, J.

    1983-01-01

    The problems are discussed of the mathematical description and simulation of temperature fields in annealing the closing weld of the steam generator jacket of the WWER 440 nuclear power plant. The basic principles are given of induction annealing, the method of calculating temperature fields is indicated and the mathematical description is given of boundary conditions on the outer and inner surfaces of the steam generator jacket for the computation of temperature fields arising during annealing. Also described are the methods of determining the temperature of exposed parts of heat exchange tubes inside the steam generator and the technical possibilities are assessed of the annealing equipment from the point of view of its computer simulation. Five alternatives are given for the computation of temperature fields in the area around the weld for different boundary conditions. The values are given of maximum differences in the temperatures of the metal in the annealed part of the steam generator jacket which allow the assessment of individual computation variants, this mainly from the point of view of observing the course of annealing temperature in the required width of the annealed jacket of the steam generator along both sides of the closing weld. (B.S.)

  20. The sensitivity of soil respiration to soil temperature, moisture, and carbon supply at the global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursh, Andrew; Ballantyne, Ashley; Cooper, Leila; Maneta, Marco; Kimball, John; Watts, Jennifer

    2017-05-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is a major pathway by which fixed carbon in the biosphere is returned to the atmosphere, yet there are limits to our ability to predict respiration rates using environmental drivers at the global scale. While temperature, moisture, carbon supply, and other site characteristics are known to regulate soil respiration rates at plot scales within certain biomes, quantitative frameworks for evaluating the relative importance of these factors across different biomes and at the global scale require tests of the relationships between field estimates and global climatic data. This study evaluates the factors driving Rs at the global scale by linking global datasets of soil moisture, soil temperature, primary productivity, and soil carbon estimates with observations of annual Rs from the Global Soil Respiration Database (SRDB). We find that calibrating models with parabolic soil moisture functions can improve predictive power over similar models with asymptotic functions of mean annual precipitation. Soil temperature is comparable with previously reported air temperature observations used in predicting Rs and is the dominant driver of Rs in global models; however, within certain biomes soil moisture and soil carbon emerge as dominant predictors of Rs. We identify regions where typical temperature-driven responses are further mediated by soil moisture, precipitation, and carbon supply and regions in which environmental controls on high Rs values are difficult to ascertain due to limited field data. Because soil moisture integrates temperature and precipitation dynamics, it can more directly constrain the heterotrophic component of Rs, but global-scale models tend to smooth its spatial heterogeneity by aggregating factors that increase moisture variability within and across biomes. We compare statistical and mechanistic models that provide independent estimates of global Rs ranging from 83 to 108 Pg yr -1 , but also highlight regions of uncertainty

  1. Rapid high temperature field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcite scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    A test method is described which allows the rapid field testing of calcite scale inhibitors in high- temperature geothermal brines. Five commercial formulations, chosen on the basis of laboratory screening tests, were tested in brines with low total dissolved solids at ca 500 F. Four were found to be effective; of these, 2 were found to be capable of removing recently deposited scale. One chemical was tested in the full-flow brine line for 6 wks. It was shown to stop a severe surface scaling problem at the well's control valve, thus proving the viability of the rapid test method. (12 refs.)

  2. Modelling of Temperature Profiles and Transport Scaling in Auxiliary Heated Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, J.D.; Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    time , the heating effectiveness η, and the energy offset W(0). Considering both the temperature profile responses and the global transport scaling, the constant heat pinch or excess temperature gradient model is found to best characterize the present JET data. Finally, new methods are proposed......The temperature profiles produced by various heating profiles are calculated from local heat transport models. The models take the heat flux to be the sum of heat diffusion and a non-diffusive heat flow, consistent with local measurements of heat transport. Two models are developed analytically...... in detail: (i) a heat pinch or excess temperature gradient model with constant coefficients; and (ii) a non-linear heat diffusion coefficient (χ) model. Both models predict weak (lesssim20%) temperature profile responses to physically relevant changes in the heat deposition profile – primarily because...

  3. Temperature and saturation dependence in the vapor sensing of butterfly wing scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertész, K.; Piszter, G.; Jakab, E.; Bálint, Zs.; Vértesy, Z.; Biró, L.P.

    2014-01-01

    The sensing of gasses/vapors in the ambient air is the focus of attention due to the need to monitor our everyday environment. Photonic crystals are sensing materials of the future because of their strong light-manipulating properties. Natural photonic structures are well-suited materials for testing detection principles because they are significantly cheaper than artificial photonic structures and are available in larger sizes. Additionally, natural photonic structures may provide new ideas for developing novel artificial photonic nanoarchitectures with improved properties. In the present paper, we discuss the effects arising from the sensor temperature and the vapor concentration in air during measurements with a photonic crystal-type optical gas sensor. Our results shed light on the sources of discrepancy between simulated and experimental sensing behaviors of photonic crystal-type structures. Through capillary condensation, the vapors will condensate to a liquid state inside the nanocavities. Due to the temperature and radius of curvature dependence of capillary condensation, the measured signals are affected by the sensor temperature as well as by the presence of a nanocavity size distribution. The sensing materials used are natural photonic nanoarchitectures present in the wing scales of blue butterflies. - Highlights: • We report optical gas sensing on blue butterfly wing scale nanostructures. • The sample temperature decrease effects a reversible break-down in the measured spectra. • The break-down is connected with the vapor condensation in the scales and wing surface. • Capillary condensation occurs in the wing scales

  4. Data scaling and temperature calibration in time-resolved photocrystallographic experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro; Kaminski, Radoslaw; Benedict, Jason B.

    2010-01-01

    -steady-state experiments conducted at conventional sources, but not negligible in synchrotron studies in which very short laser exposures may be adequate. The relative scaling of the light-ON and light-OFF data and the correction for temperature differences between the two sets are discussed....

  5. Temperature and saturation dependence in the vapor sensing of butterfly wing scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertész, K., E-mail: kertesz.krisztian@ttk.mta.hu [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Piszter, G. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Jakab, E. [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P O Box 17 (Hungary); Bálint, Zs. [Hungarian Natural History Museum, H-1088, Budapest, Baross utca 13 (Hungary); Vértesy, Z.; Biró, L.P. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary)

    2014-06-01

    The sensing of gasses/vapors in the ambient air is the focus of attention due to the need to monitor our everyday environment. Photonic crystals are sensing materials of the future because of their strong light-manipulating properties. Natural photonic structures are well-suited materials for testing detection principles because they are significantly cheaper than artificial photonic structures and are available in larger sizes. Additionally, natural photonic structures may provide new ideas for developing novel artificial photonic nanoarchitectures with improved properties. In the present paper, we discuss the effects arising from the sensor temperature and the vapor concentration in air during measurements with a photonic crystal-type optical gas sensor. Our results shed light on the sources of discrepancy between simulated and experimental sensing behaviors of photonic crystal-type structures. Through capillary condensation, the vapors will condensate to a liquid state inside the nanocavities. Due to the temperature and radius of curvature dependence of capillary condensation, the measured signals are affected by the sensor temperature as well as by the presence of a nanocavity size distribution. The sensing materials used are natural photonic nanoarchitectures present in the wing scales of blue butterflies. - Highlights: • We report optical gas sensing on blue butterfly wing scale nanostructures. • The sample temperature decrease effects a reversible break-down in the measured spectra. • The break-down is connected with the vapor condensation in the scales and wing surface. • Capillary condensation occurs in the wing scales.

  6. Non-monotonic behavior of electron temperature in argon inductively coupled plasma and its analysis via novel electron mean energy equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the behavior of electron temperature against the power in argon inductively coupled plasma is investigated by a fluid model. The model properly reproduces the non-monotonic variation of temperature with power observed in experiments. By means of a novel electron mean energy equation proposed for the first time in this article, this electron temperature behavior is interpreted. In the overall considered power range, the skin effect of radio frequency electric field results in localized deposited power density, responsible for an increase of electron temperature with power by means of one parameter defined as power density divided by electron density. At low powers, the rate fraction of multistep and Penning ionizations of metastables that consume electron energy two times significantly increases with power, which dominates over the skin effect and consequently leads to the decrease of temperature with power. In the middle power regime, a transition region of temperature is given by the competition between the ionizing effect of metastables and the skin effect of electric field. The power location where the temperature alters its trend moves to the low power end as increasing the pressure due to the lack of metastables. The non-monotonic curve of temperature is asymmetric at the short chamber due to the weak role of skin effect in increasing the temperature and tends symmetric when axially prolonging the chamber. Still, the validity of the fluid model in this prediction is estimated and the role of neutral gas heating is guessed. This finding is helpful for people understanding the different trends of temperature with power in the literature.

  7. Impact of the Dominant Large-scale Teleconnections on Winter Temperature Variability over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Monthly mean geopotential height for the past 33 DJF seasons archived in Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications reanalysis is decomposed into the large-scale teleconnection patterns to explain their impacts on winter temperature variability over East Asia. Following Arctic Oscillation (AO) that explains the largest variance, East Atlantic/West Russia (EA/WR), West Pacific (WP) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are identified as the first four leading modes that significantly explain East Asian winter temperature variation. While the northern part of East Asia north of 50N is prevailed by AO and EA/WR impacts, temperature in the midlatitudes (30N-50N), which include Mongolia, northeastern China, Shandong area, Korea, and Japan, is influenced by combined effect of the four leading teleconnections. ENSO impact on average over 33 winters is relatively weaker than the impact of the other three teleconnections. WP impact, which has received less attention than ENSO in earlier studies, characterizes winter temperatures over Korea, Japan, and central to southern China region south of 30N mainly by advective process from the Pacific. Upper level wave activity fluxes reveal that, for the AO case, the height and circulation anomalies affecting midlatitude East Asian winter temperature is mainly located at higher latitudes north of East Asia. Distribution of the fluxes also explains that the stationary wave train associated with EA/WR propagates southeastward from the western Russia, affecting the East Asian winter temperature. Investigation on the impact of each teleconnection for the selected years reveals that the most dominant teleconnection over East Asia is not the same at all years, indicating a great deal of interannual variability. Comparison in temperature anomaly distributions between observation and temperature anomaly constructed using the combined effect of four leading teleconnections clearly show a reasonable consistency between

  8. Topoclimatic modeling for minimum temperature prediction at a regional scale in the Central Valley of Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santibáñez, F.; Morales, L.; Fuente, J. de la; Cellier, P.; Huete, A.

    1997-01-01

    Spring frost may strongly affect fruit production in the Central Valley of Chile. Minimum temperatures are spatially variable owing to topography and soil conditions. A methodology for forecasting minimum temperature at a regional scale in the Central Valley of Chile, integrating spatial variability of temperature under radiative frost conditions, has been developed. It uses simultaneously a model for forecasting minimum temperatures at a reference station using air temperature and humidity measured at 6 pm, and topoclimatic models, based on satellite infra-red imagery (NOAA/AVHRR) and a digital elevation model, to extend the prediction at a regional scale. The methodological developments were integrated in a geographic information system for geo referencing of a meteorological station with satellite imagery and modeled output. This approach proved to be a useful tool for short range (12 h) minimum temperature prediction by generating thermal images over the Central Valley of Chile. It may also be used as a tool for frost risk assessment, in order to adapt production to local climatological conditions. (author)

  9. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a 'hydrogen economy.' The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  10. CFD study of temperature distribution in full scale boiler adopting in-furnace coal blending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadhil, S S A; Hasini, H; Shuaib, N H

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the investigation of temperature characteristics of an in-furnace combustion using different coals in a 700 MW full scale boiler. Single mixture fraction approach is adopted for combustion model of both primary and secondary coals. The primary coal was based on the properties of Adaro which has been used as the design coal for the boiler under investigation. The secondary blend coal was selected based on sub-bituminous coal with higher calorific value. Both coals are simultaneously injected into the furnace at alternate coal burner elevations. The general prediction of the temperature contours at primary combustion zone shows identical pattern compared with conventional single coal combustion in similar furnace. Reasonable agreement was achieved by the prediction of the average temperature at furnace exit. The temperature distribution is at different furnace elevation is non-uniform with higher temperature predicted at circumferential 'ring-like' region at lower burner levels for both cases. The maximum flame temperature is higher at the elevation where coal of higher calorific value is injected. The temperature magnitude is within the accepTable limit and the variations does not differ much compared to the conventional single coal combustion.

  11. Effects of different vegetation on temperature in an urban building environment. Micro-scale numerical experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Guenter [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie und Klimatologie

    2012-08-15

    A three-dimensional micro-scale model is used to study the effects of various greenery on temperature in a built-up environment. Green design elements like roofs and facades, lawns in courtyards and single trees are studied individually as well as in various combinations. Measures for comparison are temperatures at 2 m height and mean temperatures for the urban atmosphere up to the building height. Different types of greenery can reduce local temperatures up to 15 K during specific daytime hours. However, this extraordinary effect is restricted to a short time and especially to the direct surroundings, while an impact over larger distances is small. Roof and facade greenery have hardly any influence on temperature at the 2 m level but reduce daytime heating of the urban atmosphere to a minor degree, while the relevance of trees is more or less limited to the shadow effect. A significant decrease in urban temperatures can be achieved only with a large number of very different individual green elements. The largest effect on the urban atmosphere was simulated for a change in albedo resulting in a temperature decrease of some degrees around noon. (orig.)

  12. The long-range correlation and evolution law of centennial-scale temperatures in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaohui; Lian, Yi; Wang, Qiguang

    2018-01-01

    This paper applies the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method to investigate the long-range correlation of monthly mean temperatures from three typical measurement stations at Harbin, Changchun, and Shenyang in Northeast China from 1909 to 2014. The results reveal the memory characteristics of the climate system in this region. By comparing the temperatures from different time periods and investigating the variations of its scaling exponents at the three stations during these different time periods, we found that the monthly mean temperature has long-range correlation, which indicates that the temperature in Northeast China has long-term memory and good predictability. The monthly time series of temperatures over the past 106 years also shows good long-range correlation characteristics. These characteristics are also obviously observed in the annual mean temperature time series. Finally, we separated the centennial-length temperature time series into two time periods. These results reveal that the long-range correlations at the Harbin station over these two time periods have large variations, whereas no obvious variations are observed at the other two stations. This indicates that warming affects the regional climate system's predictability differently at different time periods. The research results can provide a quantitative reference point for regional climate predictability assessment and future climate model evaluation.

  13. Ambient temperature effects on growth of milkfish (Chanos chanos) at aquaculture scale in Blanakan, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    A'yun, Q.; Takarina, N. D.

    2017-07-01

    Growth and survival of fishes can be influenced by temperature [1]. Variation among size like weight and length could be the preference how temperature works on growth of fishes [2]. This could be key factor in determining in production as well as market demand since people like heavy and large fishes. The main purpose of this study was to determine the effects of temperature on the growth of milkfish (Chanos Chanos) on weight and length parameters in fish farms Blanakan. This study conducted to assess the optimal temperature for the growth of fish of different sizes to optimize the culture conditions for raising milkfishes in scale cultivation in Blanakan, West Java. Milkfishes were reared in the aquaculture Blanakan ponds because they can adapt very well. The weight and length of milkfishes were measured together with water temperature. The results showed the temperature min (tmin) and max (tmax) were ranged from 29-35 °C. Based on the result, there were significant differences in mean weight (p = 0.00) between temperature with the fish reared in tmax group having the lowest mean weight (99.87±11.51 g) and fish reared in tmin group having the highest mean weight (277.17±33.76 g). Likewise, the significant differences were also observed in mean length (p = 0.00) between temperature with the fish reared in tmax group having the lowest mean length (176.50±12.50 mm) and fish reared in tmin group having the highest mean length (183.60±23.86 mm). Therefore, this paper confirmed the significant effects of temperature on the fish growth reared in aquaculture ponds. More, maintaining aquaculture to lower temperature can be considered as way to keep growth of milkfish well.

  14. Empirical Mode Decomposition on the sphere: application to the spatial scales of surface temperature variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fauchereau

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD is applied here in two dimensions over the sphere to demonstrate its potential as a data-adaptive method of separating the different scales of spatial variability in a geophysical (climatological/meteorological field. After a brief description of the basics of the EMD in 1 then 2 dimensions, the principles of its application on the sphere are explained, in particular via the use of a zonal equal area partitioning. EMD is first applied to an artificial dataset, demonstrating its capability in extracting the different (known scales embedded in the field. The decomposition is then applied to a global mean surface temperature dataset, and we show qualitatively that it extracts successively larger scales of temperature variations related, for example, to topographic and large-scale, solar radiation forcing. We propose that EMD can be used as a global data-adaptive filter, which will be useful in analysing geophysical phenomena that arise as the result of forcings at multiple spatial scales.

  15. Review of induction linac studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, Denis

    1984-01-01

    The major emphasis of the U.S. program in Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is on developing and understanding induction-linac systems that employ multiple beams of high-current heavy ions. The culmination of the plan lies in building the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) which will involve an ion induction linac to deliver multiple high current beams, that can be focussed and overlapped on a two-millimeter diameter spot. A sequence of three major experimental activities are as follows. In the Single-Beam Transport Experiment (SBTE), the stability or otherwise transport of a high-current Cs +1 beam over a long distance is tested. In the Multiple-Beam Experiment (MBE), the experiment is designed to simulate on a small scale as many as possible of the features to be encountered in the HTE. (Mori, K.)

  16. TEMPERATURE STRESS AND THERMO DORMANCY OF VEGETABLE SEEDS OF UMBELLIFERAE CROPS. FEATURES OF INDUCTION; MANIR FESTATION AND OVERCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Buharov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  The high6temperature stress  during 5620 days has a negative impact on activity of growth of embryo and inhibits the seeds germination of the Umbelliferae crops. The germination of the studied seeds  of different species at low temperature contributes to the recovery of the embryo growth; however; growth is less intensive in comparison  with the control. All studied Umbelliferae crops showed the differences in seed germination and development of embryos at various temperatures and duration of heat treatment.

  17. Nanometer-scale temperature measurements of phase change memory and carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Kyle Lane

    This work investigates nanometer-scale thermometry and thermal transport in new electronic devices to mitigate future electronic energy consumption. Nanometer-scale thermal transport is integral to electronic energy consumption and limits current electronic performance. New electronic devices are required to improve future electronic performance and energy consumption, but heat generation is not well understood in these new technologies. Thermal transport deviates significantly at the nanometer-scale from macroscopic systems as low dimensional materials, grain structure, interfaces, and thermoelectric effects can dominate electronic performance. This work develops and implements an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanometer-scale thermometry technique, known as scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM), to measure nanometer-scale heat generation in new graphene and phase change memory (PCM) devices, which have potential to improve performance and energy consumption of future electronics. Nanometer-scale thermometry of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene measured the heat generation at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs). Graphene is an atomically-thin, two dimensional (2D) carbon material with promising applications in new electronic devices. Comparing measurements and predictions of CVD graphene heating predicted the resistivity, voltage drop, and temperature rise across the one dimensional (1D) GB defects. This work measured the nanometer-scale temperature rise of thin film Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) based PCM due to Joule, thermoelectric, interface, and grain structure effects. PCM has potential to reduce energy consumption and improve performance of future electronic memory. A new nanometer-scale thermometry technique is developed for independent and direct observation of Joule and thermoelectric effects at the nanometer-scale, and the technique is demonstrated by SJEM measurements of GST devices. Uniform heating and GST properties are observed for

  18. Continental-Scale Temperature Reconstructions from the PAGES 2k Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    We present a major new synthesis of seven regional temperature reconstructions to elucidate the global pattern of variations and their association with climate-forcing mechanisms over the past two millennia. To coordinate the integration of new and existing data of all proxy types, the Past Global Changes (PAGES) project developed the 2k Network. It comprises nine working groups representing eight continental-scale regions and the oceans. The PAGES 2k Consortium, authoring this paper, presently includes 79 representatives from 25 countries. For this synthesis, each of the PAGES 2k working groups identified the proxy climate records for reconstructing past temperature and associated uncertainty using the data and methodologies that they deemed most appropriate for their region. The datasets are from 973 sites where tree rings, pollen, corals, lake and marine sediment, glacier ice, speleothems, and historical documents record changes in biologically and physically mediated processes that are sensitive to temperature change, among other climatic factors. The proxy records used for this synthesis are available through the NOAA World Data Center for Paleoclimatology. On long time scales, the temperature reconstructions display similarities among regions, and a large part of this common behavior can be explained by known climate forcings. Reconstructed temperatures in all regions show an overall long-term cooling trend until around 1900 C.E., followed by strong warming during the 20th century. On the multi-decadal time scale, we assessed the variability among the temperature reconstructions using principal component (PC) analysis of the standardized decadal mean temperatures over the period of overlap among the reconstructions (1200 to 1980 C.E.). PC1 explains 35% of the total variability and is strongly correlated with temperature reconstructions from the four Northern Hemisphere regions, and with the sum of external forcings including solar, volcanic, and greenhouse

  19. On the validity of neutral gas temperature by N{sub 2} rovibrational spectroscopy in low-pressure inductively coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, J-S; Berube, P-M; Munoz, J; Margot, J; Stafford, L [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Chaker, M [INRS-EMT, 1650 Boulevard Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Measurement of the rotational temperature of the second positive system of N{sub 2} was used as a diagnostic of the gas temperature in low-pressure inductively coupled Ar, Kr and N{sub 2} plasmas. The rotational temperatures determined from the rovibrational bands ({nu}', {nu}'') = (0, 0), (1, 0), (0, 2) and (4, 2) of the N{sub 2} C {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} {yields} B {sup 3{Pi}}{sub g} system differ by about 300 K depending on the operating gas pressure in the 0.4-20 mTorr range. Important discrepancies exist between the temperatures found from each of the rovibrational bands of N{sub 2}. This shows that the method has important intrinsic uncertainty that may be due either to errors in the transition probabilities of N{sub 2} C {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} {yields} B {sup 3{Pi}}{sub g} or to inefficient thermal coupling between translational and rotational temperatures. In the case of argon, the population of the emitting C {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} states by energy transfer from Ar {sup 3}P{sub 0,2} metastable atoms is also considered as a possible factor influencing the rotational structure of some rovibrational bands. Based on these measurements, it is shown that, in the range of experimental conditions studied herein, the uncertainty of the method should be carefully accounted before considering one of the rotational temperatures of the N{sub 2} second positive system equal to the gas temperature.

  20. SCALING LAWS AND TEMPERATURE PROFILES FOR SOLAR AND STELLAR CORONAL LOOPS WITH NON-UNIFORM HEATING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    2010-01-01

    The bulk of solar coronal radiative loss consists of soft X-ray emission from quasi-static loops at the cores of active regions. In order to develop diagnostics for determining the heating mechanism of these loops from observations by coronal imaging instruments, I have developed analytical solutions for the temperature structure and scaling laws of loop strands for a set of temperature- and pressure-dependent heating functions that encompass heating concentrated at the footpoints, uniform heating, and heating concentrated at the loop apex. Key results are that the temperature profile depends only weakly on the heating distribution-not sufficiently to be of significant diagnostic value-and that the scaling laws survive for this wide range of heating distributions, but with the constant of proportionality in the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana scaling law (P 0 L ∼ T 3 max ) depending on the specific heating function. Furthermore, quasi-static solutions do not exist for an excessive concentration of heating near the loop footpoints, a result in agreement with recent numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that a generalization of the results to a set of solutions for strands with a functionally prescribed variable diameter leads to only relatively small correction factors in the scaling laws and temperature profiles for constant diameter loop strands. A quintet of leading theoretical coronal heating mechanisms is shown to be captured by the formalism of this paper, and the differences in thermal structure between them may be verified through observations. Preliminary results from full numerical simulations demonstrate that, despite the simplifying assumptions, the analytical solutions from this paper are accurate and stable.

  1. Critical scaling of a jammed system after a quench of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Michio; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2012-09-01

    Critical behavior of soft repulsive particles after quench of temperature near the jamming transition is numerically investigated. It is found that the plateau of the mean-square displacement of tracer particles and the pressure satisfy critical scaling laws. The critical density for the jamming transition depends on the protocol to prepare the system, while the values of the critical exponents which are consistent with the prediction of a phenomenology are independent of the protocol.

  2. MHD model including small-scale perturbations in a plasma with temperature variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Mikhailovskii, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility is studied of using a hydrodynamic model to describe a magnetized plasma with density and temperature variations on scales that are arbitrary with respect to the ion Larmor radius. It is shown that the inertial component of the transverse ion thermal flux should be taken into account. This component is found from the collisionless kinetic equation. It can also be obtained from the equations of the Grad type. A set of two-dimensional hydrodynamic equations for ions is obtained with this component taken into account. These equations are used to derive model hydrodynamic expressions for the density and temperature variations. It is shown that, for large-scale perturbations (when the wavelengths are longer than the ion Larmor radius), the expressions derived coincide with the corresponding kinetic expressions and, for perturbations on sub-Larmor scales (when the wavelengths are shorter than the Larmor radius), they agree qualitatively. Hydrodynamic dispersion relations are derived for several types of drift waves with arbitrary wavenumbers. The range of applicability of the MHD model is determined from a comparison of these dispersion relations with the kinetic ones. It is noted that, on the basis of results obtained, drift effects can be included in numerical MHD codes for studying plasma instabilities in high-temperature regimes in tokamaks

  3. A space and time scale-dependent nonlinear geostatistical approach for downscaling daily precipitation and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-07-21

    A geostatistical framework is proposed to downscale daily precipitation and temperature. The methodology is based on multiple-point geostatistics (MPS), where a multivariate training image is used to represent the spatial relationship between daily precipitation and daily temperature over several years. Here, the training image consists of daily rainfall and temperature outputs from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at 50 km and 10 km resolution for a twenty year period ranging from 1985 to 2004. The data are used to predict downscaled climate variables for the year 2005. The result, for each downscaled pixel, is daily time series of precipitation and temperature that are spatially dependent. Comparison of predicted precipitation and temperature against a reference dataset indicates that both the seasonal average climate response together with the temporal variability are well reproduced. The explicit inclusion of time dependence is explored by considering the climate properties of the previous day as an additional variable. Comparison of simulations with and without inclusion of time dependence shows that the temporal dependence only slightly improves the daily prediction because the temporal variability is already well represented in the conditioning data. Overall, the study shows that the multiple-point geostatistics approach is an efficient tool to be used for statistical downscaling to obtain local scale estimates of precipitation and temperature from General Circulation Models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Three dimensional numerical simulation of a full scale CANDU reactor moderator to study temperature fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarchami, Araz; Ashgriz, Nasser; Kwee, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D model of a Candu reactor is modeled to investigate flow distribution. • The results show the temperature distribution is not symmetrical. • Temperature contours show the hot regions at the top left-hand side of the tank. • Interactions of momentum flows and buoyancy flows create circulation zones. • The results indicate that the moderator tank operates in the buoyancy driven mode. -- Abstract: Three dimensional numerical simulations are conducted on a full scale CANDU Moderator and transient variations of the temperature and velocity distributions inside the tank are determined. The results show that the flow and temperature distributions inside the moderator tank are three dimensional and no symmetry plane can be identified. Competition between the upward moving buoyancy driven flows and the downward moving momentum driven flows in the center region of the tank, results in the formation of circulation zones. The moderator tank operates in the buoyancy driven mode and any small disturbances in the flow or temperature makes the system unstable and asymmetric. Different types of temperature fluctuations are noted inside the tank: (i) large amplitude are at the boundaries between the hot and cold; (ii) low amplitude are in the core of the tank; (iii) high frequency fluctuations are in the regions with high velocities and (iv) low frequency fluctuations are in the regions with lower velocities

  5. Thermal Stress FE Analysis of Large-scale Gas Holder Under Sunshine Temperature Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyu; Yang, Ranxia; Wang, Hehui

    2018-03-01

    The temperature field and thermal stress of Man type gas holder is simulated by using the theory of sunshine temperature field based on ASHRAE clear-sky model and the finite element method. The distribution of surface temperature and thermal stress of gas holder under the given sunshine condition is obtained. The results show that the thermal stress caused by sunshine can be identified as one of the important factors for the failure of local cracked oil leakage which happens on the sunny side before on the shady side. Therefore, it is of great importance to consider the sunshine thermal load in the stress analysis, design and operation of large-scale steel structures such as the gas holder.

  6. Influence of sintering temperature in red ceramic with addition of mill scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnt, A.B.C.; Rocha, M.R.; Bernardin, A.M.; Meller, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of sintering temperature in a red ceramic body with the addition of mill scale. This residue consists of oxides of iron had to replace the function of pigments used in ceramic materials. After chemical characterization, by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, this residue was added at a rate of 5% in commercial ceramic past. The formulations were subjected to different burn temperatures of around 950 deg C, 1000 deg C and 1200 deg C. The formulations were evaluated for physical loss to fire, linear firing shrinkage, water absorption and flexural strength by 3 and intensity of tone. The results indicate that the different firing temperatures influence the strength and stability of tone in the formulations tested. (author)

  7. Batch scale storage of sprouting foods by irradiation combined with natural low temperature; pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, M.W.; Lee, C.H.; Cho, H.O.; Kwon, J.H.; Yang, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    Two varieties of potatoes, Irish cobbler and Shimabara stored for seven and nine months respectively by irradiation combined with natural low temperature (year-round temperature change: 2-17degC) on a batch scale were investigated on the suitability for processing of potato chip. Nine months after storage, irradiated potatoes (Irish cobbler) tended to maintain somewhat better texture and sensory quality than untreated in potatoe chip processing. Peel rate, closely related to potato chip yield, of untreated potatoes were 20-25% higher than those of irradiated and Agtron color determination of potato chip from both irradiated were commercially acceptable. Preservation of potatoes by irradiation combined with natural low temperature was evaluated as an alternative method of the supply for raw materials of potato chip processing in the off-season in Korea. (Author)

  8. Labor Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ154 LABOR, DELIVERY, AND POSTPARTUM CARE Labor Induction • What is labor induction? • Why is labor induced? • What is the Bishop score? • What is “ripening ...

  9. Modeling of a Large-Scale High Temperature Regenerative Sulfur Removal Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konttinen, Jukka T.; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1999-01-01

    model that does not account for bed hydrodynamics. The pilot-scale test run results, obtained in the test runs of the sulfur removal process with real coal gasifier gas, have been used for parameter estimation. The validity of the reactor model for commercial-scale design applications is discussed.......Regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbents are prime candidates for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from hot gasifier gas in the simplified integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process. As part of the regenerative sulfur removal process development, reactor models are needed for scale......-up. Steady-state kinetic reactor models are needed for reactor sizing, and dynamic models can be used for process control design and operator training. The regenerative sulfur removal process to be studied in this paper consists of two side-by-side fluidized bed reactors operating at temperatures of 400...

  10. Observing the temperature of the big bang through large scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Pedro G.; Magueijo, João

    2008-09-01

    It is an interesting possibility that the Universe underwent a period of thermal equilibrium at very early times. One expects a residue of this primordial state to be imprinted on the large scale structure of space time. In this paper, we study the morphology of this thermal residue in a universe whose early dynamics is governed by a scalar field. We calculate the amplitude of fluctuations on large scales and compare it with the imprint of vacuum fluctuations. We then use the observed power spectrum of fluctuations on the cosmic microwave background to place a constraint on the temperature of the Universe before and during inflation. We also present an alternative scenario, where the fluctuations are predominantly thermal and near scale-invariant.

  11. Millennial-scale temperature change velocity in the continental northern Neotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Metrio, Alexander; Bush, Mark; Lozano-García, Socorro; Sosa-Nájera, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Climate has been inherently linked to global diversity patterns, and yet no empirical data are available to put modern climate change into a millennial-scale context. High tropical species diversity has been linked to slow rates of climate change during the Quaternary, an assumption that lacks an empirical foundation. Thus, there is the need for quantifying the velocity at which the bioclimatic space changed during the Quaternary in the tropics. Here we present rates of climate change for the late Pleistocene and Holocene from Mexico and Guatemala. An extensive modern pollen survey and fossil pollen data from two long sedimentary records (30,000 and 86,000 years for highlands and lowlands, respectively) were used to estimate past temperatures. Derived temperature profiles show a parallel long-term trend and a similar cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Guatemalan lowlands and the Mexican highlands. Temperature estimates and digital elevation models were used to calculate the velocity of isotherm displacement (temperature change velocity) for the time period contained in each record. Our analyses showed that temperature change velocities in Mesoamerica during the late Quaternary were at least four times slower than values reported for the last 50 years, but also at least twice as fast as those obtained from recent models. Our data demonstrate that, given extremely high temperature change velocities, species survival must have relied on either microrefugial populations or persistence of suppressed individuals. Contrary to the usual expectation of stable climates being associated with high diversity, our results suggest that Quaternary tropical diversity was probably maintained by centennial-scale oscillatory climatic variability that forestalled competitive exclusion. As humans have simplified modern landscapes, thereby removing potential microrefugia, and climate change is occurring monotonically at a very high velocity, extinction risk for tropical

  12. Millennial-scale temperature change velocity in the continental northern Neotropics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Correa-Metrio

    Full Text Available Climate has been inherently linked to global diversity patterns, and yet no empirical data are available to put modern climate change into a millennial-scale context. High tropical species diversity has been linked to slow rates of climate change during the Quaternary, an assumption that lacks an empirical foundation. Thus, there is the need for quantifying the velocity at which the bioclimatic space changed during the Quaternary in the tropics. Here we present rates of climate change for the late Pleistocene and Holocene from Mexico and Guatemala. An extensive modern pollen survey and fossil pollen data from two long sedimentary records (30,000 and 86,000 years for highlands and lowlands, respectively were used to estimate past temperatures. Derived temperature profiles show a parallel long-term trend and a similar cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Guatemalan lowlands and the Mexican highlands. Temperature estimates and digital elevation models were used to calculate the velocity of isotherm displacement (temperature change velocity for the time period contained in each record. Our analyses showed that temperature change velocities in Mesoamerica during the late Quaternary were at least four times slower than values reported for the last 50 years, but also at least twice as fast as those obtained from recent models. Our data demonstrate that, given extremely high temperature change velocities, species survival must have relied on either microrefugial populations or persistence of suppressed individuals. Contrary to the usual expectation of stable climates being associated with high diversity, our results suggest that Quaternary tropical diversity was probably maintained by centennial-scale oscillatory climatic variability that forestalled competitive exclusion. As humans have simplified modern landscapes, thereby removing potential microrefugia, and climate change is occurring monotonically at a very high velocity, extinction risk

  13. 1D-Var temperature retrievals from microwave radiometer and convective scale model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Martinet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the potential of ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR for providing accurate temperature retrievals by combining convective scale numerical models and brightness temperatures (BTs. A one-dimensional variational (1D-Var retrieval technique has been tested to optimally combine MWR and 3-h forecasts from the French convective scale model AROME. A microwave profiler HATPRO (Humidity and Temperature PROfiler was operated during 6 months at the meteorological station of Bordeaux (Météo France. MWR BTs were monitored against simulations from the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator 2 radiative transfer model. An overall good agreement was found between observations and simulations for opaque V-band channels but large errors were observed for channels the most affected by liquid water and water vapour emissions (51.26 and 52.28 GHz. 1D-Var temperature retrievals are performed in clear-sky and cloudy conditions using a screening procedure based on cloud base height retrieval from ceilometer observations, infrared radiometer temperature and liquid water path derived from the MWR observations. The 1D-Var retrievals were found to improve the AROME forecasts up to 2 km with a maximum gain of approximately 50 % in root-mean-square-errors (RMSE below 500 m. They were also found to outperform neural network retrievals. A static bias correction was proposed to account for systematic instrumental errors. This correction was found to have a negligible impact on the 1D-Var retrievals. The use of low elevation angles improves the retrievals up to 12 % in RMSE in cloudy-sky in the first layers. The present implementation achieved a RMSE with respect to radiosondes within 1 K in clear-sky and 1.3 K in cloudy-sky conditions for temperature.

  14. Scale Resistant Heat Exchanger for Low Temperature Geothermal Binary Cycle Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Lance G. [Energent Corporation, Santa Ana, CA (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Phase 1 of the investigation of improvements to low temperature geothermal power systems was completed. The improvements considered were reduction of scaling in heat exchangers and a hermetic turbine generator (eliminating seals, seal system, gearbox, and lube oil system). A scaling test system with several experiments was designed and operated at Coso geothermal resource with brine having a high scaling potential. Several methods were investigated at the brine temperature of 235 ºF. One method, circulation of abradable balls through the brine passages, was found to substantially reduce scale deposits. The test heat exchanger was operated with brine outlet temperatures as low as 125 ºF, which enables increased heat input available to power conversion systems. For advanced low temperature cycles, such as the Variable Phase Cycle (VPC) or Kalina Cycle, the lower brine temperature will result in a 20-30% increase in power production from low temperature resources. A preliminary design of an abradable ball system (ABS) was done for the heat exchanger of the 1 megawatt VPC system at Coso resource. The ABS will be installed and demonstrated in Phase 2 of this project, increasing the power production above that possible with the present 175 ºF brine outlet limit. A hermetic turbine generator (TGH) was designed and manufacturing drawings produced. This unit will use the working fluid (R134a) to lubricate the bearings and cool the generator. The 200 kW turbine directly drives the generator, eliminating a gearbox and lube oil system. Elimination of external seals eliminates the potential of leakage of the refrigerant or hydrocarbon working fluids, resulting in environmental improvement. A similar design has been demonstrated by Energent in an ORC waste heat recovery system. The existing VPC power plant at Coso was modified to enable the “piggyback” demonstration of the TGH. The existing heat exchanger, pumps, and condenser will be operated to provide the required

  15. Effectiveness of a temperature control system in home induction hobs to reduce acrylamide formation during pan frying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillen, S.; Oria, R.; Salvador, M. L.

    2017-01-01

    Three trials were conducted to determine the influence of the use of temperature control systems on physico-chemical characteristics and acrylamide formation in the domestic preparation of potatoes. French fries were pre-treated by soaking in water or acidified water, and then they were cooked...

  16. Processing and characterization of Al–Cu–Li alloy AA2195 undergoing scale up production through the vacuum induction melting technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayan, Niraj, E-mail: metnayan@gmail.com [Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Trivandrum 695022 (India); Murty, S.V.S. Narayana; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; Sharma, S.C.; George, Koshy M. [Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Trivandrum 695022 (India); Sastry, G.V.S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India)

    2013-08-01

    The inherent properties of lithium, such as high reactivity and toxicity, relatively low density, low melting point, along with its high cost requires a special technological approach to cast Al–Cu–Li alloy AA2195 as compared to the conventional Direct Chill (DC) casting of aluminum alloys. This paper describes the processing requirements for melting and casting of 200 kg of Al–Cu–Li alloy in a Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM) furnace under dynamic inert atmosphere. The as-cast billets have been homogenized to remove microsegregation as well as to avoid incipient melting, and subsequently subjected for secondary metal processing operations viz., forging and rolling. The product in the form of 4 mm thick sheets was subjected to various heat treatments in T8 (Solution Treatment+WQ+CW+Aging) condition. Mechanical properties were evaluated at room temperature and were correlated with microstructures of the sheets processed under different conditions using transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  17. Processing and characterization of Al–Cu–Li alloy AA2195 undergoing scale up production through the vacuum induction melting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayan, Niraj; Murty, S.V.S. Narayana; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; Sharma, S.C.; George, Koshy M.; Sastry, G.V.S.

    2013-01-01

    The inherent properties of lithium, such as high reactivity and toxicity, relatively low density, low melting point, along with its high cost requires a special technological approach to cast Al–Cu–Li alloy AA2195 as compared to the conventional Direct Chill (DC) casting of aluminum alloys. This paper describes the processing requirements for melting and casting of 200 kg of Al–Cu–Li alloy in a Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM) furnace under dynamic inert atmosphere. The as-cast billets have been homogenized to remove microsegregation as well as to avoid incipient melting, and subsequently subjected for secondary metal processing operations viz., forging and rolling. The product in the form of 4 mm thick sheets was subjected to various heat treatments in T8 (Solution Treatment+WQ+CW+Aging) condition. Mechanical properties were evaluated at room temperature and were correlated with microstructures of the sheets processed under different conditions using transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  18. Effects of particle shape and temperature on compaction of copper powder at micro scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chao-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of particle shape and temperature on the compaction of copper powder at micro scale. Copper powder particles were compressed inside a cylindrical die cavity with 2 mm diameter to form compacts with about 3 mm height. Two kinds of particle shapes, spherical and dendritic, and two forming temperatures, room temperature and 400 °C, were considered in the experiments. Some of the produced compacts were further sintered at 600 °C. The study also used simple upsetting tests to investigate the characteristics of the deformation of the compacts under compressive stresses. The results showed that the compacts produced at room temperature demonstrated brittle deformations. However, by increasing the forming temperature to 400 °C, ductile deformations have been observed on the compacts of dendritic particles. Furthermore, the sintering treatment resulted in increases in dimensions, decreases in relative density and hardness, and an increase in ductility. It also led to pore growths which have been seen on scanning-electron microscope images. These phenomena were most significant in the dendritic powder compacts which were produced at 400 °C and treated by the sintering process.

  19. Induction linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    The principle of linear induction acceleration is described, and examples are given of practical configurations for induction linacs. These examples include the Advanced Technology Accelerator, Long Pulse Induction Linac, Radial Line Accelerator (RADLAC), and Magnetically-Insulated Electron-Focussed Ion Linac. A related concept, the auto accelerator, is described in which the high-current electron-beam technology in the sub-10 MeV region is exploited to produce electron beams at energies perhaps as high as the 100 to 1000 MeV range. Induction linacs for ions are also discussed. The efficiency of induction linear acceleration is analyzed

  20. Small-Scale High Temperature Melter-1 (SSHTM-1) Data Package. Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This appendix provides the data for Alternate HTM Flowsheet 2 (Glycolic Acid) melter feed preparation activities in both the laboratory- and small-scale testing. The first section provides an outline of this appendix. The melter feed preparation data are presented in the next two main sections, laboratory melter feed preparation data and small-scale melter feed preparation data. Section 3.0 provides the laboratory data which is discussed in the main body of the Small-Scale High Temperature-1 (SSHTM-1) Data Package, milestone C95-02.02Y. Section 3.1 gives the flowsheet in outline form as used in the laboratory-scale tests. This section also includes the ``Laboratory Melter Feed Preparation Activity Log`` which gives A chronological account of the test in terms of time, temperature, slurry pH, and specific observations about slurry appearance, acid addition rates, and samples taken. The ``Laboratory Melter Feed Preparation Activity Log`` provides a road map to the reader by which all the activity and data from the laboratory can be easily accessed. A summary of analytical data is presented next, section 3.2, which covers starting materials and progresses to the analysis of the melter feed. The next section, 3.3, characterizes the off-gas generation that occurs during the slurry processing. The following section, 3.4, provides the rheology data gathered including gram waste oxide loading information for the various slurries tested. The final section, 3.5, includes data from standard crucible redox testing. Section 4.0 provides the small-scale data in parallel form to section 3.0. Section 5.0 concludes with the references for this appendix.

  1. Investigation of the dew-point temperature scale maintained at the MIKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Martti

    1999-01-01

    For the investigation of the dew-point temperature scale realized by the MIKES primary dew-point generator, a two-pressure generator and a dew-point indicator based on condensation in a cooled coil were constructed and tested. In addition, a chilled mirror hygrometer was validated by means of an uncertainty analysis. The comparison of these systems was focused on the dew-point temperature range from 0957-0233/10/1/010/img1 to 0957-0233/10/1/010/img2 but measurements were made up to 0957-0233/10/1/010/img3. The generator systems were compared using a dew-point comparator based on two relative humidity sensors. According to the results of the comparisons, the differences between the measurement systems were less than 0957-0233/10/1/010/img4, while the expanded uncertainty of the MIKES generator was between 0957-0233/10/1/010/img5 and 0957-0233/10/1/010/img6. The uncertainty of the other systems was from 0957-0233/10/1/010/img7 to 0957-0233/10/1/010/img8. It was concluded that the dew-point temperature scale was not dependent on the realization method.

  2. Prediction and experimental determination of the solubility of exotic scales at high temperatures - Zinc sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carolina Figueroa Murcia, Diana; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    The presence of "exotic" scale such as Zinc Sulfide (ZnS), Lead Sulfide (PbS) and Iron Sulfide (FeS) in HP/HT reservoirs has been identified. "Exotic" scale materials come as a new challenge in HP/HT reservoirs. This has led to the development of more advanced tools to predict their behavior...... at extreme conditions. The aim of this work is to include ZnS into the group of scale materials that can be modeled with the Extended UNIQUAC model. Solubility data for ZnS are scarce in the open literature. In order to improve the available data, we study the experimental behavior of ZnS solubility at high...... temperatures. The determination of the solubility of ZnS is carried out at temperatures up to 250°C. Zinc sulfide (99.99%) and ultra-pure water are placed in a vial in a reduced oxygen atmosphere. The sample is placed in a controlled bath and stirred until equilibrium is attained. The suspension is filtered...

  3. Leveraging a temperature-tunable, scale-like microstructure to produce multimodal, supersensitive sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2017-05-31

    The microstructure of a flexible film plays an important role in its sensing capability. Here, we fabricate a temperature-dependent wrinkled single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) film (WSPF) and a wrinkle-dependent scale-like SWCNT/PDMS film (SSPF) successfully, and address the formation and evolution mechanisms of each film. The low elastic modulus and high coefficient of thermal expansion of the PDMS layer combined with the excellent piezoresistive behavior of the SWCNT film motivated us to investigate how the scale-like microstructure of the SSPF could be used to design multimodal-sensing devices with outstanding capabilities. The results show that SSPFs present supersensitive performance in mechanical loading (an effective sensitivity of up to 740.7 kPa-1) and in temperature (a tunable thermal index of up to 29.9 × 103 K). These exceptional properties were demonstrated in practical applications in a programmable flexile pressure sensor, thermal/light monitor or switch, etc., and were further explained through the macroscopic and microscopic piezoresistive behaviors of scale-like SWCNT coatings.

  4. Extreme Temperature Regimes during the Cool Season and their Associated Large-Scale Circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In the cool season (November-March), extreme temperature events (ETEs) always hit the continental United States (US) and provide significant societal impacts. According to the anomalous amplitudes of the surface air temperature (SAT), there are two typical types of ETEs, e.g. cold waves (CWs) and warm waves (WWs). This study used cluster analysis to categorize both CWs and WWs into four distinct regimes respectively and investigated their associated large-scale circulations on intra-seasonal time scale. Most of the CW regimes have large areal impact over the continental US. However, the distribution of cold SAT anomalies varies apparently in four regimes. In the sea level, the four CW regimes are characterized by anomalous high pressure over North America (near and to west of cold anomaly) with different extension and orientation. As a result, anomalous northerlies along east flank of anomalous high pressure convey cold air into the continental US. To the middle troposphere, the leading two groups feature large-scale and zonally-elongated circulation anomaly pattern, while the other two regimes exhibit synoptic wavetrain pattern with meridionally elongated features. As for the WW regimes, there are some patterns symmetry and anti-symmetry with respect to CW regimes. The WW regimes are characterized by anomalous low pressure and southerlies wind over North America. The first and fourth groups are affected by remote forcing emanating from North Pacific, while the others appear mainly locally forced.

  5. Local-scale analysis of temperature patterns over Poland during heatwave events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyżewska, Agnieszka; Dyer, Jamie

    2018-01-01

    Heatwaves are predicted to increase in frequency, duration, and severity in the future, including over Central Europe where populations are sensitive to extreme temperature. This paper studies six recent major heatwave events over Poland from 2006 through 2015 using regional-scale simulations (10-km grid spacing, hourly frequency) from the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model to define local-scale 2-m temperature patterns. For this purpose, a heatwave is defined as at least three consecutive days with maximum 2-m air temperature exceeding 30 °C. The WRF simulations were validated using maximum daily 2-m temperature observations from 12 meteorological stations in select Polish cities, which were selected to have even spatial coverage across the study area. Synoptic analysis of the six study events shows that the inflow of tropical air masses from the south is the primary driver of heatwave onset and maintenance, the highest temperatures (and most vulnerable areas) occur over arable land and artificial surfaces in central and western Poland, while coastal areas in the north, mountain areas in the south, and forested and mosaic areas of smaller fields and pastures of the northwest, northeast, and southeast are less affected by prolonged periods of elevated temperatures. In general, regional differences in 2-m temperature between the hottest and coolest areas is about 2-4 °C. Large urban areas like Warsaw, or the large complex of artificial areas in the conurbation of Silesian cities, are also generally warmer than surrounding areas by roughly 2-4 °C, and even up to 6 °C, especially during the night. Additionally, hot air from the south of Poland flows through a low-lying area between two mountain ranges (Sudetes and Carpathian Mountains)—the so-called Moravian Gate—hitting densely populated urban areas (Silesian cities) and Cracow. These patterns occur only during high-pressure synoptic conditions with low cloudiness and wind and without any active fronts

  6. Tolerance Induction of Temperature and Starvation with Tricalcium Phosphate on Preservation and Sporulation in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Detected by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokh Esfahani, Samaneh; Emtiazi, Giti; Shafiei, Rasoul; Ghorbani, Najmeh; Zarkesh Esfahani, Seyed Hamid

    2016-09-01

    The Bacillus species have many applications in the preparation of various enzymes, probiotic, biofertilizer, and biomarkers for which the survival of resting cells and spore formation under different conditions are important. In this study, water and saline along with different mineral substances such as calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, and silica were used for the detection of survival and preservation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The results showed intensive death of resting cells at 8 °C, but significant survival at 28 °C after one month. However, preservation by minerals significantly decreased the rate of death and induced sporulation at both the temperatures. The resting cells were maintained at room temperature (about 60 % of the initial population survived after a month) in the presence of tricalcium phosphate. The results showed that temperature has more effect on sporulation compare with starvation. The sporulation in normal saline at 28 °C was 70 times more than that at 8 °C; meanwhile, addition of tricalcium phosphate increases sporulation by 90 times. Also, the FTIR data showed the interaction of tricalcium phosphate with spores and resting cells. The discrimination of sporulation from non-sporulation state was performed by nucleic acid staining with thiazole orange and detected by flow cytometry. The flow cytometric studies confirmed that the rates of sporulation in pure water were significantly more at 28 °C. This is the first report on the detection of bacterial spore with thiazole orange by flow cytometry and also on the interaction of tricalcium phosphate with spores by FTIR analyses.

  7. Overfishing and nutrient pollution interact with temperature to disrupt coral reefs down to microbial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaneveld, Jesse R; Burkepile, Deron E; Shantz, Andrew A; Pritchard, Catharine E; McMinds, Ryan; Payet, Jérôme P; Welsh, Rory; Correa, Adrienne M S; Lemoine, Nathan P; Rosales, Stephanie; Fuchs, Corinne; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Thurber, Rebecca Vega

    2016-06-07

    Losses of corals worldwide emphasize the need to understand what drives reef decline. Stressors such as overfishing and nutrient pollution may reduce resilience of coral reefs by increasing coral-algal competition and reducing coral recruitment, growth and survivorship. Such effects may themselves develop via several mechanisms, including disruption of coral microbiomes. Here we report the results of a 3-year field experiment simulating overfishing and nutrient pollution. These stressors increase turf and macroalgal cover, destabilizing microbiomes, elevating putative pathogen loads, increasing disease more than twofold and increasing mortality up to eightfold. Above-average temperatures exacerbate these effects, further disrupting microbiomes of unhealthy corals and concentrating 80% of mortality in the warmest seasons. Surprisingly, nutrients also increase bacterial opportunism and mortality in corals bitten by parrotfish, turning normal trophic interactions deadly for corals. Thus, overfishing and nutrient pollution impact reefs down to microbial scales, killing corals by sensitizing them to predation, above-average temperatures and bacterial opportunism.

  8. Quantum Critical Scaling and Temperature-Dependent Logarithmic Corrections in the Spin-Half Heisenberg Chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starykh, O.; Singh, R.; Sandvik, A.

    1997-01-01

    Low temperature dynamics of the S=(1)/(2) Heisenberg chain is studied via a simple ansatz generalizing the conformal mapping and analytic continuation procedures to correlation functions with multiplicative logarithmic factors. Closed form expressions for the dynamic susceptibility and the NMR relaxation rates 1/T 1 and 1/T 2G are obtained, and are argued to improve the agreement with recent experiments. Scaling in q/T and ω/T are violated due to these logarithmic terms. Numerical results show that the logarithmic corrections are very robust. While not yet in the asymptotic low temperature regime, they provide striking qualitative confirmation of the theoretical results. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Performance ceramic red mass containing mill scale of rolling in different firing temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, J.G.; Arnt, A.B.C; Rocha, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the properties of samples of red clay with addition of mill scale steel. This residue consists of oxides of iron has the function replace pigments used in ceramic materials. The mechanical strength of the sintered material can be associated with reactions that occur during sintering, leading to the formation of compounds provided with good mechanical characteristics, particle size of the components and the structure of the dough piece after the compactation. After chemical and microstructural characterization diffraction and fluorescence X-rays, this residue was added in the proportion of 1.45% of a commercial ceramic mass. The formulations were subjected to different temperatures and performance of the formulations was evaluated for physical characteristics: loss on ignition, linear firing shrinkage, water absorption, flexural strength by 3 and intensity of tone. The loss on ignition and linear firing shrinkage tests relate to the sintering temperature with the performance of the tested formulations. (author)

  10. Batch scale strength of garlic by irradiation combined with natural low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, H.O.; Kwon, J.H.; Byun, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt was made on the development of a commercial scale storage method of garlic by irradiation. Irradiated garlics with 50, 100 and 150 Gy were stored at natural low temperature storage room (12±6°C, 75-85% RH) and the physicochemical properties during the 10 months storage were investigated. The unirradiated garlic was mostly sprouted after 8 months storage, whereas the sprouting of all irradiated groups was completely inhibited until 10 months storage, The rotting rate and weigh loss of garlic after 10 months storage were reduced by 25 to 54% at 100 Gy irradiation compared with those of an unirradiated group. The moisture content remained relatively constant during the whole storage period. The total sugar content was increased with storage period. Ascorbic acid content was also decreased until 8 months storage but its content was rapidly increased along with sprouting. Garlic was marketable after 10 months storage by 100 Gy irradiation combined with natural low temperature. (author)

  11. Temperature gradient scale length measurement: A high accuracy application of electron cyclotron emission without calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houshmandyar, S., E-mail: houshmandyar@austin.utexas.edu; Phillips, P. E.; Rowan, W. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Yang, Z. J. [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Hubbard, A. E.; Rice, J. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Wolfe, S. M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02129 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Calibration is a crucial procedure in electron temperature (T{sub e}) inference from a typical electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic on tokamaks. Although the calibration provides an important multiplying factor for an individual ECE channel, the parameter ΔT{sub e}/T{sub e} is independent of any calibration. Since an ECE channel measures the cyclotron emission for a particular flux surface, a non-perturbing change in toroidal magnetic field changes the view of that channel. Hence the calibration-free parameter is a measure of T{sub e} gradient. B{sub T}-jog technique is presented here which employs the parameter and the raw ECE signals for direct measurement of electron temperature gradient scale length.

  12. Analysis of a computational benchmark for a high-temperature reactor using SCALE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goluoglu, S.

    2006-01-01

    Several proposed advanced reactor concepts require methods to address effects of double heterogeneity. In doubly heterogeneous systems, heterogeneous fuel particles in a moderator matrix form the fuel region of the fuel element and thus constitute the first level of heterogeneity. Fuel elements themselves are also heterogeneous with fuel and moderator or reflector regions, forming the second level of heterogeneity. The fuel elements may also form regular or irregular lattices. A five-phase computational benchmark for a high-temperature reactor (HTR) fuelled with uranium or reactor-grade plutonium has been defined by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD NEA), Nuclear Science Committee, Working Party on the Physics of Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles. This paper summarizes the analysis results using the latest SCALE code system (to be released in CY 2006 as SCALE 5.1). (authors)

  13. Reproducible, large-scale production of thallium-based high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.L.; Stelman, D.; Newcomb, J.C.; Grantham, L.F.; Schnittgrund, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a large scale spray-calcination technique generic to the preparation of ceramic high-temperature superconductor (HTSC) powders. Among the advantages of the technique is that of producing uniformly mixed metal oxides on a fine scale. Production of both yttrium and thallium-based HTSCs has been demonstrated using this technique. In the spray calciner, solutions of the desired composition are atomized as a fine mist into a hot gas. Evaporation and calcination are instantaneous, yielding an extremely fine, uniform oxide powder. The calciner is 76 cm in diameter and can produce metal oxide powder at relatively large rates (approximately 100 g/h) without contamination

  14. An ultrahigh vacuum fast-scanning and variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope for large scale imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconescu, Bogdan; Nenchev, Georgi; de la Figuera, Juan; Pohl, Karsten

    2007-10-01

    We describe the design and performance of a fast-scanning, variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating from 80 to 700 K in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), which routinely achieves large scale atomically resolved imaging of compact metallic surfaces. An efficient in-vacuum vibration isolation and cryogenic system allows for no external vibration isolation of the UHV chamber. The design of the sample holder and STM head permits imaging of the same nanometer-size area of the sample before and after sample preparation outside the STM base. Refractory metal samples are frequently annealed up to 2000 K and their cooldown time from room temperature to 80 K is 15 min. The vertical resolution of the instrument was found to be about 2 pm at room temperature. The coarse motor design allows both translation and rotation of the scanner tube. The total scanning area is about 8 x 8 microm(2). The sample temperature can be adjusted by a few tens of degrees while scanning over the same sample area.

  15. Multi-scale kinetic description of granular clusters: invariance, balance, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriz, Gianfranco; Mariano, Paolo Maria

    2017-12-01

    We discuss a multi-scale continuum representation of bodies made of several mass particles flowing independently each other. From an invariance procedure and a nonstandard balance of inertial actions, we derive the balance equations introduced in earlier work directly in pointwise form, essentially on the basis of physical plausibility. In this way, we analyze their foundations. Then, we propose a Boltzmann-type equation for the distribution of kinetic energies within control volumes in space and indicate how such a distribution allows us to propose a definition of (granular) temperature along processes far from equilibrium.

  16. Scaling of dynamical decoupling for a single electron spin in nanodiamonds at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Dong-Qi; Liu, Gang-Qin; Chang, Yan-Chun; Pan, Xin-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Overcoming the spin qubit decoherence is a challenge for quantum science and technology. We investigate the decoherence process in nanodiamonds by Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) technique at room temperature. We find that the coherence time T 2 scales as n γ . The elongation effect of coherence time can be represented by a constant power of the number of pulses n. Considering the filter function of CPMG decoupling sequence as a δ function, the spectrum density of noise has been reconstructed directly from the coherence time measurements and a Lorentzian noise power spectrum model agrees well with the experiment. These results are helpful for the application of nanodiamonds to nanoscale magnetic imaging

  17. Transient characteristics of current lead losses for the large scale high-temperature superconducting rotating machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, T. D.; Kim, J. H.; Park, S. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H. M.; Lee, H. G.; Yoon, Y. S.; Jo, Y. S.; Yoon, K. Y.

    2014-01-01

    To minimize most heat loss of current lead for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) rotating machine, the choice of conductor properties and lead geometry - such as length, cross section, and cooling surface area - are one of the various significant factors must be selected. Therefore, an optimal lead for large scale of HTS rotating machine has presented before. Not let up with these trends, this paper continues to improve of diminishing heat loss for HTS part according to different model. It also determines the simplification conditions for an evaluation of the main flux flow loss and eddy current loss transient characteristics during charging and discharging period.

  18. Validation of SCALE for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Sunny, Eva E [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    This report documents verification and validation studies carried out to assess the performance of the SCALE code system methods and nuclear data for modeling and analysis of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) configurations. Validation data were available from the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhE Handbook), prepared by the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project, for two different HTGR designs: prismatic and pebble bed. SCALE models have been developed for HTTR, a prismatic fuel design reactor operated in Japan and HTR-10, a pebble bed reactor operated in China. The models were based on benchmark specifications included in the 2009, 2010, and 2011 releases of the IRPhE Handbook. SCALE models for the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed configuration at the PROTEUS critical facility in Switzerland have also been developed, based on benchmark specifications included in a 2009 IRPhE draft benchmark. The development of the SCALE models has involved a series of investigations to identify particular issues associated with modeling the physics of HTGRs and to understand and quantify the effect of particular modeling assumptions on calculation-to-experiment comparisons.

  19. Natural variability of atmospheric temperatures and geomagnetic intensity over a wide range of time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jon D

    2002-02-19

    The majority of numerical models in climatology and geomagnetism rely on deterministic finite-difference techniques and attempt to include as many empirical constraints on the many processes and boundary conditions applicable to their very complex systems. Despite their sophistication, many of these models are unable to reproduce basic aspects of climatic or geomagnetic dynamics. We show that a simple stochastic model, which treats the flux of heat energy in the atmosphere by convective instabilities with random advection and diffusive mixing, does a remarkable job at matching the observed power spectrum of historical and proxy records for atmospheric temperatures from time scales of one day to one million years (Myr). With this approach distinct changes in the power-spectral form can be associated with characteristic time scales of ocean mixing and radiative damping. Similarly, a simple model of the diffusion of magnetic intensity in Earth's core coupled with amplification and destruction of the local intensity can reproduce the observed 1/f noise behavior of Earth's geomagnetic intensity from time scales of 1 (Myr) to 100 yr. In addition, the statistics of the fluctuations in the polarity reversal rate from time scales of 1 Myr to 100 Myr are consistent with the hypothesis that reversals are the result of variations in 1/f noise geomagnetic intensity above a certain threshold, suggesting that reversals may be associated with internal fluctuations rather than changes in mantle thermal or magnetic boundary conditions.

  20. United States Temperature and Precipitation Extremes: Phenomenology, Large-Scale Organization, Physical Mechanisms and Model Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, R. X.

    2017-12-01

    We summarize results from a project focusing on regional temperature and precipitation extremes over the continental United States. Our project introduces a new framework for evaluating these extremes emphasizing their (a) large-scale organization, (b) underlying physical sources (including remote-excitation and scale-interaction) and (c) representation in climate models. Results to be reported include the synoptic-dynamic behavior, seasonality and secular variability of cold waves, dry spells and heavy rainfall events in the observational record. We also study how the characteristics of such extremes are systematically related to Northern Hemisphere planetary wave structures and thus planetary- and hemispheric-scale forcing (e.g., those associated with major El Nino events and Arctic sea ice change). The underlying physics of event onset are diagnostically quantified for different categories of events. Finally, the representation of these extremes in historical coupled climate model simulations is studied and the origins of model biases are traced using new metrics designed to assess the large-scale atmospheric forcing of local extremes.

  1. Cuprous Oxide Scale up: Gram Production via Bulk Synthesis using Classic Solvents at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Han, T. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Cuprous oxide is a p-type semiconducting material that has been highly researched for its interesting properties. Many small-scale syntheses have exhibited excellent control over size and morphology. As the demand for cuprous oxide grows, the synthesis method need to evolve to facilitate large-scale production. This paper supplies a facile bulk synthesis method for Cu₂O on average, 1-liter reaction volume can produce 1 gram of particles. In order to study the shape and size control mechanisms on such a scale, the reaction volume was diminished to 250 mL producing on average 0.3 grams of nanoparticles per batch. Well-shaped nanoparticles have been synthesized using an aqueous solution of CuCl₂, NaOH, SDS surfactant, and NH₂OH-HCl at mild temperatures. The time allotted between the addition of NaOH and NH₂OH-HCl was determined to be critical for Cu(OH)2 production, an important precursor to the final produce The effects of stirring rates on a large scale was also analyzed during reagent addition and post reagent addition. A morphological change from rhombic dodecahedra to spheres occurred as the stirring speed was increased. The effects of NH₂OH-HCl concentration were also studied to control the etching effects of the final product.

  2. Characteristic and magnetic field analysis of a high temperature superconductor axial-flux coreless induction maglev motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qin; Yu, Fan; Jin, Fang; Shuo, Li; Guoguo, Li; Gang, Lv

    2012-04-01

    A new high temperature superconductor axial-flux coreless maglev motor (HTS AFIM) is proposed, of which the primary windings are made of HTS tapes and the secondary is a non-magnetic conductor. The main works of this paper are the magnetic-field computation and characteristics analysis of HTS AFIM. For the first one, the reduction of magnetic fields near outer and inner radius of the HTS AFIM is solved by introducing the sub-loop electro-magnetic model along the radial position. For the second one, the AC losses of HTS coils are calculated. The relationships between the device's characteristics and device parameters are presented, and the results indicate that under certain frequency and current levitation device can output enough lift force. The conclusions are verified by finite element calculations.

  3. In situ post-weld heat treatment on martensitic stainless steel turbine runners using a robotic induction heating process to control temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, E.; Hazel, B.; Côté, J.; Godin, S.

    2014-03-01

    A new robotic heat treatment process is developed. Using this solution it is now possible to perform local heat treatment on large steel components. Crack, cavitation and erosion repairs on turbine blades and Pelton buckets are among the applications of this technique. The proof of concept is made on a 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel designated "CA6NM". This alloy is widely used in the power industry for modern system components. Given the very tight temperature tolerance (600 to 630 °C) for post-weld heat treatment on this alloy, 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel is very well suited for demonstrating the possibilities of this process. To achieve heat treatment requirements, an induction heating system is mounted on a compact manipulator named "Scompi". This robot moves a pancake coil in order to control the temperature distribution. A simulator using thermal finite element analysis is first used for path planning. A feedback loop adjusts parameters in function of environmental conditions.

  4. In situ post-weld heat treatment on martensitic stainless steel turbine runners using a robotic induction heating process to control temperature distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreault, E; Hazel, B; Côté, J; Godin, S

    2014-01-01

    A new robotic heat treatment process is developed. Using this solution it is now possible to perform local heat treatment on large steel components. Crack, cavitation and erosion repairs on turbine blades and Pelton buckets are among the applications of this technique. The proof of concept is made on a 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel designated C A6NM . This alloy is widely used in the power industry for modern system components. Given the very tight temperature tolerance (600 to 630 °C) for post-weld heat treatment on this alloy, 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel is very well suited for demonstrating the possibilities of this process. To achieve heat treatment requirements, an induction heating system is mounted on a compact manipulator named S compi . This robot moves a pancake coil in order to control the temperature distribution. A simulator using thermal finite element analysis is first used for path planning. A feedback loop adjusts parameters in function of environmental conditions

  5. Inductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brett K; Heit, Evan; Swendsen, Haruka

    2010-03-01

    Inductive reasoning entails using existing knowledge or observations to make predictions about novel cases. We review recent findings in research on category-based induction as well as theoretical models of these results, including similarity-based models, connectionist networks, an account based on relevance theory, Bayesian models, and other mathematical models. A number of touchstone empirical phenomena that involve taxonomic similarity are described. We also examine phenomena involving more complex background knowledge about premises and conclusions of inductive arguments and the properties referenced. Earlier models are shown to give a good account of similarity-based phenomena but not knowledge-based phenomena. Recent models that aim to account for both similarity-based and knowledge-based phenomena are reviewed and evaluated. Among the most important new directions in induction research are a focus on induction with uncertain premise categories, the modeling of the relationship between inductive and deductive reasoning, and examination of the neural substrates of induction. A common theme in both the well-established and emerging lines of induction research is the need to develop well-articulated and empirically testable formal models of induction. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. CFD Modeling of Flow, Temperature, and Concentration Fields in a Pilot-Scale Rotary Hearth Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Su, Fu-Yong; Wen, Zhi; Li, Zhi; Yong, Hai-Quan; Feng, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional mathematical model for simulation of flow, temperature, and concentration fields in a pilot-scale rotary hearth furnace (RHF) has been developed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, FLUENT. The layer of composite pellets under the hearth is assumed to be a porous media layer with CO source and energy sink calculated by an independent mathematical model. User-defined functions are developed and linked to FLUENT to process the reduction process of the layer of composite pellets. The standard k-ɛ turbulence model in combination with standard wall functions is used for modeling of gas flow. Turbulence-chemistry interaction is taken into account through the eddy-dissipation model. The discrete ordinates model is used for modeling of radiative heat transfer. A comparison is made between the predictions of the present model and the data from a test of the pilot-scale RHF, and a reasonable agreement is found. Finally, flow field, temperature, and CO concentration fields in the furnace are investigated by the model.

  7. Low temperature electroweak phase transition in the Standard Model with hidden scale invariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suntharan Arunasalam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a cosmological phase transition within the Standard Model which incorporates spontaneously broken scale invariance as a low-energy theory. In addition to the Standard Model fields, the minimal model involves a light dilaton, which acquires a large vacuum expectation value (VEV through the mechanism of dimensional transmutation. Under the assumption of the cancellation of the vacuum energy, the dilaton develops a very small mass at 2-loop order. As a result, a flat direction is present in the classical dilaton-Higgs potential at zero temperature while the quantum potential admits two (almost degenerate local minima with unbroken and broken electroweak symmetry. We found that the cosmological electroweak phase transition in this model can only be triggered by a QCD chiral symmetry breaking phase transition at low temperatures, T≲132 MeV. Furthermore, unlike the standard case, the universe settles into the chiral symmetry breaking vacuum via a first-order phase transition which gives rise to a stochastic gravitational background with a peak frequency ∼10−8 Hz as well as triggers the production of approximately solar mass primordial black holes. The observation of these signatures of cosmological phase transitions together with the detection of a light dilaton would provide a strong hint of the fundamental role of scale invariance in particle physics.

  8. An exponential universal scaling law for the volume pinning force of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampshire, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    The exponential magnetic field dependence of the critical current density (J c (B,T)) found in many high temperature superconductors, given by: J c (B,T) α(T)exp(-B/β(T)) where α(T) and β(T) are functions of temperature alone, necessarily implies a Universal Scaling Law for the volume pinning force (F p ) of the form: F p /F PMAX exp(+1).(B/β(T)).exp(-B/β(T)). If the Upper Critical Field is not explicitly measured but is artificially determined by smooth extrapolation of J c (B,T) to zero on a linear J c (B,T) vs B plot, this exponential scaling law can be closely approximated by the Kramer dependence given by: F p /F PMAX C.b p .(1-b) q where p = 0.5, q = 2, C ∼ 3.5 and b = B/B C2 (T). The implications for flux pinning studies are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Induction of mutation in Trichoderma viride and on laboratory-scale conversion of natural cellulose into fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahoun, M.K.; Khalil, A.; Helmi, S.; Khairy, A.H.

    1990-01-01

    Mutants of Trichoderma viride ATCC 32630 were obtained by uv-irradiation (2,400 erg/mm 2 (240 J/m 2 )) for 60 s of conidia suspension to 6% survivors. The mutants were selected on the basis of their capacity to convert cellulose into reducing sugars. Six of the selected mutants revealed higher avicelase activity 0.0365, 0.0375, 0.0385, 0.0475, 0.0565, and 0.0605 μmol reducing sugars/ml/min than the wild type 0.033 μmol reducing sugars/ml/min. While five mutants exhibited higher CMCase activity values 4.35, 4.58, 4.61, 4.91, and 5.74 μmol reducing sugars/ml/min as compared with the parent strain 3.76 μmol reducing sugars/ml/min. However, only one mutant gave 29.95 μmol P-nitrophenol/ml/min compared to the wild strain 21.0 μmol P-nitrophenol/ml/min. Hydrolysis of natural cellulose (rice straw) and cellulose powder on a laboratory scale by the cell-free extract of A. niger, T. viride, or the mixture of both, indicated the superiority of T. viride liquid culture filtrate and the mixture of the culture filtrate of the two fungi species, in the saccharification of the cellulosic materials tested

  10. Evaluating Vegetation Type Effects on Land Surface Temperature at the City Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherley, E. B.; McFadden, J. P.; Roberts, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the effects of different plant functional types and urban materials on surface temperatures has significant consequences for climate modeling, water management, and human health in cities. To date, doing so at the urban scale has been complicated by small-scale surface heterogeneity and limited data. In this study we examined gradients of land surface temperature (LST) across sub-pixel mixtures of different vegetation types and urban materials across the entire Los Angeles, CA, metropolitan area (4,283 km2). We used AVIRIS airborne hyperspectral imagery (36 m resolution, 224 bands, 0.35 - 2.5 μm) to estimate sub-pixel fractions of impervious, pervious, tree, and turfgrass surfaces, validating them with simulated mixtures constructed from image spectra. We then used simultaneously imaged LST retrievals collected at multiple times of day to examine how temperature changed along gradients of the sub-pixel mixtures. Diurnal in situ LST measurements were used to confirm image values. Sub-pixel fractions were well correlated with simulated validation data for turfgrass (r2 = 0.71), tree (r2 = 0.77), impervious (r2 = 0.77), and pervious (r2 = 0.83) surfaces. The LST of pure pixels showed the effects of both the diurnal cycle and the surface type, with vegetated classes having a smaller diurnal temperature range of 11.6°C whereas non-vegetated classes had a diurnal range of 16.2°C (similar to in situ measurements collected simultaneously with the imagery). Observed LST across fractional gradients of turf/impervious and tree/impervious sub-pixel mixtures decreased linearly with increasing vegetation fraction. The slopes of decreasing LST were significantly different between tree and turf mixtures, with steeper slopes observed for turf (p < 0.05). These results suggest that different physiological characteristics and different access to irrigation water of urban trees and turfgrass results in significantly different LST effects, which can be detected at

  11. A preliminary study on induction and identification of chlorophyll mutants of indica type temperature sensitive genie male-sterile rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yingwu; Liu Guifu; Shu Qingyao; Jiang Ronghua; Xie Jiahua

    1995-01-01

    Chlorophyll mutants of different type were obtained from indica type temperature sensitive genie male-sterile rice (cv. 2177s) by using 60 Co γ-rays irradiation. The total chlorophyll mutation frequency reached to 0.26% in M 2 generation. However only about 4.50% of these mutants could survived. Among them, 33 heritable chlorophyll mutant lines were easily distinguished, and were screened and studied. The mutants either showed chlorosis or yellowing or expressed only at seedling period or persisted all growth cycle. The expression of mutant character was stable under different environment. It is suggested that they are useful as the marker traits in two-line hybrid rice. Moreover, the agronomic traits of most of these lines changed in different levels compared with the parent line 2177S. Every mutation line seemed to be controlled by one recessive gene as the F 1 plants of reciprocal crosses between mutant and 2177S showed normal leaf color. And the ratio of green plants/mutant plants was 3:1 in the segregated F 2 population

  12. Flame spread and smoke temperature of full-scale fire test of car fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayan Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Full-scale experiments using two 4-door sedan passenger cars, placed side by side in the reverse direction, were carried out to establish the burning behavior and describe the spread of fire to adjacent car. The temperature was measured by thermocouples. Radiant heat flux was measured with heat flux gauge placed at a distance of 5 m, at the right side of the car. Four cameras were placed inside the car and in the fire test room recording burning behavior during the test. Engine compartment was ignited by a sponge dipped with little gasoline. During the experiment, the ignition was initiated in the engine compartment of car I and approximately 20 min were enough time for fire to spread into the second car. Fully-developed burning of two cars occurred at 29 min. It was observed that the flame spread through car roof faster than through the bottom of car compartment. The fire followed a slow rate spread from engine compartment to car cab. The temperature inside the car peaked at the point of 900 °C. The peak smoke temperatures at every location were measured at the range of 89–285 °C. The smoke production at the time of 11 min to 15 min 50 s of fire was 1.76 m3/s, which was obtained through indirect calculation method.

  13. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Batch scale storage of sprouting foods by irradiation combined with natural low temperature; pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, H.O.; Kwon, J.H.; Yang, H.S.; Byun, M.W.; Lee, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    In order to develop the commercial storage method of potatoes by irradiation combined with natural low temperature, two varieties of potatoes, Irish cobbler and Shimabara were stored at natural low temperature storage room (450x650x250cm; year round temperature change, 2-17 degC; 70-85% R.H.) on a batch scale followed by irradiation with optimum dose level. Irish cobbler and Shimabara were 100% sprouted after 3 months storage in control, whereas in 15Krad irradiated group, sprouting was completely inhibited at Irish cobbler for 9 months storage, and at Shimabara for 12 months. The extent of loss due to rot attack after 9 months storage was 6% in control, 6-8% in 10-15Krad irradiated group at Irish cobbler and weight loss was 16.5% in control, 5.1-5.6% in irradiated group, whereas rotting rate of Shimabara after 12 months storage was 100% in control, 15% in irradiated group and the weight loss of its was 12.6% in control, 7.3-7.4% in irradiated group. The moisture content in whole storage period of two varieties were 72-82% without remarkable changes. The total sugar and ascorbic acid contents were slightly decreased according to the dose increase and elapse of storage period, whereas reducing sugar content was increased. Irish cobbler was 90% markrtable after 9 months storage and 85% in Shimabara after 12 months storage. (Author)

  15. Flow characteristics of a pilot-scale high temperature, short time pasteurizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasula, P M; Kozempel, M F

    2004-09-01

    In this study, we present a method for determining the fastest moving particle (FMP) and residence time distribution (RTD) in a pilot-scale high temperature, short time (HTST) pasteurizer to ensure that laboratory or pilot-scale HTST apparatus meets the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance standards for pasteurization of milk and can be used for obtaining thermal inactivation data. The overall dimensions of the plate in the pasteurizer were 75 x 115 mm, with a thickness of 0.5 mm and effective diameter of 3.0 mm. The pasteurizer was equipped with nominal 21.5- and 52.2-s hold tubes, and flow capacity was variable from 0 to 20 L/h. Tracer studies were used to determine FMP times and RTD data to establish flow characteristics. Using brine milk as tracer, the FMP time for the short holding section was 18.6 s and for the long holding section was 36 s at 72 degrees C, compared with the nominal times of 21.5 and 52.2 s, respectively. The RTD study indicates that the short hold section was 45% back mixed and 55% plug flow for whole milk at 72 degrees C. The long hold section was 91% plug and 9% back mixed for whole milk at 72 degrees C. This study demonstrates that continuous laboratory and pilot-scale pasteurizers may be used to study inactivation of microorganisms only if the flow conditions in the holding tube are established for comparison with commercial HTST systems.

  16. What spatial scales are believable for climate model projections of sea surface temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Halloran, Paul R.; Mumby, Peter J.; Stephenson, David B.

    2014-09-01

    Earth system models (ESMs) provide high resolution simulations of variables such as sea surface temperature (SST) that are often used in off-line biological impact models. Coral reef modellers have used such model outputs extensively to project both regional and global changes to coral growth and bleaching frequency. We assess model skill at capturing sub-regional climatologies and patterns of historical warming. This study uses an established wavelet-based spatial comparison technique to assess the skill of the coupled model intercomparison project phase 5 models to capture spatial SST patterns in coral regions. We show that models typically have medium to high skill at capturing climatological spatial patterns of SSTs within key coral regions, with model skill typically improving at larger spatial scales (≥4°). However models have much lower skill at modelling historical warming patters and are shown to often perform no better than chance at regional scales (e.g. Southeast Asian) and worse than chance at finer scales (coral bleaching frequency and other marine processes linked to SST warming.

  17. Bioinspired large-scale aligned porous materials assembled with dual temperature gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hao; Chen, Yuan; Delattre, Benjamin; Tomsia, Antoni P; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-12-01

    Natural materials, such as bone, teeth, shells, and wood, exhibit outstanding properties despite being porous and made of weak constituents. Frequently, they represent a source of inspiration to design strong, tough, and lightweight materials. Although many techniques have been introduced to create such structures, a long-range order of the porosity as well as a precise control of the final architecture remain difficult to achieve. These limitations severely hinder the scale-up fabrication of layered structures aimed for larger applications. We report on a bidirectional freezing technique to successfully assemble ceramic particles into scaffolds with large-scale aligned, lamellar, porous, nacre-like structure and long-range order at the centimeter scale. This is achieved by modifying the cold finger with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wedge to control the nucleation and growth of ice crystals under dual temperature gradients. Our approach could provide an effective way of manufacturing novel bioinspired structural materials, in particular advanced materials such as composites, where a higher level of control over the structure is required.

  18. Comparison of a high temperature torch integrated sample introduction system with a desolvation system for the analysis of microsamples through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Raquel; Cañabate, Águeda; Bresson, Carole; Chartier, Frédéric; Isnard, Hélène; Maestre, Salvador; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí, José-Luis

    2017-03-01

    This work describes for the first time the comparison of the analytical performances obtained with a high temperature torch integrated sample introduction system (hTISIS) against those found with a commercially available desolvation system (APEX) associated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A double pass spray chamber was taken as the reference system. Similar detection limits and sensitivities were obtained in continuous injection mode at low liquid flow rates for the APEX and hTISIS operating at high temperatures. In contrast, in the air-segmented injection mode, the detection limits obtained with hTISIS at high temperatures were up to 12 times lower than those found for the APEX. Regarding memory effects, wash out times were shorter in continuous mode and peaks were narrower in air segmented mode for the hTISIS as compared to the APEX. Non spectral interferences (matrix effects) were studied with 10% nitric acid, 2% methanol, for an ICP multielemental solution and a hydro-organic matrix containing 70% (v/v) acetonitrile in water, 15 mmol L- 1 ammonium acetate and 0.5% formic acid containing lanthanide complexes. In all the cases, matrix effects were less severe for the hTISIS operating at 200 °C and the APEX than for the double pass spray chamber. Finally, two spiked reference materials (sea water and Antartic krill) were analyzed. The hTISIS operating at 200 °C gave the best results compared to those obtained with the APEX and the double pass spray chamber. In conclusion, despite the simplicity of the hTISIS, it provided, at low liquid flow rates, results similar to or better than those obtained with the by other sample introduction systems.

  19. Teacher induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijaard, D.; Buitink, J.; Kessels, C.; Peterson, P.; Baker, E.; McGraw, B.

    2010-01-01

    Teacher induction programs are intended to support the professional development of beginning teachers and thereby contribute to the reduction of teacher attrition during the early teaching years. Teacher induction programs are often based upon a deficit model with a focus on the better organization

  20. Forsterite Shock Temperatures and Entropy: New Scaling Laws for Impact Melting and Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, E.; Root, S.; Kraus, R. G.; Townsend, J. P.; Spaulding, D.; Stewart, S. T.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Fratanduono, D.; Millot, M. A.; Mattsson, T. R.; Hanshaw, H. L.

    2017-12-01

    The observed masses, radii and temperatures of thousands of extra-solar planets have challenged our theoretical understanding of planet formation and planetary structures. Planetary materials are subject to extreme pressures and temperatures during formation and within the present-day interiors of large bodies. Here, we focus on improving understanding of the physical properties of rocky planets for calculations of internal structure and the outcomes of giant impacts. We performed flyer plate impact experiments on forsterite [Mg2SiO4] on the Z-Machine at Sandia National Laboratory and decaying shock temperature measurements at the Omega EP laser at U. Rochester. At Z, planar, supported shock waves are generated in single crystal samples, permitting observation of both compressed and released states. Using available static and dynamic thermodynamic data, we calculate absolute entropy and heat capacity along the forsterite shock Hugoniot. Entropy and heat capacity on the Hugoniot are larger than previous estimates. Our data constrain the thermodynamic properties of forsterite liquid at high pressures and temperatures and the amount of melt and vapor produced during impact events. For an ambient pressure of 1 bar, shock-vaporization begins upon reaching the liquid region on the forsterite Hugoniot (about 200 GPa). Using hydrocode simulations of giant impacts between rocky planets with forsterite mantles and iron cores and the new experimentally-constrained forsterite shock entropy, we present a new scaling law for the fraction of mantle that is melted or vaporized by the initial shock wave. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Prepared by the Center

  1. Regional scaling of annual mean precipitation and water availability with global temperature change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Peter; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2018-03-01

    Changes in regional water availability belong to the most crucial potential impacts of anthropogenic climate change, but are highly uncertain. It is thus of key importance for stakeholders to assess the possible implications of different global temperature thresholds on these quantities. Using a subset of climate model simulations from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), we derive here the sensitivity of regional changes in precipitation and in precipitation minus evapotranspiration to global temperature changes. The simulations span the full range of available emission scenarios, and the sensitivities are derived using a modified pattern scaling approach. The applied approach assumes linear relationships on global temperature changes while thoroughly addressing associated uncertainties via resampling methods. This allows us to assess the full distribution of the simulations in a probabilistic sense. Northern high-latitude regions display robust responses towards wetting, while subtropical regions display a tendency towards drying but with a large range of responses. Even though both internal variability and the scenario choice play an important role in the overall spread of the simulations, the uncertainty stemming from the climate model choice usually accounts for about half of the total uncertainty in most regions. We additionally assess the implications of limiting global mean temperature warming to values below (i) 2 K or (ii) 1.5 K (as stated within the 2015 Paris Agreement). We show that opting for the 1.5 K target might just slightly influence the mean response, but could substantially reduce the risk of experiencing extreme changes in regional water availability.

  2. Scale-dependency of the global mean surface temperature trend and its implication for the recent hiatus of global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong; Franzke, Christian L. E.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the global mean surface temperature trend are typically conducted at a single (usually annual or decadal) time scale. The used scale does not necessarily correspond to the intrinsic scales of the natural temperature variability. This scale mismatch complicates the separation of externally forced temperature trends from natural temperature fluctuations. The hiatus of global warming since 1999 has been claimed to show that human activities play only a minor role in global warming. Most likely this claim is wrong due to the inadequate consideration of the scale-dependency in the global surface temperature (GST) evolution. Here we show that the variability and trend of the global mean surface temperature anomalies (GSTA) from January 1850 to December 2013, which incorporate both land and sea surface data, is scale-dependent and that the recent hiatus of global warming is mainly related to natural long-term oscillations. These results provide a possible explanation of the recent hiatus of global warming and suggest that the hiatus is only temporary. PMID:26259555

  3. Scale-dependency of the global mean surface temperature trend and its implication for the recent hiatus of global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong; Franzke, Christian L E

    2015-08-11

    Studies of the global mean surface temperature trend are typically conducted at a single (usually annual or decadal) time scale. The used scale does not necessarily correspond to the intrinsic scales of the natural temperature variability. This scale mismatch complicates the separation of externally forced temperature trends from natural temperature fluctuations. The hiatus of global warming since 1999 has been claimed to show that human activities play only a minor role in global warming. Most likely this claim is wrong due to the inadequate consideration of the scale-dependency in the global surface temperature (GST) evolution. Here we show that the variability and trend of the global mean surface temperature anomalies (GSTA) from January 1850 to December 2013, which incorporate both land and sea surface data, is scale-dependent and that the recent hiatus of global warming is mainly related to natural long-term oscillations. These results provide a possible explanation of the recent hiatus of global warming and suggest that the hiatus is only temporary.

  4. A hybrid downscaling procedure for estimating the vertical distribution of ambient temperature in local scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannikopoulou, I.; Philippopoulos, K.; Deligiorgi, D.

    2012-04-01

    The vertical thermal structure of the atmosphere is defined by a combination of dynamic and radiation transfer processes and plays an important role in describing the meteorological conditions at local scales. The scope of this work is to develop and quantify the predictive ability of a hybrid dynamic-statistical downscaling procedure to estimate the vertical profile of ambient temperature at finer spatial scales. The study focuses on the warm period of the year (June - August) and the method is applied to an urban coastal site (Hellinikon), located in eastern Mediterranean. The two-step methodology initially involves the dynamic downscaling of coarse resolution climate data via the RegCM4.0 regional climate model and subsequently the statistical downscaling of the modeled outputs by developing and training site-specific artificial neural networks (ANN). The 2.5ox2.5o gridded NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2 dataset is used as initial and boundary conditions for the dynamic downscaling element of the methodology, which enhances the regional representivity of the dataset to 20km and provides modeled fields in 18 vertical levels. The regional climate modeling results are compared versus the upper-air Hellinikon radiosonde observations and the mean absolute error (MAE) is calculated between the four grid point values nearest to the station and the ambient temperature at the standard and significant pressure levels. The statistical downscaling element of the methodology consists of an ensemble of ANN models, one for each pressure level, which are trained separately and employ the regional scale RegCM4.0 output. The ANN models are theoretically capable of estimating any measurable input-output function to any desired degree of accuracy. In this study they are used as non-linear function approximators for identifying the relationship between a number of predictor variables and the ambient temperature at the various vertical levels. An insight of the statistically derived input

  5. Multi scale study of the plasticity at low temperature in α-iron: application for the cleavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussidon, J.

    2007-10-01

    An accident inside a nuclear power plant may lead to the cleavage of the nuclear vessel made of bainitic steel. In order to understand the origin of this fracture, we studied BCC-iron plasticity at low temperature using numerical simulations at different scales. Molecular Dynamics simulations show the high dependency of screw dislocation motion with temperature and stress. Results from these simulations were added to experiment data to develop a new Dislocation Dynamics code dedicated to BCC iron at low temperature. The code was used to model plasticity into a ferritic lath for various temperatures. This work confirms that cleavage is favoured by low temperatures. (author)

  6. Finite-Size Scaling in a Two-Temperature Lattice Gas: a Monte Carlo Study of Critical Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Heine; Præstgaard, Eigil; Zia, R.K.P.

    1994-01-01

    We present computer studies of the critical properties of an Ising lattice gas driven to a non-equilibrium steady state by coupling to two temperature baths. Anisotropic scaling, a dominant feature near criticality, is used as a tool to extract the values of the critical temperature and some expo...

  7. Time Scales of the European Surface Air Temperature Variability: The Role of the 7-8 Year Cycle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jajcay, Nikola; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Kravtsov, S.; Tsonis, A.A.; Paluš, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2016), s. 902-909 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH14001 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : 7-8 year cycle * air temperature variability * annual cycle amplitude * cross-scale interactions * seasonality * time scales Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 4.253, year: 2016

  8. Natural-Scale Lava Flow Experiments on Video: Variations with Temperature, Slope, and Effusion Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karson, J. A.; Wysocki, R.; Edwards, B. R.; Lev, E.

    2013-12-01

    Investigations of active basaltic lava flows and analog materials show that flow dynamics and final flow morphology are strongly determined by the rapidly evolving rheology of the lava crust which constrains the downslope advance of the lava flow. The non-dimensional factor Ψ (ratio of the time scale of crust formation to advective heat loss) provides a useful means of comparing different flows. The key parameters that control Ψ include the melt viscosity, temperature, effusion rate, and slope. Experimental lava flows, up to several meters long created in the Syracuse University Lava Project permit these variables to be investigated independently and in combination in volume-limited flows (Pele), that provide additional information on lava crust development. New, continuous flow (cooling-limited) experiments show downslope variations under constant flow conditions.

  9. Space-Time Dynamics of Soil Moisture and Temperature: Scale issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Binayak P.; Miller, Douglas A.; Th.vanGenuchten, M.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this project is to gain further understanding of soil moisture/temperature dynamics at different spatio-temporal scales and physical controls/parameters.We created a comprehensive GIS database, which has been accessed extensively by NASA Land Surface Hydrology investigators (and others), is located at the following URL: http://www.essc.psu.edu/nasalsh. For soil moisture field experiments such as SGP97, SGP99, SMEX02, and SMEX03, cartographic products were designed for multiple applications, both pre- and post-mission. Premission applications included flight line planning and field operations logistics, as well as general insight into the extent and distribution of soil, vegetation, and topographic properties for the study areas. The cartographic products were created from original spatial information resources that were imported into Adobe Illustrator, where the maps were created and PDF versions were made for distribution and download.

  10. Digital simulation of a commercial scale high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, A.; Bowman, H.F.

    1978-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model of a commercial scale high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam power plant was derived in state-space form from fundamental principles. The plant model is 40th order, time-invariant, deterministic and continuous-time. Numerical results were obtained by digital simulation. Steady-state performance of the nonlinear model was verified with plant heat balance data at 100, 75 and 50 percent load levels. Local stability, controllability and observability were examined in this range using standard linear algorithms. Transfer function matrices for the linearized models were also obtained. Transient response characteristics of 6 system variables for independent step distrubances in 2 different input variables are presented as typical results

  11. Scaling of dynamical decoupling for a single electron spin in nanodiamonds at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dong-Qi; Liu, Gang-Qin; Chang, Yan-Chun; Pan, Xin-Yu, E-mail: xypan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    Overcoming the spin qubit decoherence is a challenge for quantum science and technology. We investigate the decoherence process in nanodiamonds by Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) technique at room temperature. We find that the coherence time T{sub 2} scales as n{sup γ}. The elongation effect of coherence time can be represented by a constant power of the number of pulses n. Considering the filter function of CPMG decoupling sequence as a δ function, the spectrum density of noise has been reconstructed directly from the coherence time measurements and a Lorentzian noise power spectrum model agrees well with the experiment. These results are helpful for the application of nanodiamonds to nanoscale magnetic imaging.

  12. The cooling law and the search for a good temperature scale, from Newton to Dalton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, Ugo, E-mail: ugo.besson@unipv.it [Department of Physics ' A Volta' , University of Pavia, Via A Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    The research on the cooling law began with an article by Newton published in 1701. Later, many studies were performed by other scientists confirming or confuting Newton's law. This paper presents a description and an interpretation of Newton's article, provides a short overview of the research conducted on the topic during the 18th century, and discusses the relationships between the research on cooling laws and the definition of a temperature scale, as it was treated in Newton's article and in the work of Dalton, including Dalton's search for the absolute zero of temperature. It is shown that these scientists considered the exponential cooling law as a fundamental principle rather than a conjecture to be tested by means of experiments. The faith in the simplicity of natural laws and the spontaneous idea of proportionality between cause and effect seem to have strongly influenced Newton and Dalton. The topic is developed in a way that can be suitable for both undergraduate students and general physicists.

  13. The cooling law and the search for a good temperature scale, from Newton to Dalton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, Ugo

    2011-01-01

    The research on the cooling law began with an article by Newton published in 1701. Later, many studies were performed by other scientists confirming or confuting Newton's law. This paper presents a description and an interpretation of Newton's article, provides a short overview of the research conducted on the topic during the 18th century, and discusses the relationships between the research on cooling laws and the definition of a temperature scale, as it was treated in Newton's article and in the work of Dalton, including Dalton's search for the absolute zero of temperature. It is shown that these scientists considered the exponential cooling law as a fundamental principle rather than a conjecture to be tested by means of experiments. The faith in the simplicity of natural laws and the spontaneous idea of proportionality between cause and effect seem to have strongly influenced Newton and Dalton. The topic is developed in a way that can be suitable for both undergraduate students and general physicists.

  14. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, N. G.; Williams, A. P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.; Mackay, D. S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, J. C.; Allen, C. D.; Fisher, R. A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J. D.; Breshears, D. D.; Rauscher, S. A.; Koven, C.

    2016-03-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests and their associated climatic feedbacks. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April-August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted >=50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  15. Local properties of the large-scale peaks of the CMB temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos-Caballero, A.; Martínez-González, E.; Vielva, P., E-mail: marcos@ifca.unican.es, E-mail: martinez@ifca.unican.es, E-mail: vielva@ifca.unican.es [Instituto de Física de Cantabria, CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Avda. de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    In the present work, we study the largest structures of the CMB temperature measured by Planck in terms of the most prominent peaks on the sky, which, in particular, are located in the southern galactic hemisphere. Besides these large-scale features, the well-known Cold Spot anomaly is included in the analysis. All these peaks would contribute significantly to some of the CMB large-scale anomalies, as the parity and hemispherical asymmetries, the dipole modulation, the alignment between the quadrupole and the octopole, or in the case of the Cold Spot, to the non-Gaussianity of the field. The analysis of the peaks is performed by using their multipolar profiles, which characterize the local shape of the peaks in terms of the discrete Fourier transform of the azimuthal angle. In order to quantify the local anisotropy of the peaks, the distribution of the phases of the multipolar profiles is studied by using the Rayleigh random walk methodology. Finally, a direct analysis of the 2-dimensional field around the peaks is performed in order to take into account the effect of the galactic mask. The results of the analysis conclude that, once the peak amplitude and its first and second order derivatives at the centre are conditioned, the rest of the field is compatible with the standard model. In particular, it is observed that the Cold Spot anomaly is caused by the large value of curvature at the centre.

  16. High temperature CO2 capture of hydroxyapatite extracted from tilapia scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar H. Ojeda-Niño

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HAp was obtained from tilapia scales by two extraction methods: direct calcination and acid-base treatment. The physicochemical characteristics of the obtained HAps were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, surface area, infrared spectroscopy, and basicity measurement at 298 K by CO2-pulse titration. Furthermore, the CO2 capture capacity of the solids at high temperature was also determined. Both methods showed the presence of a HAp phase although significant differences in the properties of the solids were found. The HAp obtained by direct calcination exhibited a lower crystallinity and a greater surface area and basicity than the HAp obtained by the acid-base treatment. These features were correlated with the solid’s CO2 capture capacity. In this work, CO2 capture capacity values for HAp yielded by calcination ranged from 2.5 to 3.2 mg CO2 /g captured at 973 K, and for the acid-base treatment-derived HAp, CO2 capture capacity values between 1.2 to 2.5 mg CO2 /g were recorded. These results reveal the potential of HAps extracted from tilapia scales as solids with high CO2 capture capacity, thermal stability, and capture/release cycles reversibility.

  17. Field-scale permeability and temperature of volcanic crust from borehole data: Campi Flegrei, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, Stefano; Piochi, Monica; Tramelli, Anna; Mormone, Angela; Montanaro, Cristian; Scheu, Bettina; Klaus, Mayer

    2018-05-01

    We report combined measurements of petrophysical and geophysical parameters for a 501-m deep borehole located on the eastern side of the active Campi Flegrei caldera (Southern Italy), namely (i) in situ permeability by pumping tests, (ii) laboratory-determined permeability of the drill core, and (iii) thermal gradients by distributed fiber optic and thermocouple sensors. The borehole was drilled during the Campi Flegrei Deep Drilling Project (in the framework of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) and gives information on the least explored caldera sector down to pre-caldera deposits. The results allow comparative assessment of permeability obtained from both borehole (at depth between 422 a 501 m) and laboratory tests (on a core sampled at the same depth) for permeability values of 10-13 m2 (borehole test) and 10-15 m2 (laboratory test) confirm the scale-dependency of permeability at this site. Additional geochemical and petrophysical determinations (porosity, density, chemistry, mineralogy and texture), together with gas flow measurements, corroborate the hypothesis that discrepancies in the permeability values are likely related to in-situ fracturing. The continuous distributed temperature profile points to a thermal gradient of about 200 °C km-1. Our findings (i) indicate that scale-dependency of permeability has to be carefully considered in modelling of the hydrothermal system at Campi Flegrei, and (ii) improve the understanding of caldera dynamics for monitoring and mitigation of this very high volcanic risk area.

  18. Full Scale Field Trial of the Low Temperature Mercury Capture Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, James [CONSOL Energy Inc., South Park, PA (United States); Winschel, Richard [CONSOL Energy Inc., South Park, PA (United States)

    2012-05-21

    CONSOL Energy Inc., with partial funding from the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory, designed a full-scale installation for a field trial of the Low-Temperature Mercury Control (LTMC) process, which has the ability to reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants by over 90 percent, by cooling flue gas temperatures to approximately 230°F and absorbing the mercury on the native carbon in the fly ash, as was recently demonstrated by CONSOL R&D on a slip-stream pilot plant at the Allegheny Energy Mitchell Station with partial support by DOE. LTMC has the potential to remove over 90 percent of the flue gas mercury at a cost at least an order of magnitude lower (on a $/lb mercury removed basis) than activated carbon injection. The technology is suitable for retrofitting to existing and new plants, and, although it is best suited to bituminous coal-fired plants, it may have some applicability to the full range of coal types. Installation plans were altered and moved from the original project host site, PPL Martins Creek plant, to a second host site at Allegheny Energy's R. Paul Smith plant, before installation actually occurred at the Jamestown (New York) Board of Public Utilities (BPU) Samuel A. Carlson (Carlson) Municipal Generating Station Unit 12, where the LTMC system was operated on a limited basis. At Carlson, over 60% mercury removal was demonstrated by cooling the flue gas to 220-230°F at the ESP inlet via humidification. The host unit ESP operation was unaffected by the humidification and performed satisfactorily at low temperature conditions.

  19. Temperature and heat flux scaling laws for isoviscous, infinite Prandtl number mixed heating convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Kenny; Deschamps, Frederic

    2018-04-01

    Thermal evolution of terrestrial planets is controlled by heat transfer through their silicate mantles. A suitable framework for modelling this heat transport is a system including bottom heating (from the core) and internal heating, e.g., generated by secular cooling or by the decay of radioactive isotopes. The mechanism of heat transfer depends on the physical properties of the system. In systems where convection is able to operate, two different regimes are possible depending on the relative amount of bottom and internal heating. For moderate internal heating rates, the system is composed of active hot upwellings and cold downwellings. For large internal heating rates, the bottom heat flux becomes negative and the system is only composed of active cold downwellings. Here, we build theoretical scaling laws for both convective regimes following the approach of Vilella & Kaminski (2017), which links the surface heat flux and the temperature jump across both the top and bottom thermal boundary layer (TBL) to the Rayleigh number and the dimensionless internal heating rate. Theoretical predictions are then verified against numerical simulations performed in 2D and 3D-Cartesian geometry, and covering a large range of the parameter space. Our theoretical scaling laws are more successful in predicting the thermal structure of systems with large internal heating rates than that of systems with no or moderate internal heating. The differences between moderate and large internal heating rates are interpreted as differences in the mechanisms generating thermal instabilities. We identified three mechanisms: conductive growth of the TBL, instability impacting, and TBL erosion, the last two being present only for moderate internal heating rates, in which hot plumes are generated at the bottom of the system and are able to reach the surface. Finally, we apply our scaling laws to the evolution of the early Earth, proposing a new model for the cooling of the primordial magma ocean

  20. Decadal-scale teleconnection between South Atlantic SST and southeast Australia surface air temperature in austral summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jiaqing; Li, Jianping; Sun, Cheng; Zhao, Sen; Mao, Jiangyu; Dong, Di; Li, Yanjie; Feng, Juan

    2018-04-01

    Austral summer (December-February) surface air temperature over southeast Australia (SEA) is found to be remotely influenced by sea surface temperature (SST) in the South Atlantic at decadal time scales. In austral summer, warm SST anomalies in the southwest South Atlantic induce concurrent above-normal surface air temperature over SEA. This decadal-scale teleconnection occurs through the eastward propagating South Atlantic-Australia (SAA) wave train triggered by SST anomalies in the southwest South Atlantic. The excitation of the SAA wave train is verified by forcing experiments based on both linear barotropic and baroclinic models, propagation pathway and spatial scale of the observed SAA wave train are further explained by the Rossby wave ray tracing analysis in non-uniform basic flow. The SAA wave train forced by southwest South Atlantic warming is characterized by an anomalous anticyclone off the eastern coast of the Australia. Temperature diagnostic analyses based on the thermodynamic equation suggest anomalous northerly flows on western flank of this anticyclone can induce low-level warm advection anomaly over SEA, which thus lead to the warming of surface air temperature there. Finally, SST-forced atmospheric general circulation model ensemble experiments also demonstrate that SST forcing in the South Atlantic is associated with the SAA teleconnection wave train in austral summer, this wave train then modulate surface air temperature over SEA on decadal timescales. Hence, observations combined with numerical simulations consistently demonstrate the decadal-scale teleconnection between South Atlantic SST and summertime surface air temperature over SEA.

  1. Practicing induction:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprogøe, Jonas; Rohde, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    We claim that induction potentially triggers both individual and organizational learning and by drawing on practice-based theory we discuss how the interplay between individual and organization, what we call a generative dance, ignites both kinds of learning.......We claim that induction potentially triggers both individual and organizational learning and by drawing on practice-based theory we discuss how the interplay between individual and organization, what we call a generative dance, ignites both kinds of learning....

  2. Detection of Variations in Air Temperature at Different Time Scales During the Period 1889-1998 at Firenze, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P.V. [Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture, Santoshnagar, Saidabad, Hyderabad, 500059, Andhra Pradesh (India); Bindi, M. [DISAT-UNIFI, P.le delle Cascine 18, 50144, Firenze (Italy); Crisci, A. [LaMMA-Laboratorio per la Meteorologia, Climatologia e la Modellistica Ambientale, Campi Bisenzio (Italy); Maracchi, G. [IATA-CNR, P.le delle Cascine 18, 50144 Firenze (Italy)

    2005-09-01

    In an attempt to contribute to studies on global climatic change, 110 years of temperature data for Firenze, Italy, were analysed. Means and trends of annual and monthly temperatures (minimum, maximum and average) were analysed at three different time scales: short (20 years), medium (36-38 years) and long (55 years). Comparative changes in extreme events viz. frosts in the first and second parts of the 20th century were also analysed. At short time scales, climatic change was found in minimum and average temperatures but not in maximum temperatures. At all three time scales, the annual means of minimum, maximum and average temperatures were significantly warmer in the last part than in the early part of the 20th century. The monthly mean temperatures showed significant warming of winter months. Over the last four decades, minimum, maximum and average temperatures had warmed by 0.4, 0.43 and 0.4C per decade, respectively, and if this trend continues, they will be warmer by 4C by the end of the 21st century. The significant decline in days with subzero temperatures and frosts in the last half of the 20th century, further substantiated the occurrence of climate change at this site.

  3. High-Temperature Structural Analysis of a Small-Scale Prototype of a Process Heat Exchanger (IV) - Macroscopic High-Temperature Elastic-Plastic Analysis -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam; Hong, Sung Deok; Park, Hong Yoon

    2011-01-01

    A PHE (Process Heat Exchanger) is a key component required to transfer heat energy of 950 .deg. C generated in a VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) to a chemical reaction that yields a large quantity of hydrogen. A small-scale PHE prototype made of Hastelloy-X was scheduled for testing in a small-scale gas loop at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this study, as a part of the evaluation of the high-temperature structural integrity of the PHE prototype, high-temperature structural analysis modeling, and macroscopic thermal and elastic-plastic structural analysis of the PHE prototype were carried out under the gas-loop test conditions as a preliminary qwer123$ study before carrying out the performance test in the gas loop. The results obtained in this study will be used to design the performance test setup for the modified PHE prototype

  4. Sensitivity of extreme precipitation to temperature: the variability of scaling factors from a regional to local perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeer, K.; Kirchengast, G.

    2018-06-01

    Potential increases in extreme rainfall induced hazards in a warming climate have motivated studies to link precipitation intensities to temperature. Increases exceeding the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) rate of 6-7%/°C-1 are seen in short-duration, convective, high-percentile rainfall at mid latitudes, but the rates of change cease or revert at regionally variable threshold temperatures due to moisture limitations. It is unclear, however, what these findings mean in term of the actual risk of extreme precipitation on a regional to local scale. When conditioning precipitation intensities on local temperatures, key influences on the scaling relationship such as from the annual cycle and regional weather patterns need better understanding. Here we analyze these influences, using sub-hourly to daily precipitation data from a dense network of 189 stations in south-eastern Austria. We find that the temperature sensitivities in the mountainous western region are lower than in the eastern lowlands. This is due to the different weather patterns that cause extreme precipitation in these regions. Sub-hourly and hourly intensities intensify at super-CC and CC-rates, respectively, up to temperatures of about 17 °C. However, we also find that, because of the regional and seasonal variability of the precipitation intensities, a smaller scaling factor can imply a larger absolute change in intensity. Our insights underline that temperature precipitation scaling requires careful interpretation of the intent and setting of the study. When this is considered, conditional scaling factors can help to better understand which influences control the intensification of rainfall with temperature on a regional scale.

  5. Kinetically controlled synthesis of large-scale morphology-tailored silver nanostructures at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Yuda; Lin, Ziyuan; Gu, Fangyuan; Lau, Shu Ping; Li, Li; Chai, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Ag nanostructures are widely used in catalysis, energy conversion and chemical sensing. Morphology-tailored synthesis of Ag nanostructures is critical to tune physical and chemical properties. In this study, we develop a method for synthesizing the morphology-tailored Ag nanostructures in aqueous solution at a low temperature (45 °C). With the use of AgCl nanoparticles as the precursor, the growth kinetics of Ag nanostructures can be tuned with the pH value of solution and the concentration of Pd cubes which catalyze the reaction. Ascorbic acid and cetylpyridinium chloride are used as the mild reducing agent and capping agent in aqueous solution, respectively. High-yield Ag nanocubes, nanowires, right triangular bipyramids/cubes with twinned boundaries, and decahedra are successfully produced. Our method opens up a new environmentally-friendly and economical route to synthesize large-scale and morphology-tailored Ag nanostructures, which is significant to the controllable fabrication of Ag nanostructures and fundamental understanding of the growth kinetics.Ag nanostructures are widely used in catalysis, energy conversion and chemical sensing. Morphology-tailored synthesis of Ag nanostructures is critical to tune physical and chemical properties. In this study, we develop a method for synthesizing the morphology-tailored Ag nanostructures in aqueous solution at a low temperature (45 °C). With the use of AgCl nanoparticles as the precursor, the growth kinetics of Ag nanostructures can be tuned with the pH value of solution and the concentration of Pd cubes which catalyze the reaction. Ascorbic acid and cetylpyridinium chloride are used as the mild reducing agent and capping agent in aqueous solution, respectively. High-yield Ag nanocubes, nanowires, right triangular bipyramids/cubes with twinned boundaries, and decahedra are successfully produced. Our method opens up a new environmentally-friendly and economical route to synthesize large-scale and morphology

  6. Relationship between the Arctic oscillation and surface air temperature in multi-decadal time-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi L.; Tamura, Mina

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a simple energy balance model (EBM) was integrated in time, considering a hypothetical long-term variability in ice-albedo feedback mimicking the observed multi-decadal temperature variability. A natural variability was superimposed on a linear warming trend due to the increasing radiative forcing of CO2. The result demonstrates that the superposition of the natural variability and the background linear trend can offset with each other to show the warming hiatus for some period. It is also stressed that the rapid warming during 1970-2000 can be explained by the superposition of the natural variability and the background linear trend at least within the simple model. The key process of the fluctuating planetary albedo in multi-decadal time scale is investigated using the JRA-55 reanalysis data. It is found that the planetary albedo increased for 1958-1970, decreased for 1970-2000, and increased for 2000-2012, as expected by the simple EBM experiments. The multi-decadal variability in the planetary albedo is compared with the time series of the AO mode and Barents Sea mode of surface air temperature. It is shown that the recent AO negative pattern showing warm Arctic and cold mid-latitudes is in good agreement with planetary albedo change indicating negative anomaly in high latitudes and positive anomaly in mid-latitudes. Moreover, the Barents Sea mode with the warm Barents Sea and cold mid-latitudes shows long-term variability similar to planetary albedo change. Although further studies are needed, the natural variabilities of both the AO mode and Barents Sea mode indicate some possible link to the planetary albedo as suggested by the simple EBM to cause the warming hiatus in recent years.

  7. The underestimated role of temperature-oxygen relationship in large-scale studies on size-to-temperature response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczyńska, Aleksandra; Sobczyk, Łukasz

    2017-09-01

    The observation that ectotherm size decreases with increasing temperature (temperature-size rule; TSR) has been widely supported. This phenomenon intrigues researchers because neither its adaptive role nor the conditions under which it is realized are well defined. In light of recent theoretical and empirical studies, oxygen availability is an important candidate for understanding the adaptive role behind TSR. However, this hypothesis is still undervalued in TSR studies at the geographical level. We reanalyzed previously published data about the TSR pattern in diatoms sampled from Icelandic geothermal streams, which concluded that diatoms were an exception to the TSR. Our goal was to incorporate oxygen as a factor in the analysis and to examine whether this approach would change the results. Specifically, we expected that the strength of size response to cold temperatures would be different than the strength of response to hot temperatures, where the oxygen limitation is strongest. By conducting a regression analysis for size response at the community level, we found that diatoms from cold, well-oxygenated streams showed no size-to-temperature response, those from intermediate temperature and oxygen conditions showed reverse TSR, and diatoms from warm, poorly oxygenated streams showed significant TSR. We also distinguished the roles of oxygen and nutrition in TSR. Oxygen is a driving factor, while nutrition is an important factor that should be controlled for. Our results show that if the geographical or global patterns of TSR are to be understood, oxygen should be included in the studies. This argument is important especially for predicting the size response of ectotherms facing climate warming.

  8. Parametric Study of the current limit within a single driver-scale transport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2007-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program that explores heavy-ion beam as the driver option for fusion energy production in an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) plant. The HCX is a beam transport experiment at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linear accelerator driver. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density ∼0.2 (micro)C/m) over long pulse durations (4 (micro)s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K + ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor (∼80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss. We achieved good envelope control, and re-matching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics

  9. Variability of OH rotational temperatures on time scales from hours to 15 years by kinetic temperature variations, emission layer changes, and non-LTE effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Rotational temperatures derived from hydroxyl (OH) line emission are frequently used to study atmospheric temperatures at altitudes of about 87 km. While the measurement only requires intensities of a few bright lines of an OH band, the interpretation can be complicated. Ground-based temperatures are averages for the entire, typically 8 km wide emission layer. Variations in the rotational temperature are then caused by changes of the kinetic temperature and the OH emission profile. The latter can also be accompanied by differences in the layer-averaged efficiency of the thermalisation of the OH rotational level populations. Since this especially depends on the frequency of collisions with O_2, which is low at high altitudes, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) contribution to the measured temperatures can be significant and variable. In order to understand the impact of the different sources of OH rotational temperature variations from time scales of hours to a solar cycle, we have studied spectra from the astronomical echelle spectrographs X-shooter and UVES located at Cerro Paranal in Chile. While the X-shooter data spanning 3.5 years allowed us to measure temperatures for 25 OH and two O_2 bands, the UVES spectra cover no more than 10 OH bands simultaneously but a period of about 15 years. These data have been complemented by kinetic temperature and OH and O_2 emission profiles from the multi-channel radiometer SABER on the TIMED satellite. Taking the O_2 and SABER kinetic temperatures as reference and considering the different band-dependent emission profiles, we could evaluate the contribution of non-LTE effects to the measured OH rotational temperatures depending on line set, band, and time. Non-LTE contributions are significant for most bands and can exceed 10 K. The amplitudes of their average nocturnal and seasonal variation are of the order of 1 to 2 K.

  10. Effects of bryophyte and lichen cover on permafrost soil temperature at large scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Porada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bryophyte and lichen cover on the forest floor at high latitudes exerts an insulating effect on the ground. In this way, the cover decreases mean annual soil temperature and can protect permafrost soil. Climate change, however, may change bryophyte and lichen cover, with effects on the permafrost state and related carbon balance. It is, therefore, crucial to predict how the bryophyte and lichen cover will react to environmental change at the global scale. To date, current global land surface models contain only empirical representations of the bryophyte and lichen cover, which makes it impractical to predict the future state and function of bryophytes and lichens. For this reason, we integrate a process-based model of bryophyte and lichen growth into the global land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere–Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg. The model simulates bryophyte and lichen cover on upland sites. Wetlands are not included. We take into account the dynamic nature of the thermal properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover and their relation to environmental factors. Subsequently, we compare simulations with and without bryophyte and lichen cover to quantify the insulating effect of the organisms on the soil. We find an average cooling effect of the bryophyte and lichen cover of 2.7 K on temperature in the topsoil for the region north of 50° N under the current climate. Locally, a cooling of up to 5.7 K may be reached. Moreover, we show that using a simple, empirical representation of the bryophyte and lichen cover without dynamic properties only results in an average cooling of around 0.5 K. This suggests that (a bryophytes and lichens have a significant impact on soil temperature in high-latitude ecosystems and (b a process-based description of their thermal properties is necessary for a realistic representation of the cooling effect. The advanced land surface scheme, including a dynamic bryophyte and lichen model, will

  11. Evaluation of anti-scale property of CrN coatings at high temperature and high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Tomomi; Iwai, Yoshiro; Uno, Ryoji; Yoshinaga, Shigeki

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that oxide scale which adheres to the inner wall of the nozzle in nuclear power plant causes a serious problem. This study was carried out to obtain the knowledge about initiation and deposition behavior of oxide scale on the surface of SUS304 stainless steel and the evaluation of anti-scale property of chromium nitride (CrN) coatings at high temperature and high pressure. SUS304 stainless steel and CrN coating specimens were heated in water up to 200degC for more than 250 hours. Obtained results are summarized as follows. Initiation of the scale started from corrosive part of SUS304 stainless steel and the scale grows by deposition of magnetite particles. CrN coating can be applied to prevent the initiation and deposition of oxide scale. (author)

  12. The Morphology, Dynamics and Potential Hotspots of Land Surface Temperature at a Local Scale in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiong Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Current characterization of the Urban Heat Island (UHI remains insufficient to support the effective mitigation and adaptation of increasing temperatures in urban areas. Planning and design strategies are restricted to the investigation of temperature anomalies at a city scale. By focusing on Land Surface Temperature of Wuhan, China, this research examines the temperature variations locally where mitigation and adaptation would be more feasible. It shows how local temperature anomalies can be identified morphologically. Technically, the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite image products are used. They are first considered as noisy observations of the latent temperature patterns. The continuous latent patterns of the temperature are then recovered from these discrete observations by using the non-parametric Multi-Task Gaussian Process Modeling. The Multi-Scale Shape Index is then applied in the area of focus to extract the local morphological features. A triplet of shape, curvedness and temperature is formed as the criteria to extract local heat islands. The behavior of the local heat islands can thus be quantified morphologically. The places with critical deformations are identified as hotpots. The hotspots with certain yearly behavior are further associated with land surface composition to determine effective mitigation and adaptation strategies. This research can assist in the temperature and planning field on two levels: (1 the local land surface temperature patterns are characterized by decomposing the variations into fundamental deformation modes to allow a process-based understanding of the dynamics; and (2 the characterization at local scale conforms to planning and design conventions where mitigation and adaptation strategies are supposed to be more practical. The weaknesses and limitations of the study are addressed in the closing section.

  13. Review of induction linac studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1984-01-01

    The three major experimental activities are as follows: (1) The Single-Beam Transport Experiment (SBTE): A quadrupole transport system consisting of 5 matching lenses and 41 identical F-D lens pairs to test the stability, or otherwise, of transport of a high-current Cs +1 beam over a long distance; (2) The Multiple-Beam Experiment (MBE): An arrangement of long-pulse induction accelerating units between which are placed multiple-beam focussing arrays to transport 16 independent beams threading the same accelerating structure. The experiment is designed to simulate on a small scale as many as possible of the features to be encountered in the HTE; and (3) The High Temperature Experiment

  14. Field and temperature scaling of the critical current density in commercial REBCO coated conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Senatore, Carmine; Bonura, Marco; Kulich, Miloslav; Mondonico, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Scaling relations describing the electromagnetic behaviour of coated conductors (CCs) greatly simplify the design of REBCO-based devices. The performance of REBCO CCs is strongly influenced by fabrication route, conductor architecture and materials, and these parameters vary from one manufacturer to the others. In the present work we have examined the critical surface for the current density, Jc(T,B,θ ), of coated conductors from six different manufacturers: American Superconductor Co. (US), Bruker HTS GmbH (Germany), Fujikura Ltd. (Japan), SuNAM Co. Ltd. (Korea), SuperOx ZAO (Russia) and SuperPower Inc. (US). Electrical transport and magnetic measurements were performed at temperatures between 4.2 K and 77 K and in magnetic field up to 19 T. Experiments were conducted at three different orientations of the field with respect to the crystallographic c-axis of the REBCO layer, θ = 0deg , 45deg and 90deg , in order to probe the angular anisotropy of Jc. In spite of the large variability of CCs performance, ...

  15. Downscaling the Impacts of Large-Scale LUCC on Surface Temperature along with IPCC RCPs: A Global Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangzheng Deng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the potential impacts of large-scale land use and land cover changes (LUCC on surface temperature from a global perspective. As important types of LUCC, urbanization, deforestation, cultivated land reclamation, and grassland degradation have effects on the climate, the potential changes of the surface temperature caused by these four types of large-scale LUCC from 2010 to 2050 are downscaled, and this issue analyzed worldwide along with Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC. The first case study presents some evidence of the effects of future urbanization on surface temperature in the Northeast megalopolis of the United States of America (USA. In order to understand the potential climatological variability caused by future forest deforestation and vulnerability, we chose Brazilian Amazon region as the second case study. The third selected region in India as a typical region of cultivated land reclamation where the possible climatic impacts are explored. In the fourth case study, we simulate the surface temperature changes caused by future grassland degradation in Mongolia. Results show that the temperature in built-up area would increase obviously throughout the four land types. In addition, the effects of all four large-scale LUCC on monthly average temperature change would vary from month to month with obviously spatial heterogeneity.

  16. Large-Scale Atmospheric Circulation Patterns Associated with Temperature Extremes as a Basis for Model Evaluation: Methodological Overview and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loikith, P. C.; Broccoli, A. J.; Waliser, D. E.; Lintner, B. R.; Neelin, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Anomalous large-scale circulation patterns often play a key role in the occurrence of temperature extremes. For example, large-scale circulation can drive horizontal temperature advection or influence local processes that lead to extreme temperatures, such as by inhibiting moderating sea breezes, promoting downslope adiabatic warming, and affecting the development of cloud cover. Additionally, large-scale circulation can influence the shape of temperature distribution tails, with important implications for the magnitude of future changes in extremes. As a result of the prominent role these patterns play in the occurrence and character of extremes, the way in which temperature extremes change in the future will be highly influenced by if and how these patterns change. It is therefore critical to identify and understand the key patterns associated with extremes at local to regional scales in the current climate and to use this foundation as a target for climate model validation. This presentation provides an overview of recent and ongoing work aimed at developing and applying novel approaches to identifying and describing the large-scale circulation patterns associated with temperature extremes in observations and using this foundation to evaluate state-of-the-art global and regional climate models. Emphasis is given to anomalies in sea level pressure and 500 hPa geopotential height over North America using several methods to identify circulation patterns, including self-organizing maps and composite analysis. Overall, evaluation results suggest that models are able to reproduce observed patterns associated with temperature extremes with reasonable fidelity in many cases. Model skill is often highest when and where synoptic-scale processes are the dominant mechanisms for extremes, and lower where sub-grid scale processes (such as those related to topography) are important. Where model skill in reproducing these patterns is high, it can be inferred that extremes are

  17. Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that ...

  18. Different Multifractal Scaling of the 0 cm Average Ground Surface Temperature of Four Representative Weather Stations over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal scaling properties of the daily 0 cm average ground surface temperature (AGST records obtained from four selected sites over China are investigated using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA method. Results show that the AGST records at all four locations exhibit strong persistence features and different scaling behaviors. The differences of the generalized Hurst exponents are very different for the AGST series of each site reflecting the different scaling behaviors of the fluctuation. Furthermore, the strengths of multifractal spectrum are different for different weather stations and indicate that the multifractal behaviors vary from station to station over China.

  19. Induction practice -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Nicolas; Sprogøe, Jonas

    2007-01-01

    that induction potentially triggers both individual and organizational learning and by drawing on practice-based theory we discuss how the interplay between individual and the organization, what we call agenerative dance, ignites both kinds of learning. We focus on and describe the interplay , ignites both kinds...

  20. Interannual variability of Central European mean temperature in January / February and its relation to the large-scale circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, P.C.; Storch, H. von

    1993-01-01

    The Central European temperature distribution field, as given by 11 stations (Fanoe, Hamburg, Potsdam, Jena, Frankfurt, Uccle, Hohenpeissenberg, Praha, Wien, Zuerich and Geneve), is analysed with respect to its year-to-year variability. January-February (JF) average temperatures are considered for the interval 1901-80. An Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis reveals that the JF temperature variability is almost entirely controlled by one EOF with uniform sign. The second EOF represents only 7% of the total variance and describes a north-south gradient. The time coefficient of the first EOF is almost stationary whereas the second pattern describes a slight downward trend at the northern stations and a slight upward trend at the southern stations. The relationship of the temperature field to the large-scale circulation, represented by the North Atlantic/European sea-level pressure (SLP) field, is investigated by means of a Canonical Correlation (CCA) Analysis. Two CCA pairs are identified which account for most of the temperature year-to-year variance and which suggest plausible mechanisms. The CCA pairs fail, however, to consistently link the long-term temperature trends to changes in the large-scale circulation. In the output of a 100-year run with a coupled atmosphere-ocean model (ECHAM1/LSG), the same CCA pairs are found but the strength of the link between Central European temperature and North Atlantic SLP is markedly weaker than in the observed data. (orig.)

  1. Scaling and design analyses of a scaled-down, high-temperature test facility for experimental investigation of the initial stages of a VHTR air-ingress accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcilesi, David J.; Ham, Tae Kyu; Kim, In Hun; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N.; Oh, Chang H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 1/8th geometric-scale test facility that models the VHTR hot plenum is proposed. • Geometric scaling analysis is introduced for VHTR to analyze air-ingress accident. • Design calculations are performed to show that accident phenomenology is preserved. • Some analyses include time scale, hydraulic similarity and power scaling analysis. • Test facility has been constructed and shake-down tests are currently being carried out. - Abstract: A critical event in the safety analysis of the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is an air-ingress accident. This accident is initiated, in its worst case scenario, by a double-ended guillotine break of the coaxial cross vessel, which leads to a rapid reactor vessel depressurization. In a VHTR, the reactor vessel is located within a reactor cavity that is filled with air during normal operating conditions. Following the vessel depressurization, the dominant mode of ingress of an air–helium mixture into the reactor vessel will either be molecular diffusion or density-driven stratified flow. The mode of ingress is hypothesized to depend largely on the break conditions of the cross vessel. Since the time scales of these two ingress phenomena differ by orders of magnitude, it is imperative to understand under which conditions each of these mechanisms will dominate in the air ingress process. Computer models have been developed to analyze this type of accident scenario. There are, however, limited experimental data available to understand the phenomenology of the air-ingress accident and to validate these models. Therefore, there is a need to design and construct a scaled-down experimental test facility to simulate the air-ingress accident scenarios and to collect experimental data. The current paper focuses on the analyses performed for the design and operation of a 1/8th geometric scale (by height and diameter), high-temperature test facility. A geometric scaling analysis for the VHTR, a time

  2. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory's Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maio, Vince

    2011-01-01

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing

  3. High Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Scale-up and Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Ben [Research Triangle Inst. (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Turk, Brian [Research Triangle Inst. (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Denton, David [Research Triangle Inst. (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gupta, Raghubir [Research Triangle Inst. (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Gasification is a technology for clean energy conversion of diverse feedstocks into a wide variety of useful products such as chemicals, fertilizers, fuels, electric power, and hydrogen. Existing technologies can be employed to clean the syngas from gasification processes to meet the demands of such applications, but they are expensive to build and operate and consume a significant fraction of overall parasitic energy requirements, thus lowering overall process efficiency. RTI International has developed a warm syngas desulfurization process (WDP) utilizing a transport-bed reactor design and a proprietary attrition-resistant, high-capacity solid sorbent with excellent performance replicated at lab, bench, and pilot scales. Results indicated that WDP technology can improve both efficiency and cost of gasification plants. The WDP technology achieved ~99.9% removal of total sulfur (as either H2S or COS) from coal-derived syngas at temperatures as high as 600°C and over a wide range of pressures (20-80 bar, pressure independent performance) and sulfur concentrations. Based on the success of these tests, RTI negotiated a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy for precommercial testing of this technology at Tampa Electric Company’s Polk Power Station IGCC facility in Tampa, Florida. The project scope also included a sweet water-gas-shift process for hydrogen enrichment and an activated amine process for 90+% total carbon capture. Because the activated amine process provides some additional non-selective sulfur removal, the integration of these processes was expected to reduce overall sulfur in the syngas to sub-ppmv concentrations, suitable for most syngas applications. The overall objective of this project was to mitigate the technical risks associated with the scale up and integration of the WDP and carbon dioxide capture technologies, enabling subsequent commercial-scale demonstration. The warm syngas cleanup pre-commercial test unit

  4. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Kyle L; Pop, Eric; King, William P

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K(-1). This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  5. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, Kyle L. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); King, William P., E-mail: wpk@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K{sup −1}. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  6. A multi-scale approach of mechanical and transport properties of cementitious materials under rises of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caratini, G.

    2012-01-01

    The modern industrial activities (storage of nuclear waste, geothermal wells, nuclear power plants,...) can submit cementitious materials to some extreme conditions, for example at temperatures above 200 C. This level of temperature will induce phenomena of dehydration in the cement paste, particularly impacting the CSH hydrates which led to the mechanical cohesion. The effects of these temperatures on the mechanical and transport properties have been the subject of this thesis.To understand these effects, we need to take into account the heterogeneous, porous, multi-scale aspects of these materials. To do this, micro-mechanics and homogenization tools based on the Eshelby problem's solution were used. Moreover, to support this multi-scale modeling, mechanical testing based on the theory of porous media were conducted. The measurements of modulus compressibility, permeability and porosity under confining pressure were used to investigate the mechanisms of degradation of these materials during thermal loads up to 400 C. (author)

  7. Smoke flow temperature beneath tunnel ceiling for train fire at subway station: Reduced-scale experiments and correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Na; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Li, Xiao; Yang, He

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Reduced-scale experiments on train fire at subway station. • Smoke flow temperature beneath tunnel ceiling measured and correlated. • Effect of platform-tunnel conjunction door type on smoke temperature is clarified. - Abstract: This paper is to investigate the smoke flow temperature beneath tunnel ceiling for a train on fire stopping besides a subway station. Experiments were carried out in a reduced-scale (1:10) subway station model to study the maximum smoke temperature and the longitudinal temperature distribution beneath the tunnel ceiling by considering platform-tunnel conjunction doors of two types: the full-seal platform screen door (PSD) and the full-height safety door. For the maximum temperature beneath the tunnel ceiling, it is found to be well correlated non-dimensionally with heat release rate by a 3.65 and a 2.92 power law function for the full-seal platform screen door and the full-height safety door, respectively. For the longitudinal temperature distribution along the tunnel ceiling, it can be well correlated by an exponential function for both types of platform-tunnel conjunction doors. Concerning the effect of the door type, the maximum temperature is lower and the longitudinal temperature decays faster for full-height safety door than that for full-seal PSD. This is due to that with the full-height safety door, the effective width of the tunnel ceiling is widened, which results in more heat losses from the smoke flow to the ceiling.

  8. Qualification of a full plant nodalization for the prediction of the core exit temperature through a scaling methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freixa, J., E-mail: jordi.freixa-terradas@upc.edu; Martínez-Quiroga, V., E-mail: victor.martinez.quiroga@upc.edu; Reventós, F., E-mail: francesc.reventos@upc.edu

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Core exit temperature is used in PWRs as an indication of core heat up. • Qualification of full scale nuclear reactors by means of a scaling methodology. • Scaling of RELAP5 calculations to full scale power plants. - Abstract: System codes and their necessary power plant nodalizations are an essential step in thermal hydraulic safety analysis. In order to assess the safety of a particular power plant, in addition to the validation and verification of the code, the nodalization of the system needs to be qualified. Since most existing experimental data come from scaled-down facilities, any qualification process must therefore address scale considerations. The Group of Thermal Hydraulic Studies at Technical University of Catalonia has developed a scaling-up methodology (SCUP) for the qualification of full-scale nodalizations through a systematic procedure based on the extrapolation of post-test simulations of Integral Test Facility experiments. In the present work, the SCUP methodology will be employed to qualify the nodalization of the AscóNPP, a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), for the reproduction of an important safety phenomenon which is the effectiveness of the Core Exit Temperature (CET) as an Accident Management (AM) indicator. Given the difficulties in placing measurements in the core region, CET measurements are used as a criterion for the initiation of safety operational procedures during accidental conditions in PWR. However, the CET response has some limitation in detecting inadequate core cooling simply because the measurement is not taken in the position where the cladding exposure occurs. In order to apply the SCUP methodology, the OECD/NEA ROSA-2 Test 3, an SBLOCA in the hot leg, has been selected as a starting point. This experiment was conducted at the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF), a facility operated by the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and was focused on the assessment of the effectiveness of AM actions triggered by

  9. From boiling point to glass transition temperature: transport coefficients in molecular liquids follow three-parameter scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, B; Petzold, N; Kahlau, R; Hofmann, M; Rössler, E A

    2012-10-01

    The phenomenon of the glass transition is an unresolved problem in condensed matter physics. Its prominent feature, the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the transport coefficients, remains a challenge to be described over the full temperature range. For a series of molecular glass formers, we combined τ(T) collected from dielectric spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering covering a range 10(-12) s < τ(T) < 10(2) s. Describing the dynamics in terms of an activation energy E(T), we distinguish a high-temperature regime characterized by an Arrhenius law with a constant activation energy E(∞) and a low-temperature regime for which E(coop)(T) ≡ E(T)-E(∞) increases exponentially while cooling. A scaling is introduced, specifically E(coop)(T)/E(∞) [proportionality] exp[-λ(T/T(A)-1)], where λ is a fragility parameter and T(A) a reference temperature proportional to E(∞). In order to describe τ(T) still the attempt time τ(∞) has to be specified. Thus, a single interaction parameter E(∞) describing the high-temperature regime together with λ controls the temperature dependence of low-temperature cooperative dynamics.

  10. Induction Brazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul

    , or if the hottest area is located outside the joint interface, a number of defects may appear: the braze metal may flow away from the joint, the flux may burn off, poor binding of the braze metal may appear or the braze metal may be overheated. Joint geometry as well as electro-magnetic properties of the work piece...... presents a combined numerical and experimental method for determination of appropriate/optimiged coil geometry and position in induction brazing tube-to-plate joints of different ratios between tube and plate thickness and different combinations of the materials stainless steel, brass and copper....... The method has proven to give successful results in brazing tube-plate joints of copper-brass, copper-stainless steel, stainless steel-brass, and stainless steel-stainless steel. A new design of an adjustable flux concentrator for induction heating tube-to-plate joints is proposed and tested on a variety...

  11. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of surface scale formation during CO2 corrosion of carbon steel at temperatures up to 90 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingham, B.; Ko, M.; Kear, G.; Kappen, P.; Laycock, N.; Kimpton, J.A.; Williams, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to follow the formation of corrosion product scales on carbon steel in CO 2 saturated brine at temperatures from 40 to 90 o C. The corrosion process was accelerated by applying a small anodic current, and in selected tests a scale inhibitor, amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMPA), was added. Siderite was identified as the major phase in the scale formed in all conditions. With increasing temperature, the scale formation rate increased, while the scale thickness and crystallite size decreased. Above 60 o C, the scale became increasingly protective. The scale thickness and crystallite size decreased with increasing ATMPA concentration.

  12. 0D modelling and efficiency analysis of three power amplification schemes for inductive storage generators in the μs scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, D.; Lassalle, F.; Chuvatin, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Extensive studies were conducted to sharpen current pulse on IES (Inductive Energy Storage) drivers using the plasma opening switch scheme. Due to the emergence of new power amplification concepts, new opportunities appear for improving IES generators operation. In order to evaluate and compare the performances of these schemes this paper proposes a system analysis based on a 0D modelling [ru

  13. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-01-01

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure

  14. 3D Analysis of Coupled Quasi-Stationary Electromagnetic and Non-Stationary Temperature Fields in Non-Magnetic Inductively Heated Charge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barglik, J.; Doležel, Ivo; Šolín, Pavel; Ulrych, B.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 885 (2001), s. 9-16 ISSN 0072-4688 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/01/0184; GA MŠk ME 448 Grant - others:-(PL) 7T08603716 Keywords : induction heating * numerical analysis * integral model Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  15. Enabling Junction Temperature Estimation via Collector-Side Thermo-Sensitive Electrical Parameters through Emitter Stray Inductance in High-Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Haoze; Li, Wuhua; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes the adoption of the inherent emitter stray inductance LeE in high-power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules as a new dynamic thermo-sensitive electrical parameter (d-TSEP). Furthermore, a family of 14 derived dynamic TSEP candidates has been extracted and classified...

  16. High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL small-scale development apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsburg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Sato, K.; Kinoshita, M.

    1994-08-01

    The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is a 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperatures between 300K and 650K at a fixed initial pressure of 0.1 MPa. Hydrogen-air mixtures with hydrogen composition from 9 to 60 percent by volume and steam fractions up to 35 percent by volume were studied for stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K-650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside diameter SSDA test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent hydrogen at 300K down to between 9 and 10 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments

  17. High-Temperature Structural Analysis of a Small-Scale PHE Prototype under the Test Condition of a Small-Scale Gas Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K.; Hong, S.; Park, H.

    2012-01-01

    A process heat exchanger (PHE) is a key component for transferring the high-temperature heat generated from a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) to a chemical reaction for the massive production of hydrogen. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has designed and assembled a small-scale nitrogen gas loop for a performance test on VHTR components and has manufactured a small-scale PHE prototype made of Hastelloy-X alloy. A performance test on the PHE prototype is underway in the gas loop, where different kinds of pipelines connecting to the PHE prototype are tested for reducing the thermal stress under the expansion of the PHE prototype. In this study, to evaluate the high-temperature structural integrity of the PHE prototype under the test condition of the gas loop, a realistic and effective boundary condition imposing the stiffness of the pipelines connected to the PHE prototype was suggested. An equivalent spring stiffness to reduce the thermal stress under the expansion of the PHE prototype was computed from the bending deformation and expansion of the pipelines connected to the PHE. A structural analysis on the PHE prototype was also carried out by imposing the suggested boundary condition. As a result of the analysis, the structural integrity of the PHE prototype seems to be maintained under the test condition of the gas loop.

  18. A space and time scale-dependent nonlinear geostatistical approach for downscaling daily precipitation and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Evans, Jason; McCabe, Matthew; Sharma, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    precipitation and daily temperature over several years. Here, the training image consists of daily rainfall and temperature outputs from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at 50 km and 10 km resolution for a twenty year period ranging from 1985

  19. Temperature oscillation and the sloshing motion of the large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Chen, Xin; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2017-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the temperature oscillation and the sloshing motion of the large-scale circulation (LSC) in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water. Temperature measurements were made in aspect ratio one cylindrical cell by probes put in fluid and embedded in the sidewall simultaneously, and located at the 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 heights of the convection cell. The results show that the temperature measured in fluid contains information of both the LSC and the signature of the hot and cold plumes, while the temperature measured in sidewall only contains information of the LSC. It is found that the sloshing motion of the LSC can be measured by both the temperatures in fluid and in sidewall. We also studies the effect of cell tilting on the temperature oscillation and sloshing motion of the LSC. It is found that both the amplitude and the frequency of the temperature oscillation (and the sloshing motion) increase when the tilt angle increases, while the off-center distance of the sloshing motion of the LSC remains unchanged. This work is supported by the NSFC of China (Grant Nos. 11472094 and U1613227), the RGC of Hong Kong SAR (Grant No. 403712) and the 111 project of China (Grant No. B17037).

  20. Thermal reaction norms and the scale of temperature variation: latitudinal vulnerability of intertidal nacellid limpets to climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A Morley

    Full Text Available The thermal reaction norms of 4 closely related intertidal Nacellid limpets, Antarctic (Nacella concinna, New Zealand (Cellana ornata, Australia (C. tramoserica and Singapore (C. radiata, were compared across environments with different temperature magnitude, variability and predictability, to test their relative vulnerability to different scales of climate warming. Lethal limits were measured alongside a newly developed metric of "duration tenacity", which was tested at different temperatures to calculate the thermal reaction norm of limpet adductor muscle fatigue. Except in C. tramoserica which had a wide optimum range with two break points, duration tenacity did not follow a typical aerobic capacity curve but was best described by a single break point at an optimum temperature. Thermal reaction norms were shifted to warmer temperatures in warmer environments; the optimum temperature for tenacity (T(opt increased from 1.0°C (N. concinna to 14.3°C (C. ornata to 18.0°C (an average for the optimum range of C. tramoserica to 27.6°C (C. radiata. The temperature limits for duration tenacity of the 4 species were most consistently correlated with both maximum sea surface temperature and summer maximum in situ habitat logger temperature. Tropical C. radiata, which lives in the least variable and most predictable environment, generally had the lowest warming tolerance and thermal safety margin (WT and TSM; respectively the thermal buffer of CT(max and T(opt over habitat temperature. However, the two temperate species, C. ornata and C. tramoserica, which live in a variable and seasonally unpredictable microhabitat, had the lowest TSM relative to in situ logger temperature. N. concinna which lives in the most variable, but seasonally predictable microhabitat, generally had the highest TSMs. Intertidal animals live at the highly variable interface between terrestrial and marine biomes and even small changes in the magnitude and predictability of their

  1. Thermal reaction norms and the scale of temperature variation: latitudinal vulnerability of intertidal nacellid limpets to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Simon A; Martin, Stephanie M; Day, Robert W; Ericson, Jess; Lai, Chien-Houng; Lamare, Miles; Tan, Koh-Siang; Thorne, Michael A S; Peck, Lloyd S

    2012-01-01

    The thermal reaction norms of 4 closely related intertidal Nacellid limpets, Antarctic (Nacella concinna), New Zealand (Cellana ornata), Australia (C. tramoserica) and Singapore (C. radiata), were compared across environments with different temperature magnitude, variability and predictability, to test their relative vulnerability to different scales of climate warming. Lethal limits were measured alongside a newly developed metric of "duration tenacity", which was tested at different temperatures to calculate the thermal reaction norm of limpet adductor muscle fatigue. Except in C. tramoserica which had a wide optimum range with two break points, duration tenacity did not follow a typical aerobic capacity curve but was best described by a single break point at an optimum temperature. Thermal reaction norms were shifted to warmer temperatures in warmer environments; the optimum temperature for tenacity (T(opt)) increased from 1.0°C (N. concinna) to 14.3°C (C. ornata) to 18.0°C (an average for the optimum range of C. tramoserica) to 27.6°C (C. radiata). The temperature limits for duration tenacity of the 4 species were most consistently correlated with both maximum sea surface temperature and summer maximum in situ habitat logger temperature. Tropical C. radiata, which lives in the least variable and most predictable environment, generally had the lowest warming tolerance and thermal safety margin (WT and TSM; respectively the thermal buffer of CT(max) and T(opt) over habitat temperature). However, the two temperate species, C. ornata and C. tramoserica, which live in a variable and seasonally unpredictable microhabitat, had the lowest TSM relative to in situ logger temperature. N. concinna which lives in the most variable, but seasonally predictable microhabitat, generally had the highest TSMs. Intertidal animals live at the highly variable interface between terrestrial and marine biomes and even small changes in the magnitude and predictability of their

  2. Scaling analysis of the coupled heat transfer process in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1986-08-01

    The differential equations representing the coupled heat transfer from the solid nuclear core components to the helium in the coolant channels are scaled in terms of representative quantities. This scaling process identifies the relative importance of the various terms of the coupled differential equations. The relative importance of these terms is then used to simplify the numerical solution of the coupled heat transfer for two bounding cases of full-power operation and depressurization from full-system operating pressure for the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. This analysis rigorously justifies the simplified system of equations used in the nuclear safety analysis effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  3. Rapid, high-temperature, field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcium carbonate scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1986-09-01

    A new test method is described that allows the rapid field testing of calcium carbonate scale inhibitors at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). The method evolved from use of a full-flow test loop on a well with a mass flow rate of about 1 x 10/sup 6/ lbm/hr (126 kg/s). It is a simple, effective way to evaluate the effectiveness of inhibitors under field conditions. Five commercial formulations were chosen for field evaluation on the basis of nonflowing, laboratory screening tests at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). Four of these formulations from different suppliers controlled calcium carbonate scale deposition as measured by the test method. Two of these could dislodge recently deposited scale that had not age-hardened. Performance-profile diagrams, which were measured for these four effective inhibitors, show the concentration interrelationship between brine calcium and inhibitor concentrations at which the formulations will and will not stop scale formation in the test apparatus. With these diagrams, one formulation was chosen for testing on the full-flow brine line. The composition was tested for 6 weeks and showed a dramatic decrease in the scaling occurring at the flow-control valve. This scaling was about to force a shutdown of a major, long-term flow test being done for reservoir economic evaluations. The inhibitor stopped the scaling, and the test was performed without interruption.

  4. Does a General Temperature-Dependent Q10 Model of Soil Respiration Exist at Biome and Global Scale?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua CHEN; Han-Qin TIAN

    2005-01-01

    Soil respiration (SR) is commonly modeled by a Q10 (an indicator of temperature sensitivity)function in ecosystem models. Q10is usually treated as a constant of 2 in these models, although Q10 value of SR often decreases with increasing temperatures. It remains unclear whether a general temperaturedependent Q10 model of SR exists at biome and global scale. In this paper, we have compiled the long-term Q10 data of 38 SR studies ranging from the Boreal, Temperate, to Tropical/Subtropical biome on four continents.Our analysis indicated that the general temperature-dependent biome Q10 models of SR existed, especially in the Boreal and Temperate biomes. A single-exponential model was better than a simple linear model in fitting the average Q10 values at the biome scale. Average soil temperature is a better predictor of Q10 value than average air temperature in these models, especially in the Boreal biome. Soil temperature alone could explain about 50% of the Q10 variations in both the Boreal and Temperate biome single-exponential Q10 model. Q10 value of SR decreased with increasing soil temperature but at quite different rates among the three biome Q10 models. The k values (Q10 decay rate constants) were 0.09, 0.07, and 0.02/℃ in the Boreal, Temperate, and Tropical/Subtropical biome, respectively, suggesting that Q10 value is the most sensitive to soil temperature change in the Boreal biome, the second in the Temperate biome, and the least sensitive in the Tropical/Subtropical biome. This also indirectly confirms that acclimation of SR in many soil warming experiments probably occurs. The k value in the "global" single-exponential Q10 model which combined both the Boreal and Temperate biome data set was 0.08/℃. However, the global general temperature-dependent Q10model developed using the data sets of the three biomes is not adequate for predicting Q10 values of SR globally.The existence of the general temperature-dependent Q10 models of SR in the Boreal and

  5. Temporal scale of the action of temperature and photoperiod on the xylogenesis at the treeline

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi S; Deslauriers A

    2007-01-01

    The possible role and interaction of two ecological factors, photoperiod and temperature, on xylogenesis of conifers growing at treeline are review. In cold climates, temperature is one of the major factors regulating metabolic activities of plants and influencing onset and rate of cell production during the growing period. However, photoperiod was found to act as a signal regulating the timing of maximum growth rate and synchronizing radial growth at annual level. During tree-ring formation,...

  6. Combination of the ionic-to-atomic line intensity ratios from two test elements for the diagnostic of plasma temperature and electron number density in Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tognoni, E. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: tognoni@ipcf.cnr.it; Hidalgo, M.; Canals, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia. Universidad de Alicante. Apdo. 99, 03080, Alicante (Spain); Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Salvetti, A.; Palleschi, V. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    In Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) spectrochemical analysis, the MgII(280.270 nm)/MgI(285.213 nm) ionic to atomic line intensity ratio is commonly used as a monitor of the robustness of operating conditions. This approach is based on the univocal relationship existing between intensity ratio and plasma temperature, for a pure argon atmospheric ICP in thermodynamic equilibrium. In a multi-elemental plasma in the lower temperature range, the measurement of the intensity ratio may not be sufficient to characterize temperature and electron density. In such a range, the correct relationship between intensity ratio and plasma temperature can be calculated only when the complete plasma composition is known. We propose the combination of the line intensity ratios of two test elements (double ratio) as an effective diagnostic tool for a multi-elemental low temperature LTE plasma of unknown composition. In particular, the variation of the double ratio allows us discriminating changes in the plasma temperature from changes in the electron density. Thus, the effects on plasma excitation and ionization possibly caused by introduction of different samples and matrices in non-robust conditions can be more accurately interpreted. The method is illustrated by the measurement of plasma temperature and electron density in a specific analytic case.

  7. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  8. Nano-viscosity of supercooled liquid measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Pressure and temperature dependence and the density scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, G.; Gapinski, J.; Ratajczyk, M.; Lettinga, M. P.; Hirtz, K.; Banachowicz, E.; Patkowski, A.

    2018-03-01

    The Stokes-Einstein relation allows us to calculate apparent viscosity experienced by tracers in complex media on the basis of measured self-diffusion coefficients. Such defined nano-viscosity values can be obtained through single particle techniques, like fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and particle tracking (PT). In order to perform such measurements, as functions of pressure and temperature, a new sample cell was designed and is described in this work. We show that this cell in combination with a long working distance objective of the confocal microscope can be used for successful FCS, PT, and confocal imaging experiments in broad pressure (0.1-100 MPa) and temperature ranges. The temperature and pressure dependent nano-viscosity of a van der Waals liquid obtained from the translational diffusion coefficient measured in this cell by means of FCS obeys the same scaling as the rotational relaxation and macro-viscosity of the system.

  9. Progress in generating fracture data base as a function of loading rate and temperature using small-scale tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couque, H.; Hudak, S.J. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Structural integrity assessment of nuclear pressure vessels requires small specimen fracture testing to generate data over a wide range of material loading, and temperature conditions. Small scale testing is employed since extensive testing is required including small radiation embrittled samples from nuclear surveillance capsules. However, current small scale technology does not provide the needed dynamic fracture toughness relevant to the crack arrest/reinitiation events that may occur during pressurized thermal shock transients following emergency shutdown. This paper addresses the generation of this much needed dynamic toughness data using a novel experimental-computational approach involving a coupled pressure bars (CPB) technique and a viscoplastic dynamic fracture code. CPB data have been generated to testing temperatures never before reached: 37 to 100 degrees C -- 60 to 123 degrees C above the nil ductility transition temperature. Fracture behavior of pressure vessel steel from lower shelf to upper shelf temperatures and previous toughness estimates for the 10 6 MPa√m s -1 loading rate regime are assessed in light of the new CPB data. 26 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Large-scale behaviour of local and entanglement entropy of the free Fermi gas at any temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschke, Hajo; Sobolev, Alexander V.; Spitzer, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The leading asymptotic large-scale behaviour of the spatially bipartite entanglement entropy (EE) of the free Fermi gas infinitely extended in multidimensional Euclidean space at zero absolute temperature, T = 0, is by now well understood. Here, we present and discuss the first rigorous results for the corresponding EE of thermal equilibrium states at T> 0. The leading large-scale term of this thermal EE turns out to be twice the first-order finite-size correction to the infinite-volume thermal entropy (density). Not surprisingly, this correction is just the thermal entropy on the interface of the bipartition. However, it is given by a rather complicated integral derived from a semiclassical trace formula for a certain operator on the underlying one-particle Hilbert space. But in the zero-temperature limit T\\downarrow 0, the leading large-scale term of the thermal EE considerably simplifies and displays a {ln}(1/T)-singularity which one may identify with the known logarithmic enhancement at T = 0 of the so-called area-law scaling. birthday of the ideal Fermi gas.

  11. SQDFT: Spectral Quadrature method for large-scale parallel O(N) Kohn-Sham calculations at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayana, Phanish; Pratapa, Phanisri P.; Sharma, Abhiraj; Pask, John E.

    2018-03-01

    We present SQDFT: a large-scale parallel implementation of the Spectral Quadrature (SQ) method for O(N) Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations at high temperature. Specifically, we develop an efficient and scalable finite-difference implementation of the infinite-cell Clenshaw-Curtis SQ approach, in which results for the infinite crystal are obtained by expressing quantities of interest as bilinear forms or sums of bilinear forms, that are then approximated by spatially localized Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature rules. We demonstrate the accuracy of SQDFT by showing systematic convergence of energies and atomic forces with respect to SQ parameters to reference diagonalization results, and convergence with discretization to established planewave results, for both metallic and insulating systems. We further demonstrate that SQDFT achieves excellent strong and weak parallel scaling on computer systems consisting of tens of thousands of processors, with near perfect O(N) scaling with system size and wall times as low as a few seconds per self-consistent field iteration. Finally, we verify the accuracy of SQDFT in large-scale quantum molecular dynamics simulations of aluminum at high temperature.

  12. High-Temperature Tolerance in Multi-Scale Cermet Solar-Selective Absorbing Coatings Prepared by Laser Cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xuming; Wei, Qian; Zhou, Jianxin; Ma, Huiyang

    2018-06-19

    In order to achieve cermet-based solar absorber coatings with long-term thermal stability at high temperatures, a novel single-layer, multi-scale TiC-Ni/Mo cermet coating was first prepared using laser cladding technology in atmosphere. The results show that the optical properties of the cermet coatings using laser cladding were much better than the preplaced coating. In addition, the thermal stability of the optical properties for the laser cladding coating were excellent after annealing at 650 °C for 200 h. The solar absorptance and thermal emittance of multi-scale cermet coating were 85% and 4.7% at 650 °C. The results show that multi-scale cermet materials are more suitable for solar-selective absorbing coating. In addition, laser cladding is a new technology that can be used for the preparation of spectrally-selective coatings.

  13. High-Temperature Tolerance in Multi-Scale Cermet Solar-Selective Absorbing Coatings Prepared by Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuming Pang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve cermet-based solar absorber coatings with long-term thermal stability at high temperatures, a novel single-layer, multi-scale TiC-Ni/Mo cermet coating was first prepared using laser cladding technology in atmosphere. The results show that the optical properties of the cermet coatings using laser cladding were much better than the preplaced coating. In addition, the thermal stability of the optical properties for the laser cladding coating were excellent after annealing at 650 °C for 200 h. The solar absorptance and thermal emittance of multi-scale cermet coating were 85% and 4.7% at 650 °C. The results show that multi-scale cermet materials are more suitable for solar-selective absorbing coating. In addition, laser cladding is a new technology that can be used for the preparation of spectrally-selective coatings.

  14. Temperature-dependent nucleation and capture-zone scaling of C 60 on silicon oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, M. A.; Conrad, B. R.; Cullen, W. G.; Pimpinelli, A.; Williams, E. D.; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Submonolayer films of C 60 have been deposited on ultrathin SiO 2 films for the purpose of characterizing the initial stages of nucleation and growth as a function of temperature. Capture zones extracted from the initial film morphology were analyzed using both the gamma and generalized Wigner distributions. The calculated critical nucleus size i of the C 60 islands was observed to change over the temperature range 298 K to 483 K. All fitted values of i were found to be between 0 and 1, representing stable monomers and stable dimers, respectively. With increasing temperature of film preparation, we observed i first increasing through this range and then decreasing. We discuss possible explanations of this reentrant-like behavior.

  15. Mantle temperature as a control on the time scale of thermal evolution of extensional basins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kenni Dinesen; Armitage, J.J.; Nielsen, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Extension of the lithosphere, the thermo-mechanical boundary layer above the convecting mantle, is followed by cooling and subsidence. The timescale of oceanic basin subsidence is ∼100 Myr whereas basins of the continental interior often subside continuously for more than 200 Myr after...... rifting. Using numerical modelling, we show how these diverse rifting scenarios are unified when accounting for varying mantle potential temperature. At a temperature of 1300 °C, cooling is plate-like with nearly exponential subsidence as observed in oceanic basins. At 1200 °C, subsidence is almost linear...... and continues for more than 800 Myr. The longevity of basin subsidence in the continental interior can therefore be explained by variation of mantle temperature. An additional cause of the longevity of subsidence is related to the equilibrium thickness of the lithosphere which is increased by the local...

  16. Glass manufacturing through induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, R.; Paya, B.; Roscini, M.; Fautrelle, Y.; Tuaz, F.; Delage, D.

    1991-01-01

    Oxides and glasses are electrical and thermal insulators, but show the characteristic of being weakly conductors of electricity when they are melt. It is then possible to heat them through HF induction. This interesting property allows the development of a melting process in cold crucible induction furnace. The process is being studied and developed by a consortium made up of CFEI, CEA Marcoule, ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE and MADYLAM laboratory. The studies include 2 parts: a) One experimental part to develop the technology and research for satisfying configurations, through a small size platform (10 to 30 kg/h). The long run continuous pouring melting tests made on different kinds of glass allow to go-on with industrial range units. b) One theoretical part to understand the magneto-thermo-hydraulic phenomenon hardly in relation with the heavy dependence of the physical characteristics (electrical and heat conductivities, viscosity) according to temperature. 6 refs., 4 figs [fr

  17. Research on the enhancement of biological nitrogen removal at low temperatures from ammonium-rich wastewater by the bio-electrocoagulation technology in lab-scale systems, pilot-scale systems and a full-scale industrial wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Qian, Guangsheng; Ye, Linlin; Hu, Xiaomin; Yu, Xin; Lyu, Weijian

    2018-04-17

    In cold areas, nitrogen removal performance of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) declines greatly in winter. This paper systematically describes the enhancement effect of a periodic reverse electrocoagulation technology on biological nitrogen removal at low temperatures. The study showed that in the lab-scale systems, the electrocoagulation technology improved the biomass amount, enzyme activity and the amount of nitrogen removal bacteria (Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, Paracoccus, Thauera and Enterobacter). This enhanced nitrification and denitrification of activated sludge at low temperatures. In the pilot-scale systems, the electrocoagulation technology increased the relative abundance of cold-adapted microorganisms (Luteimonas and Trueperaceae) at low temperatures. In a full-scale industrial WWTP, comparison of data from winter 2015 and winter 2016 showed that effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH 4 + -N, and NO 3 - -N reduced by 10.37, 3.84, and 136.43 t, respectively, throughout the winter, after installation of electrocoagulation devices. These results suggest that the electrocoagulation technology is able to improve the performance of activated sludge under low-temperature conditions. This technology provides a new way for upgrading of the performance of WWTPs in cold areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microbial habitat connectivity across spatial scales and hydrothermal temperature gradients at Guaymas Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eMeyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California hydrothermal vent area is known as a dynamic and hydrothermally vented sedimentary system, where the advection and production of a variety of different metabolic substrates support a high microbial diversity and activity in the seafloor. The main objective of our study was to explore the role of temperature and other environmental factors on community diversity, such as the presence of microbial mats and seafloor bathymetry within one hydrothermally vented field of 200 × 250 m dimension. In this field, temperature increased strongly with sediment depth reaching the known limit to life within a few decimeters. Potential sulfate reduction rate as a key community activity parameter was strongly affected by in situ temperature and sediment depth, declining from high rates of 1-5 μmol ml-1 d-1 at the surface to the detection limit below 5 cm sediment depth, despite the presence of sulfate and hydrocarbons. Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis yielded a high-resolution fingerprint of the dominant members of the bacterial community. Our analyses showed strong temperature and sediment depth effects on bacterial cell abundance and Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs number, both declining by more than one order of magnitude below the top 5 cm of the sediment surface. Another fraction of the variation in diversity and community structure was explained by differences in the local bathymetry and spatial position within the vent field. Nevertheless, more than 80% of all detected OTUs were shared among the different temperature realms and sediment depths, after being classified as cold (T<10°C, medium (10°C≤T<40°C or hot (T≥40°C temperature conditions, with significant OTU overlap with the richer surface communities. Overall, this indicates a high connectivity of benthic bacterial habitats in this dynamic and heterogeneous marine ecosystem influenced by strong hydrothermalism.

  19. An LTE effective temperature scale for red supergiants in the Magellanic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, H. M.; Dorda, R.; Negueruela, I.; González-Fernández, C.

    2018-05-01

    We present a self-consistent study of cool supergiants (CSGs) belonging to the Magellanic clouds. We calculated stellar atmospheric parameters using LTE KURUCZ and MARCS atmospheric models for more than 400 individual targets by fitting a careful selection of weak metallic lines. We explore the existence of a Teff scale and its implications in two different metallicity environments (each Magellanic cloud). Critical and in-depth tests have been performed to assess the reliability of our stellar parameters (i.e. internal error budget, NLTE systematics). In addition, several Monte Carlo tests have been carried out to infer the significance of the Teff scale found. Our findings point towards a unique Teff scale that seems to be independent of the environment.

  20. Temporal scale of the action of temperature and photoperiod on the xylogenesis at the treeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible role and interaction of two ecological factors, photoperiod and temperature, on xylogenesis of conifers growing at treeline are review. In cold climates, temperature is one of the major factors regulating metabolic activities of plants and influencing onset and rate of cell production during the growing period. However, photoperiod was found to act as a signal regulating the timing of maximum growth rate and synchronizing radial growth at annual level. During tree-ring formation, both factors are crucial but with different levels of interaction. Some recent findings about xylogenesis in cold environments are described and discussed

  1. High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL small-scale development apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Sato, K.

    1994-01-01

    The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam-mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger-scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperature between 300K and 650K at a fixed pressure of 0.1 MPa. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K to 650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments. Experiments were conducted to measure the rate of hydrogen oxidation in the absence of ignition sources at temperatures of 500K and 650K, for hydrogen-air mixtures of 15% and 50%, and for a mixture of equimolar hydrogen-air and 30% steam at 650K. The rate of hydrogen oxidation was found to be significant at 650K. Reduction of hydrogen concentration by chemical reaction from 50 to 44% hydrogen, and from 15 to 11% hydrogen, were observed on a time frame of minutes. The DeSoete rate equation predicts the 50% experiment very well, but greatly underestimates the reaction rate of the lean mixtures

  2. Scaling properties of velocity and temperature spectra above the surface friction layer in a convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. McNaughton

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We report velocity and temperature spectra measured at nine levels from 1.42 meters up to 25.7 m over a smooth playa in Western Utah. Data are from highly convective conditions when the magnitude of the Obukhov length (our proxy for the depth of the surface friction layer was less than 2 m. Our results are somewhat similar to the results reported from the Minnesota experiment of Kaimal et al. (1976, but show significant differences in detail. Our velocity spectra show no evidence of buoyant production of kinetic energy at at the scale of the thermal structures. We interpret our velocity spectra to be the result of outer eddies interacting with the ground, not "local free convection".

    We observe that velocity spectra represent the spectral distribution of the kinetic energy of the turbulence, so we use energy scales based on total turbulence energy in the convective boundary layer (CBL to collapse our spectra. For the horizontal velocity spectra this scale is (zi εo2/3, where zi is inversion height and εo is the dissipation rate in the bulk CBL. This scale functionally replaces the Deardorff convective velocity scale. Vertical motions are blocked by the ground, so the outer eddies most effective in creating vertical motions come from the inertial subrange of the outer turbulence. We deduce that the appropriate scale for the peak region of the vertical velocity spectra is (z εo2/3 where z is height above ground. Deviations from perfect spectral collapse under these scalings at large and small wavenumbers are explained in terms of the energy transport and the eddy structures of the flow.

    We find that the peaks of the temperature spectra collapse when wavenumbers are scaled using (z1/2 zi1/2. That is, the lengths of the thermal structures depend on both the lengths of the

  3. Mantle temperature as a control on the time scale of thermal evolution of extensional basins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K. D.; Armitage, J. J.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    and continues for more than 800 Myr. The longevity of basin subsidence in the continental interior can therefore be explained by variation of mantle temperature. An additional cause of the longevity of subsidence is related to the equilibrium thickness of the lithosphere which is increased by the local...

  4. Continental distribution as a forcing factor for global-scale temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron, E J; Thompson, S L; Hay, W W

    1984-08-16

    Since the advent of the continental drift hypothesis, changing continental geometries have been proposed as an explanation for long-term temperature variability. The climatic influence of a few specific past geographies has been investigated quantitatively, but these studies do not indicate the potential temperature variability due to continental positions. This problem has been examined only with simple climate models having limiting assumptions such as no cloud cover. Here idealized continental geometries are used as boundary conditions in a simulation using a general circulation model (GCM) of the atmosphere. The range in model simulated globally-averaged surface temperature is 7.4 K with a difference in polar surface temperature of up to 34 K. The simulations suggest a substantial climatic sensitivity to continental positions with the coldest global climate when land masses are in high latitudes. Although the simulations have not captured theoretical limits of climatic variability due to continental positions, present-day geography is near the cold end of this spectrum. 20 references, 1 figure.

  5. Study of Volcanic Activity at Different Time Scales Using Hypertemporal Land Surface Temperature Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlidou, Efthymia; Hecker, Chris; van der Werff, Harald; van der Meijder, Mark

    2017-01-01

    We apply a method for detecting subtle spatiotemporal signal fluctuations to monitor volcanic activity. Whereas midwave infrared data are commonly used for volcanic hot spot detection, our approach utilizes hypertemporal longwave infrared-based land surface temperature (LST) data. Using LST data of

  6. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jeppe Miki Busk; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocity...

  7. Temperature sensing of micron scale polymer fibers using fiber Bragg gratings

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Jian

    2015-07-02

    Highly conductive polymer fibers are key components in the design of multifunctional textiles. Measuring the voltage/temperature relationships of these fibers is very challenging due to their very small diameters, making it impossible to rely on classical temperature sensing techniques. These fibers are also so fragile that they cannot withstand any perturbation from external measurement systems. We propose here, a non-contact temperature measurement technique based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The heat exchange is carefully controlled between the probed fibers and the sensing FBG by promoting radiation and convective heat transfer rather than conduction, which is known to be poorly controlled. We demonstrate our technique on a highly conductive Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS)-based fiber. A non-phenomenological model of the sensing system based on meaningful physical parameters is validated towards experimental observations. The technique reliably measures the temperature of the polymer fibers when subjected to electrical loading. © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Spatial variability of night temperatures at a fine scale over the Stellenbosch wine district, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Bonnardot

    2012-03-01

    Significance and impact of the study: In the context of climate change, it is crucial to improve knowledge of current climatic conditions at fine scale during periods of grapevine growth and berry ripening in order to have a baseline from which to work when discussing and considering future local adaptations to accommodate to a warmer environnement.

  9. The impact of component performance on the overall cycle performance of small-scale low temperature organic Rankine cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M.; Sayma, A. I.

    2015-08-01

    Low temperature organic Rankine cycles offer a promising technology for the generation of power from low temperature heat sources. Small-scale systems (∼10kW) are of significant interest, however there is a current lack of commercially viable expanders. For a potential expander to be economically viable for small-scale applications it is reasonable to assume that the same expander must have the ability to be implemented within a number of different ORC applications. It is therefore important to design and optimise the cycle considering the component performance, most notably the expander, both at different thermodynamic conditions, and using alternative organic fluids. This paper demonstrates a novel modelling methodology that combines a previously generated turbine performance map with cycle analysis to establish at what heat source conditions optimal system performance can be achieved using an existing turbine design. The results obtained show that the same turbine can be effectively utilised within a number of different ORC applications by changing the working fluid. By selecting suitable working fluids, this turbine can be used to convert pressurised hot water at temperatures between 360K and 400K, and mass flow rates between 0.45kg/s and 2.7kg/s, into useful power with outputs between 1.5kW and 27kW. This is a significant result since it allows the same turbine to be implemented into a variety of applications, improving the economy of scale. This work has also confirmed the suitability of the candidate turbine for a range of low temperature ORC applications.

  10. Large Scale Variability of Phytoplankton Blooms in the Arctic and Peripheral Seas: Relationships with Sea Ice, Temperature, Clouds, and Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Cota, Glenn F.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially detailed satellite data of mean color, sea ice concentration, surface temperature, clouds, and wind have been analyzed to quantify and study the large scale regional and temporal variability of phytoplankton blooms in the Arctic and peripheral seas from 1998 to 2002. In the Arctic basin, phytoplankton chlorophyll displays a large symmetry with the Eastern Arctic having about fivefold higher concentrations than those of the Western Arctic. Large monthly and yearly variability is also observed in the peripheral seas with the largest blooms occurring in the Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk, and the Barents Sea during spring. There is large interannual and seasonal variability in biomass with average chlorophyll concentrations in 2002 and 2001 being higher than earlier years in spring and summer. The seasonality in the latitudinal distribution of blooms is also very different such that the North Atlantic is usually most expansive in spring while the North Pacific is more extensive in autumn. Environmental factors that influence phytoplankton growth were examined, and results show relatively high negative correlation with sea ice retreat and strong positive correlation with temperature in early spring. Plankton growth, as indicated by biomass accumulation, in the Arctic and subarctic increases up to a threshold surface temperature of about 276-277 degree K (3-4 degree C) beyond which the concentrations start to decrease suggesting an optimal temperature or nutrient depletion. The correlation with clouds is significant in some areas but negligible in other areas, while the correlations with wind speed and its components are generally weak. The effects of clouds and winds are less predictable with weekly climatologies because of unknown effects of averaging variable and intermittent physical forcing (e.g. over storm event scales with mixing and upwelling of nutrients) and the time scales of acclimation by the phytoplankton.

  11. The nonstationary impact of local temperature changes and ENSO on extreme precipitation at the global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiaohong; Miao, Chiyuan; Qiao, Yuanyuan; Duan, Qingyun

    2017-12-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and local temperature are important drivers of extreme precipitation. Understanding the impact of ENSO and temperature on the risk of extreme precipitation over global land will provide a foundation for risk assessment and climate-adaptive design of infrastructure in a changing climate. In this study, nonstationary generalized extreme value distributions were used to model extreme precipitation over global land for the period 1979-2015, with ENSO indicator and temperature as covariates. Risk factors were estimated to quantify the contrast between the influence of different ENSO phases and temperature. The results show that extreme precipitation is dominated by ENSO over 22% of global land and by temperature over 26% of global land. With a warming climate, the risk of high-intensity daily extreme precipitation increases at high latitudes but decreases in tropical regions. For ENSO, large parts of North America, southern South America, and southeastern and northeastern China are shown to suffer greater risk in El Niño years, with more than double the chance of intense extreme precipitation in El Niño years compared with La Niña years. Moreover, regions with more intense precipitation are more sensitive to ENSO. Global climate models were used to investigate the changing relationship between extreme precipitation and the covariates. The risk of extreme, high-intensity precipitation increases across high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere but decreases in middle and lower latitudes under a warming climate scenario, and will likely trigger increases in severe flooding and droughts across the globe. However, there is some uncertainties associated with the influence of ENSO on predictions of future extreme precipitation, with the spatial extent and risk varying among the different models.

  12. Progress in scale-up of second-generation high-temperature superconductors at SuperPower Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Y.-Y.; Knoll, A.; Chen, Y.; Li, Y.; Xiong, X.; Qiao, Y.; Hou, P.; Reeves, J.; Salagaj, T.; Lenseth, K.; Civale, L.; Maiorov, B.; Iwasa, Y.; Solovyov, V.; Suenaga, M.; Cheggour, N.; Clickner, C.; Ekin, J.W.; Weber, C.; Selvamanickam, V.

    2005-01-01

    SuperPower is focused on scaling up second-generation (2-G) high-temperature superconductor (HTS) technology to pilot-scale manufacturing. The emphasis of this program is to develop R and D solutions for scale-up issues in pilot-scale operations to lay the foundation for a framework for large-scale manufacturing. Throughput continues to be increased in all process steps including substrate polishing, buffer and HTS deposition. 2-G HTS conductors have been produced in lengths up to 100 m. Process optimization with valuable information provided by several unique process control and quality-control tools has yielded performances of 6000-7000 A m (77 K, 0 T) in 50-100 m lengths using two HTS fabrication processes: metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Major progress has been made towards the development of practical conductor configurations. Modifications to the HTS fabrication process have resulted in enhanced performance in magnetic fields. Industrial slitting and electroplating processes have been successfully adopted to fabricate tapes in width of 4 mm and with copper stabilizer for cable and coil applications. SuperPower's conductor configuration has yielded excellent mechanical properties and overcurrent carrying capability. Over 60 m of such practical conductors with critical current over 100 A/cm-width have been delivered to Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. for prototype cable construction

  13. Progress in scale-up of second-generation high-temperature superconductors at SuperPower Inc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Y.-Y. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States)]. E-mail: yxie@igc.com; Knoll, A. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Chen, Y. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Li, Y. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Xiong, X. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Qiao, Y. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Hou, P. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Reeves, J. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Salagaj, T. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Lenseth, K. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Civale, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Maiorov, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Iwasa, Y. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Solovyov, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Suenaga, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Cheggour, N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Clickner, C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Ekin, J.W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Weber, C. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    SuperPower is focused on scaling up second-generation (2-G) high-temperature superconductor (HTS) technology to pilot-scale manufacturing. The emphasis of this program is to develop R and D solutions for scale-up issues in pilot-scale operations to lay the foundation for a framework for large-scale manufacturing. Throughput continues to be increased in all process steps including substrate polishing, buffer and HTS deposition. 2-G HTS conductors have been produced in lengths up to 100 m. Process optimization with valuable information provided by several unique process control and quality-control tools has yielded performances of 6000-7000 A m (77 K, 0 T) in 50-100 m lengths using two HTS fabrication processes: metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Major progress has been made towards the development of practical conductor configurations. Modifications to the HTS fabrication process have resulted in enhanced performance in magnetic fields. Industrial slitting and electroplating processes have been successfully adopted to fabricate tapes in width of 4 mm and with copper stabilizer for cable and coil applications. SuperPower's conductor configuration has yielded excellent mechanical properties and overcurrent carrying capability. Over 60 m of such practical conductors with critical current over 100 A/cm-width have been delivered to Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. for prototype cable construction.

  14. Effect of temperature downshifts on a bench-scale hybrid A/O system: Process performance and microbial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hexi; Li, Xiangkun; Chu, Zhaorui; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Effect of temperature downshifts on process performance and bacterial community dynamics was investigated in a bench-scale hybrid A/O system treating real domestic wastewater. Results showed that the average COD removal in this system reached 90.5%, 89.1% and 90.3% for Run 1 (25 °C), Run 2 (15 °C) and Run 3 (10 °C), respectively, and variations in temperature barely affected the effluent COD concentration. The average removal efficiencies of NH4(+)-N were 98.4%, 97.8%, 95.7%, and that of TN were 77.1%, 61.8%, 72% at 25 °C, 15 °C and 10 °C, respectively. Although the hybrid system was subjected to low temperature, this process effectively removed NH4(+)-N and TN even at 10 °C with the average effluent concentrations of 2.4 mg/L and 14.3 mg/L, respectively. Results from high-throughput sequencing analysis revealed that when the operation temperature decreased from 25 °C to 10 °C, the richness and diversity indexes of the system decreased in the sludge samples, while underwent an increase in the biofilm samples. Furthermore, the major heterotrophic bacteria consisted of Lewinella, Lutimonas, Chitinophaga and Fluviicola at 10 °C, which could be central to effective COD removal at low temperature. Additionally, Azospira, one denitrifying-related genus increased from 0.4% to 4.45% in the biofilm samples, with a stable TN removal in response to temperature downshifts. Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira increased significantly in the biofilm samples, implying that the attached biofilm contributed to more nitrification at low temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Honey bee forager thoracic temperature inside the nest is tuned to broad-scale differences in recruitment motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Nik; Nieh, James C

    2011-02-01

    Insects that regulate flight muscle temperatures serve as crucial pollinators in a broad range of ecosystems, in part because they forage over a wide span of temperatures. Honey bees are a classic example and maintain their thoracic muscles at temperatures (T(th)) tuned to the caloric benefits of floral resources. Using infrared thermography, we tested the hypothesis that forager motivation to recruit nestmates for a food source is positively correlated with T(th). We trained bees to a sucrose feeder located 5-100 m from the nest. Recruiting foragers had a significantly higher average T(th) (2.7°C higher) when returning from 2.5 mol l(-1) sucrose (65% w/w) than when returning from 1.0 mol l(-1) sucrose (31% w/w). Foragers exhibited significantly larger thermal fluctuations the longer they spent inside the nest between foraging trips. The difference between maximum and minimum temperatures during a nest visit (T(range)) increased with total duration of the nest visit (0.7°C increase per additional min spent inside the nest). Bees that recruited nestmates (waggle or round danced) were significantly warmer, with a 1.4-1.5 times higher ΔT(th) (difference between T(th) and nest ambient air temperature) than bees who tremble danced or simply walked on the nest floor without recruiting between foraging bouts. However, recruiter T(th) was not correlated with finer-scale measures of motivation: the number of waggle dance circuits or waggle dance return phase duration. These results support the hypothesis that forager T(th) within the nest is correlated to broad-scale differences in foraging motivation.

  16. The effect of water contamination on the dew-point temperature scale realization with humidity generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilbaste, M.; Heinonen, M.; Saks, O.; Leito, I.

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of contaminated water in the context of humidity generators. Investigation of different methods to determine the drop in dew-point temperature due to contamination and experiments on actual contamination rates are reported. Different methods for calculating the dew-point temperature effect from electrical conductivity and density measurements are studied with high-purity water and aqueous solutions of NaCl and LiCl. The outcomes of the calculation methods are compared with the results of direct humidity measurements. The results show that the often applied Raoult's law based calculation method is in good agreement with other methods. For studying actual contamination, water samples were kept in glass, plastic, copper and stainless-steel vessels for up to 13 months to investigate natural ionic and organic contamination in vessels with different wall materials. The amount of ionic contamination was found to be higher in copper and glass vessels than in stainless-steel and plastic vessels. The amount of organic contamination was found to be highest in the plastic vessel. In all the cases, however, the corresponding drop in dew-point temperature due to natural contamination was found to be below 0.1 mK. The largest rate of change of dew-point temperature was 26 µK/month. Thus, if proper cleanness is maintained in a humidity generator the effect of contamination of water in the saturator is insignificant compared with the major uncertainty components even in the most accurate generators today.

  17. Decadal-to-century timescale variability of regional and hemispheric scale temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.D.

    1994-01-01

    The fact that the surface temperature of the globe has warmed by 0.3--0.6 C since the mid-nineteenth century is an important piece of evidence in the ''global warming'' debate. What is the magnitude of this warming? Where has it been greatest? How unusual is the recent warming in the context of paleoclimatic reconstructions since A.D. 1500? This article seeks to address these issues by briefly reviewing the available literature

  18. Studies Related to the Oregon State University High Temperature Test Facility: Scaling, the Validation Matrix, and Similarities to the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; William T. Taitano; James R. Wolf; Glenn E. McCreery

    2010-09-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5 year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant project. Because the NRC interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC). Since DOE has incorporated the HTTF as an ingredient in the NGNP thermal-fluids validation program, several important outcomes should be noted: 1. The reference prismatic reactor design, that serves as the basis for scaling the HTTF, became the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR has also been chosen as the reference design for all of the other NGNP thermal-fluid experiments. 2. The NGNP validation matrix is being planned using the same scaling strategy that has been implemented to design the HTTF, i.e., the hierarchical two-tiered scaling methodology developed by Zuber in 1991. Using this approach a preliminary validation matrix has been designed that integrates the HTTF experiments with the other experiments planned for the NGNP thermal-fluids verification and validation project. 3. Initial analyses showed that the inherent power capability of the OSU infrastructure, which only allowed a total operational facility power capability of 0.6 MW, is

  19. A 1500-year reconstruction of annual mean temperature for temperate North America on decadal-to-multidecadal time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trouet, V; Diaz, H F; Wahl, E R; Viau, A E; Graham, R; Graham, N; Cook, E R

    2013-01-01

    We present two reconstructions of annual average temperature over temperate North America: a tree-ring based reconstruction at decadal resolution (1200–1980 CE) and a pollen-based reconstruction at 30 year resolution that extends back to 480 CE. We maximized reconstruction length by using long but low-resolution pollen records and applied a three-tier calibration scheme for this purpose. The tree-ring-based reconstruction was calibrated against instrumental annual average temperatures on annual and decadal scale, it was then reduced to a lower resolution, and was used as a calibration target for the pollen-based reconstruction. Before the late-19th to the early-21st century, there are three prominent low-frequency periods in our extended reconstruction starting at 480 CE, notably the Dark Ages cool period (about 500–700 CE) and Little Ice Age (about 1200–1900 CE), and the warmer medieval climate anomaly (MCA; about 750–1100 CE). The 9th and the 11th century are the warmest centuries and they constitute the core of the MCA in our reconstruction, a period characterized by centennial-scale aridity in the North American West. These two warm peaks are slightly warmer than the baseline period (1904–1980), but nevertheless much cooler than temperate North American temperatures during the early-21st century. (letter)

  20. The tunnel sealing experiment: The construction and performance of full scale clay and concrete bulkheads at elevated pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, J.B.; Dixon, D.A.; Vignal, B.; Fujita, T.

    2006-01-01

    Concepts for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste, as proposed by many international organizations, include bulkheads or plugs in the shaft, or at the entrances to disposal rooms, or both. The seals are primarily to prevent groundwater transport of radioisotopes along underground openings but also provide a measure of security by restricting tunnel access. The safety of the respective disposal systems relies on the combined performance of the natural barriers (host rock) and engineered barriers (the waste form, the waste container, the buffer barrier, the room, tunnel and shaft backfill and sealing materials). To understand the functionality of these systems it is important to study them in whole or in part at full scale. One such study was the Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX), a full-scale tunnel seal component study. The TSX showed it is possible to construct tunnel seals that limit axial flow under high hydraulic gradient and elevated temperature. The clay and concrete bulkheads had seepage rates of 1 mL/min and 10 mL/min at ambient temperature. Elevated temperatures caused a further decrease in seepage past the concrete bulkhead to approximately 2-3 mL/min. (author)

  1. MIXING THE SOLAR WIND PROTON AND ELECTRON SCALES: EFFECTS OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY ON THE OBLIQUE PROTON FIREHOSE INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Viñas, A., E-mail: yana.maneva@wis.kuleuven.be [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons, unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma β and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  2. Beam displacement as a function of temperature and turbulence length scale at two different laser radiation wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isterling, William M; Dally, Bassam B; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dubovinsky, Miro; Wright, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Narrow laser beams directed from aircraft may at times pass through the exhaust plume of the engines and potentially degrade some of the laser beam characteristics. This paper reports on controlled studies of laser beam deviation arising from propagation through turbulent hot gases, in a well-characterized laboratory burner, with conditions of relevance to aircraft engine exhaust plumes. The impact of the temperature, laser wavelength, and turbulence length scale on the beam deviation has been investigated. It was found that the laser beam displacement increases with the turbulent integral length scale. The effect of temperature on the laser beam angular deviation, σ, using two different laser wavelengths, namely 4.67 μm and 632.8 nm, was recorded. It was found that the beam deviation for both wavelengths may be semiempirically modeled using a single function of the form, σ=a(b+(1/T)(2))(-1), with two parameters only, a and b, where σ is in microradians and T is the temperature in °C. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  3. Mixing the Solar Wind Proton and Electron Scales: Effects of Electron Temperature Anisotropy on the Oblique Proton Firehose Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A.; Poedts, S.

    2016-01-01

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons,? unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma ß and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  4. A new scaling law for temperature variance profile in the mixing zone of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin; Xu, Wei; He, Xiao-Zhou; Yik, Hiu-Fai; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Schumacher, Jorg; Tong, Penger

    2017-11-01

    We report a combined experimental and numerical study of the scaling properties of the temperature variance profile η(z) along the central z axis of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a thin disk cell and an upright cylinder of aspect ratio unity. In the mixing zone outside the thermal boundary layer region, the measured η(z) is found to scale with the cell height H in both cells and obey a power law, η(z) (z/H)ɛ, with the obtained values of ɛ being very close to -1. Based on the experimental and numerical findings, we derive a new equation for η(z) in the mixing zone, which has a power-law solution in good agreement with the experimental and numerical results. Our work thus provides a common framework for understanding the effect of boundary layer fluctuations on the scaling properties of the temperature variance profile in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. This work was supported in part by Hong Kong Research Grants Council.

  5. Simulation of atmospheric temperature inversions over greater cairo using the MM5 Meso-Scale atmospheric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, H.A.; Elhadidi, B.M.; Kader, A. A.; Moaty, A.A.; Sherif, A.O.

    2006-01-01

    Air pollution episodes have been recorded in Cairo, during the fall season, since 1999, as a result of specific meteorological conditions combined with large quantity of pollutants created by several ground-based sources. The main reason for the smog-like episodes (black clouds) is adverse weather conditions with low and variable winds, high humidity and strong temperature inversions in the few-hundred meters above the ground. The two important types of temperature inversion affecting the air pollution are surface or ground (radiation) inversion and subsidence (elevated) inversion. The surface temperature inversion is associated with a rapid decrease in the ground surface temperature with the simultaneous existence of warm air in the lower troposphere. The inversion develops at dusk and continues until the surface warms again the following day. Pollutants emitted during the night are caught under this i nversion lid. S ubsidence inversion forms when warm air masses move over colder air masses. The inversion develops with a stagnating high-pressure system (generally associated with fair weather). Under these conditions, the pressure gradient becomes progressively weaker so that winds become light. These light winds greatly reduce the horizontal transport and dispersion of pollutants. At the same time, the subsidence inversion acts as a barrier to the vertical dispersion of the pollutants. In this study, the Penn State/NCAR meso -scale model (MM5) is used to simulate the temperature inversion phenomenon over Greater Cairo region during the fall season of 2004. Accurate computations of the heat transfer at the surface are needed to capture this phenomenon. This can only be achieved by high-resolution simulations in both horizontal and vertical directions. Hence, for accurate simulation of the temperature inversion over Greater Cairo, four nested domains of resolutions of 27 km, 9 km, 3 km and 1 km, respectively, were used in the horizontal planes. Furthermore, 42

  6. Exploiting the atmosphere's memory for monthly, seasonal and interannual temperature forecasting using Scaling LInear Macroweather Model (SLIMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio Amador, Lenin; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, most of the models for prediction of the atmosphere behavior in the macroweather and climate regimes follow a deterministic approach. However, modern ensemble forecasting systems using stochastic parameterizations are in fact deterministic/ stochastic hybrids that combine both elements to yield a statistical distribution of future atmospheric states. Nevertheless, the result is both highly complex (both numerically and theoretically) as well as being theoretically eclectic. In principle, it should be advantageous to exploit higher level turbulence type scaling laws. Concretely, in the case for the Global Circulation Models (GCM's), due to sensitive dependence on initial conditions, there is a deterministic predictability limit of the order of 10 days. When these models are coupled with ocean, cryosphere and other process models to make long range, climate forecasts, the high frequency "weather" is treated as a driving noise in the integration of the modelling equations. Following Hasselman, 1976, this has led to stochastic models that directly generate the noise, and model the low frequencies using systems of integer ordered linear ordinary differential equations, the most well-known are the Linear Inverse Models (LIM). For annual global scale forecasts, they are somewhat superior to the GCM's and have been presented as a benchmark for surface temperature forecasts with horizons up to decades. A key limitation for the LIM approach is that it assumes that the temperature has only short range (exponential) decorrelations. In contrast, an increasing body of evidence shows that - as with the models - the atmosphere respects a scale invariance symmetry leading to power laws with potentially enormous memories so that LIM greatly underestimates the memory of the system. In this talk we show that, due to the relatively low macroweather intermittency, the simplest scaling models - fractional Gaussian noise - can be used for making greatly improved forecasts

  7. Centennial-Scale Relationship Between the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, D. A.; Perren, B.; Roberts, S. J.; Sime, L. C.; Verleyen, E.; Van Nieuwenhuyze, W.; Vyverman, W.

    2017-12-01

    Recent changes in the intensity and position of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds (SHW) have been implicated in a number of important physical changes in the Southern High Latitudes. These include changes in the efficiency of the Southern Ocean CO2 sink through alterations in ocean circulation, the loss of Antarctic ice shelves through enhanced basal melting, changes in Antarctic sea ice extent, and warming of the Antarctic Peninsula. Many of these changes have far-reaching implications for global climate and sea level rise. Despite the importance of the SHW in global climate, our current understanding of the past and future behaviour of the westerly winds is limited by relatively few reconstructions and measurements of the SHW in their core belt over the Antarctic Circumpolar Current; the region most relevant to Southern Ocean air-sea gas exchange. The aim of this study was to reconstruct changes in the relative strength of the SHW at Marion Island, one of a small number of sub-Antarctic islands that lie in the core of the SHWs. We applied independent diatom- and geochemistry- based methods to track past changes in relative wind intensity. This mutiproxy approach provides a validation that the proxies are responding to the external forcing (the SHW) rather than local (e.g. precipitation ) or internal dynamics. Results show that that the strength of the SHW are intrinsically linked to extratropical temperatures over centennial timescales, with warmer temperatures driving stronger winds. Our findings also suggest that large variations in the path and intensity of the westerly winds are driven by relatively small variations in temperature over these timescales. This means that with continued climate warming, even in the absence of anthropogenic ozone-depletion, we should anticipate large shifts in the SHW, causing stronger, more poleward-intensified winds in the decades and centuries to come, with attendant impacts on ocean circulation, ice shelf stability, and

  8. Explaining growth variation over large spatial scales: Effects of temperature and food on walleye growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosgaard, Thomas; Venturelli, Paul; Lester, Nigel P.

    2012-01-01

    freshwater fish species in North America. We then use length at age data from yellow perch (Perca flavescens) to identify the mechanisms behind the remaining variation in the length at age – temperature relationship for walleye. A positive perch – walleye relationship indicates that the mechanism behind......Most fishes exhibit strong spatial variation in growth. Because fish growth and production are tightly linked, quantifying and explaining variation in growth can mean the difference between successful management and unforeseen collapse. However, disentangling the factors that are responsible...

  9. Temperature-induced strain release via rugae on the nanometer and micrometer scale in graphene monolayer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verhagen, Timotheus; Valeš, Václav; Frank, Otakar; Kalbáč, Martin; Vejpravová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 119, Aug (2017), s. 483-491 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S; GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene * wrinkle * low temperature Raman mapping * strain * doping * thermal expansion Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Physical chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  10. Optimization of instant powdered chicken feet broth’s drying temperature and time on pilot plant scale production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayati, N.; Widyaningsih, T. D.

    2018-03-01

    Chicken feet by-product of chicken industries amounted to approximately 65,894 tons/year commonly used as broths. These by-products are potentially produced into an instant form as an anti-inflammatory functional food on industrial scale. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize the critical parameters of the drying process. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum temperature and time of instant powdered chicken feet broth’s drying on pilot plant scale, to find out product’s comparison of the laboratory and pilot plant scale, and to assess financial feasibility of the business plan. The optimization of pilot plant scale’s research prepared and designed with Response Surface Methodology-Central Composite Design. The optimized factors were powdered broth’s drying temperature (55°C, 60°C, 65°C) and time (10 minutes, 11 minutes, 12 minutes) with the response observed were water and chondroitin sulphate content. The optimum condition obtained was drying process with temperature of 60.85°C for 10,05 minutes resulting in 1.90 ± 0.02% moisture content, 32.48 ± 0.28% protein content, 12.05 ± 0.80% fat content, 28.92 ± 0.09 % ash content, 24.64 ± 0.52% carbohydrate content, 1.26 ± 0.05% glucosamine content, 0.99 ± 0.23% chondroitin sulphate content, 50.87 ± 1.00% solubility, 8.59 ± 0.19% water vapour absorption, 0.37% levels of free fatty acid, 13.66 ± 4.49% peroxide number, lightness of 60.33 ± 1.24, yellowness of 3.83 ± 0.26 and redness of 21.77 ± 0.42. Financial analysis concluded that this business project was feasible to run.

  11. Vegetation types alter soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity at the field scale in an estuary wetland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxuan Han

    Full Text Available Vegetation type plays an important role in regulating the temporal and spatial variation of soil respiration. Therefore, vegetation patchiness may cause high uncertainties in the estimates of soil respiration for scaling field measurements to ecosystem level. Few studies provide insights regarding the influence of vegetation types on soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity in an estuary wetland. In order to enhance the understanding of this issue, we focused on the growing season and investigated how the soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity are affected by the different vegetation (Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa and bare soil in the Yellow River Estuary. During the growing season, there were significant linear relationships between soil respiration rates and shoot and root biomass, respectively. On the diurnal timescale, daytime soil respiration was more dependent on net photosynthesis. A positive correlation between soil respiration and net photosynthesis at the Phragmites australis site was found. There were exponential correlations between soil respiration and soil temperature, and the fitted Q10 values varied among different vegetation types (1.81, 2.15 and 3.43 for Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa and bare soil sites, respectively. During the growing season, the mean soil respiration was consistently higher at the Phragmites australis site (1.11 µmol CO2 m(-2 s(-1, followed by the Suaeda salsa site (0.77 µmol CO2 m(-2 s(-1 and the bare soil site (0.41 µmol CO2 m(-2 s(-1. The mean monthly soil respiration was positively correlated with shoot and root biomass, total C, and total N among the three vegetation patches. Our results suggest that vegetation patchiness at a field scale might have a large impact on ecosystem-scale soil respiration. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the differences in vegetation types when using models to evaluate soil respiration in an estuary wetland.

  12. Vegetation Types Alter Soil Respiration and Its Temperature Sensitivity at the Field Scale in an Estuary Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Luo, Yiqi; Rafique, Rashad; Yu, Junbao; Mikle, Nate

    2014-01-01

    Vegetation type plays an important role in regulating the temporal and spatial variation of soil respiration. Therefore, vegetation patchiness may cause high uncertainties in the estimates of soil respiration for scaling field measurements to ecosystem level. Few studies provide insights regarding the influence of vegetation types on soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity in an estuary wetland. In order to enhance the understanding of this issue, we focused on the growing season and investigated how the soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity are affected by the different vegetation (Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa and bare soil) in the Yellow River Estuary. During the growing season, there were significant linear relationships between soil respiration rates and shoot and root biomass, respectively. On the diurnal timescale, daytime soil respiration was more dependent on net photosynthesis. A positive correlation between soil respiration and net photosynthesis at the Phragmites australis site was found. There were exponential correlations between soil respiration and soil temperature, and the fitted Q 10 values varied among different vegetation types (1.81, 2.15 and 3.43 for Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa and bare soil sites, respectively). During the growing season, the mean soil respiration was consistently higher at the Phragmites australis site (1.11 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1), followed by the Suaeda salsa site (0.77 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1) and the bare soil site (0.41 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1). The mean monthly soil respiration was positively correlated with shoot and root biomass, total C, and total N among the three vegetation patches. Our results suggest that vegetation patchiness at a field scale might have a large impact on ecosystem-scale soil respiration. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the differences in vegetation types when using models to evaluate soil respiration in an estuary wetland. PMID:24608636

  13. Implementing high-temperature short-time media treatment in commercial-scale cell culture manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlscheidt, Michael; Charaniya, Salim; Kulenovic, Fikret; Corrales, Mahalia; Shiratori, Masaru; Bourret, Justin; Meier, Steven; Fallon, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The production of therapeutic proteins by mammalian cell culture is complex and sets high requirements for process, facility, and equipment design, as well as rigorous regulatory and quality standards. One particular point of concern and significant risk to supply chain is the susceptibility to contamination such as bacteria, fungi, mycoplasma, and viruses. Several technologies have been developed to create barriers for these agents to enter the process, e.g. filtration, UV inactivation, and temperature inactivation. However, if not implemented during development of the manufacturing process, these types of process changes can have significant impact on process performance if not managed appropriately. This article describes the implementation of the high-temperature short-time (HTST) treatment of cell culture media as an additional safety barrier against adventitious agents during the transfer of a large-scale commercial cell culture manufacturing process. The necessary steps and experiments, as well as subsequent results during qualification runs and routine manufacturing, are shown.

  14. Sodium-immersed self-cooled electromagnetic pump design and development of a large-scale coil for high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oto, Akihiro; Naohara, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Masayoshi; Katsuki, Kenji; Kumazawa, Ryouji

    1995-01-01

    A sodium-immersed, self-cooled electromagnetic (EM) pump was recently studied as a prospective innovative technology to simplify a fast breeder reactor plant system. The EM pump for a primary pump, a pump type, was designed, and the structural concept and the system performance were clarified. For the flow control method, a constant voltage/frequency method was preferable from the point of view of pump performance and efficiency. The insulation life was tested on a large-scale coil at high temperature as part of the development of a large-capacity EM pump. Mechanical and electrical damage were not observed, and the insulation performance was quite good. The insulation system could also be applied to large-scale coils

  15. Root cause analysis of oxide scale forming and shedding in high temperature reheater of a 200MW super high pressure boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Jiang; Hao, Weidong; Hu, Zhihong; Liu, Fuguo

    2015-12-01

    In order to solve the problem of over temperature tube-burst caused by oxide scale shedding and blocking tubes of high temperature reheater of a 200MW super high pressure power plant boiler, this paper expounds the mechanism of scale forming and shedding, and analyzes the probable causes of the tube-burst failure. The results show that the root cause of scale forming is that greater steam extraction flow after reforming of the second extraction leads to less steam flow into reheater, which causes over temperature to some of the heated tubes; and the root cause of scale shedding is that long term operation in AGC-R mode brings about great fluctuations of unit load, steam temperature and pressure, accelerating scale shedding. In conclusion, preventive measures are drawn up considering the operation mode of the unit.

  16. Heat flow and subsurface temperature as evidence for basin-scale ground-water flow, North Slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, D.; Sass, J.H.; Lachenbruch, A.H.; De Rito, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Several high-resolution temperature logs were made in each of 21 drillholes and a total of 601 thermal conductivity measurements were made on drill cuttings and cores. Near-surface heat flow (??20%) is inversely correlated with elevation and ranges from a low of 27 mW/m2 in the foothills of the Brooks Range in the south, to a high of 90 mW/m2 near the north coast. Subsurface temperatures and thermal gradients estimated from corrected BHTs are similarly much higher on the coastal plain than in the foothills province to the south. Significant east-west variation in heat flow and subsurface temperature is also observed; higher heat flow and temperature coincide with higher basement topography. The observed thermal pattern is consistent with forced convection by a topographically driven ground-water flow system. Average ground-water (Darcy) velocity in the postulated flow system is estimated to be of the order of 0.1 m/yr; the effective basin-scale permeability is estimated to be of the order of 10-14 m2. -from Authors

  17. Effects of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) on CIE documentary standards for radiometry, photometry, and colorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mielenz, K.D.; Hsia, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    The differences between ITS-90 and IPTS-68 (International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968) above 1235 K are described. It is shown that none of the following CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage or International Commission on Illumination) definitions or recommendations require revision because of the introduction of the ITS-90: International Lighting Vocabulary definitions; CIE Standard Illuminants A, D(65), other illuminants; and sources for realizing CIE Illuminants. The effect of the ITS-90 on previously calibrated sources for realizing CIE illuminants is negligibly small

  18. A statistical method for model extraction and model selection applied to the temperature scaling of the L–H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peluso, E; Gelfusa, M; Gaudio, P; Murari, A

    2014-01-01

    Access to the H mode of confinement in tokamaks is characterized by an abrupt transition, which has been the subject of continuous investigation for decades. Various theoretical models have been developed and multi-machine databases of experimental data have been collected. In this paper, a new methodology is reviewed for the investigation of the scaling laws for the temperature threshold to access the H mode. The approach is based on symbolic regression via genetic programming and allows first the extraction of the most statistically reliable models from the available experimental data. Nonlinear fitting is then applied to the mathematical expressions found by symbolic regression; this second step permits to easily compare the quality of the data-driven scalings with the most widely accepted theoretical models. The application of a complete set of statistical indicators shows that the data-driven scaling laws are qualitatively better than the theoretical models. The main limitations of the theoretical models are that they are all expressed as power laws, which are too rigid to fit the available experimental data and to extrapolate to ITER. The proposed method is absolutely general and can be applied to the extraction or scaling law from any experimental database of sufficient statistical relevance. (paper)

  19. Scaling Studies for Advanced High Temperature Reactor Concepts, Final Technical Report: October 2014—December 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Brian; Gutowska, Izabela; Chiger, Howard

    2018-03-26

    Computer simulations of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic phenomena are often used in the design and licensing of nuclear reactor systems. In order to assess the accuracy of these computer simulations, computer codes and methods are often validated against experimental data. This experimental data must be of sufficiently high quality in order to conduct a robust validation exercise. In addition, this experimental data is generally collected at experimental facilities that are of a smaller scale than the reactor systems that are being simulated due to cost considerations. Therefore, smaller scale test facilities must be designed and constructed in such a fashion to ensure that the prototypical behavior of a particular nuclear reactor system is preserved. The work completed through this project has resulted in scaling analyses and conceptual design development for a test facility capable of collecting code validation data for the following high temperature gas reactor systems and events— 1. Passive natural circulation core cooling system, 2. pebble bed gas reactor concept, 3. General Atomics Energy Multiplier Module reactor, and 4. prismatic block design steam-water ingress event. In the event that code validation data for these systems or events is needed in the future, significant progress in the design of an appropriate integral-type test facility has already been completed as a result of this project. Where applicable, the next step would be to begin the detailed design development and material procurement. As part of this project applicable scaling analyses were completed and test facility design requirements developed. Conceptual designs were developed for the implementation of these design requirements at the Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF). The original HTTF is based on a ¼-scale model of a high temperature gas reactor concept with the capability for both forced and natural circulation flow through a prismatic core with

  20. Two-temperature model of the energy balance for the plasma of a high-frequency induction discharge near the plasmoid axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, A.V.; Kirpichnikov, A.P.

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of analysis of the equation system for energy balance within near-the-axis range of HF-plasmatron inductor in terms of a two-temperature model one derived the analytical dependences to calculate temperature fields within that range in a two-dimensional definition of the problem. Paper presents the results of calculations carried out for various cross sections of HF-discharge plasmoid. The calculations were carried out for the air plasma under the atmospheric pressure. The derived formulae describe rather accurately distribution of temperature fields near the plasmoid axis and may be applied to tackle rather wide scope of problems dealing with heat transfer [ru

  1. Electric field and temperature scaling of polarization reversal in silicon doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dayu; Guan, Yan; Vopson, Melvin M.; Xu, Jin; Liang, Hailong; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin; Mueller, Johannes; Schenk, Tony; Schroeder, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    HfO 2 -based binary lead-free ferroelectrics show promising properties for non-volatile memory applications, providing that their polarization reversal behavior is fully understood. In this work, temperature-dependent polarization hysteresis measured over a wide applied field range has been investigated for Si-doped HfO 2 ferroelectric thin films. Our study indicates that in the low and medium electric field regimes (E < twofold coercive field, 2E c ), the reversal process is dominated by the thermal activation on domain wall motion and domain nucleation; while in the high-field regime (E > 2E c ), a non-equilibrium nucleation-limited-switching mechanism dominates the reversal process. The optimum field for ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) applications was determined to be around 2.0 MV/cm, which translates into a 2.0 V potential applied across the 10 nm thick films

  2. Investigation of radial power and temperature effects in large-scale reflood experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motley, F.

    1983-01-01

    The largest reflood test facility in the world has been designed and constructed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The experimental test facility, known as the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), models a full-height core section and the four primary loops of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The radial power distribution and temperature distribution were varied during the testing program. The test results indicate that the radial effects, while noticeable, do not appreciably alter the overall quenching behavior of the facility. The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) correctly predicted the experimental results of several of the tests. The code results indicate that the core flow pattern adjusts multidimensionally to mitigate the effects of increased power or stored energy

  3. Conceptual design of current lead for large scale high temperature superconducting rotating machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, T. D.; Kim, J. H.; Park, S. I.; Kim, H. M.

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) rotating machines always require an electric current of from several hundreds to several thousand amperes to be led from outside into cold region of the field coil. Heat losses through the current leads then assume tremendous importance. Consequently, it is necessary to acquire optimal design for the leads which would achieve minimum heat loss during operation of machines for a given electrical current. In this paper, conduction cooled current lead type of 10 MW-Class HTS rotating machine will be chosen, a conceptual design will be discussed and performed relied on the least heat lost estimation between conventional metal lead and partially HTS lead. In addition, steady-state thermal characteristic of each one also is considered and illustrated.

  4. Orbital-scale Central Arctic Ocean Temperature Records from Benthic Foraminiferal δ18O and Ostracode Mg/Ca Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, K.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G. S.; Farmer, J. R.; Poirier, R. K.; Schaller, M. F.

    2017-12-01

    Orbital-scale climate variability is often amplified in the polar region, for example in changes in seawater temperature, sea-ice cover, deep-water formation, ecosystems, heat storage and carbon cycling. Yet, the relationship between the Arctic Ocean and global climate remains poorly understood due largely to limited orbital-scale paleoclimate records, the complicated nature of sea-ice response to climate and limited abundance of deep sea biological proxies. Here we reconstruct central Arctic Ocean bottom temperatures over the last 600 kyr using ostracode Mg/Ca ratios (genus Krithe) and benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope ratios (δ18Obf - I. teretis, O. tener, P. bulloides, C. reniforme, C. wuellerstorfi) in six sediment cores recovered from the Mendeleev and Northwind Ridges (700- 2726 m water depth). We examined glacial-interglacial cycles in Arctic seawater temperatures and Arctic δ18Obf chronostratigraphy to reconcile effects of changing bottom water temperature, ice volume and regional hydrography on δ18Obf records. Results show lower ( 10-12 mmol/mol) interglacial and higher ( 16-23 mmol/mol) glacial Mg/Ca ratios, signifying intermediate depth ocean warming during glacials of up to 2 ºC. These temperature maxima are likely related to a deepening of the halocline and the corresponding deeper influence of warm Atlantic water. Glacial-interglacial δ18Obf ranges are smaller in the Arctic ( 0.8-1‰ VPDB) than in the global ocean ( 1.8 ‰). However, when the distinct glacial-interglacial temperature histories of the Arctic (glacial warming) and global ocean (glacial cooling) are accounted for, both Arctic and global ocean seawater δ18O values (δ18Osw) exhibit similar 1.2-1.3 ‰ glacial-interglacial ranges. Thus, Arctic δ18Obf confirms glacial Arctic warming inferred from ostracode Mg/Ca. This study will discuss the strengths and limitations of applying paired Mg/Ca and oxygen isotope proxies in reconstructing more robust paleoceanographic changes in the

  5. Variations in VLT/UVES-based OH rotational temperatures for time scales from hours to 15 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Stefan; Kimeswenger, Stefan; Proxauf, Bastian; Kausch, Wolfgang; Unterguggenberger, Stefanie; Jones, Amy M.

    2017-04-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) emission is an important tracer of the climate, chemistry, and dynamics of the Earth's mesopause region. However, the relation of intensity variations in different OH lines is not well understood yet. This is critical for the most popular use of OH lines: the estimate of ambient temperatures based on transitions at low rotational levels of the same band. It is possible that the measured variability of the derived rotational temperature does not coincide with changes in the ambient temperature. Such differences can be caused by varying deviations from the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for the population distribution over the considered rotational levels. The non-LTE effects depend on the ratio of the thermalising collisions (mostly related to molecular oxygen) and competing radiative transitions or collisions without thermalisation of the rotational level distribution. Therefore, significant changes in the vertical structure of excited OH and its main quenchers can affect the temperature measurements. We have investigated the variability of OH rotational temperatures and the corresponding contributions of non-LTE effects for different OH bands and time scales up to 15 years based on data of the high-resolution echelle spectrograph UVES at the Very Large Telescope at Cerro Paranal in Chile. In order to link the measured rotational temperatures with the structure of the OH emission layer, we have also studied OH emission and kinetic temperature profiles from the multi-channel radiometer SABER on the TIMED satellite taken between 2002 and 2015. The results show that non-LTE contributions can significantly affect the OH rotational temperatures. Their variations can be especially strong during the night and for high upper vibrational levels of the transitions, where amplitudes of several Kelvins can be measured. They appear to be weak if long-term variations such as those caused by the solar cycle are investigated. These differences in the response

  6. Development of metal-carbon eutectic cells for application as high temperature reference points in nuclear reactor severe accident tests: Results on the Fe-C, Co-C, Ti-C and Ru-C alloys' melting/freezing transformation temperature under electromagnetic induction heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente J.; Journeau, Christophe; Parga, Clemente J.; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of reducing the high temperature measurement uncertainty of nuclear reactor severe accident experimental tests at the PLINIUS platform in Cadarache Research Centre, France, a variety of graphite cells containing a metal-carbon eutectic mix have been tested to assess the melting/freezing temperature reproducibility and their feasibility as calibration cells for thermometers. The eutectic cells have been thermally cycled in an induction furnace to assess the effect of heating/cooling rate, metal purity, graphite crucible design, and binary system constituents on the eutectic transformation temperature. A bi-chromatic pyrometer was used to perform temperature measurements in the graphite cell black cavity containing the metal-carbon eutectic mix. The eutectic points analyzed are all over 1100 C and cover an almost thousand degree span, i.e. from the Fe-Fe 3 C to the Ru-C eutectic. The induction heating permitted the attainment of heating and cooling rates of over 200 C/min under an inert atmosphere. The conducted tests allowed the determination of general trends and peculiarities of the solid. liquid transformation temperature under non-equilibrium and non-steady-state conditions of a variety of eutectic alloys (Fe-C, Co-C, Ti-C and Ru-C binary systems). (authors)

  7. TA [B] Predicting Microstructure-Creep Resistance Correlation in High Temperature Alloys over Multiple Time Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Vikas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-03-06

    DoE-NETL partnered with Purdue University to predict the creep and associated microstructure evolution of tungsten-based refractory alloys. Researchers use grain boundary (GB) diagrams, a new concept, to establish time-dependent creep resistance and associated microstructure evolution of grain boundaries/intergranular films GB/IGF controlled creep as a function of load, environment, and temperature. The goal was to conduct a systematic study that includes the development of a theoretical framework, multiscale modeling, and experimental validation using W-based body-centered-cubic alloys, doped/alloyed with one or two of the following elements: nickel, palladium, cobalt, iron, and copper—typical refractory alloys. Prior work has already established and validated a basic theory for W-based binary and ternary alloys; the study conducted under this project extended this proven work. Based on interface diagrams phase field models were developed to predict long term microstructural evolution. In order to validate the models nanoindentation creep data was used to elucidate the role played by the interface properties in predicting long term creep strength and microstructure evolution.

  8. Measuring α in the early universe: CMB temperature, large-scale structure, and Fisher matrix analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.; Melchiorri, A.; Trotta, R.; Bean, R.; Rocha, G.; Avelino, P. P.; Viana, P. T. P.

    2002-01-01

    We extend our recent work on the effects of a time-varying fine-structure constant α in the cosmic microwave background by providing a thorough analysis of the degeneracies between α and the other cosmological parameters, and discussing ways to break these with both existing and/or forthcoming data. In particular, we present the state-of-the-art cosmic microwave background constraints on α through a combined analysis of the BOOMERanG, MAXIMA and DASI data sets. We also present a novel discussion of the constraints on α coming from large-scale structure observations, focusing in particular on the power spectrum from the 2dF survey. Our results are consistent with no variation in α from the epoch of recombination to the present day, and restrict any such variation to be less than about 4%. We show that the forthcoming Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck experiments will be able to break most of the currently existing degeneracies between α and other parameters, and measure α to better than percent accuracy

  9. The influence of the scale effect and high temperatures on the strength and strains of high performance concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korsun Vladimyr Ivanovych

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most effective way to reduce the structure mass, labor input and expenses for its construction is to use modern high-performance concrete of the classes С50/60… С90/105, which possess high physical and mathematic characteristics. One of the constraints for their implementation in mass construction in Ukraine is that in design standards there are no experimental data on the physical and mathematic properties of concrete of the classes more than С50/60. Also there are no exact statements on calculating reinforced concrete structures made of high-performance concretes.The authors present the results of experimental research of the scale effect and short-term and long-term heating up to +200 ° C influence on temperature and shrinkage strain, on strength and strain characteristics under compression and tensioning of high-strength modified concrete of class C70/85. The application of high performance concretes is challenging in the process of constructing buildings aimed at operating in high technological temperatures: smoke pipes, coolers, basins, nuclear power plants' protective shells, etc. Reducing cross-sections can lead to reducing temperature drops and thermal stresses in the structures.

  10. Bacterial diversity and active biomass in full-scale granular activated carbon filters operated at low water temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarela, Outi E; Härkki, Heli A; Palmroth, Marja R T; Tuhkanen, Tuula A

    2015-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration enhances the removal of natural organic matter and micropollutants in drinking water treatment. Microbial communities in GAC filters contribute to the removal of the biodegradable part of organic matter, and thus help to control microbial regrowth in the distribution system. Our objectives were to investigate bacterial community dynamics, identify the major bacterial groups, and determine the concentration of active bacterial biomass in full-scale GAC filters treating cold (3.7-9.5°C), physicochemically pretreated, and ozonated lake water. Three sampling rounds were conducted to study six GAC filters of different operation times and flow modes in winter, spring, and summer. Total organic carbon results indicated that both the first-step and second-step filters contributed to the removal of organic matter. Length heterogeneity analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes illustrated that bacterial communities were diverse and considerably stable over time. α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, and Nitrospira dominated in all of the GAC filters, although the relative proportion of dominant phylogenetic groups in individual filters differed. The active bacterial biomass accumulation, measured as adenosine triphosphate, was limited due to low temperature, low flux of nutrients, and frequent backwashing. The concentration of active bacterial biomass was not affected by the moderate seasonal temperature variation. In summary, the results provided an insight into the biological component of GAC filtration in cold water temperatures and the operational parameters affecting it.

  11. A model for global diversity in response to temperature change over geological time scales, with reference to planktic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasio, Fabio Vittorio; Liow, Lee Hsiang; Schweder, Tore; De Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben

    2015-01-21

    There are strong propositions in the literature that abiotic factors override biotic drivers of diversity on time scales of the fossil record. In order to study the interaction of biotic and abiotic forces on long term changes, we devise a spatio-temporal discrete-time Markov process model of macroevolution featuring population formation, speciation, migration and extinction, where populations are free to migrate. In our model, the extinction probability of these populations is controlled by latitudinally and temporally varying environment (temperature) and competition. Although our model is general enough to be applicable to disparate taxa, we explicitly address planktic organisms, which are assumed to disperse freely without barriers over the Earth's oceans. While rapid and drastic environmental changes tend to eliminate many species, generalists preferentially survive and hence leave generalist descendants. In other words, environmental fluctuations result in generalist descendants which are resilient to future environmental changes. Periods of stable or slow environmental changes lead to more specialist species and higher population numbers. Simulating Cenozoic diversity dynamics with both competition and the environmental component of our model produces diversity curves that reflect current empirical knowledge, which cannot be obtained with just one component. Our model predicts that the average temperature optimum at which planktic species thrive best has declined over the Neogene, following the trend of global average temperatures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of Sintering Temperature on Mechanical and Physical properties of Mill Scale based Bipolar Plates for PEMFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaerudini, Deni S.; Berliana, Rina; Prakoso, Gatra B.; Insiyanda, Dita R.; Alva, Sagir

    2018-03-01

    This work concerns the utilization of mill scale, a by-product of iron and steel formed during the hot rolling of steel, as a potential material for use as bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). On the other hand, mill scale is considered a very rich in iron source having characteristic required such as for current collector in bipolar plate and would significantly contribute to lower the overall cost of PEMFC based fuel cell systems. In this study, the iron reach source of mill scale powder, after sieving of 150 mesh, was mechanically alloyed with the aluminium source containing 30 wt.% using a shaker mill for 3 h. The mixed powders were then pressed at 300 MPa and sintered at various temperatures of 400, 450 and 500 °C for 1 h under inert gas atmosphere. The structural changes of powder particles during mechanical alloying and after sintering were studied by x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), microhardness measurement, and density - porosity analysis. The details of the performance variation of three different sintering conditions can be preliminary explained by the metallographic and crystallographic structure and phase analysis as well as sufficient mechanical strength of the sintered materials was presented in this report.

  13. Role and status of scaled experiments in the development of fluoride-salt-cooled, high-temperature reactors - 15185

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweibaum, N.; Huddar, L.; Laufer, M.R.; Peterson, P.F.; Hughes, J.T.; Blandford, E.D.; Scarlat, R.O.

    2015-01-01

    Development of fluoride-salt-cooled, high-temperature reactor (FHR) technology requires a better understanding of key hydrodynamic and heat transfer phenomena associated with this novel class of reactors. The use of simulant fluids that can match the most important non dimensional numbers between scaled experiments and prototypical FHR systems enables integral effects tests (IETs) to be performed at reduced cost and difficulty for FHR code validation. The University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) have built a number of IETs and separate effects tests to investigate pebble-bed FHR (PB-FHR) phenomenology using water or simulant oils such as Dowtherm A. PB-FHR pebble motion and porous media flow dynamics have been investigated with UCB's pebble recirculation experiments using water and plastic spheres. Transient flow of high-Prandtl-number fluids around hot spheres has also been investigated by UCB to measure Nusselt numbers in pebble-bed cores, using simulant oils and copper spheres. Finally, single-phase forced/natural circulation has been investigated using the scaled height, reduced flow area loops of the Compact Integral Effects Test facility at UCB and a multi-flow regime loop at UNM, using Dowtherm A oil. The scaling methodology and status of these ongoing experiments are described here

  14. Summer planetary-scale oscillations: aura MLS temperature compared with ground-based radar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Meek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of satellite based sampling brings with it the opportunity to examine virtually any part of the globe. Aura MLS mesospheric temperature data are analysed in a wavelet format for easy identification of possible planetary waves (PW and aliases masquerading as PW. A calendar year, 2005, of eastward, stationary, and westward waves at a selected latitude is shown in separate panels for wave number range −3 to +3 for period range 8 h to 30 days (d. Such a wavelet analysis is made possible by Aura's continuous sampling at all latitudes 82° S–82° N. The data presentation is suitable for examination of years of data. However this paper focuses on the striking feature of a "dish-shaped" upper limit to periods near 2 d in mid-summer, with longer periods appearing towards spring and fall, a feature also commonly seen in radar winds. The most probable cause is suggested to be filtering by the summer jet at 70–80 km, the latter being available from ground based medium frequency radar (MFR. Classically, the phase velocity of a wave must be greater than that of the jet in order to propagate through it. As an attempt to directly relate satellite and ground based sampling, a PW event of period 8d and wave number 2, which appears to be the original rather than an alias, is compared with ground based radar wind data. An appendix discusses characteristics of satellite data aliases with regard to their periods and amplitudes.

  15. Preliminary Laboratory-scale Study Temperature Shape Memory Alloy for Sensor Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippayakul, C.; Petchrak, A.; Wetchagarun, S.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most widespread uses of radiotracers in the industrial applications is the leak detection of the systems. This technique can be applied, for example, to detect leak in heat exchangers or along buried industrial pipelines. Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) is currently conducting R&D on this technique aiming to promote the radiotracer use in Thailand. In this paper, a preliminary study of the leak detection using radiotracer on laboratory-scale was presented. Br-82 was selected for this work due to its chemical property, its suitable half-life and its on-site availability. The radiotracer in form of NH4Br powder was irradiated in Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1) to produce Br-82. The irradiated target was subsequently prepared in the form of aqueous solution in a hot cell ready for injection into the experimental system as the radiotracer. A relatively simplified experimental setup was used with three NaI detectors being placed along the pipelines to measure system flow rate and to detect the leakage from the piping system. The results obtained from the radiotracer technique were compared to those measured by other methods. It is found that the flow rate obtained from the radiotracer technique agreed well with the one obtained from the flow meter. The leak rate result, however, showed discrepancy between results obtained from two different measuring methods indicating that the simplified experimental setup was not adequate for the leak rate study. Hence, further study with more elaborate experimental setup was required before applying this technique in the actual industrial system.

  16. Multi scale study of the plasticity at low temperature in {alpha}-iron: application for the cleavage; Etude multiechelle de la plasticite du fer-{alpha} a basse temperature application au clivage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaussidon, J

    2007-10-15

    An accident inside a nuclear power plant may lead to the cleavage of the nuclear vessel made of bainitic steel. In order to understand the origin of this fracture, we studied BCC-iron plasticity at low temperature using numerical simulations at different scales. Molecular Dynamics simulations show the high dependency of screw dislocation motion with temperature and stress. Results from these simulations were added to experiment data to develop a new Dislocation Dynamics code dedicated to BCC iron at low temperature. The code was used to model plasticity into a ferritic lath for various temperatures. This work confirms that cleavage is favoured by low temperatures. (author)

  17. Critical Causes of Degradation in Integrated Laboratory Scale Cells during High Temperature Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.S. Sohal; J.E. O' Brien; C.M. Stoots; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; S. Elangovan; J.S. Herring; J.D. Carter; V.I. Sharma; B. Yildiz

    2009-05-01

    An ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory involves generating hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC). This report describes background information about SOECs, the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) testing of solid-oxide electrolysis stacks, ILS performance degradation, and post-test examination of SOECs by various researchers. The ILS test was a 720- cell, three-module test comprised of 12 stacks of 60 cells each. A peak H2 production rate of 5.7 Nm3/hr was achieved. Initially, the module area-specific resistance ranged from 1.25 Ocm2 to just over 2 Ocm2. Total H2 production rate decreased from 5.7 Nm3/hr to a steady state value of 0.7 Nm3/hr. The decrease was primarily due to cell degradation. Post test examination by Ceramatec showed that the hydrogen electrode appeared to be in good condition. The oxygen evolution electrode does show delamination in operation and an apparent foreign layer deposited at the electrolyte interface. Post test examination by Argonne National Laboratory showed that the O2-electrode delaminated from the electrolyte near the edge. One possible reason for this delamination is excessive pressure buildup with high O2 flow in the over-sintered region. According to post test examination at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the electrochemical reactions have been recognized as one of the prevalent causes of their degradation. Specifically, two important degradation mechanisms were examined: (1) transport of Crcontaining species from steel interconnects into the oxygen electrode and LSC bond layers in SOECs, and (2) cation segregation and phase separation in the bond layer. INL conducted a workshop October 27, 2008 to discuss possible causes of degradation in a SOEC stack. Generally, it was agreed that the following are major degradation issues relating to SOECs: • Delamination of the O2-electrode and bond layer on the steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites

  18. Optimized Flow Sheet for a Reference Commercial-Scale Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; E. A. Harvego; J. S. Herring

    2007-01-01

    This report presents results from the development and optimization of a reference commercial scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540 C and 900 C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.176 - 10 6 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm-cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 49.07% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.45 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. The information presented in this report is intended to establish an optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant so that parameters can be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics

  19. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE, LARGE-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION, AND CONVECTION OVER THE TROPICAL INDIAN AND PACIFIC OCEANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orbita Roswintiarti

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the quantitative estimates of the effect of large-scale circulations on the sea surface temperature (SST-tropical convection relationship and the effect of SST on the large-scale circulation-convection relationship over the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans are presented. Although convection tends to maximize at warm SSTs, increased deep convection is also determined by the divergence (DIV associated with large-scale circulation. An analysis of the relationship between SST and deep convection shows that under subsidence and clear conditions, there is a decrease in convection or increase in Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR at a maximum rate of 3.4 Wm-2 °C-1. In the SST range of 25°C to 29.5°C, a large increase in deep convection (decrease in OLR occurs in the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans. The OLR reduction is found to be a strong function of the large-scale circulation in the Indian and western Pacific Oceans. Under a weak large-scale circulation, the rate of OLR reduction is about    -3.5 Wm-2 °C-1 to -8.1 Wm-2 °C-1. Under the influence of strong rising motions, the rate can increase to about -12.5 Wm-2 °C-1 for the same SST range. The overall relationship between large-scale circulation and deep convection is nearly linear. A maximum rate of OLR reduction with respect to DIV is -6.1 Wm-2 (10-6 s-1 in the western Pacific Ocean. It is also found that the DIV-OLR relationship is less dependent on SST. For example, the rate of OLR reduction over the western Pacific Ocean for 26°C < SST £ 27°C is -4.2 Wm-2 (10-6 s-1, while that for 28°C < SST £ 29°C is  -5.1 Wm-2 (10-6 s-1. These results are expected to have a great importance for climate feedback mechanisms associated with clouds and SST and for climate predictability.

  20. Current, temperature and confinement time scaling in toroidal reversed-field pinch experiments ZT-I and ZT-S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Burkhardt, L.C.; Di Marco, J.N.; Haberstich, A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Howell, R.B.; Karr, H.J.; Schofield, A.E.

    1977-01-01

    The scaling properties of a toroidal reversed-field Z pinch have been investigated over a limited range by comparing two experiments having conducting walls and discharge-tube minor diameters which differ by a factor of approximately 1.5. Both the confinement time of the plasma column and the electron temperature were found to increase about a factor of two with the increased minor diameter. Both the poloidal field diffusion and the decay of the toroidal reversed field were significantly reduced with the larger tube diameter. These results support the hypothesis that the loss of stability later in the discharge is caused by diffusion-induced deterioration of initially favourable plasma-field profiles to MHD unstable ones. This conclusion has been verified by stability analysis of the magnetic field profiles. Fusion reactor calculations show that small reactors are conceptually possible assuming good containment can be achieved for current densities approximately >20MAm -2 . (author)

  1. Sudden transitions and scaling behavior of geometric quantum correlation for two qubits in quantum critical environments at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Da-Wei; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden transitions in geometric quantum correlation of two qubits in spin chain environments at finite temperature. It is shown that when only one qubit is coupled to the spin environment, the geometric discord exhibits a double sudden transition behavior, which is closely related to the quantum criticality of the spin chain environment. When two qubits are uniformly coupled to a common spin chain environment, the geometric discord is found to display a sudden transition behavior whereby the system transits from pure classical decoherence to pure quantum decoherence. Moreover, an interesting scaling behavior is revealed for the frozen time, and we also present a scheme to prolong the time during which the discord remains constant by applying bang–bang pulses. (paper)

  2. Regional-scale winter-spring temperature variability and chilling damage dynamics over the past two centuries in southeastern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jianping; Zhang, Qi-Bin; Lv, Lixin; Zhang, Chao [Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Beijing (China)

    2012-08-15

    Winter-spring cold extreme is a kind of serious natural disaster for southeastern China. As such events are recorded in discrete documents, long and continuous records are required to understand their characteristics and driving forces. Here we report a regional-scale winter-spring (January-April) temperature reconstruction based on a tree-ring network of pine trees (Pinus massoniana) from five sampling sites over a large spatial scale (25-29 N, 111-115 E) in southeastern China. The regional tree-ring chronology explains 48.6% of the instrumental temperature variance during the period 1957-2008. The reconstruction shows six relatively warm intervals (i.e., {proportional_to}1849-1855, {proportional_to}1871-1888, {proportional_to}1909-1920, {proportional_to}1939-1944, {proportional_to}1958-1968, 1997-2007) and five cold intervals (i.e., {proportional_to}1860-1870, {proportional_to}1893-1908, {proportional_to}1925-1934, {proportional_to}1945-1957, {proportional_to}1982-1996) during 1849-2008. The last decade and the 1930s were the warmest and coldest decades, respectively, in the past 160 years. The composite analysis of 500-hPa geopotential height fields reveals that distinctly different circulation patterns occurred in the instrumental and pre-instrumental periods. The winter-spring cold extremes in southeastern China are associated with Ural-High ridge pattern for the instrumental period (1957-2008), whereas the cold extremes in pre-instrumental period (1871-1956) are associated with North circulation pattern. (orig.)

  3. Small-Scale Gravity Waves in ER-2 MMS/MTP Wind and Temperature Measurements during CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Alexander, M. J.; Bui, T. P.; Mahoney, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    Lower stratospheric wind and temperature measurements made from NASA's high-altitude ER-2 research aircraft during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign in July 2002 were analyzed to retrieve information on small scale gravity waves (GWs) at the aircraft's flight level (typically approximately 20 km altitude). For a given flight segment, the S-transform (a Gaussian wavelet transform) was used to search for and identify small horizontal scale GW events, and to estimate their apparent horizontal wavelengths. The horizontal propagation directions of the events were determined using the Stokes parameter method combined with the cross S-transform analysis. The vertical temperature gradient was used to determine the vertical wavelengths of the events. GW momentum fluxes were calculated from the cross S-transform. Other wave parameters such as intrinsic frequencies were calculated using the GW dispersion relation. More than 100GW events were identified. They were generally high frequency waves with vertical wavelength of approximately 5 km and horizontal wavelength generally shorter than 20 km. Their intrinsic propagation directions were predominantly toward the east, whereas their ground-based propagation directions were primarily toward the west. Among the events, approximately 20% of them had very short horizontal wavelength, very high intrinsic frequency, and relatively small momentum fluxes, and thus they were likely trapped in the lower stratosphere. Using the estimated GW parameters and the background winds and stabilities from the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis data, we were able to trace the sources of the events using a simple reverse ray-tracing. More than 70% of the events were traced back to convective sources in the troposphere, and the sources were generally located upstream of the locations of the events observed at the aircraft level. Finally, a probability density function of the reversible cooling rate due to GWs was obtained in this study, which may be useful for cirrus

  4. Small-scale gravity waves in ER-2 MMS/MTP wind and temperature measurements during CRYSTAL-FACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower stratospheric wind and temperature measurements made from NASA's high-altitude ER-2 research aircraft during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign in July 2002 were analyzed to retrieve information on small scale gravity waves (GWs at the aircraft's flight level (typically ~20 km altitude. For a given flight segment, the S-transform (a Gaussian wavelet transform was used to search for and identify small horizontal scale GW events, and to estimate their apparent horizontal wavelengths. The horizontal propagation directions of the events were determined using the Stokes parameter method combined with the cross S-transform analysis. The vertical temperature gradient was used to determine the vertical wavelengths of the events. GW momentum fluxes were calculated from the cross S-transform. Other wave parameters such as intrinsic frequencies were calculated using the GW dispersion relation. More than 100GW events were identified. They were generally high frequency waves with vertical wavelength of ~5 km and horizontal wavelength generally shorter than 20 km. Their intrinsic propagation directions were predominantly toward the east, whereas their ground-based propagation directions were primarily toward the west. Among the events, ~20% of them had very short horizontal wavelength, very high intrinsic frequency, and relatively small momentum fluxes, and thus they were likely trapped in the lower stratosphere. Using the estimated GW parameters and the background winds and stabilities from the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis data, we were able to trace the sources of the events using a simple reverse ray-tracing. More than 70% of the events were traced back to convective sources in the troposphere, and the sources were generally located upstream of the locations of the events observed at the aircraft level. Finally, a probability density function of the reversible cooling rate due to GWs was obtained in this study, which may be useful for cirrus cloud models.

  5. Modelling temporal and large-scale spatial variability of soil respiration from soil water availability, temperature and vegetation productivity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichstein, M.; Rey, A.; Freibauer, A.; Tenhunen, J.; Valentini, R.; Soil Respiration Synthesis Team

    2003-04-01

    Field-chamber measurements of soil respiration from 17 different forest and shrubland sites in Europe and North America were summarized and analyzed with the goal to develop a model describing seasonal, inter-annual and spatial variability of soil respiration as affected by water availability, temperature and site properties. The analysis was performed at a daily and at a monthly time step. With the daily time step, the relative soil water content in the upper soil layer expressed as a fraction of field capacity was a good predictor of soil respiration at all sites. Among the site variables tested, those related to site productivity (e.g. leaf area index) correlated significantly with soil respiration, while carbon pool variables like standing biomass or the litter and soil carbon stocks did not show a clear relationship with soil respiration. Furthermore, it was evidenced that the effect of precipitation on soil respiration stretched beyond its direct effect via soil moisture. A general statistical non-linear regression model was developed to describe soil respiration as dependent on soil temperature, soil water content and site-specific maximum leaf area index. The model explained nearly two thirds of the temporal and inter-site variability of soil respiration with a mean absolute error of 0.82 µmol m-2 s-1. The parameterised model exhibits the following principal properties: 1) At a relative amount of upper-layer soil water of 16% of field capacity half-maximal soil respiration rates are reached. 2) The apparent temperature sensitivity of soil respiration measured as Q10 varies between 1 and 5 depending on soil temperature and water content. 3) Soil respiration under reference moisture and temperature conditions is linearly related to maximum site leaf area index. At a monthly time-scale we employed the approach by Raich et al. (2002, Global Change Biol. 8, 800-812) that used monthly precipitation and air temperature to globally predict soil respiration (T

  6. Variability of cold season surface air temperature over northeastern China and its linkage with large-scale atmospheric circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuanhuang; Zhang, Jingyong; Wang, Lin

    2018-05-01

    Cold temperature anomalies and extremes have profound effects on the society, the economy, and the environment of northeastern China (NEC). In this study, we define the cold season as the months from October to April, and investigate the variability of cold season surface air temperature (CSAT) over NEC and its relationships with large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns for the period 1981-2014. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis shows that the first EOF mode of the CSAT over NEC is characterized by a homogeneous structure that describes 92.2% of the total variance. The regionally averaged CSAT over NEC is closely linked with the Arctic Oscillation ( r = 0.62, 99% confidence level) and also has a statistically significant relation with the Polar/Eurasian pattern in the cold season. The positive phases of the Arctic Oscillation and the Polar/Eurasian pattern tend to result in a positive geopotential height anomaly over NEC and a weakened East Asian winter monsoon, which subsequently increase the CSAT over NEC by enhancing the downward solar radiation, strengthening the subsidence warming and warm air advection. Conversely, the negative phases of these two climate indices result in opposite regional atmospheric circulation anomalies and decrease the CSAT over NEC.

  7. Response of temperature and density profiles to heat deposition profile and its impact on global scaling in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.

    2002-01-01

    Significant density dependence of the energy confinement time as described in the ISS95 scaling has been demonstrated in the extended parameter regimes in LHD. However, recent experiments have indicated that this density dependence is lost at a certain density under specific conditions. This paper discusses the cause of this saturation and related characteristics of anomalous transport. The saturation of the energy confinement time is observed in the density ramp-up phase of NBI heated plasmas. In contrast to the global energy confinement time, the local heat conduction coefficient still indicates the temperature dependence which is a companion to the density dependence of the energy confinement time. The apparent contradiction between the global confinement and the local transport can be attributed to the change of the heat deposition profile. Through this study, the response of temperature and density profiles to the heat deposition profile is highlighted, which is contrasted to the concept of stiffness or profile consistency observed in tokamaks. The major anomalous transport models based on ITG/TEM and interchange/ballooning modes are assessed. (author)

  8. Global-Scale Associations of Vegetation Phenology with Rainfall and Temperature at a High Spatio-Temporal Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Clinton

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenology response to climatic variables is a vital indicator for understanding changes in biosphere processes as related to possible climate change. We investigated global phenology relationships to precipitation and land surface temperature (LST at high spatial and temporal resolution for calendar years 2008–2011. We used cross-correlation between MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI, MODIS LST and Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN gridded rainfall to map phenology relationships at 1-km spatial resolution and weekly temporal resolution. We show these data to be rich in spatiotemporal information, illustrating distinct phenology patterns as a result of complex overlapping gradients of climate, ecosystem and land use/land cover. The data are consistent with broad-scale, coarse-resolution modeled ecosystem limitations to moisture, temperature and irradiance. We suggest that high-resolution phenology data are useful as both an input and complement to land use/land cover classifiers and for understanding climate change vulnerability in natural and anthropogenic landscapes.

  9. Low-Temperature Soft-Cover Deposition of Uniform Large-Scale Perovskite Films for High-Performance Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Tang, Wentao; Xie, Fengxian; Yin, Maoshu; He, Jinjin; Wang, Yanbo; Chen, Han; Qiang, Yinghuai; Yang, Xudong; Han, Liyuan

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale high-quality perovskite thin films are crucial to produce high-performance perovskite solar cells. However, for perovskite films fabricated by solvent-rich processes, film uniformity can be prevented by convection during thermal evaporation of the solvent. Here, a scalable low-temperature soft-cover deposition (LT-SCD) method is presented, where the thermal convection-induced defects in perovskite films are eliminated through a strategy of surface tension relaxation. Compact, homogeneous, and convection-induced-defects-free perovskite films are obtained on an area of 12 cm 2 , which enables a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.5% on a solar cell with an area of 5 cm 2 . This is the highest efficiency at this large cell area. A PCE of 15.3% is also obtained on a flexible perovskite solar cell deposited on the polyethylene terephthalate substrate owing to the advantage of presented low-temperature processing. Hence, the present LT-SCD technology provides a new non-spin-coating route to the deposition of large-area uniform perovskite films for both rigid and flexible perovskite devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-11-01

    Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

  11. Confinement and the Glass Transition Temperature in Supported Polymer Films: Molecular Weight, Repeat Unit Modification, and Cooperativity Length Scale Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundra, Manish K.

    2005-03-01

    It is well known that the glass transition temperatures, Tgs, of supported polystyrene (PS) films decrease dramatically with decreasing film thickness below 60-80 nm. However, a detailed understanding of the cause of this effect is lacking. We have investigated the impact of several parameters, including polymer molecular weight (MW), repeat unit structure, and the length scale of cooperatively rearranging regions in bulk. There is no significant effect of PS MW on the Tg-confinement effect over a range of 5,000 to 3,000,000 g/mol. In contrast, the strength of the Tg reduction and the onset of the confinement effect increase dramatically upon changing the polymer from PS to poly(4-tert-butylstyrene) (PTBS), with PTBS exhibiting a Tg reduction relative to bulk at a thickness of 300-400 nm. PTBS also shows a Tg reduction relative to bulk of 47 K in a 21-nm-thick film, more than twice that observed in a PS film of identical thickness. Characterization of the length scale of cooperatively rearranging regions has been done by differential scanning calorimetry but reveals at best a limited correlation with the confinement effect.

  12. How Robust Are the Surface Temperature Fingerprints of the Atlantic Overturning Meridional Circulation on Monthly Time Scales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Turner, R.; Ortega, P.; Robson, J. I.

    2018-04-01

    It has been suggested that changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) can drive sea surface temperature (SST) on monthly time scales (Duchez et al., 2016, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017GB005667). However, with only 11 years of continuous observations, the validity of this result over longer, or different, time periods is uncertain. In this study, we use a 120 yearlong control simulation from a high-resolution climate model to test the robustness of the AMOC fingerprints. The model reproduces the observed AMOC seasonal cycle and its variability, and the observed 5-month lagged AMOC-SST fingerprints derived from 11 years of data. However, the AMOC-SST fingerprints are very sensitive to the particular time period considered. In particular, both the Florida current and the upper mid-ocean transport produce highly inconsistent fingerprints when using time periods shorter than 30 years. Therefore, several decades of RAPID observations will be necessary to determine the real impact of the AMOC on SSTs at monthly time scales.

  13. Low-cost multi-vehicle air temperature measurements for heat load assessment in local-scale climate applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuvela-Aloise, Maja; Weyss, Gernot; Aloise, Giulliano; Mifka, Boris; Löffelmann, Philemon; Hollosi, Brigitta; Nemec, Johana; Vucetic, Visnja

    2014-05-01

    In the recent years there has been a strong interest in exploring the potential of low-cost measurement devices as alternative source of meteorological monitoring data, especially in the urban areas where high-density observations become crucial for appropriate heat load assessment. One of the simple, but efficient approaches for gathering large amount of spatial data is through mobile measurement campaigns in which the sensors are attached to driving vehicles. However, non-standardized data collecting procedure, instrument quality, their response-time and design, variable device ventilation and radiation protection influence the reliability of the gathered data. We investigate what accuracy can be expected from the data collected through low-cost mobile measurements and whether the achieved quality of the data is sufficient for validation of the state-of-the-art local-scale climate models. We tested 5 types of temperature sensors and data loggers: Maxim iButton, Lascar EL-USB-2-LCD+ and Onset HOBO UX100-003 as market available devices and self-designed solar powered Arduino-based data loggers combined with the AOSONG AM2315 and Sensirion SHT21 temperature and humidity sensors. The devices were calibrated and tested in stationary mode at the Austrian Weather Service showing accuracy between 0.1°C and 0.8°C, which was mostly within the device specification range. In mobile mode, the best response-time was found for self-designed device with Arduino-based data logger and Sensirion SHT21 sensor. However, the device lacks the mechanical robustness and should be further improved for broad-range applications. We organized 4 measurement tours: two taking place in urban environment (Vienna, Austria in July 2011 and July 2013) and two in countryside with complex terrain of Mid-Adriatic islands (Hvar and Korcula, Croatia in August 2013). Measurements were taken on clear-sky, dry and hot days. We combined multiple devices attached to bicycle and cars with different

  14. Indução floral de limeiras ácidas 'Tahiti' submetidas a baixas temperaturas Flower induction of acid lime trees 'Tahiti' subjected to low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dierlei dos Santos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de quantificar a necessidade de acúmulo de horas de frio para a floração da limeira ácida 'Tahiti', sem a aplicação de deficiência hídrica, além de avaliar as trocas gasosas e fluorescência da clorofila a em condições de baixa temperatura e baixa luminosidade. O experimento foi conduzido em Viçosa-MG, Brasil, com plantas de limeira ácida 'Tahiti', enxertadas sobre limoeiro 'Cravo', cultivadas em vasos de 12 litros. O delineamento utilizado foi o inteiramente casualizado, com sete tratamentos e quatro repetições, com uma planta por parcela. A partir do dia 01/02/2008 até o dia 30/04/2008, quatro plantas foram retiradas da câmara de crescimento (CC (temperatura: 16/12°C (dia/noite; umidade relativa: 70%; fotoperíodo: 10 horas; densidade de fluxo de fótons fotossintéticos: 100µmol m-2 s-1 a cada 15 dias e levadas para a casa de vegetação (CV sem controle ambiental, totalizando sete datas de transferência. A exposição de plantas a baixas temperaturas, sob condições controladas não causou alterações significativas nas características de fluorescência da clorofila a, mas causou redução de 80% nas trocas gasosas. Entretanto, essa redução não prejudicou a floração das plantas. As plantas expostas a condições não indutoras apenas emitiram brotações vegetativas, enquanto aquelas submetidas a baixas temperaturas, quanto maior foi o tempo de exposição, maior foi o número de flores emitidas.The research was realized to quantify the need for accumulation hours under low temperatures to the acid lime 'Tahiti' flowering, without water application and beyond evaluating gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence under low temperature and light. The experiment was conducted in Viçosa-MG, Brazil, with plants from acid lime 'Tahiti' grafted on Rangpur lime grown in pots of 12 liters. The design was completely randomized with seven treatments and four replicates with one

  15. Induction of sporulation and the influence of time, temperature, and inoculum size on growth in two species of aquatic fungi (Saprolegniales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, T.A.; Bradford, K.; Bland, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    Because the infective stage of most mycoses of aquatic organisms is the zoospore, we attempted to establish optimum conditions under which zoospores could be produced for use in antifungal testing. Optimum sporulation time, incubation time, inoculum size, and growth temperature were determined for each oftwo saprolegniaceous fungi, Achlya flagellata Coker and Saprolegnia hypogyna (Pringsheim) de Bary. Both species produced the largest number of zoospores after 18 hours (51.7 spores/ml for A. jlagellata and 848.0 spores/ml for S. hypogyna), and yielded maximum growth after 48 hours at 22 'C. The recommended test inoculum size for S. hypogyna (5,600 spores/ml was nearly three times that for A. flagellata (2,000 spores/ml),

  16. Induction melting for volume reduction of metallic TRU wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Montgomery, D.R.; Katayama, Y.B.; Ross, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Volume reduction of metallic transuranic wastes offers economic and safety incentives for treatment of wastes generated at a hypothetical commercial fuel reprocessing facility. Induction melting has been identified as the preferred process for volume reduction of spent fuel hulls, fuel assembly hardware, and failed equipment from a reprocessing plant. Bench-scale melting of Zircaloy and stainless steel mixtures has been successfully conducted in a graphite crucible inside a large vacuum chamber. A low-melting-temperature alloy forms that has demonstrated excellent leach resistance. The alloy can be used to encapsulate other metallic wastes that cannot be melted using the existing equipment design

  17. Induction melting for volume reduction of metallic TRU wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Montgomery, D.R.; Katayama, Y.B.; Ross, W.A.

    1986-02-01

    Volume reduction of metallic transuranic wastes offers economic and safety incentives for treatment of wastes generated at a hypothetical commercial fuel reprocessing facility. Induction melting has been identified as the preferred process for volume reduction of spent fuel hulls, fuel assembly hardware, and failed equipment from a reprocessing plant. Bench-scale melting of Zircaloy and stainless steel mixtures has been successfully conducted in a graphite crucible inside a large vacuum chamber. A low-melting-temperature alloy forms that has demonstrated excellent leach resistance. The alloy can be used to encapsulate other metallic wastes that cannot be melted using the existing equipment design. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Modeling temporal and large-scale spatial variability of soil respiration from soil water availability, temperature and vegetation productivity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichstein, Markus; Rey, Ana; Freibauer, Annette; Tenhunen, John; Valentini, Riccardo; Banza, Joao; Casals, Pere; Cheng, Yufu; Grünzweig, Jose M.; Irvine, James; Joffre, Richard; Law, Beverly E.; Loustau, Denis; Miglietta, Franco; Oechel, Walter; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Pereira, Joao S.; Peressotti, Alessandro; Ponti, Francesca; Qi, Ye; Rambal, Serge; Rayment, Mark; Romanya, Joan; Rossi, Federica; Tedeschi, Vanessa; Tirone, Giampiero; Xu, Ming; Yakir, Dan

    2003-12-01

    Field-chamber measurements of soil respiration from 17 different forest and shrubland sites in Europe and North America were summarized and analyzed with the goal to develop a model describing seasonal, interannual and spatial variability of soil respiration as affected by water availability, temperature, and site properties. The analysis was performed at a daily and at a monthly time step. With the daily time step, the relative soil water content in the upper soil layer expressed as a fraction of field capacity was a good predictor of soil respiration at all sites. Among the site variables tested, those related to site productivity (e.g., leaf area index) correlated significantly with soil respiration, while carbon pool variables like standing biomass or the litter and soil carbon stocks did not show a clear relationship with soil respiration. Furthermore, it was evidenced that the effect of precipitation on soil respiration stretched beyond its direct effect via soil moisture. A general statistical nonlinear regression model was developed to describe soil respiration as dependent on soil temperature, soil water content, and site-specific maximum leaf area index. The model explained nearly two thirds of the temporal and intersite variability of soil respiration with a mean absolute error of 0.82 μmol m-2 s-1. The parameterized model exhibits the following principal properties: (1) At a relative amount of upper-layer soil water of 16% of field capacity, half-maximal soil respiration rates are reached. (2) The apparent temperature sensitivity of soil respiration measured as Q10 varies between 1 and 5 depending on soil temperature and water content. (3) Soil respiration under reference moisture and temperature conditions is linearly related to maximum site leaf area index. At a monthly timescale, we employed the approach by [2002] that used monthly precipitation and air temperature to globally predict soil respiration (T&P model). While this model was able to

  19. On the induction of homogeneous bulk crystallization in Eu-doped calcium aluminosilicate glass by applying simultaneous high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, R. F., E-mail: robsonfmuniz@yahoo.com.br [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 CNRS-Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, 87020900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Ligny, D. de [Department of Materials Science, Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen Nürnberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Le Floch, S.; Martinet, C.; Guyot, Y. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 CNRS-Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Rohling, J. H.; Medina, A. N.; Sandrini, M.; Baesso, M. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, 87020900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Andrade, L. H. C.; Lima, S. M. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Óptica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, C.P. 351, Dourados, MS (Brazil)

    2016-06-28

    From initial calcium aluminosilicate glass, transparent glass-ceramics have been successfully synthesized under simultaneous high pressure and temperature (SHPT). Possible homogeneous volumetric crystallization of this glassy system, which was not achieved previously by means of conventional heat treatment, has been put in evidence with a SHPT procedure. Structural, mechanical, and optical properties of glass and glass-ceramic obtained were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction allowed to identify two main crystalline phases: merwinite [Ca{sub 3}Mg(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}] and diopside [CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}]. A Raman scanning profile showed that the formation of merwinite is quite homogeneous over the bulk sample. However, the sample surface also contains significant diopside crystals. Instrumented Berkovich nanoindentation was applied to determine the effect of SHPT on hardness from glass to glass-ceramic. For Eu-doped samples, the broadband emission due to 4f{sup 6}5d{sup 1} → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} was studied in both host systems. Additionally, the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub J} transition of Eu{sup 3+} was used as an environment probe in the pristine glass and the glass-ceramic.

  20. Inductive Monitoring System (IMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IMS: Inductive Monitoring System The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) is a tool that uses a data mining technique called clustering to extract models of normal...

  1. High Lipid Induction in Microalgae for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer M. Schenk

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Oil-accumulating microalgae have the potential to enable large-scale biodiesel production without competing for arable land or biodiverse natural landscapes. High lipid productivity of dominant, fast-growing algae is a major prerequisite for commercial production of microalgal oil-derived biodiesel. However, under optimal growth conditions, large amounts of algal biomass are produced, but with relatively low lipid contents, while species with high lipid contents are typically slow growing. Major advances in this area can be made through the induction of lipid biosynthesis, e.g., by environmental stresses. Lipids, in the form of triacylglycerides typically provide a storage function in the cell that enables microalgae to endure adverse environmental conditions. Essentially algal biomass and triacylglycerides compete for photosynthetic assimilate and a reprogramming of physiological pathways is required to stimulate lipid biosynthesis. There has been a wide range of studies carried out to identify and develop efficient lipid induction techniques in microalgae such as nutrients stress (e.g., nitrogen and/or phosphorus starvation, osmotic stress, radiation, pH, temperature, heavy metals and other chemicals. In addition, several genetic strategies for increased triacylglycerides production and inducibility are currently being developed. In this review, we discuss the potential of lipid induction techniques in microalgae and also their application at commercial scale for the production of biodiesel.

  2. Multi-scale approach to Euro-Atlantic climatic cycles based on phenological time series, air temperatures and circulation indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Luigi; Zavatti, Franco

    2017-09-01

    The spectral periods in North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) were analyzed and has been verified how they imprint a time series of European temperature anomalies (ETA), two European temperature time series and some phenological series (dates of cherry flowering and grapevine harvest). Such work had as reference scenario the linear causal chain MCTP (Macroscale Circulation→Temperature→Phenology of crops) that links oceanic and atmospheric circulation to surface air temperature which in its turn determines the earliness of appearance of phenological phases of plants. Results show that in the three segments of the MCTP causal chain are present cycles with the following central period in years (the % of the 12 analyzed time series interested by these cycles are in brackets): 65 (58%), 24 (58%), 20.5 (58%), 13.5 (50%), 11.5 (58%), 7.7 (75%), 5.5 (58%), 4.1 (58%), 3 (50%), 2.4 (67%). A comparison with short term spectral peaks of the four El Niño regions (nino1+2, nino3, nino3.4 and nino4) show that 10 of the 12 series are imprinted by periods around 2.3-2.4yr while 50-58% of the series are imprinted by El Niño periods of 4-4.2, 3.8-3.9, 3-3.1years. The analysis highlights the links among physical and biological variables of the climate system at scales that range from macro to microscale whose knowledge is crucial to reach a suitable understanding of the ecosystem behavior. The spectral analysis was also applied to a time series of spring - summer precipitation in order to evaluate the presence of peaks common with other 12 selected series with result substantially negative which brings us to rule out the existence of a linear causal chain MCPP (Macroscale Circulation→Precipitation→Phenology). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Inductive Reasoning and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, Clay; Boyd, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Induction, properly understood, is not merely a game, nor is it a gimmick, nor is it an artificial way of explaining an element of reasoning. Proper understanding of inductive reasoning--and the various types of reasoning that the authors term inductive--enables the student to evaluate critically other people's writing and enhances the composition…

  4. Comparison of two Centennial-scale Sea Surface Temperature Datasets in the Regional Climate Change Studies of the China Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingyuan, Wang; Yanan, Wang; Yiwei, Liu

    2017-08-01

    Two widely used sea surface temperature (SST) datasets are compared in this article. We examine characteristics in the climate variability of SST in the China Seas.Two series yielded almost the same warming trend for 1890-2013 (0.7-0.8°C/100 years). However, HadISST1 series shows much stronger warming trends during 1961-2013 and 1981-2013 than that of COBE SST2 series. The disagreement between data sets was marked after 1981. For the hiatus period 1998-2013, the cooling trends of HadISST1 series is much lower than that of COBE SST2. These differences between the two datasets are possibly caused by the different observations which are incorporated to fill with data-sparse regions since 1982. Those findings illustrate that there are some uncertainties in the estimate of SST warming patterns in certain regions. The results also indicate that the temporal and spatial deficiency of observed data is still the biggest handicap for analyzing multi-scale SST characteristics in regional area.

  5. Dry corrosion prediction of radioactive waste containers in long term interim storage: mechanisms of low temperature oxidation of pure iron and numerical simulation of an oxide scale growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, N.

    2006-10-01

    In the framework of research on long term behaviour of radioactive waste containers, this work consists on the one hand in the study of low temperature oxidation of iron and on the other hand in the development of a numerical model of oxide scale growth. Isothermal oxidation experiments are performed on pure iron at 300 and 400 C in dry and humid air at atmospheric pressure. Oxide scales formed in these conditions are characterized. They are composed of a duplex magnetite scale under a thin hematite scale. The inner layer of the duplex scale is thinner than the outer one. Both are composed of columnar grains, that are smaller in the inner part. The outer hematite layer is made of very small equiaxed grains. Markers and tracers experiments show that a part of the scale grows at metal/oxide interface thanks to short-circuits diffusion of oxygen. A model for iron oxide scale growth at low temperature is then deduced. Besides this experimental study, the numerical model EKINOX (Estimation Kinetics Oxidation) is developed. It allows to simulate the growth of an oxide scale controlled by mixed mechanisms, such as anionic and cationic vacancies diffusion through the scale, as well as metal transfer at metal/oxide interface. It is based on the calculation of concentration profiles of chemical species and also point defects in the oxide scale and in the substrate. This numerical model does not use the classical quasi-steady-state approximation and calculates the future of cationic vacancies at metal/oxide interface. Indeed, these point defects can either be eliminated by interface motion or injected in the substrate, where they can be annihilated, considering sinks as the climb of dislocations. Hence, the influence of substrate cold-work can be investigated. The EKINOX model is validated in the conditions of Wagner's theory and is confronted with experimental results by its application to the case of high temperature oxidation of nickel. (author)

  6. Effect of the temperature and the CO2 concentration on the behaviour of the citric acid as a scale inhibitor of CaCO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, K.; Aponte, H.; Vera, E.

    2017-12-01

    For all Industrial sector is important to extend the useful life of the materials that they use in their process, the scales of CaCO3 are common in situation where fluids are handled with high concentration of ions and besides this temperatures and CO2 concentration dissolved, that scale generates large annual losses because there is a reduction in the process efficiency or corrosion damage under deposit, among other. In order to find new alternatives to this problem, the citric acid was evaluated as scale of calcium carbonate inhibition in critical condition of temperature and concentration of CO2 dissolved. Once the results are obtained it was carried out the statistical evaluation in order to generate an equation that allow to see that behaviour, giving as result, a good efficiency of inhibition to the conditions evaluated the scales of products obtained were characterized through scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Contrasting trait syndromes in angiosperms and conifers are associated with different responses of tree growth to temperature on a large scale

    OpenAIRE

    Carnicer i Cols, Jofre

    2013-01-01

    Recent large-scale studies of tree growth in the Iberian Peninsula reported contrasting positive and negative effects of temperature in Mediterranean angiosperms and conifers. Here we review the different hypotheses that may explain these trends and propose that the observed contrasting responses of tree growth to temperature in this region could be associated with a continuum of trait differences between angiosperms and conifers. Angiosperm and conifer trees differ in the effects of phenolog...

  8. Contrasting trait syndromes in angiosperms and conifers are associated with different responses of tree growth to temperature on a large scale.

    OpenAIRE

    Jofre eCarnicer; Adria eBarbeta; Dominik eSperlich; Dominik eSperlich; Marta eColl; Josep ePenuelas

    2013-01-01

    Recent large-scale studies of tree growth in the Iberian Peninsula reported contrasting positive and negative effects of temperature in Mediterranean angiosperms and conifers. Here we review the different hypotheses that may explain these trends and propose that the observed contrasting responses of tree growth to temperature in this region could be associated with a continuum of trait differences between angiosperms and conifers. Angiosperm and conifer trees differ in the effects of phenolog...

  9. Implementation of the Peak Scaling Method for Temperature Measurement in the Laser Heated Diamond Anvil Cell at ALS Beamline 12.2.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, M.; MacDowell, A. A.; Yan, J.; Beavers, C.; Doran, A.; Williams, Q. C.

    2016-12-01

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) is an important tool in the quest to correlate seismologically derived density and velocity profiles of the Earth with mineralogical models. Precise and accurate measurement of pressure and temperature is crucial for the LHDAC to be useful. Measuring accurate temperatures of laser-heated samples is an ongoing problem. One of the more promising approaches is the `peak-scaling method' as proposed by Kavner and Panero [2004]. This method relies on imaging the entire hot spot, rather than only the peak region onto the grating of a spectrometer. The temperature derived from the entire hotspot is an `average' temperature of the full hot spot. Combined with a monochromatic intensity map of the hot spot and a single temperature spot on this map (normally the peak temperature), a complete temperature map of the LHDAC can be derived. The crux of the method is to determine an accurate peak temperature. Using MATLAB, we derived systematic dependences of the relationship between average temperature and peak temperature as a function of peak temperature, deviations from the grey body assumption [ɛ = f(T,λ)], size and shape of hotspot, as well as the size and position of the spectral window used for spectral fitting. We find these average-to-peak deviations to be significant (5 - 25 %) and hard to control. To avoid biases introduced into the temperature map by erroneous assumptions on the peak temperature, we implemented on ALS beamline 12.2.2 an iterative way to fit a correct peak temperature based on the measured average temperature and measured monochromatic (700 nm) intensity map of the hot spot. The method calculates an average temperature by inverting the Planck equation on the intensities extracted from the monochromatic hotspot image and compares this value to the value obtained by fitting the Wien approximation to the averaged spectrum of the entire hotspot. The peak temperature is adjusted until the difference between

  10. Induction machine handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Boldea, Ion

    2002-01-01

    Often called the workhorse of industry, the advent of power electronics and advances in digital control are transforming the induction motor into the racehorse of industrial motion control. Now, the classic texts on induction machines are nearly three decades old, while more recent books on electric motors lack the necessary depth and detail on induction machines.The Induction Machine Handbook fills industry's long-standing need for a comprehensive treatise embracing the many intricate facets of induction machine analysis and design. Moving gradually from simple to complex and from standard to

  11. Microstructural Investigations of Al2O3 Scale Formed on FeCrAl Steel during High Temperature Oxidation in SO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, M.; Zurek, Z.; Morgiel, B.; Zieba, P.; Wojewoda, J.

    2008-01-01

    The results of microstructure observations of the Al 2 O 3 scale formed on a Fe-Cr-Al steel during high temperature oxidation in the SO 2 atmosphere are presented. Morphology of the scale has been studied by SEM and TEM techniques. Phase and chemical compositions have been studied by EDX and XRD techniques. The alumina oxide is a primary component of the scale. TEM observations showed that the scale was multilayer. The entire surface of the scale is covered with 'whiskers, which look like very thin platelets and have random orientation. The cross section of a sample shows, that the 'whiskers' are approximately 2 μm high, however the compact scale layer on which they reside is 0.2 μm thick. The scale layer was composed mainly of small equiaxial grains and a residual amount of small columnar grains. EDX analysis of the scale surface showed that the any sulfides were found in the formed outer and thin inner scale layer. A phase analysis of the scale formed revealed that it is composed mainly of the θ-Al 2 O 3 phase and a residual amount of α-Al 2 O 3

  12. Inductance position sensor for pneumatic cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Ripka

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The position of the piston in pneumatic cylinder with aluminum wall can be measured by external inductance sensor without modifications of the aluminum piston and massive iron piston rod. For frequencies below 20 Hz the inductance is increasing with inserting rod due to the rod permeability. This mode has disadvantage of slow response to piston movement and also high temperature sensitivity. At the frequency of 45 Hz the inductance is position independent, as the permeability effect is compensated by the eddy current effect. At higher frequencies eddy current effects in the rod prevail, the inductance is decreasing with inserting rod. In this mode the sensitivity is smaller but the sensor response is fast and temperature stability is better. We show that FEM simulation of this sensor using measured material properties gives accurate results, which is important for the sensor optimization such as designing the winding geometry for the best linearity.

  13. Inductance position sensor for pneumatic cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripka, Pavel; Chirtsov, Andrey; Mirzaei, Mehran; Vyhnanek, Jan

    2018-04-01

    The position of the piston in pneumatic cylinder with aluminum wall can be measured by external inductance sensor without modifications of the aluminum piston and massive iron piston rod. For frequencies below 20 Hz the inductance is increasing with inserting rod due to the rod permeability. This mode has disadvantage of slow response to piston movement and also high temperature sensitivity. At the frequency of 45 Hz the inductance is position independent, as the permeability effect is compensated by the eddy current effect. At higher frequencies eddy current effects in the rod prevail, the inductance is decreasing with inserting rod. In this mode the sensitivity is smaller but the sensor response is fast and temperature stability is better. We show that FEM simulation of this sensor using measured material properties gives accurate results, which is important for the sensor optimization such as designing the winding geometry for the best linearity.

  14. Three dimensional optimization of small-scale axial turbine for low temperature heat source driven organic Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Jubori, Ayad; Al-Dadah, Raya K.; Mahmoud, Saad; Bahr Ennil, A.S.; Rahbar, Kiyarash

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Three-dimensional optimization of axial turbine stage is presented. • Six organic fluids suitable for low-temperature heat source are considered. • Three-dimensional optimization has been done for each working fluid. • The results showed highlight the potential of optimization technique. • The performance of optimized turbine has been improved off-design conditions. - Abstract: Advances in optimization techniques can be used to enhance the performance of turbines in various applications. However, limited work has been reported on using such optimization techniques to develop small-scale turbines for organic Rankine cycles. This paper investigates the use of multi-objective genetic algorithm to optimize the stage geometry of a small-axial subsonic turbine. This optimization is integrated with organic Rankine cycle analysis using wide range of high density organic working fluids like R123, R134a, R141b, R152a, R245fa and isobutane suitable for low temperature heat sources <100 °C such as solar energy to achieve the best turbine design and highest organic Rankine cycle efficiency. The isentropic efficiency of the turbine in most of the reported organic Rankine cycle studies was assumed constant, while the current work allows the turbine isentropic efficiency to change (dynamic value) with both operating conditions and working fluids. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analysis and multi-objective genetic algorithm optimization were performed using three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with k-omega shear stress transport turbulence model in ANSYS"R"1"7-CFX and design exploration for various working fluids. The optimization was carried out using eight design parameters for the turbine stage geometry optimization including stator and rotor number of blades, rotor leading edge beta angle, trailing edge beta angle, stagger angle, throat width, trailing half wedge angle and shroud tip clearance. Results showed that

  15. Contrasting trait syndromes in angiosperms and conifers are associated with different responses of tree growth to temperature on a large scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnicer, Jofre; Brbeta, Adria; Sperlich, Dominik; Coll, Marta; Penuelas, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Recent large-scale studies of tree growth in the Iberian Peninsula reported contrasting positive and negative effects of temperature in Mediterranean angiosperms and conifers. Here we review the different hypotheses that may explain these trends and propose that the observed contrasting responses of

  16. Test results of full-scale high temperature superconductors cable models destined for a 36 kV, 2 kA(rms) utility demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daumling, M.; Rasmussen, C.N.; Hansen, F.

    2001-01-01

    Power cable systems using high temperature superconductors (HTS) are nearing technical feasibility. This presentation summarises the advancements and status of a project aimed at demonstrating a 36 kV, 2 kA(rms) AC cable system by installing a 30 m long full-scale functional model in a power...

  17. High-Resolution Wellbore Temperature Logging Combined with a Borehole-Scale Heat Budget: Conceptual and Analytical Approaches to Characterize Hydraulically Active Fractures and Groundwater Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Meyzonnat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to provide an overview of the thermal processes that shape wellbore temperature profiles under static and dynamic conditions. Understanding of the respective influences of advection and conduction heat fluxes is improved through the use of a new heat budget at the borehole scale. Keeping in mind the thermal processes involved, a qualitative interpretation of the temperature profiles allows the occurrence, the position, and the origin of groundwater flowing into wellbores from hydraulically active fractures to be constrained. With the use of a heat budget developed at the borehole scale, temperature logging efficiency has been quantitatively enhanced and allows inflow temperatures to be calculated through the simultaneous use of a flowmeter. Under certain hydraulic or pumping conditions, both inflow intensities and associated temperatures can also be directly modelled from temperature data and the use of the heat budget. Theoretical and applied examples of the heat budget application are provided. Applied examples are shown using high-resolution temperature logging, spinner flow metering, and televiewing for three wells installed in fractured bedrock aquifers in the St-Lawrence Lowlands, Quebec, Canada. Through relatively rapid manipulations, thermal measurements in such cases can be used to detect the intervals or discrete positions of hydraulically active fractures in wellbores, as well as the existence of ambient flows with a high degree of sensitivity, even at very low flows. Heat budget calculations at the borehole scale during pumping indicate that heat advection fluxes rapidly dominate over heat conduction fluxes with the borehole wall. The full characterization of inflow intensities provides information about the distribution of hydraulic properties with depth. The full knowledge of inflow temperatures indicates horizons that are drained from within the aquifer, providing advantageous information on the depth from which

  18. Development of a versatile high-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization device for small-scale processing of cell culture medium formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Patrick; Curtin, Sean; Kaisermayer, Christian; Lindeberg, Anna; Bones, Jonathan

    2018-07-01

    The compatibility of CHO cell culture medium formulations with all stages of the bioprocess must be evaluated through small-scale studies prior to scale-up for commercial manufacturing operations. Here, we describe the development of a bespoke small-scale device for assessing the compatibility of culture media with a widely implemented upstream viral clearance strategy, high-temperature short-time (HTST) treatment. The thermal stability of undefined medium formulations supplemented with soy hydrolysates was evaluated upon variations in critical HTST processing parameters, namely, holding times and temperatures. Prolonged holding times of 43 s at temperatures of 110 °C did not adversely impact medium quality while significant degradation was observed upon treatment at elevated temperatures (200 °C) for shorter time periods (11 s). The performance of the device was benchmarked against a commercially available mini-pilot HTST system upon treatment of identical formulations on both platforms. Processed medium samples were analyzed by untargeted LC-MS/MS for compositional profiling followed by chemometric evaluation, which confirmed the observed degradation effects caused by elevated holding temperatures but revealed comparable performance of our developed device with the commercial mini-pilot setup. The developed device can assist medium optimization activities by reducing volume requirements relative to commercially available mini-pilot instrumentation and by facilitating fast throughput evaluation of heat-induced effects on multiple medium lots.

  19. Inductive inference for large scale text classification

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Catarina Helena Branco Simões da

    2009-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Informática apresentada à Fac. de Ciências e Tecnologia da Univ. de Coimbra Nas últimas décadas a disponibilidade e importância dos textos em formato digital tem vindo a aumentar exponencialmente, encontrando-se neste momento presentes em quase todos os aspectos da vida moderna. A classificação de textos é deste modo uma área activa de investigação, justificada por muitas aplicações reais. Ainda assim, lidar com a sobrecarga de textos em formato digital e...

  20. Effects of Cooking End-point Temperature and Muscle Part on Sensory 'Hardness' and 'Chewiness' Assessed Using Scales Presented in ISO11036:1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Keisuke; Motoyama, Michiyo; Narita, Takumi; Chikuni, Koichi

    2013-10-01

    Texture and 'tenderness' in particular, is an important sensory characteristic for consumers' satisfaction of beef. Objective and detailed sensory measurements of beef texture have been needed for the evaluation and management of beef quality. This study aimed to apply the sensory scales defined in ISO11036:1994 to evaluate the texture of beef. Longissimus and Semitendinosus muscles of three Holstein steers cooked to end-point temperatures of 60°C and 72°C were subjected to sensory analyses by a sensory panel with expertise regarding the ISO11036 scales. For the sensory analysis, standard scales of 'chewiness' (9-points) and 'hardness' (7-points) were presented to the sensory panel with reference materials defined in ISO11036. As a result, both 'chewiness' and 'hardness' assessed according to the ISO11036 scales increased by increasing the cooking end-point temperature, and were different between Longissimus and Semitendinosus muscles. The sensory results were in good agreement with instrumental texture measurements. However, both texture ratings in this study were in a narrower range than the full ISO scales. For beef texture, ISO11036 scales for 'chewiness' and 'hardness' are useful for basic studies, but some alterations are needed for practical evaluation of muscle foods.

  1. Effects of Cooking End-point Temperature and Muscle Part on Sensory ‘Hardness’ and ‘Chewiness’ Assessed Using Scales Presented in ISO11036:1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Sasaki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Texture and ‘tenderness’ in particular, is an important sensory characteristic for consumers’ satisfaction of beef. Objective and detailed sensory measurements of beef texture have been needed for the evaluation and management of beef quality. This study aimed to apply the sensory scales defined in ISO11036:1994 to evaluate the texture of beef. Longissimus and Semitendinosus muscles of three Holstein steers cooked to end-point temperatures of 60°C and 72°C were subjected to sensory analyses by a sensory panel with expertise regarding the ISO11036 scales. For the sensory analysis, standard scales of ‘chewiness’ (9-points and ‘hardness’ (7-points were presented to the sensory panel with reference materials defined in ISO11036. As a result, both ‘chewiness’ and ‘hardness’ assessed according to the ISO11036 scales increased by increasing the cooking end-point temperature, and were different between Longissimus and Semitendinosus muscles. The sensory results were in good agreement with instrumental texture measurements. However, both texture ratings in this study were in a narrower range than the full ISO scales. For beef texture, ISO11036 scales for ‘chewiness’ and ‘hardness’ are useful for basic studies, but some alterations are needed for practical evaluation of muscle foods.

  2. Controls on seasonal patterns of maximum ecosystem carbon uptake and canopy-scale photosynthetic light response: contributions from both temperature and photoperiod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoy, Paul C; Trowbridge, Amy M; Bauerle, William L

    2014-02-01

    Most models of photosynthetic activity assume that temperature is the dominant control over physiological processes. Recent studies have found, however, that photoperiod is a better descriptor than temperature of the seasonal variability of photosynthetic physiology at the leaf scale. Incorporating photoperiodic control into global models consequently improves their representation of the seasonality and magnitude of atmospheric CO2 concentration. The role of photoperiod versus that of temperature in controlling the seasonal variability of photosynthetic function at the canopy scale remains unexplored. We quantified the seasonal variability of ecosystem-level light response curves using nearly 400 site years of eddy covariance data from over eighty Free Fair-Use sites in the FLUXNET database. Model parameters describing maximum canopy CO2 uptake and the initial slope of the light response curve peaked after peak temperature in about 2/3 of site years examined, emphasizing the important role of temperature in controlling seasonal photosynthetic function. Akaike's Information Criterion analyses indicated that photoperiod should be included in models of seasonal parameter variability in over 90% of the site years investigated here, demonstrating that photoperiod also plays an important role in controlling seasonal photosynthetic function. We also performed a Granger causality analysis on both gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and GEP normalized by photosynthetic photon flux density (GEP n ). While photoperiod Granger-caused GEP and GEP n in 99 and 92% of all site years, respectively, air temperature Granger-caused GEP in a mere 32% of site years but Granger-caused GEP n in 81% of all site years. Results demonstrate that incorporating photoperiod may be a logical step toward improving models of ecosystem carbon uptake, but not at the expense of including enzyme kinetic-based temperature constraints on canopy-scale photosynthesis.

  3. Development of micro-scale axial and radial turbines for low-temperature heat source driven organic Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Jubori, Ayad; Daabo, Ahmed; Al-Dadah, Raya K.; Mahmoud, Saad; Ennil, Ali Bahr

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • One and three-dimensional analysis with real gas properties are integrated. • Micro axial and radial-inflow turbines configurations are investigated. • Five organic working fluids are considered. • The maximum total isentropic efficiency of radial-inflow turbine 83.85%. • The maximum ORC thermal efficiency based on radial-inflow turbine is 10.60%. - Abstract: Most studies on the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) focused on parametric studies and selection working fluids to maximize the performance of organic Rankine cycle but without attention for turbine design features which are crucial to achieving them. The rotational speed, expansion ratio, mass flow rate and turbine size have markedly effect on turbine performance. For this purpose organic Rankine cycle modeling, mean-line design and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analysis were integrated for both micro axial and radial-inflow turbines with five organic fluids (R141b, R1234yf, R245fa, n-butane and n-pentane) for realistic low-temperature heat source <100 °C like solar and geothermal energy. Three-dimensional simulation is performed using ANSYS"R"1"7-CFX where three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with k-omega shear stress transport turbulence model. Both configurations of turbines are designed at wide range of mass flow rate (0.1–0.5) kg/s for each working fluid. The results showed that n-pentane has the highest performance at all design conditions where the maximum total-to-total efficiency and power output of radial-inflow turbine are 83.85% and 8.893 kW respectively. The performance of the axial turbine was 83.48% total-to-total efficiency and 8.507 kW power output. The maximum overall size of axial turbine was 64.685 mm compared with 70.97 mm for radial-inflow turbine. R245fa has the lowest overall size for all cases. The organic Rankine cycle thermal efficiency was about 10.60% with radial-inflow turbine and 10.14% with axial turbine

  4. A Picea crassifolia Tree-Ring Width-Based Temperature Reconstruction for the Mt. Dongda Region, Northwest China, and Its Relationship to Large-Scale Climate Forcing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    Full Text Available The historical May-October mean temperature since 1831 was reconstructed based on tree-ring width of Qinghai spruce (Picea crassifolia Kom. collected on Mt. Dongda, North of the Hexi Corridor in Northwest China. The regression model explained 46.6% of the variance of the instrumentally observed temperature. The cold periods in the reconstruction were 1831-1889, 1894-1901, 1908-1934 and 1950-1952, and the warm periods were 1890-1893, 1902-1907, 1935-1949 and 1953-2011. During the instrumental period (1951-2011, an obvious warming trend appeared in the last twenty years. The reconstruction displayed similar patterns to a temperature reconstruction from the east-central Tibetan Plateau at the inter-decadal timescale, indicating that the temperature reconstruction in this study was a reliable proxy for Northwest China. It was also found that the reconstruction series had good consistency with the Northern Hemisphere temperature at a decadal timescale. Multi-taper method spectral analysis detected some low- and high-frequency cycles (2.3-2.4-year, 2.8-year, 3.4-3.6-year, 5.0-year, 9.9-year and 27.0-year. Combining these cycles, the relationship of the low-frequency change with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO, North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO and Southern Oscillation (SO suggested that the reconstructed temperature variations may be related to large-scale atmospheric-oceanic variations. Major volcanic eruptions were partly reflected in the reconstructed temperatures after high-pass filtering; these events promoted anomalous cooling in this region. The results of this study not only provide new information for assessing the long-term temperature changes in the Hexi Corridor of Northwest China, but also further demonstrate the effects of large-scale atmospheric-oceanic circulation on climate change in Northwest China.

  5. Determination of osmium concentrations and (187)Os/(188)Os of crude oils and source rocks by coupling high-pressure, high-temperature digestion with sparging OsO(4) into a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Indra S; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard

    2014-03-18

    The (187)Os/(188)Os ratio that is based on the β(-)-decay of (187)Re to (187)Os (t1/2 = 41.6 billion years) is widely used to investigate petroleum system processes. Despite its broad applicability to studies of hydrocarbon deposits worldwide, a suitable matrix-matched reference material for Os analysis does not exist. In this study, a method that enables Os isotope measurement of crude oil with in-line Os separation and purification from the sample matrix is proposed. The method to analyze Os concentration and (187)Os/(187)Os involves sample digestion under high pressure and high temperature using a high pressure asher (HPA-S, Anton Paar), sparging of volatile osmium tetroxide from the sample solution, and measurements using multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). This methods significantly reduced the total procedural time compared to conventional Carius tube digestion followed by Os separation and purification using solvent extraction, microdistillation and N-TIMS analysis. The method yields Os concentration (28 ± 4 pg g(-1)) and (187)Os/(188)Os (1.62 ± 0.15) of commercially available crude oil reference material NIST 8505 (1 S.D., n = 6). The reference material NIST 8505 is homogeneous with respect to Os concentration at a test portion size of 0.2 g. Therefore, (187)Os/(188)Os composition and Os concentration of NIST 8505 can serve as a matrix-matched reference material for Os analysis. Data quality was assessed by repeated measurements of the USGS shale reference material SCo-1 (sample matrix similar to petroleum source rock) and the widely used Liquid Os Standard solution (LOsSt). The within-laboratory reproducibility of (187)Os/(188)Os for a 5 pg of LOsSt solution, analyzed with this method over a period of 12 months was ∼1.4% (1 S.D., n = 26), respectively.

  6. Urofollitropin and ovulation induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wely, Madelon; Yding Andersen, Claus; Bayram, Neriman; van der Veen, Fulco

    2005-01-01

    Anovulation is a common cause of female infertility. Treatment for women with anovulation is aimed at induction of ovulation. Ovulation induction with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is indicated in women with WHO type II anovulation in whom treatment with clomifene citrate (clomifene) has

  7. Reduction of statistic scale applied to data of the CCM3 to generate data of temperature of the air in surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Lizcano Alicia; Bernal Suarez, Nestor Ricardo; Martinez Collantes, Jorge; Pabon Jose Daniel; Vega Rodriguez, Emel

    2000-01-01

    The technique is applied of statistical down scaling to find the relations between the variables simulated by a Climate Community Model, in its third version (CCM3) available on the closest grid points near three stations in the Guajira region in north-eastern Colombia, and the surface temperature at those stations. As training (or calibrating)period we chose the years from 1969 to 1990, while the phase of assessment was from 1991 to 1998. The method used was the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) The results were good insofar as the relations obtained approximate satisfactorily the real behaviour of the surface air temperature at the three stations

  8. Inductance loop and partial

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Clayton R

    2010-01-01

    "Inductance is an unprecedented text, thoroughly discussing "loop" inductance as well as the increasingly important "partial" inductance. These concepts and their proper calculation are crucial in designing modern high-speed digital systems. World-renowned leader in electromagnetics Clayton Paul provides the knowledge and tools necessary to understand and calculate inductance." "With the present and increasing emphasis on high-speed digital systems and high-frequency analog systems, it is imperative that system designers develop an intimate understanding of the concepts and methods in this book. Inductance is a much-needed textbook designed for senior and graduate-level engineering students, as well as a hands-on guide for working engineers and professionals engaged in the design of high-speed digital and high-frequency analog systems."--Jacket.

  9. Half Bridge Inductive Heater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán GERMÁN-SALLÓ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Induction heating performs contactless, efficient and fast heating of conductive materials, therefore became one of the preferred heating procedure in industrial, domestic and medical applications. During induction heating the high-frequency alternating currents that heat the material are induced by means of electromagnetic induction. The material to be heated is placed inside the time-varying magnetic field generated by applying a highfrequency alternating current to an induction coil. The alternating electromagnetic field induces eddy currents in the workpiece, resulting resistive losses, which then heat the material. This paper describes the design of a power electronic converter circuit for induction heating equipment and presents the obtained results. The realized circuit is a low power half bridge resonant inverter which uses power MOS transistors and adequate driver circuits.

  10. Pore Scale Thermal Hydraulics Investigations of Molten Salt Cooled Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactor with BCC and FCC Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixiong Song

    2014-01-01

    CFD results and empirical correlations’ predictions of pressure drop and local Nusselt numbers. Local pebble surface temperature distributions in several default conditions are investigated. Thermal removal capacities of molten salt are confirmed in the case of nominal condition; the pebble surface temperature under the condition of local power distortion shows the tolerance of pebble in extreme neutron dose exposure. The numerical experiments of local pebble insufficient cooling indicate that in the molten salt cooled pebble bed reactor, the pebble surface temperature is not very sensitive to loss of partial coolant. The methods and results of this paper would be useful for optimum designs and safety analysis of molten salt cooled pebble bed reactors.

  11. Characteristics of oxide scale formed on Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel during early stages of high temperature oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan, E-mail: swaminathan@kist.re.kr [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136 791 (Korea, Republic of); Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kim, Dong-Ik, E-mail: dongikkim@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136 791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Initial oxidation characteristics of Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel at 650 °C were studied. • Strong segregation and oxidation of Mn and Nb were found in the entire oxide scale. • Surface coverage by metallic Cu-rich precipitates increases with exposure time. • Chemical heterogeneity of oxide scale revealed initial oxidation to be non-selective. • Fe-Cr and Mn-Cr mixed oxides were realized along with binary oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn. - Abstract: Oxide scale evolution on Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel 304H at 650 °C, in ambient air, for exposure times 100, 300, 500 and 1000 h, has been investigated. Surface morphology and chemistry of the oxide scale grown were examined using SEM/EDX and XPS. The oxidation kinetics was determined by measuring the weight change using an electronic balance. At the initial stage, up to 500 h of exposure time, the oxidation rate was rapid due to surface reactions governed primarily by oxygen ingress, and then, dropped to a low rate after prolonged oxidation for 1000 h. The diffusion of reactants through the initially formed oxide scale limits the oxidation rate at longer times, thus, the progress of reaction followed the parabolic kinetics. The formed oxide scale was enriched significantly with segregation and subsequent oxidation of Nb, and finely dispersed metallic Cu particles. Within the time frame of oxidation, the oxide scale was mainly composed of mixed oxides such as FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} along with the binary oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn. Moreover, the precipitation fraction of Cu-rich particles on the oxide scale increased markedly with increase of exposure times. The chemical heterogeneity of oxide scale suggests that the oxidation occurred in a non-selective manner.

  12. Identifying conditions for inducible protein production in E. coli: combining a fed-batch and multiple induction approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Young J

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the interest of generating large amounts of recombinant protein, inducible systems have been studied to maximize both the growth of the culture and the production of foreign proteins. Even though thermo-inducible systems were developed in the late 1970's, the number of studies that focus on strategies for the implementation at bioreactor scale is limited. In this work, the bacteriophage lambda PL promoter is once again investigated as an inducible element but for the production of green fluorescent protein (GFP. Culture temperature, induction point, induction duration and number of inductions were considered as factors to maximize GFP production in a 20-L bioreactor. Results It was found that cultures carried out at 37°C resulted in a growth-associated production of GFP without the need of an induction at 42°C. Specific production was similar to what was achieved when separating the growth and production phases. Shake flask cultures were used to screen for desirable operating conditions. It was found that multiple inductions increased the production of GFP. Induction decreased the growth rate and substrate yield coefficients; therefore, two time domains (before and after induction having different kinetic parameters were created to fit a model to the data collected. Conclusion Based on two batch runs and the simulation of culture dynamics, a pre-defined feeding and induction strategy was developed to increase the volumetric yield of a temperature regulated expression system and was successfully implemented in a 20-L bioreactor. An overall cell density of 5.95 g DW l-1 was achieved without detriment to the cell specific production of GFP; however, the production of GFP was underestimated in the simulations due to a significant contribution of non-growth associated product formation under limiting nutrient conditions.

  13. Correlation between δ18O in precipitation and surface air temperature on different time-scale in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lin; Chen Zongyu; Nie Zhenlong; Liu Fuliang; Jia Yankun; Zhang Xiangyang

    2008-01-01

    The relation between isotopic compositions of precipitation and surface air temperature provides a unique tool for paleoclimate studies, among which the relation between long term changes in δ 18 O of precipitation and surface air temperature at different stations or in a given location seems to be the most appropriate to paleoclimatic reconstructions. Analysis was conducted on monthly and annual mean δ 18 O content of precipitation and surface air temperature at spatial and fixed locations by using the data of China (1985-2002) in Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) Database. This study shows that there is a positive correlation between δ 18 O of precipitation and surface air temperature for stations located in north of 34 degree-36 degree N latitudes. The seasonal δ 18 O-temperature gradient derived from the monthly data of 12 stations in northern China is about 0.034% degree C -1 . The δ 18 O-temperature gradient, however, derived from the long term annual mean data of 13 stations, is about 0.052% degree C -1 , which is substantially larger than the seasonal gradient. (authors)

  14. Temperature Dependence in Heterogeneous Nucleation with Application to the Direct Determination of Cluster Energy on Nearly Molecular Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Robert L; Winkler, Paul M; Wagner, Paul E

    2017-12-04

    A re-examination of measurements of heterogeneous nucleation of water vapor on silver nanoparticles is presented here using a model-free framework that derives the energy of critical cluster formation directly from measurements of nucleation probability. Temperature dependence is correlated with cluster stabilization by the nanoparticle seed and previously found cases of unusual increasing nucleation onset saturation ratio with increasing temperature are explained. A necessary condition for the unusual positive temperature dependence is identified, namely that the critical cluster be more stable, on a per molecule basis, than the bulk liquid to exhibit the effect. Temperature dependence is next examined in the classical Fletcher model, modified here to make the energy of cluster formation explicit in the model.  The contact angle used in the Fletcher model is identified as the microscopic contact angle, which can be directly obtained from heterogeneous nucleation experimental data by a recently developed analysis method. Here an equivalent condition, increasing contact angle with temperature, is found necessary for occurrence of unusual temperature dependence. Our findings have immediate applications to atmospheric particle formation and nanoparticle detection in condensation particle counters (CPCs).

  15. Photosynthetic responses to temperature across leaf-canopy-ecosystem scales: a 15-year study in a Californian oak-grass savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Siyan; Osuna, Jessica L; Verfaillie, Joseph; Baldocchi, Dennis D

    2017-06-01

    Ecosystem CO 2 fluxes measured with eddy-covariance techniques provide a new opportunity to retest functional responses of photosynthesis to abiotic factors at the ecosystem level, but examining the effects of one factor (e.g., temperature) on photosynthesis remains a challenge as other factors may confound under circumstances of natural experiments. In this study, we developed a data mining framework to analyze a set of ecosystem CO 2 fluxes measured from three eddy-covariance towers, plus a suite of abiotic variables (e.g., temperature, solar radiation, air, and soil moisture) measured simultaneously, in a Californian oak-grass savanna from 2000 to 2015. Natural covariations of temperature and other factors caused remarkable confounding effects in two particular conditions: lower light intensity at lower temperatures and drier air and soil at higher temperatures. But such confounding effects may cancel out. At the ecosystem level, photosynthetic responses to temperature did follow a quadratic function on average. The optimum value of photosynthesis occurred within a narrow temperature range (i.e., optimum temperature, T opt ): 20.6 ± 0.6, 18.5 ± 0.7, 19.2 ± 0.5, and 19.0 ± 0.6 °C for the oak canopy, understory grassland, entire savanna, and open grassland, respectively. This paradigm confirms that photosynthesis response to ambient temperature changes is a functional relationship consistent across leaf-canopy-ecosystem scales. Nevertheless, T opt can shift with variations in light intensity, air dryness, or soil moisture. These findings will pave the way to a direct determination of thermal optima and limits of ecosystem photosynthesis, which can in turn provide a rich resource for baseline thresholds and dynamic response functions required for predicting global carbon balance and geographic shifts of vegetative communities in response to climate change.

  16. Cold crucible induction melter studies for making glass ceramic waste forms: A feasibility assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Jarrod; Maio, Vince; McCloy, John; Scott, Clark; Riley, Brian; Benefiel, Brad; Vienna, John; Archibald, Kip; Rodriguez, Carmen; Rutledge, Veronica; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joe; Olszta, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Glass ceramics are being developed to immobilize fission products, separated from used nuclear fuel by aqueous reprocessing, into a stable waste form suitable for disposal in a geological repository. This work documents the glass ceramic formulation at bench scale and for a scaled melter test performed in a pilot-scale (∼1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). Melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling were measured on a small set of compositions to select a formulation for melter testing. Property measurements also identified a temperature range for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form. Bench scale and melter run results successfully demonstrate the processability of the glass ceramic using the CCIM melter technology

  17. Design and Experimental Verification of a 0.19 V 53 μW 65 nm CMOS Integrated Supply-Sensing Sensor With a Supply-Insensitive Temperature Sensor and an Inductive-Coupling Transmitter for a Self-Powered Bio-sensing System Using a Biofuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Atsuki; Ikeda, Kei; Ogawa, Yudai; Kai, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Nakazato, Kazuo; Niitsu, Kiichi

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we present a self-powered bio-sensing system with the capability of proximity inductive-coupling communication for supply sensing and temperature monitoring. The proposed bio-sensing system includes a biofuel cell as a power source and a sensing frontend that is associated with the CMOS integrated supply-sensing sensor. The sensor consists of a digital-based gate leakage timer, a supply-insensitive time-domain temperature sensor, and a current-driven inductive-coupling transmitter and achieves low-voltage operation. The timer converts the output voltage from a biofuel cell to frequency. The temperature sensor provides a pulse width modulation (PWM) output that is not dependent on the supply voltage, and the associated inductive-coupling transmitter enables proximity communication. A test chip was fabricated in 65 nm CMOS technology and consumed 53 μW with a supply voltage of 190 mV. The low-voltage-friendly design satisfied the performance targets of each integrated sensor without any trimming. The chips allowed us to successfully demonstrate proximity communication with an asynchronous receiver, and the measurement results show the potential for self-powered operation using biofuel cells. The analysis and experimental verification of the system confirmed their robustness.

  18. Influence of sintering temperature in red ceramic with addition of mill scale; Influencia da temperatura de sinterizacao em ceramica vermelha com adicao de carepa/residuo de laminacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnt, A.B.C.; Rocha, M.R.; Bernardin, A.M.; Meller, J.G., E-mail: anb@unesc.ne [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil). Engenharia de Materiais. Lab. de Fenomenos de Superficies e Tratamentos Termicos

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of sintering temperature in a red ceramic body with the addition of mill scale. This residue consists of oxides of iron had to replace the function of pigments used in ceramic materials. After chemical characterization, by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, this residue was added at a rate of 5% in commercial ceramic past. The formulations were subjected to different burn temperatures of around 950 deg C, 1000 deg C and 1200 deg C. The formulations were evaluated for physical loss to fire, linear firing shrinkage, water absorption and flexural strength by 3 and intensity of tone. The results indicate that the different firing temperatures influence the strength and stability of tone in the formulations tested. (author)

  19. Review of induction LINACS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.

    1981-10-01

    There has been a recent upsurge of activity in the field of induction linacs, with several new machines becoming operational and others in the design stages. The performance levels of electron machines have reached 10's of kiloamps of current and will soon reach 10's of MeV's of energy. Acceleration of ion current has been demonstrated, and the study of a 10 GeV heavy ion induction linac for ICF continues. The operating principles of induction linacs are reviewed with the emphasis on design choices which are important for increasing the maximum beam currents

  20. Review of induction linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.

    1982-01-01

    There has been a recent upsurge of activity in the field of induction linacs, with several new machines becoming operational and others in the design stages. The performance levels of electron machines have reached 10's of kiloamps of current and will soon reach 10's of MeV's of energy. Acceleration of several kiloamps of ion current has been demonstrated, and the study of a 10 GeV heavy ion induction linac for ICF continues. The operating principles of induction linacs are reviewed with the emphasis on design choices which are important for increasing the maximum beam currents

  1. Properties of inductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, E

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the main psychological phenomena of inductive reasoning, covering 25 years of experimental and model-based research, in particular addressing four questions. First, what makes a case or event generalizable to other cases? Second, what makes a set of cases generalizable? Third, what makes a property or predicate projectable? Fourth, how do psychological models of induction address these results? The key results in inductive reasoning are outlined, and several recent models, including a new Bayesian account, are evaluated with respect to these results. In addition, future directions for experimental and model-based work are proposed.

  2. Parametric Evaluation of Large-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Using Different Advanced Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvego, Edwin A.; McKellar, Michael G.; O'Brien, James E.; Herring, J. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered

  3. Multi-scale modelling of the physicochemical-mechanical coupling of fuel behaviour at high temperature in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julien, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    Within the frame of the problematic of pellet-sheath interaction in a nuclear fuel rod, a good description of the fuel thermo-mechanical behaviour is required. This research thesis reports the coupling of physics-chemistry (simulation of gas transfers between different cavities) and mechanics (assessment of fuel viscoplastic strains). A new micromechanical model is developed which uses a multi-scale approach to describe the evolution of the double population of cavities (cavities with two different scales) while taking internal pressures as well as the fuel macroscopic viscoplastic behaviour into account. The author finally describes how to couple this micromechanical mode to physics-chemistry models [fr

  4. Induction melter apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Jay A [Idaho Falls, ID; Richardson, John G [Idaho Falls, ID; Raivo, Brian D [Idaho Falls, ID; Soelberg, Nicholas R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-06-17

    Apparatus and methods of operation are provided for a cold-crucible-induction melter for vitrifying waste wherein a single induction power supply may be used to effect a selected thermal distribution by independently energizing at least two inductors. Also, a bottom drain assembly may be heated by an inductor and may include an electrically resistive heater. The bottom drain assembly may be cooled to solidify molten material passing therethrough to prevent discharge of molten material therefrom. Configurations are provided wherein the induction flux skin depth substantially corresponds with the central longitudinal axis of the crucible. Further, the drain tube may be positioned within the induction flux skin depth in relation to material within the crucible or may be substantially aligned with a direction of flow of molten material within the crucible. An improved head design including four shells forming thermal radiation shields and at least two gas-cooled plenums is also disclosed.

  5. Nano-Scale Au Supported on Carbon Materials for the Low Temperature Water Gas Shift (WGS Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Sánchez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Au-based catalysts supported on carbon materials with different structures such as graphite (G and fishbone type carbon nanofibers (CNF-F were prepared using two different methods (impregnation and gold-sol to be tested in the water gas shift (WGS reaction. Atomic absorption spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, elemental analyses (CNH, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR and temperature-programmed decomposition were employed to characterize both the supports and catalysts. Both the crystalline nature of the carbon supports and the method of gold incorporation had a strong influence on the way in which Au particles were deposited on the carbon surface. The higher crystallinity and the smaller and well dispersed Au particle size were, the higher activity of the catalysts in the WGS reaction was noted. Finally, catalytic activity showed an important dependence on the reaction temperature and steam-to-CO molar ratio.

  6. Simulating the impact of the large-scale circulation on the 2-m temperature and precipitation climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of the simulated large-scale atmospheric circulation on the regional climate is examined using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model as a regional climate model. The purpose is to understand the potential need for interior grid nudging for dynamical downscal...

  7. Improving the energy efficiency of a pilot-scale UASB-digester for low temperature domestic wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Shengnan; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shengle; Zeeman, Grietje; Rijnaarts, Huub; Liu, Yang

    2018-01-01

    A pilot-scale UASB-Settler-Digester (USD) system was utilized to treat raw municipal wastewater collected from a sewer system at 10 °C. During the reactor operation, UASB sludge was continuously transferred from the UASB to a settler; concentrated sludge in the settler was then transferred to a

  8. Linear induction accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  9. Advanced evaluation of asphalt mortar for induction healing purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolidis, P.; Liu, X.; Scarpas, Athanasios; Kasbergen, C.; van de Ven, M.F.C.

    2016-01-01

    Induction heating technique is an innovative asphalt pavement maintenance method that is applied to inductive asphalt concrete mixes in order to prevent the formation of macro-cracks by increasing locally the temperature of asphalt. The development of asphalt mixes with improved electrical and

  10. Linear induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1986-06-01

    The development of linear induction accelerators has been motivated by applications requiring high-pulsed currents of charged particles at voltages exceeding the capability of single-stage, diode-type accelerators and at currents too high for rf accelerators. In principle, one can accelerate charged particles to arbitrarily high voltages using a multi-stage induction machine, but the 50-MeV, 10-kA Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at LLNL is the highest voltage machine in existence at this time. The advent of magnetic pulse power systems makes sustained operation at high-repetition rates practical, and this capability for high-average power is very likely to open up many new applications of induction machines in the future. This paper surveys the US induction linac technology with primary emphasis on electron machines. A simplified description of how induction machines couple energy to the electron beam is given, to illustrate many of the general issues that bound the design space of induction linacs

  11. The Teleconnection of the Tropical Atlantic to Indo-Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures on Inter-Annual to Centennial Time Scales: A Review of Recent Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Kucharski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the teleconnections from the tropical Atlantic to the Indo-Pacific region from inter-annual to centennial time scales will be reviewed. Identified teleconnections and hypotheses on mechanisms at work are reviewed and further explored in a century-long pacemaker coupled ocean-atmosphere simulation ensemble. There is a substantial impact of the tropical Atlantic on the Pacific region at inter-annual time scales. An Atlantic Niño (Niña event leads to rising (sinking motion in the Atlantic region, which is compensated by sinking (rising motion in the central-western Pacific. The sinking (rising motion in the central-western Pacific induces easterly (westerly surface wind anomalies just to the west, which alter the thermocline. These perturbations propagate eastward as upwelling (downwelling Kelvin-waves, where they increase the probability for a La Niña (El Niño event. Moreover, tropical North Atlantic sea surface temperature anomalies are also able to lead La Niña/El Niño development. At multidecadal time scales, a positive (negative Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation leads to a cooling (warming of the eastern Pacific and a warming (cooling of the western Pacific and Indian Ocean regions. The physical mechanism for this impact is similar to that at inter-annual time scales. At centennial time scales, the Atlantic warming induces a substantial reduction of the eastern Pacific warming even under CO2 increase and to a strong subsurface cooling.

  12. A large-scale layered stationary convection of a incompressible viscous fluid under the action of shear stresses at the upper boundary. Temperature and presure field investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natal'ya V. Burmasheva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new exact solution of an overdetermined system of Oberbeck–Boussinesq equations that describes a stationary shear flow of a viscous incompressible fluid in an infinite layer is under study. The given exact solution is a generalization of the Ostroumov–Birich class for a layered unidirectional flow. In the proposed solution, the horizontal velocities depend only on the transverse coordinate z. The temperature field and the pressure field are three-dimensional. In contradistinction to the Ostroumov–Birich solution, in the solution presented in the paper the horizontal temperature gradients are linear functions of the $z$ coordinate. This structure of the exact solution allows us to find a nontrivial solution of the Oberbeck–Boussinesq equations by means of the identity zero of the incompressibility equation. This exact solution is suitable for investigating large-scale flows of a viscous incompressible fluid by quasi-two-dimensional equations. Convective fluid motion is caused by the setting of tangential stresses on the free boundary of the layer. Inhomogeneous thermal sources are given on both boundaries. The pressure in the fluid at the upper boundary coincides with the atmospheric pressure. The paper focuses on the study of temperature and pressure fields, which are described by polynomials of three variables. The features of the distribution of the temperature and pressure profiles, which are polynomials of the seventh and eighth degree, respectively, are discussed in detail. To analyze the properties of temperature and pressure, algebraic methods are used to study the number of roots on a segment. It is shown that the background temperature and the background pressure are nonmonotonic functions. The temperature field is stratified into zones that form the thermocline and the thermal boundary layer near the boundaries of the fluid layer. Investigation of the properties of the pressure field showed that it is stratified

  13. Extrapolation of radiation thermometry scales for determining the transition temperature of metal-carbon points. Experiments with the Co-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battuello, M.; Girard, F.; Florio, M.

    2009-02-01

    Four independent radiation temperature scales approximating the ITS-90 at 900 nm, 950 nm and 1.6 µm have been realized from the indium point (429.7485 K) to the copper point (1357.77 K) which were used to derive by extrapolation the transition temperature T90(Co-C) of the cobalt-carbon eutectic fixed point. An INRIM cell was investigated and an average value T90(Co-C) = 1597.20 K was found with the four values lying within 0.25 K. Alternatively, thermodynamic approximated scales were realized by assigning to the fixed points the best presently available thermodynamic values and deriving T(Co-C). An average value of 1597.27 K was found (four values lying within 0.25 K). The standard uncertainties associated with T90(Co-C) and T(Co-C) were 0.16 K and 0.17 K, respectively. INRIM determinations are compatible with recent thermodynamic determinations on three different cells (values lying between 1597.11 K and 1597.25 K) and with the result of a comparison on the same cell by an absolute radiation thermometer and an irradiance measurement with filter radiometers which give values of 1597.11 K and 1597.43 K, respectively (Anhalt et al 2006 Metrologia 43 S78-83). The INRIM approach allows the determination of both ITS-90 and thermodynamic temperature of a fixed point in a simple way and can provide valuable support to absolute radiometric methods in defining the transition temperature of new high-temperature fixed points.

  14. Response of temperature and density profiles to heat deposition profile and its impact on global scaling in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Murakami, S.; Yamazaki, K.

    2002-01-01

    Energy confinement and heat transport of net current-free NBI-heated plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD) are discussed with an emphasis on density dependence. Although the apparent density dependence of the energy confinement time has been demonstrated in a wide parameter range in LHD, the loss of this dependence has been observed in the high density regime under the specific condition. Broad heat deposition due to off-axis alignment and shallow penetration of neutral beams degrades the global energy confinement while the local heat transport maintains a clear temperature dependence lying between Bohm and gyro-Bohm characteristics. The central heat deposition inclines towards an intrinsic density dependence like τ E ∝(n-bar e /P) 0.6 from the saturated state. The broadening of the temperature profile due to the broad heat deposition profile contrasts with the invariant property which has observed widely as profile consistency and stiffness in tokamak experiments. (author)

  15. Response of temperature and density profiles to heat deposition profile and its impact on global scaling in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Murakami, S.; Yamazaki, K.

    2003-01-01

    Energy confinement and heat transport of net current-free NBI-heated plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD) are discussed with an emphasis on density dependence. Although the apparent density dependence of the energy confinement time has been demonstrated in a wide parameter range in LHD, the loss of this dependence has been observed in the high density regime under the specific condition. Broad heat deposition due to off-axis alignment and shallow penetration of neutral beams degrades the global energy confinement while the local heat transport maintains a clear temperature dependence lying between Bohm and gyro-Bohm characteristics. The central heat deposition inclines towards an intrinsic density dependence like τ E ∝(n-bars e /P) 0.6 from the saturated state. The broadening of the temperature profile due to the broad heat deposition profile contrasts with the invariant property which has observed widely as profile consistency and stiffness in tokamak experiments. (author)

  16. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20degN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  17. Experiments on the Scaling of Ionization Balance vs. Electron and Radiation Temperature in Non-LTE Gold Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeter, R.F.; Hansen, S.B.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Foord, M.E.; Fournier, K.B.; Froula, D.H.; Mackinnon, A.J.; May, M.J.; Schneider, M.B.; Young, B.K.F.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding and predicting the behavior of high-Z non-LTE plasmas is important for developing indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion. Extending earlier work from the Nova laser, we present results from experiments using the Omega laser to study the ionization balance of gold as a function of electron and radiation temperature. In these experiments, gold samples embedded in Be disks expand under direct laser heating to ne ≅ 1021cm-3, with Te varying from 0.8 to 2.5 keV. An additional finite radiation field with effective temperature Tr up to 150 eV is provided by placing the gold Be disks inside truncated 1.2 mm diameter tungsten-coated cylindrical hohlraums with full laser entrance holes. Densities are measured by imaging of plasma expansion. Electron temperatures are diagnosed with either 2ω or 4ω Thomson scattering, and also K-shell spectroscopy of KCl tracers co-mixed with the gold. Hohlraum flux and effective radiation temperature are measured using an absolutely-calibrated multichannel filtered diode array. Spectroscopic measurements of the M-shell gold emission in the 2.9-4 keV spectral range provide ionization balance and charge state distribution information. The spectra show strong variation with Te, strong variation with the applied Tr, at Te below 1.6 keV, and relatively little variation with Tr at higher Te (upwards of 2 keV). We summarize our most recent spectral analyses and discuss emerging and outstanding issues

  18. Growth mechanisms of oxide scales on ODS alloys in the temperature range 1000-1100deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    After a short overview of the production, microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel- and iron-based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, the oxidation properties of this class of materials is extensively discussed. The excellent oxidation resistance of ODS alloys is illustrated by comparing their behaviour with conventional chromia and alumina forming wrought alloys of the same base composition. ODS alloys exhibit improved scale adherence, decreased oxide growth rates, enhanced selective oxidation and decreased oxide grain size compared to corresponding non-ODS alloys. It is shown, that these experimental observations can be explained by a change in oxide growth mechanism. The presence of the oxide dispersion reduces cation diffusion in the scale, causing the oxides on the ODS alloys to grow mainly by oxygen grain boundary transport. As oxide grain size increases with time, the oxide growth kinetics obey a sub-parabolic time dependence especially in the case of the alumina forming iron-based ODS alloy. (orig.) [de

  19. The influence of large-scale climatic patterns on precipitation, temperature, and discharge in Czech river basins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípek, Václav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2013), s. 278-285 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300600901 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : macro-scale climatic patterns * cidlina river * Blanice river * hydrometeorology Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2013 http://147.213.145.2/vc/vc1.asp

  20. 2012/13 abnormal cold winter in Japan associated with Large-scale Atmospheric Circulation and Local Sea Surface Temperature over the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Y.; Ogi, M.; Tachibana, Y.

    2013-12-01

    On Japan, wintertime cold wave has social, economic, psychological and political impacts because of the lack of atomic power stations in the era of post Fukushima world. The colder winter is the more electricity is needed. Wintertime weather of Japan and its prediction has come under the world spotlight. The winter of 2012/13 in Japan was abnormally cold, and such a cold winter has persisted for 3 years. Wintertime climate of Japan is governed by some dominant modes of the large-scale atmospheric circulations. Yasunaka and Hanawa (2008) demonstrated that the two dominant modes - Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Pacific (WP) pattern - account for about 65% of the interannual variation of the wintertime mean surface air temperature of Japan. A negative AO brings about cold winter in Japan. In addition, a negative WP also brings about cold winter in Japan. Looking back to the winter of 2012/13, both the negative AO and negative WP continued from October through December. If the previous studies were correct, it would have been extremely very cold from October through December. In fact, in December, in accordance with previous studies, it was colder than normal. Contrary to the expectation, in October and November, it was, however, warmer than normal. This discrepancy signifies that an additional hidden circumstance that heats Japan overwhelms these large-scale atmospheric circulations that cool Japan. In this study, we therefore seek an additional cause of wintertime climate of Japan particularly focusing 2012 as well as the AO and WP. We found that anomalously warm oceanic temperature surrounding Japan overwhelmed influences of the AO or WP. Unlike the inland climate, the island climate can be strongly influenced by surrounding ocean temperature, suggesting that large-scale atmospheric patterns alone do not determine the climate of islands. (a) Time series of a 5-day running mean AO index (blue) as defined by Ogi et al., (2004), who called it the SVNAM index. For

  1. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carlos F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Trent, D.; Stewart, E.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  2. Electrical-thermal coupling of induction machine for improved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrical-thermal coupling of induction machine for improved thermal performance. ... Nigerian Journal of Technology ... The interaction of its electrical and mechanical parts leads to an increase in temperature which if not properly monitored ...

  3. VIBROCASTING CRUCIBLES OF DIFFERENT COMPOSITION FOR FRYING INDUCTION MELTING ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Primachenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that PSC «UKRNIIO them. A.S.Berezhnogo  has developed technologies for a wide range of induction melting temperature alloys and started commercial production of crucibles of different composition.

  4. VIBROCASTING CRUCIBLES OF DIFFERENT COMPOSITION FOR FRYING INDUCTION MELTING ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Primachenko; V. V. Martynenko; I. G. Szulik; S. V. Chaplyanko; L. V. Gritsyuk; L. P. Tkachenko

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that PSC «UKRNIIO them. A.S.Berezhnogo  has developed technologies for a wide range of induction melting temperature alloys and started commercial production of crucibles of different composition.

  5. Relationship between the induction frequency and LTE in inductively coupled plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostaghimi, J.; Boulos, M.I.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of the induction frequency on the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions in an inductively coupled plasma is investigated. Using generators with frequencies ranging from 5 to 56 MHz, a previous study investigated demonstrated the importance of this effect. Their measurements of the excitation temperatures of the iron atomic lines showed a sharp decrease in this temperature as a result of the increase in frequency. Another conclusion was that, all other parameters constant, increase in frequency will help the promotion of non-LTE effects

  6. Evaluation and scale-up of intermediate temperature (700{sup o}C) solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, J.

    1999-10-01

    This 3-year development and evaluation of materials and fabrication processes for ITSOFC has resulted in a successful demonstration of the components developed. A 120 mm 5-cell stack was operated over 2000 hours at high fuel utilisation using steam reformed CH{sub 4} at temperatures between 630{sup o}C to 675{sup o}C. Cost effective materials were largely used resulting in a 45% reduction of costs compared to state of the art SOFC stacks. The demonstration of a large stack was, however, only partially successful due to the inherent thermomechanical weakness of the key component, the CGO electrolyte. (author)

  7. Model evaluation of temperature dependency for carbon and nitrogen removal in a full-scale activated sludge plant treating leather-tanning wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgün, Erdem; Insel, Güçlü; Artan, Nazik; Orhon, Derin

    2007-05-01

    Organic carbon and nitrogen removal performance of a full-scale activated sludge plant treating pre-settled leather tanning wastewater was evaluated under dynamic process temperatures. Emphasis was placed upon observed nitrogen removal depicting a highly variable magnitude with changing process temperatures. As the plant was not specifically designed for this purpose, observed nitrogen removal could be largely attributed to simultaneous nitrification and denitrification presumably occurring at increased process temperatures (T>25 degrees C) and resulting low dissolved oxygen levels (DO<0.5 mgO2/L). Model evaluation using long-term data revealed that the yearly performance of activated sludge reactor could be successfully calibrated by means of temperature dependent parameters associated with nitrification, hydrolysis, ammonification and endogenous decay parameters. In this context, the Arrhenius coefficients of (i) for the maximum autotrophic growth rate, [image omitted]A, (ii) maximum hydrolysis rate, khs and (iii) endogenous heterotrophic decay rate, bH were found to be 1.045, 1.070 and 1.035, respectively. The ammonification rate (ka) defining the degradation of soluble organic nitrogen could not be characterized however via an Arrhenius-type equation.

  8. An experimental study on the influence of water stagnation and temperature change on water quality in a full-scale domestic drinking water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatanović, Lj; van der Hoek, J P; Vreeburg, J H G

    2017-10-15

    The drinking water quality changes during the transport through distribution systems. Domestic drinking water systems (DDWSs), which include the plumbing between the water meter and consumer's taps, are the most critical points in which water quality may be affected. In distribution networks, the drinking water temperature and water residence time are regarded as indicators of the drinking water quality. This paper describes an experimental research on the influence of stagnation time and temperature change on drinking water quality in a full-scale DDWS. Two sets of stagnation experiments, during winter and summer months, with various stagnation intervals (up to 168 h of stagnation) were carried out. Water and biofilms were sampled at two different taps, a kitchen and a shower tap. Results from this study indicate that temperature and water stagnation affect both chemical and microbial quality in DDWSs, whereas microbial parameters in stagnant water appear to be driven by the temperature of fresh water. Biofilm formed in the shower pipe contained more total and intact cells than the kitchen pipe biofilm. Alphaproteobacteria were found to dominate in the shower biofilm (78% of all Proteobacteria), while in the kitchen tap biofilm Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were evenly distributed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling the contributions of global air temperature, synoptic-scale phenomena and soil moisture to near-surface static energy variability using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Sara C.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Schoof, Justin T.

    2017-12-01

    The static energy content of the atmosphere is increasing on a global scale, but exhibits important subglobal and subregional scales of variability and is a useful parameter for integrating the net effect of changes in the partitioning of energy at the surface and for improving understanding of the causes of so-called warming holes (i.e., locations with decreasing daily maximum air temperatures (T) or increasing trends of lower magnitude than the global mean). Further, measures of the static energy content (herein the equivalent potential temperature, θe) are more strongly linked to excess human mortality and morbidity than air temperature alone, and have great relevance in understanding causes of past heat-related excess mortality and making projections of possible future events that are likely to be associated with negative human health and economic consequences. New nonlinear statistical models for summertime daily maximum and minimum θe are developed and used to advance understanding of drivers of historical change and variability over the eastern USA. The predictor variables are an index of the daily global mean temperature, daily indices of the synoptic-scale meteorology derived from T and specific humidity (Q) at 850 and 500 hPa geopotential heights (Z), and spatiotemporally averaged soil moisture (text">SM). text">SM is particularly important in determining the magnitude of θe over regions that have previously been identified as exhibiting warming holes, confirming the key importance of text">SM in dictating the partitioning of net radiation into sensible and latent heat and dictating trends in near-surface T and θe. Consistent with our a priori expectations, models built using artificial neural networks (ANNs) out-perform linear models that do not permit interaction of the predictor variables (global T, synoptic-scale meteorological conditions and text">SM). This is particularly marked in regions with high variability in minimum and maximum θe, where

  10. Numerical investigation of room-temperature deformation behavior of a duplex type γTiAl alloy using a multi-scale modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, M.R.; Chernova, L.; Bartsch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Room-temperature deformation of a niobium-rich TiAl alloy with duplex microstructure has been numerically investigated. The model links the microstructural features at micro- and meso-scale by the two-level (FE 2 ) multi-scale approach. The deformation mechanisms of the considered phases were described in the micro-mechanical crystal-plasticity model. Initial material parameters for the model were taken from the literature and validated using tensile experiments at macro-scale. For the niobium-rich TiAl alloy further adaptation of the crystal plasticity parameters is proposed. Based on these model parameters, the influences of the grain orientation, grain size, and texture on the global mechanical behavior have been investigated. The contributions of crystal deformation modes (slips and dislocations in the phases) to the mechanical response are also analyzed. The results enable a quantitative prediction of relationships between microstructure and mechanical behavior on global and local scale, including an assessment of possible crack initiation sites. The model can be used for microstructure optimization to obtain better material properties.

  11. Symmetry control using beam phasing in ∼0.2 NIF scale high temperature Hohlraum experiment on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delamater, Norman D.; Wilson, Goug C.; Kyrala, George A.; Seifter, Achim; Hoffman, N.M.; Dodd, E.; Glebov, V.

    2009-01-01

    Results are shown from recent experiments at the Omega laser facility, using 40 Omega beams driving the hohlraum with 3 cones from each side and up to 19.5 kJ of laser energy. Beam phasing is achieved by decreasing the energy separately in each of the three cones, by 3 kJ, for a total drive energy of 16.5kJ. This results in a more asymmetric drive, which will vary the shape of the imploded symmetry capsule core from round to oblate or prolate in a systematic and controlled manner. These results would be the first demonstration of beam phasing for implosions in such 'high temperature' (275 eV) hohlraums at Omega. Dante measurements confirmed the predicted peak drive temperatures of 275 eV. Implosion core time dependent x-ray images were obtained from framing camera data which show the expected change in symmetry due to beam phasing and which also agree well with post processed hydro code calculations. Time resolved hard x-ray data has been obtained and it was found that the hard x-rays are correlated mainly with the low angle 21 o degree cone.

  12. 3D Online Submicron Scale Observation of Mixed Metal Powder's Microstructure Evolution in High Temperature and Microwave Compound Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influence on the mechanical properties caused by microstructure evolution of metal powder in extreme environment, 3D real-time observation of the microstructure evolution of Al-Ti mixed powder in high temperature and microwave compound fields was realized by using synchrotron radiation computerized topography (SR-CT technique; the spatial resolution was enhanced to 0.37 μm/pixel through the designed equipment and the introduction of excellent reconstruction method for the first time. The process of microstructure evolution during sintering was clearly distinguished from 2D and 3D reconstructed images. Typical sintering parameters such as sintering neck size, porosity, and particle size of the sample were presented for quantitative analysis of the influence on the mechanical properties and the sintering kinetics during microwave sintering. The neck size-time curve was obtained and the neck growth exponent was 7.3, which indicated that surface diffusion was the main diffusion mechanism; the reason was the eddy current loss induced by the external microwave fields providing an additional driving force for mass diffusion on the particle surface. From the reconstructed images and the curve of porosity and average particle size versus temperature, it was believed that the presence of liquid phase aluminum accelerated the densification and particle growth.

  13. Inductive Shimming of Superconductive Undulators - Preparations for a realistic test

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Bernhard,; Burkart, F; Ehlers, S; Gerstl, S; Grau, A; Peiffer, P; Rossmanith, R; Wollmann, D

    2010-01-01

    The monochromaticity and intensity of synchrotron light emitted by undulators strongly depend on the undulator field quality. For the particular case of superconductive undulators it was shown recently that their field quality can be significantly improved by an array of coupled high temperature superconductor loops attached to the surface of the superconductive undulator. Local field errors induce currents in the coupled closed superconducting loops and, as a result, the hereby generated magnetic field minimizes the field errors. In previous papers the concept was described theoretically and a proof-of-principle experiment was reported. This paper reports on a prepatation experiment for the first quantitative measurement of the phase error reduction in a 13-period short model undulator equipped with a full-scale induction shimming system.

  14. Catestatin, vasostatin, cortisol, temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, scores of the short form of the Glasgow composite measure pain scale and visual analog scale for stress and pain behavior in dogs before and after ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srithunyarat, Thanikul; Höglund, Odd V; Hagman, Ragnvi; Olsson, Ulf; Stridsberg, Mats; Lagerstedt, Anne-Sofie; Pettersson, Ann

    2016-08-02

    The stress reaction induced by surgery and associated pain may be detrimental for patient recovery and should be minimized. The neuropeptide chromogranin A (CGA) has shown promise as a sensitive biomarker for stress in humans. Little is known about CGA and its derived peptides, catestatin (CST) and vasostatin (VS), in dogs undergoing surgery. The objectives of this study were to investigate and compare concentrations of CGA epitopes CST and VS, cortisol, body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, scores of the short form of the Glasgow composite measure pain scale (CMPS-SF) and visual analog scales (VAS) for stress and pain behavior in dogs before and after ovariohysterectomy. Thirty healthy privately owned female dogs admitted for elective ovariohysterectomy were included. Physical examination, CMPS-SF, pain behavior VAS, and stress behavior VAS were recorded and saliva and blood samples were collected before surgery, 3 h after extubation, and once at recall 7-15 days after surgery. Dogs were premedicated with morphine and received carprofen as analgesia for 7 days during the postoperative period. At 3 h after extubation, CMPS-SF and pain behavior VAS scores had increased (p stress behavior VAS scores, temperature, respiratory rate (p stress and pain changed in dogs subjected to ovariohysterectomy. To further evaluate CST and VS usefulness as pain biomarkers, studies on dogs in acute painful situations are warranted.

  15. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part I: experimental tests in full scale plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Rigamonti, Lucia; Marras, Roberto; Grosso, Mario

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, several waste-to-energy plants in Italy have experienced an increase of the concentration of acid gases (HCl, SO2 and HF) in the raw gas. This is likely an indirect effect of the progressive decrease of the amount of treated municipal waste, which is partially replaced by commercial waste. The latter is characterised by a higher variability of its chemical composition because of the different origins, with possible increase of the load of halogen elements such as chlorine (Cl) and fluorine (F), as well as of sulphur (S). A new dolomitic sorbent was then tested in four waste-to-energy plants during standard operation as a pre-cleaning stage, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber. For a sorbent injection of about 6 kg per tonne of waste, the decrease of acid gases concentration downstream the boiler was in the range of 7-37% (mean 23%) for HCl, 34-95% (mean 71%) for SO2 and 39-80% (mean 63%) for HF. This pre-abatement of acid gases allowed to decrease the feeding rate of the traditional low temperature sorbent (sodium bicarbonate in all four plants) by about 30%. Furthermore, it was observed by the plant operators that the sorbent helps to keep the boiler surfaces cleaner, with a possible reduction of the fouling phenomena and a consequent increase of the specific energy production. A preliminary quantitative estimate was carried out in one of the four plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inductive dielectric analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agranovich, Daniel; Popov, Ivan; Ben Ishai, Paul; Feldman, Yuri; Polygalov, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    One of the approaches to bypass the problem of electrode polarization in dielectric measurements is the free electrode method. The advantage of this technique is that, the probing electric field in the material is not supplied by contact electrodes, but rather by electromagnetic induction. We have designed an inductive dielectric analyzer based on a sensor comprising two concentric toroidal coils. In this work, we present an analytic derivation of the relationship between the impedance measured by the sensor and the complex dielectric permittivity of the sample. The obtained relationship was successfully employed to measure the dielectric permittivity and conductivity of various alcohols and aqueous salt solutions. (paper)

  17. Induction heat treatment of laser welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Sørensen, Joakim Ilsing

    2003-01-01

    of an induction coil. A number of systematic laboratory tests were then performed in order to study the effects of the coil on bead-on-plate laser welded samples. In these tests, important parameters such as coil current and distance between coil and sample were varied. Temperature measurements were made...... the laser beam as close as possible. After welding, the samples were quality assessed according to ISO 13.919-1 and tested for hardness. The metallurgical phases are analysed and briefly described. A comparison between purely laser welded samples and induction heat-treated laser welded samples is made......In this paper, a new approach based on induction heat-treatment of flat laser welded sheets is presented. With this new concept, the ductility of high strength steels GA260 with a thickness of 1.8 mm and CMn with a thickness of 2.13 mm is believed to be improved by prolonging the cooling time from...

  18. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Avery, R.T.; Brady, V.; Bisognano, J.; Celata, C.; Chupp, W.W.; Faltens, A.; Hartwig, E.C.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.H.; Laslett, L.J.; Lee, E.P.; Rosenblum, S.S.; Smith, L.; Warwick, A.

    1984-01-01

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams. (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to proportional70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units. (orig.)

  19. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1984-05-01

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams, (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to approx. 70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units.

  20. A high-current racetrack induction accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondelli, A.; Roberson, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, the energy and system scaling laws of the Racetrack Induction Accelerator are determined and its operating principles are discussed. This device is a cyclic accelerator that is capable of multi-kiloamp operation. Long pulse induction linac technology is used to obtain short acceleration times. The accelerator consists of a long-pulse linear induction module and a racetrack beam transport system. For detailed studies of the particle dynamics in a racetrack, a numerical model is required to integrate the fully-relativistic single-particle equations of motion in an externally applied magnetic field. The numerical model is a compromise between the need for a large rotational transform and the need for a reasonable volume within the separatrix

  1. Supersonic induction plasma jet modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selezneva, S.E.; Boulos, M.I.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been applied to study the argon plasma flow downstream of the induction plasma torch. It is shown that by means of the convergent-divergent nozzle adjustment and chamber pressure reduction, a supersonic plasma jet can be obtained. We investigate the supersonic and a more traditional subsonic plasma jets impinging onto a normal substrate. Comparing to the subsonic jet, the supersonic one is narrower and much faster. Near-substrate velocity and temperature boundary layers are thinner, so the heat flux near the stagnation point is higher in the supersonic jet. The supersonic plasma jet is characterized by the electron overpopulation and the domination of the recombination over the dissociation, resulting into the heating of the electron gas. Because of these processes, the supersonic induction plasma permits to separate spatially different functions (dissociation and ionization, transport and deposition) and to optimize each of them. The considered configuration can be advantageous in some industrial applications, such as plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond and polymer-like films and in plasma spraying of nanoscaled powders

  2. Contrasting trait syndromes in angiosperms and conifers are associated with different responses of tree growth to temperature on a large scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Jofre; Barbeta, Adrià; Sperlich, Dominik; Coll, Marta; Peñuelas, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Recent large-scale studies of tree growth in the Iberian Peninsula reported contrasting positive and negative effects of temperature in Mediterranean angiosperms and conifers. Here we review the different hypotheses that may explain these trends and propose that the observed contrasting responses of tree growth to temperature in this region could be associated with a continuum of trait differences between angiosperms and conifers. Angiosperm and conifer trees differ in the effects of phenology in their productivity, in their growth allometry, and in their sensitivity to competition. Moreover, angiosperms and conifers significantly differ in hydraulic safety margins, sensitivity of stomatal conductance to vapor-pressure deficit (VPD), xylem recovery capacity or the rate of carbon transfer. These differences could be explained by key features of the xylem such as non-structural carbohydrate content (NSC), wood parenchymal fraction or wood capacitance. We suggest that the reviewed trait differences define two contrasting ecophysiological strategies that may determine qualitatively different growth responses to increased temperature and drought. Improved reciprocal common garden experiments along altitudinal or latitudinal gradients would be key to quantify the relative importance of the different hypotheses reviewed. Finally, we show that warming impacts in this area occur in an ecological context characterized by the advance of forest succession and increased dominance of angiosperm trees over extensive areas. In this context, we examined the empirical relationships between the responses of tree growth to temperature and hydraulic safety margins in angiosperm and coniferous trees. Our findings suggest a future scenario in Mediterranean forests characterized by contrasting demographic responses in conifer and angiosperm trees to both temperature and forest succession, with increased dominance of angiosperm trees, and particularly negative impacts in pines.

  3. Contrasting trait syndromes in angiosperms and conifers are associated with different responses of tree growth to temperature on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jofre eCarnicer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent large-scale studies of tree growth in the Iberian Peninsula reported contrasting positive and negative effects of temperature in Mediterranean angiosperms and conifers. Here we review the different hypotheses that may explain these trends and propose that the observed contrasting responses of tree growth to temperature in this region could be associated with a continuum of trait differences between angiosperms and conifers. Angiosperm and conifer trees differ in the effects of phenology in their productivity, in their growth allometry, and in their sensitivity to competition. Moreover, angiosperms and conifers significantly differ in hydraulic safety margins, sensitivity of stomatal conductance to vapor-pressure deficit, xylem recovery capacity or the rate of carbon transfer. These differences could be explained by key features of the xylem such as non-structural carbohydrate content (NSC, wood parenchymal fraction or wood capacitance. We suggest that the reviewed trait differences define two contrasting ecophysiological strategies that may determine qualitatively different growth responses to increased temperature and drought. Improved reciprocal common garden experiments along altitudinal or latitudinal gradients would be key to quantify the relative importance of the different hypotheses reviewed. Finally, we show that warming impacts in this area occur in an ecological context characterized by the advance of forest succession and increased dominance of angiosperm trees over extensive areas. In this context, we examined the empirical relationships between the responses of tree growth to temperature and hydraulic safety margins in angiosperm and coniferous trees. Our findings suggest a future scenario in Mediterranean forests characterized by contrasting demographic responses in conifer and angiosperm trees to both temperature and forest succession, with increased dominance of angiosperm trees, and particularly negative impacts in pines.

  4. The impact of reactants composition and temperature on the flow structure in a wake stabilized laminar lean premixed CH4/H2/air flames; mechanism and scaling

    KAUST Repository

    Michaels, D.

    2016-11-11

    In this paper we investigate the role of reactants composition and temperature in defining the steady flow structure in bluff body stabilized premixed flames. The study was motivated by experiments which showed that the flow structure and stability map for different fuels and inlet conditions collapse using the extinction strain rate as the chemical time scale. The investigation is conducted using a laminar lean premixed flame stabilized on a heat conducting bluff-body. Calculations are performed for a wide range of mixtures of CH4/H2/air (0.35 ≤ ϕ ≤ 0.75, 0 ≤ %H2 ≤ 40, 300 ≤ Tin [K] ≤ 500) in order to systematically vary the burning velocity (2.0–35.6 cm/s), dilatation ratio (2.7–6.4), and extinction strain rate (106–2924 1/s). The model is based on a fully resolved unsteady two-dimensional flow with detailed chemistry and species transport, and with no artificial flame anchoring boundary conditions. Calculations reveal that the recirculation zone length correlates with a chemical time scale based on the flame extinction strain rate corresponding to the inlet fuel composition, stoichiometry, pressure and temperature; and are consistent with experimental data in literature. It was found that in the wake region the flame is highly stretched and its location and interaction with the flow is governed by the reactants combustion characteristics under high strain.

  5. Some experiments in low-temperature thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogle, W.E.

    1982-11-01

    A powdered cerous magnesium nitrate (CMN) temperature scale has been developed in the 0.016 to 3.8 K region which represents an interpolation between the 3 He/ 4 He (T 62 /T 58 ) vapor pressure scale and absolute temperatures in the millikelvin region as determined with a 60 Co in hcp Co nuclear orientation thermometer (NOT). Both ac and dc susceptibility thermometers were used in these experiments. The ac susceptibility of a 13 mg CMN-oil slurry was measured with a mutual inductance bridge employing a SQUID null detector while the dc susceptibility of a 3 mg slurry was measured with a SQUID/flux transformer combination. To check the internal consistency of the NOT, γ-ray intensities were measured both parallel and perpendicular to the Co crystal c-axis. The independent temperatures determined in this fashion were found to agree to within experimental error. For the CMN thermometers employed in these experiments, the susceptibility was found to obey a Curie-Weiss law with a Weiss constant of Δ = 1.05 +- 0.1 mK. The powdered CMN scale in the 0.05 to 1.0 K region was transferred to two germanium resistance thermometers for use in low-temperature specific heat measurements. The integrity of the scale was checked by examining the temperature dependence of the specific heat of high purity copper in the 0.1 to 1 K region. In more recent experiments in this laboratory, the scale was also checked by a comparison with the National Bureau of Standards cryogenic temperature scale (NBS-CTS-1). The agreement between the two scales in the 99 to 206 mK region was found to be on the order of the stated accuracy of the NBS scale

  6. Porous structure analysis of large-scale randomly packed pebble bed in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Cheng; Yang, Xingtuan; Liu, Zhiyong; Sun, Yanfei; Jiang, Shengyao [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety; Li, Congxin [Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing (China). Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center

    2015-02-15

    A three-dimensional pebble bed corresponding to the randomly packed bed in the heat transfer test facility built for the High Temperature Reactor Pebble bed Modules (HTR-PM) in Shandong Shidaowan is simulated via discrete element method. Based on the simulation, we make a detailed analysis on the packing structure of the pebble bed from several aspects, such as transverse section image, longitudinal section image, radial and axial porosity distributions, two-dimensional porosity distribution and coordination number distribution. The calculation results show that radial distribution of porosity is uniform in the center and oscillates near the wall; axial distribution of porosity oscillates near the bottom and linearly varies along height due to effect of gravity; the average coordination number is about seven and equals to the maximum coordination number frequency. The fully established three-dimensional packing structure analysis of the pebble bed in this work is of fundamental significance to understand the flow and heat transfer characteristics throughout the pebble-bed type structure.

  7. Addition of Bacillus sp. inoculums in bedding for swine on a pilot scale: effect on microbial population and bedding temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, E K; Ulguim, R R; Corrêa, L B; Castilhos, D D; Bianchi, I; Gil-Turnes, C; Lucia, T

    2012-10-01

    Thermal and microbiological characteristics of beddings for swine were compared according to their depth and of addition of inoculums. Bedding was added to boxes at 0.25 (25D) and 0.50 m (50D), with three treatments: control (no inoculums); T1, with 250 g of Bacillus cereus var. toyoii at 8.4 × 10(7) CFU; and T2, with 250 g of a pool of B. subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus polymyxa at 8.4 × 10(7) CFU (250 g for 25D and 500 g for 50D). Mean temperatures were 28.5 ± 3.9 at the surface and 35.2 ± 8.9 inside the beddings. The most probable number (MPN) of thermophilic bacteria was higher for T1 and T2 than for the control (P<0.05). The MPN of thermophilic bacteria and fungi was greater for D50 than for D25 (P<0.05). The use of 25D without inoculums is recommended due to the reduction of thermophilic microbiota. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling Induction Motor Imbalances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armah, Kabenla; Jouffroy, Jerome; Duggen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a study into the development of a generalized model for a three-phase induction motor that offers flexibility of simulating balanced and unbalanced parameter scenarios. By analyzing the interaction of forces within the motor, we achieve our main objective of deriving the system d...

  9. Soil respiration in Tibetan alpine grasslands: belowground biomass and soil moisture, but not soil temperature, best explain the large-scale patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Geng

    Full Text Available The Tibetan Plateau is an essential area to study the potential feedback effects of soils to climate change due to the rapid rise in its air temperature in the past several decades and the large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC stocks, particularly in the permafrost. Yet it is one of the most under-investigated regions in soil respiration (Rs studies. Here, Rs rates were measured at 42 sites in alpine grasslands (including alpine steppes and meadows along a transect across the Tibetan Plateau during the peak growing season of 2006 and 2007 in order to test whether: (1 belowground biomass (BGB is most closely related to spatial variation in Rs due to high root biomass density, and (2 soil temperature significantly influences spatial pattern of Rs owing to metabolic limitation from the low temperature in cold, high-altitude ecosystems. The average daily mean Rs of the alpine grasslands at peak growing season was 3.92 µmol CO(2 m(-2 s(-1, ranging from 0.39 to 12.88 µmol CO(2 m(-2 s(-1, with average daily mean Rs of 2.01 and 5.49 µmol CO(2 m(-2 s(-1 for steppes and meadows, respectively. By regression tree analysis, BGB, aboveground biomass (AGB, SOC, soil moisture (SM, and vegetation type were selected out of 15 variables examined, as the factors influencing large-scale variation in Rs. With a structural equation modelling approach, we found only BGB and SM had direct effects on Rs, while other factors indirectly affecting Rs through BGB or SM. Most (80% of the variation in Rs could be attributed to the difference in BGB among sites. BGB and SM together accounted for the majority (82% of spatial patterns of Rs. Our results only support the first hypothesis, suggesting that models incorporating BGB and SM can improve Rs estimation at regional scale.

  10. Design Aspects and Test of an Inductive Fault Current Limiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsénio Pedro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic shielding inductive fault current limiters with high temperature superconducting tapes are considered as emerging devices that provide technology for the advent of modern power grids. The development of such limiters requires magnetic iron cores and leads to several design challenges regarding the constitutive parts of the limiter, namely the primary and secondary windings. Preliminary tests in a laboratory scale prototype have been carried out considering an assembly designed for simplicity in which the optimization of the magnetic coupling between the primary and secondary was not the main focus. This work addresses the design configuration of an inductive current limiter prototype regarding the assembly of the primary and secondary windings in the core. The prototype is based on a closed magnetic core wound by a primary, built from a normal electric conductor, and a short-circuited secondary, built from first generation superconducting tape. Four different design configurations are considered. Through experimental tests, the performance of such prototype is discussed and compared, in terms of normal and fault operation regimes. The results show that all the configurations assure effective magnetic shielding at normal operation regime, however, at fault operation regime, there are differences among configurations.

  11. Full-scale model development of the WWER-440 reactor fuel rod bundle for core temperature regime study under reflooding conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezrukov, Yu.A.; Logvinov, S.A.; Levchuk, S.V.; Nakladnov, V.D.; Onshin, V.P.; Sokolov, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    Consideration is given to the issues of a full scale WWER-440 fuel rod bundle imitation. An imitator contains a molybdenum heating rod inclosed in stainless steel shell. The shell diameter is 9 mm, the heated length is 2500 mm, the total len.o.th is 2855 mm. 125 fuel rod imitators are set in the bundle mock-up. The experiments were run on a test facility imitating the WWER-440 reactor primary loop, providing the conditions of the loop breaking. The mock-up thermal hydraulics has been studied during the refloodino. stage. The mock-up was heated up to predetermined initial temperature at a low power level with saturated steam cooling. Then the steam input was stopped, the power level rarapidly rised up to a given value and the cooling water injected. Simultaneously with water injection all the measured parameters monitoring was started. Both at the top spraying and combined cooling temperature oscillations in the upper and middle parts of the mock-up were observed. At the bottom reflooding the mock-up cooling down took more time, thereat temperature inthe upper part first slowly rised during reflooding then decreased and then dropped abruptly at thefront coming up [ru

  12. Lab-scale development of a high temperature aerosol particle sampling probe system for field measurements in thermochemical conversion of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindskog, M.; Malik, A.; Pagels, J.; Sanati, M. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology

    2010-07-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass requires both combustion in an oxygen rich environment and gasification in an oxygen deficient environment. Therefore, the mass concentration of fly ash from combustion processes is dominated by inorganic compounds, and the particulate matter obtained from gasification is dominated by carbonaceous compounds. The fine fly ash particles can initiate corrosion and fouling and also increases emissions of fine particulates to the atmosphere. This study involved the design of a laboratory scale setup consisting of a high temperature sampling probe and an aerosol generation system to study the formation of fine particle from biomass gasification processes. An aerosol model system using potassium chloride (KCl) as the ash compound and Di Octyl Sebacate oil (DOS) as the volatile organic part was used to test the high temperature sampling probe. Tests conducted at 200 degrees C showed good reproducibility of the aerosol generator. The tests also demonstrated suitable dilution ratios which enabled the denuder to absorb all of the gaseous organic compounds in the set up, thus enabling measurement of only the particle phase. Condensable organic concentrations of 1-68 mg/m{sup 3} were easily handled by the high temperature sampling probe system, indicating that the denuder worked well. Additional tests will be performed using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMST) to verify that the denuder can capture all of the gaseous organic compounds also when condensed onto agglomerated soot particles. 6 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  13. High current induction linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Lee, E.

    1994-07-01

    Induction linacs are among the most powerful accelerators in existence. They have accelerated electron bunches of several kiloamperes, and are being investigated as drivers for heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion (HIF), which requires peak beam currents of kiloamperes and average beam powers of some tens of megawatts. The requirement for waste transmutation with an 800 MeV proton or deuteron beam with an average current of 50 mA and an average power of 40 MW lies midway between the electron machines and the heavy ion machines in overall difficulty. Much of the technology and understanding of beam physics carries over from the previous machines to the new requirements. The induction linac allows use of a very large beam aperture, which may turn out to be crucial to reducing beam loss and machine activation from the beam halo. The major issues addressed here are transport of high intensity beams, availability of sources, efficiency of acceleration, and the state of the needed technology for the waste treatment application. Because of the transformer-like action of an induction core and the accompanying magnetizing current, induction linacs make the most economic sense and have the highest efficiencies with large beam currents. Based on present understanding of beam transport limits, induction core magnetizing current requirements, and pulse modulators, the efficiencies could be very high. The study of beam transport at high intensities has been the major activity of the HIF community. Beam transport and sources are limiting at low energies but are not significant constraints at the higher energies. As will be shown, the proton beams will be space-charge-dominated, for which the emittance has only a minor effect on the overall beam diameter but does determine the density falloff at the beam edge

  14. process controller for induction vacuum brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldea, A.

    2016-01-01

    A brazing operation involves joining two parts made of different materials, using a filler material that has a melting temperature lower than the base materials used. The temperature of the process must be carefully controlled, sometimes with an accuracy of about 1°C, because overshooting the prescribed temperature results in detrimental metallurgic phenomena and joints of poor quality. The brazing system is composed of an operating cabinet, a mid-frequency generator, a vacuum chamber with an induction coil inside and the parts that have to be brazed. Until now, to operate this system two operators were required: one to continuously read the temperature with an optical pyrometer and another to manually adjust the current in the induction coil according to his intuition and prediction gained only by experience. The improvement that we made to the system involved creating an automatic temperature control unit, using a PID closed loop controller that reads the temperature of the parts and adjusts automatically the current in the coil. Using the PID controller, the brazing engineer can implement a certain temperature slope for the current brazing process. (authors)

  15. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator

  16. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE).The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development. The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator

  17. Scale dependence of cirrus horizontal heterogeneity effects on TOA measurements – Part I: MODIS brightness temperatures in the thermal infrared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fauchez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneities on MODIS simulated thermal infrared (TIR brightness temperatures (BTs at the top of the atmosphere (TOA as a function of spatial resolution from 50 m to 10 km. A realistic 3-D cirrus field is generated by the 3DCLOUD model (average optical thickness of 1.4, cloud-top and base altitudes at 10 and 12 km, respectively, consisting of aggregate column crystals of Deff = 20 µm, and 3-D thermal infrared radiative transfer (RT is simulated with the 3DMCPOL code. According to previous studies, differences between 3-D BT computed from a heterogenous pixel and 1-D RT computed from a homogeneous pixel are considered dependent at nadir on two effects: (i the optical thickness horizontal heterogeneity leading to the plane-parallel homogeneous bias (PPHB and the (ii horizontal radiative transport (HRT leading to the independent pixel approximation error (IPAE. A single but realistic cirrus case is simulated and, as expected, the PPHB mainly impacts the low-spatial-resolution results (above ∼ 250 m with averaged values of up to 5–7 K, while the IPAE mainly impacts the high-spatial-resolution results (below ∼ 250 m with average values of up to 1–2 K. A sensitivity study has been performed in order to extend these results to various cirrus optical thicknesses and heterogeneities by sampling the cirrus in several ranges of parameters. For four optical thickness classes and four optical heterogeneity classes, we have found that, for nadir observations, the spatial resolution at which the combination of PPHB and HRT effects is the smallest, falls between 100 and 250 m. These spatial resolutions thus appear to be the best choice to retrieve cirrus optical properties with the smallest cloud heterogeneity-related total bias in the thermal infrared. For off-nadir observations, the average total effect is increased and the minimum is shifted to coarser spatial

  18. Resolving dispersion and induction components for polarisable molecular simulations of ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pádua, Agílio A. H.

    2017-05-01

    One important development in interaction potential models, or atomistic force fields, for molecular simulation is the inclusion of explicit polarisation, which represents the induction effects of charged or polar molecules on polarisable electron clouds. Polarisation can be included through fluctuating charges, induced multipoles, or Drude dipoles. This work uses Drude dipoles and is focused on room-temperature ionic liquids, for which fixed-charge models predict too slow dynamics. The aim of this study is to devise a strategy to adapt existing non-polarisable force fields upon addition of polarisation, because induction was already contained to an extent, implicitly, due to parametrisation against empirical data. Therefore, a fraction of the van der Waals interaction energy should be subtracted so that the Lennard-Jones terms only account for dispersion and the Drude dipoles for induction. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory is used to resolve the dispersion and induction terms in dimers and to calculate scaling factors to reduce the Lennard-Jones terms from the non-polarisable model. Simply adding Drude dipoles to an existing fixed-charge model already improves the prediction of transport properties, increasing diffusion coefficients, and lowering the viscosity. Scaling down the Lennard-Jones terms leads to still faster dynamics and densities that match experiment extremely well. The concept developed here improves the overall prediction of density and transport properties and can be adapted to other models and systems. In terms of microscopic structure of the ionic liquids, the inclusion of polarisation and the down-scaling of Lennard-Jones terms affect only slightly the ordering of the first shell of counterions, leading to small decreases in coordination numbers. Remarkably, the effect of polarisation is major beyond first neighbours, significantly weakening spatial correlations, a structural effect that is certainly related to the faster dynamics of

  19. Inductive Communication System Design Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    The report documents the experience obtained during the design and development of the Inductive Communications System used in the Morgantown People Mover. The Inductive Communications System is used to provide wayside-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-waysid...

  20. Induction technology optimization code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporaso, G.J.; Brooks, A.L.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1992-01-01

    A code has been developed to evaluate relative costs of induction accelerator driver systems for relativistic klystrons. The code incorporates beam generation, transport and pulsed power system constraints to provide an integrated design tool. The code generates an injector/accelerator combination which satisfies the top level requirements and all system constraints once a small number of design choices have been specified (rise time of the injector voltage and aspect ratio of the ferrite induction cores, for example). The code calculates dimensions of accelerator mechanical assemblies and values of all electrical components. Cost factors for machined parts, raw materials and components are applied to yield a total system cost. These costs are then plotted as a function of the two design choices to enable selection of an optimum design based on various criteria. (Author) 11 refs., 3 figs

  1. Inductive energy storage commutator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, I.M.

    1987-01-01

    An inductive energy storage commutator is described. The value of commutated current is up to 800 A, the voltage amplitude in the load is up to 50 kV, the working frequency is equal to 1-50 Hz, the commutated power is up to 40 MW. The commutating device comprises of the first stage commutator having two in-series connected modules of the BTSV - 800/235 high-voltage thyristor unit, the second stage commutator containing three GMI-43A parallel connected powerful pulsed triodes, a commutating capacitor, an induction coil, two supplementary high-voltage thyristor keys (20 in-series connected thyristors T2-300 (13 class)), load, control pulse shapers, thyristor keys, power supply

  2. Pulse induction heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, A S; Kachanov, B Y; Kogan, B V

    1993-12-31

    Induction heating and three types of pulse processes were studied. It was found that in pulse processes the frequency and pulse duration of heat treatments do not remain constant. High frequency pulse heat treatments can be used on sprayed coatings; such treatments will result in stronger surfaces with no cracks. For induction hardening, the rate of specific power was 1 to 1.5 kW/sq.cm, for forging it was 0.2 to 0.3 kW/sq.cm and for melting it was 0.05 to 0.1 kW/sq.cm. The application of pulse heating will result in higher rates of specific power.

  3. Inductive Reasoning: A Training Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauer, Karl Josef; Phye, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have examined inductive reasoning to identify different cognitive processes when participants deal with inductive problems. This article presents a prescriptive theory of inductive reasoning that identifies cognitive processing using a procedural strategy for making comparisons. It is hypothesized that training in the use of the…

  4. Lexicographic Path Induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Sarnat, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Programming languages theory is full of problems that reduce to proving the consistency of a logic, such as the normalization of typed lambda-calculi, the decidability of equality in type theory, equivalence testing of traces in security, etc. Although the principle of transfinite induction......, and weak normalization for Gödel’s T follows indirectly; both have been formalized in a prototypical extension of Twelf....

  5. Large scale use of brazing and high temperature brazing for the fabrication of the 6.4 km long vacuum system of the HERA electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballion, R.; Boster, J.; Giesske, W.; Hartwig, H.; Jagnow, D.; Kouptsidis, J.; Pape, R.; Prohl, W.; Schumann, G.; Schwartz, M.; Iversen, K.; Mucklenbeck, J.

    1989-01-01

    The 6.4 km long vacuum system for electrons in the large storage ring HERA at Hamburg consists of about 1,400 components having lengths between .14 and 12 m. The vacuum components are mainly made from variously shaped tubes of the copper alloy CuSn2. This alloy combines sufficient mechanical strength with the high thermal conductivity needed to remove the 6 MW dissipated power of the synchrotron-light. The vacuum components consist additionally of parts made from stainless steel such as flanges, chambers for pumps, beam monitors, etc. All of these parts are connected in a vacuum tight manner and on a large scale by using brazing and high temperature brazing both in a vacuum or in a reducing gas atmosphere. (orig.)

  6. Realization of the Temperature Scale in the Range from 234.3 K (Hg Triple Point) to 1084.62°C (Cu Freezing Point) in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvizdic, Davor; Veliki, Tomislav; Grgec Bermanec, Lovorka

    2008-06-01

    This article describes the realization of the International Temperature Scale in the range from 234.3 K (mercury triple point) to 1084.62°C (copper freezing point) at the Laboratory for Process Measurement (LPM), Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FSB), University of Zagreb. The system for the realization of the ITS-90 consists of the sealed fixed-point cells (mercury triple point, water triple point and gallium melting point) and the apparatus designed for the optimal realization of open fixed-point cells which include the gallium melting point, tin freezing point, zinc freezing point, aluminum freezing point, and copper freezing point. The maintenance of the open fixed-point cells is described, including the system for filling the cells with pure argon and for maintaining the pressure during the realization.

  7. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960's to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore's Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail

  8. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from the early 1960s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400-ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore close-quote s Site 300 produced 10,000-Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high-current, short-pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. A theory evaluation of an induction programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenrick Hendricks

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: An induction programme is commonly used to help new employees understand their job within the organisation. Research purpose: The main aim of this study was to examine whether or not the programme theory of an induction programme was plausible and would lead to the intended outcomes as described by the programme manager. Motivation for the study: Induction training is one of the most common training programmes in an organisation. However, there is little research to evaluate whether or not the activities of an induction programme will lead to the intended outcomes of such a programme. Research design, approach and method: This theory evaluation used a descriptive design. One hundred and thirteen employees of a media company completed a ten-item, five-point Likert scale which measured their perceptions of the programme’s outcome, identification with the organisation and intentions to stay with the organisation. Main findings: From this theory evaluation it was apparent that an induction programme based on an implausible programme theory could be problematic. An implausible programme theory affects the design of the programme activities and unsuitable activities may not deliver the desired outcomes. Practical/managerial implications: The intention of the evaluation is to guide human resource managers through a process of replacing an implausible programme theory with one that is plausible, and which ensures better alignment of programme activities and outcomes. Contribution/value-add: The evaluators showed how a plausible programme theory could improve programme design. This redesigned induction programme may lead to benefits, such as staff retention and company identification, rather than the vague assumption that it has been conforming to a legal obligation.

  10. A preliminary neutronic evaluation of the high temperature gas-cooled test reactor HTR-10 using the scale 6.0 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Romulo V.; Fortini, Angela; Pereira, Claubia; Carvalho, Fernando R. de; Oliveira, Arno H.

    2013-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Test Reactor HTR-10 is a 10 MW modular pebble bed type reactor, which core is filled with 27,000 spherical fuel elements, e.g. TRISO coated particles. This reactor was built by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET), Tsinghua University, China, and its first criticality was attained on December 1, 2000. The main objectives of the HTR-10 are to verify and demonstrate the technical and safety features of the modular HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) and to establish an experimental base for developing nuclear process heat applications. In this work, using the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 6.0, a nuclear code developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the HTR-10 first critical core is modeled by the DEN/UFMG. The K eff was obtained and compared with the reference value obtained by the Idaho National Laboratory. The result presents good agreement with experimental value. The goal is to validate the DEN/UFMG model to be applied in transmutation studies changing the fuel. (author)

  11. Treatment of a chocolate industry wastewater in a pilot-scale low-temperature UASB reactor operated at short hydraulic and sludge retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Soto, M; Arzate-Archundia, O; Solís-Morelos, C; Fall, C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of a 244-L pilot-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor during the treatment of chocolate-processing industry wastewater under low-temperature conditions (18 ± 0.6 °C) for approximately 250 d. The applied organic loading rate (OLR) was varied between 4 and 7 kg/m(3)/d by varying the influent soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODsol), while keeping the hydraulic retention time constant (6.4 ± 0.3 h). The CODsol removal efficiency was low (59-78%). The measured biogas production increased from 240 ± 54 to 431 ± 61 L/d during the experiments. A significant linear correlation between the measured biogas production and removed OLR indicated that 81.69 L of biogas were produced per kg/m(3) of CODsol removed. Low average reactor volatile suspended solids (VSS) (2,700-4,800 mg/L) and high effluent VSS (177-313 mg/L) were derived in a short sludge retention time (SRT) (4.9 d). The calculated SRT was shorter than those reported in the literature, but did not affect the reactor's performance. Average sludge yield was 0.20 kg-VSS/kg-CODsol. The low-temperature anaerobic treatment was a good option for the pre-treatment of chocolate-processing industry wastewater.

  12. Integrating SMOS brightness temperatures with a new conceptual spatially distributed hydrological model for improving flood and drought predictions at large scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostache, Renaud; Rains, Dominik; Chini, Marco; Lievens, Hans; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Matgen, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    , SUPERFLEX is capable of predicting runoff, soil moisture, and SMOS-like brightness temperature time series. Such a model is traditionally calibrated using only discharge measurements. In this study we designed a multi-objective calibration procedure based on both discharge measurements and SMOS-derived brightness temperature observations in order to evaluate the added value of remotely sensed soil moisture data in the calibration process. As a test case we set up the SUPERFLEX model for the large scale Murray-Darling catchment in Australia ( 1 Million km2). When compared to in situ soil moisture time series, model predictions show good agreement resulting in correlation coefficients exceeding 70 % and Root Mean Squared Errors below 1 %. When benchmarked with the physically based land surface model CLM, SUPERFLEX exhibits similar performance levels. By adapting the runoff routing function within the SUPERFLEX model, the predicted discharge results in a Nash Sutcliff Efficiency exceeding 0.7 over both the calibration and the validation periods.

  13. Regulation of phytoplankton carbon to chlorophyll ratio by light, nutrients and temperature in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean: a basin-scale model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Wang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The complex effects of light, nutrients and temperature lead to a variable carbon to chlorophyll (C:Chl ratio in phytoplankton cells. Using field data collected in the Equatorial Pacific, we derived a new dynamic model with a non-steady C:Chl ratio as a function of irradiance, nitrate, iron, and temperature. The dynamic model is implemented into a basin-scale ocean circulation-biogeochemistry model and tested in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean. The model reproduces well the general features of phytoplankton dynamics in this region. For instance, the simulated deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM is much deeper in the western warm pool (~100 m than in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (~50 m. The model also shows the ability to reproduce chlorophyll, including not only the zonal, meridional and vertical variations, but also the interannual variability. This modeling study demonstrates that combination of nitrate and iron regulates the spatial and temporal variations in the phytoplankton C:Chl ratio in the Equatorial Pacific. Sensitivity simulations suggest that nitrate is mainly responsible for the high C:Chl ratio in the western warm pool while iron is responsible for the frontal features in the C:Chl ratio between the warm pool and the upwelling region. In addition, iron plays a dominant role in regulating the spatial and temporal variations of the C:Chl ratio in the Central and Eastern Equatorial Pacific. While temperature has a relatively small effect on the C:Chl ratio, light is primarily responsible for the vertical decrease of phytoplankton C:Chl ratio in the euphotic zone.

  14. Use of ethyl lactate to extract bioactive compounds from Cytisus scoparius: Comparison of pressurized liquid extraction and medium scale ambient temperature systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lores, Marta; Pájaro, Marta; Álvarez-Casas, Marta; Domínguez, Jorge; García-Jares, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    An important trend in the extraction of chemical compounds is the application of new environmentally friendly, food grade solvents. Ethyl lactate (ethyl 2-hydroxypropanoate), produced by fermentation of carbohydrates, is miscible with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds being a potentially good solvent for bioactive compounds. Despite its relatively wide use as a general solvent, the utilization of ethyl lactate as an extraction solvent has only recently been considered. Here, we evaluate the possible use of ethyl lactate to extract phenolic compounds from wild plants belonging to Cytisus scoparius, and we compare the characteristics of the extracts obtained by Pressurized Solvent Extraction (the total phenolics content, the antioxidant activity and the concentration of the major polyphenols) with those of other extracts obtained with methanol. In order to explore the industrial production of the ethyl lactate Cytisus extract, we also evaluate medium scale ambient temperature setups. The whole plant and the different parts (flowers, branches, and seed pods) were evaluated separately as potential sources of polyphenols. All extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS for accurate identification of the major polyphenols. Similar phenolic profiles were obtained when using ethyl lactate or methanol. The main bioactives found in the Cytisus extract were the non-flavonoid phenolic compounds caffeic and protocatechuic acids and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde; the flavonoids rutin, kaempferol and quercetin; the flavones chrysin, orientin and apigenin; and the alkaloid lupanine. Regarding the comparison of the extraction systems, although the performance of the PLE was much better than that of the ambient-temperature columns, the energy consumption was also much higher. Ethyl lactate has resulted an efficient extraction solvent for polyphenols from C. scoparius, yielding extracts with high levels of plant phenolics and antioxidant activity. The antimicrobial activity of these

  15. Inductive reasoning 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brett K; Heit, Evan

    2018-05-01

    Inductive reasoning entails using existing knowledge to make predictions about novel cases. The first part of this review summarizes key inductive phenomena and critically evaluates theories of induction. We highlight recent theoretical advances, with a special emphasis on the structured statistical approach, the importance of sampling assumptions in Bayesian models, and connectionist modeling. A number of new research directions in this field are identified including comparisons of inductive and deductive reasoning, the identification of common core processes in induction and memory tasks and induction involving category uncertainty. The implications of induction research for areas as diverse as complex decision-making and fear generalization are discussed. This article is categorized under: Psychology > Reasoning and Decision Making Psychology > Learning. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A taxonomy of inductive problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Charles; Jern, Alan

    2014-02-01

    Inductive inferences about objects, features, categories, and relations have been studied for many years, but there are few attempts to chart the range of inductive problems that humans are able to solve. We present a taxonomy of inductive problems that helps to clarify the relationships between familiar inductive problems such as generalization, categorization, and identification, and that introduces new inductive problems for psychological investigation. Our taxonomy is founded on the idea that semantic knowledge is organized into systems of objects, features, categories, and relations, and we attempt to characterize all of the inductive problems that can arise when these systems are partially observed. Recent studies have begun to address some of the new problems in our taxonomy, and future work should aim to develop unified theories of inductive reasoning that explain how people solve all of the problems in the taxonomy.

  17. Field protocol for induction of triploidy in Clarias gariepinus | Nwafili ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple field protocol for induction of triploidy in Clarias gariepinus using cold shock was developed. The quantity of ice needed to bring temperature of water down to desired temperature was first calculated. Fertilized eggs were then exposed to 5 ºC or 10 ºC at different times. Percentage hatchability for 5 ºC fertilized ...

  18. Electromagnetic induction phenomena in plasma systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlovitz, B.

    1982-01-01

    The phenomenon of electromagnetic induction is considered in complex high temperature plasma systems. Thermal energy of such fully ionized plasma is really energy of the magnetic vortex fields surrounding the randomly moving ions and electrons. In an expanding plasma stream, moving across the containing magnetic field, random thermal motion of the ions and electrons is converted into ordered motion and thereby random magnetic energy of the plasma into magnetic energy of an ordered field. Consequently, in contrast to simple systems consisting of coils and magnets only, an expanding plasma stream can maintain net outflow of ordered magnetic energy from a closed volume for an indefinite length of time. Conversion of thermal energy of plasma into ordered magnetic energy by the thermodynamic expansion process leads to the expectation of a new induction phenomenon: the generation of a unidirectional induced electromotive force of unlimited duration, measured in a closed loop at rest relative to the magnetic field, by the expansion work of the plasma stream. No change is required in the differential form of Maxwell's equations for the existence of this induction phenomenon, only the definition of the concept of rate of change of magnetic flux needs to be modified in the macroscopic equations to correspond to the rate of flow of magnetic energy across a closed surface. An experimental test of the predicted induction phenomenon is proposed

  19. Linear induction motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkman, W.E.; Adams, W.Q.; Berrier, B.R.

    1978-01-01

    A linear induction motor has been operated on a test bed with a feedback pulse resolution of 5 nm (0.2 μin). Slewing tests with this slide drive have shown positioning errors less than or equal to 33 nm (1.3 μin) at feedrates between 0 and 25.4 mm/min (0-1 ipm). A 0.86-m (34-in)-stroke linear motor is being investigated, using the SPACO machine as a test bed. Initial results were encouraging, and work is continuing to optimize the servosystem compensation

  20. Antibody induction versus corticosteroid induction for liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Wettergren, André; Wilson, Colin H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation is an established treatment option for end-stage liver failure. To date, no consensus has been reached on the use of immunosuppressive T-cell specific antibody induction compared with corticosteroid induction of immunosuppression after liver transplantation....... OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of T-cell specific antibody induction versus corticosteroid induction for prevention of acute rejection in liver transplant recipients. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register...... to identify additional trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all randomised clinical trials assessing immunosuppression with T-cell specific antibody induction versus corticosteroid induction in liver transplant recipients. Our inclusion criteria stated that participants within each included trial should...

  1. The sensitivity of the atmospheric branch of the global water cycle to temperature fluctuations at synoptic to decadal time-scales in different satellite- and model-based products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Miguel

    2018-02-01

    Spectral analysis of global-mean precipitation, P, evaporation, E, precipitable water, W, and surface temperature, Ts, revealed significant variability from sub-daily to multi-decadal time-scales, superposed on high-amplitude diurnal and yearly peaks. Two distinct regimes emerged from a transition in the spectral exponents, β. The weather regime covering time-scales 1-2 years, while at time-scales global-ocean and full-globe averages, ρDCCA showed large spread of the C-C importance for P and E variability amongst different datasets at multi-year time-scales, ranging from negligible (governing mechanisms.

  2. A novel induction motor starting method using superconduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.B.B.; Orlando, M.T.D.; Fardin, J.F.; Simonetti, D.S.; Baldan, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Alternative method for starting up induction motor. • Based on using a high-temperature superconductor. • A prototype of the limiter was constructed with a 2G-YBCO tape. • Prototype was tested with a 55-kW industrial induction motor in a 440-V/60-Hz. • Offers reduced current waveform distortion compared to the soft starter method. - Abstract: In this paper, an alternative method for starting up induction motors is proposed, taking into account experimental measurements. The new starting current limitation method is based on using a high-temperature superconductor. A prototype of the superconducting starting current limiter was constructed with a commercially available second-generation high-temperature superconductor YBCO tape, and this was tested with a 55-kW industrial induction motor in a 440-V/60-Hz three-phase power grid. Performance evaluations of the superconducting limiter method (applied to startup of the induction motor) were performed and were compared with a direct-on-line starter and an electronic soft starter. In addition, a computational model was developed and used for electromagnetic torque analysis of the system. As significant characteristics, our method offers the ability to limit the starting current of the induction motor with greater electromagnetic torque, reduced current waveform distortion and therefore lower harmonic pollution during startup when compared to the soft starter method

  3. A novel induction motor starting method using superconduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, F.B.B., E-mail: flaviobarcelos@ifes.edu.br [Ifes – Federal Institute of Espírito Santo, Dept. of Industrial Automation, Serra, ES 29173087 (Brazil); UFES – Federal University of Espírito Santo, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Orlando, M.T.D. [UFES – Federal University of Espírito Santo, Dept. of Physics, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Fardin, J.F.; Simonetti, D.S. [UFES – Federal University of Espírito Santo, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Baldan, C.A. [EEL/USP – Engineering School from Lorena/University of São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Alternative method for starting up induction motor. • Based on using a high-temperature superconductor. • A prototype of the limiter was constructed with a 2G-YBCO tape. • Prototype was tested with a 55-kW industrial induction motor in a 440-V/60-Hz. • Offers reduced current waveform distortion compared to the soft starter method. - Abstract: In this paper, an alternative method for starting up induction motors is proposed, taking into account experimental measurements. The new starting current limitation method is based on using a high-temperature superconductor. A prototype of the superconducting starting current limiter was constructed with a commercially available second-generation high-temperature superconductor YBCO tape, and this was tested with a 55-kW industrial induction motor in a 440-V/60-Hz three-phase power grid. Performance evaluations of the superconducting limiter method (applied to startup of the induction motor) were performed and were compared with a direct-on-line starter and an electronic soft starter. In addition, a computational model was developed and used for electromagnetic torque analysis of the system. As significant characteristics, our method offers the ability to limit the starting current of the induction motor with greater electromagnetic torque, reduced current waveform distortion and therefore lower harmonic pollution during startup when compared to the soft starter method.

  4. Impacts of precipitation and temperature trends on different time scales on the water cycle and water resource availability in mountainous Mediterranean catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Pérez-Palazón, María; Pimentel, Rafael; Herrero, Javier; José Polo, María

    2017-04-01

    Climatology trends, precipitation and temperature variations condition the hydrological evolution of the river flow response at basin and sub-basin scales. The link between both climate and flow trends is crucial in mountainous areas, where small variations in temperature can produce significant impacts on precipitation (occurrence as rainfall or snowfall), snowmelt and evaporation, and consequently very different flow signatures. This importance is greater in semiarid regions, where the high variability of the climatic annual and seasonal regimes usually amplifies this impact on river flow. The Sierra Nevada National Park (Southern Spain), with altitudes ranging from 2000 to 3500 m.a.s.l., is part of the global climate change observatories network and a clear example of snow regions in a semiarid environment. This mountain range is head of different catchments, being the Guadalfeo River Basin one of the most influenced by the snow regime. This study shows the observed 55-year (1961-2015) trends of annual precipitation and daily mean temperature, and the associated impacts on snowfall and snow persistence, and the resulting trend of the annual river flow in the Guadalfeo River Basin (Southern Spain), a semiarid abrupt mountainous area (up to 3450 m a.s.l.) facing the Mediterranean Sea where the Alpine and Mediterranean climates coexist in a domain highly influenced by the snow regime, and a significant seasonality in the flow regime. The annual precipitation and annual daily mean temperature experimented a decreasing trend of 2.05 mm/year and an increasing trend of 0.037 °C/year, respectively, during the study period, with a high variability on a decadal basis. However, the torrential precipitation events are more frequent in the last few years of the study period, with an apparently increasing associated dispersion. The estimated annual snowfall trend shows a decreasing trend of 0.24 mm/year, associated to the decrease of precipitation rather than to temperature

  5. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razhev, A M; Kargapol' tsev, E S [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Churkin, D S; Demchuk, S V [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF6{sub 6}) and He(Ne) – H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF{sub 6}) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% – 6%. (lasers)

  6. Regulation of ATM induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.A.; Fang, Z.M.; Kearsley, J.H.; Lee, C.S.; Sarris, M.; De Murrell, D.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: ATM, the tumour suppressor protein mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia, is of pivotal importance in controlling the cells primary response to ionising radiation (IR) induced DNA damage. Mutations in ATM which reduce the level of the ATM protein and/or compromise ATM functions are known to give rise to radiosensitivity and defective cell cycle checkpoint control. In response to DNA damage ATM kinase is rapidly activated and initiates downstream signalling to cell cycle control molecules including p53. To investigate additional mechanisms of ATM control we have employed ATM antisense expression in cultured cells, western analyses and immunohistochemistry in situ. We report that ATM can be up-regulated up to 10-fold following exposure to low levels of ionising radiation. ATM radiation-induction was radiation dose dependent while the rapidity of the response indicates a post translational pathway. The concurrent time frames for the radiation-induction of ATM levels and the activation of ATM kinase activity appear to be complimentary in boosting ATM's protective response to IR induced DNA damage, especially in ATM 'low expressing' systems. We also provide the first report of ATM misregulation in 2 cancer patients, indicating that ATM is not only radio-protective but has possible implications in cancer, particularly breast cancer. These results have particular importance in defining the regulation of the ATM protein as an: adaptive radio-response; radio-prognostic market in tumours and normal tissue, and breast cancer marker

  7. Effects of Agitation, Aeration and Temperature on Production of a Novel Glycoprotein GP-1 by Streptomyces kanasenisi ZX01 and Scale-Up Based on Volumetric Oxygen Transfer Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature, agitation and aeration on glycoprotein GP-1 production by Streptomyces kanasenisi ZX01 in bench-scale fermentors were systematically investigated. The maximum final GP-1 production was achieved at an agitation speed of 200 rpm, aeration rate of 2.0 vvm and temperature of 30 °C. By using a dynamic gassing out method, the effects of agitation and aeration on volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa were also studied. The values of volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient in the logarithmic phase increased with increase of agitation speed (from 14.53 to 32.82 h−1 and aeration rate (from 13.21 to 22.43 h−1. In addition, a successful scale-up from bench-scale to pilot-scale was performed based on volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient, resulting in final GP-1 production of 3.92, 4.03, 3.82 and 4.20 mg/L in 5 L, 15 L, 70 L and 500 L fermentors, respectively. These results indicated that constant volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient was appropriate for the scale-up of batch fermentation of glycoprotein GP-1 by Streptomyces kanasenisi ZX01, and this scale-up strategy successfully achieved 100-fold scale-up from bench-scale to pilot-scale fermentor.

  8. Large-scale temperature and salinity changes in the upper Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean at a time of a drastic Arctic Oscillation inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bourgain